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Sample records for mhz plasma-forming solenoid

  1. Effect of high solenoidal magnetic fields on breakdown voltages of high vacuum 805 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Qian, Z.; Norem, J.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Errede, D.

    2005-01-01

    There is an on going international collaboration studying the feasibility and cost of building a muon collider or neutrino factory [1,2]. An important aspect of this study is the full understanding of ionization cooling of muons by many orders of magnitude for the collider case. An important muon ionization cooling experiment, MICE [3], has been proposed to demonstrate and validate the technology that could be used for cooling. Ionization cooling is accomplished by passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF Cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal field. To determine the effect of very large solenoidal magnetic fields on the generation of dark current, x-rays and on the breakdown voltage gradients of vacuum RF cavities, a test facility has been established at Fermilab in Lab G. This facility consists of a 12 MW 805 MHz RF station and a large warm bore 5 T solenoidal superconducting magnet containing a pill box type cavity with thin removable window apertures. This system allows dark current and breakdown studies of different window configurations and materials. The results of this study will be presented. The study has shown that the peak achievable accelerating gradient is reduced by a factor greater than 2 when solenoidal field of greater than 2 T are applied to the cavity

  2. Effect of High Solenoidal Magnetic Fields on Breakdown Voltages of High Vacuum 805 MHz Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, A; Geer, S; Qian, Z

    2004-01-01

    The demonstration of muon ionization cooling by a large factor is necessary to demonstrate the feasilibility of a collider or neutrino factory. An important cooling experiment, MICE [1], has been proposed to demonstrate 10 % cooling which will validate the technology. Ionization cooling is accomplished by passing a high-emittance beam in a multi-Tesla solenoidal channel alternately through regions of low Z material and very high accelerating RF Cavities. To determine the effect of very large solenoidal magnetic fields on the generations of Dark current, X-Rays and breakdown Voltage gradients of vacuum RF cavities, a test facility has been established at Fermilab in Lab G. This facility consists of a 12 MW 805 MHz RF station, and a large bore 5 T solenoidal superconducting magnet containing a pill box type Cavity with thin removable window apertures allowing dark current studies and breakdown studies of different materials. The results of this study will be presented. The study has shown that the peak achievab...

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance at 310 MHz in a superconducting solenoid; Resonance magnetique nucleaire a 310 MHz dans un solenoide supra-conducteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, J J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The realisation of an NMR spectrometer with a superconducting magnet is presented in the first section. The methods to attain the best possible homogeneity of the magnetic field and to minimize the error in the spectrometer are described. The second section is devoted to the study of elastomers and nitr-oxides free radicals. A shift of the transition temperature with the magnetic field appears for the elastomers. The increasing paramagnetic shift has allowed a complete study by NMR of piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nitroxide free radicals. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie est exposee la realisation d'un spectrometre de RMN utilisant un solenoide supraconducteur. Des solutions sont donnees pour obtenir la meilleure homogeneite possible du champ magnetique et pour minimiser les sources d'erreur apportees par le spectrometre. La deuxieme partie est consacree a l'etude d'elastomeres et de radicaux libres nitroxydes. Une variation de la temperature de transition avec le champ magnetique est mise en evidence pour les elastomeres. L'accroissement du deplacement paramagnetique a permis une etude complete par RMN des radicaux libres nitroxydes piperidiniques et pyrrolidiniques. (auteur)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance at 310 MHz in a superconducting solenoid; Resonance magnetique nucleaire a 310 MHz dans un solenoide supra-conducteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunand, J.J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The realisation of an NMR spectrometer with a superconducting magnet is presented in the first section. The methods to attain the best possible homogeneity of the magnetic field and to minimize the error in the spectrometer are described. The second section is devoted to the study of elastomers and nitr-oxides free radicals. A shift of the transition temperature with the magnetic field appears for the elastomers. The increasing paramagnetic shift has allowed a complete study by NMR of piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nitroxide free radicals. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie est exposee la realisation d'un spectrometre de RMN utilisant un solenoide supraconducteur. Des solutions sont donnees pour obtenir la meilleure homogeneite possible du champ magnetique et pour minimiser les sources d'erreur apportees par le spectrometre. La deuxieme partie est consacree a l'etude d'elastomeres et de radicaux libres nitroxydes. Une variation de la temperature de transition avec le champ magnetique est mise en evidence pour les elastomeres. L'accroissement du deplacement paramagnetique a permis une etude complete par RMN des radicaux libres nitroxydes piperidiniques et pyrrolidiniques. (auteur)

  5. Sprag solenoid brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, P. H.

    1972-01-01

    Operation of solenoid braking mechanism is discussed. Illustrations of construction of the brake are provided. Device is used for braking low or medium speed shaft rotations and produces approximately ten times braking torque of similar solenoid brakes.

  6. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Figure 1: Some members of the solenoid and liquid argon teams proudly pose in front of the barrel cryosat, complete with detector and magnet. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. Figure 2: The alignment survey by Dirk Mergelkuhl and Aude Wiart. (EST-SU) At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. Figure 3: The solenoid on the insertion stand, with Akira Yamamoto the solenoid designer and project leader. Figure 4: Taka Kondo, ATLAS Japan spokesperson, and Shoichi Mizumaki, Toshiba project engineer for the ATLAS solenoid, celebrate the insertion. Aft...

  7. A superconducting focusing solenoid for the neutrino factory linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Lebedev, V.; Strauss, B.P.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed linear Accelerator that accelerates muons from 190 MeV to 2.45 GeV will use superconducting solenoids for focusing the muon beam. The accelerator will use superconducting RF cavities. These cavities are very sensitive to stay magnetic field from the focusing magnets. Superconducting solenoids can produce large stray fields. This report describes the 201.25 MHz acceleration system for the neutrino factory. This report also describes a focusing solenoid that delivers almost no stray field to a neighboring superconducting RF cavity

  8. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  9. The CMS superconducting solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The huge solenoid that will generate the magnetic field for the CMS experiment at the LHC is shown stored in the assembly hall above the experimental cavern. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. It weighs 220 tonnes and will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field, storing enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  10. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. After a test insertion on 6th February and a few weeks of preparation work it was finally inserted on 27th February. A couple of hectic 24-hours/7-day weeks followed in order to connect all services in the cryostat bulkhead. But last Monday, 15th March, both warm flanges of the cryostat could be closed. In another week's time we expect to finish the connection of the cryogenic cooling lines and the superconducting bus lines with the external services. Then the cool-down and test will commence... ...

  11. Investigation, development and verification of printed circuit board embedded air-core solenoid transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Pedersen, Jeppe Arnsdorf

    2015-01-01

    A new printed circuit board embedded air-core transformer/coupled inductor is proposed and presented. The transformer is intended for use in power converter applications operating at very high frequency between 30 MHz to 300 MHz. The transformer is based on two or more solenoid structures...

  12. CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The milestone workshops on LHC experiments in Aachen in 1990 and at Evian in 1992 provided the first sketches of how LHC detectors might look. The concept of a compact general-purpose LHC experiment based on a solenoid to provide the magnetic field was first discussed at Aachen, and the formal Expression of Interest was aired at Evian. It was here that the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) name first became public. Optimizing first the muon detection system is a natural starting point for a high luminosity (interaction rate) proton-proton collider experiment. The compact CMS design called for a strong magnetic field, of some 4 Tesla, using a superconducting solenoid, originally about 14 metres long and 6 metres bore. (By LHC standards, this warrants the adjective 'compact'.) The main design goals of CMS are: 1 - a very good muon system providing many possibilities for momentum measurement (physicists call this a 'highly redundant' system); 2 - the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter consistent with the above; 3 - high quality central tracking to achieve both the above; and 4 - an affordable detector. Overall, CMS aims to detect cleanly the diverse signatures of new physics by identifying and precisely measuring muons, electrons and photons over a large energy range at very high collision rates, while also exploiting the lower luminosity initial running. As well as proton-proton collisions, CMS will also be able to look at the muons emerging from LHC heavy ion beam collisions. The Evian CMS conceptual design foresaw the full calorimetry inside the solenoid, with emphasis on precision electromagnetic calorimetry for picking up photons. (A light Higgs particle will probably be seen via its decay into photon pairs.) The muon system now foresaw four stations. Inner tracking would use silicon microstrips and microstrip gas chambers, with over 10 7 channels offering high track finding efficiency. In the central CMS barrel, the tracking elements are

  13. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, John

    2010-01-01

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  14. Three dimensional multilayer solenoid microcoils inside silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) solenoid microcoils could generate uniform magnetic field. Multilayer solenoid microcoils are highly pursued for strong magnetic field and high inductance in advanced magnetic microsystems. However, the fabrication of the 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils is still a challenging task. In this paper, 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils with uniform diameters and high aspect ratio were fabricated in silica glass. An alloy (Bi/In/Sn/Pb) with high melting point was chosen as the conductive metal to overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The inductance of the three layers microcoils was measured, and the value is 77.71 nH at 100 kHz and 17.39 nH at 120 MHz. The quality factor was calculated, and it has a value of 5.02 at 120 MHz. This approach shows an improvement method to achieve complex 3D metal microstructures and electronic components, which could be widely integrated in advanced magnetic microsystems.

  15. SSC detector solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Kephart, R.D.; Krebs, H.J.; Stone, M.E.; Theriot, E.D.; Wands, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    A detector utilizing a superconducting solenoid is being discussed for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). A useful field volume of 8 m diameter x 16 m length at 1.5-2 T (--1 GJ at 2T) is required. It has been decided that all of the particle physics calorimetry will be inside the bore of the solenoid and that there is no need for the coil and cryostat to be ''thin'' in radiation lengths. An iron yoke will reduce the excitation required and will provide muon identification and a redundant momentum measurement of the muons. The authors have developed a conceptual design to meet these requirements. The magnet will use a copper-stabilized Nb-Ti conductor sized for a cryostable pool boiling heat flux --0.025 W/cm/sup 2/. A thermosiphon from a storage vessel above the cryostat will be used to prevent bubble stagnation in the liquid helium bath. The operating current, current density, coil subdivision and dump resistor have been chosen to guarantee that the coil will be undamaged should a quench occur. The axial electromagnetic force will be reacted by metallic support links; the stainless steel coil case will support the radial force. The 5000 metric tons of calorimetry will be supported from the iron yoke through a trussed cylindrical shell structure separate from the cryostat. The coil and case, radiation shield and stainless vacuum vessel would be fabricated and cryogenically tested as two 8-m sections. These would be lowered into the underground experimental hall and installed into the iron flux return yoke to provide the required 16-m length

  16. The D0 solenoid NMR magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sten Uldall Hansen; Terry Kiper; Tom Regan; John Lofgren

    2002-01-01

    A field monitoring system for the 2 Tesla Solenoid of the D0 detector is described. It is comprised of a very small NMR probe cabled to a DSP based signal processing board. The design magnetic field range is from 1.0 to 2.2 Tesla, corresponding to an RF frequency range of 42.57 to 93.67 MHz. The desired an accuracy is one part in 10 5 . To minimize material in the interaction region of the D0 detector, the overall thickness of the NMR probe is 4 mm, including its mounting plate, and its width is 10 mm. To minimize cable mass, 4mm diameter IMR-100A cables are used for transmitting the RF signals from a nearby patch panel 25 meters to each of four probes mounted within the bore of the solenoid. RG213U cables 45 meters long are used to send the RF from the movable counting house to the patch panel. With this setup, the detector signal voltage at the moving counting room is in the range of 250-400 mV

  17. Solenoidal fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linlor, W.I.

    1980-01-01

    This invention discloses apparatus and methods to produce nuclear fusion utilizing fusible material in the form of high energy ion beams confined in magnetic fields. For example, beams of deuterons and tritons are injected in the same direction relative to the axis of a vacuum chamber. The ion beams are confined by the magnetic fields of long solenoids. The products of the fusion reactions, such as neutrons and alpha particles, escape to the wall surrounding the vacuum chamber, producing heat. The momentum of the deuterons is approximately equal to the momentum of the tritons, so that both types of ions follow the same path in the confining magnetic field. The velocity of the deuteron is sufficiently greater than the velocity of the triton so that overtaking collisions occur at a relative velocity which produces a high fusion reaction cross section. Electrons for space charge neutralization are obtained by ionization of residual gas in the vacuum chamber, and additionally from solid material (Irradiated with ultra-violet light or other energetic radiation) adjacent to the confinement region. For start-up operation, injected high-energy molecular ions can be dissociated by intense laser beam, producing trapping via change of charge state. When sufficiently intense deuteron and triton beams have been produced, the laser beam can be removed, and subsequent change of charge state can be achieved by collisions

  18. Inauguration of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    In early 2005 the final piece of the CMS solenoid magnet arrived, marked by this ceremony held in the CMS assembly hall at Cessy, France. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. Weighing 220 tonnes, it will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field and store enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  19. Dirac equation in magnetic-solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, S.P. [Dept. Fisica e Quimica, UNESP, Campus de Guaratingueta (Brazil); Gitman, D.M.; Smirnov, A.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    We consider the Dirac equation in the magnetic-solenoid field (the field of a solenoid and a collinear uniform magnetic field). For the case of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid, we construct self-adjoint extensions of the Dirac Hamiltonian using von Neumann's theory of deficiency indices. We find self-adjoint extensions of the Dirac Hamiltonian and boundary conditions at the AB solenoid. Besides, for the first time, solutions of the Dirac equation in the magnetic-solenoid field with a finite radius solenoid were found. We study the structure of these solutions and their dependence on the behavior of the magnetic field inside the solenoid. Then we exploit the latter solutions to specify boundary conditions for the magnetic-solenoid field with Aharonov-Bohm solenoid. (orig.)

  20. Superconducting solenoids for an international muon cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Rey, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The international muon ionization cooling experiment MICE will consist of two focusing cooling cells and a pair of uniform field solenoids used for particle identification and emittance measurements. The 2.75-meter long cooling cells have a pair of field flip coils and a coupling coil. The 0.52-meter diameter field flip coils surround an absorber that removes transverse and longitudinal momentum from the muons to be cooled. The beam in the absorber is at a minimum beta point so that scattering of the muons is minimized. The 1.7-meter diameter coupling coils are outside of conventional 201.25 MHz RF cavities that accelerate the muons putting longitudinal momentum into the muons without putting back the transverse momentum into the beam. A third set of flip coils helps the muon beam transition from and to the experimental solenoids. The 0.6-meter diameter experimental solenoids have a uniform field region (good to about 1 part in 1000) that is 1.3-meters long. The MICE experiment magnets must operate as a single unit so that the field profile will produce the maximum muon cooling

  1. Fabrication of a solenoid-type inductor with Fe-based soft magnetic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Chong; Zhou Yong; Gao Xiaoyu; Ding Wen; Cao Ying; Choi, Hyung; Won, Jonghwa

    2007-01-01

    A solenoid-type inductor was fabricated by MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) technique. The fabrication process uses UV-LIGA, dry etching, fine polishing, and electroplating technique to achieve high performance of the solenoid-type inductor. Fe-based soft magnetic thin film was sputtered as the magnetic core, and polyimide was used as the insulation materials. The inductor was in size of 4x4 mm with coil width of 20 μm and space of 35 μm. The inductance is 1.61 μH at a frequency of 5 MHz with the maximum quality factor of 1.42

  2. Stabilization of superconducting dry solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, M.; Maeda, H.

    1989-01-01

    Premature quenches in superconducting solenoids, wound with Formvar coated NbTi conductors, have been studied. Some model coils were tested wound with various winding tensions. The experimental results are discussed considering the calculated stress distribution for coil winding, cool-down to liquid helium temperature, and energization at 4.2 K. /Some mechanisms of premature quenches are classified by the winding tension. Some stabilization methods are presented based on these quench mechanisms

  3. Design of SC solenoid with high homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoliang; Liu Zhong; Luo Min; Luo Guangyao; Kang Qiang; Tan Jie; Wu Wei

    2014-01-01

    A novel kind of SC (superconducting) solenoid coil is designed to satisfy the homogeneity requirement of the magnetic field. In this paper, we first calculate the current density distribution of the solenoid coil section through the linear programming method. Then a traditional solenoid and a nonrectangular section solenoid are designed to produce a central field up to 7 T with a homogeneity to the greatest extent. After comparison of the two solenoid coils designed in magnet field quality, fabrication cost and other aspects, the new design of the nonrectangular section of a solenoid coil can be realized through improving the techniques of framework fabrication and winding. Finally, the outlook and error analysis of this kind of SC magnet coil are also discussed briefly. (authors)

  4. Novel MEMS-based fabrication technology of micro solenoid-type inductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, S; Yang, Z Q; Takagi, H; Itoh, T; Maeda, R; Zhang, Y; Toda, A; Hayase, M

    2013-01-01

    Solenoid configuration of micro inductor, which has advantages of high quality factor and low loss, is needed in micro energy and power electronics applications but it is difficult to prepare using conventional microfabrication processes. In this work, we present a new microelectromechanical systems-based technology of micro solenoid-type inductor by a newly developed cylindrical projection photolithography method. Direct electroplating process of copper film on coil patterns was also successfully developed for achieving thick windings so that thick photoresist-based electroplating molds are not needed. Micro solenoid-type inductor prototypes of the winding pitch of about 40 µm, the winding number of 20 and 50, and the winding thickness of about 14 µm, were successfully fabricated on a 1 mm diameter glass capillary. The prepared 20-turn and 50-turn micro inductors were of inductance of 69 and 205 nH at 30 MHz, respectively. (paper)

  5. Quench simulation in the thin superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaka, T.; Takasaki, M.; Wake, M.; Yamada, R.

    1983-07-01

    The propagation velocities of a normal zone were calculated for a 1 mdiameter x 1 m superconducting solenoid and for a 3 mdiameter x 5 m thin solenoid based on a simple model using the one-dimensional thermal equation. The quench back effect can be observed in certain conditions. The quench of the large thin solenoid was also simulated by using the computer program 'QUENCH'. (author)

  6. Solenoid System for PRISM and COMET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    An experiment of searching for coherent neutrino-less conversion of muons to electron conversion in muonic atom, μ - +N(A,Z)→e - +N(A,Z), is powerful probe for new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model. We offer the experiment at a sensitivity of B(μ - N→e - N) -16 with muon beamline consisting of high-field pion capture solenoids, curved solenoids to select beam momenta, and a curved solenoid spectrometer to detect μ - -e - conversion with low-counting-rate conditions. Design of superconducting solenoid magnets of pion capture and transport beam line has been studied and is described in this paper

  7. Progress in ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y; Tanaka, K; Haruyama, T; Yamaoka, H; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Mine, S; Wada, K; Meguro, S; Sotoki, T; Kikuchi, K; ten Kate, H H J

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet is being developed to provide a magnetic field of 2 Tesla in the central tracking volume of the ATLAS detector under construction at the CERN/LHC project. The solenoid coil design features high-strength aluminum stabilized superconductor to make the coil thinnest while maintaining its stability and the pure-aluminum strip technique for quench protection and safety. The solenoid coil is installed in a common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter in order to minimize the cryostat wall. A transparency of 0.66 radiation length is achieved with these integrated efforts. The progress in the solenoid coil fabrication is reported. (8 refs).

  8. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by

  9. Laser-heated solenoid fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlases, G.C.

    1977-01-01

    Since the suggestion by Dawson, Hertzberg, and Kidder that high-energy CO 2 lasers could be used to heat magnetically confined plasma columns to thermonuclear temperatures, a great deal of theoretical and experimental work has been performed. In this paper we first review the experiments on the basic laser-plasma interaction phenomena, in which lasers with energies up to 1 kJ have been used to produce plasmas at n/sub e/ greater than 10 18 and T/sub e/ greater than 200 eV. The second part reviews fusion reactor studies based on the laser solenoid

  10. High field laser heated solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A 10 kJ pulsed CO 2 laser and 3.8 cm bore, 15 T, 8 μs rise time, 1-m long fast solenoid facility has been constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of using long wavelength lasers to heat magnetically confined plasmas. The most critical physics requirement is the necessity of creating and maintaining an on-axis electron density minimum to trap the axially directed laser beam. Satisfaction of this requirement has been demonstrated by heating 1.5 Torr deuterium fill plasmas in 2.7 cm bore plasma tubes to line energies of approximately 1 kJ/m. (Auth.)

  11. CERN tests largest superconducting solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN's Compacts Muon Solenoid (CMS) - the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet - has reached full field in testing. The instrument is part of the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, located in a giant subterranean chamber at Cessy on the Franco-Swiss border." (1 page)

  12. ATLAS's superconducting solenoid takes up position

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting solenoid was moved to its final destination on 16 January. It has taken up position opposite the ATLAS liquid argon barrel cryostat, which will house the electromagnetic calorimeter. All that remains to do now is to slide it into the insulation vacuum, this will be done in the next few weeks. Built by Toshiba, under responsibility of KEK in Japan, the central solenoid is 2.4 metres in diameter, 5.3 metres long and weighs 5.5 tonnes. "It will provide an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla that will deflect particles inside the inner detector," as Roger Ruber, on-site project coordinator, explains. The inner detector, which consists of three sub-detectors, will be installed inside the solenoid later. The solenoid during one of the transport operations. Securely attached to the overhead travelling crane, the solenoid is situated in front of the opening to the liquid argon calorimeter, it will be inserted soon.

  13. ''Massless gaps'' for solenoid + calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marraffino, J.; Wu, W.; Beretvas, A.; Green, D.; Denisenko, K.; Para, A.

    1991-11-01

    The necessary existence of material in front of the first active element in a calorimeter will degrade the performance of that device. The question is by what factor. The follow up question is what can be done to minimize the damage. These questions are usually of primary importance for liquid argon calorimetry because of the necessity of containment dewars. However, the problem is universal. For example, the Solenoid Detector Collaboration, SDC, has proposed a superconducting coil which would be placed in front of the EM calorimeter. Although much effort has been made to minimize the depth of material in the coil, still the resolution and linearity must be optimized if the SDC goal of precision electromagnetic (EM) calorimetry is to be realized

  14. Electron beam solenoid reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.; Benford, J.; Cooper, R.; Dakin, D.; Ecker, B.; Lopez, O.; Putman, S.; Young, T.S.T.

    1977-01-01

    The electron Beam Heated Solenoid (EBHS) reactor is a linear magnetically confined fusion device in which the bulk or all of the heating is provided by a relativistic electron beam (REB). The high efficiency and established technology of the REB generator and the ability to vary the coupling length make this heating technique compatible with several radial and axial enery loss reduction options including multiple-mirrors, electrostatic and gas end-plug techniques. This paper addresses several of the fundamental technical issues and provides a current evaluation of the concept. The enhanced confinement of the high energy plasma ions due to nonadiabatic scattering in the multiple mirror geometry indicates the possibility of reactors of the 150 to 300 meter length operating at temperatures > 10 keV. A 275 meter EBHS reactor with a plasma Q of 11.3 requiring 33 MJ of beam eneergy is presented

  15. Indirectly cooled large thin superconducting CDF solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kunitaka; Mori, Shigeki; Yoshizaki, Ryozo; Saito, Ryusei; Asano, Katsuhiko.

    1985-01-01

    The manufacturing technique of the indirectly cooled large thin superconducting solenoid for the collider detector facility (CDF solenoid) has been studied through cooperation of University of Tsukuba and the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics of the Ministry of Education of Japan, and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the U.S. Fabrication and testing of the solenoid has recently been completed by Hitachi. The CDF solenoid has a large-sized thin structure for meeting the requirement by experiments to be applied. Hitachi has thus developed a variety of new technologies including the design standard, coil cooling method, material selection, and manufacturing technique in accordance with experimental data, which were confirmed in a series of analyses and tests made on various prototypes. The CDF solenoid, built using Hitachi's new technologies, is of the world's top class among equipment of this type. This paper outlines the design criteria for the major components employed in the CDF solenoid and the test results of the solenoid. (author)

  16. Designing focusing solenoids for superconducting RF accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; Wokas, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The design of a focusing solenoid for use in a superconducting RF linac requires resolving a range of problems with conflicting requirements. Providing the required focusing strength contradicts the goal of minimizing the stray field on the surfaces of adjacent superconducting RF cavities. The requirement of a compact solenoid, able to fit into a gap between cavities, contradicts the need of mechanical support necessary to restrain electromagnetic forces that can result in coil motion and subsequent quenching. In this report we will attempt to address these and other issues arising during the development of focusing solenoids. Some relevant test data will also be presented.

  17. Embedded Solenoid Transformer for Power Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A resonant power converter for operation in the radio frequency range, preferably in the VHF, comprises at least one PCB-embedded transformer. The transformer is configured for radio frequency operation and comprises a printed circuit board defining a horizontal plane, the printed circuit board...... comprising at least two horizontal conductive layers separated by an isolating layer, a first embedded solenoid forming a primary winding of the transformer and a second embedded solenoid being arranged parallel to the first solenoid and forming a secondary winding of the transformer, wherein the first...

  18. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, John [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort between the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of the first

  19. Test results of the g-2 superconducting solenoid magnet system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunce, G; Morse, WM; Benante, J; Cullen, MH; Danby, GT; Endo, K; Fedotovich, GV; Geller, J; Green, MA; Grossmann, A; GrossePerdckamp, M; Haeberlen, U; Hseuh, H; Hirabayashi, H; Hughes, VW; Jackson, JW; Jia, LX; Jungmann, K; Krienen, F; Larsen, R; Khazin, B; Kawall, D; Meng, W; Pai, C; Polk, T.; Prigl, R; Putlitz, GZ; Redin, S; Roberts, BL; Ryskulov, N; Semertzidas, Y; Shutt, R; Snydstrup, L; Tallerico, T; vonWalter, P; Woodle, K; Yamamoto, A

    The g-2 experiment dipole consists of a single 48 turn, 15.1 meter diameter outer solenoid and a pair of 24 turn inner solenoids, 13.4 meters in diameter. The inner solenoids are hooked in series and are run at a polarity that is opposite that of the outer solenoid, thus creating a dipole field in

  20. Form coefficient of helical toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelin, V.Z.; Kunchenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    For toroidal solenoids with continuous spiral coil, winded according to the laws of equiinclined and simple cylindrical spirals with homogeneous, linearly increasing to the coil periphery and ''Bitter'' distribution of current density, the analytical expressions for the dependence between capacity consumed and generated magnetic field, expressions for coefficients of form similar to Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids are obtained and dependence of the form coefficient and relative volume of solenoid conductor on the number of revolutions of screw line per one circumvention over the large torus radius is also investigated. Analytical expressions of form coefficients and graphical material permit to select the optimum geometry as to capacity consumed both for spiral (including ''force-free'') and conventional toroidal solenoids of magnetic systems in thermonulear installations

  1. Ultimate Performance of the ATLAS Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, R; Kawai, M; Kondo, Y; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; Kate, H ten; Kondo, T; Pirotte, O; Metselaar, J; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A

    2007-01-01

    A 2 tesla, 7730 ampere, 39 MJ, 45 mm thin superconducting solenoid with a 2.3 meters warm bore and 5.3 meters length, is installed in the center of the ATLAS detector and successfully commissioned. The solenoid shares its cryostat with one of the detector's calorimeters and provides the magnetic field required for the inner detectors to accurately track collision products from the LHC at CERN. After several years of a stepwise construction and test program, the solenoid integration 100 meters underground in the ATLAS cavern is completed. Following the on-surface acceptance test, the solenoid is now operated with its final cryogenic, powering and control system. A re-validation of all essential operating parameters is completed. The performance and test results of underground operation are reported and compared to those previously measured.

  2. Compact muon solenoid magnet reaches full field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy in Fermilab and collaborators of the US/CMS project announced that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field in tests at CERN. (1 apge)

  3. HB+ inserted into the CMS Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2006-01-01

    The first half of the barrel hadron calorimeter (HB+) has been inserted into the superconducting solenoid of CMS, in preparation for the magnet test and cosmic challenge. The operation went smoothly, lasting a couple of days.

  4. Laser solenoid fusion--fission design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of breeding performance on system engineering parameters is examined for laser solenoid fusion-fission reactors. Reactor performance is found to be relatively insensitive to most of the engineering parameters, and compact designs can be built based on reasonable technologies. Point designs are described for the prototype series of reactors (mid-term technologies) and for second generation systems (advanced technologies). It is concluded that the laser solenoid has a good probability of timely application to fuel breeding needs

  5. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Quimby, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  6. Experiments with a double solenoid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampa Condori, R.; Lichtenthaeler Filho, R.; Faria, P.N. de; Lepine-Szily, A.; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Pires, K.C.C.; Assuncao, M.; Scarduelli, V.B.; Leistenschneider, E.; Morais, M.C.; Shorto, J.M.B.; Gasques, L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: RIBRAS [1] is presently the only experimental equipment in South America capable of producing secondary beams of rare isotopes. It consists of two superconducting solenoids, installed in one of the beam lines of the 8 MV Pelletron Tandem accelerator of the University of Sao Paulo. The exotic nuclei are produced in the collision between the primary beam of the Pelletron Accelerator and the primary target. The secondary beam is selected by the in-flight technique and is usually contaminated with particles coming from scattering and reactions in the primary target such as {sup 7}Li, alpha and other light particles as protons, deuterons and tritons. Solenoids are selectors with large acceptance and the double solenoid system provides ways to improve the quality of the secondary beam by using a degrador in the midst of the two solenoids. The main contamination of the secondary beam comes from {sup 7}Li{sup 2+} particles coming from the primary beam. A degrador placed between the two solenoids is able to separate those particles from the {sup 6}He beam providing an additional charge exchange {sup 7}Li{sup 2+-→}3{sup +}. In addition, the differential energy loss in the degrador provides further selection of the light particles as protons, deuterons, tritons and and alpha particles by the second solenoid. Here we present the results of the first experiment performed at RIBRAS using both solenoids. A pure {sup 6}He beam was produced and the reaction {sup 6}He+p was measured using a thick CH{sub 2} target. 1. R. Lichtenthaeler et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 25,s01,733 (2005) and Nucl. Phys. News 15, 25 (2005). (author)

  7. Fabrication of solenoid-type inductor with electroplated NiFe magnetic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiaoyu; Cao Ying; Zhou Yong; Ding Wen; Lei Chong; Chen Jian

    2006-01-01

    Solenoid-type inductor with ultra-low profile was fabricated by MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) technique. NiFe film was electroplated as the magnetic core, and polyimide with a low relative permittivity was used as the insulation material. In the fabrication process, UV-LIGA, dry etching, fine polishing and electroplating technique have been adopted to achieve high performance of the solenoid-type inductor. The inductor was in size of 1.5 mmx0.9 mmx0.1 mm with coil width of 20 μm and aspect ratio of 5:1. The inductance and the quality factor were 0.42-0.345 μH and 1.8-5.3 in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz, respectively

  8. Central Solenoid On-surface Test

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    2004-01-01

    A full scale on-surface test of the central solenoid has been performed before its final installation in the ATLAS cavern starting in November. The successful integration of the central solenoid into the barrel cryostat, as reported in the March 2004 ATLAS eNews, was hardly finished when testing started. After a six-week period to cool down the LAr calorimeter, the solenoid underwent a similar procedure. Cooling it down to 4.6 Kelvin from room temperature took just over five and a half days. Cold and superconducting, it was time to validate the functionality of the control and safety systems. These systems were largely the same as the systems to be used in the final underground installation, and will be used not only for the solenoid and toroid magnets, but parts of it also for other LHC experiments. This solenoid test was the first occasion to test the system functionality in a real working environment. Several days were spent to fine tune the systems, especially the critical safety system, which turned out...

  9. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  10. Some options for the muon collider capture and decay solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses some of the problems associated with using solenoid magnets to capture the secondary particles that are created when an intense beam of 8 to 10 GeV protons interacts with the target at the center of the capture region. Hybrid capture solenoids with inductions of 28 T and a 22T are described. The first 14 to 15 T of the solenoid induction will be generated by a superconducting magnet. The remainder of the field will be generated by a Bitter type of water cooled solenoid. The capture solenoids include a transition section from the high field solenoid to a 7 T decay channel where pions and kaons that come off of the target decay into muons. A short 7 T solenoidal decay channel between the capture solenoid system and the phase rotation system is described. A concept for separation of negative and positive pions and kaons is briefly discussed

  11. First Operation of the Central Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R.

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. It was cooled down from the 17th to 23th May 2006, and the first kA was put into it the same evening as it was cold and superconductive. That makes our solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas. The Central Solenoid in its final position at the heart of ATLAS. The coil current (red line) and voltage (blue line) showing the operation at nominal current of 7.73 kA for a magnetic field of 2.0 T and the subsequent successful commissioning up to 8 kAT The cool down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems and was achieved in perfect collaboration with the liquid argon detector with which it shares the Barrel Cryostat. Powering up to nominal current had to wait until the last week of July when the End-Cap Calorimeters were in closed position. The Tile Barrel and E...

  12. Compensation of oscillation coupling induced by solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelinskij, A.Yu.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Shcherbakov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for construction of various schemes of oscillation coupling compensation, induced by solenoids in charged particle storage rings, are described. Peculiarities of magnetic structure, enabling to localize oscillation coupling in wide energy range are discussed. Results of calculation of compensation schemes for design of NR-2000 storage ring spin rotation are presented

  13. Successful mapping of the solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Aleksa, M.

    The ATLAS solenoid coil is about 5.3m long, has a diameter of 2.5m and is designed to deliver a magnetic field of approximately 2T for the ATLAS inner detector. The superconducting solenoid coil has been integrated inside the LAr barrel cryostat and was installed at its final position inside the cavern in November 2005. This summer - after completion of the extended barrel calorimeters and before the installation of the inner detector - the end cap calorimeters (LAr end caps and Tile extended barrels) were moved for the first time into their final position in order to create conditions as close as possible to final for the solenoid tests and for mapping the field inside the solenoid bore. Design and construction of the mapping machine The requirement on the absolute precision of the field measurements are 0.05% on the field integrals seen by particles; if this is achieved the momentum error coming from insufficient knowledge of the magnetic field will be negligible compared to the error stemming from the inn...

  14. Error field generation of solenoid magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Many applications for large solenoids and solenoidal arrays depend on the high precision of the axial field profile. In cases where requirements of ΔB/B for nonaxial fields are on the order of 10 -4 , the actual winding techniques of the solenoid need to be considered. Whereas an ideal solenoid consisting of current loops would generate no radial fields along the axis, in reality, the actual current-carrying conductors must follow spiral or helical paths. A straightforward method for determining the radial error fields generated by coils wound with actual techniques employed in magnet fabrication has been developed. The method devised uses a computer code which models a magnet by sending a single, current-carrying filament along the same path taken by the conductor during coil winding. Helical and spiral paths are simulated using small, straight-line current segments. This technique, whose results are presented in this paper, was used to predict radial field errors for the Elmo Bumpy Torus-Proof of Principle magnet. These results include effects due to various winding methods, not only spiral/helical and layer-to-layer transitions, but also the effects caused by worst-case tolerance conditions both from the conductor and the winding form (bobbin). Contributions made by extraneous circuitry (e.g., overhead buswork and incoming leads) are also mentioned

  15. Flowfield Analysis of a Pneumatic Solenoid Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheam-Chyun Lin

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic solenoid valve has been widely used in the vehicle control systems for meeting the rapid-reaction demand triggered by the dynamic conditions encountered during the driving course of vehicle. For ensuring the safety of human being, the reliable and effective solenoid valve is in great demand to shorten the reaction time and thus becomes the topic of this research. This numerical study chooses a commercial 3/2-way solenoid valve as the reference valve for analysing its performance. At first, CFD software Fluent is adopted to simulate the flow field associated with the valve configuration. Then, the comprehensive flow visualization is implemented to identify the locations of adverse flow patterns. Accordingly, it is found that a high-pressure region exists in the zone between the nozzle exit and the top of iron core. Thereafter, the nozzle diameter and the distance between nozzle and spool are identified as the important design parameters for improving the pressure response characteristics of valve. In conclusion, this work establishes a rigorous and systematic CFD scheme to evaluate the performance of pneumatic solenoid valve.

  16. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruggs, S.J.; Putman, P.T.; Fang, H.; Alessandrini, M.; Salama, K.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample

  17. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scruggs, S.J. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: Sscruggs2@uh.edu; Putman, P.T. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Fang, H. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Alessandrini, M. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Salama, K. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample.

  18. First experiment with the double solenoid RIBRAS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Condori, R. Pampa; Lepine-Szily, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morais, M. C.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. B.; Gasques, L. R. [Instituto de Fisica da USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 (Brazil); Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ, 24210-340 (Brazil); Shorto, J. M. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Assuncao, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    A description of the double solenoid system (RIBRAS) operating since 2004 in one of the beam lines of the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo is presented. The recent installation of the secondary scattering chamber after the second solenoid is reported and the first experiment in RIBRAS using both solenoids is described.

  19. Experimental study of a laser-heated solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, H.L.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the interaction of an intense CO 2 laser beam with a column of initially uv-ionized hydrogen immersed in a steady magnetic field of up to 100 kG. Under the intense laser radiation, the gas becomes ionized and heated to temperatures as high as 150 eV (1.6 x 10 6 0 K). The primary purpose of the investigation was to determine the properties of the dense, hot plasma formed in this manner. Time and space resolved measurements of the plasma electron density were made using holographic interferometry along the axis and Mach--Zehnder interferometry across the column. The temperature was determined by measuring the decay rate of a line from CV in the quartz uv. These measurements were supplemented by streak photography to provide data on the development of the luminosity of the plasma column, radially and axially, as a function of time. From these various diagnostic techniques, it was possible to determine that a density minimum is formed on-axis within a few tens of nanoseconds after initiation of the laser pulse. This effectively produces a light pipe which traps the beam, and suggests that long columns can be formed by laser irradiation. The beam energy was efficiently absorbed and plasma loss rates appeared to be those expected from classical MHD modelling. While a completely unambiguous answer as to the mode of laser discharge propagation occurring in the experiment was not obtained, the bulk of the evidence suggests a ''bleaching wave'' rather than a laser driven detonator. In summary, the experiment was successful in demonstrating the creation of dense, slender columns by laser breakdown, in support of the ''laser-heated solenoid'' fusion concept

  20. Bent solenoids for spectrometers and emittance exchange sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.

    1999-01-01

    Bent solenoids can be used to transport low energy beams as they provide both confinement and dispersion of particle orbits. Solenoids are being considered both as emittance exchange sections and spectrometers in the muon cooling system as part of the study of the muon collider. They present the results of a study of bent solenoids which considers the design of coupling sections between bent solenoids to straight solenoids, drift compensation fields, aberrations, and factors relating to the construction, such as field ripple, stored energy, coil forces and field errors

  1. Reference Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Feher, S; Brandt,, J; Cheban, S; Coleman, R; Dhanaraj, N; Fang, I; Lamm, M; Lombardo, V; Lopes, M; Miller, J; Ostojic, R ,; Orris, D; Page, T; Peterson, T; Tang, Z; Wands, R

    2014-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab has been approved by the Department of Energy to proceed developing the preliminary design. Integral to the success of Mu2e is the superconducting solenoid system. One of the three major solenoids is the Detector Solenoid that houses the stopping target and the detectors. The goal of the Detector Solenoid team is to produce detailed design specifications that are sufficient for vendors to produce the final design drawings, tooling and fabrication procedures and proceed to production. In this paper we summarize the Reference Design of the Detector Solenoid.

  2. Comparative performance analysis of a dual-solenoid mechanical oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V C C; Lee, H V; Harno, H G; Woo, K C

    2015-01-01

    An innovative dual-solenoid electro-mechanical-vibro-impact system has been constructed and experimentally studied. Comparative studies against a mechanical spring system and a permanent magnet system have been performed, where it is shown that the dual-solenoid system is able to produce oscillations better than the permanent magnet system and more energy efficiently. Comparison with a higher-powered dual solenoid system has also been conducted where a stationary solenoid has shown to be a more dominant parameter. In addition, it is also discovered that a mechanical oscillator in the dual-solenoid system is independent of the angular frequency. (paper)

  3. Form factor of some types of toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koryavko, V.I.; Litvinenko, Yu.A.

    1979-01-01

    Obtained were the type of dependence between consumed power and formed field for toroidal helical-wound solenoids and the expression for the form factor analogous to the Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids. Determined were optimum dimensions of the helical winding of ''forceless'' toroidal solenoids satisfying the condition of the formation of maximum field at minimum consumed power. Investigations also covered some types of conventional toroidal solenoids. Presented in the paper diagrams permitted to chose dimensions of the considered toroidal solenoids according to their consumed power and winding material volume

  4. SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS FOR THE MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,M.A.; EYSSA,Y.; KENNY,S.; MILLER,J.R.; PRESTEMON,S.; WEGGEL,R.J.

    2000-06-12

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 {micro}s at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration.

  5. ATLAS superconducting solenoid on-surface test

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, Roger J M Y; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; ten Kate, H H J; Kawai, M; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Makida, Y; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Pavlov, O V; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is presently under construction as one of the five LHC experiment set-ups. It relies on a sophisticated magnet system for the momentum measurement of charged particle tracks. The superconducting solenoid is at the center of the detector, the magnet system part nearest to the proton-proton collision point. It is designed for a 2 Tesla strong axial magnetic field at the collision point, while its thin-walled construction of 0.66 radiation lengths avoids degradation of energy measurements in the outer calorimeters. The solenoid and calorimeter have been integrated in their common cryostat, cooled down and tested on-surface. We review the on-surface set-up and report the performance test results.

  6. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10 11 , which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator

  7. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanesue, Takeshi, E-mail: tkanesue@bnl.gov; Okamura, Masahiro [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-7501 (Japan); RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10{sup 11}, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  8. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  9. Cross section of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2005-01-01

    The pictures show a cross section of the CMS solenoid. One can see four layers of the superconducting coil, each of which contains the superconductor (central part, copper coloured - niobium-titanium strands in a copper coating, made into a "Rutherford cable"), surrounded by an ultra-pure aluminium as a magnetic stabilizer, then an aluminium alloy as a mechanical stabilizer. Besides the four layers there is an aluminium mechanical piece that includes pipes that transport the liquid helium.

  10. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  11. Stable particle motion in a linear accelerator with solenoid focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The equation governing stable particle motion in a linear ion accelerator containing discrete rf and either discrete or continuous solenoid focusing was derived. It was found for discrete solenoid focusing that: cos μ = (1 + dΔ) cos theta/2 + (lΔ/theta - dtheta/2l - thetaΔd 2 /4l) sin theta/2, Δ = 1/f and l + 2d = βlambda, where μ, theta, f, l, and d are the phase advance per cell, precession angle in the solenoid, focal length of the rf lens, length of the solenoid in one cell, and the drift distance between the center of the rf gap and the effective edge of the solenoid. The relation for a continuous solenoid is found by setting d equal to zero. The boundaries of the stability region for theta vs Δ with fixed l and d are obtained when cos μ =+-1

  12. Survey of the laser-solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amherd, N.A.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys the prospects for a laser-solenoid fusion reactor. A sample reactor and scaling laws are used to describe the concept's characteristics. Experimental results are reviewed, and the laser and magnet technologies that undergird the laser-solenoid concept are analyzed. Finally, a systems analysis of fusion power reactors is given, including a discussion of direct conversion and fusion-fission effects, to ascertain the system attributes of the laser-solenoid configuration

  13. Functional and genomic analyses of alpha-solenoid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, David; Palidwor, Gareth A; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Szengel, Angelika; Schaefer, Martin H; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-solenoids are flexible protein structural domains formed by ensembles of alpha-helical repeats (Armadillo and HEAT repeats among others). While homology can be used to detect many of these repeats, some alpha-solenoids have very little sequence homology to proteins of known structure and we expect that many remain undetected. We previously developed a method for detection of alpha-helical repeats based on a neural network trained on a dataset of protein structures. Here we improved the detection algorithm and updated the training dataset using recently solved structures of alpha-solenoids. Unexpectedly, we identified occurrences of alpha-solenoids in solved protein structures that escaped attention, for example within the core of the catalytic subunit of PI3KC. Our results expand the current set of known alpha-solenoids. Application of our tool to the protein universe allowed us to detect their significant enrichment in proteins interacting with many proteins, confirming that alpha-solenoids are generally involved in protein-protein interactions. We then studied the taxonomic distribution of alpha-solenoids to discuss an evolutionary scenario for the emergence of this type of domain, speculating that alpha-solenoids have emerged in multiple taxa in independent events by convergent evolution. We observe a higher rate of alpha-solenoids in eukaryotic genomes and in some prokaryotic families, such as Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes, which could be associated to increased cellular complexity. The method is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~ard2/.

  14. Approximate theory the electromagnetic energy of solenoid in special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prastyaningrum, I; Kartikaningsih, S.

    2017-01-01

    Solenoid is a device that is often used in electronic devices. A solenoid is electrified will cause a magnetic field. In our analysis, we just focus on the electromagnetic energy for solenoid form. We purpose to analyze by the theoretical approach in special relativity. Our approach is begun on the Biot Savart law and Lorentz force. Special theory relativity can be derived from the Biot Savart law, and for the energy can be derived from Lorentz for, by first determining the momentum equation. We choose the solenoid form with the goal of the future can be used to improve the efficiency of the electrical motor. (paper)

  15. Calculus of the Cryebis 2 supraconductor solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the design of the superconducting solenoid CRYEBIS 2. With the prescribed parameters (5 Teslas central field, 120mm for inner diameter, 1600 mm for length), one determinates the dimensions of coil, its energy, the conductor, the working point of the magnet with its critical limits (intensity, field, temperature). The superconducting switch is calculated in the same manner. The study of a quench shows the good behaviour of the coil which is always safe even the detection system is in failure. In final, the mechanical stresses are verified lower than yield strength [fr

  16. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests.

  17. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; Wokas, T.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests

  18. ITER central solenoid manufacturing R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay Jayakumar, R.; Tsuji, H.; Ohsaki, O.

    2001-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Engineering Design Activity (EDA) includes the development of high performance superconductors, high current joints between superconducting cables and insulating materials. Also in the EDA, the resulting products of this R and D are incorporated in a Central Solenoid Model Coil which utilizes full size conductors. The manufacturing of the model coil and components has led to the development of the design, materials, tooling and process which are fully applicable to the manufacture of the ITER relevant CS coil. The R and D is essentially complete and final stages of the CS Model Coil manufacturing are underway. (author)

  19. ITER central solenoid manufacturing R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.J.; Tsuji, H.; Ohsaki, O.

    1999-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Engineering Design Activity (EDA) includes the development of high performance superconductors, high current joints between superconducting cables and insulating materials. Also in the EDA, the resulting products of this R and D are incorporated in a Central Solenoid Model Coil which utilizes full size conductors. The manufacturing of the model coil and components has led to the development of the design, materials, tooling and process which are fully applicable to the manufacture of the ITER relevant CS coil. The R and D is essentially complete and final stages of the CS Model Coil manufacturing are underway. (author)

  20. Conceptual design of a 20 Tesla pulsed solenoid for a laser solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, J.J.; Averill, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design considerations are described for a strip wound solenoid which is pulsed to 20 tesla while immersed in a 20 tesla bias field so as to achieve within the bore of the pulsed solenoid at net field sequence starting at 20 tesla and going first down to zero, then up to 40 tesla, and finally back to 20 tesla in a period of about 5 x 10 -3 seconds. The important parameters of the solenoid, e.g., aperture, build, turns, stored and dissipated energy, field intensity and powering circuit, are given. A numerical example for a specific design is presented. Mechanical stresses in the solenoid and the subsequent choice of materials for coil construction are discussed. Although several possible design difficulties are not discussed in this preliminary report of a conceptual magnet design, such as uniformity of field, long-term stability of insulation under neutron bombardment and choice of structural materials of appropriate tensile strength and elasticity to withstand magnetic forces developed, these questions are addressed in detail in the complete design report and in part in reference one. Furthermore, the authors feel that the problems encountered in this conceptual design are surmountable and are not a hindrance to the construction of such a magnet system

  1. First detector installed inside the ALICE solenoid...

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    ALICE's emblematic red magnet welcomed its first detector on 23 September, when the array of seven Cherenkov detectors, named HMPID, was successfully installed. ALICE team members standing in front of the completed HMPID detector.The red magnet, viewed from its front opening. The HMPID unit, seen from the back (top right corner of photo) is placed on a frame and lifted onto a platform during the installation. After the installation of the ACORDE scintillator array and the muon trigger and tracking chambers, the ALICE collaboration fitted the first detector inside the solenoid. The HMPID, for High Momentum Particle Identification, was installed at the 2 o'clock position in the central and most external region of the space frame, just below the solenoid yoke. It will be used to extend the hadron identification capability of the ALICE experiment up to 5 GeV/c, thus complementing the reach of the other particle identification systems (ITS, TPC and TOF). The HMPID is a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector in a...

  2. Design of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, Tim

    2013-10-15

    The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a small linear accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, which produces short, low emittance electron bunches. It is originally designed and built for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) within the framework of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL). Additionally, two future experiments are planned at REGAE. First, an external injection experiment for Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWA) will be performed in the framework of the LAOLA collaboration (LAboratory fOr Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration). This experiment will provide a method for the reconstruction of the electric field distribution within a linear plasma wakefield. Second, a time resolving high energy Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) will be implemented. Among others it is designed to allow for living cell imaging. Both experiments require strong focusing magnets inside the new target chamber at REGAE. Permanent magnetic solenoids (PMSs) can provide the needed focusing strength due to their enormous surface current density, while having compact dimensions at the same time. The present thesis deals with the design of such strong focusing PMSs. Since short and strong solenoids, as required for REGAE, exhibit a distinct non-linearity, the induced emittance growth is relatively large. This emittance growth is investigated and minimized for different set-ups with axially and radially magnetized annular magnets. Furthermore a magnetic shielding is developed. Together with a mechanical lifting system it assures that magnetic leakage fields do not disturb experiments, where the PMSs are removed from the beamline.

  3. Report of the large solenoid detector group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Mori, S.; Pondrom, L.G.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design of a large solenoid for studying physics at the SSC. The parameters and nature of the detector have been chosen based on present estimates of what is required to allow the study of heavy quarks, supersymmetry, heavy Higgs particles, WW scattering at large invariant masses, new W and Z bosons, and very large momentum transfer parton-parton scattering. Simply stated, the goal is to obtain optimum detection and identification of electrons, muons, neutrinos, jets, W's and Z's over a large rapidity region. The primary region of interest extends over +-3 units of rapidity, although the calorimetry must extend to +-5.5 units if optimal missing energy resolution is to be obtained. A magnetic field was incorporated because of the importance of identifying the signs of the charges for both electrons and muons and because of the added possibility of identifying tau leptons and secondary vertices. In addition, the existence of a magnetic field may prove useful for studying new physics processes about which we currently have no knowledge. Since hermeticity of the calorimetry is extremely important, the entire central and endcap calorimeters were located inside the solenoid. This does not at the moment seem to produce significant problems (although many issues remain to be resolved) and in fact leads to a very effective muon detector in the central region

  4. Design of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a small linear accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, which produces short, low emittance electron bunches. It is originally designed and built for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) within the framework of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL). Additionally, two future experiments are planned at REGAE. First, an external injection experiment for Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWA) will be performed in the framework of the LAOLA collaboration (LAboratory fOr Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration). This experiment will provide a method for the reconstruction of the electric field distribution within a linear plasma wakefield. Second, a time resolving high energy Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) will be implemented. Among others it is designed to allow for living cell imaging. Both experiments require strong focusing magnets inside the new target chamber at REGAE. Permanent magnetic solenoids (PMSs) can provide the needed focusing strength due to their enormous surface current density, while having compact dimensions at the same time. The present thesis deals with the design of such strong focusing PMSs. Since short and strong solenoids, as required for REGAE, exhibit a distinct non-linearity, the induced emittance growth is relatively large. This emittance growth is investigated and minimized for different set-ups with axially and radially magnetized annular magnets. Furthermore a magnetic shielding is developed. Together with a mechanical lifting system it assures that magnetic leakage fields do not disturb experiments, where the PMSs are removed from the beamline.

  5. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Condit, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus is described, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed

  6. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, T. Kenneth; Condit, William C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

  7. The Design Parameters for the MICE Tracker Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Chen, C.Y.; Juang, Tiki; Lau, Wing W.; Taylor, Clyde; Virostek, Steve P.; Wahrer, Robert; Wang, S.T.; Witte, Holger; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-01-01

    The first superconducting magnets to be installed in the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) will be the tracker solenoids. The tracker solenoid module is a five coil superconducting solenoid with a 400 mm diameter warm bore that is used to provide a 4 T magnetic field for the experiment tracker module. Three of the coils are used to produce a uniform field (up to 4 T with better than 1 percent uniformity) in a region that is 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long. The other two coils are used to match the muon beam into the MICE cooling channel. Two 2.94-meter long superconducting tracker solenoid modules have been ordered for MICE. The tracker solenoid will be cooled using two-coolers that produce 1.5 W each at 4.2 K. The magnet system is described. The decisions that drive the magnet design will be discussed in this report

  8. Pressure control valve using proportional electro-magnetic solenoid actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, So Nam; Ham, Young Bog; Park, Pyoung Won

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental characteristics of electro-hydraulic proportional pressure control valve. In this study, poppet and valve body which are assembled into the proportional solenoid were designed and manufactured. The constant force characteristics of proportional solenoid actuator in the control region should be independent of the plunger position in order to be used to control the valve position in the fluid flow control system. The stroke-force characteristics of the proportional solenoid actuator is determined by the shape (or parameters) of the control cone. In this paper, steady state and transient characteristics of the solenoid actuator for electro-hydraulic proportional valve are analyzed using finite element method and it is confirmed that the proportional solenoid actuator has a constant attraction force in the control region independently on the stroke position. The effects of the parameters such as control cone length, thickness and taper length are also discussed

  9. Superconducting Solenoid for Superfast THz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, A. V.; Khrushchev, S. V.; Kubarev, V. V.; Mezencev, N. A.; Tsukanov, V. M.; Sozinov, G. I.; Shkaruba, V. A.

    This project is related to new spectroscopy method in little-developed THz range. The method is founded on using of a free electron laser (NovoFEL) with high spectral power radiation which can be smoothly tuned in desirable range of spectrum. The objects of research of this method are fast processes in physics, chemical and biological reactions. Uniform magnetic field of 6 T value in the research area can considerably increase possibilities of this method. The magnetic field will modulate radiation of free molecules induction on characteristic frequencies of the Zeeman splitting that gives more possibilities of identification of molecules having even weak magnetic momentum. Moreover, the use of magnetic field allows essentially increase sensitivity of this method due to almost complete separation of weak measuring signals from powerful radiation of the laser. A superconducting solenoid was developed for this method. Its design and peculiarities are described in this paper.

  10. Concept design of the CFETR central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jinxing; Song, Yuntao; Liu, Xufeng; Li, Jiangang; Wan, Yuanxi; Wan, Baonian; Ye, Minyou; Wu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Main concept design work including coil's geometry, superconductor and support structure has been carried out. • The maximum magnetic field of CS coil is 11.9 T which is calculated by the coils’ operation current based on plasma equilibrium configuration. • The stray field in plasma area is less than 20 Gs under the CS coils’ operation currents designed for the plasma-heating phase. - Abstract: China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) superconducting tokamak is a national scientific research project of China with major and minor radius is 5.7 m and 1.6 m respectively. The magnetic field at the center of plasma with radius as R = 5.7 m is set to be 5.0 T. The major objective of the project is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with fusion power in the range of 50–200 MW and should be self-sufficient by blanket. Six central solenoid coils of CFETR with same structure are made of Nb 3 Sn superconductor. Besides, the stray field in plasma area should be less than 20 Gs with the operation current of CS coils for plasma heating phase. The maximum magnetic field of CS coil is 11.9 T. It is calculated by the coils’ operation current based on plasma equilibrium configuration. The central solenoid needs to have enough stability margin under the condition of high magnetic field and strain. This paper discusses the design parameters, electromagnetic distribution, structure and stability analysis of the CS superconducting magnet for CFETR

  11. Validation of Quench Simulation and Simulation of the TWIN Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Pots, Rosalinde Hendrika

    2015-01-01

    For the Future Circular Collider at CERN a multi-purpose detector is proposed. The 6T TWIN Solenoid, a very large magnet system with a stored energy of 53 GJ, is being designed. It is important to protect the magnet against quenches in the system. Therefore several existing quench protection systems are evaluated and simulations have be performed on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid. The simulations on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid have been performed with promising results; the hotspot temperatures do not exceed 120 K and layer to layer voltages stay below 500 V. Adding quench heaters to the system might improve the quench protection system further.

  12. Quench protection and safety of the ATLAS central solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Makida, Y; Haruyama, T; ten Kate, H H J; Kawai, M; Kobayashi, T; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A; Yamaoka, H

    2002-01-01

    Fabrication of the ATLAS central solenoid was completed and the performance test has been carried out. The solenoid was successfully charged up to 8.4 kA, which is 10% higher than the normal operational current of 7.6 kA. Two methods for quench protection, pure aluminum strips accelerating quench propagation and quench protection heaters distributing normal zones, are applied in order to safely dissipate the stored energy. In this paper, quench characteristics and protection methods of the ATLAS central solenoid are described. (14 refs).

  13. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  14. Solenoid hammer valve developed for quick-opening requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrench, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Quick-opening lightweight solenoid hammer valve requires a low amount of electrical energy to open, and closes by the restoring action of the mechanical springs. This design should be applicable to many quick-opening requirements in fluid systems.

  15. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid- based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems the ... For many years, the disadvantage in these investigations ... fusion or breakup reaction, preferred with large forward-peaked cross-sections. To transfer the ...

  16. The solenoidal detector collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems (STS) will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. The STS is physically a small part of the central tracking system and the calorimeter of the detector being proposed by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC). Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. The STS will consist of silicon microstrip detectors and possibly silicon pixel detectors. The other two components are an outer barrel tracker, which will consist of straw tubes or scintillating fibers; and an outer intermediate angle tracker, which will consist of gas microstrips. The components are designed to work as an integrated system. Each componenet has specific strengths, but is individually incapable of providing the overall performance required by the physics goals of the SSC. The large particle fluxes, the short times between beam crossing, the high channel count, and the required very high position measurement accuracy pose challenging problems that must be solved. Furthermore, to avoid degrading the measurements, the solutions must be achieved using only a minimal amount of material. An additional constraint is that only low-Z materials are allowed. If that were not difficlut enough, the solutions must also be affordable

  17. The Compact Muon Solenoid Detector Control System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a CERN multi-purpose experiment that exploits the physics of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Detector Control System (DCS) ensures a safe, correct and efficient experiment operation, contributing to the recording of high quality physics data. The DCS is programmed to automatically react to the LHC changes. CMS sub-detector’s bias voltages are set depending on the machine mode and particle beam conditions. A protection mechanism ensures that the sub-detectors are locked in a safe mode whenever a potentially dangerous situation exists. The system is supervised from the experiment control room by a single operator. A small set of screens summarizes the status of the detector from the approximately 6M monitored parameters. Using the experience of nearly two years of operation with beam the DCS automation software has been enhanced to increase the system efficiency. The automation allows now for configuration commands that can be used to automatically pre-configure hardwar...

  18. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  19. Detailed design of the ITER central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Mitchell, N.; Bessette, D.; Gribov, Y.; Jong, C.; Lyraud, C.

    2009-01-01

    The central solenoid (CS) of the ITER tokamak contributes to the inductive flux to drive the plasma, to the shaping of the field lines in the divertor region and to vertical stability control. It is made of 6 independent coils, using a Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit superconducting conductor, held together by a vertical precompression structure. This design enables ITER to access a wide operating window of plasma parameters, up to 17 MA and covering inductive and non-inductive operation. Each coil is based on a stack of multiple pancake winding units to minimise joints. A glass-polyimide electrical insulation, impregnated with epoxy resin, is giving a high voltage operating capability, tested up to 29 kV. The CS performance is fatigue driven mainly by the stress levels in the conductor jacket and in the precompression structure needed to keep the modules in contact during the repulsive forces which can arise in operation. A rigid connection to the TF coils provided at one end and a centering support at the other end allow to resist net vertical forces as well as unbalanced radial forces while avoiding torsion transmission from the TF Coils to the CS assembly.

  20. E-beam heated linear solenoid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, J.; Bailey, V.; Oliver, D.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and system analysis shows that electron beam heated linear solenoidal reactors are attractive for near term applications which can use low gain fusion sources. Complete plant designs have been generated for fusion based breeders of fissile fuel over a wide range of component parameters (e.g., magnetic fields, reactor lengths, plasma densities) and design options (e.g., various radial and axial loss mechanisms). It appears possible that a reactor of 100 to 300 meters length operating at power levels of 1000 MWt can economically produce 2000 to 8000 kg/yr of 233 U to supply light water reactor fuel needs beyond 2000 A.D. Pure fusion reactors of 300 to 500 meter lengths are possible. Physics and operational features of reactors are described. Beam heating by classical and anomalous energy deposition is reviewed. The technology of the required beams has been developed to MJ/pulse levels, within a factor of 20 of that needed for full scale production reactors. The required repetitive pulsing appears practical

  1. A solenoidal and monocusp ion source (SAMIS) (abstract)ab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, E.J.; Brainard, J.P.; Draper, C.H.; Ney, R.H.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new magnetic monocusp ion source for single aperture applications such as neutron generators. Coupling solenoidal magnetic fields on both sides of a monocusp magnetic field has generated over 70% atomic deuterium ions at pressures as low as 0.4 Pa (3 mTorr). This article describes the performance and characteristics of the solenoidal and monocusp ion source. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. An Inexpensive Toroidal Solenoid for an Investigative Student Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Andrew; Broberg, John

    2008-09-01

    Magnetism and Ampère's law is a common subject in most calculus-based introductory physics courses. Many textbooks offer examples to calculate the magnetic field produced by a symmetric current by using Ampère's law. These examples include the solenoid and the toroidal solenoid (sometimes called a torus; see Fig. 1), which are used in many applications, including the study of plasmas.

  3. Solenoid for Laser Induced Plasma Experiments at Janus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sallee; Leferve, Heath; Kemp, Gregory; Mariscal, Derek; Rasmus, Alex; Williams, Jackson; Gillespie, Robb; Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R.

    2017-10-01

    Creating invariant magnetic fields for experiments involving laser induced plasmas is particularly challenging due to the high voltages at which the solenoid must be pulsed. Creating a solenoid resilient enough to survive through large numbers of voltage discharges, enabling it to endure a campaign lasting several weeks, is exceptionally difficult. Here we present a solenoid that is robust through 40 μs pulses at a 13 kV potential. This solenoid is a vast improvement over our previously fielded designs in peak magnetic field capabilities and robustness. Designed to be operated at small-scale laser facilities, the solenoid housing allows for versatility of experimental set-ups among diagnostic and target positions. Within the perpendicular field axis at the center there is 300 degrees of clearance which can be easily modified to meet the needs of a specific experiment, as well as an f/3 cone for transmitted or backscattered light. After initial design efforts, these solenoids are relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

  4. Inversion of the OH 1720-MHz line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that the OH 1720-MHz line can be strongly inverted by collisions which excite the rotation states. It is also argued that radiative pumps (of any wave length) can invert strongly only the 1612-MHz line. (author)

  5. The LASS [Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid] spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K + and K - interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K - p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly

  6. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  7. A novel NiZn ferrite integrated magnetic solenoid inductor with a high quality factor at 0.7–6 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjun Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrated inductor is one of the fundamental components and has been widely used in radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs. It has been challenging to achieve simultaneously high inductance and quality factor, particularly at GHz frequencies. In this work, we reported a novel integrated solenoid inductor with a magnetic NiZn ferrite as the core material, which was deposited by a low-cost spin spray technique. These integrated inductors showed a significant improvement in both inductance and quality factor at GHz frequencies over their air core counterparts. A stable inductance was observed within a wide frequency ranged from 700 MHz to 6 GHz. The peak value of quality factor reached 23, a relatively higher value not reported for solenoid inductors up to date. Our results indicate that the integrated inductor are promising for applications in RFICs.

  8. Lessons Learned for the MICE Coupling Solenoid from the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Li, S.Y.; Zheng, S.X.; Virostek, Steve P.; DeMello, Allen J.; Li, Derun; Trillaud, Frederick; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Tests of the spectrometer solenoids have taught us some important lessons. The spectrometer magnet lessons learned fall into two broad categories that involve the two stages of the coolers that are used to cool the magnets. On the first spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the connection of the cooler 2nd-stage to the magnet cold mass. On the first test of the second spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the cooler 1st-stage temperature and its effect on the operation of the HTS leads. The second time the second spectrometer magnet was tested; the cooling to the cold mass was still not adequate. The cryogenic designs of the MICE and MuCOOL coupling magnets are quite different, but the lessons learned from the tests of the spectrometer magnets have affected the design of the coupling magnets.

  9. A Cryogenic Test Stand for Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, R. [Fermilab; Carcagno, R. [Fermilab; Nogiec, J. [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Soyars, W. [Fermilab; Sylvester, C. [Fermilab

    2013-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquifier (CHL) has been designed, and operated. This test stand has been used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab mu2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  10. Dispersion in a bent-solenoid channel with symmetric focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-xi [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2001-08-21

    Longitudinal ionization cooling of a muon beam is essential for muon colliders and will be useful for neutrino factories. Bent-solenoid channels with symmetric focusing has been considered for beam focusing and for generating the required dispersion in the ``emittance exchange'' scheme of longitudinal cooling. In this paper, we derive the Hamiltonian that governs the linear beam dynamics of a bent-solenoid channel, solve the single-particle dynamics, and give equations for determining the lattice functions, in particular, the dispersion functions.

  11. Operating experience feedback report - Solenoid-operated valve problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1991-02-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential common-mode failures of solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) in US plants. These events resulted in degradation or malfunction of multiple trains of safety systems as well as of multiple safety systems. On the basis of the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concludes that the problems with solenoid-operated valves are an important issue that needs additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for actions to reduce the occurrence of SOV common-mode failures. 115 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Laser solenoid: an alternate use of lasers in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    A unique laser assisted fusion approach is under development at Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc. (MSNW). This approach captures one of the most developed aspects of high energy laser technology, the efficient, large, scalable, pulsed electron beam initiated, electric discharge, CO 2 infrared laser. This advanced technology is then combined with the simple geometry of a linear magnetic confinement system. The laser solenoid concept will be described, current work and experimental progress will be discussed, and the technological problems of building such a system will be assessed. Finally a comparison will be made of the technology and economics for the laser solenoid and alternative fusion approaches

  13. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepes, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p T particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p T > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p T quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q 2 causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through their interactions

  14. Waveform digitizing at 500 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiya, M.; Ito, M.; Haggerty, J.; Ng, C.; Sippach, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiment E787 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is designed to study the decay K + → π + ν/bar /nu// to a sensitivity of 2 /times/ 10 -10 . To achieve acceptable muon rejection it is necessary to couple traditional methods (range/energy/momentum correlation) with observation of the (π + → μ + ν, μ + → e + ν/bar /nu//) decay sequence in scintillator. We report on the design and construction of 200 channels of relatively low cost solid state waveform digitizers. The distinguishing features are: 8 bits dynamic range, 500 MHz sampling, zero suppression on the fly, deep memory (up to .5 msec), and fast readout time (100 μsec for the entire system). We report on data obtained during the February-May 1988 run showing performance of the system for the observation of the above decay. 8 figs

  15. Waveform digitizing at 500 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiya, M.; Ito, M.; Haggerty, J.; Ng, C.; Sippach, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiment E787 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is designed to study the decay K + → π + ν/bar /nu// to a sensitivity of 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/10/. To achieve acceptable muon rejection it is necessary to couple traditional methods (range/energy/momentum correlation) with observation of the π + → μ + → e + ν/bar /nu// decay sequence in scintillator. We report on the design and construction of over 200 channels of relatively low cost solid state waveform digitizers. The distinguishing features are: 8 bits dynamic range, 500 MHz sampling, zero suppression on the fly, deep memory (up to .5 msec), and fast readout time (100 μsec for the entire system). We report on data obtained during the February--May 1988 run showing performance of the system for the observation of the above decay. 9 figs

  16. Energy losses in the D0 β solenoid cryostat caused by current changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, A.T.

    1993-11-01

    The proposed D0 β solenoid is a superconducting solenoid mounted inside an aluminum tube which supports the solenoid winding over it's full length. This aluminum support tube, also called bobbin, is therefore very tightly coupled to magnetic flux changes caused by solenoid current variations. These current changes in the solenoid, will cause answer currents to flow in the resistive bobbin wall and therefore cause heat losses. The insertion of an external dump resistor in the solenoid current loop reduces energy dissipation inside the cryostat during a quench and will shorten the discharge time constant. This note presents a simple electrical model for the coupled bobbin and solenoid and makes it easier to understand the circuit behavior and losses. Estimates for the maximum allowable rate of solenoid current changes, based on the maximum permissible rate of losses can be made using this model

  17. 2 T superconducting detector solenoid for the PANDA target spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efremov, A.A.; Koshurnikov, E.K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Lobanov, Y.Y. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)], E-mail: lobanov@jinr.ru; Makarov, A.F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Orth, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Sissakian, A.N.; Vodopianov, A.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the JINR design of the large 2 T superconducting solenoid for the target spectrometer of the PANDA experiment at HESR (FAIR, GSI, Darmstadt, Germany). The solenoid coil has an inner radius of 1.08 m and a length of 2.90 m. This solenoid is non-centrally split providing a warm bore of 100 mm in diameter through the coil to accommodate sufficient space for the internal target installations. Maximally stored energy in the windings is 22.3 MJ. All tracking and calorimetric detectors surrounding the target point, with exception of a forward cone of 5{sup 0} opening, are placed inside the lqHe-cryostat. The main features of the design and technique are as follows: a copper stabilizer and soldering technique for the superconducting cable; a stainless steel cryostat; winding technique over a mandrel; coreless type of the coil; low operational current. The details of the PANDA solenoid design including the magnetic field and stress-strain calculations are covered.

  18. Structure design of the central solenoid in JT-60SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakawa, Shuji; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Kuramochi, Masaya; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2009-09-01

    The upgrade of JT-60U magnet system to superconducting coils (JT-60SA: JT-60 Super Advanced) has been decided by parties of Japanese government (JA) and European commission (EU) in the framework of the Broader Approach (BA) agreement. The magnet system for JT-60SA consists of a central solenoid (CS), equilibrium field(EF) coils, toroidal field(TF) coils. The central solenoid consists the four winding pack modules. In order to counteract the thermal contraction as well as the electric magnetic repulsion and attraction together with other forces generated in each module, it is necessary to apply pre-loading to the support structure of the solenoid and to pursue a structure which is capable of sustaining such loading. In the present report, the structural design of the supporting structure of the solenoid and the jackets of the modules is verified analytically, and the results indicate that the structural design satisfies the 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure -'. (author)

  19. Improved focus solenoid design for linear induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zentler, J.M.; Van Maren, R.D.; Nexsen, W.E.

    1992-08-01

    Our FXR linear induction accelerator produces a 2 KA, 17 MeV electron beam of 60 ns duration. The beam is focused on a tantalum target to produce x-rays for radiography. The FWHM spot size of the focused beam is currently 2.2 mm. We strive to reduce the spot size by 30% by improving the field characteristics of focusing solenoids housed in each of 50 induction cells along the beamline. Tilts in the magnetic axis of the existing solenoids range up to 12 mrad (0.7 degrees). We are building new solenoid assemblies which include ferromagnetic homogenizer rings. These dramatically reduce field errors. A field tilt of under 0.5 mrad has been achieved. Mechanical alignment of the rings is critical. We developed a novel construction method in which the rings are wound with 4 mil thick Si-Fe ribbon into grooves on an aluminum cylinder. The cylinder then becomes the winding mandrel for the focus solenoids. This forms a more accurate and compact assembly than the standard practice of pressing individual solid rings onto a tube

  20. Modeling plasma flow in straight and curved solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boercker, D.B.; Sanders, D.M.; Storer, J.; Falabella, S.

    1991-01-01

    The ''flux-tube'' model originated by Morozov is a very simple and numerically efficient method for simulating ion motion in plasma filters. In order to test its utility as a design tool, we compare the predictions of the model to recent experimental measurements of plasma flow in both straight and curved solenoids

  1. Completion of the ITER central solenoid model coils installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, H.

    1999-01-01

    The short article details how dozens of problems, regarding the central solenoid model coils installation, were faced and successfully overcome one by one at JAERI-Naga. A black and white photograph shows K. Kwano, a staff member of the JAERI superconducting magnet laboratory, to be still inside the vacuum tank while the lid is already being brought down..

  2. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The University of Notre Dame, USA (Becchetti et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Res. A505, 377 (2003)) and later the University of São Paulo, Brazil (Lichtenthaler et al, Eur. Phys. J. A25, S-01, 733 (2005)) adopted a system based on superconducting solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems ...

  3. Insulating process for HT-7U central solenoid model coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Yimin; Pan Wanjiang; Wu Songtao; Wan Yuanxi

    2003-01-01

    The HT-7U superconducting Tokamak is a whole superconducting magnetically confined fusion device. The insulating system of its central solenoid coils is critical to its properties. In this paper the forming of the insulating system and the vacuum-pressure-impregnating (VPI) are introduced, and the whole insulating process is verified under the super-conducting experiment condition

  4. Electromagnetic behaviour of the shield in turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Vecchio, P.; Veca, G.M.; Sacerdoti, G.

    1975-11-01

    The structure of turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids is analyzed and the investigation of electromagnetic behaviour of the rotating shield is presented. The cases considered are: (a) An hypothetical operation with a single phase with nominal current; (b) Steady-state operation in inverse sequence with 10% of the nominal current; (c) A step variation of the magnetic field intensity in the shield

  5. Design of 9 tesla superconducting solenoid for VECC RIB facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Fatma, Tabassum; Dey, Malay Kanti; Bhunia, Uttam; Bandyopadhyay, Arup; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-01-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at our centre. The post acceleration scheme of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) followed by five IH LINAC cavities will provide energy of about 1.05 MeV/u. For further accelerating up to 2 MeV/u Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators (SCQWR) will be used. The radial defocusing of the beam bunch during the acceleration using SCQWRs will be taken care of by a Superconducting Solenoid (SCS) within the same cryostat. In this report the electromagnetic design of an SCS will be discussed. A 9 T SCS having effective length of 340 mm has been designed with the special requirement that the fringing field should fall sharply to a value less than 100 mT at the surfaces of the adjacent superconducting cavities. The designed solenoid comprise of two co-axial split solenoid conductors surrounded by iron shields and a pair of bucking coils. Optimizations have been carried out for the total current sharing of the main coils and the bucking coils as well as for the relative orientation and dimension of each component of the solenoid. (author)

  6. Design of 9 tesla superconducting solenoid for VECC RIB facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Fatma, Tabassum; Dey, Malay Kanti; Bhunia, Uttam; Bandyopadhyay, Arup; Chakrabarti, Alok [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India)

    2013-07-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at our centre. The post acceleration scheme of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) followed by five IH LINAC cavities will provide energy of about 1.05 MeV/u. For further accelerating up to 2 MeV/u Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators (SCQWR) will be used. The radial defocusing of the beam bunch during the acceleration using SCQWRs will be taken care of by a Superconducting Solenoid (SCS) within the same cryostat. In this report the electromagnetic design of an SCS will be discussed. A 9 T SCS having effective length of 340 mm has been designed with the special requirement that the fringing field should fall sharply to a value less than 100 mT at the surfaces of the adjacent superconducting cavities. The designed solenoid comprise of two co-axial split solenoid conductors surrounded by iron shields and a pair of bucking coils. Optimizations have been carried out for the total current sharing of the main coils and the bucking coils as well as for the relative orientation and dimension of each component of the solenoid. (author)

  7. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  8. Design, fabrication, and characterization of a solenoid system to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    system to generate magnetic field for an ECR proton source. S K JAIN .... The bore of the solenoid coils was fabricated using high voltage glass epoxy. Each ... sure drop and flow, the inlet and outlet connections were provided. ... stability of an ECR plasma source, as any small change in the distribution of the axial magnetic.

  9. 47 CFR 101.77 - Public safety licensees in the 1850-1990 MHz, 2110-2150 MHz, and 2160-2200 MHz bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., 2110-2150 MHz, and 2160-2200 MHz bands. 101.77 Section 101.77 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...-1990 MHz, 2110-2150 MHz, and 2160-2200 MHz bands. (a) In order for public safety licensees to qualify... a Police licensee, a Fire Licensee, or an Emergency Medical Licensee as defined in § 90.7 of this...

  10. Design of a Solenoid Magnet for a Microwave Ion Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sub; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Dae Il

    2011-01-01

    A microwave ion source has many advantages, such as long-life time, low emittance, high brightness, and compactness. Also it is a big merit that 2.45GHz rf systems are easily available and inexpensive. Due to the reasons microwave ion sources are very attractive for industrial applications. But microwave ion sources need a solenoid magnet which is usually an electromagnet with a DC current power supply. The electromagnet solenoids of microwave ion sources can be installed in two methods. The first method is to use isolation transformer to supply electrical power to DC current power supply for the magnets. In this case the magnet is compact because it has the same potential with the extraction voltage. The second method is to put an electrical insulator, such as G10, between ion sources and magnets. In this case the solenoid magnet is bigger than one in the first method, especially for higher extraction voltage, because the space for the insulator is required. Permanent magnets can be a good candidate to make microwave ion source more compact. But it is difficult to control the magnetic field profile and the magnetic flux density for the permanent magnet solenoids. Due to the reason, in the case that the best performances in many operating conditions should be achieved by adjusting the profile and strength of the solenoid, electromagnet is better than permanent magnet. But in the case of industrial applications where operating conditions is usually fixed and the compactness is required, permanent magnet is better choice to build an ion source

  11. The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Delepine

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study protonproton collisions at unprecedented energies and luminosities. In this article we providefi rst a brief general introduction to particle physics. We then explain what CERN is. Thenwe describe the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the most powerful particle acceleratorever built. Finally we describe the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, its physics goals,construction details, and current status.El experimento Compact Muon Solenoid en el Large Hadron Collider del CERN estudiarácolisiones protón protón a energías y luminosidades sin precedente. En este artículo presentamos primero una breve introducción general a la física de partículas. Despuésexplicamos lo que es el CERN. Luego describimos el Large Hadron Collider, el más potente acelerador de partículas construido por el hombre, en el CERN. Finalmente describimos el experimento Compact Muon Solenoid, sus objetivos en física, los detalles de su construcción,y su situación presente.

  12. Plasma current start-up experiments without the central solenoid in the TST-2 spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Y.; Ejiri, A.; Shiraiwa, S.; Adachi, Y.; Ishii, N.; Kasahara, H.; Nuga, H.; Ono, Y.; Oosako, T.; Sasaki, M.; Shimada, Y.; Sumitomo, N.; Taguchi, I.; Tojo, H.; Tsujimura, J.; Ushigome, M.; Yamada, T.; Hanada, K.; Hasegawa, M.; Idei, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Sasaki, K.; Sato, K.N.; Zushi, H.; Nishino, N.; Mitarai, O.

    2006-01-01

    Several techniques for initiating the plasma current without the use of the central solenoid are being developed in TST-2. While TST-2 was temporarily located at Kyushu University, two types of start-up scenarios were demonstrated. (1) A plasma current of 4 kA was generated and sustained for 0.28 s by either electron cyclotron wave or electron Bernstein wave, without induction. (2) A plasma current of 10 kA was obtained transiently by induction using only outboard poloidal field coils. In the second scenario, it is important to supply sufficient power for ionization (100 kW of EC power was sufficient in this case), since the vertical field during start-up is not adequate to maintain plasma equilibrium. In addition, electron heating experiments using the X-B mode conversion scenario were performed, and a heating efficiency of 60% was observed at a 100 kW RF power level. TST-2 is now located at the Kashiwa Campus of the University of Tokyo. Significant upgrades were made in both magnetic coil power supplies and RF systems, and plasma experiments have restarted. RF power of up to 400 kW is available in the high-harmonic fast wave frequency range around 20 MHz. Four 200 MHz transmitters are now being prepared for plasma current start-up experiments using RF power in the lower-hybrid frequency range. Preparations are in progress for a new plasma merging experiment (UTST) aimed at the formation and sustainment of ultra-high β ST plasmas

  13. The large superconducting solenoids for the g-2 muon storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.

    1994-01-01

    The g-2 muon storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of four large superconducting solenoids. The two outer solenoids, which are 15.1 meters in diameter, share a common cryostat. The two inner solenoids, which are 13.4 meters in diameter, are in separate cryostats. The two 24 turn inner solenoids are operated at an opposite polarity from the two 24 turn outer solenoids. This generates a dipole field between the inner and outer solenoids. The flux between the solenoids is returned through a C shaped iron return yoke that also shapes the dipole field. The integrated field around the 14 meter diameter storage ring must be good to about 1 part in one million over the 90 mm dia. circular cross section where the muons are stored, averaged over the azimuth. When the four solenoids carry their 5300 A design current, the field in the 18 centimeter gap between the poles is 1.45 T. When the solenoid operates at its design current 5.5 MJ is stored between the poles. The solenoids were wound on site at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The cryostats were built around the solenoid windings which are indirectly cooled using two-phase helium

  14. IE Information Notice No. 85-17, Supplement 1: Possible sticking of ASCO solenoid valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    This notice is to inform recipients of the results of follow up investigations regarding the reasons for sticking of Automatic Switch Company (ASCO) solenoid valves used to shut main steam isolation valves (MSIVs) under accident conditions. GE has recommend that the licensee replace the potentially contaminated MSIV solenoid valves and institute a periodic examination and cleaning of the MSIV solenoid valves. Grand Gulf has replaced the eight MSIV HTX832320V dual solenoid valves with fully environmentally qualified ASCO Model NP 8323A20E dual solenoid valves. The environmentally qualified valve Model NP 8323A20E was included in a control sample placed in the test ovens with the solenoid valves that stuck at Grand Gulf. The environmentally qualified model did not stick under the test conditions that cause sticking in the other solenoid valves

  15. Focusing solenoid for the front end of a linear RF accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terechkine, I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A prototype of a superconducting focusing solenoid for use in an RF linac has been built and tested at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The solenoid is comprised of the main coil, two bucking coils, two dipole corrector windings, and a low carbon steel flux return. At the excitation current of 250 A, the magnetic field reaches 7.2 T in the center of the solenoid and is less than 5 G on the axis at a distance of 150 mm from the center. The length of the solenoid is 150 mm; the length of a cryovessel for the solenoid with a 20 mm diameter 'warm' bore is 270 mm. This paper presents the main design features of the focusing solenoid and discusses results from tests of the solenoid.

  16. Completeness for coherent states in a magnetic–solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V G; Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M; Górska, K

    2012-01-01

    This paper completes our study of coherent states in the so-called magnetic–solenoid field (a collinear combination of a constant uniform magnetic field and Aharonov–Bohm solenoid field) presented in Bagrov et al (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 354016, 2011 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 055301). Here, we succeeded in proving nontrivial completeness relations for non-relativistic and relativistic coherent states in such a field. In addition, we solve here the relevant Stieltjes moment problem and present a comparative analysis of our coherent states and the well-known, in the case of pure uniform magnetic field, Malkin–Man’ko coherent states. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’. (paper)

  17. Conceptual design of the CMS 4 Tesla solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baze, J.M.; Desportes, H.; Duthil, R.; Lesmond, C.; Lottin, J.C.; Pabot, Y.

    1992-02-01

    A large and important meeting 'Toward the LHC experimental programme' is due to be held at EVIAN-les-BAINS, on 5-8 March 1992. The major goal accurate measurement of muon momenta makes necessary, for the detectors, the use of large and powerful magnetic system producing high bending power. The CMS experiment is based on a solenoidal magnetic configuration. It has been designed to produce a high magnetic induction (4 T) in a 14 m long, 5.9 m bore cylindrical volume surrounding the interaction point. The diameter has been fixed to the maximum dimension compatible with road transportation to CERN. This long solenoid with its 12 500 ton iron yoke is a fully shielded magnet. The paper presents the conceptual design of the superconducting coil and its technical characteristics

  18. H- beam neutralization measurements in a solenoidal beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Pitcher, E.; Stevens, R.; Allison, P.

    1992-01-01

    H minus beam space-charge neutralization is measured for 65-mA, 35-keV beams extracted from a circular-aperture Penning surface-plasma source, the small-angle source. The H minus beam is transported to a RFQ matchpoint by a two-solenoid magnet system. Beam noise is typically ±4%. A four-grid analyzer is located in a magnetic-field-free region between the two solenoid magnets. H minus potentials are deduced from kinetic energy measurements of particles (electrons and positive ions) ejected radially from the beam channel by using a griddled energy analyzer. Background neutral gas density is increased by the introduction of additional Xe and Ar gases, enabling the H minus beam to become overneutralized

  19. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-01-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS

  20. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  1. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  2. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  3. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  4. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi; Okamura, Masahiro; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  5. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (United States); Cushing, Eric [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jandovitz, Peter [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  6. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Romanelli, M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Kumaki, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Okamura, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  7. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 (micro)m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  8. Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting

  9. System of cylindrical drift chambers in a superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.; Blumenfeld, B.J.; Dimcovski, Z.

    1978-01-01

    A superconducting solenoid at the CERN ISR was equipped with a system of high accuracy cylindrical drift chambers. This detector consists of eight layers of field shaped drift cells with a delay line opposite each sense wire to provide coupled two dimensional readout. The design, construction, and operation of this system are discussed. The resolution and performance of the delay lines and sense wires under ISR running conditions are shown

  10. HIE-ISOLDE CRYO-MODULE Assembly - Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Leclercq, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the cryo-module components in SM18 cleanroom. The superconducting solenoid (housed inside its helium vessel) is cleaned, prepared then installed on the supporting frame of the cryo-module and connected to the helium tank, prior to the assembly of the RF cavities on the structure. The completed first 2 cryo-modules installed inside the HIE-ISOLDE-LINAC ready for beam operation is also shown.

  11. Synchrotron oscillation effects on an rf-solenoid spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, P.; Chiladze, D.; Dietrich, J.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Guidoboni, G.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kulessa, P.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Morse, W. M.; Öllers, D.; Pesce, A.; Polyanskiy, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Talman, R.; Valdau, Yu.; Weidemann, Ch.; Wüstner, P.

    2012-12-01

    New measurements are reported for the time dependence of the vertical polarization of a 0.97GeV/c deuteron beam circulating in a storage ring and perturbed by an rf solenoid. The storage ring is the cooler synchrotron (COSY) located at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. The beam polarization was measured continuously using a 1.5 cm thick carbon target located at the edge of the circulating deuteron beam and the scintillators of the EDDA detector. An rf solenoid mounted on the ring was used to generate fields at and near the frequency of the 1-Gγ spin resonance. Measurements were made of the vertical beam polarization as a function of time with the operation of the rf solenoid in either fixed or continuously variable frequency mode. Using rf-solenoid strengths as large as 2.66×10-5revolutions/turn, slow oscillations (˜1Hz) were observed in the vertical beam polarization. When the circulating beam was continuously electron cooled, these oscillations completely reversed the polarization and showed no sign of diminishing in amplitude. But for the uncooled beam, the oscillation amplitude was damped to nearly zero within a few seconds. A simple spin-tracking model without the details of the COSY ring lattice was successful in reproducing these oscillations and demonstrating the sensitivity of the damping to the magnitude of the synchrotron motion of the beam particles. The model demonstrates that the characteristic features of measurements made in the presence of large synchrotron oscillations are distinct from the features of such measurements when made off resonance. These data were collected in preparation for a study of the spin coherence time, a beam property that needs to become long to enable a search for an electric dipole moment using a storage ring.

  12. Sprag solenoid brake. [development and operations of electrically controlled brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, D. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of an electrically operated brake are discussed. The action of the brake depends on energizing a solenoid which causes internally spaced sprockets to contact the inner surface of the housing. A spring forces the control member to move to the braking position when the electrical function is interrupted. A diagram of the device is provided and detailed operating principles are explained.

  13. Electron Beam Size Measurements in a Cooling Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Thomas K; Burov, Alexey; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable appertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20 m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper discusses the required beam parameters, the implimentation of the measurement system and results for our application.

  14. Worcester Solenoid-Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as Integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting

  15. RF Tests of an 805 MHz Pillbox Cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Li; J. Corlett; R. MacGill; M. Zisman; J. Norem; A. Moretti; Z. Qian; J. Wallig; V. Wu; Y. Torun; R.A. Rimmer

    2003-01-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows over beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, following several weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested with and without the external magnetic field. 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, indicating that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emission significantly. A gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection of the Be window surface found no visual damage, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning the cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More thorough window and cavity surface inspection is under way

  16. RF tests of an 805 MHz pillbox cavity at Lab G of Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Rimmer, R.; Norem, J.; Torun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent high power RF tests on an 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity with demountable windows for beam apertures at Lab G of Fermilab, a dedicated facility for testing of MUCOOL (muon cooling) components. The cavity is installed inside a superconducting solenoidal magnet. A 12 MW peak RF power klystron is used for the tests. The cavity has been processed both with and without magnetic field. Without magnetic field, a gradient of 34 MV/m was reached rather quickly with very low sparking rate. In a 2.5 T solenoidal field, a 16 MV/m gradient was achieved, and it had to take many weeks of conditioning. Strong multipacting effects associated with high radiation levels were measured during the processing with the magnetic field. More recently Be windows with TiN-coated surface have been installed and tested at conditions of with and without the external magnetic field. A conservative 16 MV/m gradient without magnetic field was reached quickly as planned. Less multipacting was observed during the conditioning, it indicated that the TiN-coated surface on the windows had indeed helped to reduce the secondary electron emissions significantly. A modest gradient of 16.5 MV/m was finally achieved with magnet on in solenoidal mode and the field up to 4 T. Preliminary inspection on Be windows surface found no damage at all, in comparison with Cu windows where substantial surface damage was found. Preliminary understanding of conditioning cavity in a strong magnetic field has been developed. More through window and cavity surface inspection is under way

  17. Design and characterization of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachmann, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Gehrke, T.; Mayet, F.

    2016-01-01

    REGAE is a small electron linear accelerator at DESY. In order to focus short and low charged electron bunches down to a few μm permanent magnetic solenoids were designed, assembled and field measurements were done. Due to a shortage of space close to the operation area an in-vacuum solution has been chosen. Furthermore a two-ring design made of wedges has been preferred in terms of beam dynamic issues. To keep the field quality of a piecewise built magnet still high a sorting algorithm for the wedge arrangement including a simple magnetic field model has been developed and used for the construction of the magnets. The magnetic field of these solenoids has been measured with high precision and compared to simulations. - Highlights: • presenting a two-ring radially magnetized permanent magnetic solenoid design. • development of a analytical field description and field quality factor. • development of a sorting algorithm for permanent magnetic pieces to form a magnet. • performing a high-precision field measurement of a high gradient field.

  18. Strain-based quench detection for a solenoid superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xingzhe; Guan Mingzhi; Ma Lizhen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a non-electric quench detection method based on the strain gauge measurement of a superconducting solenoid magnet at cryogenic temperature under an intense magnetic field. Unlike the traditional voltage measurement of quench detection, the strain-based detection method utilizes low-temperature strain gauges, which evidently reduce electromagnetic noise and breakdown, to measure the magneto/thermo-mechanical behavior of the superconducting magnet during excitation. The magnet excitation, quench tests and trainings were performed on a prototype 5 T superconducting solenoid magnet. The transient strains and their abrupt changes were compared with the current, magnetic field and temperature signals collected during excitation and quench tests to indicate that the strain gauge measurements can detect the quench feature of the superconducting magnet. The proposed method is expected to be able to detect the quench of a superconducting coil independently or utilized together with other electrical methods. In addition, the axial quench propagation velocity of the solenoid is evaluated by the quench time lags among different localized strains. The propagation velocity is enhanced after repeated quench trainings. (paper)

  19. Experimental Study of an 805 MHz Cryomodule for the Rare Isotope Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Grimm, T L; Compton, C; Hartung, W; Johnson, M; Marti, F; Popielarski, J; York, R C

    2004-01-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac will use superconducting, 805 MHz, 6-cell elliptical cavities with geometric β values of 0.47, 0.61 and 0.81. Each elliptical cavity cryomodule will have four cavities [1]. Room temperature sections between each cryomodule will consist of quadrupole doublets, beam instrumentation, and vacuum systems. Michigan State University (MSU) has designed a compact cryostat that reduces the tunnel cross-section and improves the linac real estate gradient. The cold mass alignment is accomplished with a titanium rail system supported by adjustable nitronic links from the top vacuum plate, and is similar to that used for existing MSU magnet designs. The same concept has also been designed to accommodate the quarter-wave and half-wave resonators with superconducting solenoids used at lower velocity in RIA. Construction of a prototype β=0.47 cryomodule was completed in February 2004 and is presently under test in realistic operating conditions. Experimental ...

  20. Electromagnetic radiation-2450 MHz exposure causes cognition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    83

    Electromagnetic radiation-2450 MHz exposure causes cognition deficit with mitochondrial. 1 ... decrease in levels of acetylcholine, and increase in activity of acetyl ...... neuronal apoptosis and cognitive disturbances in sevoflurane or propofol ...

  1. Providing primary standard calibrations beyond 20 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickley, C J; Zeqiri, B; Robinson, S P

    2004-01-01

    The number of applications of medical ultrasound utilising frequencies in excess of 20 MHz has shown a consistent increase over recent years. Coupled with the commercial availability of wide-bandwidth hydrophones whose response extends beyond 40 MHz, this has driven a growing need to develop hydrophone calibration techniques at elevated frequencies. The current National Physical Laboratory primary standard method of calibrating hydrophones is based on an optical interferometer. This has been in operation for around 20 years and provides traceability over the frequency range of 0.3 to 20 MHz. More recently, calibrations carried out using the interferometer have been extended to 60 MHz, although the uncertainties associated with these calibrations are poor, being in excess of ±20% at high frequencies. Major contributions to the degraded calibration uncertainties arise from poor signal-to-noise at higher frequencies, the frequency response of the photodiodes used and the noise floor of the instrument. To improve the uncertainty of hydrophone calibrations above 20 MHz, it has been necessary to build and commission a new interferometer. Important features of the new primary standard are its use of a higher power laser to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, along with photodiodes whose greater bandwidth to improve the overall frequency response. This paper describes the design of key aspects of the new interferometer. It also presents some initial results of the performance assessment, including a detailed comparison of calibrations of NPL reference membrane hydrophones, undertaken using old and new interferometers for calibration up to 40 MHz

  2. D0 Central Tracking Solenoid Energization, Controls, Interlocks and Quench Protection Operating Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hance, R.

    1998-01-01

    This procedure is used when it is necessary to operate the solenoid energization, controls, interlocks and quench detection system. Note that a separate procedure exists for operating the solenoid 'cryogenic' systems. Only D0 Control Room Operators or the Project Electrical Engineer are qualified to execute these procedures or operate the solenoid system. This procedure assumes that the operator is familiar with using the Distributed Manufacturing Automation and Control Software (DMACS).

  3. A simple formula for emittance growth due to spherical aberration in a solenoid lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Phadte, D.; Patidar, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the beam dynamics in a solenoid without the paraxial approximation, including up to the fifth order term in the radial displacement. We use this analysis to derive expressions for the coefficients of spherical aberration in terms of the on-axis field profile of the solenoid. Under the thin lens approximation, a simple formula is derived for the growth of rms emittance resulting due to spherical aberration in a solenoid. (author)

  4. Generation of ten kilotesla longitudinal magnetic fields in ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Li, R.; Qiao, B.; Cao, J. M.; Cai, T. X.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2018-01-01

    Production of the huge longitudinal magnetic fields by using an ultraintense laser pulse irradiating a solenoid target is considered. Through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field up to ten kilotesla can be observed in the ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions. The finding is associated with both fast and return electron currents in the solenoid target. The huge longitudinal magnetic field is of interest for a number of impo...

  5. Design of an elliptical solenoid magnet for transverse beam matching to the spiral inflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present the design study of an elliptical solenoid magnet to be used for transverse beam matching at the input of a spiral inflector for efficient transmission. We have studied the dependence of axial field and gradients in the transverse directions of the elliptical solenoid magnet with ellipticity of the aperture. Using the beam envelope equations we have studied the feasibility of using an elliptical solenoid for transverse beam matching to the acceptance of a spiral inflector. (author)

  6. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some

  7. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-01-01

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries (1-1), but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations (1-2) provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools (1-3) contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field (1-4). Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy (1-5) and Warm Dense Matter experiments (1-6), although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca(copyright) code (1-7) and some numerical

  8. Design and fabrication of the PDX poloidal field solenoid utilizing fiberglass reinforced epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.S.C.

    1975-11-01

    This paper discusses the basic design of the Poloidal Field Solenoid Coil. It will be mainly concerned with the more unique features of the Solenoid such as the copper coil windings and the design of the epoxy-glass structural support mandrels. The center solenoid coil of the PDX machine consists of five different coil systems (OH No. 8, No. 9; NF No. 11; DF No. 7; EF Solenoid and CF No. 9). Three concentric fiberglass reinforced epoxy cylinders fabricated in-house will act as mandrels to support and to house the coils that will result as an integral unit

  9. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  10. Detection circuit of solenoid valve operation and control rod drive mechanism utilizing the circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Takehiko.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To detect the operation of a plunger and detect opening and closing operations of a solenoid valve driving device due to change in impedance of a coil for driving the solenoid valve to judge normality and abnormality of the solenoid valve, thereby increasing reliance and safety of drive and control apparatus of control rods. Structure: An arrangement comprises a drive and operation detector section wherein the operation of a solenoid driving device for controlling power supply to a coil for driving the solenoid valve to control opening and closing of the solenoid valve, and a plunger operation detector section for detecting change in impedance of the drive coil to detect that the plunger of the solenoid valve is either in the opening direction or closing direction, whereby a predetermined low voltage such as not to activate the solenoid valve even when the solenoid valve is open or closed is applied to detect a current flowing into the coil at that time, thus detecting an operating state of the plunger. (Yoshino, Y.)

  11. Analysis of electromagnetic field of direct action solenoid valve with current changing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qianfeng; Bo Hanliang; Qin Benke

    2009-01-01

    Control rod hydraulic drive mechanism(CRHDM) is a newly invented patent of Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University. The direct action solenoid valve is the key part of this technology, so the performance of the solenoid valve directly affects the function of the CRHDM. With the current and the air gap changing,the electromagnetic field of the direct action solenoid valve was analyzed using the ANSYS software,which was validated by the experiment. The result shows that the electromagnetic force of the solenoid valve increases with the current increasing or the gap between the two armatures decreasing. Further more, the working current was confirmed. (authors)

  12. What caused the failures of the solenoid valve screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassallo, T.P.; Mumford, J.R.; Hossain, F.

    2001-01-01

    At Seabrook Station on May 5,1998 following a lengthy purge of the pressurizer steam space through Containment isolation sample valve 1-RC-FV-2830, the UL status light associated with this solenoid valve did not come on when the valve was closed from the plant's main control board. The UL status light is used to confirm valve closure position to satisfy the plant's Technical Specification requirements. The incorrect valve position indication on the main control board was initially believed to have resulted from excessive heat from a failed voltage control module that did not reduce the voltage to the valve's solenoid coil. This conclusion was based on a similar event that occurred in November of 1996. Follow-up in-plant testing of the valve determined that the voltage control module had not failed and was functioning satisfactorily. Subsequent investigations determined the root cause of the event to be excessive heat-up of the valve caused by high process fluid temperature and an excessively long purge of the pressurizer. The excessive heat-up of the valve from the high temperature process fluid weakened the magnetic field strength of the valve stem magnet to the extent that the UL status light reed switch would not actuate when the valve was closed. Since the voltage control module was tested and found to be functioning properly it was not replaced. Only the UL status light reed switch was replaced with a more sensitive reed that would respond better to a reduced magnetic field strength that results from a hot magnet. During reed switch replacement, three terminal block screws in the valve housing were found fractured and three other terminal block screws fractured during determination of the electrical conductors. This paper describes the initial plant event and ensuing laboratory tests and examinations that were performed to determine the root cause of the failure of the terminal block screws from the Containment isolation sample solenoid valve. (author)

  13. Gas-mixing system for drift chambers using solenoid valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.E.; Sugano, K.; Trentlage, D.B.

    1983-04-01

    We describe an inexpensive system for mixing argon and ethane drift chamber gas which is used for the E-605 experiment at Fermilab. This system is based on the idea of intermittent mixing of gases with fixed mixing flow rates. A dual-action pressure switch senses the pressure in a mixed gas reservoir tank and operates solenoid valves to control mixing action and regulate reservoir pressure. This system has the advantages that simple controls accurately regulate the mixing ratio and that the mixing ratio is nearly flow rate independent. We also report the results of the gas analysis of various samplings, and the reliability of the system in long-term running

  14. Test Results for HINS Focusing Solenoids at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Orris, D.F.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    A focusing lens R&D program is close to completion and industrial production of magnets has begun. Two types of magnets are being built for use in the room temperature RF section at the front end of a superconducting H-minus linac of a High Intensity Neutrino Source. All of the magnets are designed as a solenoid with bucking coils to cancel the field in the vicinity of adjacent RF cavities, and one type incorporates steering dipole corrector coils. We present a summary of the predicted and measured quench and magnetic properties for both R&D and production device samples that have been tested at Fermilab.

  15. Solenoid fringe field compensation for the Cluster Klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Optimization of the solenoid pancake currents so as to have a uniform axial magnetic field over an extended volume, is very important for the successful operation of the Cluster Klystron. By boosting the first and the last pancake currents by 35%, a uniform field Br/Bz ≤ 0.1% at radius R ≤ 2 cm can be extended from ± 7 cm to ± 16 cm. The result confirms simulations and the requirements for a 3-beam Cluster Klystron Experiment are achieved

  16. A spectrometer using one or two superconducting coaxial solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schapira, J.P.; Gales, S.; Laurent, J.P.

    1979-06-01

    A set of two superconducting solenoidal coils which are presently under construction at the Orsay I.P.N. is described. Because of its optical properties, the system can be used as spectrometer: focusing properties with small geometrical aberrations allowing large solid angles to be used together with good transmission and isochronism. Various types of experiments can be envisaged with such a device: angular correlation at zero degree, study of rare events like exotic reactions, time of flight for mass identification and rapid (much less than 1 μs) and efficient collection of radioactive nuclei for subsequent spectroscopy measurements [fr

  17. Mechanical design of a 250 kilogauss solenoidal magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1975-12-01

    The mechanical design and construction of a 5 cm bore, 23 cm long solenoidal magnet operated at 250 kilogauss is described. The magnet provides confining field for a plasma heated by a CO 2 laser. Radial diagnostic ports with a clear aperture of 0.41 cm allow viewing access near the magnet midplane. The on-axis field homogeneity is within 5 percent over a central length of 12 cm. The magnet sustained 500 to 1000 pulses at the highest field levels before catastrophic failure

  18. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  19. An earthworm-like actuator using segmented solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Bu Hyun; Choi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Seung-Yop; Bang, Young-Bong

    2011-01-01

    A biomimetic actuator is developed using four segmented solenoids mimicking earthworm locomotion. The proposed actuator not only has a simple structure composed of cores and coils, but also enables bi-directional actuation and high speed locomotion regardless of friction conditions. We have implemented theoretical analysis to design the optimal profiles of input current signal for maximum speed and predict the output force and stroke. Experiments using a prototype show that the earthworm-like actuator travels with a speed above 60 mm s −1 regardless of friction conditions

  20. HB+ prepares for insertion into the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Dave Barney, CERN

    2006-01-01

    With calibration of the first half of the barrel Hadron Calorimeter (HB+) complete (using a radioactive source), preparations begin for its insertion into the solenoid for the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC). It was moved out of its alcove at the beginning of March - a non-trivial (but completely successful) operation due to the proximity of one of the barrel yoke rings (YB+1). The other half of the barrel Hadron Calorimeter (HB-) and one of the endcaps (HE+) should also be calibrated before the MTCC.

  1. Analysis of an adjustable field permanent magnet solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris-Mog, T.; Burns, M.; Chavez, A.; Schillig, J.

    2017-10-01

    A feasibility study has been performed on an adjustable-field permanent magnet (PM) solenoid concept in an effort to reduce the dependence that linear induction accelerators have on large direct current power supplies and associated cooling systems. The concept relies on the ability to reorient sections of the PMs and thus redirect their magnetization vector to either add to or subtract from the on-axis magnetic field. This study concentrated on the focal strengths and emittance growths for two different designs, both with 19 cm bore diameters extending 53 cm in length. The first design is expected to produce peak magnetic fields ranging from 260 to 900 G (0.026 to 0.09 T) while the second design is expected to produce peak magnetic fields ranging from 580 to 2100 G (0.058 to 0.21 T). Although the PM configuration generates a variable magnetic field and the torques acting on PMs within the assembly appear manageable, the emittance growth is larger than that of a DC solenoid.

  2. Design verification methodology for a solenoid valve for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Dae; Lim, Byung Ju; Chun, Kyung Yul

    2015-01-01

    Solenoid operated valves (SOV) are widely used in many applications due to their fast dynamic responses, cost effectiveness, and less contamination sensitive characteristics. In this paper, we tried to provide a convenient method of design verification of SOV to design engineers who depend on their experiences and experiment during design and development process of SOV. First, we summarize a detailed procedure for designing SOVs for industrial applications. All of the design constraints are defined in the first step of the design, and then the detail design procedure is presented based on design experiences as well as various physical and electromagnetic relationships. Secondly, we have suggested a verification method of this design using theoretical relationships, which enables optimal design of SOV from a point of view of safety factor of design attraction force. Lastly, experimental performance tests using several prototypes manufactured based on this design method show that the suggested design verification methodology is appropriate for designing new models of solenoids. We believe that this verification process is novel logic and useful to save time and expenses during development of SOV because verification tests with manufactured specimen may be substituted partly by this verification methodology.

  3. Laser heated solenoid as a neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Rose, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual designs are presented for a radiation test facility based on a laser heated plasma confined in a straight solenoid. The thin plasma column, a few meters in length and less than a centimeter in diameter, serves as a line source of neutrons. Test samples are located within or just behind the plasma tube, at a radius of 1-2 cm from the axis. The plasma is heated by an axially-directed powerful long-wavelength laser beam. The plasma is confined radially in the intense magnetic field supplied by a pulsed solenoid surrounding the plasma tube. The facility is pulsed many times a second to achieve a high time-averaged neutron flux on the test samples. Based on component performance achievable in the near term (e.g., magnetic field, laser pulse energy) and assuming classical physical processes, it appears that average fluxes of 10 13 to 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 -sec can be achieved in such a device. The most severe technical problems in such a facility appear to be rapid pulsing design and lifetime of some electrical and laser components

  4. Increase in the temperature of a laser plasma formed by two-frequency UV - IR irradiation of metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, A A; Grasyuk, Arkadii Z; Efimovskii, S V; Kurbasov, Sergei V; Losev, Leonid L; Soskov, V I

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of a laser plasma formed by successive irradiation of a metal target with 30-ps UV and IR laser pulses. The UV prepulse, of 266 nm wavelength, was of relatively low intensity (∼ 10 12 W cm -2 ), whereas the intensity of an IR pulse, of 10.6 μm wavelength, was considerably higher (∼3 x 10 14 W cm -2 ) and it was delayed by 0 - 6 ns (the optimal delay was 2 ns). Such two-frequency UV - IR irradiation produced a laser plasma with an electron temperature 5 times higher than that of a plasma created by singe-frequency IR pulses of the same (∼3 x 10 14 W cm -2 ) intensity. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  5. Derivation of magnetic Coulomb's law for thin, semi-infinite solenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Masao

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the magnetic force between thin, semi-infinite solenoids obeys a Coulomb-type law, which corresponds to that for magnetic monopoles placed at the end points of each solenoid. We derive the magnetic Coulomb law from the basic principles of electromagnetism, namely from the Maxwell equations and the Lorentz force.

  6. Plasma heating in a long solenoid by a laser or a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1975-01-01

    Advances in the technology of a large energy laser and/or relativistic electron beam (REB) generator have made it possible to seriously consider a long solenoid reactor concept. This concept has been reviewed. The physical problems in the plasma heating of the long solenoid by a laser or a REB are studied

  7. BLAZAR SPECTRAL PROPERTIES AT 74 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Paggi, A.; D' Abrusco, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Blazars are the most extreme class of active galactic nuclei. Despite a previous investigation at 102 MHz for a small sample of BL Lac objects and our recent analysis of blazars detected in the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, a systematic study of the blazar spectral properties at frequencies below 100 MHz has been never carried out. In this paper, we present the first analysis of the radio spectral behavior of blazars based on the recent Very Large Array Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) at 74 MHz. We search for blazar counterparts in the VLSS catalog, confirming that they are detected at 74 MHz. We then show that blazars present radio-flat spectra (i.e., radio spectral indices of ∼0.5) when evaluated, which also about an order of magnitude in frequency lower than previous analyses. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the blazars-radio galaxies connection since the low-frequency radio data provide a new diagnostic tool to verify the expectations of the unification scenario for radio-loud active galaxies.

  8. A large superconducting thin solenoid for the STAR experiment at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1992-06-01

    This Report describes the 4.4 meter, warm bore diameter, thin superconducting solenoid, for the proposed STAR experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The STAR solenoid will generate a very uniform central magnetic induction of 0.5 T within a space which is 4.0 meters in diameter by 4.2 meters long. The solenoid and its cryostat will be 0.7 radiation lengths thick over a length of 5.45 meters, about the center of the magnet making it the largest solenoid less than one radiation length to be built. This report describes a proposed design for the solenoid and cryostat, its flux return iron, its cryogenic system and its power supply and quench protection system

  9. Performance of a proximity cryogenic system for the ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Y; Makida, Y; Kondo, Y; Kawai, M; Aoki, K; Haruyama, T; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Wachi, Y; Mine, S; Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Passardi, Giorgio; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet has been designed and constructed as a collaborative work between KEK and CERN for the ATLAS experiment in the LHC project The solenoid provides an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla at the center of the tracking volume of the ATLAS detector. The solenoid is installed in a common cryostat of a liquid-argon calorimeter in order to minimize the mass of the cryostat wall. The coil is cooled indirectly by using two-phase helium flow in a pair of serpentine cooling line. The cryogen is supplied by the ATLAS cryogenic plant, which also supplies helium to the Toroid magnet systems. The proximity cryogenic system for the solenoid has two major components: a control dewar and a valve unit In addition, a programmable logic controller, PLC, was prepared for the automatic operation and solenoid test in Japan. This paper describes the design of the proximity cryogenic system and results of the performance test. (7 refs).

  10. Detector solenoid compensation in the PEP-II B-Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosochkov, Y.; Cai, Y.; Irwin, J.; Sullivan, M.

    1995-01-01

    The PEP-II experimental detector includes a strong 1.5 T solenoid field in the interaction region (IR). With the fringe fields, the solenoid extends over a range of 6 m. Additional complications are that (1) it is displaced longitudinally from the interaction point (IP) by about 40 cm, (2) neither beam is parallel to the solenoid axis, and (3) the solenoid overlaps a dipole and a quadrupole on either side of the IP. In each half IR the correction system includes a set of skew quadrupoles, dipole correctors and normal quadrupoles to independently compensate the coupling, orbit perturbation, dispersion and focusing effect produced by the solenoid. The correction schemes for the Low Energy Ring (LER) and for the High Energy Ring (HER) are described, and the impact on the dynamic aperture is evaluated

  11. Performance of Nb3Sn multifilamentary superconductors in solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, W.B.; Suenaga, M.; Robins, K.E.

    High current Nb 3 Sn multifilamentary conductors have been formed by heat treating cables braided from three types of composite wire. In the simplest configuration, these wires contain niobium filaments in a pure copper matrix. After braiding the conductor is coated with a layer of tin which diffuses through the copper during heat treatment to form Nb 3 S n filaments. The second configuration is made from wires containing niobium filaments in a copper-tin alloy and requires only heat treatment to form the Nb 3 Sn filaments. The third type of braid has wires which consist of groups of niobium filaments in the bronze matrix which are in turn in a copper matrix. Tantalum barriers surround each group of filaments to prevent the tin from contaminating the pure copper matrix. The cables have been wound into solenoids after heat treatment and the effect of mechanical handling was studied by monitoring the resistive voltage distribution in the coils. (U.S.)

  12. submitter Starting Manufacture of the ITER Central Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Libeyre, P; Dolgetta, N; Gaxiola, E; Jong, C; Lyraud, C; Mitchell, N; Journeaux, J Y; Vollmann, T; Evans, D; Sgobba, S; Langeslag, S; Reiersen, W; Martovetsky, N; Everitt, D; Hatfield, D; Rosenblad, P; Litherland, S; Freudenberg, K; Myatt, L; Smith, J; Brazelton, C; Abbott, R; Daubert, J; Rackers, K; Nentwich, T

    2016-01-01

    The central solenoid (CS) is a key component of the ITER magnet system to provide the magnetic flux swing required to drive induced plasma current up to 15 MA. The manufacture of its different subcomponents has now started, following completion of the design analyses and achievement of the qualification of the manufacturing procedures. A comprehensive set of analyses has been produced to demonstrate that the CS final design meets all requirements. This includes in particular structural analyses carried out with different finite-element models and addressing normal and fault conditions. Following the Final Design Review, held in November 2013, and the subsequent design modifications, the analyses were updated for consistency with the final design details and provide evidence that the Magnet Structural Design Criteria are fully met. Before starting any manufacturing activity of a CS component, a corresponding dedicated qualification program has been carried out. This includes manufacture of mockups using the re...

  13. Quench protection analysis of the Mu2e production solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashikhin, Vadim; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nikolai; Lamm, Michael; Nicol, Thomas; Orris, Darryl; Page, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The Mu2e magnet system consists of three large superconducting solenoids. In case of a quench, the stored magnetic energy is extracted to an external dump circuit. However, because of the fast current decay, a significant fraction of the energy dissipates inside of the cryostat in the coil support shells made of structural aluminum, and in the radiation shield. A 3D finite-element model of the complete cold-mass was created in order to simulate the quench development and understand the role of the quench-back. The simulation results are reported at the normal and non-standard operating conditions

  14. Quench protection analysis of the Mu2e production solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikhin, Vadim; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nikolai; Lamm, Michael; Nicol, Thomas; Orris, Darryl; Page, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The Mu2e magnet system consists of three large superconducting solenoids. In case of a quench, the stored magnetic energy is extracted to an external dump circuit. However, because of the fast current decay, a significant fraction of the energy dissipates inside of the cryostat in the coil support shells made of structural aluminum, and in the radiation shield. A 3D finite-element model of the complete cold-mass was created in order to simulate the quench development and understand the role of the quench-back. The simulation results are reported at the normal and non-standard operating conditions.

  15. Testing of the superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab collider detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Holmes, C.N.; Kephart, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    The 3 m phi x 5 m long x 1.5 T superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector has been installed at Fermilab and was tested in early 1985 with a dedicated refrigeration system. The refrigerator and 5.6-Mg magnet cold mass were cooled to 5 K in 210 hours. After testing at low currents, the magnet was charged to the design current of 5 kA in 5-MJ steps. During a 390 A/min charge a spontaneous quench occurred at 4.5 kA due to insufficient liquid helium flow. Three other quenches occurred during ''slow'' discharges which were nevertheless fast enough to cause high eddy current heating in the outer support cylinder. Quench behavior is well understood and the magnet is now quite reliable

  16. Start-up of spherical tokamak without a center solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi

    2012-01-01

    For low-aspect tokamak reactors, spherical tokamak reactors, ST-type FESF/CTFs, it is essential to remove or minimize a central solenoid (CS). Even with the minimized CS, non-inductive start up of the plasma current is required. Rapid increase in the spontaneous plasma current at the final stage of current start-up drives ignition. At the initial stage, formation of plasma and magnetic surfaces are required. As non-inductive plasma start-up scenarios, ECH/ECCD, LHCD, HHFW, DC HELICITY injection, plasma merging and NBI have been studied. In the present article, the present status and future prospect of experimental and theoretical works on these subjects. (author)

  17. Behaviour of large cylindrical drift chambers in a superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, W. de; Fues, W.; Grindhammer, G.; Kotthaus, R.; Lierl, H.; Moss, L.

    1980-04-01

    We describe the construction and behaviour of a set of cylindrical drift chambers operating inside a superconducting solenoid with a central magnetic field of 1.3 T. The chambers are part of the 4 π detector CELLO at the e + e - storage ring PETRA in Hamburg. The chambers were designed without field shaping to keep them as simple as possible. In order to parametrize accurately the nonlinear space-time relation, we used a computer simulation of the drift process in inhomogenous electric and magnetic fields. With such a parametrization we achieved a resolution of 210 μm, averaged over the whole drift cell and angles of incidence up to 30 0 . (orig.)

  18. Design of the pancake-winding central solenoid coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Masataka; Tsuji, Hirosi

    1995-01-01

    There was a debate over whether a pancake-winding or layer-winding technique is more appropriate for the Central Solenoid (CS) coil for ITER superconducting magnet. The layer-winding CS has the advantage of homogeneous winding supporting the TF centering force without weak joints, but has many difficulties during manufacturing and quality control. On other hand, the pancake-winding has the advantage of better quality control during manufacturing and module testing but has difficulties with joints and feeders, and pipes located in the load path of the bucking force from the toroidal field coils. The compact joints, reinforcement by preformed amour, sharp bending, and double seals are applied to the design of pancake-winding CS coil and demonstrated by hardware developments. The pancake-winding CS coil by using modified existing technology is compatible with the bucking concept of the ITER magnet system. (author)

  19. Conceptual fusion reactor designs based on the laser heat solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the laser heated solenoid (LHS) as an approach to fusion and fusion-fission commercial power generation has been examined. The LHS concept is based on magnetic confinement of a long slender plasma column which is partly heated by the axially directed beam from a powerful long wavelength laser. As a pure fusion concept, the LHS configurations studied so far are characterized by fairly difficult engineering constraints, particularly on the magnet, a large laser, and a marginally acceptable system energy balance. As a fusion-fission system, however, the LHS is capable of a very attractive energy balance, has much more relaxed engineering constraints, requires a relatively modest laser, and as such holds great potential as a power generator and fissile fuel breeding scheme

  20. Fusion--fission hybrid reactors based on the laser solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.; Quimby, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion-fission reactors, based on the laser solenoid concept, can be much smaller in scale than their pure fusion counterparts, with moderate first-wall loading and rapid breeding capabilities (1 to 3 tonnes/yr), and can be designed successfully on the basis of classical plasma transport properties and free-streaming end-loss. Preliminary design information is presented for such systems, including the first wall, pulse coil, blanket, superconductors, laser optics, and power supplies, accounting for the desired reactor performance and other physics and engineering constraints. Self-consistent point designs for first and second generation reactors are discussed which illustrate the reactor size, performance, component parameters, and the level of technological development required

  1. Alternative connections for the large MFTF-B solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are a set of twelve closely coupled, large superconducting magnets with similar but not exactly equal currents. Alternative methods of connecting them to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for operating conditions and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the current induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include separate power supplies, combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, series dump resistors and combinations of these. A new circuit that contains coupling resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed in detail

  2. Construction of compact FEM using solenoid-induced helical wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Mima, K.; Nakai, S.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of compact Free-Electron Maser (FEM) has been designed for the operation in a usual small laboratory which does not have electric source capacity available enough. The electron energy is 60-120 keV. As it is lower, stronger guiding magnetic field is necessary in addition to wiggler field. To fulfil this condition a solenoid-induced helical wiggler is applied from the viewpoint of saving the electric power of restricted source capacity. The wiggler, for example, with the period of 12 mm creates the field of 92 G in the guiding field of 3.2 kG. The whole system of FEM has been just constructed in a small-scale laboratory. It is so small to occupy the area of 0.7x2.9 m 2

  3. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodak, Andrei, E-mail: akhodak@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Titus, Peter [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Modified design of coil for testing ITER superconducting cable is presented. • Numerical analysis allowed design verification. • Three-dimensional current sharing temperature distributions are obtained from the results. - Abstract: The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagnetic simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4 K, no current, (3) temperature 4 K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4 K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4 K, no current, and temperature 4 K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor

  4. Designing a fractal antenna of 2400 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Hamburger, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The design of a fractal antenna with 2400 MHz of frequency has been studied. The fractal used is described by Waclaw Spierpi.ski. The initial figure, also known as seed, is divided using equilateral triangles with the aim of obtaining a perimeter similar to a meaningful portion of wave length. The use of λ to establish an ideal perimeter has reduced the radiation resistance. The adequate number of iterations needed to design the antenna is calculated based on λ. (author) [es

  5. Design of 325 MHz spoke cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Peng; Huang Hong; Dai Jianping; Zu Guoquan; Li Han

    2012-01-01

    Spoke cavity can be used in the low-energy section of the proton accelerator. It has many significant advantages: compact structure, high value of R/Q, etc. The ADS (Accelerator Driven System) project will adopt many spoke cavities with different β values. Therefore, IHEP has began the research of β=0.14, 325 MHz spoke cavity. In this pa per, the dimensions, RF performances and mechanical properties of it are studied. (authors)

  6. Heat transfer enhancement using 2MHz ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulliard-Sauret, Odin; Ferrouillat, Sebastien; Vignal, Laure; Memponteil, Alain; Gondrexon, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    The present work focuses on possible heat transfer enhancement from a heating plate towards tap water in forced convection by means of 2MHz ultrasound. The thermal approach allows to observe the increase of local convective heat transfer coefficients in the presence of ultrasound and to deduce a correlation between ultrasound power and Nusselt number. Heat transfer coefficient under ultrasound remains constant while heat transfer coefficient under silent conditions increases with Reynolds number from 900 up to 5000. Therefore, heat transfer enhancement factor ranges from 25% up to 90% for the same energy conditions (supplied ultrasonic power=110W and supplied thermal power=450W). In the same time cavitational activity due to 2MHz ultrasound emission was characterized from mechanical and chemical viewpoints without significant results. At least, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements have been performed in order to investigate hydrodynamic modifications due to the presence of 2MHz ultrasound. It was therefore possible to propose a better understanding of heat transfer enhancement mechanism with high frequency ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A D; Butenko, A V; Kekelidze, V D; Mikhaylov, V A; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yu N; Kondratenko, A M

    2016-01-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented. (paper)

  8. Spin Transparency Mode in the NICA Collider with Solenoid Siberian Snakes for Proton and Deuteron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2017-12-01

    Two solenoid Siberian Snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in spin transparency mode of the NICA collider. The snake solenoids with a total field integral of 2×50 T·m are placed into the straight sections of the NICA collider. It allows one to control polarization of protons and deuterons up to 13.5 GeV/c and 4 GeV/c respectively. The snakes introduce a strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Snakes are presented.

  9. Computer simulations of quench properties of thin, large superconducting solenoid magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Takeshi; Mori, Shigeki; Noguchi, Masaharu

    1983-01-01

    Measured quench data of a 1 m diameter x 1 m thin superconducting solenoid magnet with a single layer aluminum-stabilized NbTi/Cu superconductor of 269 turns were fitted by computer simulations using the one-dimensional approximation. Parameters obtained were used to study quench properties of a 3 m diameter x 5 m (1.5 Tesla) thin superconducting solenoid magnet with a stored magnetic energy of 30 x 10 6 J. Conductor dimensions with which the solenoid could be built substantially safe for the full field quench were optimized. (author)

  10. LIL-W: Positron conversion target and solenoid (pictures 01 and 04).

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    In the direction of the beam, from right to left: a steering dipole (DHZ.25); the arm, at 45 deg, of a wire scanner which measures beam size; the conversion target, housed in the small tank with a window, where positrons are produced; immediately afterwards, invisible inside the vacuum chamber, is a pulsed solenoid to focus the emerging positrons; finally, a large solenoid, consisting of 3 pancakes, further focuses the positrons. Towards the left, the linac LIL-W, its accelerating structure hidden under a continuous outer solenoid mantle.

  11. 47 CFR 90.355 - LMS operations below 512 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Intelligent Transportation Systems Radio Service § 90.355 LMS... LMS station and the nearest co-channel base station of another licensee operating a voice system is 75... MHz, 150-170 MHz, and 450-512 MHz bands may use either base-mobile frequencies currently assigned the...

  12. Development of an automatic frequency control system for an X-band (=9300 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Sungsu, E-mail: sscha@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byung Cheol [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung Dal [Radiation Technology eXcellence(RTX), Daejeon 34025 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Hyun [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University(SKKU), Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Buaphad, Pikad [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Radiation Technology eXcellence(RTX), Daejeon 34025 (Korea, Republic of); Accelerator and Nuclear Fusion Physical Engineering, University of Science and Technology(UST), Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-21

    KAERI is developing a 6 MeV X-band radio frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for medical purposes. The proposed X-band accelerator consists of an e-gun, an accelerating structure, two solenoid magnets, two steering magnets, a magnetron, a modulator, and an automatic frequency control (AFC) system. The accelerating structure of the component consists of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). Therefore, the ambient temperature changes the volume, and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure also changes. If the RF frequency of a 9300 MHz magnetron and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure do not match, it can degrade the performance. That is, it will decrease the output power, lower the beam current, decrease the X-ray dose rate, increase the reflection power, and result in unstable operation of the accelerator. Accelerator operation should be possible at any time during all four seasons. To prevent humans from being exposed to radiation when it is operated, the accelerator should also be operable through remote monitoring and remote control. Therefore, the AFC system is designed to meet these requirements; it is configured based on the concept of a phase-locked loop (PLL) model, which includes an RF section, an intermediate frequency (IF) [1-3] section, and a local oscillator (LO) section. Some resonance frequency controllers use a DC motor, chain, and potentiometer to store the position and tune the frequency [4,5]. Our AFC system uses a step motor to tune the RF frequency of the magnetron. The maximum tuning turn number of our magnetron frequency tuning shaft is ten. Since the RF frequency of our magnetron is 9300±25 MHz, it gives 5 MHz (∵±25 MHz/10 turns → 50 MHz/10 turns =5 MHz/turn) frequency tuning per turn. The rotation angle of our step motor is 0.72° per step and the total step number per one rotation is 360°/0.72°=500 steps. Therefore, the tuning range per step is 10 kHz/step (=5 MHz per turn/500 steps per

  13. Development of an automatic frequency control system for an X-band (=9300 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Buaphad, Pikad

    2017-05-01

    KAERI is developing a 6 MeV X-band radio frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for medical purposes. The proposed X-band accelerator consists of an e-gun, an accelerating structure, two solenoid magnets, two steering magnets, a magnetron, a modulator, and an automatic frequency control (AFC) system. The accelerating structure of the component consists of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). Therefore, the ambient temperature changes the volume, and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure also changes. If the RF frequency of a 9300 MHz magnetron and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure do not match, it can degrade the performance. That is, it will decrease the output power, lower the beam current, decrease the X-ray dose rate, increase the reflection power, and result in unstable operation of the accelerator. Accelerator operation should be possible at any time during all four seasons. To prevent humans from being exposed to radiation when it is operated, the accelerator should also be operable through remote monitoring and remote control. Therefore, the AFC system is designed to meet these requirements; it is configured based on the concept of a phase-locked loop (PLL) model, which includes an RF section, an intermediate frequency (IF) [1-3] section, and a local oscillator (LO) section. Some resonance frequency controllers use a DC motor, chain, and potentiometer to store the position and tune the frequency [4,5]. Our AFC system uses a step motor to tune the RF frequency of the magnetron. The maximum tuning turn number of our magnetron frequency tuning shaft is ten. Since the RF frequency of our magnetron is 9300±25 MHz, it gives 5 MHz (∵±25 MHz/10 turns → 50 MHz/10 turns =5 MHz/turn) frequency tuning per turn. The rotation angle of our step motor is 0.72° per step and the total step number per one rotation is 360°/0.72°=500 steps. Therefore, the tuning range per step is 10 kHz/step (=5 MHz per turn/500 steps per

  14. Development of an automatic frequency control system for an X-band (=9300 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Buaphad, Pikad

    2017-01-01

    KAERI is developing a 6 MeV X-band radio frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for medical purposes. The proposed X-band accelerator consists of an e-gun, an accelerating structure, two solenoid magnets, two steering magnets, a magnetron, a modulator, and an automatic frequency control (AFC) system. The accelerating structure of the component consists of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). Therefore, the ambient temperature changes the volume, and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure also changes. If the RF frequency of a 9300 MHz magnetron and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure do not match, it can degrade the performance. That is, it will decrease the output power, lower the beam current, decrease the X-ray dose rate, increase the reflection power, and result in unstable operation of the accelerator. Accelerator operation should be possible at any time during all four seasons. To prevent humans from being exposed to radiation when it is operated, the accelerator should also be operable through remote monitoring and remote control. Therefore, the AFC system is designed to meet these requirements; it is configured based on the concept of a phase-locked loop (PLL) model, which includes an RF section, an intermediate frequency (IF) [1-3] section, and a local oscillator (LO) section. Some resonance frequency controllers use a DC motor, chain, and potentiometer to store the position and tune the frequency [4,5]. Our AFC system uses a step motor to tune the RF frequency of the magnetron. The maximum tuning turn number of our magnetron frequency tuning shaft is ten. Since the RF frequency of our magnetron is 9300±25 MHz, it gives 5 MHz (∵±25 MHz/10 turns → 50 MHz/10 turns =5 MHz/turn) frequency tuning per turn. The rotation angle of our step motor is 0.72° per step and the total step number per one rotation is 360°/0.72°=500 steps. Therefore, the tuning range per step is 10 kHz/step (=5 MHz per turn/500 steps per

  15. Design of new central solenoid for SST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh; Raj, Piyush; Tanna, V. L.; Khan, Ziauddin; Roy, Swati; Santra, Prosenjit; Biswas, Prabal; Sharma, A. N.; Khristi, Yohan; Kanaber, Deven; Varmora, Pankaj

    2017-04-01

    The key role of central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼ 655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼ 0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼ 0.3 volt/m. The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb3Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The interlayer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) terminal praying hand joints at 14 kA at 4.5 K has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼ 3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼ 10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K shield respectively

  16. Design of new central solenoid for SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh; Raj, Piyush; Tanna, V L; Khan, Ziauddin; Roy, Swati; Santra, Prosenjit; Biswas, Prabal; Sharma, A N; Khristi, Yohan; Kanaber, Deven; Varmora, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    The key role of central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼ 655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼ 0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼ 0.3 volt/m. The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb3Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The interlayer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) terminal praying hand joints at 14 kA at 4.5 K has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼ 3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼ 10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K shield respectively

  17. Design of new superconducting central solenoid of SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    The key role of the central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current for longer duration. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼0.3 volt/m.The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb 3 Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The inter-layer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) at 14 kA @ 4.5 K terminal praying hand joints has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K

  18. Influence of non-thermal plasma forming gases on improvement of surface properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyaraj, K. Navaneetha, E-mail: dr.knpr@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L and T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Deshmukh, R.R. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Ruzybayev, Inci; Shah, S. Ismat [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, 208 Dupont Hall, Newark, NJ (United States); Su, Pi-Guey [Department of Chemistry, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Halleluyah, Jr. mercy; Halim, Ahmad Sukari [School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2014-07-01

    Owing to the superior physico-chemical properties, the low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been widely used in the various industrial applications; especially in biomedical field for artificial organs, medical devices and disposable clinical apparatus. However, the poor anticoagulation property is one of the main drawbacks of the LDPE due to its poor surface properties. Therefore, in this paper we present the effect of plasma forming gases such as argon (Ar), oxygen (O{sub 2}), air and argon-oxygen (Ar + O{sub 2}) mixture on improvement of the surfaces properties of LDPE film using direct current (dc) excited glow discharge plasma. Contact angle with evaluation of surface energy, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to examine the change in surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition and surface topography, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic recovery of the plasma treated LDPE was analyzed using ageing effect under different storage condition i.e. in air and water. The adhesive strength of the LDPE films was determined using T-peel test. In vitro tests were used to examine the blood compatibility of the surface modified LDPE films. It has been found that the hydrophilicity of the various plasma treated LDPE films was improved significantly due to the formation of oxygen containing polar groups such as OH, COO, C-O, C=O as confirmed by contact angle and XPS analysis. AFM revealed the changes in surface topography of plasma processed films. The gas mixture Ar + O{sub 2} plasma influenced the remarkable improvement on the surface properties of a LDPE film compared with other gaseous plasmas. These physiochemical changes induced by the plasma on the surface facilitate to improve the adhesive strength and blood compatibility.

  19. Influence of non-thermal plasma forming gases on improvement of surface properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandiyaraj, K. Navaneetha; Deshmukh, R.R.; Ruzybayev, Inci; Shah, S. Ismat; Su, Pi-Guey; Halleluyah, Jr. mercy; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the superior physico-chemical properties, the low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been widely used in the various industrial applications; especially in biomedical field for artificial organs, medical devices and disposable clinical apparatus. However, the poor anticoagulation property is one of the main drawbacks of the LDPE due to its poor surface properties. Therefore, in this paper we present the effect of plasma forming gases such as argon (Ar), oxygen (O 2 ), air and argon-oxygen (Ar + O 2 ) mixture on improvement of the surfaces properties of LDPE film using direct current (dc) excited glow discharge plasma. Contact angle with evaluation of surface energy, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to examine the change in surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition and surface topography, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic recovery of the plasma treated LDPE was analyzed using ageing effect under different storage condition i.e. in air and water. The adhesive strength of the LDPE films was determined using T-peel test. In vitro tests were used to examine the blood compatibility of the surface modified LDPE films. It has been found that the hydrophilicity of the various plasma treated LDPE films was improved significantly due to the formation of oxygen containing polar groups such as OH, COO, C-O, C=O as confirmed by contact angle and XPS analysis. AFM revealed the changes in surface topography of plasma processed films. The gas mixture Ar + O 2 plasma influenced the remarkable improvement on the surface properties of a LDPE film compared with other gaseous plasmas. These physiochemical changes induced by the plasma on the surface facilitate to improve the adhesive strength and blood compatibility.

  20. The influence of the iron shield of the solenoid on spin tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the iron shield of the solenoid on spin tracking is studied in this paper. In the case of the 200 MeV proton, the study has been numerically done in the ZGOUBI code. The distribution of the magnetic field was done by POISSON. We have come to the conclusion that the influence of the solenoid’s shielding on spin tracking is the same at its entrance and exit and that is directly proportional to the intensity of the magnetic induction B on the axis of the solenoid. We have also determined that the influence of the solenoid’s shielding is much stronger on transversal components of the spin than on its longitudinal component. The differences between components of the spin for the shielded and not-shielded solenoid diminish with the in crease in the distance from the solenoid.

  1. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC. A Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddo, M.E.; Bielick, E.; Dawson, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others; The STAR EMC Collaboration

    1993-09-22

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding.

  2. Proceedings of the international workshop on solenoidal detectors for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Fumio; Hasegawa, Katsuo

    1990-07-01

    This issue is the collection of the papers presented at the International Workshop on solenoidal detectors for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The 48 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D J; Carter, I P; Dasgupta, M; Simpson, E C; Cook, K J; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D H; Williams, E

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University. (paper)

  4. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlwend, J.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation

  5. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    CERN Document Server

    Inntjore Levinsen, Y.; Tomás, Rogelio; Schulte, Daniel

    2014-05-27

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of {\\sigma} = 1 nm vertically and {\\sigma} = 45 nm horizontally. Given the small and very flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded from the impact of the experimental solenoid field in combination with a large crossing angle. Main effects include y-x'-coupling and increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field, increases the beam emittance. A detailed study of the impact from a realistic solenoid field and the associated correction techniques for the CLIC Final Focus is presented. In particular, the impact of techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions due to the detector solenoid main field and its overlap with the final focus magnets are shown. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR has been evaluated, and found to...

  6. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harres, K; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Nuernberg, F; Otten, A; Schuetrumpf, J; Roth, M [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Tauschwitz, A; Bagnoud, V [GSI - Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Plasmaphysik and PHELIX, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Daido, H; Tampo, M [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa-city, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); Schollmeier, M, E-mail: k.harres@gsi.d [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM 87185 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 10{sup 12} particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  7. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harres, K; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Nuernberg, F; Otten, A; Schuetrumpf, J; Roth, M; Tauschwitz, A; Bagnoud, V; Daido, H; Tampo, M; Schollmeier, M

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 10 12 particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  8. Confinement of laser plasma by solenoidal field for laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, M.; Kanesue, T.; Kondo, K.; Dabrowski, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laser ion source can provide high current, highly charged ions with a simple structure. However, it was not easy to control the ion pulse width. To provide a longer ion beam pulse, the plasma drift length, which is the distance between laser target and extraction point, has to be extended and as a result the plasma is diluted severely. Previously, we applied a solenoid field to prevent reduction of ion density at the extraction point. Although a current enhancement by a solenoid field was observed, plasma behavior after a solenoid magnet was unclear because plasma behavior can be different from usual ion beam dynamics. We measured a transverse ion distribution along the beam axis to understand plasma motion in the presence of a solenoid field.

  9. Non-inductive Solenoid-less Plasma Current Start-up in NSTX Using Transient CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, R.; Mueller, D.; Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.; Bell, M.G.; Ono, M.; Bigelow, T.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, K.C.; Maqueda, R.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, L.

    2007-01-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has been successfully used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for a demonstration of closed flux current generation without the use of the central solenoid. The favorable properties of the Spherical Torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. However, small aspect ratio devices have very restricted space for a substantial central solenoid. Thus methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. CHI is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma startup in a ST. The method has now produced closed flux current up to 160 kA verifying the high current capability of this method in a large ST built with conventional tokamak components.

  10. 47 CFR 15.242 - Operation in the bands 174-216 MHz and 470-668 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the bands 174-216 MHz and 470-668... bands 174-216 MHz and 470-668 MHz. (a) The marketing and operation of intentional radiators under the... services, facilities, and beds for use beyond 24 hours in rendering medical treatment and institutions and...

  11. Solenoid-free plasma startup in NSTX using transient CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.; Mueller, D.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, L.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R.; Nagata, M.; Sabbagh, S.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments in NSTX have now demonstrated the coupling of toroidal plasmas produced by the technique of coaxial helicity injection (CHI) to inductive sustainment and ramp-up of the toroidal plasma current. In these discharges, the central Ohmic transformer was used to apply an inductive loop voltage to discharges with a toroidal current of about 100 kA created by CHI. The coupled discharges have ramped up to >700 kA and transitioned into an H-mode demonstrating compatibility of this startup method with conventional operation. The electron temperature in the coupled discharges reached over 800 eV and the resulting plasma had low inductance, which is preferred for long-pulse high-performance discharges. These results from NSTX in combination with the previously obtained record 160 kA non-inductively generated startup currents in an ST or tokamak in NSTX demonstrate that CHI is a viable solenoid-free plasma startup method for future STs and tokamaks.

  12. Testing of ITER central solenoid coil insulation in an array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Martovetsky, N.N.; Perfect, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    A glass-polyimide insulation system has been proposed by the US team for use in the Central Solenoid (CS) coil of the international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) machine and it is planned to use this system in the CS model coil inner module. The turn insulation will consist of 2 layers of combined prepreg and Kapton. Each layer is 50% overlapped with a butt wrap of prepreg and an overwrap of S glass. The coil layers will be separated by a glass-resin composite and impregnated in a VPI process. Small scale tests on the various components of the insulation are complete. It is planned to fabricate and test the insulation in a 4 x 4 insulated CS conductor array which will include the layer insulation and be vacuum impregnated. The conductor array will be subjected to 20 thermal cycles and 100000 mechanical load cycles in a Liquid Nitrogen environment. These loads are similar to those seen in the CS coil design. The insulation will be electrically tested at several stages during mechanical testing. This paper will describe the array configuration, fabrication: process, instrumentation, testing configuration, and supporting analyses used in selecting the array and test configurations

  13. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of Δp/p ∼ 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,Δp/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets

  14. A superconducting solenoid and press for permanent magnet fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcahy, T. M.; Hull, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    For the first time, a superconducting solenoid (SCM) was used to increase the remnant magnetization of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets (PMs). In particular, improved magnetic alignment of commercial-grade PM powder was achieved, as it was axial die pressed into 12.7-mm diameter cylindrical compacts in the 76.2-mm warm bore of a 9-T SCM. The press used to compact the powder is unique and was specifically designed for use with the SCM. Although the press was operated in the batch mode for this proof of concept study, its design is intended to enable automated production. In operation, a simple die and punch set made of nonmagnetic materials was filled with powder and loaded into a nonmagnetic press tube. The cantilevered press tube was inserted horizontally, on a carrier manually advanced along a track, into the SCM. The robustness of the mechanical components and the SCM, in its liquid helium dewar, were specifically designed to allow for insertion and extraction of the magnetic powder and compacts, while operating at 9 T. Compaction was achieved by pressing the punches between the closed end of the press tube and the hydraulic cylinder mounted on the opposite end. Improvements up to 10% in magnetization and 20% in energy products of the permanent magnets were obtained, as the alignment fields were increased above the 2-T maximum field of the electromagnets used in industry. Increases in magnetization of 3% are significant in the mature sintered magnet industry

  15. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The STAR Collaboration

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it`s experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  16. Inservice diagnostic methods for solenoid-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) were studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the USNRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The primary objective of the study was to identify, evaluate, and recommend methods for inspection, surveillance, monitoring, and maintenance of SOVs that can help ensure their operational readiness-that is, their ability to perform required safety functions under all anticipated operating conditions, since failure of one of these small and relatively inexpensive devices could have serious consequences under certain circumstances. An earlier (Phase 1) NPAR program study described SOV failure modes and causes and had identified measurable parameters thought to be linked to the progression of everpresent degradation mechanisms that may ultimately result in functional failure of the valve. Using this earlier work as a guide, the present (Phase 11) study focused on devising and then demonstrating the effectiveness of techniques and equipment with which to measure performance parameters that show promise for detecting the presence and trending the progress of such degradations before they reach a critical stage. Intrusive techniques requiring the addition of magnetic or acoustic sensors or the application of special test signals were investigated briefly, but major emphasis was placed on the examination of condition-indicating techniques that can be applied with minimal cost and impact on plant operation. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the technical feasibility and practicality of the monitoring techniques assessed in the study, and recommendations for further work are provided

  17. A solenoidal and monocusp ion source (SAMIS) (abstract){sup a}{sup b}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, E.J.; Brainard, J.P.; Draper, C.H.; Ney, R.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0516 (United States); Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    We have developed a new magnetic monocusp ion source for single aperture applications such as neutron generators. Coupling solenoidal magnetic fields on both sides of a monocusp magnetic field has generated over 70{percent} atomic deuterium ions at pressures as low as 0.4 Pa (3 mTorr). This article describes the performance and characteristics of the solenoidal and monocusp ion source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Fourier Bessel transform method for efficiently calculating the magnetic field of solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachamkin, J.; Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical procedure for calculating the magnetic field of a selenoid is derived. Based on the properties of Bessel functions, the procedure is shown to be convergent everywhere, including within the windings of the solenoid. The most critical part of the procedure is detailed in the main text. A simple method is used to ensure numerical significance while allowing economical computational times. In the appendix the procedure is generalized to universal convergence by appropriate partitioning of the solenoid windings

  19. A new scheme for critical current measurements on straight superconducting cables in a large solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, L.; Volpini, G.

    1991-01-01

    The precision of I c measurement of straight superconducting cables in solenoids can be limited by the magnetic field inhomogeneity. A solution in order to improve the field homogeneity based on iron shims is presented here. A conceptual design for the experimental lay-out of a test station to be used in connection with the SOLEMI-I solenoid at the Milan INFN Section (LASA Laboratory) is given

  20. Short-circuited coil in a solenoid circuit of a pulse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivshik, A.F.; Dubrovin, V.Yu.

    1976-01-01

    A short-circuited coil at the end of a long pulse solenoid attenuates the dissipation field by 3-5 times. A plug-configuration field is set up in the middle portion of the pulse solenoid incorporating the short-circuited coils. Shunting of the coils with the induction current by resistor Rsub(shunt) provides for the adjustment of the plug ratio γ

  1. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length ap...

  2. Frequency Arrangement For 700 MHz Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancans G.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The 694-790 MHz (700 MHz band was allocated by the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12 in ITU Region 1 (Europe included, to the mobile service on a co-primary basis with other services to which this band was allocated on the primary basis and identified for the International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT. At the same time, the countries of Region 1 will be able also to continue using these frequencies for their broadcasting services if necessary. This allocation will be effective immediately after 2015 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-15. In order to make the best possible use of this frequency band for mobile service, a worldwide harmonized frequency arrangement is to be prepared to allow for large economies of scale and international roaming as well as utilizing the available spectrum in the best possible way, minimizing possible interference between services, facilitating deployment and cross-border coordination. The authors analyze different possible frequency arrangements and conclude on the frequency arrangement most suitable for Europe.

  3. The 938 MHz resonant damping loops for the 200 MHz SPS travelling wave cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the beam stability in the SPS in 1982 - 1983 have shown a transversal instability for high intensity beams [1]. The fact that this related technical note is published nearly 30 years later, is related to the revival of interest in the frame of SPS impedance evaluation for LS1. Until now there was just a barely known paper folder available which could be consulted on request. The instability mentioned above was identified from beam measurements as raised by a deflecting mode at approximately 940 MHz in the 200 MHz travelling wave cavities of the SPS. Estimates showed that an attenuation of this particular mode by 20 dB would be desirable. In order to achieve this attenuation some vacuum ports on top of the cavities were available. For the damping devices three requirements had to be met: - sufficient damping at about 940 MHz - no serious change of cavity input VSWR at 200 MHz - no water cooling requirement for this higher order mode coupler.

  4. 47 CFR 101.69 - Transition of the 1850-1990 MHz, 2110-2150 MHz, and 2160-2200 MHz bands from the fixed microwave...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and 2160-2200 MHz bands from the fixed microwave services to personal communications services and...) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Applications and Licenses License Transfers... MHz bands from the fixed microwave services to personal communications services and emerging...

  5. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0 degrees C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0 degrees C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length

  6. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  7. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C. [and others

    1995-02-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

  8. BNL 703 MHz SRF cryomodule demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Dalesio, L.; Dottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hoff, L.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lambiase, R.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present the preliminary results of the testing of the 703 MHz SRF cryomodule designed for use in the ampere class ERL under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The preliminary cavity tests, carried out at Thomas Jefferson Laboratory, demonstrated cavity performance of 20 MV/m with a Qo of 1 x 10 10 , results we expect to reproduce in the horizontal configuration. This test of the entire string assembly will allow us to evaluate all of the additional cryomodule components not previously tested in the VTA and will prepare us for our next milestone test which will be delivery of electrons from our injector through the cryomodule to the beam dump. This will also be the first demonstration of an accelerating cavity designed for use in an ampere class ERL, a key development which holds great promise for future machines

  9. The all-sky 408 MHz survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslam, C.G.T.; Salter, C.J.; Stoffel, H.

    1981-01-01

    A brief outline of the results of this survey is presented. The 408 MHz All-sky Survey has been made from four radio continuum surveys observed between 1965 and 1978, using the Jodrell Bank MKI telescope (Haslam et al., 1970), the Effelsberg 100 metre telescope (Haslam et al., 1974) and the Parkes 64 metre telescope (Haslam et al., 1975). A detailed description of the survey data reduction and calibration methods, with preliminary astronomical results will soon be published (Haslam et al., 1980a) and a second paper will give an atlas of maps at the full survey resolution of 51' arc between half power points (Haslam et al., 1980b). A map, smoothed to a gaussian beam with resolution between half power poitns of 3 0 , is presented. (Auth.)

  10. A general method, a la Transport, for evaluation of the perturbing effects of solenoidal inserts in storage ring interaction regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.J.

    1976-07-01

    It may be expected that solenoid magnets will be used in many storage ring experiments. Typically an insert would consist of a main solenoid at the interaction point with a symmetrical pair of compensating solenoids located somewhere between the main solenoid and the ends of the interaction region. The magnetic fields of such an insert may significantly affect storage ring performance. We suggest here a simple, systematic method for evaluation of the effects, which together with adequate design supervision and field measurements will help to prevent any serious operational problems that might result if significant perturbations went unnoticed. 5 refs

  11. Manufacture and Test of a Small Ceramic-Insulated Nb$_{3}$Sn Split Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Bordini, B; Rossi, L; Tommasini, D

    2008-01-01

    A small split solenoid wound with high-Jc Nb$_{3}$Sn conductor, constituted by a 0.8 mm Rod Re-stack Process (RRP®) strand, was built and tested at CERN in order to study the applicability of: 1) ceramic wet glass braid insulation without epoxy impregnation of the magnet; 2) a new heat treatment devised at CERN and particularly suitable for reacting RRP® Nb$_{3}$Sn strands. This paper briefly describes the solenoid and the experimental results obtained during 4.4 K and 1.9 K tests. The split solenoid consists of two coils (25 mm inner diameter, 51.1 mm outer diameter, 12.9 mm height). The coils were initially separately tested, in an iron mirror configuration, and then tested together in split solenoid configuration. In all the tests at 4.4 K the coils reached a current higher than 95 % of their short sample limits at the first quench; in split solenoid configuration the maximum field values in the coils and in the aperture were respectively 10.7 T and 12.5 T. At 1.9 K the coils had premature quenches due ...

  12. Hybrid design method for air-core solenoid with axial homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Suk Jin [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, a hybrid method is proposed to design an air-core superconducting solenoid system for 6 T axial uniform magnetic field using Niobium Titanium (NbTi) superconducting wire. In order to minimize the volume of conductor, the hybrid optimization method including a linear programming and a nonlinear programming was adopted. The feasible space of solenoid is divided by several grids and the magnetic field at target point is approximated by the sum of magnetic field generated by an ideal current loop at the center of each grid. Using the linear programming, a global optimal current distribution in the feasible space can be indicated by non-zero current grids. Furthermore the clusters of the non-zero current grids also give the information of probable solenoids in the feasible space, such as the number, the shape, and so on. Applying these probable solenoids as the initial model, the final practical configuration of solenoids with integer layers can be obtained by the nonlinear programming. The design result illustrates the efficiency and the flexibility of the hybrid method. And this method can also be used for the magnet design which is required the high homogeneity within several ppm (parts per million)

  13. Limits on the field of ohmic heating solenoids, applied to a tokamak TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    If the ohmic heating solenoid for the TNS or other large tokamak is an ungraded cryostable superconducting solenoid, with NbTi at 4.2 K as the superconductor, then the smallest outer diameter is not achieved at the highest attainable field. There is a lower optimum field which minimizes the outer diameter for a given volt-second requirement. At higher fields the mean diameter decreases; but the high fields require more superconductor, more copper stabilizer, more stainless steel for support, and more liquid helium coolant. For the GA-ANL design for TNS, the optimum field is 7.55 T and the minimum outside diameter for the solenoid is 2.15 m. If, on the other hand, the solenoid is graded, with more NbTi, copper, and stainless steel on the inner turns where the field is higher, than the volt-seconds can always be increased, for a given outer diameter, by adding more turns at a higher field inside until either the critical field is reached or the solenoid bore is filled. However, the material and money required to add a few more volt-seconds increases rapidly with field

  14. Limits on the field of ohmic heating solenoids, applied to a tokamak TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    If the ohmic heating solenoid for the TNS or other large tokamak is an ungraded cryostable superconducting solenoid, with NbTi at 4.2 K as the superconductor, then the smallest outer diameter is not achieved at the highest attainable field. There is a lower optimum field which minimizes the outer diameter for a given volt-second requirement. At higher fields the mean diameter decreases; but the high fields require more superconductor, more copper stabilizer, more stainless steel for support, and more liquid helium coolant. For the GA-ANL design for TNS, the optimum field is 7.55 T and the minimum outside diameter for the solenoid is 2.15 m. If, on the other hand, the solenoid is graded, with more NbTi, copper, and stainless steel on the inner turns where the field is higher, then the volt-seconds can always be increased, for a given outer diameter, by adding more turns at a higher field inside until either the critical field is reached or the solenoid bore is filled. However, the material and money required to add a few more volt-seconds increases rapidly with field

  15. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  16. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL

  17. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 216-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  18. Solenoidal magnetic field influences the beam neutralization by a background plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.

    2004-01-01

    An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration is much longer than the electron plasma period. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. Figure 1 shows the influence of a solenoidal magnetic field on charge and current neutralization. Analytical studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field begins to influence the radial electron motion when ω ce > βω pe . Here, ω ce is the electron gyrofrequency, ω pe is the electron plasma frequency, and β = V b /c is the ion beam velocity. If a solenoidal magnetic field is not applied, plasma waves do not propagate. In contrast, in the presence of a solenoidal magnetic field, whistler waves propagate ahead of the beam and can perturb the plasma ahead of the beam pulse. In the limit ω ce >> βω pe , the electron current completely neutralizes the ion beam current and the beam self magnetic field greatly diminishes. Application of an external solenoidal magnetic field clearly makes the collective processes of ion beam-plasma interactions rich in physics content. Many results of the PIC simulations remain to be explained by analytical theory. Four new papers have been published or submitted describing plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse

  19. Experimental study on coil of direct action solenoid valve with temperature increasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lu; Liu Qianfeng; Bo Hanliang

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic control rod drive technology (HCRDT) is a newly invented patent and Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University owns HCRDT's independent intellectual property rights. The integrated valve which is made up of three direct action solenoid valves is the key part of this technology, so the performance of the solenoid valve directly affects the function of the integrated valve and the HCRDT. Based on the conditions occurring in the operation of the control rod hydraulic drive system, the coil of the direct action solenoid valve with temperature increasing was studied by the experiment and analyzed by ANSYS code. The result shows that the temperature of the coil for the solenoid valve increases with the current increasing firstly. The temperature of the inner wall of the coil is higher than that of the exterior wall. The temperature of the middle coil is higher than that of the edge of the coil. The design of the direct action solenoid valve can be optimized. (authors)

  20. A Seemingly Simple Task: Filling a Solenoid Volume in Vacuum with Dense Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Roy, Prabir; Oks, Efim

    2010-01-01

    Space-charge neutralization of a pulsed, high-current ion beam is required to compress and focus the beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described attempts to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary charge-compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from four pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means and by an array of movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. Beam neutralization and compression are accomplished, though issues of density, uniformity, and pulse-to-pulse reproducibly remain to be solved.

  1. Coherent states of non-relativistic electron in the magnetic-solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V G; Gavrilov, S P; Filho, D P Meira; Gitman, D M

    2010-01-01

    In the present work we construct coherent states in the magnetic-solenoid field, which is a superposition of the Aharonov-Bohm field and a collinear uniform magnetic field. In the problem under consideration there are two kinds of coherent states, those which correspond to classical trajectories which embrace the solenoid and those which do not. The constructed coherent states reproduce exactly classical trajectories, maintain their form under the time evolution and form a complete set of functions, which can be useful in semiclassical calculations. In the absence of the solenoid field these states are reduced to the well known in the case of uniform magnetic field Malkin-Man'ko coherent states.

  2. Coherent states of non-relativistic electron in the magnetic-solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V G [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, S P; Filho, D P Meira [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gitman, D M, E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.r, E-mail: gavrilovsergeyp@yahoo.co, E-mail: gitman@dfn.if.usp.b, E-mail: dmeira@dfn.if.usp.b [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05315-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-09-03

    In the present work we construct coherent states in the magnetic-solenoid field, which is a superposition of the Aharonov-Bohm field and a collinear uniform magnetic field. In the problem under consideration there are two kinds of coherent states, those which correspond to classical trajectories which embrace the solenoid and those which do not. The constructed coherent states reproduce exactly classical trajectories, maintain their form under the time evolution and form a complete set of functions, which can be useful in semiclassical calculations. In the absence of the solenoid field these states are reduced to the well known in the case of uniform magnetic field Malkin-Man'ko coherent states.

  3. A New Facility for Testing Superconducting Solenoid Magnets with Large Fringe Fields at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, D. [Fermilab; Carcagno, R. [Fermilab; Nogiec, J. [Fermilab; Rabehl, R. [Fermilab; Sylvester, C. [Fermilab; Tartaglia, M. [Fermilab

    2013-09-01

    Testing superconducting solenoid with no iron flux return can be problematic for a magnet test facility due to the large magnetic fringe fields generated. These large external fields can interfere with the operation of equipment while precautions must be taken for personnel supporting the test. The magnetic forces between the solenoid under test and the external infrastructure must also be taken under consideration. A new test facility has been designed and built at Fermilab specifically for testing superconducting magnets with large external fringe fields. This paper discusses the test stand design, capabilities, and details of the instrumentation and controls with data from the first solenoid tested in this facility: the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) coupling coil.

  4. A study of ISO Solenoid Valve with static and dynamic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Y. S.; Ju, M. J.; Oh, Y. C.; Kim, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of ISO Solenoid Valves is now considered as a core technology in the fields of the production line of semi-conductor chips and the ISO fluid chips for medical applications. And ISO Solenoid Valves, which operate by compressed air, are characterized by high speed response, great repeatability and that the pressure on the cross sectional area of poppet is kept constant regardless of the fluctuation of the pressure exerted on the ports. The primary objective of this study is to compare the optimally designed Solenoid Valve with the actually produced one and to design a power saving circuit which can highly improve the efficiency by providing optimal current according to mechanical load.

  5. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam

  6. Dynamic analysis of fast-acting solenoid valves using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ki Tae; Han, Hwa Taik

    2001-01-01

    It is intended to develop an algorithm for dynamic simulation of fast-acting solenoid valves. The coupled equations of the electric, magnetic, and mechanical systems should be solved simultaneously in a transient nonlinear manner. The transient nonlinear electromagnetic field is analyzed by the Finite Element Method (FEM), which is coupled with nonlinear electronic circuitry. The dynamic movement of the solenoid valve is analyzed at every time step from the force balances acting on the plunger, which include the electromagnetic force calculated from the finite element analysis as well as the elastic force by a spring and the hydrodynamic pressure force along the flow passage. Dynamic responses of the solenoid valves predicted by this algorithm agree well the experimental results including bouncing effects

  7. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-01-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons

  8. A feasibility study of a linear laser heated solenoid fusion reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-02-01

    This report examines the feasibility of a laser heated solenoid as a fusion or fusion-fission reactor system. The objective of this study, was an assessment of the laser heated solenoid reactor concept in terms of its plasma physics, engineering design, and commercial feasibility. Within the study many pertinent reactor aspects were treated including: physics of the laser-plasma interaction; thermonuclear behavior of a slender plasma column; end-losses under reactor conditions; design of a modular first wall, a hybrid (both superconducting and normal) magnet, a large CO 2 laser system; reactor blanket; electrical storage elements; neutronics; radiation damage, and tritium processing. Self-consistent reactor configurations were developed for both pure fusion and fusion-fission designs, with the latter designed both to produce power and/or fissile fuels for conventional fission reactors. Appendix A is a bibliography with commentary of theoretical and experimental studies that have been directed at the laser heated solenoid

  9. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Takahashi, K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2137 (Japan); Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Horioka, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  10. GigaGauss solenoidal magnetic field inside bubbles excited in under-dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécz, Zs.; Konoplev, I. V.; Seryi, A.; Andreev, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel and effective method for generating GigaGauss level, solenoidal quasi-static magnetic fields in under-dense plasma using screw-shaped high intensity laser pulses. This method produces large solenoidal fields that move with the driving laser pulse and are collinear with the accelerated electrons. This is in contrast with already known techniques which rely on interactions with over-dense or solid targets and generates radial or toroidal magnetic field localized at the stationary target. The solenoidal field is quasi-stationary in the reference frame of the laser pulse and can be used for guiding electron beams. It can also provide synchrotron radiation beam emittance cooling for laser-plasma accelerated electron and positron beams, opening up novel opportunities for designs of the light sources, free electron lasers, and high energy colliders based on laser plasma acceleration.

  11. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  12. 300-MHz optical discriminator-counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turko, B.; Lo, C.C.

    1981-07-01

    The prediction of future CO 2 content in the atmosphere is not completely credible because the oceanographers and terrestrial ecologists do not agree on the global CO 2 balance. Very precise measurements of O 2 /N 2 ratio using Raman scattering over a few years' period could provide important information and lead to the explanation of the disparity in the atmospheric CO 2 balance. An optical discriminator-counter has been developed to count closely spaced optical events in the few photon level. Simulated optical events as close as 2.5 ns apart had been positively detected by using selected photomultipliers and optimized discriminators. Testing of the optical discriminator-counter was done by using an electrical pulse pair spaced 3 ns apart and also by a similar optical pulse pair generated by fast light-emitting diode. The photomultiplier is capable of counting an average single photoelectron pulse frequency of 50 MHz and has a sensitive detecting area of 50 mm in diameter. The discriminator performance is discussed

  13. 500 MHz transient digitizers based on GaAs CCDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryman, D.A.; Constable, M.; Cresswell, J.V.; Daviel, A.; LeNoble, M.; Mildenberger, J.; Poutissou, R.

    1996-11-01

    A system of 500 MHz transient digitizers based on gallium arsenide resistive gate charged coupled devices has been developed for an experiment studying rare K decays. CCDs with dynamic range of 8-bits and 128 or 320 pixels are used as analog pipelines. The CCD's are driven by a single phase transport system. Data readout and manipulation occurs at 15.6 MHz. (authors)

  14. Development of a permanent magnet alternative for a solenoidal ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, J.; Fahy, A.; Barr, M. [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Jardine, A.; Allison, W. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dastoor, P.C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    The most sensitive desktop-sized ionizer utilising electron bombardment is currently the solenoidal ion source. We present an alternate design for such an ion source whereby the solenoidal windings of the electromagnet are replaced by a shaped cylindrical permanent magnet in order to reduce the complexity and running costs of the instrument. Through finite element modelling of the magnetic field in COMSOL and experimental measurements on a small-scale prototype magnet stack, we demonstrate the required shape of the permanent magnet in order to generate the needed field, and the necessity of soft iron collars to smooth fluctuations along the central axis.

  15. Conceptual design of the Mu2e production solenoid cold mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nicol, T.H.; Page, T.M.; Pronskikh, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The required magnetic field is produced by a series of superconducting solenoids of various apertures and lengths. This paper describes the conceptual design of the 5 T, 4 m long solenoid cold mass with 1.67 m bore with the emphasis on the magnetic, radiation and thermal analyses.

  16. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  17. Design of wide flat-topped low transverse field solenoid magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xiaobing; Chen Nan; Li Qin

    2010-01-01

    A wide flat-topped low transverse error field solenoid magnet design for linear induction accelerator is presented. The design features non-uniform winding to reduce field fluctuation due to the magnets' gap, and homogenizer rings within the solenoid to greatly reduce the effects of winding errors. Numerical modeling of several designs for 12 MeV linear induction accelerator (LIA) in China Academy of Engineering Physics has demonstrated that by using these two techniques the magnetic field fluctuations in the accelerator gap can be reduced by 70% and the transverse error field can be reduced by 96.5%. (authors)

  18. Force characteristics of solenoid electromagnet with ferromagnetic disc in the coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorgiev, Vultchan; Yatchev, Ivan; Alexandrov, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the construction and characteristics of a solenoid electromagnet with ferromagnetic disc placed in the coil. The presence if the disc leads to change of the force characteristic compared with conventional solenoid electromagnets - increasing the force at large air gaps and decreasing the force at small air gaps. This could be very useful for some actuators. It has been studied how the force characteristic depend on disc size, position and material. Finite element method has been used for field and force calculations of the electromagnet. (Author)

  19. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Kiyochi, M.; Nakao, N.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Nakai, S.; Mima, K.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field

  20. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B ampersand K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter

  1. CO2-laser--produced plasma columns in a solenoidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offenberger, A.A.; Cervenan, M.R.; Smy, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    A 1-GW CO 2 laser pulse has been used to produce extended column breakdown of hydrogen at low pressure in a 20-cm-long solenoid. Magnetic fields of up to 110 kG were used to inhibit radial losses of the plasma column. A differential pumping scheme was devised to prevent formation of an opaque absorption wave travelling out of the solenoid back toward the focusing lens. Target burns give direct evidence for trapped laser beam propagation along the plasma column

  2. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    CERN Document Server

    Ohigashi, N; Kiyochi, M; Nakao, N; Fujita, M; Imasaki, K; Nakai, S; Mima, K

    1999-01-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  3. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  4. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Okamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.

    2012-01-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  5. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  6. A 70 MHz pulsing beam system for protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Shizhong; Zhang Tianjue; Wu Longcheng; Lv Yinlong; Song Guofang; Guan Fengping; Jia Xianlu

    2008-01-01

    A test beam line for pulsed beam generation for 10 MeV central region model (CRM) of a compact cyclotron is under construction as China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). A 70 MHz continuous H - beam with the energy of dozens of keV or a hundred keV will be pulsed to pulse length of less than 10 ns with the repetition rate of 1-8 MHz. A 70.487 MHz buncher will be used to compress the DC beam into the RF phase acceptance of ±30° of the CRM cyclotron. The 2.2 MHz sine waveform will be used for the chopper. A pulse with the repetition rate to 4.4 MHz and pulse length less than 10 ns is expected after CRM cyclotron. (authors)

  7. Imaging melanin cancer growth in-vivo using raster-scan optoacoustic mesoscopy (RSOM) at 50 MHz and 100 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Murad; Schwarz, Mathias; Soliman, Dominik; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-01

    We used raster-scan optoacoustic mesoscopy (RSOM) at 50 MHz, and at 100 MHz, to monitor tumor growth, and tumor angiogenesis, which is a central hallmark of cancer, in-vivo. In this study we compared the performance, and the effect of the 50 MHz, and the 100 MHz frequencies on the quality of the final image. The system is based on a reflection-mode implementation of RSOM. The detectors used are custom made, ultrawideband, and spherically focused. The use of such detectors enables light coupling from the same side as the detector, thus reflection-mode. Light is in turn coupled using a fiber bundle, and the detector is raster scanned in the xy-plane. Subsequently, to retrieve small features, the raw data are reconstructed using a multi-bandwidth, beamforming reconstruction algorithm. Comparison of the system performance at the different frequencies shows as expected a higher resolution in case of the 100 MHz detector compared to the 50 MHz. On the other hand the 50 MHz has a better SNR, can detect features from deeper layers, and has higher angular acceptance. Based on these characteristics the 50 MHz detector was mostly used. After comparing the performance we monitored the growth of B16F10 cells, melanin tumor, over the course of 9 days. We see correspondence between the optoacoustic measurements and the cryoslice validations. Additionally, in areas close to the tumor we see sprouting of new vessels, starting at day 4-5, which corresponds to tumor angiogenesis.

  8. Manufacturing of Nb3Sn Sample Conductor for CFETR Central Solenoid Model Coil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Jing Gang; Wu, Yu; Xiang, Bing Lun; Dai, Chao; Mao, Zhe Hua; Jin, Huan; Liao, Guo Jun; Liu, Fang; Xue, Tianjun; Wei, Zhou Rong; Devred, Arnaud; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) is a new tokamak device, whose magnet system includes the toroidal field, central solenoid (CS), and poloidal field coils. In order to develop the manufacturing process for the full-size CS coil, the CS model coil (CSMC) project was launched first. The

  9. Optimization of the Mu2e Production Solenoid Heat and Radiation Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Coleman, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to study the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos. Observation of this process would provide unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, and can point to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. The main parts of the Mu2e apparatus are its superconducting solenoids: Production Solenoid (PS), Transport Solenoid (TS), and Detector Solenoid (DS). Being in the vicinity of the beam, PS magnets are most subjected to the radiation damage. In order for the PS superconducting magnet to operate reliably, the peak neutron flux in the PS coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude by means of sophisticatedly designed massive Heat and Radiation Shield (HRS), optimized for the performance and cost. An issue with radiation damage is related to large residual electrical resistivity degradation in the superconducting coils, especially its Al stabilizer. A detailed MARS15 analysis and optimization of the HRS has been carried out both to satisfy the Mu2e requirements to the radiation quantities (such as displacements per atom, peak temperature and power density in the coils, absorbed dose in the insulation, and dynamic heat load) and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of these radiation quantities are reported and optimized HRS models are presented; it is shown that design levels satisfy all requirements.

  10. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of the First MICE Coupling Coil and the Fermilab Solenoid Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, Roger [Fermilab; Carcagno, Ruben [Fermilab; Caspi, Shlomo [LBNL, Berkeley; DeMello, Allan [LBNL, Berkeley; Kokoska, Lidija [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Pan, Heng [LBNL, Berkeley; Sylvester, Cosmore [Fermilab; Tartaglia, Michael

    2014-11-06

    The first coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has been tested in a conduction-cooled environment at the Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab. An overview of the thermal and mechanical performance of the magnet and the test stand during cool-down and power testing of the magnet is presented.

  11. Analysing the control software of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hwong, Y.L.; Kusters, V.J.J.; Willemse, T.A.C.; Arbab, F.; Sirjani, M.

    2012-01-01

    The control software of the CERN Compact Muon Solenoid experiment contains over 30,000 finite state machines. These state machines are organised hierarchically: commands are sent down the hierarchy and state changes are sent upwards. The sheer size of the system makes it virtually impossible to

  12. TESTING OF FRAMED STRUCTURE PARTS OF COMPACT MUON SOLENOID BY NONDESTRUCTIVE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Larchenkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension parts of a compact muon solenoid for Large Hadron Collider have been tested in the paper. The paper describes a steady-state and cyclic “tension-compression” load created by superconducting electromagnet with energy of 3 GJ and magnetic induction of 4 tesla. A nondestructive testing method has been applied in the paper.

  13. Evolution of solenoidal and dilatational perturbations in transitional supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Omar; Hickey, Jean-Pierre; Scalo, Carlo; Hussain, Fazle

    2017-11-01

    We have investigated the interaction between the dilatational and solenoidal components of instability waves relying on DNS simulations of temporally-evolving compressible boundary layers ranging from Mach numbers of 2.0 to 10.0. For idealized flow conditions at subsonic-to-moderate supersonic speeds, transition to turbulence occurs due to amplification of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves (first Mack mode) exponentially amplified until nonlinear breakdown and transition to turbulence occurs. Under the same conditions, at hypersonic speeds, transition is governed by acoustically resonating trapped waves (second Mack mode). While the former are expected to be solenoidal in nature and the latter predominantly dilatational, we demonstrate that, in general, they always coexist and that, even at Mach=10 there is an appreciable energy transfer from the dilatational to the solenoidal at limit-cycle amplitude conditions in 2D simulations. In three-dimensional simulations very rapid breakdown is observed. Mechanisms of energy exchange between the dilatational and solenoidal components during the transition will be discussed.

  14. Development of large high current density superconducting solenoid magnets for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1977-05-01

    The development of a unique type of large superconducting solenoid magnet, characterized by very high current density windings and a two-phase helium tubular cooling system is described. The development of the magnet's conceptual design and the construction of two test solenoids are described. The successful test of the superconducting coil and its tubular cooling refrigeration system is presented. The safety, environmental and economic impacts of the test program on future developments in high energy physics are shown. Large solid angle particle detectors for colliding beam physics will analyze both charged and neutral particles. In many cases, these detectors will require neutral particles, such as gamma rays, to pass through the magnet coil with minimum interaction. The magnet coils must be as thin as possible. The use of superconducting windings allows one to minimize radiation thickness, while at the same time maximizing charged particle momentum resolution and saving substantial quantities of electrical energy. The results of the experimental measurements show that large high current density solenoid magnets can be made to operate at high stored energies. The superconducting magnet development described has a positive safety and environmental impact. The use of large high current density thin superconducting solenoids has been proposed in two high energy physics experiments to be conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Cornell University as a result of the successful experiments described

  15. Compact Muon Solenoid: largest physics experiment to be held in 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    Atkins, William

    2007-01-01

    "over the last fifteen years about 2'300 engineers and scientists from over 150 scientific institutions in 37 countries around the world have worked together to design and build a gigantic general-purpose particle detector, what is called the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS)." (1 page)

  16. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length approximately equals its diameter. The scaling also shows that this is usually not the case above a few MeV; consequently, a solenoid needs to be pulsed or superconducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. It is also important that the transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 135001 (2009PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.135001].

  17. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Hofmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length approximately equals its diameter. The scaling also shows that this is usually not the case above a few MeV; consequently, a solenoid needs to be pulsed or superconducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. It is also important that the transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 135001 (2009PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.135001].

  18. Evaluation results of TMI-2 solenoids AH-V6 and AH-V74

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soberano, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    Two Class 1E solenoid operators were removed from the Three Mile Island unit 2 Reactor Building and examined to determine whether they had degraded as a result of accident and post-accident conditions. Both units were functional during post-accident operation. This report discusses the examination, findings, causes of the anomalies, and recommendations for system improvement

  19. Explicit representation of roots on p-adic solenoids and non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This note generalizes known results concerning the existence of roots and embedding one-parameter subgroups on -adic solenoids. An explicit representation of the roots leads to the construction of two distinct rational embedding one-parameter subgroups. The results contribute to enlighten the group structure of ...

  20. D0 Superconducting Solenoid Quench Data and Slow Dump Data Acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markley, D.

    1998-01-01

    This Dzero Engineering note describes the method for which the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid Fast Dump and Slow Dump data are accumulated, tracked and stored. The 2 Tesla Solenoid has eleven data points that need to be tracked and then stored when a fast dump or a slow dump occur. The TI555(Texas Instruments) PLC(Programmable Logic Controller) which controls the DC power circuit that powers the Solenoid, also has access to all the voltage taps and other equipment in the circuit. The TI555 constantly logs these eleven points in a rotating memory buffer. When either a fast dump(dump switch opens) or a slow dump (power supply turns off) occurs, the TI555 organizes the respective data and will down load the data to a file on DO-CCRS2. This data in this file is moved over ethernet and is stored in a CSV (comma separated format) file which can easily be examined by Microsoft Excel or any other spreadsheet. The 2 Tesla solenoid control system also locks in first fault information. The TI555 decodes the first fault and passes it along to the program collecting the data and storing it on DO-CCRS2. This first fault information is then part of the file.

  1. ITER central solenoid model coil heat treatment complete and assembly started

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Okuno, K.

    1998-01-01

    A major R and D task in the ITER program is to fabricate a Superconducting Model Coil for the Central Solenoid to establish the design and fabrication methods for ITER size coils and to demonstrate conductor performance. Completion of its components is expected in 1998, to be followed by assembly with structural components and testing in a facility at JAERI

  2. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid-Actuated Gas-Operated VPS System Ball Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valve incorporates a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. The valve is normally open and fails safe to the closed position. The associated valve position switch is class GS

  3. Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Fields For Frequencies 900 MHz-1 800 MHz In Tirana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuqi Dhurata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The massive use of mobile phone as a communication tool nowadays is accompanied the ever increasing interest of the public and researchers for the possibly impact on human health as a result of exposure to the electromagnetic fields that accompany these devices. Therefore knowing the level of exposure electromagnetic fields of this electronic equipment has been and will be in the future interest object to the public and the subject of study for the researchers. In this paper are presents the results of measurements of electromagnetic fields for the frequencies 900 MHz - 1800 MHz used in mobile telephone in Tirana. These frequencies are included in the area radio frequency RF and Microwave MW 300 Hz - 300 GHz in the spectrum of electromagnetic waves and belong to non-ionizing radiation. The measurements were performed in different areas of Tirana. The purpose is to assess the level of exposure electromagnetic fields especially near areas where mobile antennas are mounted construction of dynamic digital mapping and comparison with the permitted levels of the exposure defined by the International Commission of Non Ionizing Radiation Protection ICNIRP. Through this publication the aim of the authors is to provide real information and reliable for the population.

  4. Technology development of solid state rf systems at 350 MHz and 325 MHz for RF accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama Rao, B.V.; Mishra, J.K.; Pande, Manjiri; Gupta, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    For decades vacuum tubes and klystrons have been used in high power application such as RF accelerators and broadcast transmitters. However, now, the solid-state technology can give power output in kilowatt regime. Higher RF power output can be achieved by combining several solid-state power amplifier modules using power combiners. This technology presents several advantages over traditional RF amplifiers, such as simpler start-up procedure, high modularity, high redundancy and flexibility, elimination of high voltage supplies and high power circulators, low operational cost, online maintenance without shut down of RF power station and no warm up time. In BARC, solid state amplifier technology development is being done both at 350 MHz and 325 MHz using RF transistors such as 1 kW LDMOS and 350 Watt VDMOS. Topology of input and output matching network in RF modules developed, consist of two L type matching sections with each section having a combination of series micro-strip line and parallel capacitor. The design is of equal Q for both the sections and of 25 ohm characteristics impedance of micro strip lines. Based on this, lengths of micro strips lines and values of shunt capacitors have been calculated. The calculated and simulated values of network elements have been compared. Similarly power combiners have been designed and developed based on Wilkinson techniques without internal resistors and using coaxial technology. This paper presents design and development of RF power amplifier modules, associated power combiner technologies and then integrated RF power amplifier. (author)

  5. Dark current, breakdown, and magnetic field effects in a multicell, 805 MHz cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Norem

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of dark currents and x rays in a six cell 805 MHz cavity, taken as part of an rf development program for muon cooling, which requires high power, high stored energy, low frequency cavities operating in a strong magnetic field. We have done the first systematic study of the behavior of high power rf in a strong (2.5–4 T magnetic field. Our measurements extend over a very large dynamic range in current and provide good fits to the Fowler-Nordheim field emission model assuming mechanical structures produce field enhancements at the surface. The locally enhanced field intensities we derive at the tips of these emitters are very large, (∼10  GV/m, and should produce tensile stresses comparable to the tensile strength of the copper cavity walls and should be capable of causing breakdown events. We also compare our data with estimates of tensile stresses from a variety of accelerating structures. Preliminary studies of the internal surface of the cavity and window are presented, which show splashes of copper with many sharp cone shaped protrusions and wires which can explain the experimentally measured field enhancements. We discuss a “cold copper” breakdown mechanism and briefly review alternatives. We also discuss a number of effects due to the 2.5 T solenoidal fields on the cavity such as altered field emission due to mechanical deformation of emitters, and dark current ring beams, which are produced from the irises by E×B drifts during the nonrelativistic part of the acceleration process.

  6. Cell death induced by GSM 900-MHz and DCS 1800-MHz mobile telephony radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagopoulos, D. J; Chavdoula, E. D.; Nezis, I. P.; Margaritis, L. H.

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay '' a well known technique widely used for detecting fragmented DNA in various types of cells'' was used to detect cell death (DNA fragmentation) in a biological model, the early and mid stages of oogenesis of the insect Drosophila melanogaster. The flies were exposed in vivo to either GSM 900-MHz (Global System for Mobile telecommunications) or DCS 1800-MHz (Digital Cellular System) radiation from a common digital mobile phone, for few minutes per day during the first 6 days of their adult life. The exposure conditions were similar to those to which a mobile phone user is exposed, and were determined according to previous studies of ours [D.J. Panagopoulos, A. Karabarbounis, L.H. Margaritis, Effect of GSM 900-MHz mobile phone radiation on the reproductive capacity of D. melanogaster, Electromagn. Biol. Med. 23 (1) (2004) 29''43; D.J. Panagopoulos, N. Messini, A. Karabarbounis, A.L. Philippetis, L.H. Margaritis, Radio frequency electromagnetic radiation within ''safety levels'' alters the physiological function of insects, in: P. Kostarakis, P. Stavroulakis (Eds.), Proceedings of the Millennium International Workshop on Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, October 17''20, 2000, pp. 169''175, ISBN: 960-86733-0-5; D.J. Panagopoulos, L.H. Margaritis, Effects of electromagnetic fields on the reproductive capacity of D. melanogaster, in: P. Stavroulakis (Ed.), Biological Effects of Electromagnetic Fields, Springer, 2003, pp. 545''578], which had shown a large decrease in the oviposition of the same insect caused by GSM radiation. Our present results suggest that the decrease in oviposition previously reported, is due to degeneration of large numbers of egg chambers after DNA fragmentation of their constituent cells, induced by both types of mobile telephony radiation. Induced cell death is recorded for the first time, in all types of

  7. CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ DOPPLER WIND PROFILER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ Doppler Wind Profiler dataset was collected by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS),...

  8. CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ DOPPLER WIND PROFILER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) is a mobile atmospheric profiling system. It includes a 915 MHz Doppler...

  9. Analog Fiber Optic Link with DC-100 MHz Bandwidth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sullivan, C. A; Girardi, P. G; Lohrmann, Dieter R

    2008-01-01

    An analog fiber optic link covering the frequency range from DC to 100 MHz was designed, constructed, and tested, in order to connect a 10 kA pulse current probe to oscilloscopes for oscillographing...

  10. 500 MHz transient digitizers based on GaAs CCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D A; Constable, M; Cresswell, J V; Daviel, A; LeNoble, M; Mildenberger, J; Poutissou, R

    1996-11-01

    A system of 500 MHz transient digitizers based on gallium arsenide resistive gate charged coupled devices has been developed for an experiment studying rare K decays. CCDs with dynamic range of 8-bits and 128 or 320 pixels are used as analog pipelines. The CCD`s are driven by a single phase transport system. Data readout and manipulation occurs at 15.6 MHz. (authors). 12 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Design and development of a vertex reconstruction for the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) data. Study of gaseous and silicon micro-strips detectors (MSGC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, St.

    2002-12-01

    The work presented in this thesis has contributed to the development of the Compact Muon Solenoid detector (CMS) that will be installed at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which will start running in summer 2007. This report is organised in three parts: the study of gaseous detectors and silicon micro-strips detectors, and a development of a software for the reconstruction and analysis of CMS data in the framework of ORCA. First, the micro-strips gaseous detectors (MSGC) study was on the ultimate critical irradiation test before their substitution in the CMS tracker. This test showed a really small number of lost anodes and a stable signal to noise ratio. This test proved that the described MSGC fulfill all the requirements to be integrated in the CMS tracker. The following contribution described a study of silicon micro-strips detectors and its electronics exposed to a 40 MHz bunched LHC like beam. These tests indicated a good behaviour of the data acquisition and control system. The signal to noise ratio, the bunch crossing identification and the cluster finding efficiency had also be analysed. The last study concern the design and the development of an ORCA algorithm dedicates to secondary vertex reconstruction. This iterative algorithm aims to be use for b tagging. This part analyse also primary vertex reconstruction in events without and with pile up. (author)

  12. The 136 MHz/400 MHz earth station antenna-noise temperature prediction program documentation for RAE-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simulation study to determine the 136 MHz and 400 MHz noise temperature of the ground network antennas which will track the RAE-B satellite during data transmission periods is described. Since the noise temperature of the antenna effectively sets the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received signal, a knowledge of SNR will be helpful in locating the optimum time windows for data transmission during low-noise periods. Antenna-noise temperatures at 136 MHz and 400 MHz will be predicted for selected earth-based ground stations which will support RAE-B. The antenna-noise temperature predictions will include the effects of galactic-brightness temperature, the sun, and the brightest radio stars. Predictions will cover the ten-month period from March 1, 1973 to December 31, 1973. The RAE-B mission will be expecially susceptible to SNR degradation during the two eclipses of the Sun occurring in this period.

  13. The 136 MHZ/400 MHz earth station antenna-noise temperature prediction program for RAE-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. E.; Fee, J. J.; Chin, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simulation study was undertaken to determine the 136 MHz and 400 MHz noise temperature of the ground network antennas which will track the RAE-B satellite during data transmission periods. Since the noise temperature of the antenna effectively sets the signal-to-noise ratio of the received signal, a knowledge of SNR will be helpful in locating the optimum time windows for data transmission during low noise periods. Antenna noise temperatures will be predicted for selected earth-based ground stations which will support RAE-B. Telemetry data acquisition will be at 400 MHz; tracking support at 136 MHz will be provided by the Goddard Range and Range Rate (RARR) stations. The antenna-noise temperature predictions will include the effects of galactic-brightness temperature, the sun, and the brightest radio stars. Predictions will cover the ten-month period from March 1, 1973 to December 31, 1973.

  14. Effect Of The LEBT Solenoid Magnetic Field On The Beam Generation For Particle Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmohammadi Satri, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2013-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV H- linear accelerator which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac2 for upgrade of the LHC injectors with higher intensity and eventually an increase of the LHC luminosity. Linac4 structure is a source, a 45 keV low energy beam transport line (LEBT) with two solenoids, a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ), a Medium Energy Beam Transport line (MEBT), a 50 Mev DTL, a 100 Mev CCDTL and PIMS up to 160 Mev. We use Travel v4.07 and PathManager code for simulation. Firstly, we need to a file as a source and defining the beginning point (last point in tracking back) of simulation. We recognise the starting point base on the solenoid magnetic property of LEBT.

  15. A harmonic expansion for the magnetic field of the helical solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewar, R.L.; Gardner, H.J.

    1987-03-01

    We discuss the boundary value problem for calculating the scalar magnetic potentials inside and outside of a helically symmetric solenoid. Under some circumstances the potentials can be expanded in infinite series of cylindrical harmonics. For a circular cross-section solenoid, we derive a Green's function integral representation of the series coefficients and calculate the radii of convergence of the series by a saddle point method. In some cases the cylinders of convergence can intersect the coil, so that there are physically accessible regions where the series fail to converge. Numerical evidence is presented to show that, even in some of these cases, the potentials can be accurately approximated by finite sums of cylindrical harmonics using boundary collocation

  16. Static stress analysis of coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly for muon ionization cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Heng; Wang Li; Wu Hong; Guo Xinglong; Xu Fengyu

    2010-01-01

    The stresses in the coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly, which is applied in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), are critical for the structure design and mechanical stability because of a large diameter and relative high magnetic field. This paper presents an analytical stress solution for the MICE coupling coil assembly. The stress due to winding tension is calculated by assuming the coil package as a set of combined cylinders. The thermal and electromechanical stresses are obtained by solving the partial differential equations of displacement based on the power series expansion method. The analytical stress solution is proved to be feasible by calculating stresses in a tested superconducting solenoid with 2.58 m bore at room temperature. The analytical result of the MICE coupling coil is in good agreement with that of the finite element which shows that the transverse shear stress induced by Lorentz force is principally dominant to magnet instability. (authors)

  17. Conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid for a magnetic SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Kephart, R.D.; Krebs, H.J.; Stone, M.E.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.H.

    1988-07-01

    The conceptual design of a large superconducting solenoid suitable for a magnetic detector at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) has begun at Fermilab. The magnet will provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a volume 8 m in diameter by 16 m long. The particle-physics calorimetry will be inside the field volume and so the coil will be bath cooled and cryostable; the vessels will be stainless steel. Predictibility of performance and the ability to safely negotiate all probable failure modes, including a quench, are important items of the design philosophy. Although the magnet is considerably larger than existing solenoids of this type and although many issues of manufacturability, transportability and cost have not been completely addressed, our conceptual design has convinced us that this magnet is a reasonable extrapolation of present technology. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibowo,; Zakaria,; Lambang, Lullus; Triyono,; Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  19. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibowo,, E-mail: wibowo-uns@yahoo.com; Zakaria,, E-mail: zakaaria27@gmail.com; Lambang, Lullus, E-mail: lulus-l@yahoo.com; Triyono,, E-mail: tyon-bila@yahoo.co.id; Muhayat, Nurul, E-mail: nurulmuhayat@ymail.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta 57128 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  20. Research design and improvement of high temperature high pressure solenoid valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yongtang

    1987-12-01

    A process for development of the pilot type high temperature high pressure solenoid valve used in a PWR power plant is described. The whole development process might be divided into two phases: research design and improvement. In the former phase the questions had chiefly been approached in the following several aspects: the principle construction design, the determination of values for the constructionally key elements, the valve seal design and the solenoid actuator design, and made such valve's successful design in the main. In the latter phase an improvement had been made upon such valve against the problems during the testing use of the valve for a period of time, i.e. the unsatisfactory leak tightness, and achieved satisfactory results. The consummate success in this development not only has met the needs of the engineering project, but also made us obtain a valuable experience useful to design the similar valves

  1. On the Suitability of a Solenoid Horn for the ESS Neutrino Superbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Olvegård, Maja; Ruber, R; Ziemann, R; Koutchouk, J -P

    2015-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), now under construction in Lund, Sweden, offers unique opportunities for experimental physics, not only in neutron science but potentially in particle physics. The ESS neutrino superbeam project plans to use a 5 MW proton beam from the ESS linac to generate a high intensity neutrino superbeam, with the final goal of detecting leptonic CP-violation in an underground megaton Cherenkov water detector. The neutrino production requires a second target station and a complex focusing system for the pions emerging from the target. The normal-conducting magnetic horns that are normally used for these applications cannot accept the 2.86 ms long proton pulses of the ESS linac, which means that pulse shortening in an accumulator ring would be required. That, in turn, requires H- operation in the linac to accommodate the high intensity. As an attractive alternative, we investigate the possibility of using superconducting solenoids for the pion focusing. This solenoid horn system needs ...

  2. The cryogenic system for the superconducting solenoid magnet of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Passardi, Giorgio; Lottin, J C; Lottin, J P; Lyraud, C

    1998-01-01

    The design concept of the CMS experiment, foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN, is based on a superconducting solenoid magnet. The large coil will be made of a four layers winding generating the 4 T uniform magnetic induction required by the detector. The length of the solenoid is 13 m with an inner diameter of 5.9 m. The mass kept at liquid helium temperature totals 220 t and the electromagnetic stored energy is 2.7 GJ. The windings are indirectly cooled with a liquid helium flow driven by a thermosyphon effect. The external cryogenic system consists of a 1.5 kW at 4.5 K (entropy equivalent) cryoplant including an additional liquid nitrogen precooling unit and a 5000 litre liquid helium buffer. The whole magnet and cryogenic system will be tested at the surface by 2003 before final installation in the underground area of LHC.

  3. Adjustment of Adiabatic Transition Magnetic Field of Solenoid-Induced Helicla Wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunawaki, Y

    2005-01-01

    We have been constructed a solenoid-induced helical wiggler for a compact free electron maser operated in a usual small laboratory which does not have electric source capacity available enough. It consists of two staggered-iron arrays inserted perpendicularly to each other in a solenoid electromagnet. In order to lead/extract an electron beam into/from the wiggler, adiabatic transition (AT) field is necessary at both ends of the wiggler. In this work the AT field was produced by setting staggered-nickel plates with different thickness in the five periods. The thickness of each nickel plate was decided by the field analysis using the MAGTZ computational code based on a magnetic moment method. Exact thickness was, however, found by the precise measurement of the field distribution with the greatest circumspection to obtain a homogeneous increment of the AT field. The change of AT field distribution was studied by referring to an equivalent electric circuit of the wiggler.

  4. Requirements for qualification of manufacture of the ITER Central Solenoid and Correction Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libeyre, Paul, E-mail: paul.libeyre@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Li, Hongwei [ITER China, 15B Fuxing Road, Beijing 100862 (China); Reiersen, Wayne [US ITER Project Office, 1055 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Dolgetta, Nello; Jong, Cornelis; Lyraud, Charles; Mitchell, Neil; Laurenti, Adamo [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Sgobba, Stefano [CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Turck, Bernard [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul lez Durance (France); Martovetsky, Nicolai; Everitt, David; Freudenberg, K.; Litherland, Steve; Rosenblad, Peter [US ITER Project Office, 1055 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Smith, John; Spitzer, Jeff [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Wei, Jing; Dong, Xiaoyu; Fang, Chao [ASIPP, Shushan Hu Road 350, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A manufacturing line is installed for the ITER Correction Coils. • A manufacturing line is under installation for the ITER Central Solenoid. • Qualification of the manufacturing procedures has started for both manufacturing lines and acceptance criteria set. • Winding procedure of Correction Coils is qualified. - Abstract: The manufacturing line of the ITER Correction Coils (CC) at ASIPP in Hefei (China) was completed in 2013 and the manufacturing line of the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) modules is under installation at General Atomic premises in Poway (USA). In both cases, before starting production of the first coils, qualification of the manufacturing procedures is achieved by the construction of a set of mock-ups and prototypes to demonstrate that design requirements defined by the ITER Organization are effectively met. For each qualification item, the corresponding mock-ups are presented with the tests to be performed and the related acceptance criteria. The first qualification results are discussed.

  5. Aberrations due to solenoid focusing of a multiply charged high-current ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Grégoire, G; Lisi, N; Schnuriger, J C; Scrivens, R; Tambini, J

    2000-01-01

    At the output of a laser ion source, a high current of highly charged ions with a large range of charge states is available. The focusing of such a beam by magnetic elements causes a nonlinear space-charge field to develop which can induce large aberrations and emittance growth in the beam. Simulation of the beam from the CERN laser ion source will be presented for an ideal magnetic and electrostatic system using a radially symmetric model. In addition, the three dimensional software KOBRA3 is used for the simulation of the solenoid line. The results of these simulations will be compared with experiments performed on the CERN laser ion source with solenoids (resulting in a hollow beam) and a series of gridded electrostatic lenses. (5 refs).

  6. D0 Central Tracking Solenoid Energization, Controls, Interlocks and Quench Protection Initial Validation Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaskierny, W.; Hance, R.

    1998-01-01

    This note presents the inspection and tests to be performed on the DZERO solenoid energization, controls, interlocks and quench protection system before it is energized for the first time. This test is to be performed with a 5000A jumper at the end of the bus instead of the solenoid. This system is based in DZERO room 511. A copy of this note shall be annotated, signed and dated by the person coordinating the procedure; and filed with the system maintenance records. Annotations shall include comments about any aspect of the procedure that is abnormal or unsuccessful. The following inspections and tests shall be performed by persons knowledgeable about the system. Each individual test step should be reviewed and understood before proceeding with that step.

  7. Plans for longitudinal and transverse neutralized beam compression experiments, and initial results from solenoid transport experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Armijo, J.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grote, D.; Haber, I.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Molvik, A.W.; Rose, D.V.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.; Vay, J.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents plans for neutralized drift compression experiments, precursors to future target heating experiments. The target-physics objective is to study warm dense matter (WDM) using short-duration (∼1 ns) ion beams that enter the targets at energies just above that at which dE/dx is maximal. High intensity on target is to be achieved by a combination of longitudinal compression and transverse focusing. This work will build upon recent success in longitudinal compression, where the ion beam was compressed lengthwise by a factor of more than 50 by first applying a linear head-to-tail velocity tilt to the beam, and then allowing the beam to drift through a dense, neutralizing background plasma. Studies on a novel pulse line ion accelerator were also carried out. It is planned to demonstrate simultaneous transverse focusing and longitudinal compression in a series of future experiments, thereby achieving conditions suitable for future WDM target experiments. Future experiments may use solenoids for transverse focusing of un-neutralized ion beams during acceleration. Recent results are reported in the transport of a high-perveance heavy ion beam in a solenoid transport channel. The principal objectives of this solenoid transport experiment are to match and transport a space-charge-dominated ion beam, and to study associated electron-cloud and gas effects that may limit the beam quality in a solenoid transport system. Ideally, the beam will establish a Brillouin-flow condition (rotation at one-half the cyclotron frequency). Other mechanisms that potentially degrade beam quality are being studied, such as focusing-field aberrations, beam halo, and separation of lattice focusing elements

  8. Large high current density superconducting solenoids for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Taylor, J.D.

    1976-05-01

    Very often the study of high energy physics in colliding beam storage-rings requires a large magnetic field volume in order to detect and analyze charged particles which are created from the collision of two particle beams. Large superconducting solenoids which are greater than 1 meter in diameter are required for this kind of physics. In many cases, interesting physics can be done outside the magnet coil, and this often requires that the amount of material in the magnet coil be minimized. As a result, these solenoids should have high current density (up to 10 9 A m -2 ) superconducting windings. The methods commonly used to stabilize large superconducting magnets cannot be employed because of this need to minimize the amount of material in the coils. A description is given of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory program for building and testing prototype solenoid magnets which are designed to operate at coil current densities in excess of 10 9 A m -2 with magnetic stored energies which are as high as 1.5 Megajoules per meter of solenoid length. The coils use intrinsically stable multifilament Nb--Ti superconductors. Control of the magnetic field quench is achieved by using a low resistance aluminum bore tube which is inductively coupled to the coil. The inner cryostat is replaced by a tubular cooling system which carries two phase liquid helium. The magnet coil, the cooling tubes, and aluminum bore tube are cast in epoxy to form a single unified magnet and cryogenic system which is about 2 centimeters thick. The results of the magnet coil tests are discussed

  9. Engineering design solutions of flux swing with structural requirements for ohmic heating solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Here a more detailed publication is summarized which presents analytical methods with solutions that describe the structural behavior of ohmic heating solenoids to achieve a better understanding of the relationships between the functional variables that can provide the basis for recommended design improvements. The solutions relate the requirements imposed by structural integrity to the need for producing sufficient flux swing to initiate a plasma current in the tokamak fusion machine. A method is provided to perform a detailed structural analysis of every conducting turn in the radial build of the solenoid, and computer programmed listings for the closed form solutions are made available as part of the reference document. Distinction is made in deriving separate models for the regions of the solenoid where turn-to-turn radial contact is maintained with radial compression or with a bond in the presence of radial tension, and also where there is turn-to-turn radial separation due to the absence or the loss of bonding in the presence of would be radial tension. The derivations follow the theory of elasticity for a body possessing cylindrical anisotropy where the material properties are different in the radial and tangential directions. The formulations are made practical by presenting the methods for reducing stress and for relocating the relative position for potential turn-to-turn radial delamination by permitting an arbitrary traction at the outer radial surface of the solenoid in the form of pressure or displacement such as may be applied by a containment or a shrink fit structural cylinder

  10. CALCULATIONS FOR A MERCURY JET TARGET IN A SOLENOID MAGNET CAPTURE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; PALMER, R.B.; THIEBERGER, P.; WEGGEL, R.J.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-01-01

    A mercury jet is being considered as the production target for a muon storage ring facility to produce an intense neutrino beam. A 20 T solenoid magnet that captures pions for muon production surrounds the mercury target. As the liquid metal jet enters or exits the field eddy currents are induced. We calculate the effects that a liquid metal jet experiences in entering and exiting the magnetic field for the magnetic configuration considered in the Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study II

  11. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    OpenAIRE

    Burris-Mog, T.; Harres, K.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Nürnberg, F.; Busold, S.; Bussmann, M.; Deppert, O.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joost, M.; Sobiella, M.; Tauschwitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we prese...

  12. View through the CMS detector during the cooldown of the solenoid on February 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon, UC Davis

    2006-01-01

    Image looking along the beam direction through CMS. One can see, from the inside out: the patch panels and cables for the Preshower and ECAL; the front of the endcap HCAL; some cathode strip chambers (CSCs) for detecting muons; the sealed solenoid (the first circular silver-coloured ring) currently being cooled to operating temperature and held by the central barrel yoke ring (red and orange); one of the other barrel yoke rings installed with many muon chambers (silver rectangular boxes).

  13. The solenoidal transport option: IFE drivers, near term research facilities, and beam dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.; Briggs, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    Solenoidal magnets have been used as the beam transport system in all the high current electron induction accelerators that have been built in the past several decades. They have also been considered for the front end transport system for heavy ion accelerators for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) drivers, but this option has received very little attention in recent years. The analysis reported here was stimulated mainly by the recent effort to define an affordable open-quotes Integrated Research Experimentclose quotes (IRE) that can meet the near term needs of the IFE program. The 1996 FESAC IFE review panel agreed that an integrated experiment is needed to fully resolve IFE heavy ion driver science and technology issues; specifically, open-quotes the basic beam dynamics issues in the accelerator, the final focusing and transport issues in a reactor-relevant beam parameter regime, and the target heating phenomenologyclose quotes. The development of concepts that can meet these technical objectives and still stay within the severe cost constraints all new fusion proposals will encounter is a formidable challenge. Solenoidal transport has a very favorable scaling as the particle mass is decreased (the main reason why it is preferred for electrons in the region below 50 MeV). This was recognized in a recent conceptual study of high intensity induction linac-based proton accelerators for Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technologies, where solenoidal transport was chosen for the front end. Reducing the ion mass is an obvious scaling to exploit in an IRE design, since the output beam voltage will necessarily be much lower than that of a full scale driver, so solenoids should certainly be considered as one option for this experiment as well

  14. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid-Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated

  15. Solenoid-free Plasma Startup in NSTX using Coaxial Helicity Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger Raman; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Bell, Michael G.; Dennis Mueller; Nelson, Brian A.; Benoit LeBlanc; Charles Bush; Masayoshi Nagata; Ted Biewer

    2005-01-01

    The favorable properties of the Spherical Torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. However, small aspect ratio devices have very restricted space for a substantial central solenoid. Thus methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma startup in a ST. Recent experiments on the HIT-II ST at the University of Washington, have demonstrated the capability of a new method, referred to as transient CHI, to produce a high quality, closed-flux equilibrium that has then been coupled to induction, with a reduced requirement for transformer flux [R. Raman, T.R. Jarboe, B.A. Nelson, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 (February 2003) 075005-1]. An initial test of this method on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has produced about 140 kA of toroidal current. Modifications are now underway to improve capability for transient CHI in NSTX

  16. Superconducting solenoids for suspension of high-speed overhead transportation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omel' yanenko, V I [Kharkov Polytechnical Inst., USSR; Bocharov, V I; Dolgosheev, E A; Usichenko, Y G

    1977-08-01

    A superconducting solenoid is the most important component of a suspension for overhead transportation facilities operating on the repulsion principle. Its design is aimed at producing an adequate magnetic field within the active zone, to ensure a high ratio of lifting force to braking force, the necessary speed dependence of both forces, and a high ratio of lifting force to solenoid mass. The design must also be both technologically and economically feasible. For safety considerations, the magnetic field intensity inside the passenger compartment must be minimum. A survey of existing designs indicates a preference for race track solenoids of quasi-rectangular shape. While all designers already agree on a coil width within 0.25 to 0.6 m, the optimum coil length has not yet been established. Intrinsic stabilization of superconductors by stranding and twisting has pushed the maximum allowable current density to 200 A/mm/sup 2/ and the energy storing capacity of magnets to 100 kJ, a capacity of 1 MJ being within reach. The recommended coil dimensions for laboratory models are 1 m length and 0.3 m width, to carry magnetizing currents up to 0.3 MA.

  17. The Cold Mass Support System and the Helium Cooling System for the MICE Focusing Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Lau, Wing W.; Senanayake, Rohan S.; Witte, Holger

    2006-01-01

    The heart of the absorber focus coil (AFC) module for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is the two-coil superconducting solenoid that surrounds the muon absorber. The superconducting magnet focuses the muons that are cooled using ionization cooling, in order to improve the efficiency of cooling. The coils of the magnet may either be run in the solenoid mode (both coils operate at the same polarity) or the gradient (the coils operate at opposite polarity). The AFC magnet cold mass support system is designed to carry a longitudinal force up to 700 kN. The AFC module will be cooled using three pulse tube coolers that produce 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. One of the coolers will be used to cool the liquid (hydrogen or helium) absorber used for ionization cooling. The other two coolers will cool the superconducting solenoid. This report will describe the MICE AFC magnet. The cold mass supports will be discussed. The reasons for using a pulsed tube cooler to cool this superconducting magnet will also be discussed

  18. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  19. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A W; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-08

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a "hairline" solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  20. Improvement in thrust force estimation of solenoid valve considering minor hysteresis loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hwan Yoon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Solenoid valve is a very important hydraulic actuator for an automatic transmission in terms of shift quality. The same form of pressure for the clutch and the input current are required for an ideal control. However, the gap between a pressure and a current can occur which brings a delay in a transmission and a decrease in quality. This problem is caused by hysteresis phenomenon. As the ascending or descending magnetic field is applied to the solenoid, different thrust forces are generated. This paper suggests the calculation method of the thrust force considering the hysteresis phenomenon and consequently the accurate force can be obtained. Such hysteresis occurs in ferromagnetic materials, however the hysteresis phenomenon includes a minor hysteresis loop which begins with an initial magnetization curve and is generated by DC biased field density. As the core of the solenoid is ferromagnetic material, an accurate thrust force is obtained by applying the minor hysteresis loop compared to the force calculated by considering only the initial magnetization curve. An analytical background and the detailed explanation of measuring the minor hysteresis loop are presented. Furthermore experimental results and finite element analysis results are compared for the verification.

  1. An improved exact inversion formula for solenoidal fields in cone beam vector tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsevich, Alexander; Rothermel, Dimitri; Schuster, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we present an improved inversion formula for the 3D cone beam transform of vector fields supported in the unit ball which is exact for solenoidal fields. It is well known that only the solenoidal part of a vector field can be determined from the longitudinal ray transform of a vector field in cone beam geometry. The inversion formula, as it was developed in Katsevich and Schuster (2013 An exact inversion formula for cone beam vector tomography Inverse Problems 29 065013), consists of two parts. The first part is of the filtered backprojection type, whereas the second part is a costly 4D integration and very inefficient. In this article we tackle this second term and obtain an improved formula, which is easy to implement and saves one order of integration. We also show that the first part contains all information about the curl of the field, whereas the second part has information about the boundary values. More precisely, the second part vanishes if the solenoidal part of the original field is tangential at the boundary. A number of numerical tests presented in the paper confirm the theoretical results and the exactness of the formula. Also, we obtain an inversion algorithm that works for general convex domains.

  2. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Guenther, M.; Nuernberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schuetrumpf, J.; Roth, M.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Tampo, M.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 10 12 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  3. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a ``hairline'' solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  4. Design of 95 GHz gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid with water cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodin, Dmitri; Ben-Moshe, Roey; Einat, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    The design work for 2nd harmonic 95 GHz, 50 kW gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid is presented. Thermionic magnetron injection gun specifications were calculated according to the linear trade off equation, and simulated with CST program. Numerical code is used for cavity design using the non-uniform string equation as well as particle motion in the “cold” cavity field. The mode TE02 with low Ohmic losses in the cavity walls was chosen as the operating mode. The Solenoid is designed to induce magnetic field of 1.8 T over a length of 40 mm in the interaction region with homogeneity of ±0.34%. The solenoid has six concentric cylindrical segments (and two correction segments) of copper foil windings separated by water channels for cooling. The predicted temperature in continuous operation is below 93 °C. The parameters of the design together with simulation results of the electromagnetic cavity field, magnetic field, electron trajectories, and thermal analyses are presented

  5. Design of 95 GHz gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid with water cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodin, Dmitri; Ben-Moshe, Roey; Einat, Moshe [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ariel University, Ariel 40700 (Israel)

    2014-07-15

    The design work for 2nd harmonic 95 GHz, 50 kW gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid is presented. Thermionic magnetron injection gun specifications were calculated according to the linear trade off equation, and simulated with CST program. Numerical code is used for cavity design using the non-uniform string equation as well as particle motion in the “cold” cavity field. The mode TE02 with low Ohmic losses in the cavity walls was chosen as the operating mode. The Solenoid is designed to induce magnetic field of 1.8 T over a length of 40 mm in the interaction region with homogeneity of ±0.34%. The solenoid has six concentric cylindrical segments (and two correction segments) of copper foil windings separated by water channels for cooling. The predicted temperature in continuous operation is below 93 °C. The parameters of the design together with simulation results of the electromagnetic cavity field, magnetic field, electron trajectories, and thermal analyses are presented.

  6. A nonintrusive method for measuring the operating temperature of a solenoid-operated valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental data are presented to show that the in-service operating temperature of a solenoid-operated valve (SOV) can be interred simply and nondisruptively by using the copper winding of the solenoid coil as a self-indicating, permanently available resistance thermometer. The principal merits of this approach include (a) there is no need for an add-on temperature sensor, (b) the true temperature of a critical --- and likely the hottest --- part of the SOV (namely, the electrical coil) is measured directly, (c) temperature readout can be provided at any location at which the SOV electrical lead wires are accessible (even though remote from the valve), (d) the SOV need not be disturbed (whether normally energized or deenergized) to measure its temperature in situ, and (e) the method is applicable to all types of SOVs, large and small, ac- and dc-powered. Laboratory tests comparing temperatures measured both by coil resistance and by a conventional thermometer placed in contact with the external surface of the potted solenoid coil indicate that temperature within the coil may be on the order of 40 degree C higher than that measured externally, a fact that is important to life-expectancy calculations made on the basis of Arrhenius theory. Field practicality is illustrated with temperature measurements made using this method on a SOV controlling the flow of refrigerant in a large chilled-water air-conditioning system. 5 refs., 7 figs

  7. Development of disposable membrane hydrophones for a frequency range from 1MHz to 10MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Wan; Ohm, Won-Suk; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2017-11-01

    A method for fabricating disposable membrane hydrophones is presented. The disposable hydrophones are intended for onetime use in such damaging environments as chemically contaminating fluids and high-amplitude (peak amplitude ∼100MPa) shock wave fields, where the use of commercial membrane hydrophones is not recommended. Fabrication of a hydrophone is done using only off-the-shelf components and hand tools, which translates into ease of fabrication and orders-of-magnitude reduction in unit cost. In particular, poling and sputtering, the two processes that are chiefly responsible for the cost and difficulty associated with the conventional fabrication method, are replaced with the use of pre-poled polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films and polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-coated aluminum foils, respectively. Despite the seemingly crude construction, these disposable hydrophones can exhibit voltage sensitivity response that compares favorably with that of commercial hydrophones. For example, one prototype having a 2mm×2mm active element shows the end-of-cable voltage sensitivity of -270 (±1.9) dB re 1V/μPa over the frequency range of 1-10MHz. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical study of the elastic-plastic cyclic deformation of the ''GLOBUS-M'' compact tokamak central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.; Kavin, A.; Krivchenkov, Y.; Panin, A.

    1996-01-01

    The ''GLOBUS-M'' is a compact resistive tokamak with a central solenoid (CS) wound around the inner portion of the toroidal field coils. The magnetic field at the solenoid axis amounts to 8.3 T. The CS incorporates two layers of conductor (CuCr copper alloy) baked into insulation. The solenoid is designed to sustain 80,000 energizing. During each loading cycle the solenoid is subjected to the radial forces accompanied with the vertical compression. The most loaded region has been considered and modeled with the use of 2D axisymmetric finite element (FE) model. The model includes two conductor turns baked into insulation compound, copper cooling tubes and solder. The stress analysis shows that there is some plastic deformation in the copper tube and solder during loading and there is some back plastic deformation in the solder during unloading. The reloading does not cause any change in the solenoid stress-strain state in comparison with the case of loading. The number of cycles to failure has been simulated for all metallic components of the solenoid

  9. 120 MW, 800 MHz Magnicon for a Future Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-01-01

    Development of a pulsed magnicon at 800 MHz was carried out for the muon collider application, based on experience with similar amplifiers in the frequency range between 915 MHz and 34.3 GHz. Numerical simulations using proven computer codes were employed for the conceptual design, while established design technologies were incorporated into the engineering design. A cohesive design for the 800 MHz magnicon amplifier was carried out, including design of a 200 MW diode electron gun, design of the magnet system, optimization of beam dynamics including space charge effects in the transient and steady-state regimes, design of the drive, gain, and output cavities including an rf choke in the beam exit aperture, analysis of parasitic oscillations and design means to eliminate them, and design of the beam collector capable of 20 kW average power operation

  10. 47 CFR 90.353 - LMS operations in the 902-928 MHz band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false LMS operations in the 902-928 MHz band. 90.353... operations in the 902-928 MHz band. LMS systems may be authorized within the 902-928 MHz band, subject to the..., scientific, and medical (ISM) devices and radiolocation Government stations that operate in the 902-928 MHz...

  11. 78 FR 42701 - Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ...] Improving Public Safety Communications in the 800 MHz Band AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION...-901 MHz/935- 940 MHz band (900 MHz B/ILT Band) to allow a qualified entity to file an application for..., manufacturing, energy) to non-commercial (e.g., clerical, educational, philanthropic, medical). In 2004, the...

  12. 77 FR 22720 - Service Rules for Advanced Wireless Services in the 2000-2020 MHz and 2180-2200 MHz Bands, etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... operations in 1930-1995 MHz and uplink operations in 2000-2020 MHz. To address this apparent tension, we seek... includes broadcast auxiliary service (BAS) and cable television service (CARS) operations, as well as...

  13. Design and construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHz klystron to be used as RF power source for LHC/RF component tests

    CERN Document Server

    Frischholz, Hans; Pearson, C

    1998-01-01

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with t...

  14. Cambridge observations at 38-115 MHz and their implications for space astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, R.

    1987-01-01

    The design and performance of the Cambridge LF telescopes are reviewed. Consideration is given to the 151-MHz 6C telescope, the 38-MHz and 151-MHz LF synthesis telescopes, 81.5-MHz interplanetary scintillation observations with the 3.6-hectare array, long-baseline interferometry at 81.5 MHz, and the use of the Jodrell Bank MERLIN for 151-MHz closure-phase observations of bright sources. The strict limitation on the field mappable at a given resolution in ground-based observations at these frequencies is pointed out, and some outstanding astronomical problems requiring 0.3-30-MHz space observations are listed. 7 references

  15. 47 CFR 90.672 - Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from 800 MHz cellular systems or part 22 Cellular Radiotelephone systems, and within the... Procedures and Process-Unacceptable Interference § 90.672 Unacceptable interference to non-cellular 800 MHz...

  16. Acceleration performance of a 50-MHz split coaxial RFQ and the design of a 25.5-MHz prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, N.; Arai, S.; Fukushima, T.; Morimoto, T.; Tojyo, E.

    1989-03-01

    Acceleration tests on a 50-MHz split coaxial RFQ have been conducted at INS. The 2-m long RFQ has accelerated protons from 2 to 60 keV. The experimental results concerning beam emittance and transmission efficiency agree with predictions of a computer simulation. Following this success, we are fabricating a 25.5-MHz prototype of 2-m long. The issues of the study are to establish a structure standing a high-power operation and to accelerate heavy ions with a charge-to-mass ratio larger than 1/30. (author)

  17. MEMS Tunable Antennas to Address LTE 600 MHz-bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Morris, Art; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-01-01

    The broadcast television spectrum around 600 MHz has been freed in the united states and will be put for auction to wireless carriers in 2015. The newest generation of mobile communication standards will be deployed on these newly available bands, to provide mobile device users with an enhanced c...

  18. Charge domain filter operating up to 20 MHz clock frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gal, R.A.J.; Wallinga, Hans

    1983-01-01

    An analog sampled data low pass third order Butterworth filter has been realised in a buried channel CCD technology. This Charge Domain Filter, composed of transversal and recursive CCD filter sections, has been tested at clock frequencies up to 20 MHz.

  19. Calibration of SAR probes in waveguide at 900 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokela, K.; Puranen, L.; Hyysalo, P.

    1998-01-01

    The radiation safety tests for hand-held mobile phones require precise calibration of the small electric field probes used for the measurement of SAR in phantoms simulating the human body. In this study a calibration based on a rectangular waveguide was developed for SAR calibrations at 900 MHz

  20. 500 MHz transient digitizers based on GaAs CCDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryman, D.; Cresswell, J.V.; LeNoble, M.; Poutissou, R.

    1990-10-01

    A wide bandwidth transient digitizer based on a recently produced gallium arsenide charged coupled device is under development. The CCDs have 128 pixels and operate at 500 MHz. Initial testing of prototype modules in Experiment 787 at Brookhaven National Laboratory is reported. (Author) (8 refs., 10 figs.)

  1. MIMOSA. A 32 channel 40 MHz Camac scaler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, A.; Bourgeois, F.; Critin, G.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes a 32 channel, 24 bit, 40 MHz single width Camac scaler based on the memory increment technique. The characteristics of the module are given and its logic is briefly described. Circuit diagrams and component lists are given. (orig.)

  2. Status of 174 MHz RF system for BEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biryuchevsky, Yu.A.; Gorniker, E.I.; Kendjebulatov, E.K.; Krutikhin, S.A.; Kurkin, G.Ya.; Petrov, V.M.; Pilan, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The new RF system for the BEP storage ring (which is an injector of VEPP-2000 accelerating complex) will increase the particles energy in the BEP from 0.9 to 1 GeV. RF system operates at a frequency of 174 MHz and consists of an accelerating cavity, RF power generator and control system.

  3. Comparison analysis of superconducting solenoid magnet systems for ECR ion source based on the evolution strategy optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shao Qing; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is an essential component of heavy-ion accelerator. For a given design, the intensities of the highly charged ion beams extracted from the source can be increased by enlarging the physical volume of ECR zone. Several models for ECR ion source were and will be constructed depending on their operating conditions. In this paper three simulation models with 3, 4 and 6 solenoid system were built, but it's not considered anything else except the number of coils. Two groups of optimization analysis are presented, and the evolution strategy (ES) is adopted as an optimization tool which is a technique based on the ideas of mutation, adaptation and annealing. In this research, the volume of ECR zone was calculated approximately, and optimized designs for ECR solenoid magnet system were presented. Firstly it is better to make the volume of ECR zone large to increase the intensity of ion beam under the specific confinement field conditions. At the same time the total volume of superconducting solenoids must be decreased to save material. By considering the volume of ECR zone and the total length of solenoids in each model with different number of coils, the 6 solenoid system represented the highest coil performance. By the way, a certain case, ECR zone volume itself can be essential than the cost. So the maximum ECR zone volume for each solenoid magnet system was calculated respectively with the same size of the plasma chamber and the total magnet space. By comparing the volume of ECR zone, the 6 solenoid system can be also made with the maximum ECR zone volume.

  4. Method to reduce non-specific tissue heating of small animals in solenoid coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ananda; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Mallipudi, Rajiv; Cornejo, Christine; Bordelon, David; Armour, Michael; Morua, Katherine; Deweese, Theodore L; Ivkov, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Solenoid coils that generate time-varying or alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) are used in biomedical devices for research, imaging and therapy. Interactions of AMF and tissue produce eddy currents that deposit power within tissue, thus limiting effectiveness and safety. We aim to develop methods that minimise excess heating of mice exposed to AMFs for cancer therapy experiments. Numerical and experimental data were obtained to characterise thermal management properties of water using a continuous, custom water jacket in a four-turn simple solenoid. Theoretical data were obtained with method-of-moments (MoM) numerical field calculations and finite element method (FEM) thermal simulations. Experimental data were obtained from gel phantoms and mice exposed to AMFs having amplitude >50 kA/m and frequency of 160 kHz. Water has a high specific heat and thermal conductivity, is diamagnetic, polar, and nearly transparent to magnetic fields. We report at least a two-fold reduction of temperature increase from gel phantom and animal models when a continuous layer of circulating water was placed between the sample and solenoid, compared with no water. Thermal simulations indicate the superior efficiency in thermal management by the developed continuous single chamber cooling system over a double chamber non-continuous system. Further reductions of heating were obtained by regulating water temperature and flow for active cooling. These results demonstrate the potential value of a contiguous layer of circulating water to permit sustained exposure to high intensity alternating magnetic fields at this frequency for research using small animal models exposed to AMFs.

  5. Conceptual design of a 2 tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D{O} detector upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid to be part of a proposed upgrade for the D0 detector. This detector was completed in 1992, and has been taking data since then. The Fermilab Tevatron had scheduled a series of luminosity enhancements prior to the startup of this detector. In response to this accelerator upgrade, efforts have been underway to design upgrades for D0 to take advantage of the new luminosity, and improvements in detector technology. This magnet is conceived as part of the new central tracking system for D0, providing a radiation-hard high-precision magnetic tracking system with excellent electron identification.

  6. Laser heating and magnetic compression of plasma in a fast solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoida, H.W.; Vlases, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    A low-β plasma column a few mm in diameter by 22 cm in length is heated by an axially directed CO 2 laser to a high-β state in a fast rising solenoidal field. Successful heating depends on proper timing between the laser pulse and rising field. Typical conditions attained are a line energy density of 6 J/cm, T-barapprox. =40 eV, and n/sub e/approx. =3 x 10 17 e - /cm 3 , with conditions quite uniform along the length. The heating suppresses instabilities which appear under certain conditions in the non-laser-heated case

  7. Modeling and Control of Retarder using On/Off Solenoid Valves

    OpenAIRE

    Steinsland, Vidar

    2008-01-01

    The Retarder is one of the main components in Scania's trucks' braking system and is used to brake down the truck and for maintaining a steady speed on descents. This Master's Thesis aims to investigate if the current system which uses a proportional valve to control the air pressure in the Retarder, can be replaced with two on/o® solenoid valves and a pressure chamber to control the air pressure, which would result in a cheaper and more robust system. By varying the air pressure, the braking...

  8. The silicon sensor for the compact muon solenoid tracker. Control of the fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolescu, Florentina; Mihul, Alexandru; Macchiolo, Anna

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at CERN. The inner tracking system of this experiment consists of the world largest Silicon Strip Tracker (SST). In total, 24,244 silicon sensors are implemented covering an area of 206 m 2 . To construct this large system and to ensure its functionality for the full lifetime of ten years under the hard LHC condition, a detailed quality assurance program has been developed. This paper describes the strategy of the Process Qualification Control to monitor the stability of the fabrication process throughout the production phase and the results obtained are shown. (authors)

  9. Optimal laser heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitela, J.; Akcasu, A.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Optimal Control Theory is used to analyze the laser-heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields. Heating strategies that minimize a linear combination of heating time and total energy spent by the laser system are found. A numerical example is used to illustrate the theory. Results of this example show that by an appropriate modulation of the laser intensity, significant savings in the laser energy are possible with only slight increases in the heating time. However, results may depend strongly on the initial state of the plasma and on the final ion temperature. (orig.)

  10. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Burris-Mog

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we present simulation results of the available spectrum after transport through the gantry.

  11. DAQ cards for the Compact Muon Solenoid: a successful technology transfer case

    CERN Document Server

    Barone, M; Geralis, T; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Tzamarias, S; Zachariadou, K; Tsoussis, L

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we give the description of a project accomplished by a collaboration of researchers, engineers and managers from a Greek medium-size company Hourdakis Electronics S.A and the research laboratories CERN in Geneva and DEMOKRITOS in Athens. The project involved the production of 22 input-output DAQ electronic modules to be used for R&D purposes in the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment of LHC at CERN. This project can be considered a successful technology transfer. (3 refs).

  12. Solenoid-free Plasma Start-up in NSTX using Transient CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Raman, B.A. Nelson, D. Mueller, T.R. Jarboe, M.G. Bell, B. LeBlanc, R. Maqueda, J. Menard, M. Ono, M. Nagata, L. Roquemore, and V. Soukhanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Experiments in NSTX have now unambiguously demonstrated the coupling of toroidal plasmas produced by the technique of CHI to inductive sustainment and ramp-up of the toroidal plasma current. This is an important step because an alternate method for plasma startup is essential for developing a fusion reactor based on the spherical torus concept. Elimination of the central solenoid would also allow greater flexibility in the choice of the aspect ratio in tokamak designs now being considered. The transient CHI method for spherical torus startup was originally developed on the HIT-II experiment at the University of Washington

  13. Algorithms for Computing the Magnetic Field, Vector Potential, and Field Derivatives for a Thin Solenoid with Uniform Current Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    A numerical algorithm for computing the field components Br and Bz and their r and z derivatives with open boundaries in cylindrical coordinates for radially thin solenoids with uniform current density is described in this note. An algorithm for computing the vector potential Aθ is also described. For the convenience of the reader, derivations of the final expressions from their defining integrals are given in detail, since their derivations are not all easily found in textbooks. Numerical calculations are based on evaluation of complete elliptic integrals using the Bulirsch algorithm cel. The (apparently) new feature of the algorithms described in this note applies to cases where the field point is outside of the bore of the solenoid and the field-point radius approaches the solenoid radius. Since the elliptic integrals of the third kind normally used in computing Bz and Aθ become infinite in this region of parameter space, fields for points with the axial coordinate z outside of the ends of the solenoid and near the solenoid radius are treated by use of elliptic integrals of the third kind of modified argument, derived by use of an addition theorem. Also, the algorithms also avoid the numerical difficulties the textbook solutions have for points near the axis arising from explicit factors of 1/r or 1/r2 in the some of the expressions.

  14. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y.Q., E-mail: tengjian@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zhou, W.M.; Cao, L.F.

    2013-11-21

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  15. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  16. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y.Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zhou, W.M.; Cao, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  17. Chromatic, geometric and space charge effects on laser accelerated protons focused by a solenoid

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Omari, Husam; Hofmann, Ingo; Ratzinger, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We stud­ied nu­mer­i­cal­ly emit­tance and trans­mis­sion ef­fects by chro­mat­ic and ge­o­met­ric aber­ra­tions, with and with­out space charge, for a pro­ton beam be­hind a solenoid in the laser pro­ton ex­per­i­ment LIGHT at GSI. The TraceWin code was em­ployed using a field map for the solenoid and an ini­tial dis­tri­bu­tion with ex­po­nen­tial en­er­gy de­pen­dence close to the ex­per­i­ment. The re­sults show a strong ef­fect of chro­mat­ic, and a rel­a­tive­ly weak one of ge­o­met­ric...

  18. Electrical characterization of S/C conductor for the CMS solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Greco, Michela; Kircher, F; Musenich, R

    2005-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the general-purpose detectors to be provided for the LHC project at CERN. The design field of the CMS superconducting magnet is 4 T, the magnetic length is 12.5 m and the free bore is 6 m. The coil is wound from 20 high purity aluminum-stabilized NbTi conductors with a total length of 45 km. The main peculiarity of the CMS magnet among other existing thin detector solenoids is its sandwich-type aluminum-stabilized superconductor. This special feature was chosen in order to have a mechanically self-supporting winding structure. We measured the critical current of all the 21 finished conductors in fields up to 6 T using the Ma.Ri.S.A. test facility at INFN-Genova. We compare these results with the critical current of single strands measured by CEA- Saclay, extracted from the conductor after the co-extrusion. A comparison among the measurements provides information about the possible critical current degradation and assures an accurate quality control of the conductor pr...

  19. Non-Solenoidal Startup Research Directions on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonck, R. J.; Bongard, M. W.; Lewicki, B. T.; Reusch, J. A.; Winz, G. R.

    2017-10-01

    The Pegasus research program has been focused on developing a physical understanding and predictive models for non-solenoidal tokamak plasma startup using Local Helicity Injection (LHI). LHI employs strong localized electron currents injected along magnetic field lines in the plasma edge that relax through magnetic turbulence to form a tokamak-like plasma. Pending approval, the Pegasus program will address a broader, more comprehensive examination of non-solenoidal tokamak startup techniques. New capabilities may include: increasing the toroidal field to 0.6 T to support critical scaling tests to near-NSTX-U field levels; deploying internal plasma diagnostics; installing a coaxial helicity injection (CHI) capability in the upper divertor region; and deploying a modest (200-400 kW) electron cyclotron RF capability. These efforts will address scaling of relevant physics to higher BT, separate and comparative studies of helicity injection techniques, efficiency of handoff to consequent current sustainment techniques, and the use of ECH to synergistically improve the target plasma for consequent bootstrap and neutral beam current drive sustainment. This has an ultimate goal of validating techniques to produce a 1 MA target plasma in NSTX-U and beyond. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  20. Ultrafast probing of magnetic field growth inside a laser-driven solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, C.; Pollock, B. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Hazi, A.; Divol, L.; Farmer, W. A.; Haberberger, D.; Javedani, J.; Johnson, A. J.; Kemp, A.; Levy, M. C.; Grant Logan, B.; Mariscal, D. A.; Landen, O. L.; Patankar, S.; Ross, J. S.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Swadling, G. F.; Williams, G. J.; Fujioka, S.; Law, K. F. F.; Moody, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the detection of the time-dependent B-field amplitude and topology in a laser-driven solenoid. The B-field inferred from both proton deflectometry and Faraday rotation ramps up linearly in time reaching 210 ± 35 T at the end of a 0.75-ns laser drive with 1 TW at 351 nm. A lumped-element circuit model agrees well with the linear rise and suggests that the blow-off plasma screens the field between the plates leading to an increased plate capacitance that converts the laser-generated hot-electron current into a voltage source that drives current through the solenoid. ALE3D modeling shows that target disassembly and current diffusion may limit the B-field increase for longer laser drive. Scaling of these experimental results to a National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraum target size (˜0.2 cm3 ) indicates that it is possible to achieve several tens of Tesla.

  1. Ion beam transport and focus for LMF using an achromatic solenoidal lens system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    The light ion LMF (Laboratory Microfusion Facility) requires an ion beam transport length for bunching and standoff to be about four meters from the diode to the target. The baseline LMF transport scheme uses an achromatic two lens system consisting of the diode (a self-field lens) and a solenoidal lens. Charge and current neutralization are provided by a background gas. A detailed analysis of this system is presented here. The effects of additional magnetic fields are examined, including those produced by non-zero net currents, applied B effects near the diode, and diamagnetic effects in the solenoidal lens. Instabilities are analyzed including the filamentation instability, the two-stream instability (beam ions, plasma electrons), the plasma two-stream instability (plasma electrons, plasma ions), and the ion acoustic instability. Scattering in the foil and gas are shown to be negligible. Gas breakdown processes are analyzed in detail, including ion impact ionization, electron avalanching, and ohmic heating. Special diode requirements are examined, including voltage accuracy, energy spread, and aiming tolerances. The neutral gas and gas pressure are chosen to satisfy several constraints, one being that the net current must be small, and another being that the filamentation instability should be avoided. With the present choice of 1 Torr He, it is concluded that the complete achromatic lens system appears to be viable, simple, and efficient transport and focusing system for LMF

  2. Stress Analysis of the D-Zero Solenoid Magnet Lifting Fixture PPD Fixture No.102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaczek, M.

    1997-01-01

    This engineering note presents stress analysis calculations for the below the hook lifting fixture which will be used to move the D-Zero solenoid magnet during installation work at the D-Zero Assembly building. Load bearing structural members are shown to have a minimum design factor of 3 based on yield strength as required by ASME B30.20. All bolts were analyzed and shown to be kept below allowable loads/stresses listed in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) manual. The lifting fixture will be manufactured at Fermilab using some material scavenged from an existing lifting fixture that was shipped with the magnet from the magnet manufacturer, Toshiba Corporation. The fixture is designed with built in versatility so that the solenoid magnet can be maneuvered through the stages of preparation and installation into it's final mounted position. The structure has been analyzed for all phases of its use, although the analysis of the structure as a below the hook lifting device is the main purpose of this note.

  3. Solenoid Driven Pressure Valve System: Toward Versatile Fluidic Control in Paper Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehoon H; Hahn, Young Ki; Lee, Jungmin; van Noort, Danny; Kim, Minseok S

    2018-02-20

    As paper-based diagnostics has become predominantly driven by more advanced microfluidic technology, many of the research efforts are still focused on developing reliable and versatile fluidic control devices, apart from improving sensitivity and reproducibility. In this work, we introduce a novel and robust paper fluidic control system enabling versatile fluidic control. The system comprises a linear push-pull solenoid and an Arduino Uno microcontroller. The precisely controlled pressure exerted on the paper stops the flow. We first determined the stroke distance of the solenoid to obtain a constant pressure while examining the fluidic time delay as a function of the pressure. Results showed that strips of grade 1 chromatography paper had superior reproducibility in fluid transport. Next, we characterized the reproducibility of the fluidic velocity which depends on the type and grade of paper used. As such, we were able to control the flow velocity on the paper and also achieve a complete stop of flow with a pressure over 2.0 MPa. Notably, after the actuation of the pressure driven valve (PDV), the previously pressed area regained its original flow properties. This means that, even on a previously pressed area, multiple valve operations can be successfully conducted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of an active and repetitive valve operation in paper microfluidics. As a proof of concept, we have chosen to perform a multistep detection system in the form of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with mouse IgG as the target analyte.

  4. Characterization of the SPS 800MHz travelling wave cavities.

    CERN Document Server

    Bazyl, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that HOMs in RF cavities are a potentially dangerous source of beam impedance. Therefore, HOMs (both longitudinal and transverse) can drive the beam unstable . The 800MHz cavities of the SPS were studied in the past. However, very little documentation was left behind. Currently, the performance of the SPS is limited by a longitudinal beam instability. In order to study this instability, an accurate impedance model of the whole SPS is needed.

  5. Polarization observations of four southern pulsars at 1560 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Ji; Manchester, R. N.; Lyne, A. G.

    1991-12-01

    Some interesting results from the mean pulse polarization observations of four southern pulsars made at the Australian National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Parkes, using the 64-m telescope in June and July, 1988, are presented. The 2 x 16 x 5 MHz filter system from Jodrell Bank has proved excellent in dedispersing the pulse signals and measuring their polarization properties. Data for the four pulsars are given in some detail, and their spectral behavior is discussed.

  6. Status of HLT1 sequence and path towards 30 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    De Cian, Michel; Gligorov, Vladimir; Hasse, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Latham, Thomas Edward; Ponce, Sebastien; Quagliani, Renato; Schreiner, Henry Fredrick; Stemmle, Simon Benedikt; Van Tilburg, Jeroen; Zdybal, Milosz Jerzy; Williams, J Michael

    2018-01-01

    We present the current status of the HLT1 reconstruction sequence for the LHCb upgrade, both in terms of the number of events which can be processed per second and the achievable physics performance on a selected range of benchmark modes. We present detailed profiling of the various algorithms, describe the bottlenecks, and outline a strategy towards an HLT1 able to process the LHCb upgrade data at 30 MHz

  7. Effect of 2 MHz ultrasound irradiation on Pisum sativum roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.W.; Voorhees, S.M.; Carstensen, E.L.; Kaufman, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of 2 MHz ultrasound at intensity levels from 2.5 to 22 W/cm 2 on the growth rate and mitotic index of Pisum sativum roots was studied. The ultrasound produced an immediate reduction in the growth rate on the first postexposure day, followed by a gradual recovery to the control value. Ultrasound reduced the root meristem mitotic index. Intensity- and time-dependent relations were found for the growth rate and mitotic index reductions

  8. Design of 1 MHz solid state high frequency power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Darshan Kumar; Singh, N.P.; Gajjar, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    A High Voltage High Frequency (HVHF) Power supply is used for various applications, like AM Transmitters, metallurgical applications, Wireless Power Transfer, RF Ion Sources, etc. The Ion Source for a Neutral beam Injector at ITER-India uses inductively coupled power source at High Frequency (∼ 1 MHz). Switching converter based topology used to generate 1 MHz sinusoidal output is expected to have advantages on efficiency and reliability as compared to traditional RF Tetrode tubes based oscillators. In terms of Power Electronics, thermal and power coupling issues are major challenges at such a high frequency. A conceptual design for a 200 kW, 1 MHz power supply and a prototype design for a 600W source been done. The prototype design is attempted with Class-E amplifier topology where a MOSFET is switched resonantly. The prototype uses two low power modules and a ferrite combiner to add the voltage and power at the output. Subsequently solution with class-D H-Bridge configuration have been evaluated through simulation where module design is stable as switching device do not participate in resonance, further switching device voltage rating is substantially reduced. The rating of the modules is essentially driven by the maximum power handling capacity of the MOSFETs and ferrites in the combiner circuit. The output passive network including resonance tuned network and impedance matching network caters for soft switching and matches the load impedance to 50 ohm respectively. This paper describes the conceptual design of a 200 kW power supply and experimental results of the prototype 600 W, 1 MHz source. (author)

  9. The quiet Sun brightness temperature at 408 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avignon, Y.; Lantos, P.; Palagi, F.; Patriarchi, P.

    1975-01-01

    The flux of the radio quiet Sun and the brightness temperature at 408 MHz (73cm) are derived from measurements with the E-W Nancay interferometer and the E-W arm of the Medicina North Cross. It is shown that the lowest envelopes, which defined the radio quiet Sun, correspond to transits of extended coronal holes across the disk of the Sun. (Auth.)

  10. Development of a high-power 432 MHz DTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, F.; Kato, T.; Takasaki, E.; Yamazaki, Y.; Kawasumi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Iino, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A high-power model of a 432 MHz Drift-Tube Linac is under construction. It will accelerate H - ions from 3 to 5.4 MeV, and is a prototype of the DTL for the Japanese Hadron Project. Several new techniques have been developed for constructing the DTL: fabricating and assembling methods of permanent quadrupole magnet and a drift tube, alignment of the drift tube, and a method of connecting the tanks. (Author) 6 refs., 5 figs

  11. Spectroscopy of radio sources from the Parkes 2700 MHz survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.J.; Djorgovski, S.; De Carvalho, R.

    1990-01-01

    The results of long-slit CCD spectroscopy on 37 objects from the Parkes 2700 MHz survey are presented, with data for an additional two companion objects. Eight of the objects are quasars, six more are AGNs, and five more are radio galaxies. Seventeen of the objects observed are stars and, thus, probable misidentifications. Three objects show featureless spectra and are identified as possible BL Lac objects. Spectra are presented for a total of 20 objects. 20 refs

  12. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests

  13. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  14. Design of 1 MHz Solid State High Frequency Power Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Darshan; Singh, N. P.; Gajjar, Sandip; Thakar, Aruna; Patel, Amit; Raval, Bhavin; Dhola, Hitesh; Dave, Rasesh; Upadhay, Dishang; Gupta, Vikrant; Goswami, Niranjan; Mehta, Kush; Baruah, Ujjwal

    2017-04-01

    High Frequency Power supply (HFPS) is used for various applications like AM Transmitters, metallurgical applications, Wireless Power Transfer, RF Ion Sources etc. The Ion Source for a Neutral beam Injector at ITER-India uses inductively coupled power source at High Frequency (∼1 MHz). Switching converter based topology used to generate 1 MHz sinusoidal output is expected to have advantages on efficiency and reliability as compared to traditional RF Tetrode tubes based oscillators. In terms of Power Electronics, thermal and power coupling issues are major challenges at such a high frequency. A conceptual design for a 200 kW, 1 MHz power supply and a prototype design for a 600 W source been done. The prototype design is attempted with Class-E amplifier topology where a MOSFET is switched resonantly. The prototype uses two low power modules and a ferrite combiner to add the voltage and power at the output. Subsequently solution with Class-D H-Bridge configuration have been evaluated through simulation where module design is stable as switching device do not participate in resonance, further switching device voltage rating is substantially reduced. The rating of the modules is essentially driven by the maximum power handling capacity of the MOSFETs and ferrites in the combiner circuit. The output passive network including resonance tuned network and impedance matching network caters for soft switching and matches the load impedance to 50ohm respectively. This paper describes the conceptual design of a 200 kW high frequency power supply and experimental results of the prototype 600 W, 1 MHz source.

  15. Velocities of Auroral Coherent Echoes At 12 and 144 Mhz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koustov, A. V.; Danskin, D. W.; Makarevitch, R. A.; Uspensky, M. V.; Janhunen, P.; Nishitani, N.; Nozawa, N.; Lester, M.; Milan, S.

    Two Doppler coherent radar systems are currently working at Hankasalmi, Finland, the STARE and CUTLASS radars operating at 144 MHz and 12 MHz, respectively. The STARE beam 3 is nearly co-located with the CUTLASS beam 5 providing an opportunity for echo velocity comparison along the same direction but at significantly different radar frequencies. In this study we consider one event when STARE radar echoes are detected t the same ranges as CUTLASS radar echoes. The observations are complemented by EISCAT measurements of the ionospheric electric field and elec- tron density behavior at one range of 900 km. Two separate situations are studied; for the first one, CUTLASS observed F-region echoes (including the range of the EIS- CAT measurements) while for the second one CUTLASS observed E-region echoes. In both cases STARE E-region measurements were available. We show that F-region CUTLASS velocities agree well with the convection component along the CUTLASS radar beam while STARE velocities are sometimes smaller by a factor of 2-3. For the second case, STARE velocities are found to be either smaller or larger than CUTLASS velocities, depending on range. Plasma physics of E- and F-region irregularities is dis- cussed in attempt to explain inferred relationship between various velocities. Special attention is paid to ionospheric refraction that is important for the detection of 12-MHz echoes.

  16. Assessment of cutaneous radiation fibrosis by 20 MHz-sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottloeber, P.; Braun-Falco, B.; Plewig, G.; Kerscher, M.; Peter, R.U.; Nadeshina, N.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation fibrosis is the cardinal symptom of the chronicle stage of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. The degree of cutaneous fibrosis can clinically be estimated by palpation. High-frequency 20 MHz-sonography is an established, noninvasive procedure, which renders an exact determination of skin thickness and additionally densitometry is possible. We investigated 15 survivors of the Chernobyl accident in 1986, who developed symptoms of the chronic stage of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. We determined skin thickness and echogenicity of skin areas clinically suggestive of radiation fibrosis before, during and after treatment. 20 MHz-sonography showed a distinct enlargement of the echorich corium and a reduction of the subcutaneous fatty tissue in comparison with the unaffected, contralateral skin, here demonstrating typical features of radiation fibrosis, namely dermal fibrosis and reactive pseudoatrophy and fatty tissue. The histology presented an increase and swelling of the collagen fibers and atypical fibroblastic cells. The patients received treatment with low-dose interferon y (Polyfcron R , 3 x 50μg s.C., three times per week) up to 30 months. A marked reduction of skin thickness and echogenicity reaching nearly normal values could be observed. We conclude that 20 MHz-sonography is an easy to apply, noninvasive, well established procedure to quantify cutaneous radiation fibrosis and to assess therapeutic outcome

  17. The LANSCE 805 MHZ RF System History and Status

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Michael; Tallerico, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear accelerator runs at 201.25 MHz for acceleration to 100 MeV. The remainder of the acceleration to 800 MeV is at 805 MHz. This is done with 44 accelerator cavity stages driven by 805 MHz klystrons. Each klystron has a peak power capability of 1.25 MeV. Originally, 97 klystrons were purchased, which was 70 from Varian/CPI and 27 from Litton. The 44 RF systems are laid out in sectors with either 6 or 7 klystrons per sector. The klystrons in each sector are powered from a common HV sytem. The current arrangement uses the Varian/CPI klystrons in 6 of the 7 sectors and Litton klystrons in the remaining sector. With that arrangement there are 38 CPI klystrons installed and 1 spare klystron per sector and 6 Litton klystrons installed in the final sector with 2 spares. The current average life of all of the operating and spare klystrons (52 total) is >112,000 filament hours and >93,000 HV hours. That is three times the typical klystron lifetime today f...

  18. A 2 MHz 3-port analog isolation and fanout module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beadle, E.R.

    1995-01-01

    In many accelerator based data acquisition systems, signal isolation is a necessary feature so ground loops are avoided. Here, a 3-port isolated circuit providing 1:3 fanout, buffering and amplification over a multi-megahertz bandwidth is presented. The circuit accepts a single input and drives 3 independently isolated output channels, up to ± 10 V into 50 ohms. The input and output isolation is supplied via a dual optocoupler, and the power isolation is achieved with DC/DC converters. In each channel, a voltage feedback amplifier is used in combination with the optocoupler to form a transimpedance configuration with the gain-bandwidth product (GBP) set by a pair of resistors. The feedback amplifier linearizes the optocoupler transfer characteristics using a servo technique and also controls the circuit drift, nonlinearity, and bandwidth. The circuit has demonstrated long-term drift of 4 MHz, and a SNR of >55 db in a 1 MHz bandwidth with < 1% THD for a 10 V amplitude sinusoidal input. With few modifications, this design is capable of providing input/output gain and bandwidth in the range of 10--50 MHz

  19. Design of 118 MHz twelfth harmonic cavity of APS PAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Bridges, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Two radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed in the Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) of the Advanced Photon Source. One is for the first harmonic frequency at 9.8 MHz, and the other is for the twelfth harmonic frequency at 118 MHz. This note reports on the design of the 118 MHz RF cavity. Computer models are used to find the mode frequencies, impedances, Q-factors, and field distributions in the cavity. The computer codes MAFIA, URMEL, and URMEL-T are useful tools which model and simulate the resonance characteristics of a cavity. These codes employ the finite difference method to solve Maxwell's equations. MAFIA is a three-dimensional problem solver and uses square patches to approximate the inner surface of a cavity. URMEL and URMEL-T are two-dimensional problem solvers and use rectangular and triangular meshes, respectively. URMEL-T and MAFIA can handle problems with arbitrary dielectric materials located inside the boundary. The cavity employs a circularly cylindrical ceramic window to limit the vacuum to the beam pipe. The ceramic window used in the modeling will have a wall thickness of 0.9 cm. This wall thickness is not negligible in determining the resonant frequencies of the cavity. In the following, results of two- and three-dimensional modeling of the cavities using the URMEL-T and MAFIA codes are reported

  20. An Automated 476 MHz RF Cavity Processing Facility at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, P; Schwarz, H

    2003-01-01

    The 476 MHz accelerating cavities currently used at SLAC are those installed on the PEP-II B-Factory collider accelerator. They are designed to operate at a maximum accelerating voltage of 1 MV and are routinely utilized on PEP-II at voltages up to 750 kV. During the summer of 2003, SPEAR3 will undergo a substantial upgrade, part of which will be to replace the existing 358.54 MHz RF system with essentially a PEP-II high energy ring (HER) RF station operating at 476.3 MHz and 3.2 MV (or 800 kV/cavity). Prior to installation, cavity RF processing is required to prepare them for use. A dedicated high power test facility is employed at SLAC to provide the capability of conditioning each cavity up to the required accelerating voltage. An automated LabVIEW based interface controls and monitors various cavity and test stand parameters, increasing the RF fields accordingly such that stable operation is finally achieved. This paper describes the high power RF cavity processing facility, highlighting the features of t...

  1. Reduction of environmental MHz noise for SQUID application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, T. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: araya@sup.ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kitamura, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kamishiro, M. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Sakuta, K. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Itozaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: itozaki@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-10-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in measurement using SQUIDs without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is an effective method to remove the environmental noise. The environmental noise has been reduced by the ANC system in the radio frequency region around MHz. The anti-phase waves of the environmental noise should be generated by this system. The ANC system including the phase and amplitude control circuit was developed to make the anti-phase waves in the MHz region. In this paper, sinusoidal waves with a MHz frequency were used as the environmental noise. When a coil antenna was used for a receiver antenna, this ANC system suppressed these sinusoidal waves to the white noise level about 40 dB. When we used a SQUID as a receiver antenna, we also cancelled sinusoidal waves to the white noise level by this system. This shows that the ANC system is useful to reduce an environmental noise when this ANC system is developed to cancel multi-frequency noise.

  2. Reduction of environmental MHz noise for SQUID application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Kamishiro, M.; Sakuta, K.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in measurement using SQUIDs without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is an effective method to remove the environmental noise. The environmental noise has been reduced by the ANC system in the radio frequency region around MHz. The anti-phase waves of the environmental noise should be generated by this system. The ANC system including the phase and amplitude control circuit was developed to make the anti-phase waves in the MHz region. In this paper, sinusoidal waves with a MHz frequency were used as the environmental noise. When a coil antenna was used for a receiver antenna, this ANC system suppressed these sinusoidal waves to the white noise level about 40 dB. When we used a SQUID as a receiver antenna, we also cancelled sinusoidal waves to the white noise level by this system. This shows that the ANC system is useful to reduce an environmental noise when this ANC system is developed to cancel multi-frequency noise

  3. A quantitative investigation of the effect of a close-fitting superconducting shield on the coil factor of a solenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarøe, Morten; Monaco, R.; Koshelet, V.

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting shields are commonly used to suppress external magnetic interference. We show, that an error of almost an order of magnitude can occur in the coil factor in realistic configurations of the solenoid and the shield. The reason is that the coil factor is determined by not only...... the geometry of the solenoid, but also the nearby magnetic environment. This has important consequences for many cryogenic experiments involving magnetic fields such as the determination of the parameters of Josephson junctions, as well as other superconducting devices. It is proposed to solve the problem...

  4. Floquet Engineering of Optical Solenoids and Quantized Charge Pumping along Tailored Paths in Two-Dimensional Chern Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Botao; Ünal, F. Nur; Eckardt, André

    2018-06-01

    The insertion of a local magnetic flux, as the one created by a thin solenoid, plays an important role in gedanken experiments of quantum Hall physics. By combining Floquet engineering of artificial magnetic fields with the ability of single-site addressing in quantum gas microscopes, we propose a scheme for the realization of such local solenoid-type magnetic fields in optical lattices. We show that it can be employed to manipulate and probe elementary excitations of a topological Chern insulator. This includes quantized adiabatic charge pumping along tailored paths inside the bulk, as well as the controlled population of edge modes.

  5. A Novel Dual-Band Rectenna for Ambient RF Energy Harvesting at GSM 900 MHz and 1800 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Khanh Ho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel dual-band rectenna for RF energy harvesting system. This rectenna is created from a dual-band antenna and a dual-band rectifier which operates at GSM bands (900 MHz and 1800 MHz. The printed monopole antenna is miniaturized by two meander-lines. The received signal from the receiving antenna is rectified by a voltage double using Schottky diode SMS-7630. The rectifier is optimized for low input power level of -20dBm using harmonic balance. Prototype is designed and fabricated. The simulation is validated by measurement with power conversion efficiency of 20% and 40.8% (in measurement at the input power level of -20dBm. The proposed rectenna has output voltage from 183-415 mV. From the measured results, this rectenna provides the possibility to harvest the ambient electromagnetic energy for powering low-power electronic devices.

  6. Design and fabrication of a 30 T superconducting solenoid using overpressure processed Bi2212 round wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-18

    High field superconducting magnets are used in particle colliders, fusion energy devices, and spectrometers for medical imaging and advanced materials research. Magnets capable of generating fields of 20-30 T are needed by future accelerator facilities. A 20-30 T magnet will require the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) and therefore the challenges of high field HTS magnet development need to be addressed. Superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) conductors fabricated by the oxide-powder-in-tube (OPIT) technique have demonstrated the capability to carry large critical current density of 105 A/cm2 at 4.2 K and in magnetic fields up to 45 T. Available in round wire multi-filamentary form, Bi2212 may allow fabrication of 20-50 T superconducting magnets. Until recently the performance of Bi2212 has been limited by challenges in realizing high current densities (Jc ) in long lengths. This problem now is solved by the National High Magnetic Field Lab using an overpressure (OP) processing technique, which uses external pressure to process the conductor. OP processing also helps remove the ceramic leakage that results when Bi-2212 liquid leaks out from the sheath material and reacts with insulation, coil forms, and flanges. Significant advances have also been achieved in developing novel insulation materials (TiO2 coating) and Ag-Al sheath materials that have higher mechanical strengths than Ag-0.2wt.% Mg, developing heat treatment approaches to broadening the maximum process temperature window, and developing high-strength, mechanical reinforced Bi-2212 cables. In the Phase I work, we leveraged these new opportunities to prototype overpressure processed solenoids and test them in background fields of up to 14 T. Additionally a design of a fully superconducting 30 T solenoid was produced. This work in conjunction with the future path outlined in the Phase II proposal would

  7. Formalising and analysing the control software of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hwong, Y.L.; Keiren, J.J.A.; Kusters, V.J.J.; Leemans, S.J.J.; Willemse, T.A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The control software of the CERN Compact Muon Solenoid experiment contains over 27 500 finite state machines. These state machines are organised hierarchically: commands are sent down the hierarchy and state changes are sent upwards. The sheer size of the system makes it virtually impossible to

  8. Development of high-strength and high-RRR aluminum-stabilized superconductor for the ATLAS thin solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Wada, K; Sakamoto, H; Shimada, T; Nagasu, Y; Inoue, I H; Tsunoda, K; Endo, S; Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y; Tanaka, K; Doi, Y; Kondo, T

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet is being constructed to provide a magnetic field of 2 Tesla in the central tracking part of the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Since the solenoid coil is placed in front of the liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeter, the solenoid coil must be as thin (and transparent) as possible. The high-strength and high- RRR aluminum-stabilized superconductor is a key technology for the solenoid to be thinnest while keeping its stability. This has been developed with an alloy of 0.1 wt% nickel addition to 5N pure aluminum and with the subsequent mechanical cold working of 21% in area reduction. A yield strength of 110 MPa at 4.2 K has been realized keeping a residual resistivity ratio (RRR) of 590, after a heat treatment corresponding to coil curing at 130 degrees C for 15 hrs. This paper describes the optimization of the fabrication process and characteristics of the developed conductor. (8 refs).

  9. C.A.P. plasma physics summer school, Banff, June 1975. I. Experiments on laser-heated solenoids and pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlases, G.C.

    1975-01-01

    A review is given of experimental progress on the use of long wavelength lasers (CO 2 or CO) to heat long, magnetically confined plasma columns to thermonuclear temperatures. Theoretical studies of the feasibility of the concept for controlled fusion power are reviewed. The laser-heated solenoid concept is reviewed in particular

  10. Resistive plate chamber online data quality monitoring for the Compact Muon Solenoid at the European Center for Nuclear Research

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, William David

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive, online, data quality monitoring software package has been developed for the muon system at the European Center for Nuclear Research's (CERN's) Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The package was written in Java, C++, and HTML. It provides real-time, RPC performance feedback in an easy to use graphic user interface (GUI).

  11. High-power circulator test results at 350 and 700 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, W.; Bradley, J.T.; Rees, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    The high-power RF systems for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program require high-power circulators at 350 MHz and 700 MHz to protect 1 MW Continuous Wave (CW) klystrons from reflected power. The 350 MHz circulator is based on the CERN, EXF, and APS designs and has performed very well. The 700 MHz circulator is a new design. Prototype 700 MHz circulators have been high-power tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The first of these circulators has satisfied performance requirements. The circulator requirements, results from the testing, and lessons learned from this development are presented and discussed

  12. Structural analysis of a superconducting central solenoid for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) concept design uses superconducting coils to accomplish magnetic confinement. The central solenoid (CS) magnet is divided vertically into 8 equal segments which are powered independently. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is too high for a case type construction; therefore, a open-quotes no caseclose quotes design has been chosen. This open-quotes no caseclose quotes design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation as a structural adhesive. This electrical insulation is the open-quotes weak linkclose quotes in the coil winding pack structure and needs to be modeled in detail. A global finite element model with smeared winding pack properties was used to study the CS magnet structural behavior. The structural analysis results and peak stresses will be presented

  13. Extensive characterisation of advanced manufacturing solutions for the ITER Central Solenoid pre-compression system

    CERN Document Server

    Langeslag, S.A.E.; Libeyre, P.; Marcinek, D.J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS), positioned in the center of the ITER tokamak, will provide a magnetic field, contributing to the confinement of the plasma. The 13 m high CS consists of a vertical stack of 6 independently driven modules, dynamically activated. Resulting opposing currents can lead to high separation forces. A pre-compression structure is implemented to counteract these opposing forces, by realising a continuous 180 MN coil-to-coil contact loading. Preload is applied by mechanical fastening via 9 subunits, positioned along the coil stack, each consisting of 2 outer and 1 inner tie plate. The tie plates therefore need to feature outstanding mechanical behaviour in a large temperature range. High strength, Nitronic®-50 type F XM-19 austenitic stainless steel is selected as candidate material. The linearised stress distribution reaches approximately 250 MPa, leading to a required yield strength of 380 MPa at room temperature. Two different manufacturing methods are being studied for the procuremen...

  14. A 4.7 tesla metre solenoid for a partial Siberian snake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratner, L.; Leonhardt, W.; Otter, A.; Ellstrom, L.

    1993-11-01

    We describe the engineering design of a 4.7 T-m solenoid magnet which will be installed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS for a partial Siberian Snake Experiment which is an interlaboratory collaboration. The magnet has an overall length of 2.5 m, a clear bore of 15 cm and operates at a peak field of 2 T. It is pulsed at 3 second intervals with a peak current of 9500 A dc driven from a 150 V power supply. The construction uses conventional hollow copper coils but the return flux yokes are made from 1/8 inch plates bolted together. On assembly the flux yokes and endplates are clamped tightly to the coil to prevent any movement during the current pulse. The fabrication experience and test data will be presented. The magnet was installed in the summer of 1993. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  15. A 4.7 tesla metre solenoid for a partial Siberian snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, L; Leonhardt, W [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Otter, A; Ellstrom, L

    1993-11-01

    We describe the engineering design of a 4.7 T-m solenoid magnet which will be installed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS for a partial Siberian Snake Experiment which is an interlaboratory collaboration. The magnet has an overall length of 2.5 m, a clear bore of 15 cm and operates at a peak field of 2 T. It is pulsed at 3 second intervals with a peak current of 9500 A dc driven from a 150 V power supply. The construction uses conventional hollow copper coils but the return flux yokes are made from 1/8 inch plates bolted together. On assembly the flux yokes and endplates are clamped tightly to the coil to prevent any movement during the current pulse. The fabrication experience and test data will be presented. The magnet was installed in the summer of 1993. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  16. D-zero rototrack: first stage of D-zero 2 Tesla solenoid field mapping device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, R.; Korienek, J.; Krider, J.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Miksa, D.; Miksa, R.

    1997-09-01

    A simple and portable field mapping device was developed at Fermilab and successfully used to test the D0 2 Tesla solenoid at Toshiba Works in Japan. A description of the mechanical structure, electric driving and control system, and software of the field mapping device is given. Four Hall probe elements of Group3 Digital Gaussmeters are mounted on the radial extension arm of a carriage, which is mounted on a central rotating beam. The system gives two dimensional motions (axial and rotational) to the Hall probes. To make the system compact and portable, we used a laptop computer with PCMCIA cards. For the control system we used commercially available software LabVIEW and Motion Toolbox, and for the data analysis we used Microsoft Excel

  17. Magnetic shielding for a transversely polarized target in the longitudinal field of the PANDA solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Bertold; Ahmed, Samer; Dbeyssi, Alaa; Mora Espi, Maria Carmen; Gerz, Kathrin; Lin, Dexu; Maas, Frank; Martinez, Ana Penuelas; Morales, Cristina; Wang, Yadi [Helmholtz Institut Mainz (Germany); Aguar Bartolome, Patricia [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A transversely polarized target in PANDA would allow for the first time access to the imaginary part of the time like electromagnetic proton form factors, namely the phase angle in the imaginary plane between electric and magnetic form factors. Moreover it would allow for a number of other target single spin asymmetries revealing nucleon structure observables connected with the transverse spin structure of the proton. As a first step for achieving a transverse target polarization, the target region has to be shielded against the 2 T longitudinal magnetic flux from the solenoid of the PANDA spectrometer. We present experimental results on intense magnetic flux shielding using a BSCCO-2212 high temperature superconducting hollow cylinder at liquid helium temperature.

  18. The upgrade and re-validation of the Compact Muon Solenoid Electromagnetic Calorimeter Control System

    CERN Multimedia

    Holme, Oliver; Di Calafiori, Diogo; Dissertori, Günther; Djambazov, Lubomir; Jovanovic, Dragoslav; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2013-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) is one of the sub-detectors of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Detector Control System (DCS) that has been developed and implemented for the CMS ECAL was deployed in accordance with the LHC schedule and has been supporting the CMS data-taking since LHC physics runs started in 2009. During these years, the control system has been regularly adapted according to operational experience and new requirements, always respecting the constraints imposed on significant changes to a running system. Several hardware and software upgrades and system extensions were therefore deferred to the first LHC Long Shutdown (LS1). This paper presents the main architectural differences between the system that supported the CMS ECAL during its first years and the new design for the coming physics runs after LS1. Details on the upgrade planning, including the certification methods performed in the CMS ECAL DCS laboratory facilities, repor...

  19. Improving Code Quality of the Compact Muon Solenoid Electromagnetic Calorimeter Control Software to Increase System Maintainability

    CERN Multimedia

    Holme, Oliver; Dissertori, Günther; Djambazov, Lubomir; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2013-01-01

    The Detector Control System (DCS) software of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN is designed primarily to enable safe and efficient operation of the detector during Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data-taking periods. Through a manual analysis of the code and the adoption of ConQAT [1], a software quality assessment toolkit, the CMS ECAL DCS team has made significant progress in reducing complexity and improving code quality, with observable results in terms of a reduction in the effort dedicated to software maintenance. This paper explains the methodology followed, including the motivation to adopt ConQAT, the specific details of how this toolkit was used and the outcomes that have been achieved. [1] ConQAT, Continuous Quality Assessment Toolkit; https://www.conqat.org/

  20. Simulation of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Barton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K. R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou, and C. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 14, 103102 (2007PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.2779281; J. Zhou, K. R. Samokhvalova, and C. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 15, 023102 (2008PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.2837891]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  1. Assessment of nonintrusive methods for monitoring the operational readiness of solenoid-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the USNRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The primary objective of the study is to identify and recommend methods for inspection, surveillance, and maintenance of SOVs that can ensure their operational readiness-- that is, their ability to perform required safety functions under all anticipated operating conditions. An earlier (Phase I) study described SOV failure modes and causes and identified measurable parameters that might be used to monitor the various degradations that lead to functional failure. The present (Phase II) study focuses on devising and then demonstrating the effectiveness of techniques and/or equipment with which to measure the previously identified performance parameters and thus detect and trend the progress of any degradation. Several nonintrusive techniques are currently under investigation. Recent experimental results which demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of the techniques being studied are presented. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Upgrade of the Global Muon Trigger for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00356020; Widmann, Eberhard

    The Large Hadron Collider is a large particle accelerator at the CERN research laboratory, designed to provide particle physics experiments with collisions at unprecedented centre-of-mass energies. For its second running period both the number of colliding particles and their collision energy were increased. To cope with these more challenging conditions and maintain the excellent performance seen during the first running period, the Level-1 trigger of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment --- a sophisticated electronics system designed to filter events in real-time --- was upgraded. This upgrade consisted of the complete replacement of the trigger electronics and a full redesign of the system's architecture. While the calorimeter trigger path now follows a time-multiplexed processing model where the entire trigger data for a collision are received by a single processing board, the muon trigger path was split into regional track finding systems where each newly introduced track finder receives data from all th...

  3. Fabrication of 3D solenoid microcoils in silica glass by femtosecond laser wet etch and microsolidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a flexible fabrication method for 3D solenoid microcoils in silica glass. The method consists of femtosecond laser wet etching (FLWE) and microsolidics process. The 3D microchannel with high aspect ratio is fabricated by an improved FLWE method. In the microsolidics process, an alloy was chosen as the conductive metal. The microwires are achieved by injecting liquid alloy into the microchannel, and allowing the alloy to cool and solidify. The alloy microwires with high melting point can overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The geometry, the height and diameter of microcoils were flexibly fabricated by the pre-designed laser writing path, the laser power and etching time. The 3D microcoils can provide uniform magnetic field and be widely integrated in many magnetic microsystems.

  4. Numerical analysis and experimental studies on solenoid common rail diesel injector with worn control valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivtsov, S. N.; Yakimov, I. V.; Ozornin, S. P.

    2018-03-01

    A mathematical model of a solenoid common rail fuel injector was developed. Its difference from existing models is control valve wear simulation. A common rail injector of 0445110376 Series (Cummins ISf 2.8 Diesel engine) produced by Bosch Company was used as a research object. Injector parameters (fuel delivery and back leakage) were determined by calculation and experimental methods. GT-Suite model average R2 is 0.93 which means that it predicts the injection rate shape very accurately (nominal and marginal technical conditions of an injector). Numerical analysis and experimental studies showed that control valve wear increases back leakage and fuel delivery (especially at 160 MPa). The regression models for determining fuel delivery and back leakage effects on fuel pressure and energizing time were developed (for nominal and marginal technical conditions).

  5. Design of high-energy high-current linac with focusing by superconducting solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batskikh, G.I.; Belugin, V.M.; Bondarev, B.I. [Moscow Radiotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The advancement of MRTI design for 1.5 GeV and 250 mA ion CW linac was presented in a previous report. In this new linac version all the way from input to output the ions are focused by magnetic fields of superconducting solenoids. The ion limit current is far beyond the needed value. The linac focusing channel offers major advantages over the more conventional ones. The acceptance is 1.7 times as large for such focusing channel as for quadrupole one. Concurrently, a random perturbation sensitivity for such channel is one order of magnitude smaller than in quadrupole channel. These focusing channel features allow to decrease beam matched radius and increase a linac radiation purity without aperture growth. {open_quotes}Regotron{close_quotes} is used as high power generator in linac main part. But D&W cavities need not be divided into sections connected by RF-bridges which denuded them of high coupling factor.

  6. Two-dimensional 220 MHz Fourier transform EPR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placidi, Giuseppe; Brivati, John A.; Alecci, Marcello; Testa, Luca; Sotgiu, Antonello

    1998-01-01

    In the last decade radiofrequency continuous-wave EPR spectrometers have been developed to detect and localize free radicals in vivo. Only recently, pulsed radiofrequency EPR spectrometers have been described for imaging applications with small samples. In the present work, we show the first two-dimensional image obtained at 220 MHz on a large phantom (40 ml) that simulates typical conditions of in vivo EPR imaging. This pulsed EPR apparatus has the potential to make the time required for three-dimensional imaging compatible with the biological half-life of normally used paramagnetic probes. (author)

  7. Operation of a 473 MHz four-rod cavity RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimi, R.; Huson, F.R.; Mackay, W.W.; Meitzler, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed a new type of four-rod Radio Frequency Quadrupole to operate at 473 MHz. Four-rod structures have not previously been built for such a high frequency. The RFQ is designed to accelerate 10 mA of H - ions from 30 keV to 0.5 MeV. The rf measurements and beam test of the RFQ have been performed successfully. Here we present operational results of the RFQ system including measurements of the beam current, the required rf power, energy, energy spread, and emittance. (Author) 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  8. LAMPF 201.25-MHz linac field distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.; Halbig, J.K.

    1978-01-01

    Returning of the 201.25-MHz accelerator structure field distributions after the 1975 shutdown is described, and final data are given for use in beam dynamics studies. Several improvements made in procedures included a different method for stopband closure check and a positive method for postcoupler clamping. To obtain accurate results for the first tank a rigorous data reduction technique that included the removal of a ''signature'' due to the bead-pull string itself was used. Other special studies are reported, including the effects of vacuum, bead size, slug tuners, and a bead-pull method for measuring the cavity quality factor Q

  9. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huque, Naeem A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward F. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William A. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); McIntyre, Gary T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Qiong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seberg, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bellavia, Steve [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  10. Effects of 415 MHz frequency on human lymphocyte genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Fucic, A.; Kubelka, D.; Vojvodic, S.

    1996-01-01

    The continuously increasing use of artificial sources of electromagnetic radiation in industry and medicine has been accompanied in everyday life with telecommunication systems which is followed with great interest in possible hazardous effects of this type of radiation. The interesting applications of mobile telecommunications and the use of cellular phones are of topic interest. Numerous cytogenetic investigations are focused on the effects of microwave radiation from mobile communications frequency of 450 and 950 MHz on isolated cells in vitro. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of microwaves from mobile telephone frequencies on human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in vitro. (author)

  11. Measure of enzymatic activity coincident with 2450 MHz microwave exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, T R; Allis, J W; Elder, J A

    1975-09-01

    Enzyme preparations were exposed to microwave radiation at 2450 MHz and enzymatic activity was simultaneously monitored spectrophotometrically with a crossed-beam exposure detection system. Enzymes studied were glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase from human red blood cells and yeast, adenylate kinase from rat liver mitochondria and rabbit muscle, and rat liver microsomal NADPH cytochrome c reductase. No difference was found between the specific activity at 25/sup 0/C of unirradiated controls and enzyme preparations irradiated at an absorbed dose rate of 42 W/kg.

  12. Controls and interlocks for a prototype 1MHz beam chopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, G.; Bishop, D.; Barnes, M.J.; Wait, G.D.

    1991-05-01

    A prototype 1 MHz beam chopper for the proposed KAON Factory at TRIUMF has been constructed. The chopper is an electric field device, driven by a tetrode based pulser, for deflecting a charged particle beam. Associated with the tetrode used in the prototype design are high voltage power supplies for the electrodes. We use an FET based grid pulser and a sequencer capable of accurate digital control of pulse timing to 0.4 ns. A safety interlock and control system using a programmable controller with fibre optic links has been built. This has given us the versatility required in a prototype system. (Author) 4 refs., 5 figs

  13. MHz gravitational waves from short-term anisotropic inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Asuka; Soda, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the universality of short-term anisotropic inflation. As a demonstration, we study inflation with an exponential type gauge kinetic function which is ubiquitous in models obtained by dimensional reduction from higher dimensional fundamental theory. It turns out that an anisotropic inflation universally takes place in the later stage of conventional inflation. Remarkably, we find that primordial gravitational waves with a peak amplitude around 10 −26 ∼10 −27 are copiously produced in high-frequency bands 10 MHz∼100 MHz. If we could detect such gravitational waves in future, we would be able to probe higher dimensional fundamental theory.

  14. Brightness distribution data on 2918 radio sources at 365 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, W.D.; Owen, F.N.; Ghigo, F.D.

    1975-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series describing the results of a program attempting to fit models of the brightness distribution to radio sources observed at 365 MHz with the Bandwidth Synthesis Interferometer (BSI) operated by the University of Texas Radio Astronomy Observatory. Results for a further 2918 radio sources are given. An unresolved model and three symmetric extended models with angular sizes in the range 10--70 arcsec were attempted for each radio source. In addition, for 348 sources for which other observations of brightness distribution are published, the reference to the observations and a brief description are included

  15. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering closeout report for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, J.; Christensen, R.W.; Hayman, G.; Jones, D.C.; Ross, R.; Wilds, W.; Yeamans, S.; Ziock, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors group at Los Alamos National Laboratory was responsible for the mechanical engineering of the silicon tracking system of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) experiment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. The responsibility included the overall design of the system from the mechanical point of view, development and integration of the cooling system, which was required to remove the heat generated by the front-end electronics, assembly of the system to extremely tight tolerances, and verification that the construction and operational stability and alignment tolerances would be met. A detailed description of the concepts they developed and the work they performed can be found in a report titled ''Silicon Subsystem Mechanical Engineering Work for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration'' which they submitted to the SSC Laboratory. In addition to the mechanical engineering work, they also performed activation, background, and shielding studies for the SSC program. Much of the work they performed was potentially useful for other future high energy physics (HEP) projects. This report describes the closeout work that was performed for the Los Alamos SDC project. Four major tasks were identified for completion: (1) integration of the semi-automated assembly station being developed and construction of a precision part to demonstrate solutions to important general assembly problems (the station was designed to build precision silicon tracker subassemblies); (2) build a state-of-the-art TV holography (TVH) system to use for detector assembly stability tests; (3) design, build, and test a water based cooling system for a full silicon shell prototype; and (4) complete and document the activation, background, and shielding studies, which is covered in a separate report

  16. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering closeout report for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlon, J.; Christensen, R.W.; Hayman, G.; Jones, D.C.; Ross, R.; Wilds, W.; Yeamans, S.; Ziock, H.J.

    1995-02-01

    The authors group at Los Alamos National Laboratory was responsible for the mechanical engineering of the silicon tracking system of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) experiment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. The responsibility included the overall design of the system from the mechanical point of view, development and integration of the cooling system, which was required to remove the heat generated by the front-end electronics, assembly of the system to extremely tight tolerances, and verification that the construction and operational stability and alignment tolerances would be met. A detailed description of the concepts they developed and the work they performed can be found in a report titled ``Silicon Subsystem Mechanical Engineering Work for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration`` which they submitted to the SSC Laboratory. In addition to the mechanical engineering work, they also performed activation, background, and shielding studies for the SSC program. Much of the work they performed was potentially useful for other future high energy physics (HEP) projects. This report describes the closeout work that was performed for the Los Alamos SDC project. Four major tasks were identified for completion: (1) integration of the semi-automated assembly station being developed and construction of a precision part to demonstrate solutions to important general assembly problems (the station was designed to build precision silicon tracker subassemblies); (2) build a state-of-the-art TV holography (TVH) system to use for detector assembly stability tests; (3) design, build, and test a water based cooling system for a full silicon shell prototype; and (4) complete and document the activation, background, and shielding studies, which is covered in a separate report.

  17. Design report for a cryostable 3m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.; Leung, E.; Mruzek, M.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.; Yamada, R.

    1981-10-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed td study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 4 m long and 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired Δp/sub T//p/sub T/ less than or equal to 15% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200μ resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. This field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10 6 A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe a design for a cryostable superconducting solenoid intended to meet the requirements of the Fermilab ies TDF

  18. A feasibility study of high-strength Bi-2223 conductor for high-field solenoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godeke, A.; Abraimov, D. V.; Arroyo, E.; Barret, N.; Bird, M. D.; Francis, A.; Jaroszynski, J.; Kurteva, D. V.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Marks, E. L.; Marshall, W. S.; McRae, D. M.; Noyes, P. D.; Pereira, R. C. P.; Viouchkov, Y. L.; Walsh, R. P.; White, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    We performed a feasibility study on a high-strength Bi{}2-xPb x Sr2Ca2Cu3O{}10-x(Bi-2223) tape conductor for high-field solenoid applications. The investigated conductor, DI-BSCCO Type HT-XX, is a pre-production version of Type HT-NX, which has recently become available from Sumitomo Electric Industries. It is based on their DI-BSCCO Type H tape, but laminated with a high-strength Ni-alloy. We used stress-strain characterizations, single- and double-bend tests, easy- and hard-way bent coil-turns at various radii, straight and helical samples in up to 31.2 T background field, and small 20-turn coils in up to 17 T background field to systematically determine the electro-mechanical limits in magnet-relevant conditions. In longitudinal tensile tests at 77 K, we found critical stress- and strain-levels of 516 MPa and 0.57%, respectively. In three decidedly different experiments we detected an amplification of the allowable strain with a combination of pure bending and Lorentz loading to ≥slant 0.92 % (calculated elastically at the outer tape edge). This significant strain level, and the fact that it is multi-filamentary conductor and available in the reacted and insulated state, makes DI-BSCCO HT-NX highly suitable for very high-field solenoids, for which high current densities and therefore high loads are required to retain manageable magnet dimensions.

  19. Study of a microstrip gas detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment; Etude d`un detecteur a micropistes pour l`experience Compact Muon Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clergeau, J F [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1997-06-19

    The micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) were realized due to the technological advances in the field of micro-electronics. The wire of usual gas counters is replaced in these detectors by metallic stripes as a periodic sequence of electrodes (anodes and cathodes) spaced by around 200 {mu}m. At a distance of 3 mm above the strip containing substrate, a metallic plane is placed, thus defining the gaseous room where the passage of a charged particle produces by ionization a primary electron signal collected by the detector anodes. Due to its granularity a MSGC can operate under very high particle fluxes since charge can be collected very rapidly. Also, the impact parameters can be determined with high accuracy due to the high space and time resolutions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) or the MSGC detectors planned to equip one of the experiments proposed for LHC should detect, in extreme operational conditions, the particle impacts in a 4 Tesla magnetic field, for around ten years and for a particle flux of around 10{sup 4} Hz/mm{sup 2}. The CMS detector is described in chapter 2. The operation principle and the problems encountered in the development of MSGC detectors are summarized in chapter 3. The chapter 4 is dedicated to the study of the performances of MSGCs in magnetic fields. In the chapters 5 to 7 the processing of the signal from detectors of this type is described, particularly, the performances of various ways of treat the signal in terms of detection efficiency and counting loads are presented.The chapter 8 presents the results obtained with the prototype obtained at IPNL while the chapter 9 gives the conclusions of the performed works. (author) 55 refs.

  20. 47 CFR 90.259 - Assignment and use of frequencies in the bands 216-220 MHz and 1427-1432 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MHz band are secondary to the Wireless Medical Telemetry Service except in the locations specified in... operations are secondary to the Wireless Medical Telemetry Service in the 1429-1431.5 MHz band. (3) All... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assignment and use of frequencies in the bands...

  1. 47 CFR 101.82 - Reimbursement and relocation expenses in the 2110-2150 MHz and 2160-2200 MHz bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement and relocation expenses in the... License Transfers, Modifications, Conditions and Forfeitures § 101.82 Reimbursement and relocation expenses in the 2110-2150 MHz and 2160-2200 MHz bands. (a) Reimbursement and relocation expenses for the...

  2. A High Current Proton Linac with 352 MHz SC Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Pagani, C; Pierini, P

    1996-01-01

    A proposal for a 10-120 mA proton linac employing superconducting beta-graded, CERN type, four cell cavities at 352 MHz is presented. The high energy part (100 MeV-1 GeV) of the machine is split in three beta-graded sections, and transverse focusing is provided via a periodic doublet array. All the parameters, like power in the couplers and accelerating fields in the cavities, are within the state of the art, achieved in operating machines. A first stage of operation at 30 mA beam current is proposed, while the upgrade of the machine to 120 mA operation can be obtained increasing the number of klystrons and couplers per cavity. The additional coupler ports, up to four, will be integrated in the cavity design. Preliminary calculations indicate that beam transport is feasible, given the wide aperture of the 352 MHz structures. A capital cost of less than 100 M$ at 10 mA, reaching up to 280 M$ for the 120 mA extension, has been estimated for the superconducting high energy section (100 MeV-1 GeV). The high effic...

  3. Design Considerations for the LHC 200 MHz RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Kindermann, H P; Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Marque, S; Tückmantel, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    The longitudinal beam transfer from the SPS into the LHC 400 MHz buckets will not be free of losses without a lower frequency capture system and a fast longitudinal damping system in LHC. We present a complete study of a combined system using four identical copper cavities at 200 MHz delivering 3 MV total CW voltage and having still enough bandwidth to achieve fast longitudinal damping. The shape of a cavity was designed according to the accelerating mode performance, its tuning and the higher order mode spectrum with respect to the LHC beam lines and their possible attenuation. The possibility to park the cavities during coast was included. The local heat load and the corresponding cooling water distribution as well as deformations were studied and techniques to build the cavity with all ports at low cost are proposed. The parameters of the RF generators, couplers and detuning are determined. Simulations of the total LHC RF system incorporating real delays, generator bandwidth and the control loops confirm t...

  4. Mechanical design and fabrication of a 425-MHz H- buncher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, N.G.; Precechtel, D.

    1987-01-01

    A beam buncher has been designed, fabricated, and installed on the accelerator test stand (ATS) to match the 2-MeV output beam of a 425-MHz H - radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) into a 425-MHz drift-tube linac (DTL). The buncher configuration provides integral-matching permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) at the exit of the RFQ and one βλ across the buncher accelerating gap; a third PMQ is the first DTL half-cell magnet. Located between the second and third PMQs is a 50-Ω, capacitively coupled, beam-sensing pickup loop. Cooling channels are provided in each of the brazed OFHC copper wall sections. Vacuum pumping of the buncher is provided by a cryogenic refrigerator vacuum pump through an array of small-diameter holes in the buncher cavity wall. Mechanical features of the buncher, the brazing and electron-beam welding of the solid-copper buncher structure, and the beam pickup loop are described in this paper. The buncher has been tuned, installed, and operated at full power on the ATS

  5. Experimental Limits on Gravitational Waves in the MHz frequency Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanza, Robert Jr. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This thesis presents the results of a search for gravitational waves in the 1-11MHz frequency range using dual power-recycled Michelson laser interferometers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. An unprecedented level of sensitivity to gravitational waves in this frequency range has been achieved by cross-correlating the output fluctuations of two identical and colocated 40m long interferometers. This technique produces sensitivities better than two orders of magnitude below the quantum shot-noise limit, within integration times of less than 1 hour. 95% confidence level upper limits are placed on the strain amplitude of MHz frequency gravitational waves at the 10-21 Hz-1/2 level, constituting the best direct limits to date at these frequencies. For gravitational wave power distributed over this frequency range, a broadband upper limit of 2.4 x 10-21Hz-1/2 at 95% confidence level is also obtained. This thesis covers the detector technology, the commissioning and calibration of the instrument, the statistical data analysis, and the gravitational wave limit results. Particular attention is paid to the end-to-end calibration of the instrument’s sensitivity to differential arm length motion, and so to gravitational wave strain. A detailed statistical analysis of the data is presented as well.

  6. VLA observations of NGC 1265 at 4886 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, F.N.; Burns, J.O.; Rudnick, L.

    1978-01-01

    Observations are presented of the head-tail radio galaxy NGC 1265, made with the VLA at 4886 MHz. The total intensity brightness distribution has a resolution of 1' x 1'.5 and an rms noise of approx.150 μJy/beam area. These observations, combined with data at 2695 and 8085 MHz on a 35 km baseline in Green Bank, show that the nuclear component is less than 0'.1 and has a slightly inverted spectrum.The VLA map reveals a narrow continuous stream of emission leading away from the nucleus and out into the lower-surface brightness tail. Several small knots are superposed on the stream. This brightness distribution is compared with the independent-blob model of Jaffe and Perola. We find that the brightness distribution predicted by this model does not agree well with the observed brightness distribution. We suggest that a hot interstellar medium in the galaxy may be necessary to explain the complex structure

  7. Very high frequency (beyond 100 MHz) PZT kerfless linear arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Da-Wei; Zhou, Qifa; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Chang-Geng; Djuth, Frank; Shung, K Kirk

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and measurements of very high frequency kerfless linear arrays prepared from PZT film and PZT bulk material. A 12-microm PZT thick film fabricated from PZT-5H powder/solution composite and a piece of 15-microm PZT-5H sheet were used to fabricate 32-element kerfless high-frequency linear arrays with photolithography. The PZT thick film was prepared by spin-coating of PZT sol-gel composite solution. The thin PZT-5H sheet sample was prepared by lapping a PZT-5H ceramic with a precision lapping machine. The measured results of the 2 arrays were compared. The PZT film array had a center frequency of 120 MHz, a bandwidth of 60% with a parylene matching layer, and an insertion loss of 41 dB. The PZT ceramic sheet array was found to have a center frequency of 128 MHz with a poorer bandwidth (40% with a parylene matching layer) but a better sensitivity (28 dB insertion loss).

  8. Resonance Frequency Readout Circuit for a 900 MHz SAW Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Zhang, Chun; Weng, Zhaoyang; Guo, Yanshu; Wang, Zhihua

    2017-09-15

    A monolithic resonance frequency readout circuit with high resolution and short measurement time is presented for a 900 MHz RF surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor. The readout circuit is composed of a fractional-N phase-locked loop (PLL) as the stimulus source to the SAW device and a phase-based resonance frequency detecting circuit using successive approximation (SAR). A new resonance frequency searching strategy has been proposed based on the fact that the SAW device phase-frequency response crosses zero monotonically around the resonance frequency. A dedicated instant phase difference detecting circuit is adopted to facilitate the fast SAR operation for resonance frequency searching. The readout circuit has been implemented in 180 nm CMOS technology with a core area of 3.24 mm². In the experiment, it works with a 900 MHz SAW resonator with a quality factor of Q = 130. Experimental results show that the readout circuit consumes 7 mW power from 1.6 V supply. The frequency resolution is 733 Hz, and the relative accuracy is 0.82 ppm, and it takes 0.48 ms to complete one measurement. Compared to the previous results in the literature, this work has achieved the shortest measurement time with a trade-off between measurement accuracy and measurement time.

  9. Q0 Degradation of LANL 700-MHZ β = 0.64 Elliptical Cavities and ANL 340 MHZ Spoke Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Chan, Kwok-Chi D.; Edwards, Randall L.; Gentzlinger, Robert C.; Kelley, John Patrick; Krawczyk, Frank L.; Madrid, Michael A.; Montoya, Debbie I.; Schrage, Dale L.; Shapiro, Alan H.

    2002-01-01

    The quality factor (Q 0 ) of most of the six LANL β = 0.64 700-MHz 5-cell elliptical cavities starts to drop at E acc = 8-10 MV/m, which may be related to multipacting. Residual resistances of these cavities were measured to be 5.0-7.6 n(Omega). The sensitivity of surface resistance to the external magnetic field was measured to be 0.22 n(Omega)/mG. Q disease tests have shown no significant Q 0 degradation for both elliptical cavities and a spoke cavity with our 100 (micro)m BCP.

  10. Comparison of 250 MHz R10K Origin 2000 and 400 MHz Origin 2000 Using NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Raymond D.; Thigpen, William W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes results of benchmark tests on Steger, a 250 MHz Origin 2000 system with R10K processors, currently installed at the NASA Ames National Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility. For comparison purposes, the tests were also run on Lomax, a 400 MHz Origin 2000 with R12K processors. The BT, LU, and SP application benchmarks in the NAS Parallel Benchmark Suite and the kernel benchmark FT were chosen to measure system performance. Having been written to measure performance on Computational Fluid Dynamics applications, these benchmarks are assumed appropriate to represent the NAS workload. Since the NAS runs both message passing (MPI) and shared-memory, compiler directive type codes, both MPI and OpenMP versions of the benchmarks were used. The MPI versions used were the latest official release of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, version 2.3. The OpenMP versions used were PBN3b2, a beta version that is in the process of being released. NPB 2.3 and PBN3b2 are technically different benchmarks, and NPB results are not directly comparable to PBN results.

  11. 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (915RWP) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, R

    2005-01-01

    The 915 MHz radar wind profiler/radio acoustic sounding system (RWP/RASS) measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 0.1 km and 5 km and virtual temperature profiles between 0.1 km and 2.5 km. It operates by transmitting electromagnetic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. Virtual temperatures are recovered by transmitting an acoustic signal vertically and measuring the electromagnetic energy scattered from the acoustic wavefront. Because the propagation speed of the acoustic wave is proportional to the square root of the virtual temperature of the air, the virtual temperature can be recovered by measuring the Doppler shift of the scattered electromagnetic wave.

  12. The seven components of Hα and the 9873 MHz line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenka, A.

    1978-01-01

    Under conditions pertaining to the middle chromosphere, the nlj-substates of the n = 2 and n = 3 states of hydrogen are found to be populated proportionally to their degree of degeneracy. Thus, the non-LTE formation of the Hα line is not expected to be influenced by some exotic excitation conditions in one of its seven components. The overpopulation of the 2Ssub(1/2) substate relative to the 2Psub(3/2) substate does not depend upon details of the radiative transfer in Hα, so that it rests wholly on the transfer in Lα (Milkey and Mihalas, 1973). One-component plane parallel models of the chromosphere thus further predict that the 2Ssub(1/2)-2Psub(3/2), 9873 MHz (3.04 cm) line will not be observeable in the radio-spectrum of the quiet Sun. (Auth.)

  13. Parametric thermal analysis of 75 MHz heavy ion RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, N.K.; Mehrotra, N.; Verma, V.; Gupta, A.K.; Bhagwat, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    An ECR based Heavy Ion Accelerator comprising of a superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion Source, normal conducting RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) and superconducting Niobium resonators is being developed at BARC under XII plan. A state-of-the-art 18 GHz superconducting ECR ion source (PK-ISIS) jointly configured with Pantechnik, France is operational at Van-de-Graaff, BARC. The electromagnetic design of the improved version of 75 MHz heavy ion RFQ has been reported earlier. The previous thermal study of 51 cm RFQ model showed large temperature variation axially along the vane tip. A new coolant flow scheme has been worked out to optimize the axial temperature gradient. In this paper the thermal analysis including parametric study of coolant flow rates and inlet temperature variation will be presented. (author)

  14. Optimized 425MHz passive wireless magnetic field sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2014-06-01

    A passive, magnetic field sensor consisting of a 425 MHz surface acoustic wave device loaded with a giant magnetoimpedance element is developed. The GMI element with a multilayer structure composed of Ni80Fe 20/Cu/Ni80Fe20, is fabricated on a 128° Y-X cut LiNbO3 LiNbO3 substrate. The integrated sensor is characterized with a network analyzer through an S-parameter measurement. Upon the application of a magnetic field, a maximum magnitude change and phase shift of 7.8 dB and 27 degree, respectively, are observed. Within the linear region, the magnetic sensitivity is 1.6 dB/Oe and 5 deg/Oe. © 2014 IEEE.

  15. 352.2 MHz rf system for the ESRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, J.; David, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that ESRF's 352.2 MHz RF system that uses 1 MW-CW klystrons and five-cell LEP type cavities has been adopted. In the storage ring (SR), two klystrons will feed a total of four cavities in order to provide the maximum required accelerating voltage of 8.9 MV. In the injector synchrotron (SY), two cavities fed by one klystron in a cycling mode at 10 Hz will give the maximum needed accelerating voltage of 7.3 MV. In multibunch operation of the SR, coupled bunch oscillations will be driven by the higher order modes (HOMs) of the cavities, and may limit the maximum beam current to about 60 mA. Spare ports will allow to install HOM dampers on the cavities in order to raise the instability thresholds above the design current of 100 mA. In addition, active feed back systems may be implemented

  16. 201 MHz Cavity R and D for MUCOOL and MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael; Norem, Jim; Bross, Alan; Moretti, Alfred; Norris, Barry; Torun, Yagmur; Phillips, Larry; Rimmer, Robert; Stirbet, Mircea; Reep, Michael; Summers, Don

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, analysis and preliminary testing of the prototype 201 MHz copper cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. Cavity applications include the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as well as cooling channels for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. This cavity was developed by the US muon cooling (MUCOOL) collaboration and is being tested in the MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab. To achieve a high accelerating gradient, the cavity beam irises are terminated by a pair of curved, thin beryllium windows. Several fabrication methods developed for the cavity and windows are novel and offer significant cost savings as compared to conventional construction methods. The cavity's thermal and structural performances are simulated with an FEA model. Preliminary high power RF commissioning results will be presented

  17. Commissioning of the 400 MHz LHC RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, Edmond; Baudrenghien, P; Brunner, O; Butterworth, A; Linnecar, T; Maesen, P; Molendijk, J; Montesinos, E; Valuch, D; Weierud, F

    2008-01-01

    The installation of the 400 MHz superconducting RF system in LHC is finished and commissioning is under way. The final RF system comprises four cryo-modules each with four cavities in the LHC tunnel straight section round IP4. Also underground in an adjacent cavern shielded from the main tunnel are the sixteen 300 kW klystron RF power sources with their high voltage bunkers, two Faraday cages containing RF feedback and beam control electronics, and racks containing all the slow controls. The system and the experience gained during commissioning will be described. In particular, results from conditioning the cavities and their movable main power couplers and the setting up of the low level RF feedbacks will be presented.

  18. 47 CFR 22.970 - Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems. 22.970 Section... MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.970 Unacceptable interference to part 90 non-cellular 800 MHz licensees from cellular radiotelephone or part 90-800 MHz cellular systems. (a) Definition...

  19. submitter Physical Properties of a High-Strength Austenitic Stainless Steel for the Precompression Structure of the ITER Central Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Arauzo, Ana; Roussel, Pascal; Libeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ITER central solenoid (CS) consists of six independent coils kept together by a precompression support structure that must react vertical tensile loads and provide sufficient preload to maintain coil-to-coil contact when the solenoid is energized. The CS precompression system includes tie plates, lower and upper key blocks, load distribution and isolation plates and other attachment, support and insulating hardware. The tie plates operating at 4 K are manufactured starting from forgings in a high-strength austenitic stainless steel (FXM-19) with a stringent specification. Moreover, forged components for the lower and upper key blocks have to be provided in the same FXM-19 grade with comparably strict requirements. FXM-19 is a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel, featuring high strength and toughness, ready weldability, and forgeability. It features as well higher integral thermal contraction down to 4 K compared with the very high Mn steel grade selected for the CS coil jackets, hence providing an ad...

  20. Competition of electron-cyclotron maser and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.T.; Lin, C.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic electron beam with a finite transverse dc momentum (β/sub perpendicular/ = 1/γ 0 ) passing through a region of combined uniform solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler magnetic fields is observed to convert 25% of its kinetic energy into coherent radiation at frequency ω = γ 2 0 (k/sub w/V 0 +Ω/sub c//γ 0 ) if the phase velocity of the generated wave is slightly above the speed of light. In this situation, the bunchings of the slow electron-cyclotron mode and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields (lowbitron) are observed to compensate each other, which gives rise to a finite threshold for lowbitron operation. In order to attain high efficiency, the wiggler strength of a lowbitron must substantially exceed the threshold

  1. Current leads for superconducting solenoids in a transportable Dewar flask for currents up to 1kA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirshov, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    A simple design of the current lead for currents up to 1 kA into a transportable helium dewar with 22 mm neck diameter is described. The lead characteristics have been studied at various conditions. Examples of pulse superconducting solenoid usage, parmitting to achieve the magnetic field up to 3.3 T are given. The 1% field homogeneity has been obtained on a length of 90 mm [ru

  2. INDUCTION HEATING OF NON-MAGNETIC SHEET METALS IN THE FIELD OF A FLAT CIRCULAR MULTITURN SOLENOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Batygin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of electromagnetic processes in the system for induction heating presented by a flat circular multiturn solenoid positioned above a plane of thin sheet non-magnetic metal has been conducted. The calculated dependences for the current induced in a metal sheet blank and ratio of transformation determined have been obtained. The maximal value of the transformation ratio with regard to spreading the eddy-currents over the whole area of the sheet metal has been determined.

  3. A solenoidal electron spectrometer for a precision measurement of the neutron β-asymmetry with ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaster, B.; Carr, R.; Filippone, B.W.; Harrison, D.; Hsiao, J.; Ito, T.M.; Liu, J.; Martin, J.W.; Tipton, B.; Yuan, J.

    2008-01-01

    We describe an electron spectrometer designed for a precision measurement of the neutron β-asymmetry with spin-polarized ultracold neutrons. The spectrometer consists of a 1.0-T solenoidal field with two identical multiwire proportional chamber and plastic scintillator electron detector packages situated within 0.6-T field-expansion regions. Select results from performance studies of the spectrometer with calibration sources are reported

  4. A solenoidal electron spectrometer for a precision measurement of the neutron {beta}-asymmetry with ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaster, B. [W.K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)], E-mail: plaster@pa.uky.edu; Carr, R.; Filippone, B.W. [W.K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Harrison, D. [Physics Department, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3B 2E9 (Canada); Hsiao, J. [W.K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ito, T.M. [W.K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Liu, J. [W.K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Martin, J.W. [W.K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Physics Department, University of Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Tipton, B.; Yuan, J. [W.K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2008-10-11

    We describe an electron spectrometer designed for a precision measurement of the neutron {beta}-asymmetry with spin-polarized ultracold neutrons. The spectrometer consists of a 1.0-T solenoidal field with two identical multiwire proportional chamber and plastic scintillator electron detector packages situated within 0.6-T field-expansion regions. Select results from performance studies of the spectrometer with calibration sources are reported.

  5. Analytical study of envelope modes for a fully depressed beam in solenoidal and quadrupole periodic transport channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukh, Boris; Lund, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    We present an analysis of envelope perturbations evolving in the limit of a fully space-charge depressed (zero emittance) beam in periodic, thin-lens focusing channels. Both periodic solenoidal and FODO quadrupole focusing channels are analyzed. The phase advance and growth rate of normal mode perturbations are analytically calculated as a function of the undepressed particle phase advance to characterize the evolution of envelope perturbations

  6. Effects of structure parameters on the static electromagnetic characteristics of solenoid valve for an electronic unit pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zuo-Yu; Li, Guo-Xiu; Wang, Lan; Wang, Wei-Hong; Gao, Qing-Xiu; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The static electromagnetic characteristics of solenoid valve were numerically studied. • The effects of driving current were considered. • The effects of solenoid valve’s eight essential structure parameters were considered. - Abstract: In the present paper, the effects of driving current and solenoid valve’s structure parameters (including iron-core’s length, magnetic pole’s cross-sectional area, coil turn, coil’s position, armature’s thickness, damping hole’s position, damping hole’s size, and width of working air–gap) on the static electromagnetic characteristics have been numerically investigated. From the results, it can be known that the electromagnetic energy conversion will be seriously influenced by driving current for its effects on magnetic field strength and magnetic saturation phenomenon, an excessive increase of current will weak electromagnetic energy conversion for the accelerating power losses. The capacity of electromagnetic energy conversion is also relative to each solenoid valve’s parameter albeit it is not very sensitive to each parameters. The generated electromagnetic force will be enhanced by rising iron-core’s length, equalizing the cross-sectional areas of major and vice poles, increasing coil turn within a moderate range, closing the coil’s position towards armature’s centre, enlarging armature’s thickness, pushing the damping holes’ positions away from armature’s centre, reducing the sizes of damping holes, and reducing the width of working air–gap; but such enhancements won’t be realized once the driving current is excessively higher.

  7. The architecture of PrPSc: Threading secondary structure elements into the 4-rung ß-solenoid scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: We propose to exploit the wealth of theoretical and experimental constraints to develop a structure of the infectious prion (hamster PrP27-30). Recent cryo-EM based evidence has determined that PrPSc is a 4-rung ß-solenoid (Vázquez-Fernández et al. 2016, PLoS Pathog. 12(9): e1005835). This ev...

  8. A design study of a cast lead electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, N.F.; Guarino, V.; Nasiatka, J.; Burke, M.; Swensrud, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to achieve the physics goals for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC), it is necessary to design and construct a scintillating calorimeter which measures both position and energy of particles originating at the intersection of colliding beams from the SSC. As part of this design, the electromagnetic section of the calorimeter, which is the front end of the calorimeter, was the first priority. Our design goal was to build as an initial phase, two small prototype test sections of the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC), within the constraint that the physics goal is to achieve 100% instrumentation of this section of the calorimeter. We based our design on minimization of ineffective structural mass to provide maximum calorimeter volume. We will present the design phases of this construction, including mechanical design, structural analysis, and fabrication of the structural frame ready for casting into test sections for test beam analysis. These test sections will be evaluated for mechanical feasibility and physics performance. The results of these evaluations will be incorporated into the detailed design of the calorimeter. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  9. Non-solenoidal Startup with High-Field-Side Local Helicity Injection on the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Pachicano, J. L.; Pierren, C.; Richner, N. J.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Weberski, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    Local Helicity Injection (LHI) is a non-solenoidal startup technique utilizing electron current injectors at the plasma edge to initiate a tokamak-like plasma at high Ip . Recent experiments on Pegasus explore the inherent tradeoffs between high-field-side (HFS) injection in the lower divertor region and low-field-side (LFS) injection at the outboard midplane. Trade-offs include the relative current drive contributions of HI and poloidal induction, and the magnetic geometry required for relaxation to a tokamak-like state. HFS injection using a set of two increased-area injectors (Ainj = 4 cm2, Vinj 1.5 kV, and Iinj 8 kA) in the lower divertor is demonstrated over the full range of toroidal field available on Pegasus (BT 0 = 10) attainable with LHI and the favorable stability of the ultra-low aspect ratio, low-li LHI-driven plasmas allow access to high βt-up to 100 % , as indicated by kinetically-constrained equilibrium reconstructions. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  10. Non-Solenoidal Startup via Helicity Injection in the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, M. W.; Bodner, G. M.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Pachicano, J. L.; Perry, J. M.; Pierren, C.; Richner, N. J.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Weberski, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    Research on the A 1 . 2 Pegasus ST is developing the physics and technology basis for optimal non-solenoidal tokamak startup. Recent work explores startup via Local Helicity Injection (LHI) using compact, multi-MW current sources placed at the plasma edge in the lower divertor region. This minimizes inductive drive from poloidal fields and dynamic shaping. Plasmas with Ip =Te >= 50 - 100 eV and large-amplitude MHD activity driven by the injectors. Under some conditions, MHD fluctuations abruptly decrease by over an order of magnitude without loss of LHI drive, improving realized Ip , and suggesting short-wavelength modes may relate to the current drive mechanism. The high IN >= 10 , ion heating, and low li driven by LHI, and the favorable stability of A 1 STs allows access to record βt 100 % and high βN 6 . 5 . Such high-βt plasmas have a minimum | B | well spanning 50 % of the plasma volume. Enhancements to the Pegasus facility are considered to increase BT towards NSTX-U levels; establish coaxial helicity injection capabilities; and add auxiliary heating and current drive. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  11. Longitudinal propagation of the normal zone through indirectly cooled superconducting solenoids. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.

    1988-03-01

    This work deals with the longitudinal propagation of the normal zone in large thin super-conducting solenoids like CELLO. From the theoretical point of view, we begin to explain, under the name of classical model, a synthesis of the models known in the literature. Then we study successively the influence of four phenomenons, which until then were neglected: 1) The current sharing zone; 2) The dependence on temperature of the specific heat and of the thermal conductivity; 3) The electromagnetic diffusion through a possible super-stabilizer, and 4) The thermal diffusion through a possible insulator. In each case, we re-formulate the equation of thermal and electromagnetic behaviour of the layer, we solve them analytically, and we derive a corrective factor, which is to apply to the classical formula of the propagation velocity. Finally, we investigate how to combine these corrections, and we converge on a general method of calculation of the velocity. In the experimental part, we have pointed out and measured in terms of current and field, propagation velocities along a super-stabilized conductor. Having established that the experimental conditions satisfied the hypotheses of our theoretical study, we verify that these measurements are in good agreement with the calculated velocities. Finally we concluded that our model of current redistribution through the super-stabilizer is valid [fr

  12. Effects of Slip Planes on Stresses in MICE Coupling Solenoid Coil Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Cheng, Y.; Green, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The MICE superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is made from copper matrix Nb-Ti conductors with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 110.4 mm at room temperature. The coil is to be wound on a mandrel made of aluminum. The peak magnetic field on the conductor is about 7.3 T when fully charged at 210 A. High magnetic field and large size make the stress inside the coupling coil assembly relatively high during cool down and full energizing. The shear stress between coil winding and aluminum casing may cause premature quench. To avoid quench potential induced by stress, slip planes were designed for the coil assembly. In this paper, FE models with and without slip planes for it have been developed to simulate the stresses during the process including winding, cooling down and charging. The stress distribution in the coil assembly with and without slip planes was investigated. The results show that slip planes with low friction coefficients can improve the stress condition in the coil, especially reduce the shear stress largely so that improve the stability.

  13. Solenoid pick-up problem in the CREN-K Triga Mark 2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malu wa Kalenga; Kobakozete Itono; Diazengwa Mpaka; Mampaka Mana Mouiny; Itio Momba

    1981-01-01

    During a lazy susan forty irradiation tube inspection with the specimen lifting device, the solenoid-operated specimen pick-up tool happened to be locked in the number fourteen position loading tube. The present paper describes the successful experiment which was carried out to solve a potential damaging situation for the safe and useful operation of the reactor. The first step in the investigation process was to ascertain what has indeed occurred in the reactor core to avoid any ill advised step which will worsen the situation. The alternatives were the following: a) The specimen tube was not lined with the loading tube; b) The lazy susan was not working properly due example to the fact that a roll pin in a drive shaft coupling inside the drive shaft tube has been broken; c) The pick-up tool has produced through the cleanout hole in the bottom of the specimen tube and engage the hole; d) The pick-up tool might have slided most of the way between the lazy susan and its housing. By moving up and down the pick-up tool and rotating back and forth the lazy susan it was possible to come to the conclusion that alternative c) was the most likely. It was not possible to release the pick-up tool because its engaging arms could not be activated as was often the case when lifting aluminium container

  14. Solenoid pick-up problem in the CREN-K Triga Mark 2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malu wa Kalenga; Kobakozete Itono; Diazengwa Mpaka; Mampaka Mana Mouiny; Itio Momba (Commissariat des Sciences Nucleaires, Kinshasa (Zaire). Centre Regional d' Etudes Nucleaires)

    1981-01-01

    During a lazy susan forty irradiation tube inspection with the specimen lifting device, the solenoid-operated specimen pick-up tool happened to be locked in the number fourteen position loading tube. The present paper describes the successful experiment which was carried out to solve a potential damaging situation for the safe and useful operation of the reactor. The first step in the investigation process was to ascertain what has indeed occurred in the reactor core to avoid any ill advised step which will worsen the situation. The alternatives were the following: a) The specimen tube was not lined with the loading tube; b) The lazy susan was not working properly due example to the fact that a roll pin in a drive shaft coupling inside the drive shaft tube has been broken; c) The pick-up tool has produced through the cleanout hole in the bottom of the specimen tube and engage the hole; d) The pick-up tool might have slided most of the way between the lazy susan and its housing. By moving up and down the pick-up tool and rotating back and forth the lazy susan it was possible to come to the conclusion that alternative c) was the most likely. It was not possible to release the pick-up tool because its engaging arms could not be activated as was often the case when lifting aluminium container.

  15. A conceptual design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor for the Central Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, J.R.; Parker, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) superconducting magnet system is nearing completion by the ITER Design Team, and one of the Central Solenoid (CS) designs is presented. The CS part of this magnet system will be a vertical stack of eight modules, approximately 16 m high, each having a approximate dimensions of: 4.1-m o.d., 2.8-m i.d., 1.9-m h. The peak field at the bore is approximately 13.5 T. Cable-in-conduit conductor with Nb 3 Sn composite wire will be used to wind the coils. The overall coil fabrication will use the insulate-wind-react-impregnate method. Coil modules will be fabricated using double-pancake coils with all splice joints located in the low-field region on the outside of the coils. All coils will be structurally graded with high-strength steel reinforcement which is co-wound with the conductor. We describe details of the CS coil design and analysis

  16. The silicon sensors for the Inner Tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krammer, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Inner Tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment, at present under construction, will consist of more than 24000 silicon strip sensors arranged in 10 central concentric layers and 2 X 9 discs at both ends. The total sensitive silicon area will exceed 200 m 2 . The silicon sensors are produced in various thicknesses and geometries. Each sensor has 512 or 768 implanted strips which will allow to measure the position of traversing high energy charged particles. This paper a short overview of the CMS tracker system. Subsequently the design of the silicon sensors is explained with special emphasis on the radiation hardness and on the high voltage stability of the sensors. Two companies share the production of these sensors. The quality of the sensors is extensively checked by several laboratories associated with CMS. Important electrical parameters are measured on the sensors themselves. In addition, dedicated test structures were designed by CMS which allow the monitoring of many parameters sensitive to the production process. By May 2003 about 3000 sensors were delivered and a large fraction of these sensors and tests structures was measured. A summary of these measurements will be given and the main results will be discussed

  17. Investigation on Electromagnetic Models of High-Speed Solenoid Valve for Common Rail Injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel formula easily applied with high precision is proposed in this paper to fit the B-H curve of soft magnetic materials, and it is validated by comparison with predicted and experimental results. It can accurately describe the nonlinear magnetization process and magnetic saturation characteristics of soft magnetic materials. Based on the electromagnetic transient coupling principle, an electromagnetic mathematical model of a high-speed solenoid valve (HSV is developed in Fortran language that takes the saturation phenomena of the electromagnetic force into consideration. The accuracy of the model is validated by the comparison of the simulated and experimental static electromagnetic forces. Through experiment, it is concluded that the increase of the drive current is conducive to improving the electromagnetic energy conversion efficiency of the HSV at a low drive current, but it has little effect at a high drive current. Through simulation, it is discovered that the electromagnetic energy conversion characteristics of the HSV are affected by the drive current and the total reluctance, consisting of the gap reluctance and the reluctance of the iron core and armature soft magnetic materials. These two influence factors, within the scope of the different drive currents, have different contribution rates to the electromagnetic energy conversion efficiency.

  18. Plasma column development in the CO2 laser-heated solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tighe, W.; Offenberger, A.A.; Capjack, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Axial and radial plasma dynamics in the CO 2 laser-heated solenoid have been studied experimentally and numerically. The axial behavior is found to be well described by a self-regulated bleaching wave model. The radial expansion is found to be strongly dependent on the focusing ratio of the input laser beam. With a fast focus ( f/5), the early radial expansion rate is twice that found with a slower focusing arrangement ( f/15). The faster focusing ratio also results in a significantly wider plasma column. On the other hand, no significant dependence of f/number on the axial propagation was found. A finite ionization time and the rapid formation of a density minimum on axis are observed and verify earlier experimental results. Detailed comparisons are made with a 2-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and laser propagation code. The axial and radial plasma behavior and, in particular, the dependence of the radial behavior on the focal ratio of the laser are reasonably well supported by the simulation results. Computational results are also in good agreement with experimental measurements of temperature and density using stimulated scattering (Brillouin, Raman) and interferometry diagnostic techniques

  19. Development of a solenoid actuated planar valveless micropump with single and multiple inlet-outlet arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; George, D.; Sajeesh, P.; Manivannan, P. V.; Sen, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    We report a planar solenoid actuated valveless micropump with multiple inlet-outlet configurations. The self-priming characteristics of the multiple inlet-multiple outlet micropump are studied. The filling dynamics of the micropump chamber during start-up and the effects of fluid viscosity, voltage and frequency on the dynamics are investigated. Numerical simulations for multiple inlet-multiple outlet micropumps are carried out using fluid structure algorithm. With DI water and at 5.0 Vp-p, 20 Hz frequency, the two inlet-two outlet micropump provides a maximum flow rate of 336 μl min-1 and maximum back pressure of 441 Pa. Performance characteristics of the two inlet-two outlet micropump are studied for aqueous fluids of different viscosity. Transport of biological cell lines and diluted blood samples are demonstrated; the flow rate-frequency characteristics are studied. Viability of cells during pumping with multiple inlet multiple outlet configuration is also studied in this work, which shows 100% of cells are viable. Application of the proposed micropump for simultaneous pumping, mixing and distribution of fluids is demonstrated. The proposed integrated, standalone and portable micropump is suitable for drug delivery, lab-on-chip and micro-total-analysis applications.

  20. DC proton beam measurements in a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Schafstall, P.; Schneider, J.D.; Sherman, J.; Zaugg, T.; Taylor, T.

    1994-01-01

    High current, CW proton accelerators are being considered for a number of applications including disposition of nuclear wastes, reduction of fissionable nuclear material inventories, safe production of critical nuclear materials, and energy production. All these applications require the development of high current, reliable, hydrogen ion injectors. In 1986, a program using CW RFQ technology was undertaken at CRL in collaboration with LANL and was continued there until 1993. During this time, an accelerator was built which produced 600 keV, 75 mA and 1,250 keV, 55 mA CW proton beams. The present program at Los Alamos using this accelerator is aimed at continuing the CRL work to demonstrate long-term reliability. In the present work, the authors are seeking to determine the optimal match to and the current limit of the 1,250-keV RFQ. This paper discusses the characterization of the 50 keV beams at the exit of the single-solenoid LEBT and presents both the experimental measurements and the beam simulations done to model this system

  1. Preventive maintenance basis: Volume 16 -- Power operated relief valves, solenoid actuated. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worledge, D.; Hinchcliffe, G.

    1997-07-01

    US nuclear plants are implementing preventive maintenance (PM) tasks with little documented basis beyond fundamental vendor information to support the tasks or their intervals. The Preventive Maintenance Basis project provides utilities with the technical basis for PM tasks and task intervals associated with 40 specific components such as valves, electric motors, pumps, and HVAC equipment. This report provides an overview of the PM Basis project and describes use of the PM Basis database. This volume 16 of the report provides a program of PM tasks suitable for application to power operated relief valves (PORV's) that are solenoid actuated. The PM tasks that are recommended provide a cost-effective way to intercept the causes and mechanisms that lead to degradation and failure. They can be used, in conjunction with material from other sources, to develop a complete PM program or to improve an existing program. Users of this information will be utility managers, supervisors, craft technicians, and training instructors responsible for developing, optimizing, or fine-tuning PM programs

  2. Compact Muon Solenoid Experimental Discovery Potential for Supersymmetry is Same-Charge Di-Lepton Events

    CERN Document Server

    Pakhotin, Yuriy Aleksandrovich

    2010-01-01

    Same-charge di-lepton events provide a very clean experimental signature for Supersymmetry (SUSY) search. This work studies the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment search potential for new physics with same-charge, isolated di-leptons accompanied by jets and large missing transverse energy. The results show that CMS sensitivity for new physics at 7 TeV with integrated luminosity 100 pb$^{−1}$ will exceed current Tevatron limits. Muon detection for SUSY discovery in the forward direction is accomplished using cathode strip chambers (CSC). These detectors identify muons, provide a fast muon trigger, and give a precise measurement of the muon trajectory. There are 468 six-plane CSCs in the system. The efficiency of finding muon trigger primitives (muon track segments) was studied using 36 CMS CSCs and cosmic ray muons during the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) exercise conducted by the CMS experiment in 2006. The efficiency of finding 2-dimensional trigger primitives within 6-layer chambers was foun...

  3. Application of optimal control theory to laser heating of a plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neal, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    Laser heating of a plasma column confined by a solenoidal magnetic field is studied via modern optimal control techniques. A two-temperature, constant pressure model is used for the plasma so that the temperature and density are functions of time and location along the plasma column. They are assumed to be uniform in the radial direction so that refraction of the laser beam does not occur. The laser intensity used as input to the column at one end is taken as the control variable and plasma losses are neglected. The localized behavior of the plasma heating dynamics is first studied and conventional optimal control theory applied. The distributed parameter optimal control problem is next considered with minimum time to reach a specified final ion temperature criterion as the objective. Since the laser intensity can only be directly controlled at the input end of the plasma column, a boundary control situation results. The problem is unique in that the control is the boundary value of one of the state variables. The necessary conditions are developed and the problem solved numerically for typical plasma parameters. The problem of maximizing the space-time integral of neutron production rate in the plasma is considered for a constant distributed control problem where the laser intensity is assumed fixed at maximum and the external magnetic field is taken as a control variable

  4. Tor forms a dimer through an N-terminal helical solenoid with a complex topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretić, Domagoj; Berndt, Alex; Ohashi, Yohei; Johnson, Christopher M.; Williams, Roger L.

    2016-04-01

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates a range of anabolic and catabolic processes. Tor is present in two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, in which the Tor-Lst8 heterodimer forms a common sub-complex. We have determined the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of Tor bound to Lst8. Two Tor-Lst8 heterodimers assemble further into a dyad-symmetry dimer mediated by Tor-Tor interactions. The first 1,300 residues of Tor form a HEAT repeat-containing α-solenoid with four distinct segments: a highly curved 800-residue N-terminal 'spiral', followed by a 400-residue low-curvature 'bridge' and an extended `railing' running along the bridge leading to the 'cap' that links to FAT region. This complex topology was verified by domain insertions and offers a new interpretation of the mTORC1 structure. The spiral of one TOR interacts with the bridge of another, which together form a joint platform for the Regulatory Associated Protein of TOR (RAPTOR) regulatory subunit.

  5. High Tensile Strength of Engineered β-Solenoid Fibrils via Sonication and Pulling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zeyu; Parker, Amanda S; Peralta, Maria D R; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M; Cox, Daniel L; Toney, Michael D

    2017-11-07

    We present estimates of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) for two engineered β-solenoid protein mutant fibril structures (spruce budworm and Rhagium inquisitor antifreeze proteins) derived from sonication-based measurements and from force pulling molecular dynamics simulations, both in water. Sonication experiments generate limiting scissioned fibrils with a well-defined length-to-width correlation for the mutant spruce budworm protein and the resultant UTS estimate is 0.66 ± 0.08 GPa. For fibrils formed from engineered R. inquisitor antifreeze protein, depending upon geometry, we estimate UTSs of 3.5 ± 3.2-5.5 ± 5.1 GPa for proteins with interfacial disulfide bonds, and 1.6 ± 1.5-2.5 ± 2.3 GPa for the reduced form. The large error bars for the R. inquisitor structures are intrinsic to the broad distribution of limiting scission lengths. Simulations provide pulling velocity-dependent UTSs increasing from 0.2 to 1 GPa in the available speed range, and 1.5 GPa extrapolated to the speeds expected in the sonication experiments. Simulations yield low-velocity values for the Young's modulus of 6.0 GPa. Without protein optimization, these mechanical parameters are similar to those of spider silk and Kevlar, but in contrast to spider silk, these proteins have a precisely known sequence-structure relationship. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Physics of Local Helicity Injection Non-Solenoidal Tokamak Startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, A. J.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Jardin, S.

    2013-10-01

    Non-solenoidal startup via Local Helicity Injection (LHI) uses compact current injectors to produce toroidal plasma current Ip up to 170 kA in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment, driven by 4-8 kA injector current on timescales of 5-20 milliseconds. Increasing the Ip buildup duration enables experimental demonstration of plasma position control on timescales relevant for high-current startup. LHI-driven discharges exhibit bursty MHD activity, apparently line-tied kinking of LHI-driven field lines, with the bursts correlating with rapid equilibrium changes, sharp Ip rises, and sharp drops in the injector impedance. Preliminary NIMROD results suggest that helical LHI-driven current channels remain coherent, with Ip increases due to reconnection between adjacent helical turns forming axisymmetric plasmoids, and corresponding sharp drops in the bias circuit impedance. The DC injector impedance is consistent with a space charge limit at low bias current and a magnetic limit at high bias current. Internal measurements show the current density profile starts strongly hollow and rapidly fills in during Ip buildup. Simulations of LHI discharges using the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) will provide insight into the detailed current drive mechanism and guide experiments on PEFASUS and NSTX-U. Work supported by US DOE Grants DE-FG02-96ER54375 and DE-SC0006928.

  7. Local Helicity Injection Systems for Non-solenoidal Startup in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Lewicki, B. T.; Redd, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Local helicity injection is being developed in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment for non-solenoidal startup in spherical tokamaks. The effective loop voltage due to helicity injection scales with the area of the injectors, requiring the development of electron current injectors with areas much larger than the 2 cm2 plasma arc injectors used to date. Solid and gas-effused metallic electrodes were found to be unusable due to reduced injector area utilization from localized cathode spots and narrow operational regimes. An integrated array of 8 compact plasma arc sources is thus being developed for high current startup. It employs two monolithic power systems, for the plasma arc sources and the bias current extraction system. The array effectively eliminates impurity fueling from plasma-material interaction by incorporating a local scraper-limiter and conical-frustum bias electrodes to mitigate the effects of cathode spots. An energy balance model of helicity injection indicates that the resulting 20 cm2 of total injection area should provide sufficient current drive to reach 0.3 MA. At that level, helicity injection drive exceeds that from poloidal induction, which is the relevant operational regime for large-scale spherical tokamaks. Future placement of the injector array near an expanded boundary divertor region will test simultaneous optimization of helicity drive and the Taylor relaxation current limit. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  8. An analysis of the performance of the Compact Muon Solenoid Endcap Muon Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Ippolito, Nicole M

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2006, the Compact Muon Solenoid, one of the two multi-purpose detectors built along the Large Hadron Collider ring, was used to collect data in a full magnetic field of 4 Tesla. This series of runs was the so-named Magnet Test-Cosmic Challenge (or MTCC). For the first time, some sector of all sub-detectors were included in the data chain. Many terabytes of data was collected during this approximately month-long endeavor. The analysis of some subset of this data is considered herein. All work focused on the achievements made by the Cathode-Strip Chambers, which are part of the Endcap Muon system. Two major areas were considered: the resolution being achieved by the CSC's using the reconstruction software at the time of the MTCC, and the possibility of momentum reconstruction from the local tracks within the CSC's, removed from other parts of the detector. This thesis is divided into a number of different chapters. In chapter 1, the physics which the LHC hopes to achieve is discussed in some gene...

  9. Thermal analysis of the cold mass of the 2T solenoid for the PANDA detector at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rolando, G; Dudarev, A; Pais Da Silva, H; Vodopyanov, A; Schmitt, L

    2015-01-01

    The superconducting solenoid of the PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany) is designed to provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a length of about 4 m in a bore of 1.9 m. To allow a warm target feed pipe oriented transversely to the solenoid axis and penetrating through the cryostat and solenoid cold mass, the magnet is split into 3 inter-connected coils fitted in a common support cylinder. During normal operation, cooling of the cold mass to the working temperature of 4.5 K will be achieved through the circulation by natural convection of two-phase helium in cooling pipes attached to the Al-alloy support cylinder. Pure aluminium strips acting as heat drains and glued to the inner surface of the three coils and thermally bonded to the cooling pipes allow minimizing the temperature gradient across the 6-layers coils. In this paper the thermal design of the cold mass during normal operation and current ramps up and down is validated using an analytical appro...

  10. Coherent and semiclassical states in a magnetic field in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V G [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M; Filho, D P Meira, E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.ru, E-mail: gavrilovsergeyp@yahoo.com, E-mail: gitman@dfn.if.usp.br, E-mail: dmeira@dfn.if.usp.br [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-04

    A new approach to constructing coherent states (CS) and semiclassical states (SS) in a magnetic-solenoid field is proposed. The main idea is based on the fact that the AB solenoid breaks the translational symmetry in the xy-plane; this has a topological effect such that there appear two types of trajectories which embrace and do not embrace the solenoid. Due to this fact, one has to construct two different kinds of CS/SS which correspond to such trajectories in the semiclassical limit. Following this idea, we construct CS in two steps, first the instantaneous CS (ICS) and then the time-dependent CS/SS as an evolution of the ICS. The construction is realized for nonrelativistic and relativistic spinning particles both in (2 + 1) and (3 + 1) dimensions and gives a non-trivial example of SS/CS for systems with a nonquadratic Hamiltonian. It is stressed that CS depending on their parameters (quantum numbers) describe both pure quantum and semiclassical states. An analysis is represented that classifies parameters of the CS in such respect. Such a classification is used for the semiclassical decompositions of various physical quantities.

  11. Coherent and semiclassical states in a magnetic field in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V G; Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M; Filho, D P Meira

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to constructing coherent states (CS) and semiclassical states (SS) in a magnetic-solenoid field is proposed. The main idea is based on the fact that the AB solenoid breaks the translational symmetry in the xy-plane; this has a topological effect such that there appear two types of trajectories which embrace and do not embrace the solenoid. Due to this fact, one has to construct two different kinds of CS/SS which correspond to such trajectories in the semiclassical limit. Following this idea, we construct CS in two steps, first the instantaneous CS (ICS) and then the time-dependent CS/SS as an evolution of the ICS. The construction is realized for nonrelativistic and relativistic spinning particles both in (2 + 1) and (3 + 1) dimensions and gives a non-trivial example of SS/CS for systems with a nonquadratic Hamiltonian. It is stressed that CS depending on their parameters (quantum numbers) describe both pure quantum and semiclassical states. An analysis is represented that classifies parameters of the CS in such respect. Such a classification is used for the semiclassical decompositions of various physical quantities.

  12. Study of blood flow inside the stenosis vessel under the effect of solenoid magnetic field using ferrohydrodynamics principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badfar, Homayoun; Motlagh, Saber Yekani; Sharifi, Abbas

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, biomagnetic blood flow in the stenosis vessel under the effect of the solenoid magnetic field is studied using the ferrohydrodynamics (FHD) model. The parabolic profile is considered at an inlet of the axisymmetric stenosis vessel. Blood is modeled as electrically non-conducting, Newtonian and homogeneous fluid. Finite volume and the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure Linked Equations) algorithm are utilized to discretize governing equations. The investigation is studied at different magnetic numbers ( MnF=164, 328, 1640 and 3280) and the number of the coil loops (three, five and nine loops). Results indicate an increase in heat transfer, wall shear stress and energy loss (pressure drop) with an increment in the magnetic number (ratio of Kelvin force to dynamic pressure force), arising from the FHD, and the number of solenoid loops. Furthermore, the flow pattern is affected by the magnetic field, and the temperature of blood can be decreased up to 1.48 {}°C under the effect of the solenoid magnetic field with nine loops and reference magnetic field ( B0) of 2 tesla.

  13. Control of spool position of on/off solenoid operated hydraulic valve by sliding-mode controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hak; Hong, Hyun Wook; Park, Myeong Kwan [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Young Won [KHPS, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The use of on/off solenoid operated hydraulic valves instead of proportional valves has been attracting the interest of many researchers and engineers. However, there exist difficulties in controlling the on/off valve because of highly nonlinear characteristics including hysteresis and saturation. This paper considers the application of on/off solenoid operated hydraulic valves to control position of a hydraulic cylinder with the aim of evaluating, feasibility and practicability of their implementation and understanding the potential benefits when they are used in existing hydraulic systems. Assuming that only the current is measured, a sliding mode observer is designed to estimate the spool position and velocity. To alleviate the aforementioned difficulties in controlling the spool position, a nonlinear observer-based controller of an on/off solenoid valve is designed, taking into account the estimated values, based on a nonlinear model including hysteresis and saturation. The control objective is to track a desired spool trajectory. Simulation and experimental results illustrate the efficiency of the designed controller. The proposed controller is validated again in a single-rod hydraulic actuator. Experimental results show that the fluid flow through the valve orifice by controlling the spool position was successfully controlled.

  14. Commissioning of the 112 MHz SRF Gun and 500 MHz bunching cavities for the CeC PoP Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Litvinenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); McIntosh, P. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Moss, A. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Narayan, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Orfin, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pinayev, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wheelhouse, A. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xin, T. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment at BNL includes a short electron linac. During Phase 1, a 112 MHz superconducting RF photo-emission gun and two 500 MHz normal conducting bunching cavities were installed and are under commissioning. The paper describes the Phase1 linac layout and presents commissioning results for the cavities and associated RF, cryogenic and other sub-systems

  15. Facial tightening with an advanced 4-MHz monopolar radiofrequency device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Amy F; Tucker, Robert D; Palange, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Over the past 10 years, radiofrequency (RF) technology has been utilized for nonablative treatments for the treatment of rhytides and skin laxity. This manuscript reviews the scientific background of collagen synthesis in vivo and in response to RF energy as well as a clinical study of 17 patients receiving a series of facial treatments with a 4-MHz monopolar RF (Pellevé, Ellman International, Inc, Oceanside, NY). Clinical methods, results, and a review of the literature for RF aesthetic treatments of the face are presented. Seventeen patients were treated in one site with 6 total treatments scheduled as follows: 1 session was performed every 15 days for 2 consecutive sessions, 1 session every month for 2 consecutive sessions, and 1 session every 2 months for 2 consecutive sessions. Both the treating physician and the patients via live viewing and comparison with baseline photographs performed assessment of results. Results are reported as averages across the 17 patients. Two weeks after the first treatment, patients noted an overall average of 25% to 30% improvement. Just before the last or sixth treatment, there was an average of 50% improvement noted by the physician, with patients ranking an average self-improvement of 48%. The treating physician rated average improvement of 46% compared with baseline, whereas the patients ranked average improvement of 30% compared with baseline at 1 year after treatment was initiated (6 months after the final treatment). Patients find this treatment to be very well tolerated, with minimal to no discomfort and no downtime or significant side effects. The Pellevé 4-MHz monopolar RF device is effective, safe, and very well tolerated for treating laxity, texture, and wrinkles of the skin without complication or discomfort. Evidence in the literature supports the scientific mechanism of action of acute collagen modification and continued neocollagenesis observed with the system. In this cohort, patients maintain approximately 50

  16. Effects of acute and chronic exposure to both 900 MHz and 2100 MHz electromagnetic radiation on glutamate receptor signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçek-Saraç, Çiğdem; Er, Hakan; Kencebay Manas, Ceren; Kantar Gok, Deniz; Özen, Şükrü; Derin, Narin

    2017-09-01

    To demonstrate the molecular effects of acute and chronic exposure to both 900 and 2100 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) on the hippocampal level/activity of some of the enzymes - including PKA, CaMKIIα, CREB, and p44/42 MAPK - from N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-related signaling pathways. Rats were divided into the following groups: sham rats, and rats exposed to 900 and 2100 MHz RF-EMR for 2 h/day for acute (1 week) or chronic (10 weeks), respectively. Western blotting and activity measurement assays were used to assess the level/activity of the selected enzymes. The obtained results revealed that the hippocampal level/activity of selected enzymes was significantly higher in the chronic groups as compared to the acute groups at both 900 and 2100 MHz RF-EMR exposure. In addition, hippocampal level/activity of selected enzymes was significantly higher at 2100 MHz RF-EMR than 900 MHz RF-EMR in both acute and chronic groups. The present study provides experimental evidence that both exposure duration (1 week versus 10 weeks) and different carrier frequencies (900 vs. 2100 MHz) had different effects on the protein expression of hippocampus in Wistar rats, which might encourage further research on protection against RF-EMR exposure.

  17. A 1 MHz beam chopper for the KAON Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wait, G.D.; Barnes, M.J.; Waters, G.; Figley, C.B.

    1990-06-01

    The proposed KAON Factory at TRIUMF requires a high repetition rate beam chopper for the injection process into the accumulator ring. Prototype studies on a novel design for an energy efficient 1 MHz (10 6 discrete pulses/s) beam chopper are described. In the low voltage prototype 20 V electrical pulses are stored in a low loss transmission line which is open circuited at the far end. Testing has just begun on high voltage prototype in which 7 kV pulses have been produced at the end of 10 cm diameter, 50 Ω coaxial cable. In the final version the voltage may be as high as 20 kV and the low loss transmission line will be coupled to an open circuited set of deflection plates through which the beam passes. Results on the performance of the low voltage prototype are presented as well as a description of the first test results from the high voltage prototype. (Author) 16 refs., 5 figs., tab

  18. Design of large aperture 500 MHz 5-cell superconducting cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yelong; Feng Ziqiang; Lu Changwang; Yu Haibo; Liu Jianfei; Hou Hongtao; Ma Zhenyu; Mao Dongqing

    2012-01-01

    With the potential application of Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), the superconducting (SC) cavities were developed to deliver much higher current than before. Nowadays, the current of the international SC accelerator designed has already exceeded 100 mA. This paper presents the design of a new 500 MHz 5-cell SC cavity (SINAP 5-cell cavity), in which the parameters r/Q= 515.5 Ω of the fundamental mode and the geometry factor G=275.8 are under an acceptable Radio Frequency (RF) field level. (B peak /E acc =4.31 mT/MV/m and E peak /E acc =2.48). This design employs a larger beam pipe to propagate the Higher Order Modes (HOMs) out of the cavity and increases the damping efficiently for the dangerous HOMs. By simulation technique, it has been found that almost all the dangerous HOMs (including TE 111 , TM 110 , and TM 011 ) can be propagated into the beam pipe and are absorbed by ferrite absorbers, when the beam pile is enlarged. Finally, the loss factor for the new 5-cell cavity is also calculated. (authors)

  19. Modulation improvements in the 201 MHZ RF generators at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, W.M.; Lyles, J.T.M.; Harris, H.W.

    1992-01-01

    Radio-frequency generators, operating at 201 MHz, power the first four stages of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator. Each generator consists of four stages of seriesconnected, vacuum-tube amplifiers. The modulation scheme for each stage is different. The fist amplifier is a grid-modulated tetrode that produces 500 W peak-power. The second amplifier is a drive-modulated tetrode that produces 5 kill peak-power. The third stage is a grid- and plate-modulated tetrode that produces 130 kill peak-power. The last stage is a plate-modulated triode that produces 2.5 MW peak power. A modernization program has been initiated to improve the reliability of each of these stages. The first two stages of each generator are being replaced with a single, drive-modulated, solid-state amplifier. Specifications for the amplifier design, and requirements for integration into the system are presented. The third stage will be converted to a drive-modulated system using the current tetrode. This modification involves the development of a 17-kV, 15-A switching supply to replace the present plate-modulator. Design requirements for this switching supply are presented. The final stage will remain plate-modulated but will contain a new driver unit for the modulator tube

  20. Dipole compensation of the 176 MHz MYRRHA RFQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuempel, Klaus; Podlech, Holger; Lenz, Christoph; Petry, Nils [IAP, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bechtold, Alexander [NTG Neue Technologien GmbH und Co.KG, Gelnhausen (Germany); Zhang, Chuan [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) Project is planned as an accelerator driven system (ADS) for the transmutation of long-living radioactive waste. For this project a cw 4-rod-RFQ with 176 MHz and a total length of about 4 m is required. It is supposed to accelerate protons from 30 keV up to 1.5 MeV*. One of the main tasks during the development of the RFQ is the very high reliability of the accelerator to limit the thermal stress inside the reactor. Another challenge was to compensate the dipole component of the MYRRHA-RFQ which is due to the design principle of 4-rod-RFQs. This dipole component is responsible for shifting the ideal beam axis from the geometrical center of the quadrupole downwards. Design studies with CST MICROWAVE STUDIO have shown that the dipole component can be almost completely compensated by widening the stems alternately so that the current paths of the lower electrodes are increased.