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Sample records for mhd turbulent decay

  1. Non-ideal MHD turbulent decay in molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Downes, T P

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects are important in the dynamics of molecular clouds: both ambipolar diffusion and possibly the Hall effect have been identified as significant. We present the results of a suite of simulations with a resolution of 512-cubed of turbulent decay in molecular clouds incorporating a simplified form of both ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect simultaneously. The initial velocity field in the turbulence is varied from being super-Alfv\\'enic and hypersonic, through to trans-Alfv\\'enic but still supersonic. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence increasing the decay from $t^{-1.25}$ to $t^{-1.4}$. The Hall effect has virtually no impact in this regard. The power spectra of density, velocity and the magnetic field are all affected by the non-ideal terms, being steepened significantly when compared with ideal MHD turbulence with exponents. The density power spectra components change from about 1.4 to about 2.1 for the i...

  2. Evidence for Decay of Turbulence by MHD Shocks in Molecular Clouds via CO Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, Rebecca L; Green, Joel D; Yang, Yao-Lun

    2015-01-01

    We utilize observations of sub-millimeter rotational transitions of CO from a Herschel Cycle 2 open time program ("COPS", PI: J. Green) to identify previously predicted turbulent dissipation by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in molecular clouds. We find evidence of the shocks expected for dissipation of MHD turbulence in material not associated with any protostar. Two models fit about equally well: model 1 has a density of 10$^{3}$ cm$^{-3}$, a shock velocity of 3 km s$^{-1}$, and a magnetic field strength of 4 ${\\mu}$G; model 2 has a density of 10$^{3.5}$ cm$^{-3}$, a shock velocity of $2$ km s$^{-1}$, and a magnetic field strength of 8 $\\mu$G. Timescales for decay of turbulence in this region are comparable to crossing times. Transitions of CO up to $J$ of 8, observed close to active sites of star formation, but not within outflows, can trace turbulent dissipation of shocks stirred by formation processes. Although the transitions are difficult to detect at individual positions, our Herschel-SPIRE survey o...

  3. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  4. MHD turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, that spectral properties of distributed chaos in MHD turbulence with zero mean magnetic field are similar to those of hydrodynamic turbulence. An exception is MHD spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry, when the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ has $\\beta=4/7$.

  5. MHD Turbulence, Turbulent Dynamo and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    MHD Turbulence is common in many space physics and astrophysics environments. We first discuss the properties of incompressible MHD turbulence. A well-conductive fluid amplifies initial magnetic fields in a process called small-scale dynamo. Below equipartition scale for kinetic and magnetic energies the spectrum is steep (Kolmogorov -5/3) and is represented by critically balanced strong MHD turbulence. In this paper we report the basic reasoning behind universal nonlinear small-scale dynamo and the inertial range of MHD turbulence. We measured the efficiency of the small-scale dynamo $C_E=0.05$, Kolmogorov constant $C_K=4.2$ and anisotropy constant $C_A=0.63$ for MHD turbulence in high-resolution direct numerical simulations. We also discuss so-called imbalanced or cross-helical MHD turbulence which is relevant for in many objects, most prominently in the solar wind. We show that properties of incompressible MHD turbulence are similar to the properties of Alfv\\'enic part of MHD cascade in compressible turbul...

  6. Electron MHD: dynamics and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron MHD (EMHD). We argue there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact non-linear solutions; (ii) co-linear whistlers do not interact (including counter-propagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector, $k_1=k_2$, do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero-mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfven turbulence cannot be transferred to the E...

  7. Multifluid magnetohydrodynamic turbulent decay

    CERN Document Server

    Downes, Turlough P

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that turbulence has a significant impact on the dynamics and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation which occurs within them. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects are known to influence the nature of this turbulence. We present the results of a suite of 512-cubed resolution simulations of the decay of initially super-Alfvenic and supersonic fully multifluid MHD turbulence. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence while the Hall effect has virtually no impact. The decay of the kinetic energy can be fitted as a power-law in time and the exponent is found to be -1.34 for fully multifluid MHD turbulence. The power spectra of density, velocity and magnetic field are all steepened significantly by the inclusion of non-ideal terms. The dominant reason for this steepening is ambipolar diffusion with the Hall effect again playing a minimal role except at short length scales where it creates extra structure in the magnetic field. Interestingl...

  8. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  9. Type I Planetary Migration with MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, G; Adams, F; Laughlin, Gregory; Steinacker, Adriane; Adams, Fred

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines how type I planet migration is affected by the presence of turbulent density fluctuations in the circumstellar disk. For type I migration, the planet does not clear a gap in the disk and its secular motion is driven by torques generated by the wakes it creates in the surrounding disk fluid. MHD turbulence creates additional density perturbations that gravitationally interact with the planet and can dominate the torques produced by the migration mechanism itself. This paper shows that conventional type I migration can be readily overwhelmed by turbulent perturbations and hence the usual description of type I migration should be modified in locations where the magnetorotational instability is active. In general, the migrating planet does not follow a smooth inward trned, but rather exhibits a random walk through phase space. Our main conclusion is that MHD turbulence will alter the time scales for type I planet migration and -- because of chaos -- requires the time scales to be described by ...

  10. Dipole Alignment in Rotating MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.; Fu, Terry; Morin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results from long-term CPU and GPU simulations of rotating, homogeneous, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and discuss their connection to the spherically bounded case. We compare our numerical results with a statistical theory of geodynamo action that has evolved from the absolute equilibrium ensemble theory of ideal MHD turbulence, which is based on the ideal MHD invariants are energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. However, for rotating MHD turbulence, the cross helicity is no longer an exact invariant, although rms cross helicity becomes quasistationary during an ideal MHD simulation. This and the anisotropy imposed by rotation suggests an ansatz in which an effective, nonzero value of cross helicity is assigned to axisymmetric modes and zero cross helicity to non-axisymmetric modes. This hybrid statistics predicts a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field due to broken ergodicity , as well as dipole vector alignment with the rotation axis, both of which are observed numerically. We find that only a relatively small value of effective cross helicity leads to the prediction of a dipole moment vector that is closely aligned (less than 10 degrees) with the rotation axis. We also discuss the effect of initial conditions, dissipation and grid size on the numerical simulations and statistical theory.

  11. Turbulence evolution in MHD plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, M; Spanier, F

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium has been an active field of research in the last decade. Numerical simulations are the tool of choice in most cases. But while there are a number of simulations on the market some questions have not been answered finally. In this paper we are going to examine the influence of compressible and incompressible driving on the evolution of turbulent spectra in a number of possible interstellar medium scenarios. We conclude that the driving not only has an influence on the ratio of compressible to incompressible component but also on the anisotropy of turbulence.

  12. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2001-06-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  13. Cosmic ray transport in MHD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Huirong

    2007-01-01

    Numerical simulations shed light onto earlier not trackable problem of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. They allowed to test the predictions of different models and choose the correct ones. Inevitably, this progress calls for revisions in the picture of cosmic ray (CR) transport. It also shed light on the problems with the present day numerical modeling of CR. In this paper we focus on the analytical way of describing CR propagation and scattering, which should be used in synergy with the numerical studies. In particular, we use recently established scaling laws for MHD modes to obtain the transport properties for CRs. We include nonlinear effects arising from large scale trapping, to remove the 90 degree divergence. We determine how the efficiency of the scattering and CR mean free path depend on the characteristics of ionized media, e.g. plasma $\\beta$, Coulomb collisional mean free path. Implications for particle transport in interstellar medium and solar corona are discussed. We also examine the perp...

  14. MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chi-kwan

    2012-01-01

    The physical modeling of the accretion disk boundary layer, the region where the disk meets the surface of the accreting star, usually relies on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity, widely adopted in astrophysics, satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability is inefficient in this inner disk region. I will discuss the results of a recent study on the generation of hydromagnetic stresses and energy density in the boundary layer around a weakly magnetized star. Our findings suggest that although magnetic energy density can be significantly amplified in this region, angular momentum transport is rather inefficient. This seems consistent with the results obtained in numerical simulations...

  15. Eigenanalysis of Ideal Hall MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, T.; Shebalin, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    Ideal, incompressible, homogeneous, Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) turbulence may be investigated through a Fourier spectral method. In three-dimensional periodic geometry, the independent Fourier coefficients represent a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density. The canonical ensemble is based on the conservation of three invariants: total energy, generalized helicity, and magnetic helicity. Generalized helicity in HMHD takes the place of cross helicity in MHD. The invariants determine the modal probability density giving the spectral structure and equilibrium statistics of ideal HMHD, which are compared to known MHD results. New results in absolute equilibrium ensemble theory are derived using a novel approach that involves finding the eigenvalues of a Hermitian covariance matrix for each modal probability density. The associated eigenvectors transform the original phase space variables into eigenvariables through a special unitary transformation. These are the normal modes which facilitate the analysis of ideal HMHD non-linear dynamics. The eigenanalysis predicts that the low wavenumber modes with very small eigenvalues may have mean values that are large compared to their standard deviations, contrary to the ideal ensemble prediction of zero mean values. (Expectation values may also be relatively large at the highest wave numbers, but the addition of even small levels of dissipation removes any relevance this may have for real-world turbulence.) This behavior is non-ergodic over very long times for a numerical simulation and is termed 'broken ergodicity'. For fixed values of the ideal invariants, the effect is seen to be enhanced with increased numerical grid size. Broken ergodicity at low wave number modes gives rise to large-scale, quasi-stationary, coherent structure. Physically, this corresponds to plasma relaxation to force-free states. For real HMHD turbulence with dissipation, broken ergodicity and coherent structure are still

  16. Drag reduction in turbulent MHD pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, P.

    1996-01-01

    This is a preliminary study devoted to verifying whether or not direct simulations of turbulent Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) flows in liquid metals reproduce experimental observations of drag reduction. Two different cases have been simulated by a finite difference scheme which is second order accurate in space and time. In the first case, an external azimuthal magnetic field is imposed. In this case, the magnetic field acts on the mean axial velocity and complete laminarization of the flow at N(sub a) = 30 has been achieved. In the second case, an axial magnetic field is imposed which affects only fluctuating velocities, and thus the action is less efficient. This second case is more practical, but comparison between numerical and experimental results is only qualitative.

  17. Dynamo action in dissipative, forced, rotating MHD turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an inherent feature of large-scale, energetic astrophysical and geophysical magnetofluids. In general, these are rotating and are energized through buoyancy and shear, while viscosity and resistivity provide a means of dissipation of kinetic and magnetic energy. Studies of unforced, rotating, ideal (i.e., non-dissipative) MHD turbulence have produced interesting results, but it is important to determine how these results are affected by dissipation and forcing. Here, we extend our previous work and examine dissipative, forced, and rotating MHD turbulence. Incompressibility is assumed, and finite Fourier series represent turbulent velocity and magnetic field on a 643 grid. Forcing occurs at an intermediate wave number by a method that keeps total energy relatively constant and allows for injection of kinetic and magnetic helicity. We find that 3-D energy spectra are asymmetric when forcing is present. We also find that dynamo action occurs when forcing has either kinetic or magnetic helicity, with magnetic helicity injection being more important. In forced, dissipative MHD turbulence, the dynamo manifests itself as a large-scale coherent structure that is similar to that seen in the ideal case. These results imply that MHD turbulence, per se, may play a fundamental role in the creation and maintenance of large-scale (i.e., dipolar) stellar and planetary magnetic fields.

  18. Numerical study of Cosmic Ray Diffusion in MHD turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Beresnyak, A.; Yan, H.; Lazarian, A.

    2010-01-01

    We study diffusion of Cosmic Rays (CRs) in turbulent magnetic fields using test particle simulations. Electromagnetic fields are produced in direct numerical MHD simulations of turbulence and used as an input for particle tracing, particle feedback on turbulence being ignored. Statistical transport coefficients from the test particle runs are compared with earlier analytical predictions. We find qualitative correspondence between them in various aspects of CR diffusion. In the incompressible ...

  19. Achieving Fast Reconnection in Resistive MHD Models via Turbulent Means

    CERN Document Server

    Lapenta, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Astrophysical fluids are generally turbulent and this preexisting turbulence must be taken into account for the models of magnetic reconnection which are attepmted to be applied to astrophysical, solar or heliospheric environments. In addition, reconnection itself induces turbulence which provides an important feedback on the reconnection process. In this paper we discuss both theoretical model and numerical evidence that magnetic reconnection gets fast in the approximation of resistive MHD. We consider the relation between the Lazarian & Vishniac turbulent reconnection theory and Lapenta's numerical experiments testifying of the spontaneous onset of turbulent reconnection in systems which are initially laminar.

  20. MHD-effects in a turbulent medium of nonuniform density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaynshteyn, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Turbulence in a medium of nonuniform density, such as the convective solar layer, is analyzed with the assumption that Del rho = rho lambda (exponential stratification). Considered are first the simplest case of a quasi-isotropic turbulence, then addition of a scalar factor such as the temperature, and finally anisotropic turbulence. The magnetic field and MHD-effects are then calculated without diffusion, and with two-dimensional turbulence as a special case. Also the values of the essential parameters in this problem are estimated. 7 references.

  1. Dissipation and Heating in Supersonic Hydrodynamic and MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaster, M Nicole

    2008-01-01

    We study energy dissipation and heating by supersonic MHD turbulence in molecular clouds using Athena, a new higher-order Godunov code. We analyze the dependence of the saturation amplitude, energy dissipation characteristics, power spectra, sonic scaling, and indicators of intermittency in the turbulence on factors such as the magnetic field strength, driving scale, energy injection rate, and numerical resolution. While convergence in the energies is reached at moderate resolutions, we find that the power spectra require much higher resolutions that are difficult to obtain. In a 1024^3 hydro run, we find a power law relationship between the velocity dispersion and the spatial scale on which it is measured, while for an MHD run at the same resolution we find no such power law. The time-variability and temperature intermittency in the turbulence both show a dependence on the driving scale, indicating that numerically driving turbulence by an arbitrary mechanism may not allow a realistic representation of these...

  2. Role of Cross Helicity in Cascade Processes of MHD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mizeva, Irina; Frick, Peter; 10.1134/S1028335809020128

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the spectral properties of the developed isotropic (non-Alfven) MHD turbulence stationary excited by an external force, which injects the cross helicity into the flow simultaneously with the energy. It is shown that the cross helicity blocks the spectral energy transfer in MHD turbulence and results in energy accumulation in the system. This accumulation proceeds until the vortex intensification compensates the decreasing efficiency of nonlinear interactions. The formula for estimating the average turbulence energy is obtained for the set ratio between the injected helicity and energy. It is remarkable that the turbulence accumulates the injected cross helicity at its low rate injection -- the integral correlation coefficient significantly exceeds the ratio between the injected helicity and the energy. It is shown that the spectrum slope gradually increases from "5/3" to "2" with the cross helicity level.

  3. Decay of Solar Wind Turbulence behind Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitňa, Alexander; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdeněk; Franci, Luca

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the decay of magnetic and kinetic energies behind IP shocks with motivation to find a relaxation time when downstream turbulence reaches a usual solar wind value. We start with a case study that introduces computation techniques and quantifies a contribution of kinetic fluctuations to the general energy balance. This part of the study is based on high-time (31 ms) resolution plasma data provided by the Spektr-R spacecraft. On the other hand, a statistical part is based on 92 s Wind plasma and magnetic data and its results confirm theoretically established decay laws for kinetic and magnetic energies. We observe the power-law behavior of the energy decay profiles and we estimated the power-law exponents of both kinetic and magnetic energy decay rates as -1.2. We found that the decay of MHD turbulence does not start immediately after the IP shock ramp and we suggest that the proper decay of turbulence begins when a contribution of the kinetic processes becomes negligible. We support this suggestion with a detailed analysis of the decay of turbulence at the kinetic scale.

  4. SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE FROM MHD TO SUB-ION SCALES: HIGH-RESOLUTION HYBRID SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franci, Luca; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Matteini, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hellinger, Petr [Astronomical Institute, AS CR, Bocni II/1401, CZ-14100 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-10

    We present results from a high-resolution and large-scale hybrid (fluid electrons and particle-in-cell protons) two-dimensional numerical simulation of decaying turbulence. Two distinct spectral regions (separated by a smooth break at proton scales) develop with clear power-law scaling, each one occupying about a decade in wavenumbers. The simulation results simultaneously exhibit several properties of the observed solar wind fluctuations: spectral indices of the magnetic, kinetic, and residual energy spectra in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) inertial range along with a flattening of the electric field spectrum, an increase in magnetic compressibility, and a strong coupling of the cascade with the density and the parallel component of the magnetic fluctuations at sub-proton scales. Our findings support the interpretation that in the solar wind, large-scale MHD fluctuations naturally evolve beyond proton scales into a turbulent regime that is governed by the generalized Ohm’s law.

  5. Alignment of Velocity and Magnetic Fluctuations in Simulations of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2007-11-01

    There has been recent theoretical interest in the effect of the alignment of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in three-dimensional (3D) MHD turbulence with a large-scale magnetic field [Boldyrev 2005, 2006]. This theory predicts that the angle θ between the velocity and magnetic fluctuation vectors has a scaling of θ&1/4circ;, where λ is the spatial scale of the fluctuations. There have also been simulations on 3D forced MHD turbulence that supports this prediction [Mason et al. 2006, 2007]. The scaling has also been tested against observations of solar wind turbulence [Podesta et al. 2007]. We report here simulation results based on decaying 2D turbulence. The scaling of θ&1/4circ; and Iroshnikov-Kraichnan scaling has also been observed within a range of time interval and spatial scales, despite the fact that Boldyrev's theory was developed for fully 3D turbulence in the presence of a strong external field. As the external field is reduced in magnitude and becomes comparable to the magnitude of magnetic fluctuations or lower, the scale-dependent alignment is weakened. Implications for observations of solar wind turbulence will be discussed.

  6. Spectral slope and Kolmogorov constant of MHD turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnyak, A

    2011-02-18

    The spectral slope of strong MHD turbulence has recently been a matter of controversy. While the Goldreich-Sridhar model predicts a -5/3 slope, shallower slopes have been observed in numerics. We argue that earlier numerics were affected by driving due to a diffuse locality of energy transfer. Our highest-resolution simulation (3072(2)×1024) exhibited the asymptotic -5/3 scaling. We also discover that the dynamic alignment, proposed in models with -3/2 slope, saturates and cannot modify the asymptotic, high Reynolds number slope. From the observed -5/3 scaling we measure the Kolmogorov constant C(KA)=3.27±0.07 for Alfvénic turbulence and C(K)=4.2±0.2 for full MHD turbulence, which is higher than the hydrodynamic value of 1.64. This larger C(K) indicates inefficient energy transfer in MHD turbulence, which is in agreement with diffuse locality.

  7. Large-scale Magnetic Structure Formation in 3D-MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D-MHD turbulence is believed to be one of the processes responsible for large scale magnetic structure formation in astrophysical systems. In this work we present an exhaustive set of high resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) of both forced and decaying 3D-MHD turbulence, to understand this structure formation process. It is first shown that an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in small-scale driven turbulence does not necessarily generate coherent large-scale magnetic structures. The observed large-scale magnetic field, in this case, is severely perturbed by magnetic fluctuations generated by the small-scale forcing. In the decaying case, coherent large-scale structure form similar to those observed astronomically. Based on the numerical results the formation of large-scale magnetic structures in some astrophysical systems, is suggested to be the consequence of an initial forcing which imparts the necessary turbulent energy into the system, which, afte...

  8. Turbulent MHD transport coefficients - An attempt at self-consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Montgomery, D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, some multiple scale perturbation calculations of turbulent MHD transport coefficients begun in earlier papers are first completed. These generalize 'alpha effect' calculations by treating the velocity field and magnetic field on the same footing. Then the problem of rendering such calculations self-consistent is addressed, generalizing an eddy-viscosity hypothesis similar to that of Heisenberg for the Navier-Stokes case. The method also borrows from Kraichnan's direct interaction approximation. The output is a set of integral equations relating the spectra and the turbulent transport coefficients. Previous 'alpha effect' and 'beta effect' coefficients emerge as limiting cases. A treatment of the inertial range can also be given, consistent with a -5/3 energy spectrum power law. In the Navier-Stokes limit, a value of 1.72 is extracted for the Kolmogorov constant. Further applications to MHD are possible.

  9. Quasi-isotropic cascade in MHD turbulence with mean field

    CERN Document Server

    Grappin, Roland; Gürcan, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological theory of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of a strong large-scale magnetic field, which establishes a link between the known anisotropic models of strong and weak MHD turbulence We argue that the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan isotropic cascade develops naturally within the plane perpendicular to the mean field, while oblique-parallel cascades with weaker amplitudes can develop, triggered by the perpendicular cascade, with a reduced flux resulting from a quasi-resonance condition. The resulting energy spectrum $E(k_\\parallel,k_\\bot)$ has the same slope in all directions. The ratio between the extents of the inertial range in the parallel and perpendicular directions is equal to $b_{rms}/B_0$. These properties match those found in recent 3D MHD simulations with isotropic forcing reported in [R. Grappin and W.-C. M\\"uller, Phys. Rev. E \\textbf{82}, 26406 (2010)].

  10. Intermittency in MHD turbulence and coronal nanoflares modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veltri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution numerical simulations, solar wind data analysis, and measurements at the edges of laboratory plasma devices have allowed for a huge progress in our understanding of MHD turbulence. The high resolution of solar wind measurements has allowed to characterize the intermittency observed at small scales. We are now able to set up a consistent and convincing view of the main properties of MHD turbulence, which in turn constitutes an extremely efficient tool in understanding the behaviour of turbulent plasmas, like those in solar corona, where in situ observations are not available. Using this knowledge a model to describe injection, due to foot-point motions, storage and dissipation of MHD turbulence in coronal loops, is built where we assume strong longitudinal magnetic field, low beta and high aspect ratio, which allows us to use the set of reduced MHD equations (RMHD. The model is based on a shell technique in the wave vector space orthogonal to the strong magnetic field, while the dependence on the longitudinal coordinate is preserved. Numerical simulations show that injected energy is efficiently stored in the loop where a significant level of magnetic and velocity fluctuations is obtained. Nonlinear interactions give rise to an energy cascade towards smaller scales where energy is dissipated in an intermittent fashion. Due to the strong longitudinal magnetic field, dissipative structures propagate along the loop, with the typical speed of the Alfvén waves. The statistical analysis on the intermittent dissipative events compares well with all observed properties of nanoflare emission statistics. Moreover the recent observations of non thermal velocity measurements during flare occurrence are well described by the numerical results of the simulation model. All these results naturally emerge from the model dynamical evolution without any need of an ad-hoc hypothesis.

  11. Scaling laws in decaying helical 3D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Christensson, M; Brandenburg, A; Christensson, Mattias; Hindmarsh, Mark; Brandenburg, Axel

    2002-01-01

    We study the evolution of growth and decay laws for the magnetic field coherence length xi, energy E_M and magnetic helicity H in freely decaying 3D MHD turbulence. We show that with certain assumptions, self-similarity of the magnetic power spectrum alone implies that xi ~ t^{1/2}. This in turn implies that magnetic helicity decays as H ~ t^{-2s}, where s=(xi_diff/xi_H)^2, in terms of xi_diff, the diffusion length scale, and xi_H, a length scale defined from the helicity power spectrum. The relative magnetic helicity remains constant, implying that the magnetic energy decays as E_M ~ t^{-0.5-2s}. At late times s is constant and inversely proportional to the magnetic Reynolds number Re_M.

  12. Determination of the Turbulent Decay Exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perot, J.; Zusi, Chris

    2011-11-01

    All theories concerning the decay of isotropic turbulence agree that the turbulent kinetic energy has a power law dependence on time. However, there is significant disagreement about what the value of the exponent should be for this power law. The primary theories, proposed by researchers such as Batchelor, Townsend, and Kolmogorov, have the decay exponent at values of 1, 6/5, 10/7, 3/2, 2, and 5/2. The debate over the decay exponent has remained unresolved for many decades because the decay exponent is an extremely sensitive quantity. Experiments have decay times which are too short to be able to accurately differentiate between the various theoretical possibilities, and all prior numerical simulations of decaying turbulence impose the decay rate a priori via the choice of initial conditions. In this work, direct numerical simulation is used to achieve very long decay times, and the initial turbulence is generated by the Navier-Stokes equations and is not imposed. The initial turbulence is created by the stirring action of the flow past 768 small randomly placed cubes. Stirring occurs at 1/30th of the simulation domain size so that the low wavenumber and large scale behavior of the turbulent spectrum which dictates the decay rate is generated by the fluid and is not imposed. It is shown that in all 16 simulations the decay exponent closely matches the theoretical predictions of Saffman at both high and low Reynolds numbers. Perot, AIP Advances 1, 022104 (2011).

  13. MHD Turbulent Mixing Layers: Equilibrium Cooling Models

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A; Cho, J; Lazarian, A; Leitner, S N

    2006-01-01

    We present models of turbulent mixing at the boundaries between hot (T~10^{6-7} K) and warm material (T~10^4 K) in the interstellar medium, using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical code, with radiative cooling. The source of turbulence in our simulations is a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, produced by shear between the two media. We found, that because the growth rate of the large scale modes in the instability is rather slow, it takes a significant amount of time (~1 Myr) for turbulence to produce effective mixing. We find that the total column densities of the highly ionized species (C IV, N V, and O VI) per interface (assuming ionization equilibrium) are similar to previous steady-state non-equilibrium ionization models, but grow slowly from log N ~10^{11} to a few 10^{12} cm^{-2} as the interface evolves. However, the column density ratios can differ significantly from previous estimates, with an order of magnitude variation in N(C IV)/N(O VI) as the mixing develops.

  14. Formation of Rotational Discontinuities in Compressive three-dimensional MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Liping; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Shaohua; Feng, Xueshang

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of solar wind turbulence reveal the ubiquity of discontinuities. In this study, we investigate how the discontinuities, especially rotational discontinuities (RDs), are formed in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. In a simulation of the decaying compressive three-dimensional (3-D) MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform background magnetic field, we detect RDs with sharp field rotations and little variations of magnetic field intensity as well as mass density. At the same time, in the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) frame, the plasma velocity is nearly in agreement with the Alfv\\'{e}n speed, and is field-aligned on both sides of the discontinuity. We take one of the identified RDs to analyze in details its 3-D structure and temporal evolution. By checking the magnetic field and plasma parameters, we find that the identified RD evolves from the steepening of the Alfv\\'{e}n wave with moderate amplitude, and that steepening is caused by the nonuniformity of the Alfv\\'{e}n speed in the ambient turbulence.

  15. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    Decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is investigated using a phenomenological model based on the three-dimensional turbulent energy spectra. We generalize the approach first used by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 25, 657 (1966)] and revised by Saffman [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 581 (1967); Phys. Fluids 10, 1349 (1967)]. At small wave numbers we assume the spectral energy is proportional to the wave number to an arbitrary power. The specific case of power 2, which follows from the Saffman invariant, is discussed in detail and is later shown to best describe experimental data. For the spectral energy density in the inertial range we apply both the Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E(k)=Cɛ2/3k-5/3, and the refined Kolmogorov law by taking into account intermittency. We show that intermittency affects the energy decay mainly by shifting the position of the virtual origin rather than altering the power law of the energy decay. Additionally, the spectrum is naturally truncated due to the size of the wind tunnel test section, as eddies larger than the physical size of the system cannot exist. We discuss effects associated with the energy-containing length scale saturating at the size of the test section and predict a change in the power law decay of both energy and vorticity. To incorporate viscous corrections to the model, we truncate the spectrum at an effective Kolmogorov wave number kη=γ(ɛ/v3)1/4, where γ is a dimensionless parameter of order unity. We show that as the turbulence decays, viscous corrections gradually become more important and a simple power law can no longer describe the decay. We discuss the final period of decay within the framework of our model, and show that care must be taken to distinguish between the final period of decay and the change of the character of decay due to the saturation of the energy containing length scale. The model is applied to a number of experiments on decaying turbulence. These include the downstream decay of turbulence in

  16. MODELING STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS THROUGH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF 3D-MHD TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Mueller, Wolf-Christian [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Statistical properties of the Sun's photospheric turbulent magnetic field, especially those of the active regions (ARs), have been studied using the line-of-sight data from magnetograms taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and several other instruments. This includes structure functions and their exponents, flatness curves, and correlation functions. In these works, the dependence of structure function exponents ({zeta}{sub p}) of the order of the structure functions (p) was modeled using a non-intermittent K41 model. It is now well known that the ARs are highly turbulent and are associated with strong intermittent events. In this paper, we compare some of the observations from Abramenko et al. with the log-Poisson model used for modeling intermittent MHD turbulent flows. Next, we analyze the structure function data obtained from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous, incompressible 3D-MHD turbulence in three cases: sustained by forcing, freely decaying, and a flow initially driven and later allowed to decay (case 3). The respective DNS replicate the properties seen in the plots of {zeta}{sub p} against p of ARs. We also reproduce the trends and changes observed in intermittency in flatness and correlation functions of ARs. It is suggested from this analysis that an AR in the onset phase of a flare can be treated as a forced 3D-MHD turbulent system in its simplest form and that the flaring stage is representative of decaying 3D-MHD turbulence. It is also inferred that significant changes in intermittency from the initial onset phase of a flare to its final peak flaring phase are related to the time taken by the system to reach the initial onset phase.

  17. Final Report: "Large-Eddy Simulation of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2008-06-23

    To acquire better understanding of turbulence in flows of liquid metals and other electrically conducting fluids in the presence of steady magnetic fields and to develop an accurate and physically adequate LES (large-eddy simulation) model for such flows. The scientific objectives formulated in the project proposal have been fully completed. Several new directions were initiated and advanced in the course of work. Particular achievements include a detailed study of transformation of turbulence caused by the imposed magnetic field, development of an LES model that accurately reproduces this transformation, and solution of several fundamental questions of the interaction between the magnetic field and fluid flows. Eight papers have been published in respected peer-reviewed journals, with two more papers currently undergoing review, and one in preparation for submission. A post-doctoral researcher and a graduate student have been trained in the areas of MHD, turbulence research, and computational methods. Close collaboration ties have been established with the MHD research centers in Germany and Belgium.

  18. Decaying turbulence and developing chaotic attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    Competition between two main attractors of the distributed chaos, one associated with translational symmetry (homogeneity) and another associated with rotational symmetry (isotropy), has been studied in freely decaying turbulence. It is shown that, unlike the case of statistically stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence, the attractor associated with rotational symmetry (and controlled by Loitsyanskii integral) can dominate turbulent local dynamics in an intermediate stage of the decay, because the attractor associated with translational symmetry (and controlled by Birkhoff-Saffman integral) is still not developed enough. The DNS data have been used in order to support this conclusion.

  19. Magnetosheath Turbulence at MHD Scales: A Statistical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiyong; Sahraoui, Fouad; Hadid, Lina; Yuan, Zhigang

    2015-04-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in space plasmas, such as terrestrial magnetotail and magnetosheath, solar wind, or the interstellar medium. In the solar wind, it is well established that at MHD scales, the magnetic energy spectra generally follow the so-called Kolmogorov's spectrum f-5/3. In the magnetosheath, Alexandrova et al. [2006] observed a Kolmogorov-like inertial range in the frequency range f < fci. In this study, we used three years data from the Cluster mission to statistically investigate the existence of the Kolmogorov inertial range in the whole magnetosheath, including flanks and subsolar regions. Statistical results show that most spectra are shallower than the Kolmogorov one, and have a scaling ~ f-1recalling the energy containing scales of solarwind turbulence. These spectra were found to be populated by uncorrelated fluctuations. The Kolmogorov scaling is observed only away from the bock shock and in the flanks region. These results suggest that random-like fluctuations are generated behind the shock, which reach a fully developed turbulence state only after some time corresponding to their propagation (or advection) away from the shock. At kinetic scales no dependence of the turbulence scaling on the location in the magnetosheath was found.

  20. The shock waves in decaying supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M D; Zuev, J M; Smith, Michael D.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Zuev, Julia M.

    2000-01-01

    We here analyse numerical simulations of supersonic, hypersonic andmagnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is free to decay. Our goals are tounderstand the dynamics of the decay and the characteristic properties of theshock waves produced. This will be useful for interpretation of observations ofboth motions in molecular clouds and sources of non-thermal radiation. We find that decaying hypersonic turbulence possesses an exponential tail offast shocks and an exponential decay in time, i.e. the number of shocks isproportional to t exp (-ktv) for shock velocity jump v and mean initialwavenumber k. In contrast to the velocity gradients, the velocity ProbabilityDistribution Function remains Gaussian with a more complex decay law. The energy is dissipated not by fast shocks but by a large number of low Machnumber shocks. The power loss peaks near a low-speed turn-over in anexponential distribution. An analytical extension of the mapping closuretechnique is able to predict the basic decay features. Our analytic descrip...

  1. Damping of MHD turbulence in partially ionized plasma: implications for cosmic ray propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Siyao; Lazarian, A

    2015-01-01

    We study the damping from neutral-ion collisions of both incompressible and compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in partially ionized medium. We start from the linear analysis of MHD waves applying both single-fluid and two-fluid treatments. The damping rates derived from the linear analysis are then used in determining the damping scales of MHD turbulence. The physical connection between the damping scale of MHD turbulence and cutoff boundary of linear MHD waves is investigated. Our analytical results are shown to be applicable in a variety of partially ionized interstellar medium (ISM) phases and solar chromosphere. As a significant astrophysical utility, we introduce damping effects to propagation of cosmic rays in partially ionized ISM. The important role of turbulence damping in both transit-time damping and gyroresonance is identified.

  2. Transition from weak to strong cascade in MHD turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdini, Andrea; Grappin, Roland

    2012-07-13

    The transition from weak to strong turbulence when passing from large to small scales in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with guide field is a cornerstone of anisotropic turbulence theory. We present the first check of this transition, using the Shell-RMHD, which combines a shell model of perpendicular nonlinear coupling and linear propagation along the guide field. This model allows us to reach Reynolds numbers around 10(6). We obtain surprisingly good agreement with the theoretical predictions, with a reduced perpendicular energy spectrum scaling as k(⊥)(-2) at large scales and as k(⊥)(-5/3) at small scales, where critical balance between nonlinear and propagation time is reached. However, even in the strong regime, a high level of excitation is found in the weak coupling region of Fourier space, which is due to the rich frequency spectrum of large eddies. A corollary is that the reduced parallel spectral slope is not a definite test of the spectral anisotropy, contrary to standard belief.

  3. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Li, P S; McKee, C F; Fisher, R

    2008-04-10

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256{sup 3} and 512{sup 3} simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li et al. (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectra compared to the ideal MHD case. Changes in the density PDF, total magnetic energy, and ionization fraction are determined as a function of the AD Reynolds number. The power spectra for the neutral gas properties of a strongly magnetized medium with a low AD Reynolds number are similar to those for a weakly magnetized medium; in particular, the power spectrum of the neutral velocity is close to that for Burgers turbulence.

  4. A heuristic model for MRI turbulent stresses in Hall MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Lingam, M

    2016-01-01

    Although the Shakura-Sunyaev $\\alpha$ viscosity prescription has been highly successful in characterizing myriad astrophysical environments, it has proven to be partly inadequate in modelling turbulent stresses driven by the MRI. Hence, we adopt the approach employed by \\citet{GIO03}, but in the context of Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), to study MRI turbulence. We utilize the exact evolution equations for the stresses, and the non-linear terms are closed through the invocation of dimensional analysis and physical considerations. We demonstrate that the inclusion of the Hall term leads to non-trivial results, including the modification of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, as well as the (asymptotic) non-equipartition between the kinetic and magnetic energies; the latter issue is also addressed via the analysis of non-linear waves. The asymptotic ratio of the kinetic and magnetic energies is shown to be \\emph{independent} of the choice of initial conditions, but it is governed by the \\emph{Hall parameter}. W...

  5. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in imbalanced MHD turbulence simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Weidl, Martin S; Teaca, Bogdan; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pitch-angle scattering rates for cosmic-ray particles in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with imbalanced turbulence are calculated for fully evolving electromagnetic turbulence. We compare with theoretical predictions derived from the quasilinear theory of cosmic-ray diffusion for an idealized slab spectrum and demonstrate how cross helicity affects the shape of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient. Additional simulations in evolving magnetic fields or static field configurations provide evidence that the scattering anisotropy in imbalanced turbulence is not primarily due to coherence with propagating Alfven waves, but an effect of the spatial structure of electric fields in cross-helical MHD turbulence.

  6. Lack of universality in decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E; Brachet, M E; Pouquet, A; Mininni, P D; Rosenberg, D

    2010-01-01

    Using computations of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a Taylor-Green flow, whose inherent time-independent symmetries are implemented numerically, and in the absence of either a forcing function or an imposed uniform magnetic field, we show that three different inertial ranges for the energy spectrum may emerge for three different initial magnetic fields, the selecting parameter being the ratio of nonlinear eddy to Alfvén time. Equivalent computational grids range from 128(3) to 2048(3) points with a unit magnetic Prandtl number and a Taylor Reynolds number of up to 1500 at the peak of dissipation. We also show a convergence of our results with Reynolds number. Our study is consistent with previous findings of a variety of energy spectra in MHD turbulence by studies performed in the presence of both a forcing term with a given correlation time and a strong, uniform magnetic field. However, in contrast to the previous studies, here the ratio of characteristic time scales can only be ascribed to the intrinsic nonlinear dynamics of the paradigmatic flows under study.

  7. A MHD-turbulence model for solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeou, Z.; Velli, M.; Einaudi, G.

    2009-02-01

    The disposition of energy in the solar corona has always been a problem of great interest. It remains an open question how the low temperature photosphere supports the occurence of solar extreme phenomena. In this work, a turbulent heating mechanism for the solar corona through the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) is proposed. Two-dimensional incompressible long time simulations of the average energy disposition have been carried out with the aim to reveal the characteristics of the long time statistical behavior of a two-dimensional cross-section of a coronal loop and the importance of the photospheric time scales in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It was found that for a slow, shear type photospheric driving the magnetic field in the loop self-organizes at large scales via an inverse MHD cascade. The system undergoes three distinct evolutionary phases. The initial forcing conditions are quickly “forgotten” giving way to an inverse cascade accompanied with and ending up to electric current dissipation. Scaling laws are being proposed in order to quantify the nonlinearity of the system response which seems to become more impulsive for decreasing resistivity. It is also shown that few, if any, qualitative changes in the above results occur by increasing spatial resolution.

  8. Wavelet transforms and their applications to MHD and plasma turbulence: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Farge, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Wavelet analysis and compression tools are reviewed and different applications to study MHD and plasma turbulence are presented. We introduce the continuous and the orthogonal wavelet transform and detail several statistical diagnostics based on the wavelet coefficients. We then show how to extract coherent structures out of fully developed turbulent flows using wavelet-based denoising. Finally some multiscale numerical simulation schemes using wavelets are described. Several examples for analyzing, compressing and computing one, two and three dimensional turbulent MHD or plasma flows are presented.

  9. Applications of continuous and orthogonal wavelet transforms to MHD and plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Wavelet analysis and compression tools are presented and different applications to study MHD and plasma turbulence are illustrated. We use the continuous and the orthogonal wavelet transform to develop several statistical diagnostics based on the wavelet coefficients. We show how to extract coherent structures out of fully developed turbulent flows using wavelet-based denoising and describe multiscale numerical simulation schemes using wavelets. Several examples for analyzing, compressing and computing one, two and three dimensional turbulent MHD or plasma flows are presented. Details can be found in M. Farge and K. Schneider. Wavelet transforms and their applications to MHD and plasma turbulence: A review. Support by the French Research Federation for Fusion Studies within the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) is thankfully acknowledged.

  10. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I; Fisher, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256^3 and 512^3 simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li, McKee, & Klein (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectr...

  11. Cascades and Spectra of Elastic Turbulence in 2D: Spinodal Decomposition & MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, Patrick; Chacon, Luis

    2016-10-01

    We report on studies of turbulence in 2D spinodal decompositions of symmetric binary mixtures. This study emphasizes a comparison and contrast of the physics of spinodal turbulence with that of 2D MHD turbulence. The important similarities include basic equations, ideal quadratic conserved quantities, cascade directions and elastic waves. Turbulence in spinodal decomposition exhibits an elastic range when the Hinze scale is sufficiently larger than the dissipation scale, i.e. LH k (analogous to HkA ≡k in MHD) scales as k - 7 / 3. This suggests an inverse cascade of Hψ, corresponding to the case in MHD. However, we also show that, the kinetic energy spectrum scales as k-3, as in the direct enstrophy cascade range for a 2D fluid (not MHD!). The resolution of this dilemma is that capillarity acts only at blob boundaries. This is in contrast to B in MHD. Thus, as blob merger progresses, the packing fraction of interfaces decreases, thus explaining the outcome for the kinetic energy spectrum. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  12. Three-Dimensional Relativistic MHD Simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability: Magnetic Field Amplification by a Turbulent Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Weiqun; Wang, Peng

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic field strengths inferred for relativistic outflows including gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and active galactic nuclei (AGN) are larger than naively expected by orders of magnitude. We present three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations demonstrating amplification and saturation of magnetic field by a macroscopic turbulent dynamo triggered by the Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability. We find rapid growth of electromagnetic energy due to the stretching and folding of field lines in the turbulent velocity field resulting from non-linear development of the instability. Using conditions relevant for GRB internal shocks and late phases of GRB afterglow, we obtain amplification of the electromagnetic energy fraction to $\\epsilon_B \\sim 5 \\times 10^{-3}$. This value decays slowly after the shear is dissipated and appears to be largely independent of the initial field strength. The conditions required for operation of the dynamo are the presence of velocity shear and some seed magnetization b...

  13. Limitations of Hall MHD as a model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Howes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The limitations of Hall MHD as a model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas are explored using quantitative comparisons to Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory over a wide range of parameter space. The validity of Hall MHD in the cold ion limit is shown, but spurious undamped wave modes exist in Hall MHD when the ion temperature is finite. It is argued that turbulence in the dissipation range of the solar wind must be one, or a mixture, of three electromagnetic wave modes: the parallel whistler, oblique whistler, or kinetic Alfvén waves. These modes are generally well described by Hall MHD. Determining the applicability of linear kinetic damping rates in turbulent plasmas requires a suite of fluid and kinetic nonlinear numerical simulations. Contrasting fluid and kinetic simulations will also shed light on whether the presence of spurious wave modes alters the nonlinear couplings inherent in turbulence and will illuminate the turbulent dynamics and energy transfer in the regime of the characteristic ion kinetic scales.

  14. Temporal and Spatial Turbulent Spectra of MHD Plasma and an Observation of Variance Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffner, D A; Lukin, V S

    2014-01-01

    The nature of MHD turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind-tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparison amongst magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor Hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed as well as the role laboratory experiment can play in understanding turbulence typica...

  15. Decay of passive scalar fluctuations in axisymmetric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Davidson, Peter A.; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Passive scalar fluctuations in axisymmetric Saffman turbulence are examined theoretically and numerically. Theoretical predictions are verified by direct numerical simulation (DNS). According to the DNS, self-similar decay of the turbulence and the persistency of the large-scale anisotropy are found for its fully developed turbulence. The DNS confirms the time-independence of the Corrsin integral.

  16. Classes of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulent decay

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We classify our time-dependent solutions by their evolutionary tracks in parametric plots between instantaneous scaling exponents. We find distinct classes of solutions evolving along specific trajectories toward points on a line of self-similar solutions. These trajectories are determined by the underlying physics governing individual cases, and not by the initial conditions, as is widely assumed. In the helical case, even for a scale-invariant initial spectrum (inversely proportional to wavenumber k), the solution evolves along the same trajectory as for a Batchelor spectrum (proportional to k^4). All of our self-similar solutions have an intrinsic subinertial range close to k^4$.

  17. Wave damping by MHD turbulence and its effect upon cosmic ray propagation in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, A J; Farmer, Alison J.; Goldreich, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic rays scatter off magnetic irregularities (Alfven waves) with which they are resonant, that is waves of wavelength comparable to their gyroradii. These waves may be generated either by the cosmic rays themselves, if they stream faster than the Alfven speed, or by sources of MHD turbulence. Waves excited by streaming cosmic rays are ideally shaped for scattering, whereas the scattering efficiency of MHD turbulence is severely diminished by its anisotropy. We show that MHD turbulence has an indirect effect on cosmic ray propagation by acting as a damping mechanism for cosmic ray generated waves. The hot (``coronal'') phase of the interstellar medium is the best candidate location for cosmic ray confinement by scattering from self-generated waves. We relate the streaming velocity of cosmic rays to the rate of turbulent dissipation in this medium, for the case in which turbulent damping is the dominant damping mechanism. We conclude that cosmic rays with up to 10^2 GeV could not stream much faster than the ...

  18. Enhanced MHD transport in astrophysical accretion flows: turbulence, winds and jets

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbie, Peter B; Bicknell, Geoffrey V; Salmeron, Raquel

    2009-01-01

    Astrophysical accretion is arguably the most prevalent physical process in the Universe; it occurs during the birth and death of individual stars and plays a pivotal role in the evolution of entire galaxies. Accretion onto a black hole, in particular, is also the most efficient mechanism known in nature, converting up to 40% of accreting rest mass energy into spectacular forms such as high-energy (X-ray and gamma-ray) emission and relativistic jets. Whilst magnetic fields are thought to be ultimately responsible for these phenomena, our understanding of the microphysics of MHD turbulence in accretion flows as well as large-scale MHD outflows remains far from complete. We present a new theoretical model for astrophysical disk accretion which considers enhanced vertical transport of momentum and energy by MHD winds and jets, as well as transport resulting from MHD turbulence. We also describe new global, 3D simulations that we are currently developing to investigate the extent to which non-ideal MHD effects may...

  19. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Makwana, K D; Li, H; Daughton, W; Cattaneo, F

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are performed with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfv\\'{e}n waves, which interfere and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of $k_{\\perp}^{-1.3}$. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of $k_{\\perp}^{-1.5}$ for smaller simulation domain, and $k_{\\perp}^{-1.3}$ for larger domain. We estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. T...

  20. Nanoflares and MHD turbulence in coronal loops: a hybrid shell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Giuseppina; Malara, Francesco; Carbone, Vincenzo; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2004-05-14

    A model to describe injection, due to footpoint motions, storage, and dissipation of MHD turbulence in coronal loops, is presented. The model is based on the use of the shell technique in the wave vector space applied to the set of reduced MHD equations. Numerical simulation showed that the energy injected is efficiently stored in the loop where a significant level of magnetic and velocity fluctuations is obtained. Nonlinear interactions among these fluctuations give rise to an energy cascade towards smaller scales where energy is dissipated in an intermittent fashion. The statistical analysis performed on the intermittent dissipative events compares well with all observed properties of nanoflare emission statistics.

  1. Exploring reconnection, current sheets, and dissipation in a laboratory MHD turbulence experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) can serve as a testbed for studying MHD turbulence in a controllable laboratory setting, and in particular, explore the phenomena of reconnection, current sheets and dissipation in MHD turbulence. Plasma with turbulently fluctuating magnetic and velocity fields can be generated using a plasma gun source and launched into a flux-conserving cylindrical tunnel. No background magnetic field is applied so internal fields are allowed to evolve dynamically. Point measurements of magnetic and velocity fluctuations yield broadband power-law spectra with a steepening breakpoint indicative of the onset of a dissipation scale. The frequency range at which this steepening occurs can be correlated to the ion inertial scale of the plasma, a length which is characteristic of the size of current sheets in MHD plasmas and suggests a connection to dissipation. Observation of non-Gaussian intermittent jumps in magnetic field magnitude and angle along with measurements of ion temperature bursts suggests the presence of current sheets embedded within the turbulent plasma, and possibly even active reconnection sites. Additionally, structure function analysis coupled with appeals to fractal scaling models support the hypothesis that current sheets are associated with dissipation in this system.

  2. Intermittent heating of the solar corona by MHD turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    É. Buchlin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available As the dissipation mechanisms considered for the heating of the solar corona would be sufficiently efficient only in the presence of small scales, turbulence is thought to be a key player in the coronal heating processes: it allows indeed to transfer energy from the large scales to these small scales. While Direct numerical simulations which have been performed to investigate the properties of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the corona have provided interesting results, they are limited to small Reynolds numbers. We present here a model of coronal loop turbulence involving shell-models and Alfvén waves propagation, allowing the much faster computation of spectra and turbulence statistics at higher Reynolds numbers. We also present first results of the forward-modelling of spectroscopic observables in the UV.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Driven Supersonic Relativistic MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zrake, Jonathan; 10.1063/1.3621748

    2011-01-01

    Models for GRB outflows invoke turbulence in relativistically hot magnetized fluids. In order to investigate these conditions we have performed high-resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations of relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (RMHD) turbulence. We find that magnetic energy is amplified to several percent of the total energy density by turbulent twisting and folding of magnetic field lines. Values of epsilon_B near 1% are thus naturally expected. We study the dependence of saturated magnetic field energy fraction as a function of Mach number and relativistic temperature. We then present power spectra of the turbulent kinetic and magnetic energies. We also present solenoidal (curl-like) and dilatational (divergence-like) power spectra of kinetic energy. We propose that relativistic effects introduce novel couplings between these spectral components. The case we explore in most detail is for equal amounts of thermal and rest mass energy, corresponding to conditions after collisions of shells with re...

  4. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K. [Center for Combustion Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, Haitao, E-mail: gaoyang-00@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS), D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation.

  5. Modeling sunspot and starspot decay by turbulent erosion

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, Yuri E

    2015-01-01

    Disintegration of sunspots (and starspots) by fluxtube erosion, originally proposed by Simon and Leighton, is considered. A moving boundary problem is formulated for a nonlinear diffusion equation that describes the sunspot magnetic field profile. Explicit expressions for the sunspot decay rate and lifetime by turbulent erosion are derived analytically and verified numerically. A parabolic decay law for the sunspot area is obtained. For moderate sunspot magnetic field strengths, the predicted decay rate agrees with the results obtained by Petrovay and Moreno-Insertis. The new analytical and numerical solutions significantly improve the quantitative description of sunspot and starspot decay by turbulent erosion.

  6. Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. R. Strauss

    2012-11-27

    The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

  7. Determination of the decay exponent in mechanically stirred isotropic turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Blair Perot

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate the decay exponent of isotropic homogeneous turbulence over a range of Reynolds numbers sufficient to display both high and low Re number decay behavior. The initial turbulence is generated by the stirring action of the flow past many small randomly placed cubes. Stirring occurs at 1/30th of the simulation domain size so that the low-wavenumber and large scale behavior of the turbulent spectrum is generated by the fluid and is not imposed. It is shown that the decay exponent in the resulting turbulence matches the theoretical predictions for a k2 low-wavenumber spectrum at both high and low Reynolds numbers. The transition from high Reynolds number behavior to low Reynolds number behavior occurs relatively abruptly at a turbulent Reynolds number of around 250 ( Re λ≈41.

  8. DNS of MHD turbulent flow via the HELIOS supercomputer system at IFERC-CSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Kimura, Masato; Yoshimori, Hajime; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    2014-06-01

    The simulation plays an important role to estimate characteristics of cooling in a blanket for such high heating plasma in ITER-BA. An objective of this study is to perform large -scale direct numerical simulation (DNS) on heat transfer of magneto hydro dynamic (MHD) turbulent flow on coolant materials assumed from Flibe to lithium. The coolant flow conditions in ITER-BA are assumed to be Reynolds number and Hartmann number of a higher order. The maximum target of the DNS assumed by this study based on the result of the benchmark of Helios at IFERC-CSC for Project cycle 1 is 116 TB (2048 nodes). Moreover, we tested visualization by ParaView to visualize directly the large-scale computational result. If this large-scale DNS becomes possible, an essential understanding and modelling of a MHD turbulent flow and a design of nuclear fusion reactor contributes greatly.

  9. On the nature of MHD and kinetic scale turbulence in the magnetosheath of Saturn: Cassini observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Kiyani, K. H.; Retino, A.; Modolo, R.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M.

    2015-10-01

    Low frequency turbulence in Saturn's magnetosheath is investigated using in-situ measurements of the Cassini spacecraft. We focus on the magnetic energy spectra computed in the frequency range # [10-4, 1]Hz. Three main results are reported: 1) The magnetic energy spectra showed a # f-1 scaling at MHD scales followed by an # f-2.6 scaling at the sub-ion scales without forming the so-called inertial range, breaking the universality of the Kolmogorov spectrum in the magnetosheath; 2) The magnetic compressibility and the cross-correlation between the parallel component of the magnetic field and density fluctuations C(#n, #B||) indicate the dominance of the compressible magnetosonic slow modes at MHD scales rather than the Alfvén mode [3] ; 3) Higher order statistics revealed a monofractal (resp. multifractal) behaviour of the turbulent flow behind a quasiperpendicular (resp. quasi-parallel) shock at the subion scales.

  10. Impact of observational uncertainties on universal scaling of MHD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoberidze, G; Hnat, B; Dunlop, M W

    2011-01-01

    Scaling exponents are the central quantitative prediction of theories of turbulence and in-situ satellite observations of the high Reynolds number solar wind flow have provided an extensive testbed of these. We propose a general, instrument independent method to estimate the uncertainty of velocity field fluctuations. We obtain the systematic shift that this uncertainty introduces into the observed spectral exponent. This shift is essential for the correct interpretation of observed scaling exponents. It is sufficient to explain the contradiction between spectral features of the Elsasser fields observed in the solar wind with both theoretical models and numerical simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  11. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES AND CORONAL HEATING: UNIFYING EMPIRICAL AND MHD TURBULENCE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Van der Holst, Bart; Oran, Rona; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B. IV; Gombosi, Tamas I. [Department of AOSS, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Downs, Cooper [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Roussev, Ilia I. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Evans, Rebekah M., E-mail: igorsok@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Space Weather Lab, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region, and the top of the chromosphere. The realistic three-dimensional magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its nonlinear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the nonlinear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic (imbalanced) turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes, from which the fast solar wind originates. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI instruments for the Carrington rotation 2107.

  12. MHD turbulence-Star Formation Connection: from pc to kpc scales

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Lazarian, A; Leão, M R M; Falceta-Gonçalves, D; Kowal, G

    2011-01-01

    The transport of magnetic flux to outside of collapsing molecular clouds is a required step to allow the formation of stars. Although ambipolar diffusion is often regarded as a key mechanism for that, it has been recently argued that it may not be efficient enough. In this review, we discuss the role that MHD turbulence plays in the transport of magnetic flux in star forming flows. In particular, based on recent advances in the theory of fast magnetic reconnection in turbulent flows, we will show results of three-dimensional numerical simulations that indicate that the diffusion of magnetic field induced by turbulent reconnection can be a very efficient mechanism, especially in the early stages of cloud collapse and star formation. To conclude, we will also briefly discuss the turbulence-star formation connection and feedback in different astrophysical environments: from galactic to cluster of galaxy scales.

  13. JOINT INVERSE CASCADE OF MAGNETIC ENERGY AND MAGNETIC HELICITY IN MHD TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, R.; Frick, P.; Mizeva, I. [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Korolyov str. 1, 614013 Perm (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-10

    We show that oppositely directed fluxes of energy and magnetic helicity coexist in the inertial range in fully developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with small-scale sources of magnetic helicity. Using a helical shell model of MHD turbulence, we study the high Reynolds number MHD turbulence for helicity injection at a scale that is much smaller than the scale of energy injection. In a short range of scales larger than the forcing scale of magnetic helicity, a bottleneck-like effect appears, which results in a local reduction of the spectral slope. The slope changes in a domain with a high level of relative magnetic helicity, which determines that part of the magnetic energy is related to the helical modes at a given scale. If the relative helicity approaches unity, the spectral slope tends to –3/2. We show that this energy pileup is caused by an inverse cascade of magnetic energy associated with the magnetic helicity. This negative energy flux is the contribution of the pure magnetic-to-magnetic energy transfer, which vanishes in the non-helical limit. In the context of astrophysical dynamos, our results indicate that a large-scale dynamo can be affected by the magnetic helicity generated at small scales. The kinetic helicity, in particular, is not involved in the process at all. An interesting finding is that an inverse cascade of magnetic energy can be provided by a small-scale source of magnetic helicity fluctuations without a mean injection of magnetic helicity.

  14. From Weakly to Strongly Magnetized Isotropic MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    High Reynolds number isotropic magneto-hydro-dynamic turbulence in the presence of large scale magnetic fields is investigated as a function of the magnetic field strength. For a variety of flow configurations the energy dissipation rate \\epsilon, follows the Kolmogorov scaling \\epsilon ~ U^3/L even when the large scale magnetic field energy is twenty times larger than the kinetic. Further increase of the magnetic energy showed a transition to the \\epsilon ~ U^2 B / L scaling implying that magnetic shear becomes more efficient at this point at cascading the energy than the velocity fluctuations. Strongly helical configurations form helicity condensates that deviate from these scalings. Weak turbulence scaling was absent from the investigation. Finally, the magnetic energy spectra showed support for the Kolmogorov spectrum k^{-5/3} while kinetic energy spectra are closer to the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectrum k^{-3/2}.

  15. MHD turbulence, cloud formation and star formation in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez-Semadeni, E; Pouquet, A

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the role of turbulence in cloud and star formation, as observed in numerical simulations of the interstellar medium. Turbulent compression at the interfaces of colliding gas streams is responsible for the formation of intermediate (\\simlt 100 pc) and small clouds (a few tens of pc), although the smallest clouds can also form from fragmentation of expanding shells around stellar heating centers. The largest cloud complexes (several hundred pc) seem to form by slow, gravitational instability-driven merging of individual clouds, which can actually be described as a large-scale tendency towards homogenization of the flow due to gravity rather than cloud collisions. These mechanisms operate as well in the presence of a magnetic field and rotation, although slight variations on the compressibility and cloud morphology are present which depend on the strength and topology of the field. In summary, the role of turbulence in the life-cycle of clouds appears to be twofold: small-scale modes contribute to clo...

  16. Extended MHD Turbulence and Its Applications to the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hamdi M.; Lingam, Manasvi; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2016-10-01

    Extended MHD is a one-fluid model that incorporates two-fluid effects such as electron inertia and the Hall drift. This model is used to construct fully nonlinear Alfvénic wave solutions, and thereby derive the kinetic and magnetic spectra by resorting to a Kolmogorov-like hypothesis based on the constant cascading rates of the energy and generalized helicities of this model. The magnetic and kinetic spectra are derived in the ideal (k\\lt 1/{λ }i), Hall (1/{λ }i\\lt k\\lt 1/{λ }e), and electron inertia (k\\gt 1/{λ }e) regimes; k is the wavenumber and {λ }s=c/{ω }{ps} is the skin depth of species “s.” In the Hall regime, it is shown that the emergent results are fully consistent with previous numerical and analytical studies, especially in the context of the solar wind. The focus is primarily on the electron inertia regime, where magnetic energy spectra with power-law indexes of -11/3 and -13/3 are always recovered. The latter, in particular, is quite close to recent observational evidence from the solar wind with a potential slope of approximately -4 in this regime. It is thus plausible that these spectra may constitute a part of the (extended) inertial range, as opposed to the standard “dissipation” range paradigm.

  17. Extended MHD turbulence and its applications to the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelhamid, Hamdi M; Mahajan, Swadesh M

    2016-01-01

    Extended MHD is a one-fluid model that incorporates two-fluid effects such as electron inertia and the Hall drift. This model is used to construct fully nonlinear Alfv\\'enic wave solutions, and thereby derive the kinetic and magnetic spectra by resorting to a Kolmogorov-like hypothesis based on the constant cascading rates of the energy and generalized helicities of this model. The magnetic and kinetic spectra are derived in the ideal $\\left(k 1/\\lambda_e\\right)$ regimes; $k$ is the wavenumber and $\\lambda_s = c/\\omega_{p s}$ is the skin depth of species `$s$'. In the Hall regime, it is shown that the emergent results are fully consistent with previous numerical and analytical studies, especially in the context of the solar wind. The focus is primarily on the electron inertia regime, where magnetic energy spectra with power-law indexes of $-11/3$ and $-13/3$ are always recovered. The latter, in particular, is quite close to recent observational evidence from the solar wind with a potential slope of approxima...

  18. Modeling Statistical Properties of Solar Active Regions through DNS of 3D-MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Statistical properties of the Sun's photospheric turbulent magnetic field, especially those of the Active Regions (ARs), have been studied using the line-of-sight data from magnetograms taken by SOHO and several other instruments (see e.g. Abramenko et al (2002, 2003),Abramenko and Yurchyshyn (2010)). This includes structure functions and their exponents, flatness curves and correlation functions. In these works, the dependence of structure function exponents ($\\zeta_p$) of the order of the structure functions ($\\it{p}$) was modeled using a non-intermittent K41 model. It is now well known that the ARs are highly turbulent and are associated with strong intermittent events. In this paper we compare some of the observations from Abramenko et al (2003) with the log-Poisson model (Biskamp 2003) used for modeling intermittent MHD turbulent flows. Next, we analyze the structure function data obtained from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous, incompressible 3D-MHD turbulence in three cases: sustain...

  19. Nature of the MHD and Kinetic Scale Turbulence in the Magnetosheath of Saturn: Cassini Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Kiyani, K. H.; Retinò, A.; Modolo, R.; Canu, P.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    Low-frequency turbulence in Saturn’s magnetosheath is investigated using in situ measurements of the Cassini spacecraft. Focus is put on the magnetic energy spectra computed in the frequency range of ˜[10-4, 1]Hz. A set of 42 time intervals in the magnetosheath were analyzed, and three main results that contrast with known features of solar wind turbulence are reported. (1) The magnetic energy spectra showed a ˜f-1 scaling at MHD scales followed by an ˜ {f}-2.6 scaling at sub-ion scales without forming the so-called inertial range. (2) The magnetic compressibility and the cross-correlation between the parallel component of the magnetic field and density fluctuations C(δ n,δ {B}| | ) indicate the dominance of the compressible magnetosonic slow-like modes at MHD scales rather than the Alfvén mode. (3) Higher-order statistics revealed a monofractal (multifractal) behavior of the turbulent flow downstream of a quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shock at sub-ion scales. Implications of these results on theoretical modeling of space plasma turbulence are discussed.

  20. The Efficiency of Second-Order Fermi Acceleration by Weakly Compressible MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, Jacob W; Chandran, Benjamin D G; Parrish, Ian J

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of pitch-angle scattering on the efficiency of particle heating and acceleration by MHD turbulence using phenomenological estimates and simulations of non-relativistic test particles interacting with strong, subsonic MHD turbulence. We include an imposed pitch-angle scattering rate, which is meant to approximate the effects of high frequency plasma waves and/or velocity space instabilities. We focus on plasma parameters similar to those found in the near-Earth solar wind, though most of our results are more broadly applicable. An important control parameter is the size of the particle mean free path lambda_{mfp} relative to the scale of the turbulent fluctuations L. For small scattering rates, particles interact quasi-resonantly with turbulent fluctuations in magnetic field strength. Scattering increases the long-term efficiency of this resonant heating by factors of a few-10, but the distribution function does not develop a significant non-thermal power-law tail. For higher scatter...

  1. On soft stability loss in rotating turbulent MHD flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapusta, Arkady [Center for MHD Studies, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev PO Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Mikhailovich, Boris, E-mail: borismic@bgu.ac.il [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev PO Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2014-08-01

    The problem of the stability of turbulent flows of liquid metal in a cylindrical cavity against small velocity disturbances under the action of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) has been studied. The flow is considered in the induction-free approximation using the ‘external’ friction model. A system of dimensionless equations is examined in cylindrical coordinates. The results of computations performed on the basis of this mathematical model using the exchange of stabilities principle have shown a good consistency between the critical values of computed and experimental Reynolds numbers. (paper)

  2. Observational Diagnostics of Self-Gravitating MHD Turbulence in Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We study the observable signatures of self-gravitating MHD turbulence by applying the probability density functions (PDFs) and the spatial density power spectrum to synthetic column density maps. We find that there exists three characterizable stages of the evolution of the collapsing cloud which we term "early," "intermediate," and "advanced." At early times, i.e. $t0.35t_{ff}$, the power spectral slope is positive valued, and a dramatic increase is observed in the PDF moments and the Tsallis incremental PDF parameters, which gives rise to deviations between PDF-sonic Mach number relations. Finally, we show that the imprint of gravity on the density power spectrum can be replicated in non-gravitating turbulence by introducing a delta-function with amplitude equivalent to the maximum valued point in a given self-gravitating map. We find that the turbulence power spectrum restored through spatial filtering of the high density material.

  3. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Spectra of Solar Convection from NST Observations and Realistic MHD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, I N; Goode, P R; Kosovichev, A G; Lele, S K; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A; Yurchyshyn, V B

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent properties of the quiet Sun represent the basic state of surface conditions, and a background for various processes of solar activity. Therefore understanding of properties and dynamics of this `basic' state is important for investigation of more complex phenomena, formation and development of observed phenomena in the photosphere and atmosphere. For characterization of the turbulent properties we compare kinetic energy spectra on granular and sub-granular scales obtained from infrared TiO observations with the New Solar Telescope (Big Bear Solar Observatory) and from 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ('SolarBox' code). We find that the numerical simulations require a high spatial resolution with 10 - 25 km grid-step in order to reproduce the inertial (Kolmogorov) turbulence range. The observational data require an averaging procedure to remove noise and potential instrumental artifacts. The resulting kinetic energy spectra show a good agreement between the simulations and observations, opening...

  4. Numerical analysis of the average MHD flow within a cylindrical region on the basis of applicable hypotheses about turbulent stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikel' son, Yu.Ya.; Yakovich, A.T.; Pavlov, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Turbulent stresses are considered in an incompressible fluid due to MHD flow induced within an axisymmetric region by electromagnetic forces on the basis of the linearized equation of motion as well as on the basis of the stress tensor in terms of average velocities and turbulent viscosity. The turbulent viscosity is treated according to the Boussinesq hypothesis (constant turbulent viscosity), according to the generalized Karman hypothesis (turbulent viscosity a function of the derivatives of the velocity components with respect to the respective coordinates), or as the product of its coordinate functions. The results of numerical calculations indicate a close agreement between all these formulas for an average MHD flow and experimental data. Calculations including this additional turbulent force, appropriately related to the flow parameters, are applicable to the design of liquid-metal devices. 7 references, 3 figures.

  5. Universal decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e. the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder ($Re_i = 2 \\cdot 10^6$, the outer cylinder is at rest) was suddenly stopped. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Next, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar, i.e. when normalizing it with the mean velocity, it is universal. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way ...

  6. Nature of the MHD and kinetic scale turbulence in the magnetosheath of Saturn: Cassini observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hadid, L Z; Kiyani, K H; Retinò, A; Modolo, R; Canu, P; Masters, A; Dougherty, M K

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency turbulence in Saturn's magnetosheath is investigated using in-situ measurements of the Cassini spacecraft. Focus is put on the magnetic energy spectra computed in the frequency range $\\sim[10^{-4}, 1]$Hz. A set of 42 time intervals in the magnetosheath were analyzed and three main results that contrast with known features of solar wind turbulence are reported: 1) The magnetic energy spectra showed a $\\sim f^{-1}$ scaling at MHD scales followed by an $\\sim f^{-2.6}$ scaling at the sub-ion scales without forming the so-called inertial range; 2) The magnetic compressibility and the cross-correlation between the parallel component of the magnetic field and density fluctuations $ C(\\delta n,\\delta B_{||}) $ indicates the dominance of the compressible magnetosonic slow-like modes at MHD scales rather than the Alfv\\'en mode; 3) Higher order statistics revealed a monofractal (resp. multifractal) behaviour of the turbulent flow downstream of a quasi-perpendicular (resp. quasi-parallel) shock at the sub-i...

  7. Kinetic cascade beyond MHD of solar wind turbulence in two-dimensional hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Verscharen, Daniel; Motschmann, Uwe; Müller, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The nature of solar wind turbulence in the dissipation range at scales much smaller than the large MHD scales remains under debate. Here a two-dimensional model based on the hybrid code abbreviated as A.I.K.E.F. is presented, which treats massive ions as particles obeying the kinetic Vlasov equation and massless electrons as a neutralizing fluid. Up to a certain wavenumber in the MHD regime, the numerical system is initialized by assuming a superposition of isotropic Alfv\\'en waves with amplitudes that follow the empirically confirmed spectral law of Kolmogorov. Then turbulence develops and energy cascades into the dispersive spectral range, where also dissipative effects occur. Under typical solar wind conditions, weak turbulence develops as a superposition of normal modes in the kinetic regime. Spectral analysis in the direction parallel to the background magnetic field reveals a cascade of left-handed Alfv\\'en/ion-cyclotron waves up to wave vectors where their resonant absorption sets in, as well as a cont...

  8. Reproducing the Solar Wind proton temperature profile via DNS of MHD turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagud-Camps, Victor; Grappin, Roland; Verdini, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Context: The Solar Wind proton temperature Tp shows a radial profile R-0.9 significantly shallower than the adiabatic R-4/3 profile [Totten et al 1996]. This temperature profile has been attributed to turbulent heating, which requires a dissipation rate equal to Q = 3.610-5TpU/R[J/(kg s)] (1) [Vasquez et al 2007]. The possibility of a turbulent heating large enough to modify the radial profile of the temperature has not been verified yet via direct numerical simulations. Aim: We want to test if MHD turbulence developing in the range [0.2,1] AU is able to reproduce the observed R-0.9 temperature profile. Method: We use the expanding box model (EBM) [Grappin & Velli 1996] which incorporates the effects of expansion into the compressible MHD equations, and so allows to follow the evolution of the plasma advected by the solar wind between 0.2 and 1 AU. In the absence of turbulence, the R-4/3 temperature profile is obtained. We start at 0.2 AU with mean field almost aligned with the radial and k⊥-1 spectrum perpendicular to the mean field [Verdini, Grappin 2016]. Simple phenomenology (Kolmogorov) suggests that the ratio between turbulent heating and the required heating (1) is close to M2/ɛ, where M is the Mach number of the large eddies and ɛ is the nonlinear time normalized by the transport time of the plasma by the wind. We thus explore the (M,ɛ) parameter space and examine whether a large enough value of M2/ɛ indeed allows to recover the temperature profile observed by Totten et al (1996). Results: We have obtained significant slowing down of the adiabatic cooling by considering increasing Mach numbers and/or decreasing ɛ and approach in some cases the R-0.9 temperature profile. The role of the compressibility in the cascade is examined.

  9. Large- and small-scale turbulent spectra in MHD and atmospheric flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Chkhetiani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present review we discuss certain studies of large- and small-scale turbulent spectra in MHD and atmospheric flows performed by S. S. Moiseev and his co-authors during the last years of his life and continued by his co-authors after he passed away. It is shown that many ideas developed in these works have not lost their novelty and urgency until now, and can form the basis of future studies in this field.

  10. Global MHD Modelling of the ISM - From large towards small scale turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A; Avillez, Miguel A. de; Breitschwerdt, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Dealing numerically with the turbulent nature and non-linearity of the physical processes involved in the ISM requires the use of sophisticated numerical schemes coupled to HD and MHD mathematical models. SNe are the main drivers of the interstellar turbulence by transferring kinetic energy into the system. This energy is dissipated by shocks (which is more efficient) and by molecular viscosity. We carried out adaptive mesh refinement simulations (with a finest resolution of 0.625 pc) of the turbulent ISM embedded in a magnetic field with mean field components of 2 and 3 $\\mu$G. The time scale of our run was 400 Myr, sufficiently long to avoid memory effects of the initial setup, and to allow for a global dynamical equilibrium to be reached in case of a constant energy input rate. It is found that the longitudinal and transverse turbulent length scales have a time averaged (over a period of 50 Myr) ratio of 0.52-0.6, almost similar to the one expected for isotropic homogeneous turbulence. The mean characteris...

  11. The flux tube paradigm and its role in MHD turbulence in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Greco, A.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Osman, K.; Ruffolo, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Descriptions of magnetic field and plasma structures in terms of flux tubes, plasmoids and other bundles of magnetic field lines are familiar in the vocabulary of observational and theoretical space physics. "Spaghetti models" and flux ropes are well known examples. Flux tubes and families of field lines can also be defined in a medium that admits magnetic fluctuations, including strong MHD turbulence, but their behavior can become complicated. In 3D fluctuations the smooth flux tube description itself becomes in some sense unstable, as nearby field lines diverge and flux surfaces shred. This lends complexity to the structure of flux tubes, and can give rise to temporarily trapped field lines and charged test particle trajectories, with immediate implications for transport, e.g., of solar energetic particles. The properties of the turbulent magnetic field can also be strongly influenced by the dynamics of turbulence. Large scale self organizing behavior, or inverse cascade, can enhance very long wavelength structure, favoring Bohm scaling of diffusion coefficients. Meanwhile smaller scale flux tube structures are integral features of the inertial range of turbulence, giving rise to a cellularization of the plasma due to rapid dynamical relaxation processes. These drive the turbulent system locally towards low-acceleration states, including Alfvenic, Beltrami and force-free states. Cell boundaries are natural positions for formation of near discontinuous boundaries, where dynamical activity can be enhanced. A primary example is appearance of numerous discontinuities and active reconnection sites in turbulence, which appear to support a wide distribution of reconnection rates associated with coherent current structures. These discontinuities are also potential sites of enhanced heating, as expected in Kolmogorov's Refined Similarity Hypothesis. All of these features are related to self organization, cascade and intermittency of the turbulence. Examples of these

  12. Scalings and decay of fractal-generated turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, D.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    A total of 21 planar fractal grids pertaining to three different fractal families have been used in two different wind tunnels to generate turbulence. The resulting turbulent flows have been studied using hot wire anemometry. Irrespective of fractal family, the fractal-generated turbulent flows and their homogeneity, isotropy, and decay properties are strongly dependent on the fractal dimension Df≤2 of the grid, its effective mesh size Meff (which we introduce and define) and its ratio tr of largest to smallest bar thicknesses, tr=tmax/tmin. With relatively small blockage ratios, as low as σ =25%, the fractal grids generate turbulent flows with higher turbulence intensities and Reynolds numbers than can be achieved with higher blockage ratio classical grids in similar wind tunnels and wind speeds U. The scalings and decay of the turbulence intensity u'/U in the x direction along the tunnel's center line are as follows (in terms of the normalized pressure drop CΔP and with similar results for v '/U and w'/U): (i) for fractal cross grids (Df=2), (u'/U)2=tr2CΔPfct (x/Meff); (ii) for fractal I grids, (u'/U)2=tr(T/Lmax)2CΔPfct(x/Meff), where T is the tunnel width and Lmax is the maximum bar length on the grid; (iii) for space-filling (Df=2) fractal square grids, the turbulence intensity builds up as the turbulence is convected downstream until a distance xpeak from the grid is reached where the turbulence intensity peaks and then decays exponentially, u'2=upeak'2exp [-(x-xpeak)/lturb], where upeak'2 increases linearly with tr, xpeak∝tminT/Lmin (Lmin being the minimum bar length on the grid), and lturb∝λ2U /ν (ν being the kinematic viscosity of the air and λ being the Taylor microscale); λ remains approximately constant during decay at x ≫xpeak. The longitudinal and lateral integral length scales also remain approximately constant during decay at x ≫xpeak.

  13. Optimal decay rates of classical solutions for the full compressible MHD equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jincheng; Tao, Qiang; Yao, Zheng-an

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with optimal decay rates for higher-order spatial derivatives of classical solutions to the full compressible MHD equations in three-dimensional whole space. If the initial perturbation is small in {H^3}-norm and bounded in {L^q(qin [1, 6/5 ))}-norm, we apply the Fourier splitting method by Schonbek (Arch Ration Mech Anal 88:209-222, 1985) to establish optimal decay rates for the second-order spatial derivatives of solutions and the third-order spatial derivatives of magnetic field in {L^2}-norm. These results improve the work of Pu and Guo (Z Angew Math Phys 64:519-538, 2013).

  14. The signature of initial production mechanisms in isotropic turbulence decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work the quantification of the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms in homogeneous isotropic turbulence decay is addressed. The analysis is developed through the use of theoretical tools as well as numerical calculations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian (EDQNM) model. In both cases a modified Lin equation is used, which accounts for production mechanisms as proposed by Meldi, Lejemble, and Sagaut ["On the emergence of non-classical decay regimes in multiscale/fractal generated isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 756, 816-843 (2014)]. The approaches used show that an exponential decay law can be observed if the intensity of the forcing is strong enough to drive the turbulence dynamics, before a power-law decay is eventually attained. The EDQNM numerical results indicate that the exponential regime can persist for long evolution times, longer than the observation time in grid turbulence experiments. A rigorous investigation of the self-similar behavior of the pressure spectrum has been performed by a comprehensive comparison of EDQNM data with direct numerical simulation (DNS)/experiments in the literature. While DNS and free decay EDQNM simulations suggest the need of a very high Reλ threshold in order to observe a clear -7/3 slope of the pressure inertial range, experimental data and forced EDQNM calculations indicate a significantly lower value. This observation suggests that the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms, which cannot be excluded in experiments, play a role in the lack of general agreement with classical numerical approaches. These results reinforce the urge to evolve the numerical simulation state of the art towards the prediction of realistic physical states.

  15. On final states of two-dimensional decaying turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Numerical and analytical studies of final states of two-dimensional (2D) decaying turbulence are carried out. The first part of this work is trying to give a definition for final states of 2D decaying turbulence. The functional relation of ω-ψ, which is frequently adopted as the characterization of those final states, is merely a sufficient but not necessary condition; moreover, it is not proper to use it as the definition. It is found that the method through the value of the effective area S covered by the scatter ω-ψ plot, initially suggested by Read, Rhines, and White ["Geostrophic scatter diagrams and potential vorticity dynamics," J. Atmos. Sci. 43, 3226 (1986)] is more general and suitable for the definition. Based on this concept, a definition is presented, which covers all existing results in late states of decaying 2D flows (including some previous unexplainable weird double-valued ω-ψ scatter plots). The remaining part of the paper is trying to further study 2D decaying turbulence with the assistance of this definition. Some numerical results, leading to "bar" final states and further verifying the predictive ability of statistical mechanics [Yin, Montgomery, and Clercx, "Alternative statistical-mechanical descriptions of decaying two-dimensional turbulence in terms of patches and points," Phys. Fluids 15, 1937 (2003)], are reported. It is realized that some simulations with narrow-band energy spectral initial conditions result in some final states that cannot be very well interpreted by the statistical theory (meanwhile, those final states are still in the scope of the definition).

  16. On the decay of Burgers turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gurbatov, S N; Aurell, E; Frisch, U; Tóth, G

    1997-01-01

    This work is devoted to the decay ofrandom solutions of the unforced Burgers equation in one dimension in the limit of vanishing viscosity. The initial velocity is homogeneous and Gaussian with a spectrum proportional to $k^n$ at small wavenumbers $k$ and falling off quickly at large wavenumbers. In physical space, at sufficiently large distances, there is an ``outer region'', where the velocity correlation function preserves exactly its initial form (a power law) when $n$ is not an even integer. When $11$. A systematic derivation is given in which both the leading term and estimates of higher order corrections can be obtained. High-resolution numerical simulations are presented which support our findings.

  17. Local 4/5-law and energy dissipation anomaly in turbulence of incompressible MHD Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shanshan; Tan, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we establish the longitudinal and transverse local energy balance equation of distributional solutions of the incompressible three-dimensional MHD equations. In particular, we find that the functions D_L^ɛ (u,B) and D_T^ɛ (u,B) appeared in the energy balance, all converging to the defect distribution (in the sense of distributions) D(u,B) which has been defined in Gao et al. (Acta Math Sci 33:865-871, 2013). Furthermore, we give a simpler form of defect distribution term, which is similar to the relation in turbulence theory, called the "4 / 3-law." As a corollary, we give the analogous "4 / 5-law" holds in the local sense.

  18. Evolution of self-gravitating magnetized disks. II- Interaction between MHD turbulence and gravitational instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Fromang, S; Terquem, C; De Villiers, J P; Fromang, Sebastien; Balbus, Steven A.; Terquem, Caroline; Villiers, Jean-Pierre De

    2004-01-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of the evolution of self--gravitating and weakly magnetized disks with an adiabatic equation of state. Such disks are subject to the development of both the magnetorotational and gravitational instabilities, which transport angular momentum outward. As in previous studies, our hydrodynamical simulations show the growth of strong m=2 spiral structure. This spiral disturbance drives matter toward the central object and disappears when the Toomre parameter Q has increased well above unity. When a weak magnetic field is present as well, the magnetorotational instability grows and leads to turbulence. In that case, the strength of the gravitational stress tensor is lowered by a factor of about~2 compared to the hydrodynamical run and oscillates periodically, reaching very small values at its minimum. We attribute this behavior to the presence of a second spiral mode with higher pattern speed than the one which dominates in the hydrodynamical simulations...

  19. Turbulent Energy Decay Along the Path of Least Action

    CERN Document Server

    Eyink, G L

    1996-01-01

    A fluctuation law of the energy in freely-decaying, homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is derived within a Gaussian closure ansatz for 3D incompressible flow. In particular, a fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived which relates the strength of a stochastic backscatter term in the energy decay equation to the mean of the energy dissipation rate. The theory is based on the so-called ``effective action'' of the energy history and illustrates a Rayleigh-Ritz method recently developed to evaluate the effective action approximately within probability density-function (PDF) closures. These effective actions generalize the Onsager-Machlup action of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics to turbulent flow and yield detailed, concrete predictions for fluctuations, such as multi-time correlation functions of arbitrary order. They also characterize the mean histories by a variational principle.

  20. Why, how and when electrically driven flows and MHD turbulence become three-dimensional

    CERN Document Server

    Pothérat, A

    2013-01-01

    The dimensionality of electrically driven flows and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence at low Magnetic Reynolds number is analysed by driving a square array of vortices of alternate spin in a cubic vessel filled with liquid metal, placed in a high homogeneous, static magnetic field $\\mathbf B$. A wide range of steady and unsteady flows is generated by varying the intensity $I$ of the DC current injected to drive them, and their dimensionality is influenced by increasing or decreasing the magnetic field intensity. It is shown theoretically, and then experimentally that three-dimensionality is characterised by scaling laws linking the core velocity $U_b$ near the wall where current is injected to the current intensity $I$, of either forms $U_b\\sim I$ or $U_b\\sim I^{2/3}$, depending on whether three-dimensionality originates from viscous or inertial effects. In turbulent flows. The opposite wall is found to be either active or passive depending whether the ratio of its distance to the bottom wall $h$ to the le...

  1. Turbulent magnetic Prandtl numbers obtained with MHD Taylor-Couette flow experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gellert, M

    2008-01-01

    The stability problem of MHD Taylor-Couette flows with toroidal magnetic fields is considered in dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number. Only the most uniform (but not current-free) field with B\\_in = B\\_out has been considered. For high enough Hartmann numbers the toroidal field is always unstable. Rigid rotation, however, stabilizes the magnetic (kink-)instability. The axial current which drives the instability is reduced by the electromotive force induced by the instability itself. Numerical simulations are presented to probe this effect as a possibility to measure the turbulent conductivity in a laboratory. It is shown numerically that in a sodium experiment (without rotation) an eddy diffusivity 4 times the molecular diffusivity appears resulting in a potential difference of ~34 mV/m. If the cylinders are rotating then also the eddy viscosity can be measured. Nonlinear simulations of the instability lead to a turbulent magnetic Prandtl number of 2.1 for a molecular magnetic Prandtl number of 0.01. The...

  2. The structure of MHD turbulence under an external magnetic field: results from simulations on elongated domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, X. M.; Yeung, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence in an electrically conducting fluid in the limit of low magnetic Reynolds number is, because of the Lorentz force due to an external magnetic field, very different from classical turbulence at both the large scales and the small scales. The importance of minimizing finite domain-size effects on the large scale development has often tended to limit the Reynolds number reached in the past. In this work we use periodic domains stretched along the magnetic field with aspect ratio up to 8 and beyond. The initial state is obtained from decaying isotropic turbulence with large-eddy length scales of order 1% of the length of the domain. After a transient period the kinetic energy returns to a power law decay while the integral length scales in the direction parallel to the magnetic field show preferential growth. At early times the parallel velocity component becomes stronger than the other two but this anisotropy is subsequently reversed under the combined effects of anisotropic Joule dissipation and viscous dissipation. The small scales show characteristics of quasi two-dimensional behavior in the transverse plane. Results over a range of magnetic interaction parameters and Reynolds numbers are compared with known theoretical predictions. Supported by NSF Grant CBET-1510749 and supercomputer resources at TACC/XSEDE and ALCF.

  3. A parallel implementation of an MHD code for the simulation of mechanically driven, turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, K.; Jenko, F.; Forest, C. B.; Bayliss, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    A parallel implementation of a nonlinear pseudo-spectral MHD code for the simulation of turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry is reported. It employs a dual domain decomposition technique in both real and spectral space. It is shown that this method shows nearly ideal scaling going up to 128 CPUs on Beowulf-type clusters with fast interconnect. Furthermore, the potential of exploiting single precision arithmetic on standard x86 processors is examined. It is pointed out that the MHD code thereby achieves a maximum speedup of 1.7, whereas the validity of the computations is still granted. The combination of both measures will allow for the direct numerical simulation of highly turbulent cases ( 1500

  4. Nonuniversality and Finite Dissipation in Decaying Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, M F; Berera, A; McComb, W D; McKay, M E

    2015-06-12

    A model equation for the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate in freely decaying homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of a mean magnetic field is derived from the real-space energy balance equation, leading to Cϵ=Cϵ,∞+C/R-+O(1/R-(2)), where R- is a generalized Reynolds number. The constant Cϵ,∞ describes the total energy transfer flux. This flux depends on magnetic and cross helicities, because these affect the nonlinear transfer of energy, suggesting that the value of Cϵ,∞ is not universal. Direct numerical simulations were conducted on up to 2048(3) grid points, showing good agreement between data and the model. The model suggests that the magnitude of cosmological-scale magnetic fields is controlled by the values of the vector field correlations. The ideas introduced here can be used to derive similar model equations for other turbulent systems.

  5. FREELY DECAYING TURBULENCE IN FORCE-FREE ELECTRODYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Freely decaying, relativistic force-free turbulence is studied for the first time. We initiate the magnetic field at a short wavelength and simulate its relaxation toward equilibrium on two- and three-dimensional periodic domains in both helical and nonhelical settings. Force-free turbulent relaxation is found to exhibit an inverse cascade in all settings and in three dimensions to have a magnetic energy spectrum consistent with the Kolmogorov 5/3 power law. Three-dimensional relaxations also obey the Taylor hypothesis; they settle promptly into the lowest-energy configuration allowed by conservation of the total magnetic helicity. However, in two dimensions, the relaxed state is a force-free equilibrium whose energy greatly exceeds the Taylor minimum and that contains persistent force-free current layers and isolated flux tubes. We explain this behavior in terms of additional topological invariants that exist only in two dimensions, namely the helicity enclosed within each level surface of the magnetic potential function. The speed and completeness of turbulent magnetic free-energy discharge could help account for rapidly variable gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula, gamma-ray bursts, blazars, and radio galaxies.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of the turbulent MHD channel flow at low magnetic Reynolds number for electric correlation characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; ChunHian

    2010-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent channel flow has been performed under the low magnetic Reynolds number assumption.The velocity-electric field and electric-electric field correlations were studied in the present work for different magnetic field orientations.The Kenjeres-Hanjalic (K-H) model was validated with the DNS data in a term by term manner.The numerical results showed that the K-H model makes good predictions for most components of the velocity-electric field correlations.The mechanisms of turbulence suppression were also analyzed for different magnetic field orientations utilizing the DNS data and the K-H model.The results revealed that the dissipative MHD source term is responsible for the turbulence suppression for the case of streamwise and spanwise magnetic orientation,while the Lorentz force which speeds up the near-wall fluid and decreases the production term is responsible for the turbulence suppression for the case of the wall normal magnetic orientation.

  7. On the scaling features of magnetic field fluctuations at non-MHD scales in turbulent space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolini, G.; Giannattasio, F.; Yordanova, E.; Vörös, Z.; Marcucci, M. F.; Echim, M.; Chang, T.

    2016-11-01

    In several different contexts space plasmas display intermittent turbulence at magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) scales, which manifests in anomalous scaling features of the structure functions of the magnetic field increments. Moving to smaller scales, i.e. below the ion-cyclotron and/or ion inertial length, these scaling features are still observed, even though its is not clear if these scaling features are still anomalous or not. Here, we investigate the nature of scaling properties of magnetic field increments at non-MHD scales for a period of fast solar wind to investigate the occurrence or not of multifractal features and collapsing of probability distribution functions (PDFs) using the novel Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) method, which is more sensitive than the traditional structure function approach. We find a strong evidence for the occurrence of a near mono-scaling behavior, which suggests that the observed turbulent regime at non-MHD scales mainly displays a mono-fractal nature of magnetic field increments. The results are discussed in terms of a non-compact fractal structure of the dissipation field.

  8. Extreme-value statistics from Lagrangian convex hull analysis I. Validation for homogeneous turbulent Boussinesq convection and MHD convection

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, J; Müller, W -C; Chapman, S C; Watkins, N W

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the utility of the convex hull to analyze physical questions related to the dispersion of a group of much more than four Lagrangian tracer particles in a turbulent flow. Validation of standard dispersion behaviors is a necessary preliminary step for use of the convex hull to describe turbulent flows. In simulations of statistically homogeneous and stationary Navier-Stokes turbulence, neutral fluid Boussinesq convection, and MHD Boussinesq convection we show that the convex hull can be used to reasonably capture the dispersive behavior of a large group of tracer particles. We validate dispersion results produced with convex hull analysis against scalings for Lagrangian particle pair dispersion. In addition to this basic validation study, we show that convex hull analysis provides information that particle pair dispersion does not, in the form of a extreme value statistics, surface area, and volume for a cluster of particles. We use the convex hull surface area and volume to examine the degree of...

  9. A STABLE, ACCURATE METHODOLOGY FOR HIGH MACH NUMBER, STRONG MAGNETIC FIELD MHD TURBULENCE WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT: RESOLUTION AND REFINEMENT STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Martin, Daniel F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McKee, Christopher F., E-mail: psli@astron.berkeley.edu, E-mail: klein@astron.berkeley.edu, E-mail: DFMartin@lbl.gov, E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu [Physics Department and Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Performing a stable, long-duration simulation of driven MHD turbulence with a high thermal Mach number and a strong initial magnetic field is a challenge to high-order Godunov ideal MHD schemes because of the difficulty in guaranteeing positivity of the density and pressure. We have implemented a robust combination of reconstruction schemes, Riemann solvers, limiters, and constrained transport electromotive force averaging schemes that can meet this challenge, and using this strategy, we have developed a new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) MHD module of the ORION2 code. We investigate the effects of AMR on several statistical properties of a turbulent ideal MHD system with a thermal Mach number of 10 and a plasma {beta}{sub 0} of 0.1 as initial conditions; our code is shown to be stable for simulations with higher Mach numbers (M{sub rms}= 17.3) and smaller plasma beta ({beta}{sub 0} = 0.0067) as well. Our results show that the quality of the turbulence simulation is generally related to the volume-averaged refinement. Our AMR simulations show that the turbulent dissipation coefficient for supersonic MHD turbulence is about 0.5, in agreement with unigrid simulations.

  10. Magnetic helicity and the evolution of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berera, Arjun; Linkmann, Moritz

    2014-10-01

    Ensemble-averaged high resolution direct numerical simulations of reverse spectral transfer are presented, extending on the many single realization numerical studies done up to now. This identifies this type of spectral transfer as a statistical property of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and thus permits reliable numerical exploration of its dynamics. The magnetic energy decay exponent from these ensemble runs has been determined to be nE=(0.47±0.03)+(13.9±0.8)/Rλ for initially helical magnetic fields. We show that even after removing the Lorentz force term in the momentum equation, thus decoupling it from the induction equation, reverse spectral transfer still persists. The induction equation is now linear with an externally imposed velocity field, thus amenable to numerous analysis techniques. A new door has opened for analyzing reverse spectral transfer, with various ideas discussed.

  11. Freely decaying turbulence in force-free electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Freely decaying relativistic force-free turbulence is studied for the first time. We initiate the magnetic field at a short wavelength and simulate its relaxation toward equilibrium on two and three dimensional periodic domains, in both helical and non-helical settings. Force-free turbulent relaxation is found to exhibit an inverse cascade in all settings, and in 3D to have a magnetic energy spectrum consistent with the Kolmogorov $5/3$ power law. 3D relaxations also obey the Taylor hypothesis; they settle promptly into the lowest energy configuration allowed by conservation of the total magnetic helicity. But in 2D, the relaxed state is a force-free equilibrium whose energy greatly exceeds the Taylor minimum, and which contains persistent force-free current layers and isolated flux tubes. We explain this behavior in terms of additional topological invariants that exist only in two dimensions, namely the helicity enclosed within each level surface of the magnetic potential function. The speed and completeness...

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  13. A nonlinear structural subgrid-scale closure for compressible MHD Part II: a priori comparison on turbulence simulation data

    CERN Document Server

    Grete, P; Schmidt, W; Schleicher, D R G

    2016-01-01

    Even though compressible plasma turbulence is encountered in many astrophysical phenomena, its effect is often not well understood. Furthermore, direct numerical simulations are typically not able to reach the extreme parameters of these processes. For this reason, large-eddy simulations (LES), which only simulate large and intermediate scales directly, are employed. The smallest, unresolved scales and the interactions between small and large scales are introduced by means of a subgrid-scale (SGS) model. We propose and verify a new set of nonlinear SGS closures for future application as an SGS model in LES of compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We use 15 simulations (without explicit SGS model) of forced, isotropic, homogeneous turbulence with varying sonic Mach number $\\mathrm{M_s} = 0.2$ to $20$ as reference data for the most extensive \\textit{a priori} tests performed so far in literature. In these tests we explicitly filter the reference data and compare the performance of the new closures against th...

  14. Modelling observed decay-less oscillations as resonantly enhanced Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices from transverse MHD waves and their seismological application

    CERN Document Server

    Antolin, Patrick; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    In the highly structured solar corona, resonant absorption is an unavoidable mechanism of energy transfer from global transverse MHD waves to local azimuthal Alfv\\'en waves. Due to its localised nature, a direct detection of this mechanism is extremely difficult. Yet, it is the leading theory explaining the observed fast damping of the global transverse waves. However, at odds with this theoretical prediction, recent observations indicate that in the low amplitude regime such transverse MHD waves can also appear decay-less, a yet unsolved phenomenon. Recent numerical work has shown that Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) often accompany transverse MHD waves. In this work, we combine 3D MHD simulations and forward modelling to show that for currently achieved spatial resolution and observed small amplitudes, an apparent decay-less oscillation is obtained. This effect results from the combination of periodic brightenings produced by the KHI and the coherent motion of the KHI vortices amplified by resonant abs...

  15. Spin-Up Instability of a Levitated Molten Drop in MHD-Flow Transition to Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, B.; Hyers, R. W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When an alternating magnetic field interacts with induced eddy currents in a conducting body, there will be a repulsive force between the body and the driving coil system generating the field. This repulsive force is the basis of electromagnetic levitation, which allows containerless processing of different materials. The eddy currents in the conducting body also generate Joule heating. Axial rotation of electromagnetically levitated objects is a common observation in levitation systems and often an undesirable side effect of such experiments on 1-g and -g. There have been recent efforts to use magnetic damping and suppress this tendency of body rotation. The first report of rotation in EML drops was attributed to a slight asymmetry of the shape and location of the levitation coils could change the axis and speed of rotation. Other theories of sample rotation include a frequency difference in the traveling electromagnetic waves and a phase difference in two different applied fields of the same frequency. All of these different mechanisms share the following characteristics: the torque is small, constant for constant field strength, and very weakly dependent on the sample's temperature and phase (solid or liquid). During experiments on the MSL-1 (First Microgravity Science Laboratory) mission of the Space Shuttle (STS-83 and STS-94, April and July 1997), a droplet of palladium-silicon alloy was electromagnetically levitated for viscosity measurements. For the non-deforming droplet, the resultant MHD flow inside the drop is inferred from motion of impurities on the surface. These observations indicate formation of a pair of co-rotating toroidal flow structures inside the spheroidal levitated drop that undergo secondary flow instabilities. As rise in the fluid temperature rises, the viscosity falls and the internal flow accelerates and becomes oscillatory; and beyond a point in the experiments, the surface impurities exhibit non-coherent chaotic motion signifying

  16. Spectral imbalance in the inertial range dynamics of decaying rotating turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Valente, Pedro C

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of homogeneous decaying turbulence with mild background rotation show the existence of a systematic and significant imbalance between the non-linear energy cascade to small scales and its dissipation. By starting the decay from a statistically stationary and fully developed rotating turbulence state, where the dissipation and the energy flux are approximately equal, the data shows a growing imbalance between the two until a maximum is reached when the dissipation is about twice the energy flux. This dichotomy of behaviours during decay is reminiscent of the non-equilibrium and the equilibrium regions previously reported for non-rotating turbulence [P.C. Valente, J.C. Vassilicos, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 108} 214503 (2012)]. Note, however, that for decaying rotating turbulence the classical scaling of the dissipation rate $\\epsilon \\propto u'^3/L$ (where $u'$ and $L$ are the root mean square fluctuating velocity and the integral length scale, respectively) does not appear to hold duri...

  17. Self-similar decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschoof, R.A.; Huisman, S.G.; Veen, van der R.C.A.; Sun, C.; Lohse, D.

    2016-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds-number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e., the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder (Re i =2×10 6 , the outer cylinder is at rest) is stopped within 12 s, thus fully removing the energy input to the syst

  18. On the spread and decay of wind turbine wakes in ambient turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. B.; Jonsson, C.; Achilleos, S.; Eames, I.

    2014-12-01

    The decay of the downstream wake of a wind turbine plays an important role in the performance of wind farms. The spread and decay of a wake depend both on wake meandering (advection of the wake as a whole) and wake diffusion (widening of the wake within its meandering frame of reference). Both of these effects depend strongly on the intensity of the ambient turbulence relative to the velocity deficit in the wake, and on the integral length scale of the turbulence relative to the wake width. Recent theory, which we review here, shows how intense large-scale turbulence can lead to a rapid x-2 decay in the time-averaged centreline velocity deficit, as compared to a x-1 decay for smaller scale turbulence, where x is distance downstream. We emphasise in this paper that common wind farm models do not predict this rapid decay. We present new experimental measurements of the velocity deficit downstream of a porous disc in relatively large-scale ambient turbulence which corroborate predictions of a x-2 decay, and we show theoretically that the commonly used k-epsilon model does not capture this effect. We further show that a commercial CFD package, configured to match our experiments and employing the k-epsilon model, fails to predict such rapid decay. We conclude that steady simulations of wind turbine wake dynamics are insufficient for informing wind farm layout optimisation.

  19. A new Jeans resolution criterion for (M)HD simulations of self-gravitating gas: Application to magnetic field amplification by gravity-driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic structure formation is characterized by the complex interplay between gravity, turbulence, and magnetic fields. The processes by which gravitational energy is converted into turbulent and magnetic energies, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we show with high-resolution, adaptive-mesh simulations that MHD turbulence is efficiently driven by extracting energy from the gravitational potential during the collapse of a dense gas cloud. Compressible motions generated during the contraction are converted into solenoidal, turbulent motions, leading to a natural energy ratio of E_sol/E_tot of approximately 2/3. We find that the energy injection scale of gravity-driven turbulence is close to the local Jeans scale. If small seeds of the magnetic field are present, they are amplified exponentially fast via the small-scale dynamo process. The magnetic field grows most efficiently on the smallest scales, for which the stretching, twisting, and folding of field lines, and the turbulent vortices are sufficientl...

  20. 3D MHD simulation of post--flare supra--arcade downflows in a turbulent current sheet medium

    CERN Document Server

    Cécere, M; Costa, A; Schneiter, M

    2014-01-01

    Supra--arcade downflows (SADs) are sunward, generally dark, plasma density depletions originated above posteruption flare arcades. In this paper using 3D MHD simulations we investigate if the SAD cavities can be produced by a direct combination of the tearing mode and Kelvin--Helmholtz instabilities leading to a turbulent current sheet (CS) medium or if the current sheet is merely the background where SADs are produced triggered by an impulsive deposition of energy. We find that to give account of the observational dark lane structures an addition of local energy provided by a reconnection event is required. This local reconnection can trigger a nonlinear internal wave dynamic, generated by the bouncing and interfering of shocks and expansion waves that compose relatively stable voids.

  1. Decay rates of magnetic modes below the threshold of a turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herault, J; Pétrélis, F; Fauve, S

    2014-04-01

    We measure the decay rates of magnetic field modes in a turbulent flow of liquid sodium below the dynamo threshold. We observe that turbulent fluctuations induce energy transfers between modes with different symmetries (dipolar and quadrupolar). Using symmetry properties, we show how to measure the decay rate of each mode without being restricted to the one with the smallest damping rate. We observe that the respective values of the decay rates of these modes depend on the shape of the propellers driving the flow. Dynamical regimes, including field reversals, are observed only when the modes are both nearly marginal. This is in line with a recently proposed model.

  2. Modelling of the decay of isotropic turbulence by the LES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdibekov, U S; Zhakebaev, D B, E-mail: uali1@mail.ru, E-mail: daurjaz@mail.ru [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan)

    2011-12-22

    This work deals with the modelling of degeneration of isotropic turbulence. To simulate the turbulent process the filtered three-dimensional nonstationary Navier-Stokes equation is used. The basic equation is closed with the dynamic model. The problem is solved numerically, and the equation of motion is solved by a modified method of fractional steps using compact schemes, the equation for pressure is solved by the Fourier method with a combination of matrix factorization. In the process of simulation changes of the kinetic energy of turbulence in the time, micro scale of turbulence and changes of inlongitudinal-transverse correlation functions are obtained, longitudinal and transverse one-dimensional spectra are defined.

  3. A Stable, Accurate Methodology for High Mach Number, Strong Magnetic Field MHD Turbulence with Adaptive Mesh Refinement: Resolution and Refinement Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I; McKee, Christopher F

    2011-01-01

    Performing a stable, long duration simulation of driven MHD turbulence with a high thermal Mach number and a strong initial magnetic field is a challenge to high-order Godunov ideal MHD schemes because of the difficulty in guaranteeing positivity of the density and pressure. We have implemented a robust combination of reconstruction schemes, Riemann solvers, limiters, and Constrained Transport EMF averaging schemes that can meet this challenge, and using this strategy, we have developed a new Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) MHD module of the ORION2 code. We investigate the effects of AMR on several statistical properties of a turbulent ideal MHD system with a thermal Mach number of 10 and a plasma $\\beta_0$ of 0.1 as initial conditions; our code is shown to be stable for simulations with higher Mach numbers ($M_rms = 17.3$) and smaller plasma beta ($\\beta_0 = 0.0067$) as well. Our results show that the quality of the turbulence simulation is generally related to the volume-averaged refinement. Our AMR simulati...

  4. Modeling of MHD turbulent heat transfer in channel flows imposed wall-normal magnetic fields under the various Prandtl number fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu, E-mail: yamamotoy@yamanashi.ac.jp [Division of Mechanical Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Kunugi, Tomoaki, E-mail: kunugi@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, C3-d2S06, Kyoto-Daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-Ku 615-8540, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We show the applicability to predict the heat transfer imposed on a uniform wall-normal magnetic field by means of the zero-equation heat transfer model. • Quasi-theoretical turbulent Prandtl numbers with various molecular Prandtl number fluids were obtained. • Improvements of the prediction accuracy in turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation rate under the magnetic fields were accomplished. - Abstract: Zero-equation heat transfer models based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number are evaluated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data for fully developed channel flows imposed on a uniform wall-normal magnetic field. Quasi-theoretical turbulent Prandtl numbers are estimated by DNS data of various molecular Prandtl number fluids. From the viewpoint of highly-accurate magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) heat transfer prediction, the parameters of the turbulent eddy viscosity of the k–É› model are optimized under the magnetic fields. Consequently, we use the zero-equation model based on a constant turbulent Prandtl number to demonstrate MHD heat transfer, and show the applicability of using this model to predict the heat transfer.

  5. Coexistence of weak and strong wave turbulence in incompressible Hall MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, Romain; Kiyani, Khurom; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    We report a numerical investigation of 3D Hall Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a strong mean magnetic field. By using a helicity decomposition and a cross-bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear 3-wave coupling is substantial among ion cyclotron and whistler waves. By studying in detail the degree of nonlinearity of these two populations we show that ion cyclotron and whistler turbulent fluctuations belong respectively to strong and weak wave turbulence. The non trivial blending of these two regime give rise to anomalous anisotropy and scaling properties. The separation of the weak random wave and strong coherent turbulence component can however be effectively done using simultaneous space and time Fourier transforms. Using this techniques we show that it is possible to recover some statistical prediction of weak turbulent theory.

  6. MHD-kinetic transition in imbalanced Alfv$\\'{e}$nic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Voitenko, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    Alfvenic turbulence in space is usually imbalanced: amplitudes of waves propagating parallel and anti-parallel to the mean magnetic field $B_0$ are unequal. It is commonly accepted that the turbulence is driven by (counter-) collisions between these counter-propagating wave fractions. Contrary to this, we found a new ion-scale dynamical range of the turbulence established by (co-) collisions among waves co-propagating in the same direction along $B_0$. The turbulent cascade is accelerated there and power spectra are steep and non-universal. The spectral indexes vary around -3 (-4) in the strong (weak) turbulence, such that steeper spectra follow larger imbalances. Intermittency steepens spectra further, up to -3.7 (-4.5). Our theoretical predictions are compatible with steep variable spectra observed in the solar wind at ion kinetic scales.

  7. Ideal evolution of MHD turbulence when imposing Taylor-Green symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Brachet, M E; Krstulovic, G; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A; Rosenberg, D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the ideal and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in three space dimensions for the development of potentially singular structures. The methodology consists in implementing the four-fold symmetries of the Taylor-Green vortex generalized to MHD, leading to substantial computer time and memory savings at a given resolution; we also use a re-gridding method that allows for lower-resolution runs at early times, with no loss of spectral accuracy. One magnetic configuration is examined at an equivalent resolution of 6144^3 points, and three different ones on grids of 4096^3 points. We find that at the highest resolution, two different current and vorticity sheet systems collide, producing two successive accelerations in the development of small scales with, at the latest time, a convergence of magnetic field lines to the location of maximum current, probably leading locally to a strong bending and directional variability of such lines.

  8. Properties of the First-order Fermi acceleration in fast magnetic reconnection driven by turbulence in collisional MHD flows

    CERN Document Server

    del Valle, M V; Kowal, G

    2016-01-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection may occur in different astrophysical sources, producing flare-like emission and particle acceleration. Currently, this process is being studied as an efficient mechanism to accelerate particles via a first-order Fermi process. In this work we analyse the acceleration rate and the energy distribution of test particles injected in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) domains with large-scale current sheets where reconnection is made fast by the presence of turbulence. We study the dependence of the particle acceleration time with the relevant parameters of the embedded turbulence, i.e., the Alfv\\'en speed $V_{\\rm A}$, the injection power $P_{\\rm inj}$ and scale $k_{\\rm inj}$ ($k_{\\rm inj} = 1/l_{\\rm inj}$). We find that the acceleration time follows a power-law dependence with the particle kinetic energy: $t_{acc} \\propto E^{\\alpha}$, with $0.2 < \\alpha < 0.6$ for a vast range of values of $c / V_{\\rm A} \\sim 20 - 1000$. The acceleration time decreases with the Alfv\\'en...

  9. Band-pass filtered velocity statistics in decaying turbulent box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    For homogeneous isotropic turbulence study,the acquisition of band-pass filtered velocity increments(FVI) in a non-forced turbulent box is still a challenge both experimentally and numerically.Turbulence and associated physical processes,at a given instant,are permanently contaminated by a forcing process which can seldom be universal.The situation tends to be the origin of intermittency and the non-Gaussian probability density distribution for acceleration and velocity gradients.To reveal implied mechanism...

  10. Sunset decay of the convective turbulence with Large-Eddy Simulation under realistic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, U.; Miglietta, M. M.; Degrazia, G. A.; Acevedo, O. C.; Marques Filho, E. P.

    2013-10-01

    Large-Eddy Simulation is performed for a single day from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES-99) field program. This study investigates an observed case of evening transition boundary layer over land. Parameters of the ambient atmosphere in the LES-decay studies conducted so far were typically prescribed in an idealized form. To provide suitable data under the wide range of the PBL weather conditions, the LES should be able to adequately reproduce the PBL turbulence dynamics including-if possible-baroclinicity, radiation, large scale advection and not only be related to a decreasing surface heating. In addition LES-decay studies usually assume that the sensible heat flux decreases instantaneously or with a very short time scale. The main purpose of this investigation is to study the decay of boundary-layer average turbulent kinetic energy at sunset with Large-Eddy Simulation that is forced with realistic environment conditions. This allows investigating the Turbulent Kinetic Energy decay over the realistic time scale that is observed in the atmosphere. During the intermediate and last stage of decay of the boundary-layer average Turbulent Kinetic Energy the exponents of the decay power law t go from 2 to 6, as evidenced by experimental results and recent analytical modeling in the surface layer.

  11. Energy Cascades in MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Most astrophysical and planetary systems e.g., solar convection and stellar winds, are in a turbulent state and coupled to magnetic fields. Understanding and quantifying the statistical properties of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) turbulence is crucial to explain the involved physical processes. Although the phenomenological theory of hydro-dynamic (HD) turbulence has been verified up to small corrections, a similar statement cannot be made for MHD turbulence. Since the phenomenological description of Hydrodynamic turbulence by Kolmogorov in 1941 there have been many attempts to derive a similar description for turbulence in conducting fluids (i.e Magneto-Hydrodynamic turbulence). However such a description is going to be based inevitably on strong assumptions (typically borrowed from hydrodynamics) that do not however necessarily apply to the MHD case. In this talk I will discuss some of the properties and differences of the energy and helicity cascades in turbulent MHD and HD flows. The investigation is going to be based on the analysis of direct numerical simulations. The cascades in MHD turbulence appear to be a more non-local process (in scale space) than in Hydrodynamics. Some implications of these results to turbulent modeling will be discussed

  12. The turbulent decay of trailing vortex pairs in stably stratified environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzaepfel, F.; Gerz, T.; Baumann, R.

    2000-03-01

    The decay of trailing vortex pairs in thermally stably stratified environments is investigated by means of large eddy simulations. Results of in-situ measurements in the wakes of different aircraft are used to find appropriate intitializations for the simulation of wake turbulence in the quiescent atmosphere. Furthermore, cases with weak atmospheric turbulence are investigated. It is shown that the early development of the vortices is not affected by turbulence and develops almost identically as in 2D simulations. In a quiescent atmosphere the subsequent vortex decay is controlled by the interaction of short-wave disturbances, owing to the aircraft induced turbulence, and baroclinic vorticity, owing to stable stratification. As a consequence, vertical vorticity streaks between the vortices are induced which are substantially intensified by vortex stretching and finally lead to rapid turbulent wake-vortex decay. When in addition also atmospheric turbulence is present, the long-wave instability is dominantly promoted. For very strong stratification (Fr < 1) it is observed that wake vortices may rebound but lose most of their strength before reaching the flight level. Finally, the simulation results are compared to the predictive capabilities of Greene's approximate model. (orig.)

  13. The Decay of Forced Turbulent Coflow of He II Past a Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babuin, S.; Varga, E.; Skrbek, L.

    2014-04-01

    We present an experimental study of the decay of He II turbulence created mechanically, by a bellows-induced flow past a stationary grid in a 7×7 mm2 superfluid wind tunnel. The temporal decay L( t) originating from various steady-states of vortex line length per unit volume, L 0, has been observed based on measurements of the attenuation of second-sound, in the temperature range 1.17 Kbench-mark Oregon towed grid experiments and, despite our turbulence being non-homogeneous, find strong similarities.

  14. Some remarks on the role of the boundary layers in decaying 2D turbulence in containers no-slip walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Van Heijst, G.J.F. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). J.M. Burges Centre for Fluid Dynamics, Dept. of Physics

    1999-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations of decaying two-dimensional (2D) turbulence inside a square container with no-slip boundaries have been carried out for Reynolds numbers up to 2000. The role of the boundary layers during the decay process has been illustrated with ensemble-averaged results for the power law behaviour of several characteristic properties of the coherent vortices which emerge during the decay of 2D turbulence. The evolution of the vortex density, the average vortex radius, the enstrophy and the vorticity extrema have been computed. An algebraic decay regime has been observed during the initial turbulent decay stage. The computed decay exponents disagree, however, with the exponents from the classical scaling theory for 2D decaying turbulence on an unbounded domain.

  15. The role of bulk viscosity on the decay of compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Eric; Pan, Shaowu

    2016-11-01

    The practice of neglecting bulk viscosity in studies of compressible turbulence is widespread. While exact for monatomic gases and unlikely to strongly affect the dynamics of fluids whose bulk-to-shear viscosity ratio is small and/or of weakly compressible turbulence, this assumption is not justifiable for compressible, turbulent flows of gases whose bulk viscosity is orders of magnitude larger than their shear viscosities (e.g., CO2). To understand the mechanisms by which bulk viscosity and the associated phenomena affect compressible turbulence, we conduct DNS of freely decaying compressible, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence for ratios of bulk-to-shear viscosity ranging from 0-1000. Our simulations demonstrate that bulk viscosity increases the decay rate of turbulent kinetic energy; while enstrophy exhibits little sensitivity to bulk viscosity, dilatation is reduced by an order of magnitude within the two eddy turnover time. Via a Helmholtz decomposition of the flow, we determined that bulk viscosity damps the dilatational velocity and reduces dilatational-solenoidal exchanges, as well as pressure-dilatation coupling. In short, bulk viscosity renders compressible turbulence incompressible by reducing energy transfer between translational and internal modes.

  16. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Resio, D; Pushkarev, A; Zakharov, V E; Brandini, C

    2002-09-30

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of [k](-2.5). We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  17. Dispersive Magnetosonic Waves and Turbulence in the Heliosheath: Multi-Fluid MHD Reconstruction of Voyager 2 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, B.; Opher, M.; Toth, G.

    2016-12-01

    Recently we demonstrated that our three-fluid MHD model of the solar wind plasma (where cold thermal solar wind ions, hot pickup ions, and electrons are treated as separate fluids) is able to reconstruct the microstructure of the termination shock observed by Voyager 2 [Zieger et al., 2015]. We constrained the unknown pickup ion abundance and temperature and confirmed the presence of a hot electron population at the termination shock, which has been predicted by a number of previous theoretical studies [e.g. Chasei and Fahr, 2014; Fahr et al., 2014]. We showed that a significant part of the upstream hydrodynamic energy is transferred to the heating of pickup ions and "massless" electrons. As shown in Zieger et al., [2015], three-fluid MHD theory predicts two fast magnetosonic modes, a low-frequency fast mode or solar wind ion (SW) mode and a high-frequency fast mode or pickup ion (PUI) mode. The coupling of the two ion populations results in a quasi-stationary nonlinear mode or oscilliton, which appears as a trailing wave train downstream of the termination shock. In single-fluid plasma, dispersive effects appear on the scale of the Debye length. However, in a non-equilibrium plasma like the solar wind, where solar wind ions and PUIs have different temperatures, dispersive effects become important on fluid scales [see Zieger et al., 2015]. Here we show that the dispersive effects of fast magnetosonic waves are expected on the scale of astronomical units (AU), and dispersion plays an important role producing compressional turbulence in the heliosheath. The trailing wave train of the termination shock (the SW-mode oscilliton) does not extend to infinity. Downstream propagating PUI-mode waves grow until they steepen into PUI shocklets and overturn starting to propagate backward. The upstream propagating PUI-mode waves result in fast magnetosonic turbulence and limit the downstream extension of the oscilliton. The overturning distance of the PUI-mode, where these waves

  18. Dynamo model for the inverse transfer of magnetic energy in a nonhelical decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kiwan

    2015-01-01

    The inverse cascade of magnetic energy occurs when helicity or rotational instability exists in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) system. This well known phenomenon provides a basis for the large scale magnetic field in space. However even the decaying nonhelical magnetic energy can evolve to expand its scale. This phenomenon, inverse transfer of decaying nonhelical magnetic field may hold some vital clues to the origin of large scale magnetic field in the astrophysical system without helicity nor any significant driving source. Zeldovich's rope model has been considered as the basic principle with regard to the amplification of magnetic field. However, since the rope model assuming a driving force is not appropriate to the decaying system, we suggest a supplementary dynamo model based on the magnetic induction equation. The model explicitly shows the basic principle of migration and amplification of magnetic field. The expansion of scale and intensity of magnetic field is basically the consequent result of the r...

  19. Scale ratios in decaying quasi-geographic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dritschel, G. [St. Andrews Univ., St. Andrews, Scotland (United Kingdom). School of Mathematics

    1999-12-01

    The study re-examines quasi-geographic turbulence in vertically periodic boundaries, at times well before two-dimensional vortices might emerge. It has been focused specifically on the characteristic scale ratio of structures, and how it compares to that found for rigid, isothermal boundaries.

  20. A 3D MHD simulation of SN 1006: a polarized emission study for the turbulent case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, P. F.; Schneiter, E. M.; Reynoso, E. M.; Esquivel, A.; De Colle, F.; Toledo-Roy, J. C.; Gómez, D. O.; Sieyra, M. V.; Moranchel-Basurto, A.

    2017-01-01

    Three dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations were carried out in order to perform a new polarization study of the radio emission of the supernova remnant SN 1006. These simulations consider that the remnant expands into a turbulent interstellar medium (including both magnetic field and figuredensity perturbations). Based on the referenced-polar angle technique, a statistical study was done on observational and numerical magnetic field position-angle distributions. Our results show that a turbulent medium with an adiabatic index of 1.3 can reproduce the polarization properties of the SN 1006 remnant. This statistical study reveals itself as a useful tool for obtaining the orientation of the ambient magnetic field, previous to be swept up by the main supernova remnant shock.

  1. Planck intermediate results. XX. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust with simulations of MHD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Aniano, G; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Arzoumanian, D; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fanciullo, L; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Pelkonen, V -M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    Polarized emission observed by Planck HFI at 353 GHz towards a sample of nearby fields is presented, focusing on the statistics of polarization fractions $p$ and angles $\\psi$. The polarization fractions and column densities in these nearby fields are representative of the range of values obtained over the whole sky. We find that: (i) the largest polarization fractions are reached in the most diffuse fields; (ii) the maximum polarization fraction $p_\\mathrm{max}$ decreases with column density $N_\\mathrm{H}$ in the more opaque fields with $N_\\mathrm{H} > 10^{21}\\,\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$; and (iii) the polarization fraction along a given line of sight is correlated with the local spatial coherence of the polarization angle. These observations are compared to polarized emission maps computed in simulations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence in which we assume a uniform intrinsic polarization fraction of the dust grains. We find that an estimate of this parameter may be recovered from the maximum pol...

  2. Assessment of the modulated gradient model in decaying isotropic turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A recently introduced nonlinear model undergoes evaluations based on two isotropic turbulent cases:a University of Wiscosion-Madison case at a moderate Reynolds number and a Johns Hopkins University case at a high Reynolds number.The model uses an estimation of the subgrid-scale(SGS) kinetic energy to model the magnitude of the SGS stress tensor,and uses the normalized velocity gradient tensor to model the structure of the SGS stress tensor.Testing is performed for the first case through a comparison betwee...

  3. Some unsteady turbulent MHD flows in flat channels and circular pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemirovskiy, Yu.V.; Kheynloo, Ya.L.

    1979-04-01

    An analysis is made of the kinematic characteristics of turbulent pulsating flow of an electrically conductive fluid in a flat channnel and in a circular pipe in longitudinal and azimuthal magnetic fields. It is assumed that walls are impermeable, and that all averaged flow characteristics depend only on the transverse coordinate in accordance with the equation of continuity (the medium is taken as incompressible) and equations of motion of electrically conductive media. Disregarding the Hall effect, a system of equations is derived for the averaged velocity components and the motion of the medium. The calculations are based on a semiempirical method developed by the authors. The theoretical results agree satisfactorily with experimental data. 4 references, 2 figures.

  4. Turbulent decay in the near field of multi-scale and conventional grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogstad, Per-Aage, E-mail: per.a.krogstad@ntnu.no [Dept. Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decay of turbulence behind a conventional grid and two mulit-scale grids is studied experimentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large scale facility having a test section of about 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 Multiplication-Sign 12 m, gave very good spatial resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Covers the near field decay of turbulence from x = 0.5M to x = 75M, where M is the mesh size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grids were designed to produce the same integral lengths to make direct comparisons possible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After initial development where jets and wakes interact, the grids produce the same turbulent energy levels and decay rates. - Abstract: Wind tunnel turbulence generated by a conventional and two multi-scale grids has been investigate. The grids were all designed to produce turbulence with the same integral scale, so that a direct comparison could be made between the flows, both in physical and scaled space. It has been suggested in the literature (e.g.) that for a particular class of multi fractal grids, the turbulence decay depends exponentially on the distance from the grid. After a short distance where the flow is highly dependent of the geometry, it was found that the exponential decay is not unique to a particular geometry, but may be found over the same streamwise distances also behind the multi-scale grids, as well as for the conventional grid. By comparing the probability density functions measured using laser Doppler and hot wire anemometry it is shown that hot wire measurements may contain severe errors if taken too close to the grid. It is shown that negative streamwise velocity components may occasionally be found as far as 10 times the mesh widths downstream of the grid. Since hot wire anemometry is not able to measure the sign of the velocity vector, this leads to a folding of the data which artificially increases the derived mean velocity and, more seriously, reduces the

  5. Numerical investigation of the turbulent MHD flow in a circular pipe with transverse magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechamps, Xavier; Rasquin, Michel; Degrez, Gérard

    2012-11-01

    In modern industrial metallurgical processes, external magnetic fields are often applied to control the motion of liquid metals by a non-intrusive means. The desired results are for example the damping of unwanted motions or the homogenization of a liquid zone in a partially solidified ingot. Because of the commonly appearing parameters in these processes, one can assume the quasi-static assumption for the magnetohydrodynamic equations. Here we are interested in the numerical study of the turbulent flow of a liquid metal inside an electrically insulated pipe with a transverse uniform magnetic field. For this purpose, we will use a hybrid spectral/finite element solver, which allows to study complex flows in Cartesian and axisymmetric geometries. For the case of interest, we consider a bulk Reynolds number of 8200 and a Hartmann number ranging between 5 and 30. Here, the main points of interest are the evolution of the skin friction coefficient as a function of the ratio of the Hartmann number Ha over the Reynolds number Re (with 0 FNRS) is aknowledged.

  6. MHD flow in a cylindrical vessel of finite size with turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbachev, L.P.; Nikitin, N.V.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of flows generated by electromagnetic forces in a cylindrical vessel of finite size, for the case of large values of the hydrodynamic and small values of the magnetic Reynolds numbers have been inadequately analyzed in previous literature, since neither the nonlinear nor the linear theory adequately accounts for secondary flows due to the strong action of boundary layers formed at the end faces of the cylinders at large Reynolds numbers and the results do not agree with experimental data. This paper generalizes the previously more accurate nonlinear scheme of the same authors, the basis for which was the fact that viscosity at large Reynolds numbers is manifest only close to solid surfaces. Two cases are treated: crossed fields and a rotating magnetic field in the cylindrical vessel, where the entire flow region is broken down into an inviscid core and end face boundary layers. It is assumed that the velocity distribution near the end surfaces obeys an empirical one-seventh power law, which is applicable to turbulent liquid flow in a tube in a range of Re = 3 x 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 5/ simple engineering formulas are derived for the angular velocity, which exhibit good agreement with the experimental data for Hartmann numbers less than 10. The procedure can be generalized to the case of a rotating magnetic field having several pairs of poles. 6 references, 2 figures.

  7. Turbulence decay towards the linearly-stable regime of Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Mónico, Rodolfo Ostilla; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Taylor-Couette (TC) flow is used to probe the hydrodynamical stability of astrophysical accretion disks. Experimental data on the subcritical stability of TC are in conflict about the existence of turbulence (cf. Ji et al. Nature, 444, 343-346 (2006) and Paoletti et al., A$\\&$A, 547, A64 (2012)), with discrepancies attributed to end-plate effects. In this paper we numerically simulate TC flow with axially periodic boundary conditions to explore the existence of sub-critical transitions to turbulence when no end-plates are present. We start the simulations with a fully turbulent state in the unstable regime and enter the linearly stable regime by suddenly starting a (stabilizing) outer cylinder rotation. The shear Reynolds number of the turbulent initial state is up to $Re_s \\sim10^5$ and the radius ratio is $\\eta=0.714$. The stabilization causes the system to behave as a damped oscillator and correspondingly the turbulence decays. The evolution of the torque and turbulent kinetic energy is analysed and th...

  8. Turbulence and selective decay in the SSX plasma wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Tim; Brown, Michael; Dandurand, Dan; Fisher, Mike; Flanagan, Ken; Weinhold, Darren; Lukin, V.

    2011-10-01

    A helical, relaxed plasma state has been observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder has dimensions L = 1 m and R = 0 . 08 m. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v >= 50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. Typical plasma parameters are Ti = 25 eV, ne >=1015 cm-3, and B = 0 . 25 T. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data is favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibits broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement to the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇ × B --> = λ B --> . While the global structure roughly corresponds to the minimum energy eigenstate for the wind tunnel geometry, the plasma is high beta (β = 0 . 5) and does not have a flat λ profile. Merging with plasma plumes injected from both ends of the cylinder will be compared to the non-merging plasmas. Supported by US DOE and NSF.

  9. Comparing Numerical Methods for Isothermal Magnetized Supersonic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kritsuk, Alexei G; Collins, David; Padoan, Paolo; Norman, Michael L; Abel, Tom; Banerjee, Robi; Federrath, Christoph; Flock, Mario; Lee, Dongwook; Li, Pak Shing; Mueller, Wolf-Christian; Teyssier, Romain; Ustyugov, Sergey D; Vogel, Christian; Xu, Hao

    2011-01-01

    We employ simulations of supersonic super-Alfv\\'enic turbulence decay as a benchmark test problem to assess and compare the performance of nine astrophysical MHD methods actively used to model star formation. The set of nine codes includes: ENZO, FLASH, KT-MHD, LL-MHD, PLUTO, PPML, RAMSES, STAGGER, and ZEUS. We present a comprehensive set of statistical measures designed to quantify the effects of numerical dissipation in these MHD solvers. We compare power spectra for basic fields to determine the effective spectral bandwidth of the methods and rank them based on their relative effective Reynolds numbers. We also compare numerical dissipation for solenoidal and dilatational velocity components to check for possible impacts of the numerics on small-scale density statistics. Finally, we discuss convergence of various characteristics for the turbulence decay test and impacts of various components of numerical schemes on the accuracy of solutions. We show that the best performing codes employ a consistently high...

  10. Statistical Theory of the Ideal MHD Geodynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    A statistical theory of geodynamo action is developed, using a mathematical model of the geodynamo as a rotating outer core containing an ideal (i.e., no dissipation), incompressible, turbulent, convecting magnetofluid. On the concentric inner and outer spherical bounding surfaces the normal components of the velocity, magnetic field, vorticity and electric current are zero, as is the temperature fluctuation. This allows the use of a set of Galerkin expansion functions that are common to both velocity and magnetic field, as well as vorticity, current and the temperature fluctuation. The resulting dynamical system, based on the Boussinesq form of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, represents MHD turbulence in a spherical domain. These basic equations (minus the temperature equation) and boundary conditions have been used previously in numerical simulations of forced, decaying MHD turbulence inside a sphere [1,2]. Here, the ideal case is studied through statistical analysis and leads to a prediction that an ideal coherent structure will be found in the form of a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field that results from broken ergodicity, an effect that has been previously studied both analytically and numerically for homogeneous MHD turbulence [3,4]. The axial dipole component becomes prominent when there is a relatively large magnetic helicity (proportional to the global correlation of magnetic vector potential and magnetic field) and a stationary, nonzero cross helicity (proportional to the global correlation of velocity and magnetic field). The expected angle of the dipole moment vector with respect to the rotation axis is found to decrease to a minimum as the average cross helicity increases for a fixed value of magnetic helicity and then to increase again when average cross helicity approaches its maximum possible value. Only a relatively small value of cross helicity is needed to produce a dipole moment vector that is aligned at approx.10deg with the

  11. Decaying magnetohydrodynamics: effects of initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu

    2000-02-01

    We study the effects of homogenous and isotropic initial conditions on decaying magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We show that for an initial distribution of velocity and magnetic-field fluctuations, appropriately defined structure functions decay as a power law in time. We also show that for a suitable choice of initial cross correlations between velocity and magnetic fields even-order structure functions acquire anomalous scaling in time where as scaling exponents of the odd-order structure functions remain unchanged. We discuss our results in the context of fully developed MHD turbulence.

  12. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  13. Characterisation of the turbulent electromotive force and its magnetically-mediated quenching in a global EULAG-MHD simulation of solar convection

    CERN Document Server

    Simard, C; Dube, C

    2016-01-01

    We perform a mean-field analysis of the EULAG-MHD millenium simulation of global magnetohydrodynamical convection presented in Passos et al. 2014. The turbulent electromotive force operating in the simulation is assumed to be linearly related to the cyclic axisymmetric mean magnetic field and its first spatial derivatives. At every grid point in the simulation's meridional plane, this assumed relationship involves 27 independent tensorial coefficients. Expanding on Racine et al. 2011, we extract these coefficients from the simulation data through a least-squares minimization procedure based on singular value decomposition. The reconstructed alpha-tensor shows good agreement with that obtained by Racine et al. 2011, who did not include derivatives of the mean-field in their fit, as well as with the alpha-tensor extracted by Augustson et al. 2015 from a distinct ASH MHD simulation. The isotropic part of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity tensor beta is positive definite and reaches values of 5.0x10^7 m2s-1 in t...

  14. Determination of the effective kinematic viscosity for the decay of quasiclassical turbulence in superfluid 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Guo, W.; Vinen, W. F.

    2016-09-01

    The energy dissipation of quasiclassical homogeneous turbulence in superfluid 4He (He II) is controlled by an effective kinematic viscosity ν', which relates the energy decay rate d E /d t to the density of quantized vortex lines L as d E /d t =-ν'(κL ) 2 . The precise value of ν' is of fundamental importance in developing our understanding of the dissipation mechanism in He II, and it is also needed in many high-Reynolds-number turbulence experiments and model testing that use He II as the working fluid. However, a reliable determination of ν' requires the measurements of both E (t ) and L (t ) , which was never achieved. Here we discuss our study of the quasiclassical turbulence that emerges in the decay of thermal counterflow in He II above 1 K. We were able to measure E (t ) by using a recently developed flow-visualization technique and L (t ) via second-sound attenuation. We report the ν' values in a wide temperature range determined from a comparison of the time evolution of E (t ) and L (t ) .

  15. Reynolds number dependence of thermal diffusion from a line source in decaying grid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erika; Warhaft, Zellman

    2008-11-01

    Existing experiments on line source dispersion in isotropic turbulence are for low Reynolds numbers (Taylor scale Reynolds numbers of less than 100) and there has been no attempt to systematically vary the Reynolds number. Here we present new results of passive temperature fluctuations produced by a fine heated wire in decaying grid turbulence. The Taylor Reynolds number is varied from approximately 50 to 500 by means of active and passive grids. We study the dependence of the mean and r.m.s. temperature profiles on the Reynolds number. The effects of source size are also investigated. The results are compared with the recent modeling work of Viswanathan and Pope (Physics of Fluids, to be published) who find significant Reynolds number dependence but small effects when varying the source size. The peak centerline ratio of the r.m.s. to the mean of the scalar is also examined and compared with predictions. This work is funded by the US National Science Foundation.

  16. A study of surface semi-geostrophic turbulence: freely decaying dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ragone, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    In this study we give a characterization of semi-geostrophic turbulence by performing freely decaying simulations of the semi-geostrophic equations for the case of constant uniform potential vorticity, a set of equations known as surface semi-geostrophic approximation. The equations are formulated as conservation laws for potential temperature and potential vorticity, with a nonlinear Monge-Amp\\'{e}re type inversion equation for the streamfunction, expressed in a transformed coordinate system that follows the geostrophic flow. We perform model studies of turbulent surface semi-geostrophic flows in a doubly-periodic domain in the horizontal limited in the vertical by two rigid lids, allowing for variations of potential temperature at one of the boundaries, and we compare them with the corresponding surface quasi-geostrophic case. Results show that, while surface quasi-geostrophic dynamics is dominated by a symmetric population of cyclones-anticyclones, surface semi-geostrophic dynamics features a prominent rol...

  17. A further experiment on two-dimensional decaying turbulence on a rotating sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoden, S. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Geophysics; Ishioka, K.; Yamada, M. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Graduate Schoool of Mathematical Sciences; Hayashi, Y.-Y. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Div. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1999-12-01

    A series of numerical experiments on the two-dimensional decaying turbulence is performed for a non-divergent barotropic fluid on a rotating sphere by using a high-resolution spectral model. Time variations of the energy spectrum and the flow field are highly dependent on the rotation rate. In non-rotational cases, isolated coherent vortices emerge in the course of time development as in the planar two-dimensional turbulence. As the rotation rate increases, however, the evolution of the flow field charges drastically, and a westward circumpolar vortex appears in high-latitudes as well as zonal band structures in mid- and low-latitudes. The dependence of these features on the initial energy spectrum is investigated and the dynamics of such pattern formulations is discussed.

  18. Parametric Study of Decay of Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Rubinstein, Robert; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Zang, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence are performed with both low-order and high-order spatial discretization schemes. The turbulent Mach and Reynolds numbers for the simulations are 0.2 and 250, respectively. For the low-order schemes we use either second-order central or third-order upwind biased differencing. For higher order approximations we apply weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, both with linear and nonlinear weights. There are two objectives in this preliminary effort to investigate possible schemes for large eddy simulation (LES). One is to explore the capability of a widely used low-order computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to perform LES computations. The other is to determine the effect of higher order accuracy (fifth, seventh, and ninth order) achieved with high-order upwind biased WENO-based schemes. Turbulence statistics, such as kinetic energy, dissipation, and skewness, along with the energy spectra from simulations of the decaying turbulence problem are used to assess and compare the various numerical schemes. In addition, results from the best performing schemes are compared with those from a spectral scheme. The effects of grid density, ranging from 32 cubed to 192 cubed, on the computations are also examined. The fifth-order WENO-based scheme is found to be too dissipative, especially on the coarser grids. However, with the seventh-order and ninth-order WENO-based schemes we observe a significant improvement in accuracy relative to the lower order LES schemes, as revealed by the computed peak in the energy dissipation and by the energy spectrum.

  19. Characterisation of the turbulent electromotive force and its magnetically-mediated quenching in a global EULAG-MHD simulation of solar convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Corinne; Charbonneau, Paul; Dubé, Caroline

    2016-10-01

    We perform a mean-field analysis of the EULAG-MHD millenium simulation of global magnetohydrodynamical convection presented in Passos and Charbonneau (2014). The turbulent electromotive force (emf) operating in the simulation is assumed to be linearly related to the cyclic axisymmetric mean magnetic field and its first spatial derivatives. At every grid point in the simulation's meridional plane, this assumed relationship involves 27 independent tensorial coefficients. Expanding on Racine et al. (2011), we extract these coefficients from the simulation data through a least-squares minimization procedure based on singular value decomposition. The reconstructed α -tensor shows good agreement with that obtained by Racine et al. (2011), who did not include derivatives of the mean-field in their fit, as well as with the α -tensor extracted by Augustson et al. (2015) from a distinct ASH MHD simulation. The isotropic part of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity tensor β is positive definite and reaches values of 5.0 ×107 m2 s-1 in the middle of the convecting fluid layers. The spatial variations of both αϕϕ and βϕϕ component are well reproduced by expressions obtained under the Second Order Correlation Approximation, with a good matching of amplitude requiring a turbulent correlation time about five times smaller than the estimated turnover time of the small-scale turbulent flow. By segmenting the simulation data into epochs of magnetic cycle minima and maxima, we also measure α - and β -quenching. We find the magnetic quenching of the α -effect to be driven primarily by a reduction of the small-scale flow's kinetic helicity, with variations of the current helicity playing a lesser role in most locations in the simulation domain. Our measurements of turbulent diffusivity quenching are restricted to the βϕϕ component, but indicate a weaker quenching, by a factor of ≃ 1.36, than of the α -effect, which in our simulation drops by a factor of three between

  20. Von Kármán energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic turbulent plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-09-20

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von Kármán hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics. Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitudes the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in the large amplitude turbulence regime.

  1. Comparison of the LBE and DUGKS methods for DNS of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng; Guo, Zhaoli

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to perform a detailed comparison of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) and the recently developed discrete unified gas-kinetic scheme (DUGKS) methods for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence (DHIT) in a periodic box. The flow fields and key statistical quantities computed by both methods are compared with those from pseudo-spectral (PS) method. The results show that the LBE and DUGKS have almost the same accuracy when the flow field is well-resolved, and that the LBE is less dissipative and is slightly more efficient than the DUGKS, but the latter has a superior numerical stability, particularly for high Reynolds number flows. Therefore, the DUGKS method can be viewed as a viable tool for DNS of turbulent flows. It should be emphasized that the main advantage of the DUGKS when compared with the LBE method is its feasibility in adopting nonuniform meshes, which is critical for wall-bounded turbulent flows. The present work provi...

  2. Technical approach for the design of a high-resolution spectral model on a sphere: Application to decaying turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ishioka

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Several technical suggestions to construct a high-resolution spectral model on a sphere (the T682 barotropic model are presented and their implementation of FORTRAN77 libraries is provided as a free software package ISPACK (http://www.gfd-dennou.org/arch/ispack/. A test experiment on decaying turbulence is conducted to demonstrate the ability of the model.

  3. Origins of the k(-2) spectrum in decaying Taylor-Green magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, V; Alexakis, A

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the origins of k(-2) spectrum in a decaying Taylor-Green magnetohydrodynamic flow with zero large scale magnetic flux that was reported by Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. E 81, 016318 (2010)]. So far, a possible candidate for this scaling exponent has been the weak turbulence phenomenology. From our numerical simulations, we observe that current sheets in the magnetic Taylor-Green flow are formed in regions of magnetic discontinuities. Based on this observation and by studying the influence of the current sheets on the energy spectrum, using a filtering technique, we argue that the discontinuities are responsible for the -2 power law scaling of the energy spectra of this flow.

  4. A renormalisation group analysis of 2d freely decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, P

    1996-01-01

    We study two dimensional freely decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We investigate the time evolution of the probability law of the gauge field and the stream function. Assuming that this probability law is initially defined by a statistical field theory in the basin of attraction of a renormalisation group fixed point, we show that its time evolution is generated by renormalisation transformations. In the long time regime, the probability law is described by non-unitary conformal field theories. In that case, we prove that the kinetic and magnetic energy spectra are proportional. We then construct a family of fixed points using the (p,p+2) non-unitary minimal models of conformal field theories.

  5. The length distribution of streamline segments in homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2012-04-01

    by Schaefer et al. ["Fast and slow changes of the length of gradient trajectories in homogenous shear turbulence," in Advances in Turbulence XII, edited by B. Eckhardt (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2009), pp. 565-572] we will refer to the morphological part of the evolution of streamline segments as slow changes while the topological part of the evolution is referred to as fast changes. This separation yields a transport equation for the probability density function (pdf) P(l) of the arclength l of streamline segments in which the slow changes translate into a convection and a diffusion term when terms up to second order are included and the fast changes yield integral terms. The overall temporal evolution (morphological and topological) of the arclength l of streamline segments is analyzed and associated with the motion of the above isosurface. This motion is diffusion controlled for small segments, while large segments are mainly subject to strain and pressure fluctuations. The convection velocity corresponds to the first order jump moment, while the diffusion term includes the second order jump moment. It is concluded, both theoretically and from direct numerical simulations (DNS) data of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence at two different Reynolds numbers, that the normalized first order jump moment is quasi-universal, while the second order one is proportional to the inverse of the square root of the Taylor based Reynolds number Re_{λ }^{-1/2}. Its inclusion thus represents a small correction in the limit of large Reynolds numbers. Numerical solutions of the pdf equation yield a good agreement with the pdf obtained from the DNS data. The interplay of viscous drift acting on small segments and linear strain acting on large segments yield, as it has already been concluded for dissipation elements, that the mean length of streamline segments should scale with Taylor microscale.

  6. First-order reactant in homogeneous turbulence before the final period of decay. [contaminant fluctuations in chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Patel, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for studying theoretically the concentration fluctuations of a dilute contaminate undergoing a first-order chemical reaction. The method is based on Deissler's (1958) theory for homogeneous turbulence for times before the final period, and it follows the approach used by Loeffler and Deissler (1961) to study temperature fluctuations in homogeneous turbulence. Four-point correlation equations are obtained; it is assumed that terms containing fifth-order correlation are very small in comparison with those containing fourth-order correlations, and can therefore be neglected. A spectrum equation is obtained in a form which can be solved numerically, yielding the decay law for the concentration fluctuations in homogeneous turbulence for the period much before the final period of decay.

  7. The Kinematics of Molecular Cloud Cores in the Presence of Driven and Decaying Turbulence: Comparisons with Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, S R; Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2008-04-18

    In this study we investigate the formation and properties of prestellar and protostellar cores using hydrodynamic, self-gravitating Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations, comparing the cases where turbulence is continually driven and where it is allowed to decay. We model observations of these cores in the C{sup 18}O(2 {yields} 1), NH{sub 3}(1,1), and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1 {yields} 0) lines, and from the simulated observations we measure the linewidths of individual cores, the linewidths of the surrounding gas, and the motions of the cores relative to one another. Some of these distributions are significantly different in the driven and decaying runs, making them potential diagnostics for determining whether the turbulence in observed star-forming clouds is driven or decaying. Comparing our simulations with observed cores in the Perseus and {rho} Ophiuchus clouds shows reasonably good agreement between the observed and simulated core-to-core velocity dispersions for both the driven and decaying cases. However, we find that the linewidths through protostellar cores in both simulations are too large compared to the observations. The disagreement is noticeably worse for the decaying simulation, in which cores show highly supersonic infall signatures in their centers that decrease toward their edges, a pattern not seen in the observed regions. This result gives some support to the use of driven turbulence for modeling regions of star formation, but reaching a firm conclusion on the relative merits of driven or decaying turbulence will require more complete data on a larger sample of clouds as well as simulations that include magnetic fields, outflows, and thermal feedback from the protostars.

  8. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  9. Planck intermediate results. XX. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust with simulations of MHD turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    with the local spatial coherence of the polarization angle. These observations are compared to polarized emission maps computed in simulations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamical turbulence in which we assume a uniform intrinsic polarization fraction of the dust grains. We find that an estimate...

  10. Magnetic discontinuities in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Mason, Joanne; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2012-04-27

    Recent measurements of solar wind turbulence report the presence of intermittent, exponentially distributed angular discontinuities in the magnetic field. In this Letter, we study whether such discontinuities can be produced by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We detect the discontinuities by measuring the fluctuations of the magnetic field direction, Δθ, across fixed spatial increments Δx in direct numerical simulations of MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform guide field B(0). A large region of the probability density function (pdf) for Δθ is found to follow an exponential decay, proportional to exp(-Δθ/θ(*)), with characteristic angle θ(*)≈(14°)(b(rms)/B(0))(0.65) for a broad range of guide-field strengths. We find that discontinuities observed in the solar wind can be reproduced by MHD turbulence with reasonable ratios of b(rms)/B(0). We also observe an excess of small angular discontinuities when Δx becomes small, possibly indicating an increasing statistical significance of dissipation-scale structures. The structure of the pdf in this case closely resembles the two-population pdf seen in the solar wind. We thus propose that strong discontinuities are associated with inertial-range MHD turbulence, while weak discontinuities emerge from dissipation-range turbulence. In addition, we find that the structure functions of the magnetic field direction exhibit anomalous scaling exponents, which indicates the existence of intermittent structures.

  11. The Kinematics of Molecular Cloud Cores in the Presence of Driven and Decaying Turbulence: Comparisons with Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offner, S R; Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2007-12-17

    In this study we investigate the formation and properties of prestellar and protostellar cores using hydrodynamic, self-gravitating Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations, comparing the cases where turbulence is continually driven and where it is allowed to decay. We model observations of these cores in the C{sup 18}O(2 {yields} 1), NH{sub 3}(1, 1), and N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1 {yields} 0) lines, and from the simulated observations we measure the linewidths of individual cores, the linewidths of the surrounding gas, and the motions of the cores relative to one another. Some of these distributions are significantly different in the driven and decaying runs, making them potential diagnostics for determining whether the turbulence in observed star-forming clouds is driven or decaying. Comparing our simulations with observed cores in the Perseus and {rho} Ophiuchus clouds shows reasonably good agreement between the observed and simulated core-to-core velocity dispersions for both the driven and decaying cases. However, we find that the linewidths through protostellar cores in both simulations are too large compared to the observations. The disagreement is noticeably worse for the decaying simulation, in which cores show highly supersonic in fall signatures in their centers that decrease toward their edges, a pattern not seen in the observed the regions.

  12. Experimental Study of Homogeneous Isotropic Slowly-Decaying Turbulence in Giant Grid-Wind Tunnel Set Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliseda, Alberto; Bourgoin, Mickael; Eswirp Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present preliminary results from a recent grid turbulence experiment conducted at the ONERA wind tunnel in Modane, France. The ESWIRP Collaboration was conceived to probe the smallest scales of a canonical turbulent flow with very high Reynolds numbers. To achieve this, the largest scales of the turbulence need to be extremely big so that, even with the large separation of scales, the smallest scales would be well above the spatial and temporal resolution of the instruments. The ONERA wind tunnel in Modane (8 m -diameter test section) was chosen as a limit of the biggest large scales achievable in a laboratory setting. A giant inflatable grid (M = 0.8 m) was conceived to induce slowly-decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a large region of the test section, with minimal structural risk. An international team or researchers collected hot wire anemometry, ultrasound anemometry, resonant cantilever anemometry, fast pitot tube anemometry, cold wire thermometry and high-speed particle tracking data of this canonical turbulent flow. While analysis of this large database, which will become publicly available over the next 2 years, has only started, the Taylor-scale Reynolds number is estimated to be between 400 and 800, with Kolmogorov scales as large as a few mm . The ESWIRP Collaboration is formed by an international team of scientists to investigate experimentally the smallest scales of turbulence. It was funded by the European Union to take advantage of the largest wind tunnel in Europe for fundamental research.

  13. Angular Momentum Transport by MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disks: Gas Pressure Dependence of the Saturation Level of the Magnetorotational Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, T; Turner, N J; Stone, J M; Sano, Takayoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Turner, Neal J.; Stone, James M.

    2004-01-01

    The saturation level of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is investigated using three-dimensional MHD simulations. The shearing box approximation is adopted and the vertical component of gravity is ignored, so that the evolution of the MRI is followed in a small local part of the disk. We focus on the dependence of the saturation level of the stress on the gas pressure, which is a key assumption in the standard alpha disk model. From our numerical experiments it is found that there is a weak power-law relation between the saturation level of the Maxwell stress and the gas pressure in the nonlinear regime; the higher the gas pressure, the larger the stress. Although the power-law index depends slightly on the initial field geometry, the relationship between stress and gas pressure is independent of the initial field strength, and is unaffected by Ohmic dissipation if the magnetic Reynolds number is at least 10. The relationship is the same in adiabatic calculations, where pressure increases over time, an...

  14. The role of MHD turbulence in magnetic self-excitation: A study of the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nornberg, Mark D.

    2006-07-01

    Determining the onset conditions for magnetic field growth in magnetohydrodynamics is fundamental to understanding how astrophysical dynamos such as the Earth, the Sun, and the galaxy self-generate magnetic fields. The Madison Dynamo Experiment was constructed to explore the role of turbulence in changing these onset conditions for an impeller-driven flow of liquid sodium. The flow generates intermittent magnetic bursts with the spatial structure predicted from kinematic dynamo theory. A model of the mean flow was constructed from laser Doppler velocimetry measurements of the flow in an identical-scale water experiment. A kinematic eigenvalue code predicted that the flow would generate a predominantly dipolar magnetic field perpendicular to the symmetry axis for sufficiently high impeller speeds. The flow amplifies the magnetic field by stretching field lines. The field lines are then twisted back onto themselves creating a feedback loop for dynamo growth. The same flow was generated in the sodium experiment and was found to amplify an applied magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the drive shaft axis of the experiment. The amplification increased with motor rotation rate as the induced field became more closely aligned with the applied field, though a reduction in the amplitude is attributed to an enhanced resistivity due to turbulent diffusion. The turbulence was characterized by measurements of the velocity and magnetic power spectra. The velocity spectra have a Kolmogorov scaling. The wavenumber at which resistive dissipation range becomes dominant was observed to increase with flow speed indicating that smaller scale magnetic structures were generated. No amplification due to a small-scale dynamo was observed. The intermittent bursts were analyzed using conditional averaging. The growth rate was found to increase linearly with impeller rotation rate resulting in stronger bursts. The average duration decreased so that the bursts continued to satisfy Poisson

  15. Magnetic reconnection as an element of turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Servidio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, recent advances on the study of reconnection in turbulence are reviewed. Using direct numerical simulations of decaying incompressible two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD, it was found that in fully developed turbulence complex processes of reconnection locally occur (Servidio et al., 2009, 2010a. In this complex scenario, reconnection is spontaneous but locally driven by the fields, with the boundary conditions provided by the turbulence. Matching classical turbulence analysis with a generalized Sweet-Parker theory, the statistical features of these multiple-reconnection events have been identified. A discussion on the accuracy of our algorithms is provided, highlighting the necessity of adequate spatial resolution. Applications to the study of solar wind discontinuities are reviewed, comparing simulations to spacecraft observations. New results are shown, studying the time evolution of these local reconnection events. A preliminary study on the comparison between MHD and Hall MHD is reported. Our new approach to the study of reconnection as an element of turbulence has broad applications to space plasmas, shedding a new light on the study of magnetic reconnection in nature.

  16. Cascades and dissipation ratio in rotating magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at low magnetic Prandtl number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion

    2010-10-01

    A phenomenology of isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence subject to both rotation and applied magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the triple correlation decay time is the shortest between the eddy turn-over time and the ones associated to the rotating frequency and the Alfvén wave period. For Pm=1 it leads to four kinds of piecewise spectra, depending on four parameters: injection rate of energy, magnetic diffusivity, rotation rate, and applied field. With a shell model of MHD turbulence (including rotation and applied magnetic field), spectra for Pm ≤ 1 are presented, together with the ratio between magnetic and viscous dissipations.

  17. Helicity and its role in the varieties of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.; Bates, Jason W.

    Magnetic helicity has appeared as an important but slippery quantity in the theory of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in two contexts: (1) as a slowly-decaying ideal invariant that can control to some extent the formation of a "relaxed" MHD state—one far from thermal equilibrium—in laboratory confinement devices such as the toroidal pinch; and (2) as a potentially inversely-cascadable global quantity in driven, homogeneous MHD turbulence. In the former case, the origin of helicity is straightforwardly clear: electric current is forced to flow along a dc magnetic field, generating poloidal magnetic flux and causing the magnetic field lines to kink up, helically. In the latter, helicity's origins and physical interpretation are more obscure, sometimes having to do with mechanically driven helical motions which supposedly generate magnetic helicity that, however, no longer has any obvious "linked flux" interpretation. In both cases, its usefulness and even its definition sometimes depend sensitively on boundary conditions in a way that, say, those for energy do not. We will examine what the utility of the concept of magnetic helicity has so far been shown to be in discussing turbulent MHD, and comment on some of the ways it differs from other global ideal invariants that have been discussed, such as kinetic energy in 2D Navier-Stokes flows, and mean-square magnetic vector potential in 2D MHD. Attention will be devoted to the evidence for variational principles such as "maximal helicity," or "minimum energy," conjectured to predict various relaxation processes and late-time laminar states in evolving MHD situations. What is believed to be an important distinction between applications of the principles to decaying and driven situations will be stressed. Our discussion will be confined to the cases of small but non-zero transport coefficients, and will not deal with any possible role of helicity in ideal MHD.

  18. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  19. Dynamic multiscaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    We present the first study of the multiscaling of time-dependent velocity and magnetic-field structure functions in homogeneous, isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in three dimensions. We generalize the formalism that has been developed for analogous studies of time-dependent structure functions in fluid turbulence to MHD. By carrying out detailed numerical studies of such time-dependent structure functions in a shell model for three-dimensional MHD turbulence, we obtain both equal-time and dynamic scaling exponents.

  20. Dynamic multiscaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Sahoo, Ganapati; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the multiscaling of time-dependent velocity and magnetic-field structure functions in homogeneous, isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in three dimensions. We generalize the formalism that has been developed for analogous studies of time-dependent structure functions in fluid turbulence to MHD. By carrying out detailed numerical studies of such time-dependent structure functions in a shell model for three-dimensional MHD turbulence, we obtain both equal-time and dynamic scaling exponents.

  1. Numerical simulation of MHD duct flow about laminar and turbulence model%磁流体管流的层流与湍流模型数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯俊; 毛洁; 潘华辰

    2013-01-01

    采用FLUENT软件分别对外加均匀横向磁场的等截面三维充分发展液态金属管流的层流模型和低雷诺数湍流Lam/Bremhost(LB)模型进行了数值模拟,分析了外加磁场对普通方管LB模型速度分布和压降的影响.比较在相同哈特曼数下,层流和湍流模型方管截面上速度分布和管道中MHD压降.其中,对电流的计算采用磁感应方程来求得.数值模拟结果证明了用低雷诺数LB湍流模型解决方管磁流体流动的可行性.通过层流模型和湍流模型的对比可知,层流模型有较短的入口长度,但管内流体的压降却很大;而湍流模型管内速度更加平均化,管内压降较小,但管内入口长度较长.%The numerical analysis of full-developed flow of a liquid metal in a rectangular duct of constant cross-section with a uniform transverse magnetic field was proceeded in laminar and low-Reynolds number Lam/Bremhost turbulence model (for short LB model) using FLUENT software. The paper analyzed the influence of external magnetic field for velocity distribution and MHD pressure drop in turbulence model. Under the same Hartmann number conductions, the paper compared the velocity distribution and MHD pressure drop of laminar model and turbulent model. The solution of current density was obtained by means of induced magnetic field formulation. The result of numerical simulation proved that this was a feasible scheme to use the low-Reynolds LB turbulence model to calculate MHD duct flow. Comparison between laminar model and turbulent model show that laminar model made shorter entrance length, but the pressure drop in the duct increased. Turbulent model had more average speed and smaller pressure drop, but entrance length was longer.

  2. On the All-Speed Roe-type Scheme for Large Eddy Simulation of Homogeneous Decaying Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xue-song

    2015-01-01

    As the representative of the shock-capturing scheme, the Roe scheme fails to LES because important turbulent characteristics cannot be reproduced such as the famous k-5/3 spectral law owing to large numerical dissipation. In this paper, the Roe scheme is divided into five parts: , , , , and , which means basic upwind dissipation, pressure-difference-driven and velocity-difference-driven modification of the interface fluxes and pressure, respectively. Then, the role of each part on LES is investigated by homogeneous decaying turbulence. The results show that the parts , , and have little effect on LES. It is important especially for because it is necessary for computation stability. The large numerical dissipation is due to and , and each of them has much larger dissipation than SGS dissipation. According to these understanding, an improved all-speed LES-Roe scheme is proposed, which can give enough good LES results for even coarse grid resolution with usually adopted reconstruction.

  3. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  4. Phenomenology of non-Alfvenic turbulence in a uniformly expanding medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    Transport and decay of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a weakly inhomogeneous uniformly expanding medium involves a fairly complex formalism, even for the case where no spectral information is required. Here we argue that the phenomenology for decay simplifies greatly if: (1) the cross helicity (Alfvenicity) is small, (2) the dynamical influence of the large scale magnetic field is negligible either because of spectral anisotropy or because the expansion speed is much greater than the corresponding Alfven speed, and (3) the ratio of kinetic energy to magnetic energy for the fluctuations is either unity or some other constant. These conditions are acceptable as an approximation to solar wind turbulence in the outer heliosphere. In these circumstances a reasonable MHD energy-containing phenomenology is essentially that of locally homogeneous Kolmogoroff turbulence in a uniformly expanding medium. Analytical solutions for this model are presented for both undriven and driven cases.

  5. Turbulence in weakly-ionized proto-planetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Flock, M; Klahr, H

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the characteristic properties of self-sustained MRI turbulence in low-ionized proto-planetary disks. We study the transition regime between active and dead-zone, performing 3D global non-ideal MHD simulations of stratified disk covering range of magnetic Reynolds number between 2700 5000 with a strength of alpha ~ 0.01. Below Rm < 5000 the MRI starts to decay at the midplane, having Elsasser numbers below one. We find a transition regime between 3300 < Rm < 5000 where the MRI turbulence is still sustained but damped. At around Rm < 3000 the MRI turbulence decays but could reestablished due to the accumulation of toroidal magnetic field or the radial transport of magnetic field from the active region. Below Rm < 3000 the MRI cannot be sustained and is decaying. Here hydro-dynamical motions, like density waves dominate. We observe anti-cyclonic vortices in the transition between dead-zone and active zone.

  6. The effect of the polymer relaxation time on the nonlinear energy cas- cade and dissipation of statistically steady and decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pedro C.; da Silva, Carlos B.; Pinho, Fernando T.

    2013-11-01

    We report a numerical study of statistically steady and decaying turbulence of FENE-P fluids for varying polymer relaxation times ranging from the Kolmogorov dissipation time-scale to the eddy turnover time. The total turbulent kinetic energy dissipation is shown to increase with the polymer relaxation time in both steady and decaying turbulence, implying a ``drag increase.'' If the total power input in the statistically steady case is kept equal in the Newtonian and the viscoelastic simulations the increase in the turbulence-polymer energy transfer naturally lead to the previously reported depletion of the Newtonian, but not the overall, kinetic energy dissipation. The modifications to the nonlinear energy cascade with varying Deborah/Weissenberg numbers are quantified and their origins investigated. The authors acknowledge the financial support from Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia under grant PTDC/EME-MFE/113589/2009.

  7. Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate in homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Berera, Arjun; Goldstraw, Erin E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ for stationary and nonstationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the presence of external forces. By combining with previous studies for freely decaying MHD turbulence, we obtain here both the most general model equation for Cɛ applicable to homogeneous MHD turbulence and a comprehensive numerical study of the Reynolds number dependence of the dimensionless total energy dissipation rate at unity magnetic Prandtl number. We carry out a series of medium to high resolution direct numerical simulations of mechanically forced stationary MHD turbulence in order to verify the predictions of the model equation for the stationary case. Furthermore, questions of nonuniversality are discussed in terms of the effect of external forces as well as the level of cross- and magnetic helicity. The measured values of the asymptote Cɛ ,∞ lie between 0.193 ≤Cɛ ,∞≤0.268 for free decay, where the value depends on the initial level of cross- and magnetic helicities. In the stationary case we measure Cɛ ,∞=0.223 .

  8. A numerical study of the alpha model for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A G

    2004-01-01

    We explore some consequences of the ``alpha model,'' also called the ``Lagrangian-averaged'' model, for two-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. This model is an extension of the smoothing procedure in fluid dynamics which filters velocity fields locally while leaving their associated vorticities unsmoothed, and has proved useful for high Reynolds number turbulence computations. We consider several known effects (selective decay, dynamic alignment, inverse cascades, and the probability distribution functions of fluctuating turbulent quantities) in magnetofluid turbulence and compare the results of numerical solutions of the primitive MHD equations with their alpha-model counterparts' performance for the same flows, in regimes where available resolution is adequate to explore both. The hope is to justify the use of the alpha model in regimes that lie outside currently available resolution, as will be the case in particular in three-dimensional geometry or for magnetic Prandtl number...

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research results concerning forced, dissipative, rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence will be discussed. In particular, we present new results from long-time Fourier method (periodic box) simulations in which forcing contains varying amounts of magnetic and kinetic helicity. Numerical results indicate that if MHD turbulence is forced so as to produce a state of relatively constant energy, then the largest-scale components are dominant and quasistationary, and in fact, have an effective dipole moment vector that aligns closely with the rotation axis. The relationship of this work to established results in ideal MHD turbulence, as well as to models of MHD turbulence in a spherical shell will also be presented. These results appear to be very pertinent to understanding the Geodynamo and the origin of its dominant dipole component. Our conclusion is that MHD turbulence, per se, may well contain the origin of the Earth's dipole magnetic field.

  10. Resistive MHD jet simulations with large resistivity

    CERN Document Server

    Cemeljic, Miljenko; Vlahakis, Nektarios; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2009-01-01

    Axisymmetric resistive MHD simulations for radially self-similar initial conditions are performed, using the NIRVANA code. The magnetic diffusivity could occur in outflows above an accretion disk, being transferred from the underlying disk into the disk corona by MHD turbulence (anomalous turbulent diffusivity), or as a result of ambipolar diffusion in partially ionized flows. We introduce, in addition to the classical magnetic Reynolds number Rm, which measures the importance of resistive effects in the induction equation, a new number Rb, which measures the importance of the resistive effects in the energy equation. We find two distinct regimes of solutions in our simulations. One is the low-resistivity regime, in which results do not differ much from ideal-MHD solutions. In the high-resistivity regime, results seem to show some periodicity in time-evolution, and depart significantly from the ideal-MHD case. Whether this departure is caused by numerical or physical reasons is of considerable interest for nu...

  11. Error-landscape-based multi-objective calibration of the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity using high-Reynolds-number decaying turbulence data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles; Geurts, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    A suite of large-eddy simulation(LESs) of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers is performed and compared to wind-tunnel experiments in the tradition of Comte-Bellot and Corrsin. The error-landscape approach is used for the evaluation of the Smagorinsky model, and the re

  12. Wave turbulence in magnetized plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galtier

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the recent progress on wave turbulence for magnetized plasmas (MHD, Hall MHD and electron MHD in the incompressible and compressible cases. The emphasis is made on homogeneous and anisotropic turbulence which usually provides the best theoretical framework to investigate space and laboratory plasmas. The solar wind and the coronal heating problems are presented as two examples of application of anisotropic wave turbulence. The most important results of wave turbulence are reported and discussed in the context of natural and simulated magnetized plasmas. Important issues and possible spurious interpretations are also discussed.

  13. Measurement of modulation induced by interaction between bubble motion and liquid-phase motion in the decaying turbulence formed by an oscillating-grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuyuki Nagami; Takayuki Saito

    2013-01-01

    In multiphase flows,dynamical gas-liquid interactions are essential for in-depth understanding of their multi-scale phenomena and complicated structures.The purpose of the present study is to clearly extract the modulation in bubble motion and liquid motion induced by bubble-liquid interaction and to discuss the relations between bubble motion and liquid-phase motion.For this particular purpose,the decaying turbulence formed in a cylindrical acrylic pipe (diameter 149 mm,height 600 mm) by using an oscillatinggrid was employed.Uniform single bubbles were launched from an in-house bubble launching device into the decaying turbulence.By comparing the bubble motion in the stagnant water with that in the oscillating-grid decaying turbulence,the transition of the 2D bubble motion (i.e.,zigzagging motion)to 3D motion was enhanced in the latter.In addition,the initial conditions of the bubble motion that was not influenced by the ambient turbulence were carefully confirmed.In the area where the bubble motion started to translate from 2D motion into 3D motion,the modulation of ambient liquid-phase motion was obtained by PIV/LIF measurement.By combining these results,we quantitatively discussed the modulation of the bubble motion and ambient liquid-phase motion and considered the dominant factor for the enhancement to be the bubble-liquid interaction.

  14. Molecular Tracers of Turbulent Shocks in Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Pon, A; Kaufman, M J

    2012-01-01

    Giant molecular clouds contain supersonic turbulence and simulations of MHD turbulence show that these supersonic motions decay in roughly a crossing time, which is less than the estimated lifetimes of molecular clouds. Such a situation requires a significant release of energy. We run models of C-type shocks propagating into gas with densities around 10^3 cm^(-3) at velocities of a few km / s, appropriate for the ambient conditions inside of a molecular cloud, to determine which species and transitions dominate the cooling and radiative energy release associated with shock cooling of turbulent molecular clouds. We find that these shocks dissipate their energy primarily through CO rotational transitions and by compressing pre-existing magnetic fields. We present model spectra for these shocks and by combining these models with estimates for the rate of turbulent energy dissipation, we show that shock emission should dominate over emission from unshocked gas for mid to high rotational transitions (J >5) of CO. ...

  15. Detrended analysis of Reynolds stress in a decaying turbulent flow in a wind tunnel with active grids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄永祥; 卢志明

    2014-01-01

    Multi-scale properties of Reynolds stress in decaying turbulence in a wind tunnel with high Reynolds number are investi-gated. Two filtering techniques i.e., the zeroth-order and first-order detrending methods are applied to the two velocity components, where the local mean value (resp. local linear trend) is removed in the former (latter) technique. Some basic statistics for thirty mea-surements show that the variation is very large at first two locations and relatively small at last two locations. Moderately good power law is found for the mean value of local Reynolds stress at last three measurement locations with scaling exponents approxi-mately being 1.0 and a dual power law exists for the mean value of standard deviation of local Reynolds stress at all four measureme-nt locations with scaling exponents being 0.53 and 0.58 for zeroth-and first-order filtering respectively. Present results about local Reynolds stress are useful to build and evaluate the model of sub-grid Reynolds stress in large eddy simulations.

  16. Turbulence, selective decay, and merging in the SSX plasma wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Tim; Brown, Michael; Flanagan, Ken; Werth, Alexandra; Lukin, V.

    2012-10-01

    A helical, relaxed plasma state has been observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder has dimensions L = 1 m and R = 0.08 m. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v >=50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. Typical plasma parameters are Ti= 25 eV, ne>=10^15 cm-3, and B = 0.25 T. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1--2 axial Alfv'en times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data is favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibits broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement to the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇xB = λB. While the global structure roughly corresponds to the minimum energy eigenstate for the wind tunnel geometry, the plasma is high beta (β= 0.5) and does not have a flat λ profile. Merging of two plasmoids in this configuration results in noticeably more dynamic activity compared to a single plasmoid. These episodes of activity exhibit s

  17. von K\\'arm\\'an energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, P; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-01-01

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von K\\'arm\\'an hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics (MHD). Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitude the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in large amplitude turbulence regime.

  18. A new class of finite element variational multiscale turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sondak, David; Oberai, Assad A; Pawlowski, Roger P; Cyr, Eric C; Smith, Tom M

    2014-01-01

    New large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) derived from the variational multiscale (VMS) formulation for finite element simulations are introduced. The new models include the variational multiscale formulation, a residual-based eddy viscosity model, and a mixed model that combines both of these component models. Each model contains terms that are proportional to the residual of the incompressible MHD equations and is therefore numerically consistent. Moreover, each model is also dynamic, in that its effect vanishes when this residual is small. The new models are tested on the decaying MHD Taylor Green vortex at low and high Reynolds numbers. The evaluation of the models is based on comparisons with available data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the time evolution of energies as well as energy spectra at various discrete times. A numerical study, on a sequence of meshes, is presented that demonstrates that the large eddy simulation approaches the ...

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic flow and turbulence: a report on the fifth Beer-Sheva seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branover, H.; Moffatt, H.K.; Mond, M.; Pierson, E.S.; Sulem, P.S.; Yakhot, A.

    1988-03-01

    This paper is a summary of the Fifth Beer-Sheva Seminar on Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Flows and Turbulence, held in Jerusalem during 2-6 March 1987, with 99 participants from 12 countries. Reviews and research papers were presented on general problems of turbulence. MHD turbulence, fundamental MHD, two-phase flows with and without magnetic fields, and on different applications of liquid-metal MHD, especially in power generation nuclear fission and fusion, and in metallurgy.

  20. Large-scale magnetic structure formation in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Müller, Wolf-Christian [Max-Planck Institute for Plasmaphysics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-11-20

    The inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D-MHD) turbulence is believed to be one of the processes responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in astrophysical systems. In this work, we present an exhaustive set of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of both forced and decaying 3D-MHD turbulence, to understand this structure formation process. It is first shown that an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in small-scale driven turbulence does not necessarily generate coherent large-scale magnetic structures. The observed large-scale magnetic field, in this case, is severely perturbed by magnetic fluctuations generated by the small-scale forcing. In the decaying case, coherent large-scale structures form similarly to those observed astronomically. Based on the numerical results, the formation of large-scale magnetic structures in some astrophysical systems is suggested to be the consequence of an initial forcing that imparts the necessary turbulent energy into the system, which, after the forcing shuts off, decays to form the large-scale structures. This idea is supported by representative examples, e.g., clusters of galaxies.

  1. A FOUR-FLUID MHD MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND/INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM INTERACTION WITH TURBULENCE TRANSPORT AND PICKUP PROTONS AS SEPARATE FLUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, Melvyn L., E-mail: arcadi.usmanov@nasa.gov [Code 672, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    We have developed a four-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. The unique features of the model are: (a) a three-fluid description for the charged components of the solar wind and interstellar plasmas (thermal protons, electrons, and pickup protons), (b) the built-in turbulence transport equations based on Reynolds decomposition and coupled with the mean-flow Reynolds-averaged equations, and (c) a solar corona/solar wind model that supplies inner boundary conditions at 40 au by computing solar wind and magnetic field parameters outward from the coronal base. The three charged species are described by separate energy equations and are assumed to move with the same velocity. The fourth fluid in the model is the interstellar hydrogen which is treated by separate continuity, momentum, and energy equations and is coupled with the charged components through photoionization and charge exchange. We evaluate the effects of turbulence transport and pickup protons on the global heliospheric structure and compute the distribution of plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence parameters throughout the heliosphere for representative solar minimum and maximum conditions. We compare our results with Voyager 1 observations in the outer heliosheath and show that the relative amplitude of magnetic fluctuations just outside the heliopause is in close agreement with the value inferred from Voyager 1 measurements by Burlaga et al. The simulated profiles of magnetic field parameters in the outer heliosheath are in qualitative agreement with the Voyager 1 observations and with the analytical model of magnetic field draping around the heliopause of Isenberg et al.

  2. Turbulence and dynamo interlinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Santos-Lima, R.; Kowal, G.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2013-07-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  3. Turbulence and Dynamo Interlinks

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal

    2013-01-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  4. Shell Models of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Plunian, Franck; Frick, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accu...

  5. LES investigation of the transport and decay of various-strengths wake vortices in ground effect and subjected to a turbulent crosswind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricteux, L.; Duponcheel, M.; De Visscher, I.; Winckelmans, G.

    2016-06-01

    This study is concerned with the investigation of two-vortex systems (2VS) of various strengths that are released near the ground and evolve in the presence of a turbulent crosswind. We analyze the physics of the vortices interactions with the turbulent wind and with the ground during the rebound phase, and that lead to the fully developed turbulent flow and interactions. The transport and decay of the vortices are also analyzed. The turbulent wind itself is obtained by direct numerical simulation using a half channel flow. The flow is then supplemented with the 2VS, using vortices with a circulation distribution that is representative of vortices after roll-up of a near wake. The vortex strengths, Γ0, are such that ReΓ = Γ0/ν = 2.0 × 104 for the baseline; there is then a case with twice weaker vortices, and a case with twice stronger vortices. The simulations are run in wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulation (LES) mode. The baseline is in line with the wall-resolved LES study of a similar case [A. Stephan et al., "Aircraft wake-vortex decay in ground proximity - Physical mechanisms and artificial enhancement," J. Aircr. 50(4), 1250-1260 (2013)]. They highlighted the significant effect that the near-wall streaks of the wind have on the development of instabilities in the secondary vortices, and the ensuing turbulence. Our analysis complements theirs by also showing the significant effect that the wind turbulent structures, away from the ground and that are stretched by the primary vortices, also have on the destabilization of the secondary vortices. Comparisons are also made with the most recent study [F. N. Holzäpfel et al., "Wind impact on single vortices and counter-rotating vortex pairs in ground proximity," in 7th AIAA Atmospheric and Space Environments Conference, AIAA Aviation (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2015)], where ReΓ = 2.0 × 104 for all cases and where it is the wind intensity that is varied. Diagnostics on the vortex

  6. Comparing Numerical Methods for Isothermal Magnetized Supersonic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsuk, Alexei G.; Nordlund, Åke; Collins, David; Padoan, Paolo; Norman, Michael L.; Abel, Tom; Banerjee, Robi; Federrath, Christoph; Flock, Mario; Lee, Dongwook; Li, Pak Shing; Müller, Wolf-Christian; Teyssier, Romain; Ustyugov, Sergey D.; Vogel, Christian; Xu, Hao

    2011-08-01

    Many astrophysical applications involve magnetized turbulent flows with shock waves. Ab initio star formation simulations require a robust representation of supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds on a wide range of scales imposing stringent demands on the quality of numerical algorithms. We employ simulations of supersonic super-Alfvénic turbulence decay as a benchmark test problem to assess and compare the performance of nine popular astrophysical MHD methods actively used to model star formation. The set of nine codes includes: ENZO, FLASH, KT-MHD, LL-MHD, PLUTO, PPML, RAMSES, STAGGER, and ZEUS. These applications employ a variety of numerical approaches, including both split and unsplit, finite difference and finite volume, divergence preserving and divergence cleaning, a variety of Riemann solvers, and a range of spatial reconstruction and time integration techniques. We present a comprehensive set of statistical measures designed to quantify the effects of numerical dissipation in these MHD solvers. We compare power spectra for basic fields to determine the effective spectral bandwidth of the methods and rank them based on their relative effective Reynolds numbers. We also compare numerical dissipation for solenoidal and dilatational velocity components to check for possible impacts of the numerics on small-scale density statistics. Finally, we discuss the convergence of various characteristics for the turbulence decay test and the impact of various components of numerical schemes on the accuracy of solutions. The nine codes gave qualitatively the same results, implying that they are all performing reasonably well and are useful for scientific applications. We show that the best performing codes employ a consistently high order of accuracy for spatial reconstruction of the evolved fields, transverse gradient interpolation, conservation law update step, and Lorentz force computation. The best results are achieved with divergence-free evolution of the

  7. Small-scale behavior of Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarz, Julia E; Pouquet, Annick

    2015-12-01

    Decaying Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) turbulence is studied using three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulations with grids up to 768(3) points and two different types of initial conditions. Results are compared to analogous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) runs and both Laplacian and Laplacian-squared dissipative operators are examined. At scales below the ion inertial length, the ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy as a function of wave number transitions to a magnetically dominated state. The transition in behavior is associated with the advection term in the momentum equation becoming subdominant to dissipation. Examination of autocorrelation functions reveals that, while current and vorticity structures are similarly sized in MHD, HMHD current structures are narrower and vorticity structures are wider. The electric field autocorrelation function is significantly narrower in HMHD than in MHD and is similar to the HMHD current autocorrelation function at small separations. HMHD current structures are found to be significantly more intense than in MHD and appear to have an enhanced association with strong alignment between the current and magnetic field, which may be important in collisionless plasmas where field-aligned currents can be unstable. When hyperdiffusivity is used, a longer region consistent with a k(-7/3) scaling is present for right-polarized fluctuations when compared to Laplacian dissipation runs.

  8. Comparison of the lattice Boltzmann equation and discrete unified gas-kinetic scheme methods for direct numerical simulation of decaying turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Lian-Ping; Guo, Zhaoli

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this work is to perform a detailed comparison of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) and the recently developed discrete unified gas-kinetic scheme (DUGKS) methods for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the Kida vortex flow in a periodic box. The flow fields and key statistical quantities computed by both methods are compared with those from the pseudospectral method at both low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The results show that the LBE is more accurate and efficient than the DUGKS, but the latter has a superior numerical stability, particularly for high Reynolds number flows. In addition, we conclude that the DUGKS can adequately resolve the flow when the minimum spatial resolution parameter k_{max}η>3, where k_{max} is the maximum resolved wave number and η is the flow Kolmogorov length. This resolution requirement can be contrasted with the requirements of k_{max}η>1 for the pseudospectral method and k_{max}η>2 for the LBE. It should be emphasized that although more validations should be conducted before the DUGKS can be called a viable tool for DNS of turbulent flows, the present work contributes to the overall assessment of the DUGKS, and it provides a basis for further applications of DUGKS in studying the physics of turbulent flows.

  9. Comparison of the lattice Boltzmann equation and discrete unified gas-kinetic scheme methods for direct numerical simulation of decaying turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Lian-Ping; Guo, Zhaoli

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this work is to perform a detailed comparison of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) and the recently developed discrete unified gas-kinetic scheme (DUGKS) methods for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the Kida vortex flow in a periodic box. The flow fields and key statistical quantities computed by both methods are compared with those from the pseudospectral method at both low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The results show that the LBE is more accurate and efficient than the DUGKS, but the latter has a superior numerical stability, particularly for high Reynolds number flows. In addition, we conclude that the DUGKS can adequately resolve the flow when the minimum spatial resolution parameter kmaxη >3 , where kmax is the maximum resolved wave number and η is the flow Kolmogorov length. This resolution requirement can be contrasted with the requirements of kmaxη >1 for the pseudospectral method and kmaxη >2 for the LBE. It should be emphasized that although more validations should be conducted before the DUGKS can be called a viable tool for DNS of turbulent flows, the present work contributes to the overall assessment of the DUGKS, and it provides a basis for further applications of DUGKS in studying the physics of turbulent flows.

  10. One- and two-point velocity distribution functions and velocity autocorrelation functions for various Reynolds numbers in decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Iwao

    2007-01-01

    A decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence is treated on the combined bases of the Kolmogorov hypothesis and the cross-independence hypothesis (for a closure of the Monin-Lundgren (ML) hierarchy of many-point velocity distributions) in turbulence. Similarity solutions for one- and two-point velocity distributions are obtained in the viscous, inertial and large-scale ranges of separation distance, from which we can give a reasonable picture of longitudinal and transverse velocity autocorrelation functions for any Reynolds number, even though they are distant from exact solutions of the infinite ML hierarchy. Possibility of non-similarity solutions with other reasonable and more realistic features is unveiled within the same theoretical framework. The cross-independence hypothesis is proved to be inconsistent with the Kolmogorov [1941b. Dissipation of energy in locally isotropic turbulence. Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 32, 16-18.] theory in the inertial range. This is the main factor by which our special strategy (described in Introduction) is taken for solving this problem.

  11. Nonlinear evolution of parallel propagating Alfven waves: Vlasov - MHD simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Nariyuki, Y; Kumashiro, T; Hada, T

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of circularly polarized Alfv\\'en waves are discussed by using the recently developed Vlasov-MHD code, which is a generalized Landau-fluid model. The numerical results indicate that as far as the nonlinearity in the system is not so large, the Vlasov-MHD model can validly solve time evolution of the Alfv\\'enic turbulence both in the linear and nonlinear stages. The present Vlasov-MHD model is proper to discuss the solar coronal heating and solar wind acceleration by Alfve\\'n waves propagating from the photosphere.

  12. Planetary migration in weakly magnetized turbulent discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruteau, C.; Fromang, S.; Nelson, R. P.; Masset, F.

    2011-12-01

    In laminar viscous disc models, the migration of protoplanets embedded in their nascent protoplanetary discs may be directed inwards or outwards, depending on the relative magnitude of the Lindblad and corotation torques. The long-term evolution of the corotation torque is intimately related to diffusion processes inside the planet's horseshoe region. This communication examines the properties of the corotation torque in discs where magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence develops as a result of the magnetorotational instability (MRI), considering a weak initial toroidal magnetic field. We show that the differential Lindblad torque takes very similar values in MHD turbulent and laminar viscous discs, and there exists an unsaturated corotation torque in MHD turbulent discs.

  13. MHD Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Aerospace Applications, AIAA-Paper 96-2355, New Orleans, 1996 2. V.A.Bityurin, A.N.Bocharov, J.Lineberry, MHD Aerospace Applications, Invited Lecture ...Paper 2003- 4303, Orlando, FL 8. V.A.Bityurin, Prospective of MHD Interaction in Hypersonic and Propulsion Technologies, In: von Karman Series : Lectures ...Efforts in MHD AeoSpace Applications, In: von Karman Series : Lectures , Introduction of Magneto-Fluid Dynamics for AeroSpace Applications, von Karman

  14. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent liquid metal flow entering a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albets-Chico, X., E-mail: xalbets@ucy.ac.cy; Grigoriadis, D.G.E.; Votyakov, E.V.; Kassinos, S.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of turbulence persistence of fully developed MHD pipe flow at Re{sub b} = 4000. • Turbulence decay of fully developed turbulence flow entering low, moderate and strong magnetic fields. • Analysis of the wall conductivity on the aforementioned phenomena. • Discovering and further analysis of flow instabilities of the flow entering a strong magnetic field. -- Abstract: This paper presents direct numerical simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulent liquid-metal flow in a circular duct entering a magnetic field. The case of a magnetohydrodynamic flow leaving a strong magnetic field has been extensively studied experimentally and numerically owing to its similarity to typical flow configurations appearing in liquid metal blankets of nuclear fusion reactors. Although also relevant to the design of fusion reactor blankets, the flow entering the fringing field of a magnet remains unexplored because its high intricacy precludes any simplification of the governing equations. Indeed, the complexity of the magnetohydrodynamic–turbulence interaction can only be analysed by direct numerical simulations or experiments. With that purpose, this paper addresses the case of a fully developed turbulent flow (Re{sub τ} ≈ 520) entering low, intermediate and strong magnetic fields under electrically insulating and poorly conducting walls by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. Purely hydrodynamic computations (without the effect of the magnetic field) reveal an excellent agreement against previous experimental and numerical results. Current MHD results provide a very detailed information of the turbulence decay and reveal new three-dimensional features related to liquid-metal flow entering strong increasing magnetic fields, such as flow instabilities due to the effect of the Lorentz forces within the fringing region at high Ha numbers.

  15. Nonlinear Terms of MHD Equations for Homogeneous Magnetized Shear Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, Z D; Hristov, T S; Mishonov, T M

    2011-01-01

    We have derived the full set of MHD equations for incompressible shear flow of a magnetized fluid and considered their solution in the wave-vector space. The linearized equations give the famous amplification of slow magnetosonic waves and describe the magnetorotational instability. The nonlinear terms in our analysis are responsible for the creation of turbulence and self-sustained spectral density of the MHD (Alfven and pseudo-Alfven) waves. Perspectives for numerical simulations of weak turbulence and calculation of the effective viscosity of accretion disks are shortly discussed in k-space.

  16. INVERSE CASCADE OF NONHELICAL MAGNETIC TURBULENCE IN A RELATIVISTIC FLUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zrake, Jonathan [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The free decay of nonhelical relativistic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is studied numerically, and found to exhibit cascading of magnetic energy toward large scales. Evolution of the magnetic energy spectrum P{sub M} (k, t) is self-similar in time and well modeled by a broken power law with subinertial and inertial range indices very close to 7/2 and –2, respectively. The magnetic coherence scale is found to grow in time as t {sup 2/5}, much too slow to account for optical polarization of gamma-ray burst afterglow emission if magnetic energy is to be supplied only at microphysical length scales. No bursty or explosive energy loss is observed in relativistic MHD turbulence having modest magnetization, which constrains magnetic reconnection models for rapid time variability of GRB prompt emission, blazars, and the Crab nebula.

  17. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: dynamics and turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k(1)=k(2) do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade [proportionality]k(-2). The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic flows and turbulence: a report on the Fourth Beer-Sheva seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branover, H.; Mond, M. (Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pierson, E.S. (Purdue Univ. Calumet, Hammond, IN (USA)); Walker, J.S. (Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA))

    1984-11-01

    This paper is a summary of the Fourth Beer-Sheva Seminar on Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Flows and Turbulence held in Israel during 27 February-2 March 1984 with 67 participants from 13 countries. Reviews and contributed papers were presented on laminar and turbulent single-phase and two-phase MHD flows, turbulent and two-phase flows without magnetic fields, and applications of MHD in power generation, in nuclear fission and fusion and in metallurgy.

  19. Homogeneous turbulence theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bershadskii, A.G.

    1985-06-01

    An exact solution for the nonlinear problem of the spectral energy function of a homogeneous turbulence is derived under the assumption that energy transfer under the effect of inertial forces is determined mainly by the interactions among vortices whose wavenumbers are only slightly different from each other. The results are experimentally verified for turbulence behind grids. Similar problems are solved for MHD turbulence and for a nonstationary spectral energy function. It is shown that at the initial stage of degeneration, the spectral energy function is little influenced by the Stewart number; this agrees with experimental data for the damping of longitudinal velocity pulsations behind a grid in a longitudinal magnetic field. 15 references.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann Large Eddy Simulation Model of MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Flint, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The work of Ansumali \\textit{et al.}\\cite{Ansumali} is extended to Two Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in which energy is cascaded to small spatial scales and thus requires subgrid modeling. Applying large eddy simulation (LES) modeling of the macroscopic fluid equations results in the need to apply ad-hoc closure schemes. LES is applied to a suitable mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann representation from which one can recover the MHD equations in the long wavelength, long time scale Chapman-Enskog limit (i.e., the Knudsen limit). Thus on first performing filter width expansions on the lattice Boltzmann equations followed by the standard small Knudsen expansion on the filtered lattice Boltzmann system results in a closed set of MHD turbulence equations provided we enforce the physical constraint that the subgrid effects first enter the dynamics at the transport time scales. In particular, a multi-time relaxation collision operator is considered for the density distribution function and a single rel...

  1. Dynamos and MHD theory of turbulence suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 87, Kasuga 810- 8580 (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2004-03-01

    Characteristics of electrically conducting media are reviewed from the macroscopic viewpoint based on mean-field magnetohydrodynamics, while being compared using the methodology and knowledge in fluid mechanics. The themes covered in this review range from the mechanism of generating stellar magnetic fields (dynamo) to transport properties in fusion. The primary concern here is to see the characteristics common to these apparently different phenomena, within the framework of the mean-field theory. Owing to the intrinsic limitation of the approach, the present discussions are limited more or less to specific aspects of phenomena. They are supplemented with reference to theoretical, numerical, and observational approaches intrinsic to each theme. In the description of dynamo phenomena, emphasis is laid on the cross helicity dynamo. Features common to stellar magnetic-field generation and the rotational-motion drive in toroidal plasmas are illustrated on this basis. (topical review)

  2. Three-dimensional fluid and electrodynamic modeling for MHD DCW channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B. L.; Lineberry, J. T.; Schmidt, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A three dimensional, numerical solution for modeling diagonal conducting wall (DCW) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generators is developed and discussed. Cross plane gasdynamic and electrodynamic profiles are computed considering coupled MHD flow and electrical phenomena. A turbulent transport model based on the mixing length theory is used to deal with wall roughness generated turbulence effects. The infinitely fine electrode segmentation formulation is applied to simplify the governing electrical equations. Calculations show the development of distorted temperature and velocity profiles under influence of magnetohydrodynamic interaction. Since both sidewall and electrode wall boundary losses are treated, the results furnish a realistic representation of MHD generator behavior.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore College, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 19081 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations E{sub B}(f). We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  4. Nonlocal bottleneck effect in two-dimensional turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biskamp, D; Schwarz, E

    1998-01-01

    The bottleneck pileup in the energy spectrum is investigated for several two-dimensional (2D) turbulence systems by numerical simulation using high-order diffusion terms to amplify the effect, which is weak for normal diffusion. For 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, 2D electron MHD (EMHD) turbulence and 2D thermal convection, which all exhibit direct energy cascades, a nonlocal behavior is found resulting in a logarithmic enhancement of the spectrum.

  5. Simple MHD Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    In this lecture we will examine some simple examples of MHD equilibrium configurations. These will all be in cylindrical geometry. They form the basis for more complicated equilibrium states in toroidal geometry.

  6. Polarimetric studies of magnetic turbulence with interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-01-01

    We study statistical properties of synchrotron polarization emitted from media with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We use both synthetic and MHD turbulence simulation data for our studies. We obtain the spatial spectrum and its derivative with respect to wavelength of synchrotron polarization arising from both synchrotron radiation and Faraday rotation fluctuations. In particular, we investigate how the spectrum changes with frequency. We find that our simulations agree with the theoretical predication in Lazarian \\& Pogosyan (2016). We conclude that the spectrum of synchrotron polarization and it derivative can be very informative tools to get detailed information about the statistical properties of MHD turbulence from radio observations of diffuse synchrotron polarization. Especially, they are useful to recover the statistics of turbulent magnetic field as well as turbulent density of electrons. We also simulate interferometric observations that incorporate the effects of noise and finite telesco...

  7. MHD equilibria with diamagnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarotto, M.; Zorat, R.; Johnson, J. L.; White, R. B.

    1997-11-01

    An outstanding issue in magnetic confinement is the establishment of MHD equilibria with enhanced flow shear profiles for which turbulence (and transport) may be locally effectively suppressed or at least substantially reduced with respect to standard weak turbulence models. Strong flows develop in the presence of equilibrium E× B-drifts produced by a strong radial electric field, as well as due to diamagnetic contributions produced by steep equilibrium radial profiles of number density, temperature and the flow velocity itself. In the framework of a kinetic description, this generally requires the construction of guiding-center variables correct to second order in the relevant expansion parameter. For this purpose, the Lagrangian approach developed recently by Tessarotto et al. [1] is adopted. In this paper the conditions of existence of such equilibria are analyzed and their basic physical properties are investigated in detail. 1 - M. Pozzo, M. Tessarotto and R. Zorat, in Theory of fusion Plasmas, E.Sindoni et al. eds. (Societá Italiana di Fisica, Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1996), p.295.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamics turbulence: An astronomical perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sridhar

    2011-07-01

    Early work on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the 1960s due, independently, to Iroshnikov and Kraichnan (IK) considered isotropic inertial-range spectra. Whereas laboratory experiments were not in a position to measure the spectral index, they showed that the turbulence was strongly anisotropic. Theoretical horizons correspondingly expanded in the 1980s, to accommodate both the isotropy of the IK theory and the anisotropy suggested by the experiments. Since the discovery of pulsars in 1967, many years of work on interstellar scintillation suggested that small-scale interstellar turbulence must have a hydromagnetic origin; but the IK spectrum was too flat and the ideas on anisotropic spectra too qualitative to explain the observations. In response, new theories of balanced MHD turbulence were proposed in the 1990s, which argued that the IK theory was incorrect, and made quantitative predictions of anisotropic inertial-range spectra; these theories have since found applications in many areas of astrophysics. Spacecraft measurements of solar-wind turbulence show that there is more power in Alfvén waves that travel away from the Sun than towards it. Theories of imbalanced MHD turbulence have now been proposed to address interplanetary turbulence. This very active area of research continues to be driven by astronomy.

  9. Turbulent Plasmoid Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Widmer, Fabien; Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    The plasmoid instability may lead to fast magnetic reconnection through long current sheets(CS). It is well known that large-Reynolds-number plasmas easily become turbulent. We address the question whether turbulence enhances the energy conversion rate of plasmoid-unstable current sheets. We carry out appropriate numerical MHD simulations, but resolving simultaneously the relevant large-scale (mean-) fields and the corresponding small-scale, turbulent, quantities by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) is not possible. Hence we investigate the influence of small scale turbulence on large scale MHD processes by utilizing a subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model. We verify the applicability of our SGS model and then use it to investigate the influence of turbulence on the plasmoid instability. We start the simulations with Harris-type and force-free CS equilibria in the presence of a finite guide field in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. We use the DNS results to investigate the growt...

  10. Statistical properties of transport in plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Garcia, O.E.; Nielsen, A.H.;

    2004-01-01

    The statistical properties of the particle flux in different types of plasma turbulence models are numerically investigated using probability distribution functions (PDFs). The physics included in the models range from two-dimensional drift wave turbulence to three-dimensional MHD dynamics...

  11. Resonant interactions of perturbations in MHD flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagalakov, A.M.; Shtern, V.N.

    1977-01-17

    The nonlinear theory of hydrodynamic stability differentiates three types of interactions: deformation of the initial velocity profile by Reynolds stress pulsations, multiplication of harmonics, and the resonant interaction of harmonics with dissimilar wave numbers and frequencies. This article analyzes an approach considering the first and third of these non-linear mechanisms, producing an acceptable approximation of the averaged characteristics of a developing pulsation movement, particularly the averaged turbulent velocity profile. The approach consists in analysis of triharmonic oscillations, the parameters of which satisfy the resonant relationships. A model of a triharmonic pulsation mode is studied which is applicable to MHD flows. It is shown in particular how a magnetic field transverse to the flow plane suppresses the resonant interaction of three-dimensional perturbations. This agrees with experimental studies on two-dimensional turbulence conducted earlier. 11 references, 3 figures.

  12. Nonlinear MHD dynamo operating at equipartition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archontis, V.; Dorch, Bertil; Nordlund, Åke

    2007-01-01

    Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy-equipartition a......Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy......-equipartition and a turbulent state. The generation and evolution of such strong magnetic fields is relevant for the understanding of dynamo action that occurs in stars and other astrophysical objects. Aims.We study the mode of operation of this dynamo, in the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. We also consider...... the effect of varying the magnetic and fluid Reymolds number on the non-linear behaviour of the system. Methods.We perform three-dimensional non-linear MHD simulations and visualization using a high resolution numerical scheme. Results.We find that this dynamo has a high growth rate in the linear regime...

  13. Turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in kinematic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: two-loop approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M; Remecký, R

    2011-10-01

    The turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in the framework of the kinematic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, where the magnetic field behaves as a passive vector field advected by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation, is calculated by the field theoretic renormalization group technique in the two-loop approximation. It is shown that the two-loop corrections to the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number in the kinematic MHD turbulence are less than 2% of its leading order value (the one-loop value) and, at the same time, the two-loop turbulent magnetic Prandtl number is the same as the two-loop turbulent Prandtl number obtained in the corresponding model of a passively advected scalar field. The dependence of the turbulent magnetic Prandtl number on the spatial dimension d is investigated and the source of the smallness of the two-loop corrections for spatial dimension d=3 is identified and analyzed.

  14. Turbulent General Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma flows with an MHD-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of General Magnetic Reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip-velocity source vector, which gives the rate of development of slip velocity per unit arc length of field line. The slip source vector is the ratio of the curl of the non ideal electric field in the Generalized Ohm's Law and the magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with magnetic null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of the quasi potential (integral of parallel electric field along field lines). In a turbulent inertial range the curl becomes extremely large while the parallel component is tiny, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution of this paradox is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial-range only in a weak sense which does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution i...

  15. Forced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in three dimensions using Taylor-Green symmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstulovic, G; Brachet, M E; Pouquet, A

    2014-04-01

    We examine the scaling laws of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence for three different types of forcing functions and imposing at all times the fourfold symmetries of the Taylor-Green (TG) vortex generalized to MHD; no uniform magnetic field is present and the magnetic Prandtl number is equal to unity. We also include pumping in the induction equation, and we take the three configurations studied in the decaying case in Lee et al. [Phys. Rev. E 81, 016318 (2010)]. To that effect, we employ direct numerical simulations up to an equivalent resolution of 20483 grid points. We find that, similarly to the case when the forcing is absent, different spectral indices for the total energy spectrum emerge, corresponding to either a Kolmogorov law, an Iroshnikov-Kraichnan law that arises from the interactions of turbulent eddies and Alfvén waves, or to weak turbulence when the large-scale magnetic field is strong. We also examine the inertial range dynamics in terms of the ratios of kinetic to magnetic energy, and of the turnover time to the Alfvén time, and analyze the temporal variations of these quasiequilibria.

  16. Using Coronal Hole Maps to Constrain MHD Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Ronald M.; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2017-08-01

    In this presentation, we explore the use of coronal hole maps (CHMs) as a constraint for thermodynamic MHD models of the solar corona. Using our EUV2CHM software suite (predsci.com/chd), we construct CHMs from SDO/AIA 193Å and STEREO-A/EUVI 195Å images for multiple Carrington rotations leading up to the August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse. We then contruct synoptic CHMs from synthetic EUV images generated from global thermodynamic MHD simulations of the corona for each rotation. Comparisons of apparent coronal hole boundaries and estimates of the net open flux are used to benchmark and constrain our MHD model leading up to the eclipse. Specifically, the comparisons are used to find optimal parameterizations of our wave turbulence dissipation (WTD) coronal heating model.

  17. Recent observations of MHD fluctuations in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    Full Text Available A short review of recent observations of solar wind fluctuations in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD range of scales is presented. In recent years, the use of high time-resolution data on an extended interval of heliocentric distance has allowed significant advances in our knowledge of MHD fluctuations. We first focus on the origin and evolution of the Alfvénic-type fluctuations. The role of interplanetary sources and the influence of interactions with structures convected by the solar wind are examined. Then compressive fluctuations are investigated, with special attention being given to their nature and origin. Observations are discussed in the light of recent theories and models. Finally, predictions for MHD turbulence in polar regions of the heliosphere are highlighted.

  18. Using Faraday Rotation to Probe MHD Instabilities in Intracluster Media

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanovic, Tamara; Massey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that conduction-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities may operate at all radii within an intracluster medium (ICM), and profoundly affect the structure of a cluster's magnetic field. Where MHD instabilities dominate the dynamics of an ICM, they will re-orient magnetic field lines perpendicular to the temperature gradient inside a cooling core, or parallel to the temperature gradient outside it. This characteristic structure of magnetic field could be probed by measurements of polarized radio emission from background sources. Motivated by this possibility we have constructed 3-d models of a magnetized cooling core cluster and calculated Faraday rotation measure (RM) maps in the plane of the sky under realistic observing conditions. We compare a scenario in which magnetic field geometry is characterized by conduction driven MHD instabilities to that where it is determined by the turbulent motions. We find that future high-sensitivity spectro-polarimetric measurements of R...

  19. Lectures in magnetohydrodynamics. With an appendix on extended MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. Physics

    2009-07-01

    This concise and self-contained primer is based on class-tested notes for an advanced graduate course in MHD. The broad areas chosen for presentation are the derivation and properties of the fundamental equations, equilibrium, waves and instabilities, self-organization, turbulence, and dynamos. The latter topics require the inclusion of the effects of resistivity and nonlinearity. Together, these span the range of MHD issues that have proven to be important for understanding magnetically confined plasmas as well as in some space and astrophysical applications. The combined length and style of the thirty-eight lectures are appropriate for complete presentation in a single semester. An extensive appendix on extended MHD is included as further reading. (orig.)

  20. Global Structure of Magnetorotationally Turbulent Protoplanetary Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Flaig, M; Kley, W; Kissmann, R

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to investigate the spatial structure of a protoplanetary disc whose dynamics is governed by magnetorotational turbulence. We perform a series of local 3D chemo-radiative MHD simulations located at different radii of a disc which is twice as massive as the standard minimum mass solar nebula of Hayashi (1981). The ionisation state of the disc is calculated by including collisional ionisation, stellar X-rays, cosmic rays and the decay of radionuclides as ionisation sources, and by solving a simplified chemical network which includes the effect of the absorption of free charges by {\\mu}m-sized dust grains. In the region where the ionisation is too low to assure good coupling between matter and magnetic fields, a non-turbulent central "dead zone" forms, which ranges approximately from a distance of 2 AU to 4 AU from the central star. The approach taken in the present work allows for the first time to derive the global spatial structure of a protoplanetary disc from a set of physical...

  1. Turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of solar wind turbulence from both the theoretical and observational perspective. It argues that the interplanetary medium offers the best opportunity to directly study turbulent fluctuations in collisionless plasmas. In fact, during expansion, the solar wind evolves towards a state characterized by large-amplitude fluctuations in all observed parameters, which resembles, at least at large scales, the well-known hydrodynamic turbulence. This text starts with historical references to past observations and experiments on turbulent flows. It then introduces the Navier-Stokes equations for a magnetized plasma whose low-frequency turbulence evolution is described within the framework of the MHD approximation. It also considers the scaling of plasma and magnetic field fluctuations and the study of nonlinear energy cascades within the same framework. It reports observations of turbulence in the ecliptic and at high latitude, treating Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations separately in...

  2. Nonaxisymmetric anisotropy of solar wind turbulence as a direct test for models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A J; Gogoberidze, G; Chapman, S C

    2012-02-24

    Single point spacecraft observations of the turbulent solar wind flow exhibit a characteristic nonaxisymmetric anisotropy that depends sensitively on the perpendicular power spectral exponent. We use this nonaxisymmetric anisotropy as a function of wave vector direction to test models of MHD turbulence. Using Ulysses magnetic field observations in the fast, quiet polar solar wind we find that the Goldreich-Sridhar model of MHD turbulence is not consistent with the observed anisotropy, whereas the observations are well reproduced by the "slab+2D" model. The Goldreich-Sridhar model alone cannot account for the observations unless an additional component is also present.

  3. Scaling laws in magnetized plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-28

    Interactions of plasma motion with magnetic fields occur in nature and in the laboratory in an impressively broad range of scales, from megaparsecs in astrophysical systems to centimeters in fusion devices. The fact that such an enormous array of phenomena can be effectively studied lies in the existence of fundamental scaling laws in plasma turbulence, which allow one to scale the results of analytic and numerical modeling to the sized of galaxies, velocities of supernovae explosions, or magnetic fields in fusion devices. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest framework for describing magnetic plasma turbulence. Recently, a number of new features of MHD turbulence have been discovered and an impressive array of thought-provoking phenomenological theories have been put forward. However, these theories have conflicting predictions, and the currently available numerical simulations are not able to resolve the contradictions. MHD turbulence exhibits a variety of regimes unusual in regular hydrodynamic turbulence. Depending on the strength of the guide magnetic field it can be dominated by weakly interacting Alfv\\'en waves or strongly interacting wave packets. At small scales such turbulence is locally anisotropic and imbalanced (cross-helical). In a stark contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, which tends to ``forget'' global constrains and become uniform and isotropic at small scales, MHD turbulence becomes progressively more anisotropic and unbalanced at small scales. Magnetic field plays a fundamental role in turbulent dynamics. Even when such a field is not imposed by external sources, it is self-consistently generated by the magnetic dynamo action. This project aims at a comprehensive study of universal regimes of magnetic plasma turbulence, combining the modern analytic approaches with the state of the art numerical simulations. The proposed study focuses on the three topics: weak MHD turbulence, which is relevant for laboratory devices

  4. Spectral properties of electromagnetic turbulence in plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shaikh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the nonlinear turbulent processes associated with electromagnetic waves in plasmas. We focus on low-frequency (in comparison with the electron gyrofrequency nonlinearly interacting electron whistlers and nonlinearly interacting Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (H-MHD fluctuations in a magnetized plasma. Nonlinear whistler mode turbulence study in a magnetized plasma involves incompressible electrons and immobile ions. Two-dimensional turbulent interactions and subsequent energy cascades are critically influenced by the electron whisters that behave distinctly for scales smaller and larger than the electron skin depth. It is found that in whistler mode turbulence there results a dual cascade primarily due to the forward spectral migration of energy that coexists with a backward spectral transfer of mean squared magnetic potential. Finally, inclusion of the ion dynamics, resulting from a two fluid description of the H-MHD plasma, leads to several interesting results that are typically observed in the solar wind plasma. Particularly in the solar wind, the high-time-resolution databases identify a spectral break at the end of the MHD inertial range spectrum that corresponds to a high-frequency regime. In the latter, turbulent cascades cannot be explained by the usual MHD model and a finite frequency effect (in comparison with the ion gyrofrequency arising from the ion inertia is essentially included to discern the dynamics of the smaller length scales (in comparison with the ion skin depth. This leads to a nonlinear H-MHD model, which is presented in this paper. With the help of our 3-D H-MHD code, we find that the characteristic turbulent interactions in the high-frequency regime evolve typically on kinetic-Alfvén time-scales. The turbulent fluctuation associated with kinetic-Alfvén interactions are compressive and anisotropic and possess equipartition of the kinetic and magnetic energies.

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on nonlinear MHD and extended MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulations have proven their value in interpreting experimental results over the years. As magnetic fusion experiments reach higher performance regimes, more sophisticated experimental diagnostics coupled with ever expanding computer capabilities have increased both the need for and the feasibility of nonlinear global simulations using models more realistic than regular ideal and resistive MHD. Such extended-MHD nonlinear simulations have already begun to produce useful results. These studies are expected to lead to ever more comprehensive simulation models in the future and to play a vital role in fully understanding fusion plasmas. Topics include the following: (1) current state of nonlinear MHD and extended-MHD simulations; (2) comparisons to experimental data; (3) discussions between experimentalists and theorists; (4) /equations for extended-MHD models, kinetic-based closures; and (5) paths toward more comprehensive simulation models, etc. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. Turbulence Measurements in Swirling Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Domkundwar

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigation have been conducted to find out the region of high turbulent intensities in a swirling jet passing through a divergent passage. A hot wire anemometer is used to measure the turbulence intensity using a four position method. It has been concluded that the jet spreads with increasing diffuser angle and the region of high turbulent intensity also spreads. The high turbulence intensity region lies around the recirculation zone and it decays rapidly along the main flow direction.

  7. Turning the resistive MHD into a stochastic field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Materassi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical systems stirred by random forces of given statistics may be described via a path integral formulation in which their degrees of freedom are stochastic variables themselves, undergoing a multiple-history probabilistic evolution. This framework seems to be easily applicable to resistive Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD. Indeed, MHD equations form a dynamic system of classical variables in which the terms representing the density, the pressure and the conductivity of the plasma are irregular functions of space and time when turbulence occurs. By treating those irregular terms as random stirring forces, it is possible to introduce a Stochastic Field Theory which should represent correctly the impulsive phenomena caused by the spece- and time-irregularity of plasma turbulence. This work is motivated by the recent observational evidences of the crucial role played by stochastic fluctuations in space plasmas.

  8. Turning the resistive MHD into a stochastic field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materassi, M.; Consolini, G.

    2008-08-01

    Classical systems stirred by random forces of given statistics may be described via a path integral formulation in which their degrees of freedom are stochastic variables themselves, undergoing a multiple-history probabilistic evolution. This framework seems to be easily applicable to resistive Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD). Indeed, MHD equations form a dynamic system of classical variables in which the terms representing the density, the pressure and the conductivity of the plasma are irregular functions of space and time when turbulence occurs. By treating those irregular terms as random stirring forces, it is possible to introduce a Stochastic Field Theory which should represent correctly the impulsive phenomena caused by the spece- and time-irregularity of plasma turbulence. This work is motivated by the recent observational evidences of the crucial role played by stochastic fluctuations in space plasmas.

  9. A Numerical Study of Resistivity and Hall Effects for a Compressible MHD Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of resistive, Hall, and viscous terms on the flow structure compared with compressible ideal MHD is studied numerically for a one-fluid non-ideal MHD model. The goal of the present study is to shed some light on the emerging area of non-ideal MHD modeling and simulation. Numerical experiments are performed on a hypersonic blunt body flow with future application to plasma aerodynamics flow control in reentry vehicles. Numerical experiments are also performed on a magnetized time-developing mixing layer with possible application to magnetic/turbulence mixing.

  10. MHD Generation Code

    CERN Document Server

    Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    A program to generate codes in Fortran and C of the full Magnetohydrodynamic equations is shown. The program used the free computer algebra system software REDUCE. This software has a package called EXCALC, which is an exterior calculus program. The advantage of this program is that it can be modified to include another complex metric or spacetime. The output of this program is modified by means of a LINUX script which creates a new REDUCE program to manipulate the MHD equations to obtain a code that can be used as a seed for a MHD code for numerical applications. As an example, we present part of output of our programs for Cartesian coordinates and how to do the discretization.

  11. SHOCKFIND - An algorithm to identify magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in turbulent clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The formation of stars occurs in the dense molecular cloud phase of the interstellar medium. Observations and numerical simulations of molecular clouds have shown that supersonic magnetised turbulence plays a key role for the formation of stars. Simulations have also shown that a large fraction of the turbulent energy dissipates in shock waves. The three families of MHD shocks --- fast, intermediate and slow --- distinctly compress and heat up the molecular gas, and so provide an important probe of the physical conditions within a turbulent cloud. Here we introduce the publicly available algorithm, SHOCKFIND, to extract and characterise the mixture of shock families in MHD turbulence. The algorithm is applied to a 3-dimensional simulation of a magnetised turbulent molecular cloud, and we find that both fast and slow MHD shocks are present in the simulation. We give the first prediction of the mixture of turbulence-driven MHD shock families in this molecular cloud, and present their distinct distributions of s...

  12. Theory and Transport of Nearly Incompressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Shiota, D.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.

    2017-02-01

    The theory of nearly incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (NI MHD) was developed largely in the early 1990s, together with an important extension to inhomogeneous flows in 2010. Much of the focus in the earlier work was to understand the apparent incompressibility of the solar wind and other plasma environments, and the relationship of density fluctuations to apparently incompressible manifestations of turbulence in the solar wind and interstellar medium. Further important predictions about the “dimensionality” of solar wind turbulence and its relationship to the plasma beta were made and subsequently confirmed observationally. However, despite the initial success of NI MHD in describing fluctuations in the solar wind, a detailed application to solar wind turbulence has not been undertaken. Here, we use the equations of NI MHD to describe solar wind turbulence, rewriting the NI MHD system in terms of Elsässer variables. Distinct descriptions of 2D and slab turbulence emerge naturally from the Elsässer formulation, as do the nonlinear couplings between 2D and slab components. For plasma beta order 1 or less regions, predictions for 2D and slab spectra result from the NI MHD description, and predictions for the spectral characteristics of density fluctuations can be made. We conclude by presenting a NI MHD formulation describing the transport of majority 2D and minority slab turbulence throughout the solar wind. A preliminary comparison of theory and observations is presented.

  13. Broken Ergodicity in Two-Dimensional Homogeneous Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence has many of the same qualitative features as three-dimensional (3-D) homogeneous MHD turbulence.The se features include several ideal invariants, along with the phenomenon of broken ergodicity. Broken ergodicity appears when certain modes act like random variables with mean values that are large compared to their standard deviations, indicating a coherent structure or dynamo.Recently, the origin of broken ergodicity in 3-D MHD turbulence that is manifest in the lowest wavenumbers was explained. Here, a detailed description of the origins of broken ergodicity in 2-D MHD turbulence is presented. It will be seen that broken ergodicity in ideal 2-D MHD turbulence can be manifest in the lowest wavenumbers of a finite numerical model for certain initial conditions or in the highest wavenumbers for another set of initial conditions.T he origins of broken ergodicity in ideal 2-D homogeneous MHD turbulence are found through an eigen analysis of the covariance matrices of the modal probability density functions.It will also be shown that when the lowest wavenumber magnetic field becomes quasi-stationary, the higher wavenumber modes can propagate as Alfven waves on these almost static large-scale magnetic structures

  14. Nonlinear helical MHD instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueva, N.M.; Solov' ev, L.S.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the boundary problem on the development of MHD instability in a toroidal plasma. Two types of local helical instability are noted - Alfven and thermal, and the corresponding criteria of instability are cited. An evaluation is made of the maximum attainable kinetic energy, limited by the degree to which the law of conservation is fulfilled. An examination is made of a precise solution to a kinematic problem on the helical evolution of a cylindrical magnetic configuration at a given velocity distribution in a plasma. A numerical computation of the development of MHD instability in a plasma cylinder by a computerized solution of MHD equations is made where the process's helical symmetry is conserved. The development of instability is of a resonance nature. The instability involves the entire cross section of the plasma and leads to an inside-out reversal of the magnetic surfaces when there is a maximum unstable equilibrium configuration in the nonlinear stage. The examined instability in the tore is apparently stabilized by a magnetic hole when certain limitations are placed on the distribution of flows in the plasma. 29 references, 8 figures.

  15. The Efficiency of B-Field Amplification at Shocks by Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Suoqing; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Markevitch, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent dynamo field amplification has often been invoked to explain the strong field strengths in thin rims in supernova shocks ($\\sim 100 \\, \\mu$G) and in radio relics in galaxy clusters ($\\sim \\mu$G). We present high resolution MHD simulations of the interaction between pre-shock turbulence, clumping and shocks, to quantify the conditions under which turbulent dynamo amplification can be significant. We demonstrate numerically converged field amplification which scales with Alfv\\'en Mach number, $B/B_0 \\propto {\\mathcal M}_{\\rm A}$, up to ${\\mathcal M}_{\\rm A} \\sim 150$. Amplification is dominated by compression at low ${\\mathcal M}_{\\rm A}$, and stretching (turbulent amplification) at high ${\\mathcal M}_{\\rm A}$. For the high Mach numbers characteristic of supernova shocks, the B-field grows exponentially and saturates at equipartition with turbulence, while the vorticity jumps sharply at the shock and subsequently decays; the resulting field is orientated predominately along the shock normal (an effect...

  16. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  17. Study of Nonlinear Interaction and Turbulence of Alfven Waves in LAPD Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2013-11-29

    The complete project had two major goals — investigate MHD turbulence generated by counterpropagating Alfven modes, and study such processes in the LAPD device. In order to study MHD turbulence in numerical simulations, two codes have been used: full MHD, and reduced MHD developed specialy for this project. Quantitative numerical results are obtained through high-resolution simulations of strong MHD turbulence, performed through the 2010 DOE INCITE allocation. We addressed the questions of the spectrum of turbulence, its universality, and the value of the so-called Kolmogorov constant (the normalization coefficient of the spectrum). In these simulations we measured with unprecedented accuracy the energy spectra of magnetic and velocity fluctuations. We also studied the so-called residual energy, that is, the difference between kinetic and magnetic energies in turbulent fluctuations. In our analytic work we explained generation of residual energy in weak MHD turbulence, in the process of random collisions of counterpropagating Alfven waves. We then generalized these results for the case of strong MHD turbulence. The developed model explained generation of residual energy is strong MHD turbulence, and verified the results in numerical simulations. We then analyzed the imbalanced case, where more Alfven waves propagate in one direction. We found that spectral properties of the residual energy are similar for both balanced and imbalanced cases. We then compared strong MHD turbulence observed in the solar wind with turbulence generated in numerical simulations. Nonlinear interaction of Alfv´en waves has been studied in the upgraded Large Plasma Device (LAPD). We have simulated the collision of the Alfven modes in the settings close to the experiment. We have created a train of wave packets with the apltitudes closed to those observed n the experiment, and allowed them to collide. We then saw the generation of the second harmonic, resembling that observed in the

  18. Dynamics for Controlled 2D Generalized MHD Systems with Distributed Controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AKMEL De G; BAHI L.C

    2013-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a piecewise (in time) distributed optimal control problem for Generalized MHD equations which model velocity tracking coupled to magnetic field over time.The long-time behavior of solutions for an optimal distributed control problem associated with the Generalized MHD equations is studied.First,a quasi-optimal solution for the Generalized MHD equations is constructed; this quasi-optimal solution possesses the decay (in time) properties.Then,some preliminary estimates for the long-time behavior of all solutions of Generalized MHD equations are derived.Next,the existence of a solution of optimal control problem is proved also optimality system is derived.Finally,the long-time decay properties for the optimal solutions is established.

  19. MHD Generation Code

    OpenAIRE

    Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco; Carboni-Mendez, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    A program to generate codes in Fortran and C of the full Magnetohydrodynamic equations is shown. The program used the free computer algebra system software REDUCE. This software has a package called EXCALC, which is an exterior calculus program. The advantage of this program is that it can be modified to include another complex metric or spacetime. The output of this program is modified by means of a LINUX script which creates a new REDUCE program to manipulate the MHD equations to obtain a c...

  20. Mhd models for pne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. García Segura

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un escenario auto consistente para explicar la morfolog a de las nebulosas planetarias. El escenario es consistente con la distribuci on Gal actica de los diferentes tipos morfol ogicos. Este trabajo resuelve, por medio de efectos MHD, algunas de las caracter sticas controversiales que aparecen en las nebulosas planetarias. Estas caracter sticas incluyen la presencia de ujos axisim etricos y colimados, con una cinem atica que aumenta linealmente con la distancia y la existencia de morfolog as asim etricas tales como las de las nebulosas con simetr a de punto.

  1. MHD-ETF design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retallick, F.D.

    1978-04-01

    This document establishes criteria to be utilized for the design of a pilot-scale (150 to 300 MW thermal) open cycle, coal-fired MHD/steam plant. Criteria for this Engineering Test Facility (ETF) are presented relative to plant siting, plant engineering and operations, MHD-ETF testing, costing and scheduling.

  2. EVIDENCE OF ACTIVE MHD INSTABILITY IN EULAG-MHD SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, Nicolas; Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul, E-mail: nicolas.laws@gmail.ca, E-mail: strugarek@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Qc H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2015-11-10

    We investigate the possible development of magnetohydrodynamical instabilities in the EULAG-MHD “millennium simulation” of Passos and Charbonneau. This simulation sustains a large-scale magnetic cycle characterized by solar-like polarity reversals taking place on a regular multidecadal cadence, and in which zonally oriented bands of strong magnetic fields accumulate below the convective layers, in response to turbulent pumping from above in successive magnetic half-cycles. Key aspects of this simulation include low numerical dissipation and a strongly sub-adiabatic fluid layer underlying the convectively unstable layers corresponding to the modeled solar convection zone. These properties are conducive to the growth and development of two-dimensional instabilities that are otherwise suppressed by stronger dissipation. We find evidence for the action of a non-axisymmetric magnetoshear instability operating in the upper portions of the stably stratified fluid layers. We also investigate the possibility that the Tayler instability may be contributing to the destabilization of the large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component at high latitudes. On the basis of our analyses, we propose a global dynamo scenario whereby the magnetic cycle is driven primarily by turbulent dynamo action in the convecting layers, but MHD instabilities accelerate the dissipation of the magnetic field pumped down into the overshoot and stable layers, thus perhaps significantly influencing the magnetic cycle period. Support for this scenario is found in the distinct global dynamo behaviors observed in an otherwise identical EULAG-MHD simulations, using a different degree of sub-adiabaticity in the stable fluid layers underlying the convection zone.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of reconnection in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmer, Fabien

    2016-07-19

    Turbulence is ubiquitous at large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasmas like in the Solar corona. In such environments, the turbulence is thought to enhance the energy conversion rate by magnetic reconnection above the classical model predictions. Since turbulence cannot be simulated together with the large scale behaviour of the plasma, magnetic reconnection is studied through the average properties of turbulence. A Reynolds-averaged turbulence model is explored in which turbulence is self-sustained and -generated by the large scales (mean-) field inhomogeneities. Employing that model, the influence of turbulence is investigated by large-scale MHD numerical simulations solving evolution equations of the energy and cross-helicity of the turbulence together with the MHD equations. Magnetic reconnection is found to be either rapidly enhanced or suppressed by turbulence depending on the turbulence timescale. If the turbulence timescale is self-consistently calculated, reconnection is always strongly enhanced. Since the solar corona bears strong guide magnetic fields perpendicular to the reconnecting magnetic fields, the influences of a strong guide field on turbulent reconnection is separately investigated. A slow down of reconnection, obtained in the presence of a finite guide field, can be understood by a finite residual helicity working against the enhancement of reconnection by the turbulence. The influence of turbulence on magnetic reconnection is further studied by means of high resolution simulations of plasmoid-unstable current sheets. These simulations revealed the importance of turbulence for reaching fast reconnection.

  4. Simulating solar MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schüssler

    Full Text Available Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse' are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.

    Key words. Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy (photosphere and chromosphere; stellar interiors and dynamo theory; numerical simulation studies.

  5. A turbulent premixed flame on fractal-grid generated turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Soulopoulos, Nikos; Beyrau, Frank; Hardalupas, Yannis; Taylor, A M K P; Vassilicos, J Christos

    2010-01-01

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent combustion experiment. In contrast to the power law decay of a standard turbulence grid, the downstream turbulence intensity of the fractal grid increases until it reaches a peak at some distance from the grid before it finally decays. The effective mesh size and the solidity are the same as those of a standard square mesh grid with which it is compared. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry, the fractal generated turbulence enhances the burning rate and causes the flame to further increase its area. Using a flame fractal model, an attempt is made to highlight differences between the flames established at the two different turbulent fields.

  6. Cosmic Ray transport in turbulent magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Huirong

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) transport and acceleration is determined by the properties of magnetic turbulence. Recent advances in MHD turbulence call for revisions in the paradigm of cosmic ray transport. We use the models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that were tested in numerical simulation, in which turbulence is injected at large scale and cascades to to small scales. We shall address the issue of the transport of CRs, both parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. We shall demonstrate compressible fast modes are dominant cosmic ray scatterer from both quasilinear and nonlinear theories. We shall also show that the self-generated wave growth by CRs are constrained by preexisting turbulence and discuss the process in detail in the context of shock acceleration at supernova remnants and their implications. In addition, we shall dwell on the nonlinear growth of kinetic gyroresonance instability of cosmic rays induced by large scale compressible turbulence. This gyroresonance of cosmic rays on turbulence is d...

  7. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Performance with Real Gas Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul; Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The theoretical performance of a scramjet propulsion system incorporating an magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) energy bypass scheme is calculated. The one-dimensional analysis developed earlier, in which the theoretical performance is calculated neglecting skin friction and using a sudden-freezing approximation for the nozzle flow, is modified to incorporate the method of Van Driest for turbulent skin friction and a finite-rate chemistry calculation in the nozzle. Unlike in the earlier design, in which four ramp compressions occurred in the pitch plane, in the present design the first two ramp compressions occur in the pitch plane and the next two compressions occur in the yaw plane. The results for the simplified design of a spaceliner show that (1) the present design produces higher specific impulses than the earlier design, (2) skin friction substantially reduces thrust and specific impulse, and (3) the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is still better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Results suggest that the energy management with MHD principles offers the possibility of improving the performance of the scramjet. The technical issues needing further studies are identified.

  8. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  9. Scale locality of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluie, Hussein; Eyink, Gregory L

    2010-02-26

    We investigate the scale locality of cascades of conserved invariants at high kinetic and magnetic Reynold's numbers in the "inertial-inductive range" of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, where velocity and magnetic field increments exhibit suitable power-law scaling. We prove that fluxes of total energy and cross helicity-or, equivalently, fluxes of Elsässer energies-are dominated by the contributions of local triads. Flux of magnetic helicity may be dominated by nonlocal triads. The magnetic stretching term may also be dominated by nonlocal triads, but we prove that it can convert energy only between velocity and magnetic modes at comparable scales. We explain the disagreement with numerical studies that have claimed conversion nonlocally between disparate scales. We present supporting data from a 1024{3} simulation of forced MHD turbulence.

  10. Scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, J C; Boldyrev, S; Cattaneo, F

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the majority of natural systems, including the interstellar medium, the solar corona, and the solar wind, has Reynolds numbers far exceeding the Reynolds numbers achievable in numerical experiments. Much attention is therefore drawn to the universal scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations, which can be reliably measured in the simulations and then extrapolated to astrophysical scales. However, in contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, where the universal structure of the inertial and dissipation intervals is described by the Kolmogorov self-similarity, the scaling for MHD turbulence cannot be established based solely on dimensional arguments due to the presence of an intrinsic velocity scale -- the Alfven velocity. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the Kolmogorov first self-similarity hypothesis cannot be formulated for MHD turbulence in the same way it is formulated for the hydrodynamic case. Besides profound consequences for the analytical consideration, this...

  11. Attempts to Simulate Anisotropies of Solar Wind Fluctuations Using MHD with a Turning Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    We examine a "two-component" model of the solar wind to see if any of the observed anisotropies of the fields can be explained in light of the need for various quantities, such as the magnetic minimum variance direction, to turn along with the Parker spiral. Previous results used a 3-D MHD spectral code to show that neither Q2D nor slab-wave components will turn their wave vectors in a turning Parker-like field, and that nonlinear interactions between the components are required to reproduce observations. In these new simulations we use higher resolution in both decaying and driven cases, and with and without a turning background field, to see what, if any, conditions lead to variance anisotropies similar to observations. We focus especially on the middle spectral range, and not the energy-containing scales, of the simulation for comparison with the solar wind. Preliminary results have shown that it is very difficult to produce the required variances with a turbulent cascade.

  12. Solar Wind Turbulence and the Role of Ion Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrova, Olga; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Horbury, Timothy S; Bale, Stuart D

    2013-01-01

    Solar wind is probably the best laboratory to study turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. In addition to the presence of magnetic field, the differences with neutral fluid isotropic turbulence are: weakness of collisional dissipation and presence of several characteristic space and time scales. In this paper we discuss observational properties of solar wind turbulence in a large range from the MHD to the electron scales. At MHD scales, within the inertial range, turbulence cascade of magnetic fluctuations develops mostly in the plane perpendicular to the mean field. Solar wind turbulence is compressible in nature. The spectrum of velocity fluctuations do not follow magnetic field one. Probability distribution functions of different plasma parameters are not Gaussian, indicating presence of intermittency. At the moment there is no global model taking into account all these observed properties of the inertial range. At ion scales, turbulent spectra have a break, compressibility increases and the density fluctuat...

  13. Extended MHD Effects in High Energy Density Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The MHD model is the workhorse for computational modeling of HEDP experiments. Plasma models are inheritably limited in scope, but MHD is expected to be a very good model for studying plasmas at the high densities attained in HEDP experiments. There are, however, important ways in which MHD fails to adequately describe the results, most notably due to the omission of the Hall term in the Ohm's law (a form of extended MHD or XMHD). This talk will discuss these failings by directly comparing simulations of MHD and XMHD for particularly relevant cases. The methodology is to simulate HEDP experiments using a Hall-MHD (HMHD) code based on a highly accurate and robust Discontinuous Galerkin method, and by comparison of HMHD to MHD draw conclusions about the impact of the Hall term. We focus on simulating two experimental pulsed power machines under various scenarios. We examine the MagLIF experiment on the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories and liner experiments on the COBRA machine at Cornell. For the MagLIF experiment we find that power flow in the feed leads to low density plasma ablation into the region surrounding the liner. The inflow of this plasma compresses axial magnetic flux onto the liner. In MHD this axial flux tends to resistively decay, whereas in HMHD a force-free current layer sustains the axial flux on the liner leading to a larger ratio of axial to azimuthal flux. During the liner compression the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability leads to helical perturbations due to minimization of field line bending. Simulations of a cylindrical liner using the COBRA machine parameters can under certain conditions exhibit amplification of an axial field due to a force-free low-density current layer separated by some distance from the liner. This results in a configuration in which there is predominately axial field on the liner inside the current layer and azimuthal field outside the layer. We are currently attempting to experimentally verify the simulation

  14. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav [University of Wisconsin - Madison

    2013-07-26

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a “condensate”, that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small k{sub {parallel}}. A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

  15. Anisotropic turbulence in weakly stratified rotating magnetoconvection

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, A

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the 3D MHD-equations that describe rotating magnetoconvection in a Cartesian box have been performed using the code NIRVANA. The characteristics of averaged quantities like the turbulence intensity and the turbulent heat flux that are caused by the combined action of the small-scale fluctuations are computed. The correlation length of the turbulence significantly depends on the strength and orientation of the magnetic field and the anisotropic behavior of the turbulence intensity induced by Coriolis and Lorentz force is considerably more pronounced for faster rotation. The development of isotropic behavior on the small scales -- as it is observed in pure rotating convection -- vanishes even for a weak magnetic field which results in a turbulent flow that is dominated by the vertical component. In the presence of a horizontal magnetic field the vertical turbulent heat flux slightly increases with increasing field strength, so that cooling of the rotating system is facilitated. Horizont...

  16. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, Romain; Galtier, Sébastien

    2012-11-01

    Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is investigated through three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We show that the Hall effect induces a spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the turbulent dynamics. The normalized magnetic polarization is introduced to separate the right- (R) and left-handed (L) fluctuations. A classical k(-7/3) spectrum is found at small scales for R magnetic fluctuations which corresponds to the electron MHD prediction. A spectrum compatible with k(-11/3) is obtained at large-scales for the L magnetic fluctuations; we call this regime the ion MHD. These results are explained heuristically by rewriting the Hall MHD equations in a succinct vortex dynamical form. Applications to solar wind turbulence are discussed.

  17. 3D simulations of fluctuation spectra in the hall-MHD plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P K

    2009-01-30

    Turbulent spectral cascades are investigated by means of fully three-dimensional (3D) simulations of a compressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (H-MHD) plasma in order to understand the observed spectral break in the solar wind turbulence spectra in the regime where the characteristic length scales associated with electromagnetic fluctuations are smaller than the ion gyroradius. In this regime, the results of our 3D simulations exhibit that turbulent spectral cascades in the presence of a mean magnetic field follow an omnidirectional anisotropic inertial-range spectrum close to k(-7/3). The latter is associated with the Hall current arising from nonequal electron and ion fluid velocities in our 3D H-MHD plasma model.

  18. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jiahe, E-mail: jsi@nmt.edu; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Nornberg, Mark D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  19. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  20. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  1. Turbulence of swarming sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L.; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation.

  2. Effect of de-correlating turbulence on the low frequency decay of jet-surface interaction noise in sub-sonic unheated air jets using a CFD-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Leib, S. J.; Bozak, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we extend the Rapid-distortion theory (RDT)-based model derived by Goldstein, Afsar & Leib (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 736, pp. 532-569, 2013) for the sound generated by the interaction of a large-aspect-ratio rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a flat plate to include a more realistic upstream turbulence spectrum that possess a de-correlation (i.e. negative dip) in its space-time structure and use results from three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length & time scales. Since the interaction noise dominates the low-frequency portion of the spectrum, we use an appropriate asymptotic approximation for the Rayleigh equation Green's function, which enters the analysis, based on a two-dimensional mean flow representation for the jet. We use the model to predict jet-surface interaction noise for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets, nozzle aspect ratios, streamwise and transverse trailing-edge locations and compare them with experimental data. The RANS meanflow computations are also compared with flow data for selected cases to assess their validity. We find that finite de-correlation in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low-frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency to give a model that has a pure dipole frequency scaling. This gives better agreement with noise data compared to Goldstein et al. (2013) for Strouhal numbers less than the peak jet-surface interaction noise. For example, through sensitivity analysis we find that there is a difference of 10 dB at the lowest frequency for which data exists (relative to a model without de-correlation effects included) for the highest acoustic Mach number case. Secondly, our results for the planar flow theory provide a first estimate of the low-frequency amplification due to the jet-surface interaction for moderate aspect ratio nozzles when RANS

  3. Dissipation of Molecular Cloud Turbulence by Magnetohydrodynamic Shockwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the giant molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low velocity shock waves. These shocks cause molecular line cooling of the compressed and heated gas, and so their radiative signatures probe the nature of the turbulence. In MHD fluids the three distinct families of shocks—fast, intermediate and slow—differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so observational differences between them may also distinguish driving modes of turbulent regions.Here we use a two-fluid model to compare the characteristics of one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks. Fast MHD shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where all the fluid variables only weakly change in the shock front. In contrast, slow MHD shocks are driven by gas pressure where neutral species collide with ion species in a thin hot slab that closely resembles an ordinary gas dynamic shock.We computed observational diagnostics for fast and slow shocks at velocities vs = 2-4 km/s and preshock Hydrogen nuclei densities n(H) = 102-4 cm-3. We followed the abundances of molecules relevant for a simple oxygen chemistry and include cooling by CO, H2 and H2O. Estimates of intensities of CO rotational lines show that high-J lines, above J = 6→5, are more strongly excited in slow MHD shocks. We discuss how these shocks could help interpret recently observed anomalously strong mid- and high-J CO lines emitted by warm gas in the Milky Way and external galaxies, and implications for simulations of MHD turbulence.

  4. Stochastic Particle Acceleration by Helical Turbulence in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2012-01-01

    Flaring release of magnetic energy in solar corona is only possible if the magnetic field deviates from a potential one. We show that the linear MHD modes excited on top of the non-potential magnetic field possess a nonzero kinetic helicity. Accordingly, this necessarily results in a noticeable kinetic helicity of the turbulence, composed of these linear modes with various scales and random phases, generated at the flare site by the primary energy release, which may be important for many applications. In particular, a nonzero turbulence helicity has a potentially strong effect on the particle acceleration because the helical component of the turbulence induces a mean regular large-scale (DC) electric field capable of directly accelerating the charged particles in addition to the commonly considered stochastic turbulent electric field. In this paper, we derive the kinetic helicity density of the linear MHD modes excited on top of a twisted large-scale magnetic field, estimate the corresponding turbulence helic...

  5. Tsallis statistics as a tool for studying interstellar turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A

    2009-01-01

    We used magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of interstellar turbulence to study the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of increments of density, velocity, and magnetic field. We found that the PDFs are well described by a Tsallis distribution, following the same general trends found in solar wind and Electron MHD studies. We found that the PDFs of density are different in subsonic and supersonic turbulence. In order to extend this work to ISM observations we studied maps of column density obtained from 3D MHD simulations. From the column density maps we found the parameters that fit to Tsallis distributions and demonstrated that these parameters vary with the Mach and Alfvenic Mach numbers of turbulence. This opens avenues for using Tsallis distributions to study the dynamical and magnetic states of interstellar gas.

  6. Problems in nonlinear resistive MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, A.D.; Strait, E.J.; La Haye, R.J.; Chu, M.S.; Miller, R.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Two experimentally relevant problems can relatively easily be tackled by nonlinear MHD codes. Both problems require plasma rotation in addition to the nonlinear mode coupling and full geometry already incorporated into the codes, but no additional physics seems to be crucial. These problems discussed here are: (1) nonlinear coupling and interaction of multiple MHD modes near the B limit and (2) nonlinear coupling of the m/n = 1/1 sawtooth mode with higher n gongs and development of seed islands outside q = 1.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel corner seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1980-01-01

    A corner seal for an MHD duct includes a compressible portion which contacts the duct walls and an insulating portion which contacts the electrodes, sidewall bars and insulators. The compressible portion may be a pneumatic or hydraulic gasket or an open-cell foam rubber. The insulating portion is segmented into a plurality of pieces of the same thickness as the electrodes, insulators and sidewall bars and aligned therewith, the pieces aligned with the insulator being of a different size from the pieces aligned with the electrodes and sidewall bars to create a stepped configuration along the corners of the MHD channel.

  8. Sub-Grid-Scale Description of Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection in Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Widmer, Fabien; Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection requires, at least locally, a non-ideal plasma response. In collisionless space and astrophysical plasmas, turbulence could permit this instead of the too rare binary collisions. We investigated the influence of turbulence on the reconnection rate in the framework of a single fluid compressible MHD approach. The goal is to find out, whether unresolved, sub-grid for MHD simulations, turbulence can enhance the reconnection process in high Reynolds number astrophysical plasma. We solve, simultaneously with the grid-scale MHD equations, evolution equations for the sub-grid turbulent energy and cross helicity according to Yokoi's model (Yokoi (2013)) where turbulence is self-generated and -sustained through the inhomogeneities of the mean fields. Simulations of Harris and force free sheets confirm the results of Higashimori et al. (2013) and new results are obtained about the dependence on resistivity for large Reynolds number as well as guide field effects. The amount of energy transferred f...

  9. Dust polarization and ISM turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, Robert R; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Perhaps the most intriguing result of Planck's dust-polarization measurements is the observation that the power in the E-mode polarization is twice that in the B mode, as opposed to pre-Planck expectations of roughly equal dust powers in E and B modes. Here we show how the E- and B-mode powers depend on the detailed properties of the fluctuations in the magnetized interstellar medium. These fluctuations are classified into the slow, fast, and Alfv\\'en magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are determined once the ratio of gas to magnetic-field pressures is specified. We also parametrize models in terms of the power amplitudes and power anisotropies for the three types of waves. We find that the observed EE/BB ratio (and its scale invariance) and positive TE correlation cannot be easily explained in terms of favored models for MHD turbulence. The observed power-law index for temperature/polarization fluctuations also disfavors MHD turbulence. We thus speculate that the 0.1--30 pc length scales probed by these ...

  10. VISIOMETRICS OF 2D SHOCK-PLANAR S/F/S CURTAIN INTERACTIONS: VORTEX DOUBLE LAYERS, VORTEX PROJECTILES AND DECAYING STRATIFIED TURBULENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Vortex double layers (VDLs) and vortex projectiles (VPs) are the essential coherent structures which emerge in the shock excited (s/f/s) planar-parallel "curtain" simulations of a 2D shock tube with PPM. These opposite signed layers, formed by shock induced baroclinic deposition of vorticity, "ind" and are strongly affected by secondary reflected shocks and vortex interactions. In our visiometric mode of working, we quantify several of these processes and introduce time epochs to discuss the emerging phenomena and normalizations to scale (collapse) the data at M= 1. 5 and 2. 0. This versatile configuration,easily obtained in the laboratory, allows us to study the formation, evolution and reacceleration of VPs and stratified turbulence and mixing.``

  11. Multiscale nature of the dissipation range in solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Told, D; TenBarge, J M; Howes, G G; Hammett, G W

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear energy transfer and dissipation in Alfv\\'en wave turbulence are analyzed in the first gyrokinetic simulation spanning all scales from the tail of the MHD range to the electron gyroradius scale. For typical solar wind parameters at 1 AU, about 30% of the nonlinear energy transfer close to the electron gyroradius scale is mediated by modes in the tail of the MHD cascade. Collisional dissipation occurs across the entire kinetic range $k_\\perp\\rho_i\\gtrsim 1$. Both mechanisms thus act on multiple coupled scales, which have to be retained for a comprehensive picture of the dissipation range in Alfv\\'enic turbulence.

  12. Test-field method for mean-field coefficients with MHD background

    CERN Document Server

    Rheinhardt, M

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The test-field method for computing turbulent transport coefficients from simulations of hydromagnetic flows is extended to the regime with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) background. Methods: A generalized set of test equations is derived using both the induction equation and a modified momentum equation. By employing an additional set of auxiliary equations, we derive linear equations describing the response of the system to a set of prescribed test fields. Purely magnetic and MHD backgrounds are emulated by applying an electromotive force in the induction equation analogously to the ponderomotive force in the momentum equation. Both forces are chosen to have Roberts flow-like geometry. Results: Examples with an MHD background are studied where the previously used quasi-kinematic test-field method breaks down. In cases with homogeneous mean fields it is shown that the generalized test-field method produces the same results as the imposed-field method, where the field-aligned component of the actual electr...

  13. Plasmoid Instabilities Mediated Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulent Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yi-min [Princeton University; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    After some introductory remarks on fast reconnection in resistive MHD due to plasmoid instability, oblique tearing modes in 3D, and previous studies on 3D turbulent reconnection, the subject is presented under the following topics: 3D simulation setup, time evolution of the 3D simulation, comparison with Sweet-Parker and 2D plasmoid reconnection, and diagnostics of the turbulent state (decomposition of mean fields and fluctuations, power spectra of energy fluctuations, structure function and eddy anisotropy with respect to local magnetic field). Three primary conclusions were reached: (1) The results suggest that 3D plasmoid instabilities can lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection (evidence of energy cascade and development of inertial range, energy fluctuations preferentially align with the local magnetic field, which is one of the characteristics of MHD turbulence); (2) The turbulence is highly inhomogeneous, due to the presence of magnetic shear and outflow jets (conventional MHD turbulence theories or phenomenologies may not be applicable – e.g. scale-dependent anisotropy as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar is not found); (3) 3D turbulent reconnection is different from 2D plasmoid-dominated reconnection in many aspects. However, in fully developed state, reconnection rates in 2D and 3D are comparable — this result needs to be further checked in higher S.

  14. MHD control in burning plasmas MHD control in burning plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donné, Tony; Liang, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Fusion physics focuses on the complex behaviour of hot plasmas confined by magnetic fields with the ultimate aim to develop a fusion power plant. In the future generation of tokamaks like ITER, the power generated by the fusion reactions substantially exceeds the external input power (Pfusion}/Pin >= 10). When this occurs one speaks of a burning plasma. Twenty per cent of the generated fusion power in a burning plasma is carried by the charged alpha particles, which transfer their energy to the ambient plasma in collisions, a process called thermalization. A new phenomenon in burning plasmas is that the alpha particles, which form a minority but carry a large fraction of the plasma kinetic energy, can collectively drive certain types of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modes, while they can suppress other MHD modes. Both types of MHD modes can have desirable effects on the plasma, as well as be detrimental to the plasma. For example, the so-called sawtooth instability, on the one hand, is largely responsible for the transport of the thermalized alpha particles out of the core, but, on the other hand, may result in the loss of the energetic alphas before they have fully thermalized. A further undesirable effect of the sawtooth instability is that it may trigger other MHD modes such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). These NTMs, in turn, are detrimental to the plasma confinement and in some cases may even lead to disruptive termination of the plasma. At the edge of the plasma, finally, so-called edge localized modes or ELMs occur, which result in extremely high transient heat and particle loads on the plasma-facing components of a reactor. In order to balance the desired and detrimental effects of these modes, active feedback control is required. An additional complication occurs in a burning plasma as the external heating power, which is nowadays generally used for plasma control, is small compared to the heating power of the alpha particles. The scientific challenge

  15. Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, P.

    1994-04-01

    Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion are now attracting attention in several countries. Different superconducting MagLev and MHD systems will be described concentrating on, above all, the electromagnetic aspect. Some programmes occurring throughout the world will be described. Magnetic levitated trains could be the new high speed transportation system for the 21st century. Intensive studies involving MagLev trains using superconductivity have been carried out in Japan since 1970. The construction of a 43 km long track is to be the next step. In 1991 a six year programme was launched in the United States to evaluate the performances of MagLev systems for transportation. The MHD (MagnetoHydroDynamic) offers some interesting advantages (efficiency, stealth characteristics, ...) for naval propulsion and increasing attention is being paid towards it nowadays. Japan is also up at the top with the tests of Yamato I, a 260 ton MHD propulsed ship. Depuis quelques années nous assistons à un redémarrage de programmes concernant la lévitation et la propulsion supraconductrices. Différents systèmes supraconducteurs de lévitation et de propulsion seront décrits en examinant plus particulièrement l'aspect électromagnétique. Quelques programmes à travers le monde seront abordés. Les trains à sustentation magnétique pourraient constituer un nouveau mode de transport terrestre à vitesse élevée (500 km/h) pour le 21^e siècle. Les japonais n'ont cessé de s'intéresser à ce système avec bobine supraconductrice. Ils envisagent un stade préindustriel avec la construction d'une ligne de 43 km. En 1991 un programme américain pour une durée de six ans a été lancé pour évaluer les performances des systèmes à lévitation pour le transport aux Etats Unis. La MHD (Magnéto- Hydro-Dynamique) présente des avantages intéressants pour la propulsion navale et un regain d'intérêt apparaît à l'heure actuelle. Le japon se situe là encore à la pointe des d

  16. Temporal intermittency of energy dissipation in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-02-13

    Energy dissipation in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is known to be highly intermittent in space, being concentrated in sheetlike coherent structures. Much less is known about intermittency in time, another fundamental aspect of turbulence which has great importance for observations of solar flares and other space or astrophysical phenomena. In this Letter, we investigate the temporal intermittency of energy dissipation in numerical simulations of MHD turbulence. We consider four-dimensional spatiotemporal structures, "flare events," responsible for a large fraction of the energy dissipation. We find that although the flare events are often highly complex, they exhibit robust power-law distributions and scaling relations. We find that the probability distribution of dissipated energy has a power-law index close to α≈1.75, similar to observations of solar flares, indicating that intense dissipative events dominate the heating of the system. We also discuss the temporal asymmetry of flare events as a signature of the turbulent cascade.

  17. Non Axi-symmetric Anisotropy of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, A J; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Mueller, W -C

    2011-01-01

    A key prediction of turbulence theories is frame-invariance, and in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, axisymmetry of fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Paradoxically the power in fluctuations in the turbulent solar wind are observed to be ordered with respect to the bulk macroscopic flow as well as the background magnetic field. Here, non- axisymmetry across the inertial and dissipation ranges is quantified using in-situ observations from Cluster. The observed inertial range non- axisymmetry is reproduced by a 'fly through' sampling of a Direct Numerical Simulation of MHD turbulence. Furthermore, 'fly through' sampling of a linear superposition of transverse waves with axisymmetric fluctuations generates the trend in non- axisymmetry with power spectral exponent. The observed non-axisymmetric anisotropy may thus simply arise as a sampling effect related to Taylor's hypothesis and is not related to the plasma dynamics itself.

  18. Integral Constraints and MHD Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, T. H.

    2003-10-01

    Determining stability of a plasma in MHD equilibrium, energetically isolated by a conducting wall, requires an assumption on what governs the dynamics of the plasma. One example is the assumption that the plasma obeys ideal MHD, leading to the well known ``δ W" criteria [I. Bernstein, et al., Proc. Roy. Soc. London A244, 17 (1958)]. A radically different approach was used by Taylor [J.B. Taylor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 58, 741 (1986)] in assuming that the dynamics of the plasma is restricted only by the requirement that helicity, an integral constant associated with the plasma, is conserved. The relevancy of Taylor's assumption is supported by the agreement between resulting theoretical results and experimental observations. Another integral constraint involves the canonical angular momentum of the plasma particles. One consequence of using this constraint is that tokamak plasmas have no poloidal current in agreement with some current hole tokamak observations [T.H. Jensen, Phys. Lett. A 305, 183 (2002)].

  19. Shunting ratios for MHD flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birzvalk, Yu.

    1978-01-01

    The shunting ratio and the local shunting ratio, pertaining to currents induced by a magnetic field in a flow channel, are properly defined and systematically reviewed on the basis of the Lagrange criterion. Their definition is based on the energy balance and related to dimensionless parameters characterizing an MHD flow, these parameters evolving from the Hartmann number and the hydrodynamic Reynolds number as well as the magnetic Reynolds number, and the Lundquist number. These shunting ratios, of current density in the core of a stream (uniform) or equivalent mean current density to the short-circuit (maximum) current density, are given here for a slot channel with nonconducting or conducting walls, for a conduction channel with heavy side rails, and for an MHD-flow around bodies. 5 references, 1 figure.

  20. Laboratory Plasma Source as an MHD Model for Astrophysical Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The significance of the work described herein lies in the demonstration of Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun (MCG) devices like CPS-1 to produce energetic laboratory magneto-flows with embedded magnetic fields that can be used as a simulation tool to study flow interaction dynamic of jet flows, to demonstrate the magnetic acceleration and collimation of flows with primarily toroidal fields, and study cross field transport in turbulent accreting flows. Since plasma produced in MCG devices have magnetic topology and MHD flow regime similarity to stellar and extragalactic jets, we expect that careful investigation of these flows in the laboratory will reveal fundamental physical mechanisms influencing astrophysical flows. Discussion in the next section (sec.2) focuses on recent results describing collimation, leading flow surface interaction layers, and turbulent accretion. The primary objectives for a new three year effort would involve the development and deployment of novel electrostatic, magnetic, and visible plasma diagnostic techniques to measure plasma and flow parameters of the CPS-1 device in the flow chamber downstream of the plasma source to study, (1) mass ejection, morphology, and collimation and stability of energetic outflows, (2) the effects of external magnetization on collimation and stability, (3) the interaction of such flows with background neutral gas, the generation of visible emission in such interaction, and effect of neutral clouds on jet flow dynamics, and (4) the cross magnetic field transport of turbulent accreting flows. The applicability of existing laboratory plasma facilities to the study of stellar and extragalactic plasma should be exploited to elucidate underlying physical mechanisms that cannot be ascertained though astrophysical observation, and provide baseline to a wide variety of proposed models, MHD and otherwise. The work proposed herin represents a continued effort on a novel approach in relating laboratory experiments to

  1. Turbulent Velocity Structure in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Ossenkopf, Volker; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2002-01-01

    We compare velocity structure observed in the Polaris Flare molecular cloud at scales ranging from 0.015 pc to 20 pc to the velocity structure of a suite of simulations of supersonic hydrodynamic and MHD turbulence computed with the ZEUS MHD code. We examine different methods of characterising the structure, including a scanning-beam size-linewidth relation, structure functions, velocity and velocity difference probability distribution functions (PDFs), and the Delta-variance wavelet transform, and use them to compare models and observations. The Delta-variance is most sensitive in detecting characteristic scales and varying scaling laws, but is limited in the observational application by its lack of intensity weighting. We compare the true velocity PDF in our models to simulated observations of velocity centroids and average line profiles in optically thin lines, and find that the line profiles reflect the true PDF better. The observed velocity structure is consistent with supersonic turbulence showing a com...

  2. Transition from 2D HD to 2D MHD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Seshasayanan, Kannabiran

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the critical transition from an inverse cascade of energy to a forward energy cascade in a two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic flow as the ratio of magnetic to mechanical forcing amplitude is varied. It is found that the critical transition is the result of two competing processes. The first process is due to hydrodynamic interactions, cascades the energy to the large scales. The second process couples small scale magnetic fields to large scale flows transferring the energy back to the small scales via a non-local mechanism. At marginality the two cascades are both present and cancel each other. The phase space diagram of the transition is sketched.

  3. Simulations and Transport Models for Imbalanced Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chung-Sang; Dennis, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a series of three-dimensional simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence based on reduced MHD equations. Alfven waves are launched from both ends of a long tube along the background uniform magnetic field so that turbulence develops due to collision between counter propagating Alfven waves in the interior region. Waves are launched randomly with specified correlation time Tc such that the length of the tube, L, is greater than (but of the same order of) VA *Tc such that turbulence can fill most of the tube. While waves at both ends are launched with equal power, turbulence generated is imbalanced in general, with normalized cross-helicity gets close to -1 at one end and 1 at the other end. This simulation setup allows easier comparison of turbulence properties with one-dimensional turbulence transport models, which have been applied rather successfully in modeling solar wind turbulence. However, direct comparison of such models with full simulations of solar wind turbulence is difficult due to much higher level of complexity involved. We will present our latest simulations at different resolutions with decreasing dissipation (resistivity and viscosity) levels and compare with model outputs from turbulence transport models. This work is supported by a NASA Grant NNX15AU61G.

  4. Longitudinal and transverse structure functions in high Reynolds-number magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, J; Schäfer, T; Grauer, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scaling behavior of longitudinal and transverse structure functions in homogeneous and isotropic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence by means of an exact hierarchy of structure function equations as well as by direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional MHD turbulence. In particular, rescaling relations between longitudinal and transverse structure functions are derived and utilized in order to compare different scaling behavior in the inertial range. It is found that there are no substantial differences between longitudinal and transverse structure functions in MHD turbulence. This finding stands in contrast to the case of hydrodynamic turbulence which shows persistent differences even at high Reynolds numbers. We propose a physical picture that is based on an effective reduction of pressure contributions due to local regions of same magnitude and alignment of velocity and magnetic field fluctuations. Finally, our findings underline the importance of the pressure term for ...

  5. Vortex statistics for turbulence in a container with rigid boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of vortex statistics for decaying two-dimensional turbulence in a square container with rigid no-slip walls is compared with a few available experimental results and with the scaling theory of two-dimensional turbulent decay as proposed by Carnevale et al. Power-law exponents...

  6. Phenomenology treatment of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with non-equipartition and anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Matthaeus, W H

    2005-02-07

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) turbulence theory, often employed satisfactorily in astrophysical applications, has often focused on parameter ranges that imply nearly equal values of kinetic and magnetic energies and length scales. However, MHD flow may have disparity magnetic Prandtl number, dissimilar kinetic and magnetic Reynolds number, different kinetic and magnetic outer length scales, and strong anisotropy. Here a phenomenology for such ''non-equipartitioned'' MHD flow is discussed. Two conditions are proposed for a MHD flow to transition to strong turbulent flow, extensions of (1) Taylor's constant flux in an inertial range, and (2) Kolmogorov's scale separation between the large and small scale boundaries of an inertial range. For this analysis, the detailed information on turbulence structure is not needed. These two conditions for MHD transition are expected to provide consistent predictions and should be applicable to anisotropic MHD flows, after the length scales are replaced by their corresponding perpendicular components. Second, it is stressed that the dynamics and anisotropy of MHD fluctuations is controlled by the relative strength between the straining effects between eddies of similar size and the sweeping action by the large-eddies, or propagation effect of the large-scale magnetic fields, on the small scales, and analysis of this balance in principle also requires consideration of non-equipartition effects.

  7. Depolarization canals and interstellar turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, A.; Shukurov, A.

    Recent radio polarization observations have revealed a plethora of unexpected features in the polarized Galactic radio background that arise from propagation effects in the random (turbulent) interstellar medium. The canals are especially striking among them, a random network of very dark, narrow regions clearly visible in many directions against a bright polarized Galactic synchrotron background. There are no obvious physical structures in the ISM that may have caused the canals, and so they have been called Faraday ghosts. They evidently carry information about interstellar turbulence but only now is it becoming clear how this information can be extracted. Two theories for the origin of the canals have been proposed; both attribute the canals to Faraday rotation, but one invokes strong gradients in Faraday rotation in the sky plane (specifically, in a foreground Faraday screen) and the other only relies on line-of-sight effects (differential Faraday rotation). In this review we discuss the physical nature of the canals and how they can be used to explore statistical properties of interstellar turbulence. This opens studies of magnetized interstellar turbulence to new methods of analysis, such as contour statistics and related techniques of computational geometry and topology. In particular, we can hope to measure such elusive quantities as the Taylor microscale and the effective magnetic Reynolds number of interstellar MHD turbulence.

  8. Investigating prominence turbulence with Hinode SOT Dopplergrams

    CERN Document Server

    Hillier, Andrew; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Quiescent prominences host a diverse range of flows, including Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven upflows and impulsive downflows, and so it is no surprise that turbulent motions also exist. As prominences are believed to have a mean horizontal guide field, investigating any turbulence they host could shed light on the nature of MHD turbulence in a wide range of astrophysical systems. In this paper we have investigated the nature of the turbulent prominence motions using structure function analysis on the velocity increments estimated from H$\\alpha$ Dopplergrams constructed with observational data from Hinode SOT. The pdf of the velocity increments shows that as we look at increasingly small spatial separations the distribution displays greater departure from a reference Gaussian distribution, hinting at intermittency in the velocity field. Analysis of the even order structure functions for both the horizontal and vertical separations showed the existence of two distinct regions displaying different exponents...

  9. Detached Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Davidson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resolving inflow turbulence in detached eddy simulations of airfoil flows is studied. Synthetic turbulence is used for inflow boundary condition. The generated turbulence fields are shown to decay according to experimental data as they are convected through the domain with the free ...

  10. Dissipation of Quasiclassical Turbulence in Superfluid $^4$He

    CERN Document Server

    Zmeev, D E; Golov, A I; McClintock, P V E; Fisher, S N; Vinen, W F

    2015-01-01

    We compare the decay of turbulence in superfluid $^4$He produced by a moving grid to the decay of turbulence created by either impulsive spin-down to rest or by intense ion injection. In all cases the vortex line density $L$ decays at late time $t$ as $L \\propto t^{-3/2}$. At temperatures above 0.8 K, all methods result in the same rate of decay. Below 0.8 K, the spin-down turbulence maintains initial rotation and decays slower than grid turbulence and ion-jet turbulence. This may be due to a decoupling of the large-scale superfluid flow from the normal component at low temperatures, which changes its effective boundary condition from no-slip to slip.

  11. Imbalanced Relativistic Force-Free Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2013-01-01

    When magnetic energy density is much larger than that of matter, as in pulsar/black hole magnetospheres, the medium becomes force-free and we need relativity to describe it. As in non-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), Alfv\\'enic MHD turbulence in the relativistic limit can be described by interactions of counter-traveling wave packets. In this paper we numerically study strong imbalanced MHD turbulence in such environments. Here, imbalanced turbulence means the waves traveling in one direction (dominant waves) have higher amplitudes than the opposite-traveling waves (sub-dominant waves). We find that (1) spectrum of the dominant waves is steeper than that of sub-dominant waves, (2) the anisotropy of the dominant waves is weaker than that of sub-dominant waves, and (3) the dependence of the ratio of magnetic energy densities of dominant and sub-dominant waves on the ratio of energy injection rates is steeper than quadratic (i.e., \\$b_+^2/b_-^2 \\propto (\\epsilon_+/\\epsilon_-)^n \\$ with n>2). These result...

  12. Understanding Accretion Disks through Three Dimensional Radiation MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei

    I study the structures and thermal properties of black hole accretion disks in the radiation pressure dominated regime. Angular momentum transfer in the disk is provided by the turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI), which is calculated self-consistently with a recently developed 3D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) code based on Athena. This code, developed by my collaborators and myself, couples both the radiation momentum and energy source terms with the ideal MHD equations by modifying the standard Godunov method to handle the stiff radiation source terms. We solve the two momentum equations of the radiation transfer equations with a variable Eddington tensor (VET), which is calculated with a time independent short characteristic module. This code is well tested and accurate in both optically thin and optically thick regimes. It is also accurate for both radiation pressure and gas pressure dominated flows. With this code, I find that when photon viscosity becomes significant, the ratio between Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress from the MRI turbulence can increase significantly with radiation pressure. The thermal instability of the radiation pressure dominated disk is then studied with vertically stratified shearing box simulations. Unlike the previous results claiming that the radiation pressure dominated disk with MRI turbulence can reach a steady state without showing any unstable behavior, I find that the radiation pressure dominated disks always either collapse or expand until we have to stop the simulations. During the thermal runaway, the heating and cooling rates from the simulations are consistent with the general criterion of thermal instability. However, details of the thermal runaway are different from the predictions of the standard alpha disk model, as many assumptions in that model are not satisfied in the simulations. We also identify the key reasons why previous simulations do not find the instability. The thermal

  13. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  14. MHD Driving of Relativistic Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh Königl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Paulatinamente se ha ido reconociendo que los campos magnéticos juegan un papel dominante en la producción y colimación de chorros astrofísicos. Demostramos aquí, usando soluciones semianalíticas exactas para las ecuaciones de MHD ideal en relatividad especial, que un disco de acreción altamente magnetizado (con un campo magnético principalmente poloidal o azimutal alrededor de un agujero negro es capaz de acelerar un flujo de protones y electrones a los factores de Lorentz y energías cinéticas asociadas a fuentes de destellos de rayos gama y nucleos activos de galaxias. También se discuten las contribuciones a la aceleración provenientes de efectos térmicos (por presión de radiación y pares electrón-positrón y de MHD no ideal. Notamos que la aceleración por MHD se caracteriza por ser extendida espacialmente, y esta propiedad se manifesta más claramente en flujos relativistas. Las indicaciones observacionales de que la aceleración de movimientos superlumínicos en chorros de radio ocurre sobre escalas mucho más grandes que las del agujero negro propiamente, apoyan la idea de que la producción de chorros es principalmente un fenómeno magnético. Presentamos resultados preliminares de un modelo global que puede utilizarse para probar esta interpretación.

  15. Global MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    A global MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere is defined. An introduction to numerical methods for solving the MHD equations is given with emphasis on the shock-capturing technique. Finally, results concerning the shape of the magnetosphere and the plasma flows inside the magnetosphere are presented.

  16. An MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the earth's magnetosphere arises from the interaction of the solar wind with the earth's geomagnetic field. A global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model of the earth's magnetosphere has drawn much attention in recent years. In this model, MHD equations are used to describe the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere. In the present paper, some numerical aspects of the model are considered. Attention is given to the ideal MHD equations, an equation of state for the plasma, the model as an initial- and boundary-value problem, the shock capturing technique, computational requirements and techniques for global MHD modeling, a three-dimensional mesh system employed in the global MHD model, and some computational results.

  17. Turbulence and diffusion fossil turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2000-01-01

    Fossil turbulence processes are central to turbulence, turbulent mixing, and turbulent diffusion in the ocean and atmosphere, in astrophysics and cosmology, and in most other natural flows. George Gamov suggested in 1954 that galaxies might be fossils of primordial turbulence produced by the Big Bang. John Woods showed that breaking internal waves on horizontal dye sheets in the interior of the stratified ocean form highly persistent remnants of these turbulent events, which he called fossil turbulence. The dark mixing paradox of the ocean refers to undetected mixing that must exist somewhere to explain why oceanic scalar fields like temperature and salinity are so well mixed, just as the dark matter paradox of galaxies refers to undetected matter that must exist to explain why rotating galaxies don't fly apart by centrifugal forces. Both paradoxes result from sampling techniques that fail to account for the extreme intermittency of random variables involved in self-similar, nonlinear, cascades over a wide ra...

  18. Coupled simulation of kinetic pedestal growth and MHD ELM crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Cummings, J [California Institute of Technology (United States); Chang, C S [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Podhorszki, N [Univ. California at Davis (United States); Klasky, S [ORNL (United States); Ku, S [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Pankin, A [Lehigh Univ. (United States); Samtaney, R [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States); Shoshani, A [LBNL (United States); Snyder, P [General Atomics (United States); Strauss, H [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Sugiyama, L [MIT (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Edge pedestal height and the accompanying ELM crash are critical elements of ITER physics yet to be understood and predicted through high performance computing. An entirely self-consistent first principles simulation is being pursued as a long term research goal, and the plan is planned for completion in time for ITER operation. However, a proof-of-principle work has already been established using a computational tool that employs the best first principles physics available at the present time. A kinetic edge equilibrium code XGC0, which can simulate the neoclassically dominant pedestal growth from neutral ionization (using a phenomenological residual turbulence diffusion motion superposed upon the neoclassical particle motion) is coupled to an extended MHD code M3D, which can perform the nonlinear ELM crash. The stability boundary of the pedestal is checked by an ideal MHD linear peeling-ballooning code, which has been validated against many experimental data sets for the large scale (type I) ELMs onset boundary. The coupling workflow and scientific results to be enabled by it are described.

  19. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  20. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doss, E.D. (ed.) (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C. (ed.) (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  1. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, A; Frank, A; Carroll, J; Blackman, E; Quillen, A

    2008-04-11

    The link between turbulence in star formatting environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers-type turbulence and produces a driving scale-length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star forming environments. In the last section we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets can not be the source of turbulence.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade of coronal loop magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappazzo, A F; Velli, M

    2011-06-01

    The Parker model for coronal heating is investigated through a high resolution simulation. An inertial range is resolved where fluctuating magnetic energy EMk[Please see symbol]) [Please see symbol] k[Please see symbol](-2.7) exceeds kinetic energy EK(k[Please see symbol])[Please see symbol]k[Please see symbol](-0.6). Increments scale as δbℓ ~/= ℓ(-0.85) and δuℓ ~/= ℓ(+0.2) with velocity increasing at small scales, indicating that magnetic reconnection plays a prime role in this turbulent system. We show that spectral energy transport is akin to standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence even for a system of reconnecting current sheets sustained by the boundary. In this new MHD turbulent cascade, kinetic energy flows are negligible while cross-field flows are enhanced, and through a series of "reflections" between the two fields, cascade more than half of the total spectral energy flow.

  3. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Santo-Lima, R; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Lazarian, A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic MHD turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the isotropic (standard) one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are able to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropy can also drive kinetic instabilities which grow faster near the ions kinetic scales. Observations from the solar wind suggest that these micro- instabilities scatter the ions, thus relaxing the anisotropy. This work aims to compare this relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the scattering rate provided by...

  4. A renormalization group analysis of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenli Z.; Diamond, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    The renormalization group (RNG) method is used to study the physics of two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. It is shown that, for a turbulent magnetofluid in two dimensions, no RNG transformation fixed point exists on account of the coexistence of energy transfer to small scales and mean-square magnetic flux transfer to large scales. The absence of a fixed point renders the RNG method incapable of describing the 2D MHD system. A similar conclusion is reached for 2D hydrodynamics, where enstrophy flows to small scales and energy to large scales. These analyses suggest that the applicability of the RNG method to turbulent systems is intrinsically limited, especially in the case of systems with dual-direction transfer.

  5. On the energy spectrum of strong magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence attracts interest due to its fundamental importance and its relevance for interpreting astrophysical data. Here we present measurements of the energy spectra from a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of MHD turbulence with a strong guide field and for increasing Reynolds number. The presented simulations, with numerical resolutions up to 2048^3 mesh points and statistics accumulated over 30 to 150 eddy turnover times, constitute, to the best of our knowledge, the largest statistical sample of steady state MHD turbulence to date. We study both the balanced case, where the energies associated with Alfv\\'en modes propagating in opposite directions along the guide field, E^+ and $E^-, are equal, and the imbalanced case where the energies are different. In the balanced case, we find that the energy spectrum converges to a power law with exponent -3/2 as the Reynolds number is increased, consistent with phenomenological models that include sc...

  6. Modeling Of Z-Pinch Dynamics With Taking Into Account The Generation Of Turbulent/Chaotic Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikhrev, V. V.; Baronova, E. O.

    2006-01-01

    Pinch dynamics is described, which takes into account generation of turbulent magnetic fields. Turbulent/chaotic magnetic fields (TMF) appear due to MHD and kinetic instabilities. It is shown, that TMF arises near the moment of maximal compression and essentially affects plasma dynamics at the expansion stage.

  7. Alfven Wave Tomography for Cold MHD Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2001-09-07

    Alfven waves propagation in slightly nonuniform cold plasmas is studied by means of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nonlinear equations. The evolution of the MHD spectrum is shown to be governed by a matrix linear differential equation with constant coefficients determined by the spectrum of quasi-static plasma density perturbations. The Alfven waves are shown not to affect the plasma density inhomogeneities, as they scatter off of them. The application of the MHD spectrum evolution equation to the inverse scattering problem allows tomographic measurements of the plasma density profile by scanning the plasma volume with Alfven radiation.

  8. Using Synthetic Spacecraft Data to Interpret Compressible Fluctuations in Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, K G; TenBarge, J M; Bale, S D; Chen, C H K; Salem, C S

    2012-01-01

    Kinetic plasma theory is used to generate synthetic spacecraft data to analyze and interpret the compressible fluctuations in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence. The kinetic counterparts of the three familiar linear MHD wave modes---the fast, Alfven, and slow waves---are identified and the properties of the density-parallel magnetic field correlation for these kinetic wave modes is presented. The construction of synthetic spacecraft data, based on the quasi-linear premise---that some characteristics of magnetized plasma turbulence can be usefully modeled as a collection of randomly phased, linear wave modes---is described in detail. Theoretical predictions of the density-parallel magnetic field correlation based on MHD and Vlasov-Maxwell linear eigenfunctions are presented and compared to the observational determination of this correlation based on 10 years of Wind spacecraft data. It is demonstrated that MHD theory is inadequate to describe the compressible turbulent fluctuations and that the observ...

  9. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-11-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfvén waves excited in the photosphere is the target of this study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfvén waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 per cent of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The importance of compressibility shown in this study would significantly impact on the prospects of successful MHD turbulence theory in the solar chromosphere.

  10. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This seventeenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period August 1, 1991 to October 31, 1991. Manufacturing of the prototypical combustor pressure shell has been completed including leak, proof, and assembly fit checking. Manufacturing of forty-five cooling panels was also completed including leak, proof, and flow testing. All precombustor internal components (combustion can baffle and swirl box) were received and checked, and integration of the components was initiated. A decision was made regarding the primary and backup designs for the 1A4 channel. The assembly of the channel related prototypical hardware continued. The cathode wall electrical wiring is now complete. The mechanical design of the diffuser has been completed.

  11. Cosmological AMR MHD with Enzo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hao [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we present EnzoMHD, the extension of the cosmological code Enzoto include magnetic fields. We use the hyperbolic solver of Li et al. (2008) for the computation of interface fluxes. We use constrained transport methods of Balsara & Spicer (1999) and Gardiner & Stone (2005) to advance the induction equation, the reconstruction technique of Balsara (2001) to extend the Adaptive Mesh Refinement of Berger & Colella (1989) already used in Enzo, though formulated in a slightly different way for ease of implementation. This combination of methods preserves the divergence of the magnetic field to machine precision. We use operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We then present a series of cosmological and non cosmologjcal tests problems to demonstrate the quality of solution resulting from this combination of solvers.

  12. Sunspot Modeling: From Simplified Models to Radiative MHD Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Schlichenmaier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We review our current understanding of sunspots from the scales of their fine structure to their large scale (global structure including the processes of their formation and decay. Recently, sunspot models have undergone a dramatic change. In the past, several aspects of sunspot structure have been addressed by static MHD models with parametrized energy transport. Models of sunspot fine structure have been relying heavily on strong assumptions about flow and field geometry (e.g., flux-tubes, "gaps", convective rolls, which were motivated in part by the observed filamentary structure of penumbrae or the necessity of explaining the substantial energy transport required to maintain the penumbral brightness. However, none of these models could self-consistently explain all aspects of penumbral structure (energy transport, filamentation, Evershed flow. In recent years, 3D radiative MHD simulations have been advanced dramatically to the point at which models of complete sunspots with sufficient resolution to capture sunspot fine structure are feasible. Here overturning convection is the central element responsible for energy transport, filamentation leading to fine-structure and the driving of strong outflows. On the larger scale these models are also in the progress of addressing the subsurface structure of sunspots as well as sunspot formation. With this shift in modeling capabilities and the recent advances in high resolution observations, the future research will be guided by comparing observation and theory.

  13. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  14. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  15. Wake-vortex decay in external turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Armenio, V.; Fröhlich, J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2010-01-01

    Wake vortices that form behind a moving aircraft represent 11 safety COil cern for other aircraft.s that follow. These tornado-like wake structures may persist for several minutes, extending for many kilometers across the sky. This safety issue is particularly important close to major airports where

  16. Wake-vortex decay in external turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Armenio, V.; Fröhlich, J.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Wake vortices that form behind a moving aircraft represent 11 safety COil cern for other aircraft.s that follow. These tornado-like wake structures may persist for several minutes, extending for many kilometers across the sky. This safety issue is particularly important close to major airports where

  17. Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer in pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.Y.; Liu, Y.J., E-mail: yajun@scut.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    As gradually wide applications of MHD fluid, transportation as well as control with pumps and valves is unavoidable, which induces MHD fluid hammer. The paper attempts to combine MHD effect and fluid hammer effect and to investigate the characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer. A non-dimensional fluid hammer model, based on Navier–Stocks equations, coupling with Lorentz force is numerically solved in a reservoir–pipe–valve system with uniform external magnetic field. The MHD effect is represented by the interaction number which associates with the conductivity of the MHD fluid as well as the external magnetic field and can be interpreted as the ratio of Lorentz force to Joukowsky force. The transient numerical results of pressure head, average velocity, wall shear stress, velocity profiles and shear stress profiles are provided. The additional MHD effect hinders fluid motion, weakens wave front and homogenizes velocity profiles, contributing to obvious attenuation of oscillation, strengthened line packing and weakened Richardson annular effect. Studying the characteristics of MHD laminar fluid hammer theoretically supplements the gap of knowledge of rapid-transient MHD flow and technically provides beneficial information for MHD pipeline system designers to better devise MHD systems. - Highlights: • Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer are discussed by simulation. • MHD effect has significant influence on attenuation of wave. • MHD effect strengthens line packing. • MHD effect inhibits Richardson annular effect.

  18. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  19. Direct numerical simulation of axisymmetric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Bo; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Naso, Aurore

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics of decaying, strictly axisymmetric, incompressible turbulence is investigated using direct numerical simulations. It is found that the angular momentum is a robust invariant of the system. It is further shown that long-lived coherent structures are generated by the flow. These structures can be associated with stationary solutions of the Euler equations. The structures obey relations in agreement with predictions from selective decay principles, compatible with the decay laws of the system. Two different types of decay scenarios are highlighted. The first case results in a quasi-two-dimensional flow with a dynamical behavior in the poloidal plane similar to freely decaying two-dimensional turbulence. In a second regime, the long-time dynamics is dominated by a single three-dimensional mode.

  20. Black Hole Variability in MHD: A Numerical Test of the Propagating Fluctuations Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-08-01

    The variability properties of accreting black hole systems offer a crucial probe of the accretion physics providing the angular momentum transport and enabling the mass accretion. A few of the most telling signatures are the characteristic log-normal flux distributions, linear RMS-flux relations, and frequency-dependent time lags between energy bands. These commonly observed properties are often interpreted as evidence of inward propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations where fluctuations in the accretion flow combine multiplicatively. We present recent results from a long, semi-global MHD simulation of a thin (h/r=0.1) accretion disk that naturally reproduces this phenomenology. This bolsters the theoretical underpinnings of the “propagating fluctuations” model and demonstrates the viability of this process manifesting in MHD turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability. We find that a key ingredient to this model is the modulation of the effective α parameter by the magnetic dynamo.

  1. Lagrangian frequency spectrum as a diagnostic for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Angela; Müller, Wolf-Christian; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2010-12-01

    For the phenomenological description of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence competing models exist, e.g., Boldyrev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 115002 (2006)] and Gogoberidze [Phys. Plasmas 14, 022304 (2007)], which predict the same Eulerian inertial-range scaling of the turbulent energy spectrum although they employ fundamentally different basic interaction mechanisms. A relation is found that links the Lagrangian frequency spectrum with the autocorrelation time scale of the turbulent fluctuations τ(ac) and the associated cascade time scale τ(cas). Thus, the Lagrangian energy spectrum can serve to identify weak (τ(ac) ≪ τ(cas)) and strong (τ(ac) ∼ τ(cas)) interaction mechanisms providing insight into the turbulent energy cascade. The new approach is illustrated by results from direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional incompressible MHD turbulence.

  2. Evolution of turbulence in the expanding solar wind, a numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yue; Grappin, Roland [LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Verdini, Andrea, E-mail: Yue.Dong@lpp.polytechnique.fr, E-mail: verdini@arcetri.astro.it, E-mail: grappin@lpp.polytechnique.fr [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of turbulence in the solar wind by solving numerically the full three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations embedded in a radial mean wind. The corresponding equations (expanding box model or EBM) have been considered earlier but never integrated in 3D simulations. Here, we follow the development of turbulence from 0.2 AU up to about 1.5 AU. Starting with isotropic spectra scaling as k {sup –1}, we observe a steepening toward a k {sup –5/3} scaling in the middle of the wave number range and formation of spectral anisotropies. The advection of a plasma volume by the expanding solar wind causes a non-trivial stretching of the volume in directions transverse to radial and the selective decay of the components of velocity and magnetic fluctuations. These two effects combine to yield the following results. (1) Spectral anisotropy: gyrotropy is broken, and the radial wave vectors have most of the power. (2) Coherent structures: radial streams emerge that resemble the observed microjets. (3) Energy spectra per component: they show an ordering in good agreement with the one observed in the solar wind at 1 AU. The latter point includes a global dominance of the magnetic energy over kinetic energy in the inertial and f {sup –1} range and a dominance of the perpendicular-to-the-radial components over the radial components in the inertial range. We conclude that many of the above properties are the result of evolution during transport in the heliosphere, and not just the remnant of the initial turbulence close to the Sun.

  3. Turbulent Transport in a Three-dimensional Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, D.; Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Telloni, D.; Bruno, R.

    2017-03-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind can play essential roles in the heating of coronal and solar wind plasma and the acceleration of the solar wind and energetic particles. Turbulence sources are not well understood and thought to be partly enhanced by interaction with the large-scale inhomogeneity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field and/or transported from the solar corona. To investigate the interaction with background inhomogeneity and the turbulence sources, we have developed a new 3D MHD model that includes the transport and dissipation of turbulence using the theoretical model of Zank et al. We solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of three moments or variables, the energy in the forward and backward fluctuating modes and the residual energy and their three corresponding correlation lengths. The transport model is coupled to our 3D model of the inhomogeneous solar wind. We present results of the coupled solar wind-turbulence model assuming a simple tilted dipole magnetic configuration that mimics solar minimum conditions, together with several comparative intermediate cases. By considering eight possible solar wind and turbulence source configurations, we show that the large-scale solar wind and IMF inhomogeneity and the strength of the turbulence sources significantly affect the distribution of turbulence in the heliosphere within 6 au. We compare the predicted turbulence distribution results from a complete solar minimum model with in situ measurements made by the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft, finding that the synthetic profiles of the turbulence intensities show reasonable agreement with observations.

  4. Structure-function hierarchies and von Kármán-Howarth relations for turbulence in magnetohydrodynamical equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Abhik; Naji, Ali; Pandit, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    We generalize the method of A. M. Polyakov, [Phys. Rev. E 52, 6183 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevE.52.6183] for obtaining structure-function relations in turbulence in the stochastically forced Burgers equation, to develop structure-function hierarchies for turbulence in three models for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). These are the Burgers analogs of MHD in one dimension [Eur. Phys. J. B 9, 725 (1999), 10.1007/s100510050817], and in three dimensions (3DMHD and 3D Hall MHD). Our study provides a convenient and unified scheme for the development of structure-function hierarchies for turbulence in a variety of coupled hydrodynamical equations. For turbulence in the three sets of MHD equations mentioned above, we obtain exact relations for third-order structure functions and their derivatives; these expressions are the analogs of the von Kármán-Howarth relations for fluid turbulence. We compare our work with earlier studies of such relations in 3DMHD and 3D Hall MHD.

  5. INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Falceta-Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstellar Medium (ISM is a complex, multi-phase system, where the history of the stars occurs. The processes of birth and death of stars are strongly coupled to the dynamics of the ISM. The observed chaotic and diffusive motions of the gas characterize its turbulent nature. Understanding turbulence is crucial for understanding the star-formation process and the energy-mass feedback from evolved stars. Magnetic fields, threading the ISM, are also observed, making this effort even more difficult. In this work, I briefly review the main observations and the characterization of turbulence from these observable quantities. Following on, I provide a review of the physics of magnetized turbulence. Finally, I will show the main results from theoretical and numerical simulations, which can be used to reconstruct observable quantities, and compare these predictions to the observations.

  6. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  7. GEOMETRIC TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have investigated the solutions of Maxwell's equations, Navier-Stokes equations and the Schrödinger associated with the solutions of Einstein's equations for empty space. It is shown that in some cases the geometric instability leading to turbulence on the mechanism of alternating viscosity, which offered by N.N. Yanenko. The mechanism of generation of matter from dark energy due to the geometric turbulence in the Big Bang has been discussed

  8. On the Nature of Magnetic Turbulence in Rotating, Shearing Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Justin; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    The local properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in rotating, shearing flows are studied in the framework of a shearing-box model. Based on numerical simulations, we propose that the MRI-driven turbulence comprises two components: the large-scale shear-aligned strong magnetic field and the small-scale fluctuations resembling magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The energy spectrum of the large-scale component is close to $k^{-2}$, whereas the spectrum of the small-scale component agrees with the spectrum of strong MHD turbulence $k^{-3/2}$. While the spectrum of the fluctuations is universal, the outer-scale characteristics of the turbulence are not; they depend on the parameters of the system, such as the net magnetic flux. However, there is remarkable universality among the allowed turbulent states -- their intensity $v_0$ and their outer scale $\\lambda_0$ satisfy the balance condition $v_0/\\lambda_0\\sim \\mathrm d\\Omega/\\mathrm d\\ln r$, where $\\mathrm d\\Omega/\\mathrm d\\l...

  9. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Lima, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas; Yan, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Gouveia Dal Pino, E.M. de [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas; Lazarian, A. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Astronomy

    2016-05-15

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are successful to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities which can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the ions scattering rate due to the parallel firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instabilities thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model which bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvenic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  10. MHD Jets in inhomogeneous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O´Sullivan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos simulaciones de la propagaci on de jets moleculares no-adiab aticos en un medio ambiente inhomog eneo. Los jets tienen condiciones descritos por un modelo de jet MHD en el cual la forma de las l neas magn eticas se prescribe cerca de la fuente. Per les de densidad ambiental fueron elegidos para representar la zona de transici on entre las regiones exteriores de una nube molecular y el medio interestelar. Escalamos las tasas de enfriamiento at omico y molecular a niveles apropriados para resolver todas las escalas espaciales apropriadas. Con la inclusi on de variabilidad de la fuente, las simulaciones reproducen varias caracter sticas observacionales de jets moleculares, entre ellas las cavidades moleculares. Adicionalmente, encontramos similitudes entre teor a y observaci on para la fracci on de ionizaci on a lo largo del jet. Encontramos que la extensi on lateral de las super cies de trabajo internas son sensibles al medio ambiente. Tambi en presentamos resultados preliminares para un m etodo de calcular mapas de emisi on en l neas usando solamente variables fundamentales de estado que parecen reproducir la emisi on lamentosa de Balmer en frentes de choque.

  11. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

  12. Vorticity, Shocks and Magnetic Fields in Subsonic, ICM-like Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Porter, David H; Ryu, Dongsu

    2015-01-01

    We analyze high resolution simulations of compressible, MHD turbulence with properties resembling conditions in galaxy clusters. The flow is driven to turbulence Mach number $\\mathcal{M}_t \\sim 1/2$ in an isothermal medium with an initially very weak, uniform seed magnetic field ($\\beta = P_g/P_B = 10^6$). Since cluster turbulence is likely to result from a mix of sheared (solenoidal) and compressive forcing processes, we examine the distinct turbulence properties for both cases. In one set of simulations velocity forcing is entirely solenoidal ($\

  13. Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Supratik

    2016-01-01

    Besides total energy, three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses two inviscid invariants which are the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. New exact relations are derived for homogeneous (non-isotropic) stationary Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) with non-zero helicities and in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments. It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding invariant flux. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations.

  14. Chiral exact relations for helicities in Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Galtier, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Besides total energy, three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses two inviscid invariants, which are the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. Exact relations are derived for homogeneous (nonisotropic) stationary Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) with nonzero helicities and in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e., the scalar product of two different increments. It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding invariant flux. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations, while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations.

  15. Influence of stable stratification on three-dimensional isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metais, O.

    The influence of a stable stratification on three-dimensional homogeneous turbulence is investigated by performing large eddy simulations with the subgrid scales procedure developed by Chollet and Lesieur for isotropic turbulence. Computational initial conditions close to those of the experiments performed by Itsweire, Helland and Van Atta allow the comparison of the experimental and numerical evolutions of density-stratified turbulent flows. Theoretical works by Riley, Metcalfe and Weisman and by Lilly suggest that low Froude number stably-stratified turbulence may be a nearly noninteracting superposition of wave and quasi-horizontal turbulent vortex motions. For our computations the stably-stratified turbulence seems to be a decaying three-dimensional turbulence pulsed by internal gravity waves. However some tendencies towards two-dimensional turbulence are observed.

  16. Theory and Applications of Non-Relativistic and Relativistic Turbulent Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A; Takamoto, M; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Cho, J

    2015-01-01

    Realistic astrophysical environments are turbulent due to the extremely high Reynolds numbers. Therefore, the theories of reconnection intended for describing astrophysical reconnection should not ignore the effects of turbulence on magnetic reconnection. Turbulence is known to change the nature of many physical processes dramatically and in this review we claim that magnetic reconnection is not an exception. We stress that not only astrophysical turbulence is ubiquitous, but also magnetic reconnection itself induces turbulence. Thus turbulence must be accounted for in any realistic astrophysical reconnection setup. We argue that due to the similarities of MHD turbulence in relativistic and non-relativistic cases the theory of magnetic reconnection developed for the non-relativistic case can be extended to the relativistic case and we provide numerical simulations that support this conjecture. We also provide quantitative comparisons of the theoretical predictions and results of numerical experiments, includi...

  17. Characterization and parametric dependencies of low wavenumber pedestal turbulence in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Thompson, D. S. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The spherical torus edge region is among the most challenging regimes for plasma turbulence simulations. Here, we measure the spatial and temporal properties of ion-scale turbulence in the steep gradient region of H-mode pedestals during edge localized mode-free, MHD quiescent periods in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Poloidal correlation lengths are about 10 ρ{sub i}, and decorrelation times are about 5 a/c{sub s}. Next, we introduce a model aggregation technique to identify parametric dependencies among turbulence quantities and transport-relevant plasma parameters. The parametric dependencies show the most agreement with transport driven by trapped-electron mode, kinetic ballooning mode, and microtearing mode turbulence, and the least agreement with ion temperature gradient turbulence. In addition, the parametric dependencies are consistent with turbulence regulation by flow shear and the empirical relationship between wider pedestals and larger turbulent structures.

  18. Planetary turbulence: survey of Cassini data in the Saturn's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, Lina; Sahraoui, Fouad; Kiyani, Khurom; Modolo, Ronan; Retino, Alessandro; Canu, Patrick; Masters, Adam; Dougherty, Michele K.; Gurnett, Donald A.

    2015-04-01

    Turbulence is one of the most important yet not fully understood topics of modern physics. Understanding turbulence is collisionless plasmas, where kinetic effects mediate interactions between fields and charged particles play, is crucial to apprehend many dynamical processes such as particle heating and acceleration. Among others, one key open issue of plasma turbulence is how the energy associated to magnetic and electric fields is converted, and eventually dissipated, into kinetic and internal energy of the plasma. The planets' magnetosheath present a high level of turbulence that involves both nonlinear stochastic processes and a rich variety of wave phenomena. In comparison with turbulence in the solar wind and in the terrestrial magnetosheath, turbulence around other planets is far less explored. Here, we expand our knowledge in plasma turbulence by exploring the properties of turbulence in the Kronian magnetosheath using the Cassini spacecraft data. These properties include the magnetic field energy spectra, the magnetic compressibility and intermittency at both MHD and kinetic scales. The analysis is based on in-situ data provided by the Fluxgate Magnetometer of the MAG instrument, which measures the magnetic field data with 32ms time resolution and the plasma data from the CAPS/IMS (Cassini Plasma Spectrometer) and the Electron Spectrometer (ELS), during 39 shock-crossings between 2004 and 2005. Similarities and differences with the solar wind were found, in particular about the nature of the turbulence and its scaling laws, as well as the dependence of those properties on the topology of the bow shock.

  19. Rebound Shock Breakouts of Exploding Massive Stars: A MHD Void Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ren-Yu

    2008-01-01

    With a self-similar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of an exploding progenitor star and an outgoing rebound shock and with the thermal bremsstrahlung as the major radiation mechanism in X-ray bands, we reproduce the early X-ray light curve observed for the recent event of XRO 080109/SN 2008D association. The X-ray light curve consists of a fast rise, as the shock travels into the "visible layer" in the stellar envelope, and a subsequent power-law decay, as the plasma cools in a self-similar evolution. The observed spectral softening is naturally expected in our rebound MHD shock scenario. We propose to attribute the "non-thermal spectrum" observed to be a superposition of different thermal spectra produced at different layers of the stellar envelope.

  20. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2010-01-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretion on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscosity and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, creating mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until a quark-gluon strong-force SF freeze-out. Gluon-viscosity anti-gravity ({\\Lambda}SF) exponentially inflates the fireball to preserve big bang turbulence information at scales larger than ct as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background CMB temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered (10^12 s) as plasma viscous forces permit gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales (10^13 s). Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths a...

  1. Nonlinear closures for scale separation in supersonic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Grete, Philipp; Schmidt, Wolfram; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Federrath, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence in compressible plasma plays a key role in many areas of astrophysics and engineering. The extreme plasma parameters in these environments, e.g. high Reynolds numbers, supersonic and super-Alfvenic flows, however, make direct numerical simulations computationally intractable even for the simplest treatment -- magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). To overcome this problem one can use subgrid-scale (SGS) closures -- models for the influence of unresolved, subgrid-scales on the resolved ones. In this work we propose and validate a set of constant coefficient closures for the resolved, compressible, ideal MHD equations. The subgrid-scale energies are modeled by Smagorinsky-like equilibrium closures. The turbulent stresses and the electromotive force (EMF) are described by expressions that are nonlinear in terms of large scale velocity and magnetic field gradients. To verify the closures we conduct a priori tests over 137 simulation snapshots from two different codes with varying ratios of thermal to magnetic pre...

  2. Magnetic Flux Transport by turbulent reconnection in astrophysical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, Elisabete M de Gouveia Dal; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo; Guerrero, Gustavo; Kowal, Grzegorz; Lazarian, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The role of MHD turbulence in astrophysical environments is still highly debated. An important question that permeates this debate is the transport of magnetic flux. This is particularly important, for instance, in the context of star formation. When clouds collapse gravitationally to form stars, there must be some magnetic flux transport. otherwise the new born stars would have magnetic fields several orders of magnitude larger than the observed ones. Also, the magnetic flux that is dragged in the late stages of the formation of a star can remove all the rotational support from the accretion disk that grows around the protostar. The efficiency of the mechanism which is often invoked to allow the transport of magnetic fields in the different stages of star formation, namely, the ambipolar diffusion, has been lately put in check. We here discuss an alternative mechanism for magnetic flux transport which is based on turbulent fast magnetic reconnection. We review recent results obtained from 3D MHD numerical si...

  3. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Linkmann, Moritz F; McKay, Mairi E; Jäger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Fu...

  4. The influence of turbulence during magnetized core collapse and its consequences on low-mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Joos, Marc; Ciardi, Andrea; Fromang, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] Theoretical and numerical studies of star formation have shown that magnetic field (B) has a strong influence on both disk formation and fragmentation; even a relatively low B can prevent these processes. However, very few studies investigated the combined effects of B and turbulence. We study the effects of turbulence in magnetized core collapse, focusing on the magnetic diffusion, the orientation of the angular momentum (J) of the protostellar core, and on its consequences on disk formation, fragmentation and outflows. We perform 3D, AMR, MHD simulations of magnetically supercritical collapsing dense cores of 5 Msun using the MHD code RAMSES. A turbulent velocity field is imposed as initial conditions, characterised by a Kolmogorov power spectrum. Different levels of turbulence and magnetization are investigated, as well as 3 realisations for the turbulent velocity field. Magnetic diffusion, orientation of the rotation axis with respect to B, transport of J, disk formation, fragmentation and outf...

  5. Radiation-driven MHD systems for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Jalufka, N. W.

    High-power radiation such as concentrated solar or high-power laser radiation is considered as a driver for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems which could be developed for efficient power generation and propulsion in space. Eight different systems are conceivable since the MHD systems can be classified in two: plasma and liquid-metal MHD's. Each of these systems is reviewed and solar- (or laser-) driven MHD thrusters are proposed.

  6. The mathematical theory of reduced MHD models for fusion plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Guillard, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    The derivation of reduced MHD models for fusion plasma is here formulated as a special instance of the general theory of singular limit of hyperbolic system of PDEs with large operator. This formulation allows to use the general results of this theory and to prove rigorously that reduced MHD models are valid approximations of the full MHD equations. In particular, it is proven that the solutions of the full MHD system converge to the solutions of an appropriate reduced model.

  7. Convivial Decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    in the life of infrastructure we can observe common issues associated with aging infrastructures – hardware’s material decay, programming languages and software tools reaching end of support, obsolete managerial methodologies, etc. Such a case of infrastructural decay reveals how work of infrastructure...... maintenance may reach the limits of repair and shift from repair-as-sustaining into a mode of repair- into-decay, actively working towards the end-of-life. What this reveals is that, rather than infrastructural decay being a natural by-product of time’s passing, there is active work that goes into producing......This paper discusses the empirical case of an aging and obsolescent infrastructure supporting a space science mission that is currently approaching a known end. Such a case contributes to our understanding of the degrading path at the end-of-life of an infrastructure. During this later stage...

  8. Simulation of wave interactions with MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D; Bernholdt, D; Berry, L; Elwasif, W; Jaeger, E; Keyes, D; Klasky, S [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37331 (United States); Alba, C; Choi, M [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186 (United States); Bateman, G [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Bonoli, P [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MTT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bramley, R [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Breslau, J; Chance, M; Chen, J; Fu, G; Jardin, S [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Harvey, R [CompX, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States); Jenkins, T [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kruger, S [Tech-X, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)], E-mail: batchelordb@ornl.gov (and others)

    2008-07-15

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation 01 Wave Interaction with MHD) project are twofold: (1) improve our understanding of interactions that both radio frequency (RF) wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (2) develop an integrated computational system for treating multiphysics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) has been implemented. Presented here are initial physics results on RP effects on MHD instabilities in tokamaks as well as simulation results for tokamak discharge evolution using the IPS.

  9. Simulation of wave interactions with MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, Donald B [ORNL; Abla, G [General Atomics, San Diego; Bateman, Glenn [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Bonoli, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Bramley, R [Indiana University; Breslau, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chance, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chen, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Choi, M. [General Atomics; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Fu, GuoYong [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick [ORNL; Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jenkins, T [University of Wisconsin; Keyes, David E [Columbia University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Kruger, Scott [Tech-X Corporation; Ku, Long-Poe [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; McCune, Douglas [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ramos, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Schissel, D. [General Atomics; Schnack, [University of Wisconsin; Wright, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2008-07-01

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation of Wave Interaction with MHD) project are twofold: (1) improve our understanding of interactions that both radio frequency (RF) wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (2) develop an integrated computational system for treating multiphysics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) has been implemented. Presented here are initial physics results on RF effects on MHD instabilities in tokamaks as well as simulation results for tokamak discharge evolution using the IPS.

  10. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretions on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscous stresses and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, extracting mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until str...

  11. Features of collisionless turbulence in the intracluster medium from simulated Faraday rotation maps II: the effects of instabilities feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Santos-Lima, R; Falceta-Gonçalves, D A; Nakwacki, M S; Kowal, G

    2016-01-01

    Statistical analysis of Faraday Rotation Measure (RM) maps of the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters provides a unique tool to evaluate some spatial features of the magnetic fields there. Its combination with numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence allows the diagnosis of the ICM turbulence. Being the ICM plasma weakly collisional, the thermal velocity distribution of the particles naturally develops anisotropies as a consequence of the large scale motions and the conservation of the magnetic moment of the charged particles. A previous study (Paper I) analyzed the impact of large scale thermal anisotropy on the statistics of RM maps synthesized from simulations of turbulence; these simulations employed a collisionless MHD model which considered a tensor pressure with uniform anisotropy. In the present work, we extend that analysis to a collisionless MHD model in which the thermal anisotropy develops according to the conservation of the magnetic moment of the thermal particles. ...

  12. Direct numerical simulation of compressible isotropic turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xinliang(李新亮); FU; Dexun(傅德薰); MAYanwen(马延文)

    2002-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of decaying compressible isotropic turbulence at tur-bulence Mach numbers of Mt = 0.2-0.7 and Taylor Reynolds numbers of 72 and 153 is per-formed by using the 7th order upwind-biased difference and 8th order center difference schemes.Results show that proper upwind-biased difference schemes can release the limit of "start-up"problem to Mach numbers.Compressibility effects on the statistics of turbulent flow as well as the mechanics of shockletsin compressible turbulence are also studied, and the conclusion is drawn that high Mach numberleads to more dissipation. Scaling laws in compressible turbulence are also analyzed. Evidence isobtained that scaling laws and extended self similarity (ESS) hold in the compressible turbulentflow in spite of the presence of shocklets, and compressibility has little effect on scaling exponents.

  13. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Hikosaka, Koki

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  14. Euler potentials for the MHD Kamchatnov-Hopf soliton solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semenov, VS; Korovinski, DB; Biernat, HK

    2002-01-01

    In the MHD description of plasma phenomena the concept of magnetic helicity turns out to be very useful. We present here an example of introducing Euler potentials into a topological MHD soliton which has non-trivial helicity. The MHD soliton solution (Kamchatnov, 1982) is based on the Hopf invarian

  15. A Lower Bound on Adiabatic Heating of Compressed Turbulence for Simulation and Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-04-01

    The energy in turbulent flow can be amplified by compression, when the compression occurs on a timescale shorter than the turbulent dissipation time. This mechanism may play a part in sustaining turbulence in various astrophysical systems, including molecular clouds. The amount of turbulent amplification depends on the net effect of the compressive forcing and turbulent dissipation. By giving an argument for a bound on this dissipation, we give a lower bound for the scaling of the turbulent velocity with the compression ratio in compressed turbulence. That is, turbulence undergoing compression will be enhanced at least as much as the bound given here, subject to a set of caveats that will be outlined. Used as a validation check, this lower bound suggests that some models of compressing astrophysical turbulence are too dissipative. The technique used highlights the relationship between compressed turbulence and decaying turbulence.

  16. A lower bound on adiabatic heating of compressed turbulence for simulation and model validation

    CERN Document Server

    Davidovits, Seth

    2016-01-01

    The energy in turbulent flow can be amplified by compression, when the compression occurs on a timescale shorter than the turbulent dissipation time. This mechanism may play a part in sustaining turbulence in various astrophysical systems, including molecular clouds. The amount of turbulent amplification depends on the net effect of the compressive forcing and turbulent dissipation. By giving an argument for a bound on this dissipation, we give a lower bound for the scaling of the turbulent velocity with compression ratio in compressed turbulence. That is, turbulence undergoing compression will be enhanced at least as much as the bound given here, subject to a set of caveats that will be outlined. Used as a validation check, this lower bound suggests that some simulations and models of compressing astrophysical turbulence are too dissipative. The technique used highlights the relationship between compressed turbulence and decaying turbulence.

  17. Safety and reliability in superconducting MHD magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverick, C.; Powell, J.; Hsieh, S.; Reich, M.; Botts, T.; Prodell, A.

    1979-07-01

    This compilation adapts studies on safety and reliability in fusion magnets to similar problems in superconducting MHD magnets. MHD base load magnet requirements have been identified from recent Francis Bitter National Laboratory reports and that of other contracts. Information relevant to this subject in recent base load magnet design reports for AVCO - Everett Research Laboratories and Magnetic Corporation of America is included together with some viewpoints from a BNL workshop on structural analysis needed for superconducting coils in magnetic fusion energy. A summary of design codes used in large bubble chamber magnet design is also included.

  18. Explosively-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agee, F.J.; Lehr, F.M. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Vigil, M.; Kaye, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaudet, J.; Shiffler, D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Plasma jet generators have been designed and tested which used an explosive driver and shocktube with a rectangular cross section that optimize the flow velocity and electrical conductivity. The latest in a series of designs has been tested using a reactive load to diagnose the electrical properties of the MHD generator/electromagnet combination. The results of these tests indicate that the plasma jet/MHD generator design does generate a flow velocity greater than 25 km/s and produces several gigawatts of pulsed power in a very small package size. A larger, new generator design is also presented.

  19. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  20. Global MHD Simulations of Accretion Disks in Cataclysmic Variables (CVs): I. The Importance of Spiral Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Wenhua; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the first global 3D MHD simulations of accretion disks in Cataclysmic Variable (CV) systems in order to investigate the relative importance of angular momentum transport via turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) compared to that driven by spiral shock waves. Remarkably, we find that even with vigorous MRI turbulence, spiral shocks are an important component to the overall angular momentum budget, at least when temperatures in the disk are high (so that Mach numbers are low). In order to understand the excitation, propagation, and damping of spiral density waves in our simulations more carefully, we perform a series of 2D global hydrodynamical simulations with various equation of states and both with and without mass inflow via the Lagrangian point (L1). Compared with previous similar studies, we find the following new results. 1) Linear wave dispersion relation fits the pitch angles of spiral density waves very well. 2) We demonstrate explicitly that mass accreti...

  1. Investigating Magnetic Activity in the Galactic Centre by Global MHD Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Takeru K; Torii, Kazufumi; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kakiuchi, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    By performing a global magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulation for the Milky Way with an axisymmetric gravitational potential, we propose that spatially dependent amplification of magnetic fields possibly explains the observed noncircular motion of the gas in the Galactic centre (GC) region. The radial distribution of the rotation frequency in the bulge region is not monotonic in general. The amplification of the magnetic field is enhanced in regions with stronger differential rotation, because magnetorotational instability and field-line stretching are more effective. The strength of the amplified magnetic field reaches >~ 0.5 mG, and radial flows of the gas are excited by the inhomogeneous transport of angular momentum through turbulent magnetic field that is amplified in a spatially dependent manner. As a result, the simulated position-velocity diagram exhibits a time-dependent asymmetric parallelogram-shape owing to the intermittency of the magnetic turbulence; the present model provides a viable alternati...

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo: global flow generation in plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Yoshizawa, Akira [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science; Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    1999-07-01

    Generation mechanism of the spontaneous plasma rotation observed in an improved confinement mode in tokamak's is examined from the viewpoint of the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo. A dynamo model, where the concept of cross helicity (velocity/magnetic-field correlation) plays a key role, is applied to the reversed shear (RS) modes. The concave electric-current profile occurred in the RS modes is shown to be a cause of the global plasma rotation through a numerical simulation of the cross-helicity turbulence model. (author)

  3. Turbulent relaxation and meta-stable equilibrium states of an electron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Douglas J.

    A Malmberg-Penning electron trap allows for the experimental study of nearly ideal, two-dimensional (2D) inviscid (Euler) hydrodynamics. This is perhaps the simplest case of self organizing nonlinear turbulence, and is therefore a paradigm for dynamo theory, Taylor relaxation, selective decay and other nonlinear fluid processes. The dynamical relaxation of a pure electron plasma in the guiding-center-drift approximation is studied, comparing experiments, numerical simulations and statistical theories of weakly-dissipative 2D turbulence. The nonuniform metastable equilibrium states resulting from turbulent evolution are examined, and are well-described by a maximum entropy principle for constrained circulation, energy, and angular momentum. The turbulent decay of the system is also examined, and a similarity decay law is proposed which incorporates the substantial enstrophy trapped in the metastable equilibrium. This law approaches Batchelor's t-2 self-similar decay in the limit of strong turbulence, and is verified in turbulent evolution in the electron plasma experiment.

  4. Realistic radiative MHD simulation of a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark; Chintzoglou, Georgios; Chen, Feng; Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Sainz Dalda, Alberto; DeRosa, Marc L.; Viktorovna Malanushenko, Anna; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a recently developed version of the MURaM radiative MHD code that includes coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss and field aligned heat conduction. The code employs the "Boris correction" (semi-relativistic MHD with a reduced speed of light) and a hyperbolic treatment of heat conduction, which allow for efficient simulations of the photosphere/corona system by avoiding the severe time-step constraints arising from Alfven wave propagation and heat conduction. We demonstrate that this approach can be used even in dynamic phases such as a flare. We consider a setup in which a flare is triggered by flux emergence into a pre-existing bipolar active region. After the coronal energy release, efficient transport of energy along field lines leads to the formation of flare ribbons within seconds. In the flare ribbons we find downflows for temperatures lower than ~5 MK and upflows at higher temperatures. The resulting soft X-ray emission shows a fast rise and slow decay, reaching a peak corresponding to a mid C-class flare. The post reconnection energy release in the corona leads to average particle energies reaching 50 keV (500 MK under the assumption of a thermal plasma). We show that hard X-ray emission from the corona computed under the assumption of thermal bremsstrahlung can produce a power-law spectrum due to the multi-thermal nature of the plasma. The electron energy flux into the flare ribbons (classic heat conduction with free streaming limit) is highly inhomogeneous and reaches peak values of about 3x1011 erg/cm2/s in a small fraction of the ribbons, indicating regions that could potentially produce hard X-ray footpoint sources. We demonstrate that these findings are robust by comparing simulations computed with different values of the saturation heat flux as well as the "reduced speed of light".

  5. The generation, destination, and astrophysical applications of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Siyao; Lazarian, Alex; Zhang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitous turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) participates in astrophysical processes over a huge dynamic range of scales. Understanding the turbulence properties in the multiphase, magnetized, partially ionized, and compressible ISM is the fundamental step prior to the studies of the ISM physics and other fields of astrophysics. I feel that a triad of analytical, numerical and observational efforts provides a winning combination to understand this complex system and solve long-standing puzzles. I have intensively studied the fundamental physics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and focused on two primary domains, dynamo and dissipation, which concern the origin of strong magnetic fields and the destination of turbulence, respectively. I further applied my theoretical studies in interpreting numerical results and observational data in various astrophysical contexts. The advanced analyses of MHD turbulence enable me to address a number of challenging astrophysical problems, e.g. the importance of magnetic fields for star formation in the early and present-day universe, new methods of measuring magnetic fields, the density distribution in the Galaxy and the host galaxy of a fast radio burst, the diffusion and acceleration of cosmic rays in partially ionized ISM phases.

  6. Energy Cascade Rate in Compressible Fast and Slow Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S.

    2017-03-01

    Estimation of the energy cascade rate in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence has been done so far mostly within incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) theory. Here, we go beyond that approximation to include plasma compressibility using a reduced form of a recently derived exact law for compressible, isothermal MHD turbulence. Using in situ data from the THEMIS/ARTEMIS spacecraft in the fast and slow solar wind, we investigate in detail the role of the compressible fluctuations in modifying the energy cascade rate with respect to the prediction of the incompressible MHD model. In particular, we found that the energy cascade rate (1) is amplified particularly in the slow solar wind; (2) exhibits weaker fluctuations in spatial scales, which leads to a broader inertial range than the previous reported ones; (3) has a power-law scaling with the turbulent Mach number; (4) has a lower level of spatial anisotropy. Other features of solar wind turbulence are discussed along with their comparison with previous studies that used incompressible or heuristic (nonexact) compressible MHD models.

  7. Signatures of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks in turbulent molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the giant molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low-velocity shock waves. These shocks cause molecular line cooling of the compressed and heated gas, and so their radiative signatures probe the nature of the turbulence. In MHD fluids the three distinct families of shocks---fast, intermediate and slow---differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so observational differences between them may also distinguish driving modes of turbulent regions. Here we use a two-fluid model to compare the characteristics of one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks propagating at low speeds (a few km/s) in molecular clouds. Fast MHD shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where...

  8. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental sealants? How are ... fix decayed teeth. Back to Top What causes tooth decay? Germs in the mouth use the sugar in ...

  9. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  10. Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    and complexity of thermochemistry . Accordingly a practical viewpoint is required to meet near-term work required for use in advanced CFD codes...teachers the opportunity to learn/explore/ teach turbulence issues. While such a product could be an invaluable eductaional tool (university), it also

  11. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  12. Burgers turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bec, Jeremie [Laboratoire Cassiopee UMR6202, CNRS, OCA, BP4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)]. E-mail: jeremie.bec@obs-nice.fr; Khanin, Konstantin [Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., M5S 3G3 (Canada)]. E-mail: khanin@math.toronto.edu

    2007-08-15

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers model to statistical physics, cosmology, and fluid dynamics. Also Burgers turbulence appeared as one of the simplest instances of a nonlinear system out of equilibrium. The study of random Lagrangian systems, of stochastic partial differential equations and their invariant measures, the theory of dynamical systems, the applications of field theory to the understanding of dissipative anomalies and of multiscaling in hydrodynamic turbulence have benefited significantly from progress in Burgers turbulence. The aim of this review is to give a unified view of selected work stemming from these rather diverse disciplines.

  13. CUDA Simulation of Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John V.; Shum, Victor; Fu, Terry

    2011-01-01

    We discuss very fast Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) simulations of ideal homogeneous incompressible turbulence based on Fourier models. These models have associated statistical theories that predict that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. Prior numerical simulations have shown that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We review the theoretical basis of this "broken ergodicity" as applied to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence. Our new simulations examine the phenomenon of broken ergodicity through very long time and large grid size runs performed on a state-of-the-art CUDA platform. Results comparing various CUDA hardware configurations and grid sizes are discussed. NS and MHD results are compared.

  14. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2015-11-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Results of MARS parallelization and of the development of a new fix boundary equilibrium code adapted for MARS input will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  15. Application of ADER Scheme in MHD Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yanyan; FENG Xueshang; JIANG Chaowei; ZHOU Yufen

    2012-01-01

    The Arbitrary accuracy Derivatives Riemann problem method(ADER) scheme is a new high order numerical scheme based on the concept of finite volume integration,and it is very easy to be extended up to any order of space and time accuracy by using a Taylor time expansion at the cell interface position.So far the approach has been applied successfully to flow mechanics problems.Our objective here is to carry out the extension of multidimensional ADER schemes to multidimensional MHD systems of conservation laws by calculating several MHD problems in one and two dimensions: (ⅰ) Brio-Wu shock tube problem,(ⅱ) Dai-Woodward shock tube problem,(ⅲ) Orszag-Tang MHD vortex problem.The numerical results prove that the ADER scheme possesses the ability to solve MHD problem,remains high order accuracy both in space and time,keeps precise in capturing the shock.Meanwhile,the compared tests show that the ADER scheme can restrain the oscillation and obtain the high order non-oscillatory result.

  16. Hodograph method in MHD orthogonal fluid flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Nguyen

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Equations for steady plane MHD orthogonal flows of a viscous incompressible fluid of finite electrical conductivity are recast in the hodograph plane by using the Legendre transform function of the streamfunction. Three examples are studied to illustrate the developed theory. Solutions and geometries for these examples are determined.

  17. Principal characteristics of SFC type MHD generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayukawa, Naoyuki; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Aoki, Yoshiaki; Seidou, Tadashi; Okinaka, Noriyuki

    1988-02-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical results obtained for an MHD channel with a two dimensionally shaped magnetic field configuration called 'the SFC-type'. The power generating performance was examined under various load conditions and B-field intensities with a 2 MWt shock tunnel MHD facility. It is demonstrated that the power output performance and the enthalpy extraction scaling law of the conventional uniform B-field MHD generator (UFC-type) were significantly improved by the SFC-design of the spatial distribution of the magnetic field. The arcing processes were also examined by a high speed camera and the post-test observation of arc spot traces on electrodes. Further, the characteristic frequencies of each of the so-called micro and constricted arcs were clarified by spectral analyses. The critical current densities, which define the transient conditions of each from the diffuse-to micro arc, and from the micro-to constricted arc modes could be clearly obtained by the present spectral analysis method. We also investigated the three-dimensional behavior under strong magnetic field based on the coupled electrical and hydrodynamical equations for both of the middle scale SFC-and UFC-type generators. Finally, it is concluded from the above mentioned various aspects that the shaped 2-D magnetic field design will offer a most useful means for the realization of a compact, high efficiency and a long duration open-cycle MHD generator.

  18. Pseudo-reconnection in MHD numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A class of pseudo-reconnections caused by a shifted mesh in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations is reported. In terms of this mesh system, some non-physical results may be obtained in certain circumstances, e.g. magnetic reconnection occurs without resistivity. After comparison, another kind of mesh is strongly recommended.

  19. MHD equilibrium and stability in heliotron plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Recent topics in the theoretical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis in the heliotron configuration are overviewed. Particularly, properties of three-dimensional equilibria, stability boundary of the interchange mode, effects of the net toroidal current including the bootstrap current and the ballooning mode stability are focused. (author)

  20. Realistic Modeling of Multi-Scale MHD Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan; Couvidat, Sebastian; Yoon, Seokkwan; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Realistic 3D radiative MHD simulations open new perspectives for understanding the turbulent dynamics of the solar surface, its coupling to the atmosphere, and the physical mechanisms of generation and transport of non-thermal energy. Traditionally, plasma eruptions and wave phenomena in the solar atmosphere are modeled by prescribing artificial driving mechanisms using magnetic or gas pressure forces that might arise from magnetic field emergence or reconnection instabilities. In contrast, our 'ab initio' simulations provide a realistic description of solar dynamics naturally driven by solar energy flow. By simulating the upper convection zone and the solar atmosphere, we can investigate in detail the physical processes of turbulent magnetoconvection, generation and amplification of magnetic fields, excitation of MHD waves, and plasma eruptions. We present recent simulation results of the multi-scale dynamics of quiet-Sun regions, and energetic effects in the atmosphere and compare with observations. For the comparisons we calculate synthetic spectro-polarimetric data to model observational data of SDO, Hinode, and New Solar Telescope.

  1. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  2. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  3. Collisionless magnetic reconnection under anisotropic MHD approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro

    We study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection by using one- and two-dimensional collisionless magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) simulations based on the double adiabatic approximation, which is an important step to bridge the gap between the Petschek-type MHD reconnection model accompanied by a pair of slow shocks and the observational evidence of the rare occasion of in-situ slow shock observation. According to our results, a pair of slow shocks does form in the reconnection layer. The resultant shock waves, however, are quite weak compared with those in an isotropic MHD from the point of view of the plasma compression and the amount of the magnetic energy released across the shock. Once the slow shock forms, the downstream plasma are heated in highly anisotropic manner and a firehose-sense (P_{||}>P_{⊥}) pressure anisotropy arises. The maximum anisotropy is limited by the marginal firehose criterion, 1-(P_{||}-P_{⊥})/B(2) =0. In spite of the weakness of the shocks, the resultant reconnection rate is kept at the same level compared with that in the corresponding ordinary MHD simulations. It is also revealed that the sequential order of propagation of the slow shock and the rotational discontinuity, which appears when the guide field component exists, changes depending on the magnitude of the guide field. Especially, when no guide field exists, the rotational discontinuity degenerates with the contact discontinuity remaining at the position of the initial current sheet, while with the slow shock in the isotropic MHD. Our result implies that the slow shock does not necessarily play an important role in the energy conversion in the reconnection system and is consistent with the satellite observation in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  4. Turbulent Buoyant Jets in Flowing Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    1991-01-01

    and dilution can be successfully correlated by use of momentum or buoyancy length scales. In addition the centerline density deficit and velocity decay are well predicted by using an integral and a k - ∈turbulence model. The results shown here help us to understand in a better way the physical phenornenon...

  5. New aspects of plasma sheet dynamics - MHD and kinetic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wiechen

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection is a process of fundamental importance for the dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet. In this context, the development of thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet is a topic of special interest because they could be a possible cause of microscopic fluctuations acting as collective non-idealness from a macroscopic point of view. Simulations of the near-Earth plasma sheet including boundary perturbations due to localized inflow through the northern (or southern plasma sheet boundary show developing thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet about 810 RE tailwards of the Earth. This location is largely independent from the localization of the perturbation. The second part of the paper deals with the problem of the macroscopic non-ideal consequences of microscopic fluctuations. A new model is presented that allows the quantitative calculation of macroscopic non-idealness without considering details of microscopic instabilities or turbulence. This model is only based on the assumption of a strongly fluctuating, mixing dynamics on microscopic scales in phase space. The result of this approach is an expression for anomalous non-idealness formally similar to the Krook resistivity but now describing the macroscopic consequences of collective microscopic fluctuations, not of collisions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma sheet · Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; magnetic reconnection

  6. Turbulent convection model in the overshooting region: II. Theoretical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Q

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent convection models are thought to be good tools to deal with the convective overshooting in the stellar interior. However, they are too complex to be applied in calculations of stellar structure and evolution. In order to understand the physical processes of the convective overshooting and to simplify the application of turbulent convection models, a semi-analytic solution is necessary. We obtain the approximate solution and asymptotic solution of the turbulent convection model in the overshooting region, and find some important properties of the convective overshooting: I. The overshooting region can be partitioned into three parts: a thin region just outside the convective boundary with high efficiency of turbulent heat transfer, a power law dissipation region of turbulent kinetic energy in the middle, and a thermal dissipation area with rapidly decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. The decaying indices of the turbulent correlations $k$, $\\bar{u_{r}'T'}$, and $\\bar{T'T'}$ are only determined by the ...

  7. Numerical Validation and Comparison of Three Solar Wind Heating Methods by the SIP-CESE MHD Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li-Ping; FENG Xue-Shang; XIANG Chang-Qing; JIANG Chao-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We conduct simulations using the three-dimensional(3D) solar-interplanetary conservation element/solution element(SIP-CESE) maguetohydrodynamic(MHD) model and magnetogram data from a Carrington rotation (CR) 1897 to compare the three commonly used heating methods, I.e. The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin(WKB)Alfvén wave heating method, the turbulence heating method and the volumetric heating method. Our results show that all three heating models can basically reproduce the bimodal structure of the solar wind observed near the solar minimum. The results also demonstrate that the major acceleration interval terminates about 4Rs for the turbulence heating method and 1ORs for both the WKB Alfvén wave heating method and the volumetric heating method. The turbulence heating and the volumetric heating methods can capture the observed changing trends by the WIND satellite, while the WKB Alfvén wave heating method does not.

  8. Solar-wind/magnetospheric dynamos: MHD-scale collective entry of the solar wind energy, momentum and mass into the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Lysak, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A quasi open MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) scale anomalous transport controlled boundary layer model is proposed, where the MHD collective behavior of magnetofluids (direct dynamo effect, anomalous viscous interaction and anomalous diffusion of the mass and the magnetic field) plays the main role in the conversion of the Solar Wind (SW) kinetic and magnetic energy into electromagnetic energy in the Magnetosphere (MSp). The so called direct and indirect dynamo effects are based on inductive and purely dissipative energy conversion, respectively. The self organization ability of vector fields in turbulent magnetofluids implies an inductive response of the plasma, which leads to the direct dynamo effect. The direct dynamo effect describes the direct formation of localized field aligned currents and the transverse Alfven waves and provides a source for MHD scale anomalous diffusivity and viscosity. The SW/MSp coupling depends on the dynamo efficiency.

  9. Holographic thermal relaxation in superfluid turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yiqiang [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Niu, Chao [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Tian, Yu [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Hongbao [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing 100875 (China); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-02

    Holographic duality provides a first-principles approach to investigate real time processes in quantum many-body systems, in particular at finite temperature and far-from-equilibrium. We use this approach to study the dynamical evolution of vortex number in a two-dimensional (2D) turbulent superfluid through numerically solving its gravity dual. We find that the temporal evolution of the vortex number can be well fit statistically by two-body decay due to the vortex pair annihilation featured relaxation process, thus confirm the previous suspicion based on the experimental data for turbulent superfluid in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates. Furthermore, the decay rate near the critical temperature is in good agreement with the recently developed effective theory of 2D superfluid turbulence.

  10. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this report a new turbulence model is presented.In contrast to the bulk of modern work, the model is a classical continuum model with a relatively simple constitutive equation. The constitutive equation is, as usual in continuum mechanics, entirely empirical. It has the usual Newton or Stokes...... term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence....... The model is in a virgin state, but a number of numerical tests have been carried out with good results. It is published to encourage other researchers to study the model in order to find its merits and possible limitations....

  11. Two-fluid turbulence including electron inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrés, Nahuel, E-mail: nandres@iafe.uba.ar; Gómez, Daniel [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CC. 67, suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, Carlos; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    We present a full two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure, and electron inertia. According to this description, each plasma species introduces a new spatial scale: the ion inertial length λ{sub i} and the electron inertial length λ{sub e}, which are not present in the traditional MHD description. In the present paper, we seek for possible changes in the energy power spectrum in fully developed turbulent regimes, using numerical simulations of the two-fluid equations in two-and-a-half dimensions. We have been able to reproduce different scaling laws in different spectral ranges, as it has been observed in the solar wind for the magnetic energy spectrum. At the smallest wavenumbers where plain MHD is valid, we obtain an inertial range following a Kolmogorov k{sup −5∕3} law. For intermediate wavenumbers such that λ{sub i}{sup −1}≪k≪λ{sub e}{sup −1}, the spectrum is modified to a k{sup −7∕3} power-law, as has also been obtained for Hall-MHD neglecting electron inertia terms. When electron inertia is retained, a new spectral region given by k>λ{sub e}{sup −1} arises. The power spectrum for magnetic energy in this region is given by a k{sup −11∕3} power law. Finally, when the terms of electron inertia are retained, we study the self-consistent electric field. Our results are discussed and compared with those obtained in the solar wind observations and previous simulations.

  12. Controlling turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  13. Energy transfer and dissipation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Valente, Pedro C

    2013-01-01

    The nonequilibrium dissipation behaviour discovered for decaying fractal square grid-generated turbulence is experimentally investigated using hot-wire anemometry in a wind tunnel. The previous results are consolidated and benchmarked with turbulence generated by regular square-mesh grids, designed to retain certain geometrical parameters of the fractal square grid. This comparison shows that the nonequilibrium behaviour is manifested in both fractal square grid- and regular square-mesh grid-generated turbulence for a downstream region during the turbulence decay up to the first few multiples of the wake interaction distance. For one of the regular grids it is shown that beyond this region there is a transition to the classical dissipation behaviour if the local turbulent Reynolds number is sufficiently high. A sharp conclusion can thus be drawn that this behaviour is more general than initially thought and therefore of much greater scientific and engineering significance. The nonequilibrium dissipation pheno...

  14. Les Houches 2000 Summer School: Session 74: New Trends in Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yaglom, A; David, F; New Trends in Turbulence

    2001-01-01

    This book is written for researchers as well as engineers in an industrial environment. Following a longstanding tradition of the Les Houches Summer Schools, all chapters are pedagogically presented and accessible for graduate students. The book treats 2D and 3D turbulence from the experimental, theoretical and computational points of view. The reader will find, for example, comprehensive accounts of fully developed turbulence experiments, simulating deterministically coherent vortices formation, and statistical prediction of industrial flows, and a very complete review of 2D turbulence. Fundamental concepts like topological fluid dynamics in MHD flows or finite-time singularities of the Burgers, Euler and Navier--Stokes equations complete the volume.

  15. A consistent thermodynamics of the MHD wave-heated two-fluid solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    Full Text Available We start our considerations from two more recent findings in heliospheric physics: One is the fact that the primary solar wind protons do not cool off adiabatically with distance, but appear to be heated. The other one is that secondary protons, embedded in the solar wind as pick-up ions, behave quasi-isothermal at their motion to the outer heliosphere. These two phenomena must be physically closely connected with each other. To demonstrate this we solve a coupled set of enthalpy flow conservation equations for the two-fluid solar wind system consisting of primary and secondary protons. The coupling of these equations comes by the heat sources that are relevant, namely the dissipation of MHD turbulence power to the respective protons at the relevant dissipation scales. Hereby we consider both the dissipation of convected turbulences and the dissipation of turbulences locally driven by the injection of new pick-up ions into an unstable mode of the ion distribution function. Conversion of free kinetic energy of freshly injected secondary ions into turbulence power is finally followed by partial reabsorption of this energy both by primary and secondary ions. We show solutions of simultaneous integrations of the coupled set of differential thermodynamic two-fluid equations and can draw interesting conclusions from the solutions obtained. We can show that the secondary proton temperature with increasing radial distance asymptotically attains a constant value with a magnitude essentially determined by the actual solar wind velocity. Furthermore, we study the primary proton temperature within this two-fluid context and find a polytropic behaviour with radially and latitudinally variable polytropic indices determined by the local heat sources due to dissipated turbulent wave energy. Considering latitudinally variable solar wind conditions, as published by McComas et al. (2000, we also predict latitudinal variations of primary proton temperatures at

  16. Consistent Initial Conditions for the DNS of Compressible Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.; Blaisdell, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Relationships between diverse thermodynamic quantities appropriate to weakly compressible turbulence are derived. It is shown that for turbulence of a finite turbulent Mach number there is a finite element of compressibility. A methodology for generating initial conditions for the fluctuating pressure, density and dilatational velocity is given which is consistent with finite Mach number effects. Use of these initial conditions gives rise to a smooth development of the flow, in contrast to cases in which these fields are specified arbitrarily or set to zero. Comparisons of the effect of different types of initial conditions are made using direct numerical simulation of decaying isotropic turbulence.

  17. The structure and statistics of interstellar turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsuk, A. G.; Ustyugov, S. D.; Norman, M. L.

    2017-06-01

    We explore the structure and statistics of multiphase, magnetized ISM turbulence in the local Milky Way by means of driven periodic box numerical MHD simulations. Using the higher order-accurate piecewise-parabolic method on a local stencil (PPML), we carry out a small parameter survey varying the mean magnetic field strength and density while fixing the rms velocity to observed values. We quantify numerous characteristics of the transient and steady-state turbulence, including its thermodynamics and phase structure, kinetic and magnetic energy power spectra, structure functions, and distribution functions of density, column density, pressure, and magnetic field strength. The simulations reproduce many observables of the local ISM, including molecular clouds, such as the ratio of turbulent to mean magnetic field at 100 pc scale, the mass and volume fractions of thermally stable Hi, the lognormal distribution of column densities, the mass-weighted distribution of thermal pressure, and the linewidth-size relationship for molecular clouds. Our models predict the shape of magnetic field probability density functions (PDFs), which are strongly non-Gaussian, and the relative alignment of magnetic field and density structures. Finally, our models show how the observed low rates of star formation per free-fall time are controlled by the multiphase thermodynamics and large-scale turbulence.

  18. The Solar Wind as a Turbulence Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Carbone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review we will focus on a topic of fundamental importance for both astrophysics and plasma physics, namely the occurrence of large-amplitude low-frequency fluctuations of the fields that describe the plasma state. This subject will be treated within the context of the expanding solar wind and the most meaningful advances in this research field will be reported emphasizing the results obtained in the past decade or so. As a matter of fact, Helios inner heliosphere and Ulysses' high latitude observations, recent multi-spacecrafts measurements in the solar wind (Cluster four satellites and new numerical approaches to the problem, based on the dynamics of complex systems, brought new important insights which helped to better understand how turbulent fluctuations behave in the solar wind. In particular, numerical simulations within the realm of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD turbulence theory unraveled what kind of physical mechanisms are at the basis of turbulence generation and energy transfer across the spectral domain of the fluctuations. In other words, the advances reached in these past years in the investigation of solar wind turbulence now offer a rather complete picture of the phenomenological aspect of the problem to be tentatively presented in a rather organic way.

  19. Compressible Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in Magnetically-Dominated Plasmas And Implications for A New Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Takamoto, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we report compressible mode effects on relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence in Poynting-dominated plasmas using 3-dimensional numerical simulations. We decomposed fluctuations in the turbulence into 3 MHD modes (fast, slow, and Alfv\\'en) following the procedure mode decomposition in (Cho & Lazarian 2002), and analyzed their energy spectra and structure functions separately. We also analyzed the ratio of compressible mode to Alfv\\'en mode energy with respect to its Mach number. We found the ratio of compressible mode increases not only with the Alfv\\'en Mach number but with the background magnetization, which indicates a strong coupling between the fast and Alfv\\'en modes and appearance of a new regime of RMHD turbulence in Poynting-dominated plasmas where the fast and Alfv\\'en modes strongly couples and cannot be distinguished, different from the non-relativistic MHD case. This finding will affect particle acceleration efficiency obtained by assuming Alfv\\'enic critical balan...

  20. Sheared E×B flow and plasma turbulence viscosity in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Regnoli, G.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-11-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in Reversed Field Pinch configuration is addressed. The momentum balance equation for a compressible plasma is considered and the terms involved are measured in the outer region of Extrap-T2R RFP device. It results that electrostatic fluctuations determine the plasma flow through the electrostatic component of Reynolds Stress tensor. This term involves spatial and temporal scales comparable to those of MHD activity. The derived experimental perpendicular viscosity is consistent with anomalous diffusion, the latter being discussed in terms of electrostatic turbulence background and coherent structures emerging from fluctuations. The results indicate a dynamical interplay between turbulence, anomalous transport and mean E×B profiles. The momentum balance has been studied also in non-stationary condition during the application of Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive, which is known to reduce the amplitude of MHD modes.

  1. Shell-to-shell energy transfer in magnetohydrodynamics. I. Steady state turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Alexandros; Mininni, Pablo D; Pouquet, Annick

    2005-10-01

    We investigate the transfer of energy from large scales to small scales in fully developed forced three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) turbulence by analyzing the results of direct numerical simulations in the absence of an externally imposed uniform magnetic field. Our results show that the transfer of kinetic energy from large scales to kinetic energy at smaller scales and the transfer of magnetic energy from large scales to magnetic energy at smaller scales are local, as is also found in the case of neutral fluids and in a way that is compatible with the Kolmogorov theory of turbulence. However, the transfer of energy from the velocity field to the magnetic field is a highly nonlocal process in Fourier space. Energy from the velocity field at large scales can be transferred directly into small-scale magnetic fields without the participation of intermediate scales. Some implications of our results to MHD turbulence modeling are also discussed.

  2. A nonlinear structural subgrid-scale closure for compressible MHD Part I: derivation and energy dissipation properties

    CERN Document Server

    Vlaykov, Dimitar G; Schmidt, Wolfram; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2016-01-01

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysical phenomena ranging from the intergalactic to the stellar scales. In studying them, numerical simulations are nearly inescapable, due to the large degree of nonlinearity involved. However the dynamical ranges of these phenomena are much larger than what is computationally accessible. In large eddy simulations (LES), the resulting limited resolution effects are addressed explicitly by introducing to the equations of motion additional terms associated with the unresolved, subgrid-scale (SGS) dynamics. This renders the system unclosed. We derive a set of nonlinear structural closures for the ideal MHD LES equations with particular emphasis on the effects of compressibility. The closures are based on a gradient expansion of the finite-resolution operator (W.K. Yeo CUP 1993, ed. Galperin & Orszag) and require no assumptions about the nature of the flow or magnetic field. Thus the scope of their applicability ranges from the sub- to ...

  3. Numerical study of the MHD flow characteristics in a three-surface-multi-layered channel with different inlet conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: mao@karma.qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Ito, Satoshi; Hashizume, Hidetoshi

    2014-10-15

    A 3D MHD flow simulation was conducted to clarify the effects of the inlet flow conditions on the results of the validation experiment carried out previously and on the design window of the first wall using a three-surface-multi-layered channel. MHD pressure drop was largely influenced by the inlet condition. The numerical model with turbulent velocity profile showed qualitatively good agreement with the experimental result. The first wall temperature and pressure distributions obtained by the 3D simulation corresponded well to those obtained by the 2D simulation assuming fully developed flow. This suggested that complicated three-dimensional inlet flow condition generated in the L-shape elbow would not affects the existing design window.

  4. Turbulence hierarchy in a random fibre laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván R. Roa; Lima, Bismarck C.; Pincheira, Pablo I. R.; Brum, Arthur A.; Macêdo, Antônio M. S.; Vasconcelos, Giovani L.; de S. Menezes, Leonardo; Raposo, Ernesto P.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Kashyap, Raman

    2017-05-01

    Turbulence is a challenging feature common to a wide range of complex phenomena. Random fibre lasers are a special class of lasers in which the feedback arises from multiple scattering in a one-dimensional disordered cavity-less medium. Here we report on statistical signatures of turbulence in the distribution of intensity fluctuations in a continuous-wave-pumped erbium-based random fibre laser, with random Bragg grating scatterers. The distribution of intensity fluctuations in an extensive data set exhibits three qualitatively distinct behaviours: a Gaussian regime below threshold, a mixture of two distributions with exponentially decaying tails near the threshold and a mixture of distributions with stretched-exponential tails above threshold. All distributions are well described by a hierarchical stochastic model that incorporates Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence, which includes energy cascade and the intermittence phenomenon. Our findings have implications for explaining the remarkably challenging turbulent behaviour in photonics, using a random fibre laser as the experimental platform.

  5. VisAn MHD: a toolbox in Matlab for MHD computer model data visualisation and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Daum

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the many challenges facing modern space physics today is the need for a visualisation and analysis package which can examine the results from the diversity of numerical and empirical computer models as well as observational data. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD models represent the latest numerical models of the complex Earth's space environment and have the unique ability to span the enormous distances present in the magnetosphere from several hundred kilometres to several thousand kilometres above the Earth surface. This feature enables scientist to study complex structures of processes where otherwise only point measurements from satellites or ground-based instruments are available. Only by combining these observational data and the MHD simulations it is possible to enlarge the scope of the point-to-point observations and to fill the gaps left by measurements in order to get a full 3-D representation of the processes in our geospace environment. In this paper we introduce the VisAn MHD toolbox for Matlab as a tool for the visualisation and analysis of observational data and MHD simulations. We have created an easy to use tool which is capable of highly sophisticated visualisations and data analysis of the results from a diverse set of MHD models in combination with in situ measurements from satellites and ground-based instruments. The toolbox is being released under an open-source licensing agreement to facilitate and encourage community use and contribution.

  6. MHD Shallow Water Waves: Linear Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    We present a linear analysis of inviscid, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shallow water systems. In spherical geometry, a generic property of such systems is the existence of five wave modes. Three of them (two magneto-Poincare modes and one magneto-Rossby mode) are previously known. The other two wave modes are strongly influenced by the magnetic field and rotation, and have substantially lower angular frequencies; as such, we term them "magnetostrophic modes". We obtain analytical functions for the velocity, height and magnetic field perturbations in the limit that the magnitude of the MHD analogue of Lamb's parameter is large. On a sphere, the magnetostrophic modes reside near the poles, while the other modes are equatorially confined. Magnetostrophic modes may be an ingredient in explaining the frequency drifts observed in Type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars.

  7. MHD Equilibria and Triggers for Prominence Eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the emergence of twisted magnetic flux tubes from the solar interior into the corona are discussed to illustrate how twisted and sheared coronal magnetic structures (with free magnetic energy), capable of driving filament eruptions, can form in the corona in emerging active regions. Several basic mechanisms that can disrupt the quasi-equilibrium coronal structures and trigger the release of the stored free magnetic energy are discussed. These include both ideal processes such as the onset of the helical kink instability and the torus instability of a twisted coronal flux rope structure and the non-ideal process of the onset of fast magnetic reconnections in current sheets. Representative MHD simulations of the non-linear evolution involving these mechanisms are presented.

  8. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  9. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  10. Reconnection current sheet structure in a turbulent medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Vishniac

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of turbulence, magnetic field lines lose their dynamical identity and particles entrained on field lines diffuse through space at a rate determined by the amplitude of the turbulence. In previous work (Lazarian and Vishniac, 1999; Kowal et al., 2009; Eyink et al., 2011 we showed that this leads to reconnection speeds which are independent of resistivity. In particular, in Kowal et al. (2009 we showed that numerical simulations were consistent with the predictions of this model. Here we examine the structure of the current sheet in simulations of turbulent reconnection. Laminar flows consistent with the Sweet-Parker reconnection model produce very thin and well ordered currents sheets. On the other hand, the simulations of Kowal et al. (2009 show a strongly disordered state even for relatively low levels of turbulence. Comparing data cubes with and without reconnection, we find that large scale field reversals are the cumulative effect of many individual eddies, each of which has magnetic properties which are not very different from turbulent eddies in a homogeneous background. This implies that the properties of stationary and homogeneous MHD turbulence are a reasonable guide to understanding turbulence during large scale magnetic reconnection events. In addition, dissipation and high energy particle acceleration during reconnection events take place over a macroscopic volume, rather than being confined to a narrow zone whose properties depend on microscopic transport coefficients.

  11. Role of a MHD mode crash in triggering H-mode at marginal heating power on the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J.; Xu, Y.; Hidalgo, C.; Yan, L. W.; Liu, Yi; Jiang, M.; Li, Y. G.; Yu, L. M.; Dong, Y. B.; Li, D.; Liu, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Xu, J. Q.; Huang, Z. H.; Ji, X. Q.; Song, S. D.; Yu, D. L.; Xu, M.; Shi, Z. B.; Pan, O.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong

    2016-12-01

    The impact of a low frequency MHD mode crash on triggering the H-mode has been studied in detail on the HL-2A tokamak. The mode manifests fishbone characteristics with a precession frequency f ≈ 14- 19 kHz. The abrupt mode crash evokes substantial energy release from the core to the plasma boundary and hence increases the edge pressure gradient and Er × B flow shear, which further suppresses turbulence and leads to confinement improvement into the H-mode. Under the same NBI heating (∼1 MW), the I-phase plasma transits into H-mode with a rapid MHD mode crash while it returns to the L-mode without the presence of the mode in the I-phase. With increasing heating power by the ECRH added to the NBI, the MHD mode disappears. The statistical result shows that with the MHD mode crash the heating power for accessing the H-mode is significantly lower than that without the mode crash. All these facts reveal that the MHD mode crash in the I-phase plays a critical role in trigging the I → H transition at marginal heating power. In addition, it has been found that with the same NBI power heating, the magnitude of the mode (crash) increases with increasing plasma density, implying larger energy release being needed to access the H-mode for higher density plasmas.

  12. Magnetic Reconnection in a Compressible MHD Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Zenitani, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Using steady-state resistive MHD, magnetic reconnection is reinvestigated for conditions of high resistivity/low magnetic Reynolds number, when the thickness of the diffusion region is no longer small compared to its length. Implicit expressions for the reconnection rate and other reconnection parameters are derived based on the requirements of mass, momentum, and energy conservation. These expressions are solved via simple iterative procedures. Implications specifically for low Reynolds number/high resistivity are being discussed

  13. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.R. [New York Univ., NY (United States); Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Longcope, D.W. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States); Sugiyama, L.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  14. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  15. Design Study: Rocket Based MHD Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the technical feasibility and design of a rocket based MHD generator using a sub-scale LOx/RP rocket motor. The design study was constrained by assuming the generator must function within the performance and structural limits of an existing magnet and by assuming realistic limits on (1) the axial electric field, (2) the Hall parameter, (3) current density, and (4) heat flux (given the criteria of heat sink operation). The major results of the work are summarized as follows: (1) A Faraday type of generator with rectangular cross section is designed to operate with a combustor pressure of 300 psi. Based on a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla, the electrical power output from this generator is estimated to be 54.2 KW with potassium seed (weight fraction 3.74%) and 92 KW with cesium seed (weight fraction 9.66%). The former corresponds to a enthalpy extraction ratio of 2.36% while that for the latter is 4.16%; (2) A conceptual design of the Faraday MHD channel is proposed, based on a maximum operating time of 10 to 15 seconds. This concept utilizes a phenolic back wall for inserting the electrodes and inter-electrode insulators. Copper electrode and aluminum oxide insulator are suggested for this channel; and (3) A testing configuration for the sub-scale rocket based MHD system is proposed. An estimate of performance of an ideal rocket based MHD accelerator is performed. With a current density constraint of 5 Amps/cm(exp 2) and a conductivity of 30 Siemens/m, the push power density can be 250, 431, and 750 MW/m(sup 3) when the induced voltage uB have values of 5, 10, and 15 KV/m, respectively.

  16. Features of collisionless turbulence in the intracluster medium from simulated Faraday rotation maps - II. The effects of instabilities feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lima, R.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D. A.; Nakwacki, M. S.; Kowal, G.

    2017-03-01

    Statistical analysis of Faraday rotation measure (RM) maps of the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters provides a unique tool to evaluate some spatial features of the magnetic fields there. Its combination with numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence allows the diagnosis of the ICM turbulence. Being the ICM plasma weakly collisional, the thermal velocity distribution of the particles naturally develops anisotropies as a consequence of the large-scale motions and the conservation of the magnetic moment of the charged particles. A previous study (Paper I) analysed the impact of large-scale thermal anisotropy on the statistics of RM maps synthesized from simulations of turbulence; these simulations employed a collisionless MHD model that considered a tensor pressure with uniform anisotropy. In this work, we extend that analysis to a collisionless MHD model in which the thermal anisotropy develops according to the conservation of the magnetic moment of the thermal particles. We also consider the effect of anisotropy relaxation caused by the microscale mirror and firehose instabilities. We show that if the relaxation rate is fast enough to keep the anisotropy limited by the threshold values of the instabilities, the dispersion and power spectrum of the RM maps are indistinguishable from those obtained from collisional MHD. Otherwise, there is a reduction in the dispersion and steepening of the power spectrum of the RM maps (compared to the collisional case). Considering the first scenario, the use of collisional MHD simulations for modelling the RM statistics in the ICM becomes better justified.

  17. Formation of turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struminskii, V.V. (Sektor Mekhaniki Neodnorodnykh Sred, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-01-01

    Two essentially different forms of turbulence are identified in liquids and gases: (1) turbulent flow in the vicinity of solid or liquid boundaries and (2) turbulent flows evolving far from the walls. The generation mechanisms and principal characteristics of the two types of turbulent flows are discussed. It is emphasized that the two types of turbulent flows are caused by different physical mechanisms and should be considered separately in turbulence studies. 14 refs.

  18. Inductive ionospheric solver for magnetospheric MHD simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vanhamäki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new scheme for solving the ionospheric boundary conditions required in magnetospheric MHD simulations. In contrast to the electrostatic ionospheric solvers currently in use, the new solver takes ionospheric induction into account by solving Faraday's law simultaneously with Ohm's law and current continuity. From the viewpoint of an MHD simulation, the new inductive solver is similar to the electrostatic solvers, as the same input data is used (field-aligned current [FAC] and ionospheric conductances and similar output is produced (ionospheric electric field. The inductive solver is tested using realistic, databased models of an omega-band and westward traveling surge. Although the tests were performed with local models and MHD simulations require a global ionospheric solution, we may nevertheless conclude that the new solution scheme is feasible also in practice. In the test cases the difference between static and electrodynamic solutions is up to ~10 V km−1 in certain locations, or up to 20-40% of the total electric field. This is in agreement with previous estimates. It should also be noted that if FAC is replaced by the ground magnetic field (or ionospheric equivalent current in the input data set, exactly the same formalism can be used to construct an inductive version of the KRM method originally developed by Kamide et al. (1981.

  19. MHD thrust vectoring of a rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Tholin, Fabien; Chemartin, Laurent; Stillace, Thierry; Masson, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the possibility to use MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) to vectorize the thrust of a solid propellant rocket engine exhaust is investigated. Using a magnetic field for vectoring offers a mass gain and a reusability advantage compared to standard gimbaled, elastomer-joint systems. Analytical and numerical models were used to evaluate the flow deviation with a 1 Tesla magnetic field inside the nozzle. The fluid flow in the resistive MHD approximation is calculated using the KRONOS code from ONERA, coupling the hypersonic CFD platform CEDRE and the electrical code SATURNE from EDF. A critical parameter of these simulations is the electrical conductivity, which was evaluated using a set of equilibrium calculations with 25 species. Two models were used: local thermodynamic equilibrium and frozen flow. In both cases, chlorine captures a large fraction of free electrons, limiting the electrical conductivity to a value inadequate for thrust vectoring applications. However, when using chlorine-free propergols with 1% in mass of alkali, an MHD thrust vectoring of several degrees was obtained.

  20. Inductive ionospheric solver for magnetospheric MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhamäki, H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new scheme for solving the ionospheric boundary conditions required in magnetospheric MHD simulations. In contrast to the electrostatic ionospheric solvers currently in use, the new solver takes ionospheric induction into account by solving Faraday's law simultaneously with Ohm's law and current continuity. From the viewpoint of an MHD simulation, the new inductive solver is similar to the electrostatic solvers, as the same input data is used (field-aligned current [FAC] and ionospheric conductances) and similar output is produced (ionospheric electric field). The inductive solver is tested using realistic, databased models of an omega-band and westward traveling surge. Although the tests were performed with local models and MHD simulations require a global ionospheric solution, we may nevertheless conclude that the new solution scheme is feasible also in practice. In the test cases the difference between static and electrodynamic solutions is up to ~10 V km-1 in certain locations, or up to 20-40% of the total electric field. This is in agreement with previous estimates. It should also be noted that if FAC is replaced by the ground magnetic field (or ionospheric equivalent current) in the input data set, exactly the same formalism can be used to construct an inductive version of the KRM method originally developed by Kamide et al. (1981).

  1. The CHEASE code for toroidal MHD equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetjens, H. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique; Bondeson, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Inst. for Electromagnetic Field Theory and Plasma Physics; Sauter, O. [ITER-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    CHEASE solves the Grad-Shafranov equation for the MHD equilibrium of a Tokamak-like plasma with pressure and current profiles specified by analytic forms or sets of data points. Equilibria marginally stable to ballooning modes or with a prescribed fraction of bootstrap current can be computed. The code provides a mapping to magnetic flux coordinates, suitable for MHD stability calculations or global wave propagation studies. The code computes equilibrium quantities for the stability codes ERATO, MARS, PEST, NOVA-W and XTOR and for the global wave propagation codes LION and PENN. The two-dimensional MHD equilibrium (Grad-Shafranov) equation is solved in variational form. The discretization uses bicubic Hermite finite elements with continuous first order derivates for the poloidal flux function {Psi}. The nonlinearity of the problem is handled by Picard iteration. The mapping to flux coordinates is carried out with a method which conserves the accuracy of the cubic finite elements. The code uses routines from the CRAY libsci.a program library. However, all these routines are included in the CHEASE package itself. If CHEASE computes equilibrium quantities for MARS with fast Fourier transforms, the NAG library is required. CHEASE is written in standard FORTRAN-77, except for the use of the input facility NAMELIST. CHEASE uses variable names with up to 8 characters, and therefore violates the ANSI standard. CHEASE transfers plot quantities through an external disk file to a plot program named PCHEASE using the UNIRAS or the NCAR plot package. (author) figs., tabs., 34 refs.

  2. Effects of free stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with zero pressure gradient. 4th Report. Calculation of flow field; Seiatsu ittei no heiban ranryu kyokaiso ni oyobosu shuryubu midare no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M.; Yata, J. [Kyoto Inst. of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Minamiyama, T. [Fukuyama University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-04-25

    The effects of free stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer were calculated using a {kappa}-{epsilon} two-equation model. The calculations were performed with respect to velocity profiles on a flat plate wall shear stress turbulence energy integral length scales of turbulence and decay of free stream turbulence and the results were compared with experimental results. The energy of free stream turbulence and the dissipation values at the leading edge of flat plate were used, as the initial conditions for calculation. These initial values of dissipation were determined from the integral length scales of free stream turbulence at the leading edge. The calculated wall shear stress increased with the free stream turbulence and integral length scales of turbulence. The velocity profiles and turbulence energy agreed well with the experimental results and the effects of free stream turbulence on the wall shear stress agreed fairly well with those observed in experiments. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Explosive turbulent magnetic reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimori, K; Yokoi, N; Hoshino, M

    2013-06-21

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This fast turbulent reconnection is achieved by the localization of turbulent diffusion. Additionally, localized structure forms through the interaction of the mean field and turbulence.

  4. Permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, P J; Schaffner, D A; Brown, M R; Wicks, R T

    2015-02-01

    The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different turbulent plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD), and fully developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the Wind spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting that these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge I(sat). The CH plane coordinates are compared to the shape and distribution of a spectral decomposition of the wave forms. These results suggest that fully developed turbulence (solar wind) occupies the lower-right region of the CH plane, and that other plasma systems considered to be turbulent have less permutation entropy and more statistical complexity. This paper presents use of this statistical analysis tool on solar wind plasma, as well as on an MHD turbulent experimental plasma.

  5. EMAPS: An Efficient Multiscale Approach to Plasma Systems with Non-MHD Scale Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelchenko, Yuri A. [Trinum Research, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-08-08

    Global interactions of energetic ions with magnetoplasmas and neutral gases lie at the core of many space and laboratory plasma phenomena ranging from solar wind entry into and transport within planetary magnetospheres and exospheres to fast-ion driven instabilities in fusion devices to astrophysics-in-lab experiments. The ability of computational models to properly account for physical effects that underlie such interactions, namely ion kinetic, ion cyclotron, Hall, collisional and ionization processes is important for the success and planning of experimental research in plasma physics. Understanding the physics of energetic ions, in particular their nonlinear resonance interactions with Alfvén waves, is central to improving the heating performance of magnetically confined plasmas for future energy generation. Fluid models are not adequate for high-beta plasmas as they cannot fully capture ion kinetic and cyclotron physics (e.g., ion behavior in the presence of magnetic nulls, shock structures, plasma interpenetration, etc.). Recent results from global reconnection simulations show that even in a MHD-like regime there may be significant differences between kinetic and MHD simulations. Therefore, kinetic modeling becomes essential for meeting modern day challenges in plasma physics. The hybrid approximation is an intermediate approximation between the fluid and fully kinetic approximations. It eliminates light waves, removes the electron inertial temporal and spatial scales from the problem and enables full-orbit ion kinetics. As a result, hybrid codes have become effective tools for exploring ion-scale driven phenomena associated with ion beams, shocks, reconnection and turbulence that control the large-scale behavior of laboratory and space magnetoplasmas. A number of numerical issues, however, make three-dimensional (3D) large-scale hybrid simulations of inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas prohibitively expensive or even impossible. To resolve these difficulties

  6. Decay of trefoil and other magnetic knots

    CERN Document Server

    Candelaresi, Simon; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Two setups with interlocked magnetic flux tubes are used to study the evolution of magnetic energy and helicity on magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) systems like plasmas. In one setup the initial helicity is zero while in the other it is finite. To see if it is the actual linking or merely the helicity content that influences the dynamics of the system we also consider a setup with unlinked field lines as well as a field configuration in the shape of a trefoil knot. For helical systems the decay of magnetic energy is slowed down by the helicity which decays slowly. It turns out that it is the helicity content, rather than the actual linking, that is significant for the dynamics.

  7. Evolutionary Conditions in the Dissipative MHD System Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary conditions for the dissipative continuous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks are studied. We modify Hada's approach in the stability analysis of the MHD shock waves. The matching conditions between perturbed shock structure and asymptotic wave modes shows that all types of the MHD shocks, including the intermediate shocks, are evolutionary and perturbed solutions are uniquely defined. We also adopt our formalism to the MHD shocks in the system with resistivity without viscosity, which is often used in numerical simulation, and show that all types of shocks that are found in the system satisfy the evolutionary condition and perturbed solutions are uniquely defined. These results suggest that the intermediate shocks may appear in reality.

  8. Turbulence vertical structure of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Darbieu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the decay of planetary boundary layer (PBL turbulence in the afternoon, from the time the surface buoyancy flux starts to decrease until sunset. Dense observations of mean and turbulent parameters were acquired during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST field experiment by several meteorological surface stations, sounding balloons, radars, lidars, and two aircraft flying extensively during the afternoon transition. We analyzed a case study based on some of those observations and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES data focusing on the turbulent vertical structure throughout the afternoon transition. The decay of turbulence is quantified through the temporal and vertical evolution of (1 the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE, (2 the characteristic length scales of turbulence, (3 the shape of the turbulence spectra. A spectral analysis of LES data, airborne and surface measurements is performed in order to (1 characterize the variation of the turbulent decay with height and (2 study the distribution of turbulence over eddy size. This study points out the LES ability to reproduce the turbulence evolution throughout the afternoon. LES and observations agree that the afternoon transition can be divided in two phases: (1 a first phase during which the TKE decays with a low rate, with no significant change in turbulence characteristics, (2 a second phase characterized by a larger TKE decay rate and a change spectral shape, implying an evolution of eddy size distribution and energy cascade from low to high wavenumber. The changes observed either on TKE decay (during the first phase or on the vertical wind spectra shape (during the second phase of the afternoon transition occur first in the upper region of the PBL. The higher within the PBL, the stronger the spectra shape changes.

  9. Fundamental Physical Processes in Coronae: Waves, Turbulence, Reconnection, and Particle Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of fundamental processes in the solar corona has been greatly progressed based on the space observations of SMM, Yohkoh, Compton GRO, SOHO, TRACE, RHESSI, and STEREO. We observe now acoustic waves, MHD oscillations, turbulence-related line broadening, magnetic configurations related to reconnection processes, and radiation from high-energy particles on a routine basis. We review a number of key observations in EUV, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays that innovated our physical understanding of the solar corona, in terms of hydrodynamics, MHD, plasma heating, and particle acceleration processes.

  10. Ribbon Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Venaille, Antoine; Vallis, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel forced by an imposed unstable zonal mean flow, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization on the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these result by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the imposed mean flow appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the...

  11. Magnetic field amplification and evolution in turbulent collisionless magnetohydrodynamics: An application to the intracluster medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Lima, R.; De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Kowal, G. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, R. do Matão, 1226, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); Falceta-Gonçalves, D. [Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua Arlindo Bettio, 1000, São Paulo, SP 03828-000 (Brazil); Lazarian, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Nakwacki, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), CONICET (Argentina)

    2014-02-01

    The amplification of magnetic fields (MFs) in the intracluster medium (ICM) is attributed to turbulent dynamo (TD) action, which is generally derived in the collisional-MHD framework. However, this assumption is poorly justified a priori, since in the ICM the ion mean free path between collisions is of the order of the dynamical scales, thus requiring a collisionless MHD description. The present study uses an anisotropic plasma pressure that brings the plasma within a parametric space where collisionless instabilities take place. In this model, a relaxation term of the pressure anisotropy simulates the feedback of the mirror and firehose instabilities, in consistency with empirical studies. Our three-dimensional numerical simulations of forced transonic turbulence, aiming the modeling of the turbulent ICM, were performed for different initial values of the MF intensity and different relaxation rates of the pressure anisotropy. We found that in the high-β plasma regime corresponding to the ICM conditions, a fast anisotropy relaxation rate gives results that are similar to the collisional-MHD model, as far as the statistical properties of the turbulence are concerned. Also, the TD amplification of seed MFs was found to be similar to the collisional-MHD model. The simulations that do not employ the anisotropy relaxation deviate significantly from the collisional-MHD results and show more power at the small-scale fluctuations of both density and velocity as a result of the action of the instabilities. For these simulations, the large-scale fluctuations in the MF are mostly suppressed and the TD fails in amplifying seed MFs.

  12. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfv\\'{e}n waves excited in the photosphere is the target of the present study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfv\\'{e}n waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 % of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The i...

  13. Scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosály, George

    1989-04-01

    Eswaran and Pope [Phys. Fluids 31, 506 (1988)] performed direct numerical simulations to study the influence of the initial scalar integral length scale on mixing in stationary, isotropic turbulence. Their data demonstrate that both the decay rate and the shape of the rms versus time curve depend on the initial value of the scalar-to-velocity integral length-scale ratio. The present paper discusses modifications of the high Reynolds number theory of Corrsin [AIChE J. 10, 870 (1964)]. The predictions mirror the behavior found in the moderate Reynolds number simulations.

  14. Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Protostellar Jets and Turbulent Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph; Bate, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    We presents results from Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics simulations of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and dynamo amplification of the magnetic field in the presence of Mach 10 magnetised turbulence. Our star formation simulations have produced, for the first time ever, highly collimated magnetised protostellar jets from the first hydrostatic core phase. Up to 40% of the initial core mass may be ejected through this outflow. The primary difficulty in performing these simulations is maintaining the divergence free constraint of the magnetic field, and to address this issue, we have developed a new divergence cleaning method which has allowed us to stably follow the evolution of these protostellar jets for long periods. The simulations performed of supersonic MHD turbulence are able to exponentially amplify magnetic energy by up to 10 orders of magnitude via turbulent dynamo. To reduce numerical dissipation, a new shock detection algorithm is utilised which is able to track magnetic shocks throughout ...

  15. The Theory of Nearly Incompressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence: Homogeneous Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Shiota, D.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.; Avinash, K.

    2017-09-01

    The theory of nearly incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (NI MHD) was developed to understand the apparent incompressibility of the solar wind and other plasma environments, particularly the relationship of density fluctuations to incompressible manifestations of turbulence in the solar wind and interstellar medium. Of interest was the identification of distinct leading-order incompressible descriptions for plasma beta β ≫ 1 and β ∼ 1 or ≪ 1 environments. In the first case, the “dimensionality” of the MHD description is 3D whereas for the latter two, there is a collapse of dimensionality in that the leading-order incompressible MHD description is 2D in a plane orthogonal to the large-scale or mean magnetic field. Despite the success of NI MHD in describing fluctuations in a low-frequency plasma environment such as the solar wind, a basic turbulence description has not been developed. Here, we rewrite the NI MHD system in terms of Elsässer variables. We discuss the distinction that emerges between the three cases. However, we focus on the β ∼ 1 or ≪ 1 regimes since these are appropriate to the solar wind and solar corona. In both cases, the leading-order turbulence model describes 2D turbulence and the higher-order description corresponds to slab turbulence, which forms a minority component. The Elsäasser β ∼ 1 or ≪ 1 formulation exhibits the nonlinear couplings between 2D and slab components very clearly, and shows that slab fluctuations respond in a passive scalar sense to the turbulently evolving majority 2D component fluctuations. The coupling of 2D and slab fluctuations through the β ∼ 1 or ≪ 1 NI MHD description leads to a very natural emergence of the “Goldreich-Sridhar” critical balance scaling parameter, although now with a different interpretation. Specifically, the critical balance parameter shows that the energy flux in wave number space is a consequence of the intensity of Alfvén wave sweeping versus passive scalar

  16. The universality of dynamic multiscaling in homogeneous, isotropic Navier-Stokes and passive-scalar turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Pandit, Rahul [Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Mitra, Dhrubaditya [Departement Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)], E-mail: ssray@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: dhruba.mitra@gmail.com, E-mail: rahul@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2008-03-15

    We systematize the study of dynamic multiscaling of time-dependent structure functions in different models of passive-scalar and fluid turbulence. We show that, by suitably normalizing these structure functions, we can eliminate their dependence on the origin of time at which we start our measurements and that these normalized structure functions yield the same linear bridge relations that relate the dynamic-multiscaling and equal-time exponents for statistically steady turbulence. We show analytically, for both the Kraichnan model of passive-scalar turbulence and its shell model analogue, and numerically, for the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada (GOY) shell model of fluid turbulence and a shell model for passive-scalar turbulence, that these exponents and bridge relations are the same for statistically steady and decaying turbulence. Thus, we provide strong evidence for dynamic universality, i.e. dynamic-multiscaling exponents do not depend on whether the turbulence decays or is statistically steady.

  17. Stochastic reacceleration of relativistic electrons by turbulent reconnection: a mechanism for cluster-scale radio emission ?

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, G

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a situation where relativistic particles are reaccelerated diffusing across regions of reconnection and magnetic dynamo in super-Alfvenic, incompressible large-scale turbulence. We present an exploratory study of this mechanism in the intra-cluster-medium (ICM). In view of large-scale turbulence in the ICM we adopt a reconnection scheme that is based on turbulent reconnection and MHD turbulence. In this case particles are accelerated and decelerated in a systematic way in reconnecting and magnetic-dynamo regions, respectively, and on longer time-scales undergo a stochastic process diffusing across these sites (similar to second-order Fermi). Our study extends on larger scales numerical studies that focused on the acceleration in and around turbulent reconnecting regions. We suggest that this mechanism may play a role in the reacceleration of relativistic electrons in galaxy clusters providing a new physical scenario to explain the origin of cluster-scale diffuse radio emission. In...

  18. Turbulence in Extrasolar Planetary Systems Implies that Mean Motion Resonances are Rare

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred C; Bloch, Anthony M

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the effects of turbulence on mean motion resonances in extrasolar planetary systems and predicts that systems rarely survive in a resonant configuration. A growing number of systems are reported to be in resonance, which is thought to arise from the planet migration process. If planets are brought together and moved inward through torques produced by circumstellar disks, then disk turbulence can act to prevent planets from staying in a resonant configuration. This paper studies this process through numerical simulations and via analytic model equations, where both approaches include stochastic forcing terms due to turbulence. We explore how the amplitude and forcing time intervals of the turbulence affect the maintenance of mean motion resonances. If turbulence is common in circumstellar disks during the epoch of planet migration, with the amplitudes indicated by current MHD simulations, then planetary systems that remain deep in mean motion resonance are predicted to be rare. More specif...

  19. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  20. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can limit the performance and degrade the confinement of tokamak plasmas. The Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV), unique for its capability to produce a variety of poloidal plasma shapes, has been used to analyse various instabilities and compare their behaviour with theoretical predictions. These instabilities are perturbations of the magnetic field, which usually extend to the plasma edge where they can be detected with magnetic pick-up coils as magnetic fluctuations. A spatially dense set of magnetic probes, installed inside the TCV vacuum vessel, allows for a fast observation of these fluctuations. The structure and temporal evolution of coherent modes is extracted using several numerical methods. In addition to the setup of the magnetic diagnostic and the implementation of analysis methods, the subject matter of this thesis focuses on four instabilities, which impose local and global stability limits. All of these instabilities are relevant for the operation of a fusion reactor and a profound understanding of their behaviour is required in order to optimise the performance of such a reactor. Sawteeth, which are central relaxation oscillations common to most standard tokamak scenarios, have a significant effect on central plasma parameters. In TCV, systematic scans of the plasma shape have revealed a strong dependence of their behaviour on elongation {kappa} and triangularity {delta}, with high {kappa}, and low {delta} leading to shorter sawteeth with smaller crashes. This shape dependence is increased by applying central electron cyclotron heating. The response to additional heating power is determined by the role of ideal or resistive MHD in triggering the sawtooth crash. For plasma shapes where additional heating and consequently, a faster increase of the central pressure shortens the sawteeth, the low experimental limit of the pressure gradient within the q = 1 surface is consistent with ideal MHD predictions. The

  1. Scalar and Vector Nonlinear Decays of Low-frequency Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. S.; Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J.; Wu, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    We found several efficient nonlinear decays for Alfvén waves in the solar wind conditions. Depending on the wavelength, the dominant decay is controlled by the nonlinearities proportional to either scalar or vector products of wavevectors. The two-mode decays of the pump MHD Alfvén wave into co- and counter-propagating product Alfvén and slow waves are controlled by the scalar nonlinearities at long wavelengths ρ i2k0\\perp 2background magnetic field, ω0 is frequency of the pump Alfvén wave, ρ i is ion gyroradius, and ω ci is ion-cyclotron frequency). The scalar decays exhibit both local and nonlocal properties and can generate not only MHD-scale but also kinetic-scale Alfvén and slow waves, which can strongly accelerate spectral transport. All waves in the scalar decays propagate in the same plane, hence these decays are two-dimensional. At shorter wavelengths, ρ i2k0\\perp 2\\gtω 0/ω ci, three-dimensional vector decays dominate generating out-of-plane product waves. The two-mode decays dominate from MHD up to ion scales ρ i k 0 ~= 0.3; at shorter scales the one-mode vector decays become stronger and generate only Alfvén product waves. In the solar wind the two-mode decays have high growth rates >0.1ω0 and can explain the origin of slow waves observed at kinetic scales.

  2. SCALAR AND VECTOR NONLINEAR DECAYS OF LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVÉN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J., E-mail: js_zhao@pmo.ac.cn [Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence, Space Physics Division, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan 3 Avenue Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-02-01

    We found several efficient nonlinear decays for Alfvén waves in the solar wind conditions. Depending on the wavelength, the dominant decay is controlled by the nonlinearities proportional to either scalar or vector products of wavevectors. The two-mode decays of the pump MHD Alfvén wave into co- and counter-propagating product Alfvén and slow waves are controlled by the scalar nonlinearities at long wavelengths ρ{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0⊥}{sup 2}<ω{sub 0}/ω{sub ci} (k {sub 0} is wavenumber perpendicular to the background magnetic field, ω{sub 0} is frequency of the pump Alfvén wave, ρ {sub i} is ion gyroradius, and ω {sub ci} is ion-cyclotron frequency). The scalar decays exhibit both local and nonlocal properties and can generate not only MHD-scale but also kinetic-scale Alfvén and slow waves, which can strongly accelerate spectral transport. All waves in the scalar decays propagate in the same plane, hence these decays are two-dimensional. At shorter wavelengths, ρ{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0⊥}{sup 2}>ω{sub 0}/ω{sub ci}, three-dimensional vector decays dominate generating out-of-plane product waves. The two-mode decays dominate from MHD up to ion scales ρ {sub i} k {sub 0} ≅ 0.3; at shorter scales the one-mode vector decays become stronger and generate only Alfvén product waves. In the solar wind the two-mode decays have high growth rates >0.1ω{sub 0} and can explain the origin of slow waves observed at kinetic scales.

  3. Nonlinear transverse cascade and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic subcritical turbulence in plane shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatsashvili, G R; Gogichaishvili, D Z; Chagelishvili, G D; Horton, W

    2014-04-01

    We find and investigate via numerical simulations self-sustained two-dimensional turbulence in a magnetohydrodynamic flow with a maximally simple configuration: plane, noninflectional (with a constant shear of velocity), and threaded by a parallel uniform background magnetic field. This flow is spectrally stable, so the turbulence is subcritical by nature and hence it can be energetically supported just by a transient growth mechanism due to shear flow non-normality. This mechanism appears to be essentially anisotropic in the spectral (wave-number) plane and operates mainly for spatial Fourier harmonics with streamwise wave numbers less than the ratio of flow shear to Alfvén speed, kymagnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence research. We find similarity of the nonlinear dynamics to the related dynamics in hydrodynamic flows: to the bypass concept of subcritical turbulence. The essence of the analyzed nonlinear MHD processes appears to be a transverse redistribution of kinetic and magnetic spectral energies in the wave-number plane [as occurs in the related hydrodynamic flow; see Horton et al., Phys. Rev. E 81, 066304 (2010)] and differs fundamentally from the existing concepts of (anisotropic direct and inverse) cascade processes in MHD shear flows.

  4. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofman, L. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schmieder, B. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cit, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2015-11-10

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s{sup −1}, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  5. An advanced implicit solver for MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udrea, Bogdan

    A new implicit algorithm has been developed for the solution of the time-dependent, viscous and resistive single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The algorithm is based on an approximate Riemann solver for the hyperbolic fluxes and central differencing applied on a staggered grid for the parabolic fluxes. The algorithm employs a locally aligned coordinate system that allows the solution to the Riemann problems to be solved in a natural direction, normal to cell interfaces. The result is an original scheme that is robust and reduces the complexity of the flux formulas. The evaluation of the parabolic fluxes is also implemented using a locally aligned coordinate system, this time on the staggered grid. The implicit formulation employed by WARP3 is a two level scheme that was applied for the first time to the single fluid MHD model. The flux Jacobians that appear in the implicit scheme are evaluated numerically. The linear system that results from the implicit discretization is solved using a robust symmetric Gauss-Seidel method. The code has an explicit mode capability so that implementation and test of new algorithms or new physics can be performed in this simpler mode. Last but not least the code was designed and written to run on parallel computers so that complex, high resolution runs can be per formed in hours rather than days. The code has been benchmarked against analytical and experimental gas dynamics and MHD results. The benchmarks consisted of one-dimensional Riemann problems and diffusion dominated problems, two-dimensional supersonic flow over a wedge, axisymmetric magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster simulation and three-dimensional supersonic flow over intersecting wedges and spheromak stability simulation. The code has been proven to be robust and the results of the simulations showed excellent agreement with analytical and experimental results. Parallel performance studies showed that the code performs as expected when run on parallel

  6. Annular MHD Physics for Turbojet Energy Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of annular Hall type MHD generator/accelerator ducts for turbojet energy bypass is evaluated assuming weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges. The equations for a 1-D, axisymmetric MHD generator/accelerator are derived and numerically integrated to determine the generator/accelerator performance characteristics. The concept offers a shockless means of interacting with high speed inlet flows and potentially offers variable inlet geometry performance without the complexity of moving parts simply by varying the generator loading parameter. The cycle analysis conducted iteratively with a spike inlet and turbojet flying at M = 7 at 30 km altitude is estimated to have a positive thrust per unit mass flow of 185 N-s/kg. The turbojet allowable combustor temperature is set at an aggressive 2200 deg K. The annular MHD Hall generator/accelerator is L = 3 m in length with a B(sub r) = 5 Tesla magnetic field and a conductivity of sigma = 5 mho/m for the generator and sigma= 1.0 mho/m for the accelerator. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the generator is eta(sub sg) = 84 percent at an enthalpy extraction ratio, eta(sub Ng) = 0.63. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the accelerator is eta(sub sa) = 81 percent at an enthalpy addition ratio, eta(sub Na) = 0.62. An assessment of the ionization fraction necessary to achieve a conductivity of sigma = 1.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 1.90 X 10(exp -6), and for sigma = 5.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 9.52 X 10(exp -6).

  7. Probing Acceleration and Turbulence at Relativistic Shocks in Blazar Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, Matthew G; Summerlin, Errol J

    2016-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at relativistic shocks is widely thought to be an important acceleration mechanism in various astrophysical jet sources, including radio-loud active galactic nuclei such as blazars. Such acceleration can produce the non-thermal particles that emit the broadband continuum radiation that is detected from extragalactic jets. An important recent development for blazar science is the ability of Fermi-LAT spectroscopy to pin down the shape of the distribution of the underlying non-thermal particle population. This paper highlights how multi-wavelength spectra spanning optical to X-ray to gamma-ray bands can be used to probe diffusive acceleration in relativistic, oblique, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in blazar jets. Diagnostics on the MHD turbulence near such shocks are obtained using thermal and non-thermal particle distributions resulting from detailed Monte Carlo simulations of DSA. These probes are afforded by the characteristic property that the synchrotron $\

  8. Turbulent energy transfer in electromagnetic turbulence: hints from a Reversed Field Pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Bergsaker, H.

    2005-10-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic turbulence and sheared plasma flow in a Reversed Field Pinch is addressed. ExB sheared flows and turbulence at the edge tends to organize themeselves near marginal stability, suggesting an underlying energy exchange process between turbulence and mean flow. In MHD this process is well described through the quantity P which represents the energy transfer (per mass and time unit) from turbulence to mean fields. In the edge region of RFP configuration, where magnetic field is mainly poloidal and the mean ExB is consequently toroidal, the quantity P results: P =[ -ρμ0 + ]Vφr where Vφ is the mean ExB toroidal flow, ρ the mean mass density and b and v the fluctuations of velocity and magnetic field respectively. Both the radial profiles and the temporal evolution of P have been measured in the edge region of Extrap-T2R Reversed Field Pinch experiment. The results support the existence of oscillating energy exchange process between fluctuations and mean flow.

  9. Exploring Plasma Turbulence in the Kronian Magnetosheath Using Cassini Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadid, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Kiyani, K. H.; Modolo, R.; Retino, A.; Canu, P.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The shocked solar wind plasma upstream of the bowshock forms the magnetosheath. Through this region energy, mass and momentum are transported from the solar wind into the planet's magnetosphere, playing a crucial role in the solar-planet interactions. Hence, the planets' magnetosheath present a high level of turbulence, with a rich variety of wave and stochastic phenomena. While the magnetic turbulence of the terrestrial magnetosheath has been extensively studied, not so much work has been done regarding the planets magnetosheaths. Therefore, and in order to expand our knowledge on plasma turbulence, we investigate here the main properties of the plasma turbulence in the magnetosheath of Saturn using the Cassini spacecraft data and compare it with the well-explored terrestrial solar wind turbulence. These properties include the magnetic field energy spectra, the magnetic compressibility and intermittency, at both MHD and kinetic scales. The analysis is based on in-situ data provided by the Fluxgate Magnetometer of the MAG instrument, which measures the magnetic field data with 32ms time resolution and the plasma data from the CAPS/IMS (Cassini Plasma Spectrometer) and the Electron Spectrometer (ELS), during 39 shock-crossings between 2004 and 2005. Similarities and differences were found between the different media, in particular about the nature of the turbulence and its scaling laws. These finding will be discussed along with theoretical implications on the modeling of space plasma.

  10. Explosive Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Higashimori, Katsuaki; Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This ...

  11. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    of resolved inflow turbulence on airfoil simulations in CFD. The detached-eddy simulation technique is used because it can resolve the inflow turbulence without becoming too computationally expensive due to its limited requirements for mesh resolution in the boundary layer. It cannot resolve the turbulence...... synthetic turbulence in arbitrary domains. The purpose is to generate a synthetic turbulence field corresponding to the field encountered by a rotating blade....

  12. Cascades and spectra of a turbulent spinodal decomposition in two-dimensional symmetric binary liquid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, P. H.; Chacón, L.; Li, Hui

    2016-09-01

    We study the fundamental physics of cascades and spectra in two-dimensional (2D) Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes (CHNS) turbulence, and compare and contrast this system with 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The important similarities include basic equations, ideal quadratic invariants, cascades, and the role of linear elastic waves. Surface tension induces elasticity, and the balance between surface tension energy and turbulent kinetic energy determines a length scale (Hinze scale) of the system. The Hinze scale may be thought of as the scale of emergent critical balance between fluid straining and elastic restoring forces. The scales between the Hinze scale and dissipation scale constitute the elastic range of the 2D CHNS system. By direct numerical simulation, we find that in the elastic range, the mean square concentration spectrum Hkψ of the 2D CHNS system exhibits the same power law (-7 /3 ) as the mean square magnetic potential spectrum HkA in the inverse cascade regime of 2D MHD. This power law is consistent with an inverse cascade of Hψ, which is observed. The kinetic energy spectrum of the 2D CHNS system is EkK˜k-3 if forced at large scale, suggestive of the direct enstrophy cascade power law of 2D Navier-Stokes turbulence. The difference from the energy spectra of 2D MHD turbulence implies that the back reaction of the concentration field to fluid motion is limited. We suggest this is because the surface tension back reaction is significant only in the interfacial regions. The interfacial regions fill only a small portion of the 2D CHNS system, and their interface packing fraction is much smaller than that for 2D MHD.

  13. Magnetic stresses in ideal MHD plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, V.O.

    1995-01-01

    and it is shown that the resulting magnetic forces on a finite volume element can be obtained by integrating the magnetic stresses over the surface of the element. The concept is used to rederive and discuss the equilibrium conditions for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, including the virial theorem......The concept of magnetic stresses in ideal MHD plasma theory is reviewed and revisited with the aim of demonstrating its advantages as a basis for calculating and understanding plasma equilibria. Expressions are derived for the various stresses that transmit forces in a magnetized plasma...

  14. Modeling magnetized neutron stars using resistive MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Palenzuela, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This work presents an implementation of the resistive MHD equations for a generic algebraic Ohm's law which includes the effects of finite resistivity within full General Relativity. The implementation naturally accounts for magnetic-field-induced anisotropies and, by adopting a phenomenological current, is able to accurately describe electromagnetic fields in the star and in its magnetosphere. We illustrate the application of this approach in interesting systems with astrophysical implications; the aligned rotator solution and the collapse of a magnetized rotating neutron star to a black hole.

  15. Local potential analysis of MHD instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, K. K.; Wilson, S. J.

    1985-02-01

    The use of the local potential method for studying instabilities of MHD fluids is examined. The mathematical method is similar to that developed by the authors for studying the time-dependent radiative transfer problem and the radiative stability of interstellar masers. The scheme is based on the universal evolution criterion proposed by Glansdorff and Prigogine (1964) as demonstrated by Hays (1965) for the heat equation and Schechter and Himmelblau (1965) for the Benard problem in hydrodynamics. The scheme for securing stability criteria is demonstrated for two particular cases.

  16. MHD Equations with Regularity in One Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zujin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the 3D MHD equations and prove that if one directional derivative of the fluid velocity, say, ∂3u∈Lp0, T;LqR3, with 2/p + 3/q = γ ∈ [1,3/2, 3/γ ≤ q ≤ 1/(γ - 1, then the solution is in fact smooth.  This improves previous results greatly.

  17. MHD squeezing flow between two infinite plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Khan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD squeezing flow of a viscous fluid has been discussed. Conservation laws combined with similarity transformations have been used to formulate the flow mathematically that leads to a highly nonlinear ordinary differential equation. Analytical solution to the resulting differential equation is determined by employing Variation of Parameters Method (VPM. Runge–Kutta order-4 method is also used to solve the same problem for the sake of comparison. It is found that solution using VPM reduces the computational work yet maintains a very high level of accuracy. The influence of different parameters is also discussed and demonstrated graphically.

  18. Relativistic MHD with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, M; Liebling, S L; Neilsen, D; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Liebling, Steven L.; Neilsen, David

    2006-01-01

    We solve the relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations using a finite difference Convex ENO method (CENO) in 3+1 dimensions within a distributed parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) infrastructure. In flat space we examine a Balsara blast wave problem along with a spherical blast wave and a relativistic rotor test both with unigrid and AMR simulations. The AMR simulations substantially improve performance while reproducing the resolution equivalent unigrid simulation results. We also investigate the impact of hyperbolic divergence cleaning for the spherical blast wave and relativistic rotor. We include unigrid and mesh refinement parallel performance measurements for the spherical blast wave.

  19. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  20. Evaluation of feedback in conductive MHD devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinberg, G.K.

    1977-01-01

    A method is recommended for computing feedback and the self-energizing threshold of conducting MHD devices. Circuits of equivalent magnetizing currents are used for this purpose in addition to equivalent electrical circuits. This kind of an approach makes it possible to reflect the influence of R/sub m/ on the operation of the device. Dimensionless functions were found which determine the critical value of the Reynolds magnetic number. The computations demonstrated that the redistribution of the magnetic field in the machine's operating zone under the influence of an induced field must be considered.

  1. Stationary MHD equilibria describing azimuthal rotations in symmetric plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sidney T.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the stationary magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) equilibrium equation for an axisymmetric plasma undergoing azimuthal rotations. The case of cylindrical symmetry is treated, and we present two semi-analytical solutions for the stationary MHD equilibrium equations, from which a number of physical properties of the magnetically confined plasma are derived.

  2. Superconducting magnet system for an experimental disk MHD facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoopers, H.G.; Kate, ten H.H.J.; Klundert, van de L.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A predesign of a split-pair magnet for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) facility for testing a 10-MW open-cycle disk or a 5-MW closed-cycle disk generator is presented. The magnet system consists of a NbTi and a Nb 3Sn section, which provide a magnetic field of 9 T in the active area of the MHD channel.

  3. The Calculus of Variations and the Ideal MHD Energy Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    In Lecture 22, we showed that the ideal MHD force operator is self-adjoint and suggested that this allowed a formulation in which the stability of a system could be determined without solving a differential equation. Going further requires a little background in the calculus of variations. In the lecture we begin this discussion,1 and formulate the ideal MHD energy principle.

  4. Numerical simulations of turbulent ionized gas flows in the circumsolar protoplanetary disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marov, M. Ya.; Kuksa, M. M.

    2015-09-01

    An axisymmetric protoplanetary disk model that takes into account the interaction of turbulent gas flows with the magnetic field is considered. A closed system of equations of homogeneous compressible magnetohydrodynamics in the regime of developed turbulence in the gravitational and magnetic fields of a star has been constructed. Apart from the traditional probability-theoretical averaging of the MHD equations, the weighted Favre averaging is used. The approach by A.V. Kolesnichenko and M.Ya. Marov to modeling the turbulent transport coefficients in a weakly ionized disk has been implemented. It allows the inverse effects of the generated magnetic field on a turbulent gas flow and the dissipation of turbulence through kinematic and magnetic viscosities to be taken into account. A parallel code for numerically solving the system of averaged MHD equations has been developed. The averaged gas density and velocity distributions as well as the configuration of the disk's intrinsic magnetic field at a distance of 1 AU from the star have been obtained through numerical simulations. The assumption that the vertical (parallel to the disk's rotation axis) magnetic induction component changes much more profoundly in height than in radius and, hence, gives grounds to take into account its gradient in the model of the turbulent kinematic viscosity coefficient has been confirmed.

  5. Limits on the ion temperature anisotropy in the turbulent intracluster medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lima, R.; Yan, H.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxies is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields. This is in contrast to previous cosmological MHD simulations that are successful in explaining the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities that can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasi-linear theory to estimate the ion scattering rate resulting from the parallel firehose, mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instability thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model that bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvénic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  6. On Fermi acceleration and MHD-instabilities at ultra-relativistic magnetized shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pelletier, Guy; Marcowith, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Fermi acceleration can take place at ultra-relativistic shock waves if the upstream or downstream magnetic field has been remodeled so that most of the magnetic power lies on short spatial scales. The relevant conditions under which Fermi acceleration become efficient in the presence of both a coherent and a short scale turbulent magnetic field are addressed. Within the MHD approximation, this paper then studies the amplification of a pre-existing magnetic field through the streaming of cosmic rays upstream of a relativistic shock wave. The magnetic field is assumed to be perpendicular in the shock front frame, as generally expected in the limit of large shock Lorentz factor. In the MHD regime, compressive instabilities seeded by the net cosmic-ray charge in the shock precursor (as seen in the shock front frame) develop on the shortest spatial scales but saturate at a moderate level $\\delta B/B \\sim 1$, which is not sufficient for Fermi acceleration. As we argue, it is possible that other instabilities outsid...

  7. On the structure and statistical theory of turbulence of extended magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Miloshevich, George; Morrison, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress regarding the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of extended magnetohydrodynamics (XMHD), a model with Hall drift and electron inertia, is summarized. The advantages of the Hamiltonian approach are invoked to study some general properties of XMHD turbulence, and to compare them against their ideal MHD counterparts. For instance, the helicity flux transfer rates for XMHD are computed, and Liouville's theorem for this model is also verified. The latter is used, in conjunction with the absolute equilibrium states, to arrive at the spectra for the invariants, and to determine the direction of the cascades, e.g., generalizations of the well-known ideal MHD inverse cascade of magnetic helicity. After a similar analysis is conducted for XMHD by inspecting second order structure functions and absolute equilibrium states, a couple of interesting results emerge. When cross helicity is taken to be ignorable, the inverse cascade of injected magnetic helicity also occurs in the Hall MHD range - this is s...

  8. rHARM: Accretion and Ejection in Resistive GR-MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Qian; Noble, Scott; Bugli, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent magnetic diffusivity plays an important role for accretion disks and the launching of disk winds. We have implemented magnetic diffusivity, respective resistivity in the general relativistic MHD code HARM. This paper describes the theoretical background of our implementation, its numerical realization, our numerical tests and preliminary applications. The test simulations of the new code rHARM are compared with an analytic solution of the diffusion equation and a classical shock tube problem. We have further investigated the evolution of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in tori around black holes for a range of magnetic diffusivities. We find indication for a critical magnetic diffusivity (for our setup) beyond which no MRI develops in the linear regime and for which accretion of torus material to the black hole is delayed. Preliminary simulations of magnetically diffusive thin accretion disks around Schwarzschild black holes that are threaded by a large-scale poloidal magnetic field show th...

  9. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Skála, J; Büchner, J; Rampp, M

    2014-01-01

    The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal, large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasmas motivates the implementation of almost conservative MHD computer codes. They should efficiently calculate, use highly parallelized schemes scaling well with large numbers of CPU cores, allows to obtain a high grid resolution over large simulation domains and which can easily be adapted to new computer architectures as well as to new initial and boundary conditions, allow modular extensions. The new massively parallel simulation code GOEMHD3 enables efficient and fast simulations of almost ideal, large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasma flows, well resolved and on huge grids covering large domains. Its abilities are validated by major tests of ideal and weakly dissipative plasma phenomena. The high resolution ($2048^3$ grid points) simulation of a large part of the solar corona above an observed active region proved the excellent parallel scalability of the code using more than 30.000 processor cores...

  10. 3D-MHD simulations of the evolution of magnetic fields in FR II radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Huarte-Espinosa, Martin; Alexander, Paul

    2010-01-01

    3D-MHD numerical simulations of bipolar, hypersonic, weakly magnetized jets and synthetic synchrotron observations are presented to study the structure and evolution of magnetic fields in FR II radio sources. The magnetic field setup in the jet is initially random. The power of the jets as well as the observational viewing angle are investigated. We find that synthetic polarization maps agree with observations and show that magnetic fields inside the sources are shaped by the jets' backflow. Polarimetry statistics correlates with time, the viewing angle and the jet-to-ambient density contrast. The magnetic structure inside thin elongated sources is more uniform than for ones with fatter cocoons. Jets increase the magnetic energy in cocoons, in proportion to the jet velocity. Both, filaments in synthetic emission maps and 3D magnetic power spectra suggest that turbulence develops in evolved sources.

  11. THE SIGNATURE OF INITIAL CONDITIONS ON MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallas, V.; Alexakis, A., E-mail: vdallas@lps.ens.fr, E-mail: alexakis@lps.ens.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, École Normale Supérieure, Université Pierre et Marié Curie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2014-06-20

    We demonstrate that the initial correlation between velocity and current density fluctuations can lead to the formation of enormous current sheets in freely evolving magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. These coherent structures are observed at the peak of the energy dissipation rate and are the carriers of long-range correlations despite all of the nonlinear interactions during the formation of turbulence. The size of these structures spans our computational domain, dominating the scaling of the energy spectrum, which follows a E∝k {sup –2} power law. As the Reynolds number increases, the curling of the current sheets due to Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instabilities and reconnection modifies the scaling of the energy spectrum from k {sup –2} toward k {sup –5/3}. This transition occurs due to the decorrelation of the velocity and the current density which is proportional to Re{sub λ}{sup −3/2}. Finite Reynolds number behavior is observed without reaching a finite asymptote for the energy dissipation rate even for a simulation of Re{sub λ} ≅ 440 with 2048{sup 3} grid points. This behavior demonstrates that even state-of-the-art numerical simulations of the highest Reynolds numbers can be influenced by the choice of initial conditions and consequently they are inadequate to deduce unequivocally the fate of universality in MHD turbulence. Implications for astrophysical observations are discussed.

  12. Energy spectrum transfer equations of solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The recent studies of transfer equations for solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are reviewed with emphasis on the comparison with the statistical observational results. Helios and Voyager missions provide an opportunity to study the the radial evolution of the power spectrum. the cross-helicity the Alfven ratio and the minimum variance direction. Spectrum transfer equations are considered as a tool to explore the nature of this radial evolution of the fluctuations. The transfer equations are derived from incompressible MHD equations. Generally one needs to make assumptions about the nature of the fluctuations and the nature of the turbulent non-linear interactions to obtain numerical results which can be compared with the observations. Some special model results for several simple cases SUCH as for structures or strong mixing. for Alfven waves with weak turbulent interactions. and for a superposition of structures and Alfven waves. are discussed. The difference between the various approaches to derive and handle the transfer equations are also addressed. Finally some theoretical description of the compressible fluctuations are also briefly reviewed.

  13. Neutrino oscillations in MHD supernova explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, S; Kotake, K [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, T, E-mail: shio.k@nao.ac.j [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the neutrino oscillations numerically in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) explosion models to see how asphericity has impacts on neutrino spectra. Magneto-driven explosions are one of the most attracting scenarios for producing large scale departures from spherical symmetric geometry, that are reported by many observational data. We find that the event rates at Super-Kamiokande (SK) seen from the polar direction (e.g., the rotational axis of the supernovae) decrease when the shock wave is propagating through H-resonance. In addition, we find that L-resonance in this situation becomes non-adiabatic, and the effect of L-resonance appears in the neutrino signal, because the MHD shock can propagate to the stellar surface without shock-stall after core bounce, and the shock reaches the L-resonance at earlier stage than the conventional spherical supernova explosion models. Our results suggest that we may obtain the observational signatures of the two resonances in SK for Galactic supernova.

  14. Operational analysis of open-cycle MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, T. E.; McCutchan, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    Open cycle magnetohydrodynamic (OCMHD) conceptual power plant designs are studied in the context of a utility system to form a better basis for understanding their design, design requirements, and market possibilities. Based on assumed or projected plant costs and performance characteristics, assumed economics and escalation factors, and one coal supply and delivery scenario, overall and regional OCMHD utility market possibilities are reviewed. Additionally, for one hypothetical utility system a generation expansion plan is developed that includes OCMHD as a baseload power generating station. The impact on generation system economics and operation of alternating selected MHD plant cost and performance characteristics is reviewed. Baseload plant availability is shown as an important plant design consideration, and a general methodology and data base is developed to assess the impact on design and cost of various reliability decisions. An overall plant availability goal is set and the required availabilities of various MHD high technology components are derived to meet the plant goal. The approach is then extended to projecting channel life goals for various plant design configurations and assumptions.

  15. Memory effects in turbulent transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In mean-field theory of magnetic fields or passive scalars, for example, turbulent transport is usually assumed to be proportional to the corresponding mean fields and their spatial derivatives. However, this is an approximation that is valid only if the mean fields vary slowly in time. Examples are presented where turbulent transport possesses memory, i.e. it depends crucially on the past history of the mean fields at earlier times. Such effects are captured by replacing turbulent transport coefficients with time integral kernels, resulting in transport coefficients that depend effectively on the frequency or the growth rate of the mean fields themselves. In this paper we perform numerical experiments to find the characteristic timescale of this effect as well as simple analytical models of the integral kernels in the case of passive scalar concentrations and kinetic dynamos. The integral kernels can then be used to find self-consistent growth or decay rates of the mean fields. In mean-field dynamos the grow...

  16. OBSERVATION OF MHD INSTABILITY AND DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF LOCAL PERTURBED MAGNETIC FIELD USING MOTIONAL STARK EFFECT DIAGNOSTIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JAYAKUMAR,RJ; MAKOWSKI,MA; ALLEN,SL; AUSTIN,ME; GAROFALO,AM; LA HAYE,RJ; REIMERDES,H; RHODES,TL

    2003-11-01

    OAK-B135 The local oscillating component of the poloidal magnetic field in plasma associated with MHD instabilities has been measured using the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak. The magnetic field perturbations associated with a resistive wall mode (RWM) rotated by internal coils at 20 Hz was measured using the conventional MSE operation mode. These first observations of perturbations due to a MHD mode were obtained on multiple MSE channels covering a significant portion of the plasma and the radial profile o the amplitude of the perturbed field oscillations was obtained. The measured profile is similar to the profile of the amplitude of the electron temperature oscillation measured by electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements. In a new mode of measurement, the amplitude of a tearing mode rotating at a high frequency ({approx} 7 kHz) was observed using the spectral analysis of high frequency MSE data on one channel. The spectrum consists of the harmonics of the light modulation employed in the MSE diagnostics, their mutual beat frequencies and their beat frequencies with the rotation frequency of the tearing mode. The value and time variation of the frequency of the observed perturbations is in good agreement with that measured by Mirnov probes and ECE. The paper demonstrates that the MSE diagnostic can be used for observing low and high frequency phenomena such as MHD instabilities and electromagnetic turbulence.

  17. Holographic Vortex Pair Annihilation in Superfluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Yiqiang; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2014-01-01

    We make a first principles investigation of the dynamical evolution of vortex number in a two-dimensional (2D) turbulent superfluid by holography through numerically solving its highly non-trivial gravity dual. With the randomly placed vortices and antivortices prepared as initial states, we find that the temporal evolution of the vortex number can be well fit statistically by two-body decay due to the vortex pair annihilation featured relaxation process remarkably from a very early time on. In particular, subtracted by the universal offset, the power law fit indicates that our holographic turbulent superfluid exhibits an apparently different decay pattern from the superfluid recently experimented in highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensates.

  18. Fossil turbulence revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    A theory of fossil turbulence presented in the 11th Liege Colloquium on Marine turbulence is "revisited" in the 29th Liege Colloquium "Marine Turbulence Revisited". The Gibson (1980) theory applied universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as it is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Towed oceanic microstructure measurements of Schedvin (1979) confirmed the predicted universal constants. Universal constants, spectra, hydrodynamic phase diagrams (HPDs) and other predictions of the theory have been reconfirmed by a wide variety of field and laboratory observations. Fossil turbulence theory has many applications; for example, in marine biology, laboratory and field measurements suggest phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies differently by pattern recognition of several days of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times above thres...

  19. Inlet Turbulence and Length Scale Measurements in a Large Scale Transonic Turbine Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Douglas; Flegel, Ashlie; Giel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Constant temperature hotwire anemometry data were acquired to determine the inlet turbulence conditions of a transonic turbine blade linear cascade. Flow conditions and angles were investigated that corresponded to the take-off and cruise conditions of the Variable Speed Power Turbine (VSPT) project and to an Energy Efficient Engine (EEE) scaled rotor blade tip section. Mean and turbulent flowfield measurements including intensity, length scale, turbulence decay, and power spectra were determined for high and low turbulence intensity flows at various Reynolds numbers and spanwise locations. The experimental data will be useful for establishing the inlet boundary conditions needed to validate turbulence models in CFD codes.

  20. Multi-Spacecraft Turbulence Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbury, Tim S.; Osman, Kareem T.

    analyse; and, most important of all, the solar wind speed, V SW , is much higher than the local MHD wave speeds. This means that a spacecraft time series is essentially a "snapshot" spatial sample of the plasma along the flow direction, so we can consider measurements at a set of times ti to be at a set of locations in the plasma given by xi = VSW. This approximation,known as Taylor's hypothesis, greatly simplifies the analysis of the data. In contrast, in the magnetosheath the flow speed is lower than the wave speed and therefore temporal changes at the spacecraft are due to a complex combination of the plasma moving over the spacecraft and the turbulent fluctuations propagating in the plasma frame. This is also the case for ion and electron kinetic scale turbulence in the solar wind and dramatically complicates the analysis of the data. As a result, the application of multi-spacecraft techniques such as k filtering to Cluster data (see Chapter 5, which make it possible to disentangle the effects of flow and wave propagation, have probably resulted in the greatest increase in our understanding of magnetosheath turbulence rather than in the solar wind. We can therefore summarise the key advantages for plasma turbulence analysis of multi-spacecraft data sets such as those from Cluster, compared to single spacecraft data. Multiple sampling points allow us to measure how the turbulence varies in many directions, and on a range of scales, simultaneously, enabling the study of anisotropy in ways that have not previously been possible. They also allow us to distinguish between the motion of fluctuations in the plasma and motion of the plasma itself, enabling the study of turbulence in highly disturbed environments such as the magnetosheath. A number of authors have studied turbulence with Cluster data, using different techniques, the choice of which is motivated by the characteristics of the plasma environment in which they are interested. The complexity of both the Cluster