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Sample records for mhc-i class antibodies

  1. Expressão do complexo de histocompatilidade principal de classe I (MHC I no sistema nervoso central: plasticidade sináptica e regeneração Expresión del complejo principal de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I en el sistema nervioso central: plasticidad sináptica y regeneración Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I in the central nervous system: role in synaptic plasticity and regeneration

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    Renata Graciele Zanon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi demonstrado recentemente que o complexo de histocompatibilidade principal de classe I (MHC I, expresso no sistema nervoso central (SNC, não funciona somente como molécula com papel imunológico, mas também como parte de um mecanismo envolvido na plasticidade sináptica. A expressão de MHC I interfere na intensidade e seletividade da retração de sinapses em contato com neurônios que sofreram lesão e também influencia a reatividade das células gliais próximas a esses neurônios. A intensidade do rearranjo sináptico e resposta glial após lesão, ligadas à expressão de MHC I no SNC, repercute em diferenças na capacidade regenerativa e recuperação funcional em linhagens de camundongos isogênicos. Dessa forma, os novos aspectos sobre a função do MHC I no SNC direcionam futuras pesquisas no sentido de buscar o envolvimento do MHC I em doenças neurológicas e também o desenvolvimento de novas estratégias terapêuticas.El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I, expresado en el sistema nervioso central (SNC, no sólo funciona como una molécula con función inmunológica, sino que es crucial para las respuestas del tejido nervioso en casos de lesiones. El MHC I está involucrado con los procesos de plasticidad sináptica y las células gliales en el microambiente de la médula espinal después de realizada axotomía periférica. La expresión de MHC I interfiere con la intensidad y la forma en que se producen la contracción y la eliminación de sinapsis con relación a las neuronas, cuyos axones se han comprometido, y también influye en la reactividad de las células gliales, cerca de estas neuronas. La intensidad de estos cambios, que responden a la expresión de MHC I en el SNC, implica diferencias en la capacidad de regeneración axonal de las células dañadas por axotomía, por lo que el nivel de expresión de las moléculas MHC I se relaciona con el proceso de regeneración de los axones y, en

  2. Molecular characterization of major histocompatibility complex class 1 (MHC-I) from squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus).

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    Pascalis, Hervé; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Fendel, Rolf; Lavergne, Anne; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2003-12-01

    Little is known about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class 1 in squirrel monkeys ( Saimiri sciureus). We cloned, sequenced and characterized two alleles and the cDNA of the coding region of MHC class 1 in these New World monkeys. Phylogenetic analyses showed that these sequences are related to HLA class 1 genes ( HLA-A and HLA-G). The structure and organization of one of the two identified clones was similar to that of a class 1 MHC gene ( HLA-A2). All the exon/intron splice acceptor/donor sites are conserved and their locations correspond to the HLA-A2 gene. The sequences of the newly described cDNAs reveal that they code for the characteristic class 1 MHC proteins, with all the features thought necessary for cell surface expression. Typical sequences for the leader peptide, alpha(1), alpha(2), alpha(3), transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains were found.

  3. Colostrum from cows immunized with a vaccine associated with bovine neonatal pancytopenia contains allo-antibodies that cross-react with human MHC-I molecules.

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    Kasonta, Rahel; Holsteg, Mark; Duchow, Karin; Dekker, James W; Cussler, Klaus; Bendall, Justin G; Bastian, Max

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, a new haemorrhagic syndrome affecting newborn calves, Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP), was reported in southern Germany. It is characterized by severe bleeding, destruction of the red bone marrow, and a high case fatality rate. The syndrome is caused by alloreactive, maternal antibodies that are ingested by the calf with colostrum and result from a dam vaccination with one particular vaccine against Bovine-Viral-Diarrhoea-Virus. Because bovine colostrum is increasingly gaining interest as a dietary supplement for human consumption, the current study was initiated to elucidate whether BNP alloantibodies from BNP dams (i.e. animals that gave birth to a BNP-affected calf) cross-react with human cells, which could pose a health hazard for human consumers of colostral products. The present study clearly demonstrates that BNP alloantibodies cross-react with human lymphocytes in vitro. In agreement with previous reports on BNP, the cross-reactive antibodies are specific for MHC-I molecules, and sensitize opsonised human cells for in vitro complement lysis. Cross-reactive antibodies are present in serum and colostrum of individual BNP dams. They can be traced in commercial colostrum powder manufactured from cows immunized with the vaccine associated with BNP, but are absent from commercial powder manufactured from colostrum excluding such vaccinated cows. In humans alloreactive, MHC-I specific antibodies are generally not believed to cause severe symptoms. However, to minimize any theoretical risk for human consumers, manufacturers of bovine colostrum for human consumption should consider using only colostrum from animals that have not been exposed to the vaccine associated with BNP.

  4. Colostrum from cows immunized with a vaccine associated with bovine neonatal pancytopenia contains allo-antibodies that cross-react with human MHC-I molecules.

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    Rahel Kasonta

    Full Text Available In 2006, a new haemorrhagic syndrome affecting newborn calves, Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP, was reported in southern Germany. It is characterized by severe bleeding, destruction of the red bone marrow, and a high case fatality rate. The syndrome is caused by alloreactive, maternal antibodies that are ingested by the calf with colostrum and result from a dam vaccination with one particular vaccine against Bovine-Viral-Diarrhoea-Virus. Because bovine colostrum is increasingly gaining interest as a dietary supplement for human consumption, the current study was initiated to elucidate whether BNP alloantibodies from BNP dams (i.e. animals that gave birth to a BNP-affected calf cross-react with human cells, which could pose a health hazard for human consumers of colostral products. The present study clearly demonstrates that BNP alloantibodies cross-react with human lymphocytes in vitro. In agreement with previous reports on BNP, the cross-reactive antibodies are specific for MHC-I molecules, and sensitize opsonised human cells for in vitro complement lysis. Cross-reactive antibodies are present in serum and colostrum of individual BNP dams. They can be traced in commercial colostrum powder manufactured from cows immunized with the vaccine associated with BNP, but are absent from commercial powder manufactured from colostrum excluding such vaccinated cows. In humans alloreactive, MHC-I specific antibodies are generally not believed to cause severe symptoms. However, to minimize any theoretical risk for human consumers, manufacturers of bovine colostrum for human consumption should consider using only colostrum from animals that have not been exposed to the vaccine associated with BNP.

  5. Ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I) prevents apoptosis induced by Fas or SAPK/JNK activation in T-lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    -apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim). MHC-I ligation also prevented downregulation of Bcl-2 and destabilization of Deltapsim induced by anti-Fas Ab treatment or anisomycin exposure. Studies on three different Jurkat cell mutants deficient for src p56(lck), ZAP......-70 kinase, or TCR/CD3 gamma-chain showed that the cells undergo apoptosis after Fas ligation. Anisomycin exposure induced apoptosis in the src p56(lck)-deficient cell line but not in the two other mutant cell lines. Simultaneous cross-linking of MHC-I and Fas ligation inhibited apoptosis in the ZAP...

  6. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

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    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S;

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  7. Interaction of TAPBPR, a tapasin homolog, with MHC-I molecules promotes peptide editing

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    Morozov, Giora I.; Zhao, Huaying; Mage, Michael G.; Boyd, Lisa F.; Jiang, Jiansheng; Dolan, Michael A.; Venna, Ramesh; Norcross, Michael A.; McMurtrey, Curtis P.; Hildebrand, William; Schuck, Peter; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules is central to antigen presentation, self-tolerance, and CD8+ T-cell activation. TAP binding protein, related (TAPBPR), a widely expressed tapasin homolog, is not part of the classical MHC-I peptide-loading complex (PLC). Using recombinant MHC-I molecules, we show that TAPBPR binds HLA-A*02:01 and several other MHC-I molecules that are either peptide-free or loaded with low-affinity peptides. Fluorescence polarization experiments establish that TAPBPR augments peptide binding by MHC-I. The TAPBPR/MHC-I interaction is reversed by specific peptides, related to their affinity. Mutational and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies confirm the structural similarities of TAPBPR with tapasin. These results support a role of TAPBPR in stabilizing peptide-receptive conformation(s) of MHC-I, permitting peptide editing. PMID:26869717

  8. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A;

    2001-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present them to cytotoxic T cells (CTL). To establish a selection system, and, thereby, enable a library approach to identify the specificities involved (that of the MHC-I for peptides...... and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and...

  9. Contrasting patterns of selection between MHC I and II across populations of Humboldt and Magellanic penguins.

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    Sallaberry-Pincheira, Nicole; González-Acuña, Daniel; Padilla, Pamela; Dantas, Gisele P M; Luna-Jorquera, Guillermo; Frere, Esteban; Valdés-Velásquez, Armando; Vianna, Juliana A

    2016-10-01

    The evolutionary and adaptive potential of populations or species facing an emerging infectious disease depends on their genetic diversity in genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In birds, MHC class I deals predominantly with intracellular infections (e.g., viruses) and MHC class II with extracellular infections (e.g., bacteria). Therefore, patterns of MHC I and II diversity may differ between species and across populations of species depending on the relative effect of local and global environmental selective pressures, genetic drift, and gene flow. We hypothesize that high gene flow among populations of Humboldt and Magellanic penguins limits local adaptation in MHC I and MHC II, and signatures of selection differ between markers, locations, and species. We evaluated the MHC I and II diversity using 454 next-generation sequencing of 100 Humboldt and 75 Magellanic penguins from seven different breeding colonies. Higher genetic diversity was observed in MHC I than MHC II for both species, explained by more than one MHC I loci identified. Large population sizes, high gene flow, and/or similar selection pressures maintain diversity but limit local adaptation in MHC I. A pattern of isolation by distance was observed for MHC II for Humboldt penguin suggesting local adaptation, mainly on the northernmost studied locality. Furthermore, trans-species alleles were found due to a recent speciation for the genus or convergent evolution. High MHC I and MHC II gene diversity described is extremely advantageous for the long-term survival of the species.

  10. NETMHCSTAB - predicting stability of peptide-MHC-I complexes; impacts for cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper W.; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    demonstrated that pMHC-I complex stability was a better correlate of CTL immunogenicity than peptide-MHC-I affinity. We here extended this study and analysed a total of 5509 distinct peptide stability measurements covering 10 different HLA class I molecules. Artificial neural networks were used to construct...... that anchor positions in the N-terminal of the binding motif (primarily P2 and P3) play a critical role for the formation of stable pMHC-I complexes. A webserver implementing the method is available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCstab....

  11. MHC I Stabilizing Potential of Computer-Designed Octapeptides

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    Joanna M. Wisniewska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented for 180 in silico designed octapeptide sequences and their stabilizing effects on the major histocompatibility class I molecule H-2Kb. Peptide sequence design was accomplished by a combination of an ant colony optimization algorithm with artificial neural network classifiers. Experimental tests yielded nine H-2Kb stabilizing and 171 nonstabilizing peptides. 28 among the nonstabilizing octapeptides contain canonical motif residues known to be favorable for MHC I stabilization. For characterization of the area covered by stabilizing and non-stabilizing octapeptides in sequence space, we visualized the distribution of 100,603 octapeptides using a self-organizing map. The experimental results present evidence that the canonical sequence motives of the SYFPEITHI database on their own are insufficient for predicting MHC I protein stabilization.

  12. Non-Invasive Monitoring of CNS MHC-I Molecules in Ischemic Stroke Mice.

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    Xia, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Huanhuan; Wang, Jie; Gao, Xueren; Chen, Jinpeng; Fu, Bo; Shen, Yuqing; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong; Teng, Gaojun

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules in the central nervous system, which are silenced under normal physiological conditions, have been reported to be induced by injury stimulation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether MHC-I molecules could serve as molecular targets for the acute phase of ischemic stroke and to assess whether a high-affinity peptide specific for MHC-I molecules could be applied in the near-infrared imaging of cerebral ischemic mice. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the expression of MHC-I molecules in two mouse models of cerebral ischemic stroke and an in vitro model of ischemia. The NetMHC 4.0 server was used to screen a high-affinity peptide specific for mouse MHC-I molecules. The Rosetta program was used to identify the specificity and affinity of the screened peptide (histocompatibility-2 binding peptide, H2BP). The results demonstrated that MHC-I molecules could serve as molecular targets for the acute phase of ischemic stroke. Cy5.5-H2BP molecular probes could be applied in the near-infrared imaging of cerebral ischemic mice. Research on the expression of MHC-I molecules in the acute phase after ischemia and MHC-I-targeted imaging may not only be helpful for understanding the mechanism of ischemic and hypoxic brain injury and repair but also has potential application value in the imaging of ischemic stroke.

  13. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

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    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  14. Manipulation of MHC-I/TCR Interaction for Immune Therapy

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    Qingjun Liu; Bin Gao

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy involving the transfer of autologous tumor or virus-reactive T lymphocytes has been demonstrated to he effective in the eradication of cancer and vitally infected cells. Identification of MHC-restricted antigens and progress in generation of adaptive immune responses have provided new direction for such treatment for severe pathologies such as cancer and autoimmune diseases. Here we review the latest development about the molecular basis of MHC-I/TCR interaction, and it's manipulation including enhanced MHC-I expression, modification of peptide and engineered TCR for clinical applications such as vaccine design, tumor therapy and autoimmune diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(3):171-182.

  15. An MHC-I cytoplasmic domain/HIV-1 Nef fusion protein binds directly to the mu subunit of the AP-1 endosomal coat complex.

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    Rajendra Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I from the surface of infected cells by the Nef proteins of primate immunodeficiency viruses likely contributes to pathogenesis by providing evasion of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 Nef-induced down-regulation involves endosomal trafficking and a cooperative interaction between the cytoplasmic domain (CD of MHC-I, Nef, and the clathrin adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1. The CD of MHC-I contains a key tyrosine within the sequence YSQA that is required for down-regulation by Nef, but this sequence does not conform to the canonical AP-binding tyrosine-based motif Yxxphi, which mediates binding to the medium (micro subunits of AP complexes. We previously proposed that Nef allows the MHC-I CD to bind the mu subunit of AP-1 (micro1 as if it contained a Yxxphimotif. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we show that a direct interaction between the MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 plays a primary role in the down-regulation of MHC-I: GST pulldown assays using recombinant proteins indicated that most of the MHC-I CD and Nef residues that are required for the down-regulation in human cells contribute to direct interactions with a truncated version of micro1. Specifically, the tyrosine residue of the YSQA sequence in the MHC-I CD as well as Nef residues E62-65 and P78 each contributed to the interaction between MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 in vitro, whereas Nef M20 had little to no role. Conversely, residues F172/D174 and V392/L395 of the binding pocket on micro1 for Yxxphi motifs were required for a robust interaction. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the MHC-I cytoplasmic domain, Nef, and the C-terminal two thirds of the mu subunit of AP-1 are sufficient to constitute a biologically relevant interaction. The data also reveal an unexpected role for a hydrophobic pocket in micro1 for interaction with MHC-I CD/Nef.

  16. Origin and plasticity of MHC I-associated self peptides.

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    de Verteuil, Danielle; Granados, Diana Paola; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2012-07-01

    Endogenous peptides presented by MHC I molecules represent the essence of self for CD8 T lymphocytes. These MHC I peptides (MIPs) regulate all key events that occur during the lifetime of CD8 T cells. CD8 T cells are selected on self-MIPs, sustained by self-MIPs, and activated in the presence of self-MIPs. Recently, large-scale mass spectrometry studies have revealed that the self-MIP repertoire is more complex and plastic than previously anticipated. The composition of the self-MIP repertoire varies from one cell type to another and can be perturbed by cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors including dysregulation of cellular metabolism and infection. The complexity and plasticity of the self-MIP repertoire represent a major challenge for the maintenance of self tolerance and can have pervasive effects on the global functioning of the immune system.

  17. Rab22a controls MHC-I intracellular trafficking and antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

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    Cebrian, Ignacio; Croce, Cristina; Guerrero, Néstor A; Blanchard, Nicolas; Mayorga, Luis S

    2016-12-01

    Cross-presentation by MHC class I molecules allows the detection of exogenous antigens by CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This process is crucial to initiate cytotoxic immune responses against many pathogens (i.e., Toxoplasma gondii) and tumors. To achieve efficient cross-presentation, dendritic cells (DCs) have specialized endocytic pathways; however, the molecular effectors involved are poorly understood. In this work, we identify the small GTPase Rab22a as a key regulator of MHC-I trafficking and antigen cross-presentation by DCs. Our results demonstrate that Rab22a is recruited to DC endosomes and phagosomes, as well as to the vacuole containing T. gondii parasites. The silencing of Rab22a expression did not affect the uptake of exogenous antigens or parasite invasion, but it drastically reduced the intracellular pool and the recycling of MHC-I molecules. The knockdown of Rab22a also hampered the cross-presentation of soluble, particulate and T. gondii-associated antigens, but not the endogenous MHC-I antigen presentation through the classical secretory pathway. Our findings provide compelling evidence that Rab22a plays a central role in the MHC-I endocytic trafficking, which is crucial for efficient cross-presentation by DCs.

  18. HIV-1 Nef sequesters MHC-I intracellularly by targeting early stages of endocytosis and recycling.

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    Dirk, Brennan S; Pawlak, Emily N; Johnson, Aaron L; Van Nynatten, Logan R; Jacob, Rajesh A; Heit, Bryan; Dikeakos, Jimmy D

    2016-11-14

    A defining characteristic of HIV-1 infection is the ability of the virus to persist within the host. Specifically, MHC-I downregulation by the HIV-1 accessory protein Nef is of critical importance in preventing infected cells from cytotoxic T-cell mediated killing. Nef downregulates MHC-I by modulating the host membrane trafficking machinery, resulting in the endocytosis and eventual sequestration of MHC-I within the cell. In the current report, we utilized the intracellular protein-protein interaction reporter system, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), in combination with super-resolution microscopy, to track the Nef/MHC-I interaction and determine its subcellular localization in cells. We demonstrate that this interaction occurs upon Nef binding the MHC-I cytoplasmic tail early during endocytosis in a Rab5-positive endosome. Disruption of early endosome regulation inhibited Nef-dependent MHC-I downregulation, demonstrating that Nef hijacks the early endosome to sequester MHC-I within the cell. Furthermore, super-resolution imaging identified that the Nef:MHC-I BiFC complex transits through both early and late endosomes before ultimately residing at the trans-Golgi network. Together we demonstrate the importance of the early stages of the endocytic network in the removal of MHC-I from the cell surface and its re-localization within the cell, which allows HIV-1 to optimally evade host immune responses.

  19. Decreased MHC I expression in IFN gamma mutant mice alters synaptic elimination in the spinal cord after peripheral injury

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    Victório Sheila CS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histocompatibility complex (MHC class I expression in the central nervous system (CNS regulates synaptic plasticity events during development and adult life. Its upregulation may be associated with events such as axotomy, cytokine exposition and changes in neuron electrical activity. Since IFNγ is a potent inducer of the MHC I expression, the present work investigated the importance of this pro-inflammatory cytokine in the synaptic elimination process in the spinal cord, as well as the motor recovery of IFN−/−, following peripheral injury. Methods The lumbar spinal cords of C57BL/6J (wild type and IFNγ−/− (mutant mice, subjected to unilateral sciatic nerve transection, were removed and processed for immunohistochemistry and real time RT-PCR, while the sciatic nerves from animals subjected to unilateral crush, were submitted to immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy for counting of the axons. Gait recovery was monitored using the Cat Walk system. Newborn mice astrocyte primary cultures were established in order to study the astrocytic respose in the absence of the IFNγ expression. Results IFNγ−/− mutant mice showed a decreased expression of MHC I and β2-microglobulin mRNA coupled with reduced synaptophysin immunolabelling in the lesioned spinal cord segment. Following unilateral nerve transection, the Iba-1 (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP reactivities increased equally in both strains. In vitro, the astrocytes demonstrated similar GFAP levels, but the proliferation rate was higher in the wild type mice. In the crushed nerves (distal stump, neurofilaments and p75NTR immunolabeling were upregulated in the mutant mice as compared to the wild type and an improvement in locomotor recovery was observed. Conclusion The present results show that a lack of IFNγ affects the MHC I expression and the synaptic elimination process in the spinal cord. Such

  20. 乌鳢(Channa argus)MHC Class I全长cDNA序列的克隆及表达特征%The Cloning and Expression Characteristics of A Full-length cDNA of MHC I from SnakeheadChanna argus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪强强; 贾伟章; 黄泽波

    2015-01-01

    旨在探究乌鳢(Channa argus)MHC基因的分子特征、表达方式及多态性。应用抑制差减杂交(SHH)和快速扩增cDNA末端(RACE)技术克隆并鉴定了乌鳢全长MHC I cDNA序列Char-Ia-1、Char-Ia-2和Char-Ib,推测氨基酸序列与已知硬骨鱼MHC I基因同源。Char-Ia-1和Char-Ia-2 cDNA序列包含1167和1083 bp的开放阅读框,分别编码388和360 aa的膜型Ⅰ类分子;而Char-Ib cDNA序列包含978 bp的开放阅读框,编码325 aa,显著截短的羧基末端显示Char-Ib为潜在的分泌型Ⅰ类分子。比较发现Char-Ia与Char-Ib在3'非转录区存在显著差异,在细胞外区、跨膜区和细胞质区的氨基酸序列同源性均较低,推测二者来自不同的MHC I基因座。氨基酸序列比对显示乌鳢MHC I分子与抗原肽结合的关键氨基酸残基较保守,在α1和α3结构域均出现硬骨鱼特征性的氨基酸残基缺失。进化树分析表明Char-Ia-1和Char-Ia-2聚为一簇,与Char-Ib处于不同的进化分支上,进一步证实Char-Ia与Char-Ib分别由不同MHC I基因座编码。RT-PCR分析显示乌鳢MHCI在组织中呈现组成型表达。设计基因专一性引物检测乌鳢Char-Ia与Char-Ib两类MHC I基因在组织中的表达水平,结果显示Char-Ia以较低的浓度表达于所有被检测组织,而Char-Ib主要表达于脾、肠、鳃和外周血,呈现明显的组织表达特异性,提示两类MHC I分子在鱼类免疫反应中发挥不同的生理功能。%By the methods of suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH)and rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE), 3 full-length sequences,Char-Ia-1,Char-Ia-2 andChar-Ib of major histocompatibility complex(MHC)I from snakehead(Channa argus)were cloned and characterized. The sequences of these clones were predicted to be in a high degree of homology with known teleost’s MHC I.Char-Ia-1 andChar-Ia-2 contained an open reading frame(ORF)of 1 167 and 1 083 bp, and encoded a putative peptide of

  1. Computational prediction of cleavage using proteasomal in vitro digestion and MHC I ligand data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-feng LU; Hao SHENG; Yi ZHANG; Zhi-yang LI

    2013-01-01

    Proteasomes are responsible for the production of the majority of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes.Hence,it is important to identify correctly which peptides will be generated by proteasomes from an unknown protein.However,the pool of proteasome cleavage data used in the prediction algorithms,whether from major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I ligand or in vitro digestion data,is not identical to in vivo proteasomal digestion products.Therefore,the accuracy and reliability of these models still need to be improved.In this paper,three types of proteasomal cleavage data,constitutive proteasome (cCP),immunoproteasome (iCP) in vitro cleavage,and MHC I ligandv data,were used for training cleave-site predictive methods based on the kernel-function stabilized matrix method (KSMM).The predictive accuracies of the KSMM+pair coefficients were 75.0%,72.3%,and 83.1% for cCP,iCP,and MHC I ligand data,respectively,which were comparable to the results from support vector machine (SVM).The three proteasomal cleavage methods were combined in turn with MHC I-peptide binding predictions to model MHC I-peptide processing and the presentation pathway.These integrations markedly improved MHC I peptide identification,increasing area under the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC) values from 0.82 to 0.91.The results suggested that both MHC I ligand and proteasomal in vitro degradation data can give an exact simulation of in vivo processed digestion.The information extracted from cCP and iCP in vitro cleavage data demonstrated that both cCP and iCP are selective in their usage of peptide bonds for cleavage.

  2. Scrutinizing MHC-I binding peptides and their limits of variation.

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    Christian P Koch

    Full Text Available Designed peptides that bind to major histocompatibility protein I (MHC-I allomorphs bear the promise of representing epitopes that stimulate a desired immune response. A rigorous bioinformatical exploration of sequence patterns hidden in peptides that bind to the mouse MHC-I allomorph H-2K(b is presented. We exemplify and validate these motif findings by systematically dissecting the epitope SIINFEKL and analyzing the resulting fragments for their binding potential to H-2K(b in a thermal denaturation assay. The results demonstrate that only fragments exclusively retaining the carboxy- or amino-terminus of the reference peptide exhibit significant binding potential, with the N-terminal pentapeptide SIINF as shortest ligand. This study demonstrates that sophisticated machine-learning algorithms excel at extracting fine-grained patterns from peptide sequence data and predicting MHC-I binding peptides, thereby considerably extending existing linear prediction models and providing a fresh view on the computer-based molecular design of future synthetic vaccines. The server for prediction is available at http://modlab-cadd.ethz.ch (SLiDER tool, MHC-I version 2012.

  3. Ligation of MHC class I molecules on peripheral blood T lymphocytes induces new phenotypes and functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenholt, S; Röpke, M; Skov, S;

    1996-01-01

    Microgram concentrations of immobilized anti-MHC class I (MHC-I) Ab induced proliferation of resting CD3+ T cells from peripheral blood. In contrast, soluble Ab did not activate T cells. Exposure of T cells to immobilized anti-MHC-I Ab for only 24 h was followed by proliferation and development....... These data clearly demonstrate that ligation of the MHC-I complex on T cells may induce both positive and negative signals. Since the physiologic ligands for MHC-I molecules are TCR and the CD8 molecules, our data may suggest that MHC-I molecules are instrumental in cellular interactions between T cells....

  4. IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH HLA ANTIBODIES CLASS I AND II, AND MICA ANTIBODIES IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of HLA and MICA antibodies in patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation and their influence on the course of post-transplant period. Determination of HLA antibodies class I and II, and MICA antibodies was performed on a platform of Luminex (xMAP-tech- nology using sets LABScreen ONE LAMBDA (U.S.. A total of 156 patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Revealed the presence of HLA and MICA antibodies in the serum of 31.4% of patients. Regraf- ted patients increased the content of antibodies to the antigens of HLA system was noted in 88.2% of cases, 47% met the combination of antibodies to the I, II classes and MICA. In patients awaiting first kidney transplantation, HLA and MICA antibodies were determined in 23.7% of cases. The presence of pretransplant HLA and MICA antibodies had a significant influence on the course of post-transplant period. Patients with the presence of HLA and MICA in 50% of cases delayed graft function. Sessions of plasmapheresis can reduce the concentration of HLA and MICA antibodies on average by 61.1%. 

  5. Chemotherapeutics and radiation stimulate MHC class I expression through elevated interferon-beta signaling in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wan

    Full Text Available Low doses of anticancer drugs have been shown to enhance antitumor immune response and increase the efficacy of immunotherapy. The molecular basis for such effects remains elusive, although selective depletion of T regulatory cells has been demonstrated. In the current studies, we demonstrate that topotecan (TPT, a topoisomerase I-targeting drug with a well-defined mechanism of action, stimulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I expression in breast cancer cells through elevated expression/secretion of interferon-β (IFN-β and activation of type I IFN signaling. First, we show that TPT treatment elevates the expression of both total and cell-surface MHC I in breast cancer cells. Second, conditioned media from TPT-treated breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells induce elevated expression of cell-surface MHC I in drug-naïve recipient cells, suggesting the involvement of cytokines and/or other secreted molecules. Consistently, TPT-treated cells exhibit elevated expression of multiple cytokines such as IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. Third, either knocking down the type I interferon receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1 or addition of neutralizing antibody against IFN-β results in reduced MHC I expression in TPT-treated cells. Together, these results suggest that TPT induces increased IFN-β autocrine/paracrine signaling through type I IFN receptor, resulting in the elevated MHC I expression in tumor cells. Studies have also demonstrated that other chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. etoposide, cisplatin, paclitaxel and vinblastine similarly induce increased IFN-β secretion and elevated MHC I expression. In addition, conditioned media from γ-irradiated donor cells are shown to induce IFN-β-dependent MHC I expression in unirradiated recipient cells. In the aggregate, our results suggest that many cancer therapeutics induce elevated tumor antigen presentation through MHC I, which could represent a common mechanism for enhanced antitumor immune response through

  6. Neuronal MHC-I expression and its implications in synaptic function, axonal regeneration and Parkinson’s and other brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eCebrián

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal expression of major histocompatibility complex I (MHC-I has been implicated in developmental synaptic plasticity and axonal regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS, but recent findings demonstrate that constitutive neuronal MHC-I can also be involved in neurodegenerative diseases by playing a neuroinflammtory role. Recent reports demonstrate its expression in vitro and in human postmortem samples and support a role in neurodegeneration involving proinflammatory cytokines, activated microglia and increased cytosolic oxidative stress. MHC-I may be important for both normal development and pathogenesis of some CNS diseases including Parkinson’s.

  7. MHC-I-induced apoptosis in human B-lymphoma cells is dependent on protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Johansen, B;

    1999-01-01

    B lymphoma cells, is dependent on protein tyrosine kinases and the phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI-3) kinase. Functional studies showed that MHC-I crosslinking induced almost complete inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of the B lymphoma cells as early as 6 h post-crosslinking and apoptosis 24 h...... post-crosslinking. Preincubation with either protein tyrosine kinase or protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitors reduced the MHC-I-induced apoptosis to background levels, whereas inhibition of PI-3 kinase had no effect. These data demonstrate a pivotal role for protein tyrosine and serine....../threonine kinases in MHC-I-mediated apoptosis in human B-cells and suggest the presence of several MHC-I signaling pathways leading to diverse effects in these cells....

  8. Protective efficacy of cross-reactive CD8+ T cells recognising mutant viral epitopes depends on peptide-MHC-I structural interactions and T cell activation threshold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A Valkenburg

    Full Text Available Emergence of a new influenza strain leads to a rapid global spread of the virus due to minimal antibody immunity. Pre-existing CD8(+ T-cell immunity directed towards conserved internal viral regions can greatly ameliorate the disease. However, mutational escape within the T cell epitopes is a substantial issue for virus control and vaccine design. Although mutations can result in a loss of T cell recognition, some variants generate cross-reactive T cell responses. In this study, we used reverse genetics to modify the influenza NP(336-374 peptide at a partially-solvent exposed residue (N->A, NPN3A mutation to assess the availability, effectiveness and mechanism underlying influenza-specific cross-reactive T cell responses. The engineered virus induced a diminished CD8(+ T cell response and selected a narrowed T cell receptor (TCR repertoire within two V beta regions (V beta 8.3 and V beta 9. This can be partially explained by the H-2D(bNPN3A structure that showed a loss of several contacts between the NPN3A peptide and H-2D(b, including a contact with His155, a position known to play an important role in mediating TCR-pMHC-I interactions. Despite these differences, common cross-reactive TCRs were detected in both the naïve and immune NPN3A-specific TCR repertoires. However, while the NPN3A epitope primes memory T-cells that give an equivalent recall response to the mutant or wild-type (wt virus, both are markedly lower than wt->wt challenge. Such decreased CD8(+ responses elicited after heterologous challenge resulted in delayed viral clearance from the infected lung. Furthermore, mice first exposed to the wt virus give a poor, low avidity response following secondary infection with the mutant. Thus, the protective efficacy of cross-reactive CD8(+ T cells recognising mutant viral epitopes depend on peptide-MHC-I structural interactions and functional avidity. Our study does not support vaccine strategies that include immunization against

  9. Structural allele-specific patterns adopted by epitopes in the MHC-I cleft and reconstruction of MHC:peptide complexes to cross-reactivity assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinler A Antunes

    Full Text Available The immune system is engaged in a constant antigenic surveillance through the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. This is an efficient mechanism for detection of intracellular infections, especially viral ones. In this work we describe conformational patterns shared by epitopes presented by a given MHC allele and use these features to develop a docking approach that simulates the peptide loading into the MHC cleft. Our strategy, to construct in silico MHC:peptide complexes, was successfully tested by reproducing four different crystal structures of MHC-I molecules available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB. An in silico study of cross-reactivity potential was also performed between the wild-type complex HLA-A2-NS31073 and nine MHC:peptide complexes presenting alanine exchange peptides. This indicates that structural similarities among the complexes can give us important clues about cross reactivity. The approach used in this work allows the selection of epitopes with potential to induce cross-reactive immune responses, providing useful tools for studies in autoimmunity and to the development of more comprehensive vaccines.

  10. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  11. Human monoclonal HLA antibodies reveal interspecies crossreactive swine MHC class I epitopes relevant for xenotransplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.; Kardol, M.J.; Arn, J.S.; Eijsink, C.; Franke, M.E.; Schreuder, G.M.; Haasnoot, G.W.; Doxiadis, I.I.; Sachs, D.H.; Smith, D.M.; Claas, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Crossreactivity of anti-HLA antibodies with SLA alleles may limit the use of pig xenografts in some highly sensitized patients. An understanding of the molecular basis for this crossreactivity may allow better selection of xenograft donors. We have tested 68 human monoclonal HLA class I antibodies (

  12. Interferon-γ induces immunoproteasomes and the presentation of MHC I-associated peptides on human salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano-Garcia, Martha E; Misuno, Kaori; Tran, Simon D; Hu, Shen

    2014-01-01

    A prominent histopathological feature of Sjögren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease, is the presence of lymphocytic infiltrates in the salivary and lachrymal glands. Such infiltrates are comprised of activated lymphocytes and macrophages, and known to produce multiple cytokines including interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). In this study, we have demonstrated that IFN-γ strongly induces the expression of immunoproteasome beta subunits (β1i, β2i and β5i) and immunoproteasome activity but conversely inhibits the expression of proteasome beta subunits (β1, β2 and β5) in human salivary gland (HSG) cells. Mass spectrometric analysis has revealed potential MHC I-associated peptides on the HSG cells, including a tryptic peptide derived from salivary amylase, due to IFN-γ stimulation. These results suggest that IFN-γ induces immunoproteasomes in HSG cells, leading to enhanced presentation of MHC I-associated peptides on cell surface. These peptide-presenting salivary gland cells may be recognized and targeted by auto-reactive T lymphocytes. We have also found that lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, inhibits the expression of β1 subunit in HSG cells and blocks the IFN-γ-induced expression of β1i and immunoproteasome activity. However, the expression of β2i and β5i in HSG cells is not affected by lactacystin. These results may add new insight into the mechanism regarding how lactacystin blocks the action of proteasomes or immunoproteasomes.

  13. Interferon-γ induces immunoproteasomes and the presentation of MHC I-associated peptides on human salivary gland cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha E Arellano-Garcia

    Full Text Available A prominent histopathological feature of Sjögren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease, is the presence of lymphocytic infiltrates in the salivary and lachrymal glands. Such infiltrates are comprised of activated lymphocytes and macrophages, and known to produce multiple cytokines including interferon-gamma (IFN-γ. In this study, we have demonstrated that IFN-γ strongly induces the expression of immunoproteasome beta subunits (β1i, β2i and β5i and immunoproteasome activity but conversely inhibits the expression of proteasome beta subunits (β1, β2 and β5 in human salivary gland (HSG cells. Mass spectrometric analysis has revealed potential MHC I-associated peptides on the HSG cells, including a tryptic peptide derived from salivary amylase, due to IFN-γ stimulation. These results suggest that IFN-γ induces immunoproteasomes in HSG cells, leading to enhanced presentation of MHC I-associated peptides on cell surface. These peptide-presenting salivary gland cells may be recognized and targeted by auto-reactive T lymphocytes. We have also found that lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, inhibits the expression of β1 subunit in HSG cells and blocks the IFN-γ-induced expression of β1i and immunoproteasome activity. However, the expression of β2i and β5i in HSG cells is not affected by lactacystin. These results may add new insight into the mechanism regarding how lactacystin blocks the action of proteasomes or immunoproteasomes.

  14. Maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies are associated with reduced birth weight in thrombocytopenic neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, J; Husebekk, A; Acharya, G; Flo, K; Stuge, T B; Skogen, B; Straume, B; Tiller, H

    2016-02-01

    In this comparative cross-sectional study, possible associations between maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies and birth weight in neonatal thrombocytopenia are explored. Although commonly detected in pregnancies and generally regarded as harmless, it has been suggested that such antibodies might be associated with fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). As a link between FNAIT due to human platelet antigen 1a-specific antibodies and reduced birth weight in boys has previously been demonstrated, we wanted to explore whether maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies might also affect birth weight. To examine this, suspected cases of FNAIT referred to the Norwegian National Unit for Platelet Immunology during the period 1998-2009 were identified. Pregnancies where the only finding was maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies were included. An unselected group of pregnant women participating in a prospective study investigating maternal-fetal hemodynamics at the University Hospital North Norway during the years 2006-2010 served as controls. Twenty-nine percent of controls had anti-HLA class I antibodies. The thrombocytopenic neonates had a significantly lower adjusted birth weight (linear regression, P=0.036) and significantly higher odds of being small for gestational age (OR=6.72, P<0.001) compared with controls. Increasing anti-HLA class I antibody levels in the mother were significantly associated with lower birth weight and placental weight among thrombocytopenic neonates, but not among controls. These results indicate that maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies in thrombocytopenic neonates are associated with reduced fetal growth. Further studies are needed to test if placental function is affected.

  15. Caracterización molecular y análisis evolutivo del complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad clase I (MHC-I) en primates del nuevo mundo (Platyrrhini)

    OpenAIRE

    Lugo Ramos, Juan Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad clase I (MHC-I) codifica para proteínas de membrana que presentan péptidos antigénicos a los linfocitos T citotóxicos que inician la respuesta inmune celular [1]. El MHC-I se ha conservado en primates catarrinos, compartiendo los clásicos MHC-A, y B, y los no-clásicos-E, F y G. Por su parte, los primates platirrinos expresan un complemento diferente de loci clásicos, llamado MHC-G-Like [2], aunque también hay evidencia genómica de varios loci relaciona...

  16. MHC-I Ligand Discovery Using Targeted Database Searches of Mass Spectrometry Data: Implications for T-Cell Immunotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, J. Patrick; Konda, Prathyusha; Kowalewski, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    we offer a solution to this problem whereby we developed a targeted database search approach and accompanying tool SpectMHC, that is based on a priori-predicted MHC-I peptides. We first validated the approach using MS data from two different allotype-specific immunoprecipitates for the C57BL/6 mouse...... background. We then developed allotype-specific HLA databases to search previously published MS data sets of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This targeted search strategy improved peptide identifications for both mouse and human ligandomes by greater than 2-fold and is superior...... to traditional “no enzyme” searches of reference proteomes. Our targeted database search promises to uncover otherwise missed novel T-cell epitopes of therapeutic potential....

  17. MHC-I Ligand Discovery Using Targeted Database Searches of Mass Spectrometry Data: Implications for T-Cell Immunotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, J. Patrick; Konda, Prathyusha; Kowalewski, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    we offer a solution to this problem whereby we developed a targeted database search approach and accompanying tool SpectMHC, that is based on a priori-predicted MHC-I peptides. We first validated the approach using MS data from two different allotype-specific immunoprecipitates for the C57BL/6 mouse......-I peptides, wherein MS spectra are compared against a reference proteome. Unfortunately, matching these spectra to reference proteome databases is hindered by inflated search spaces attributed to a lack of enzyme restriction in the searches, limiting the efficiency with which MHC ligands are discovered. Here...... background. We then developed allotype-specific HLA databases to search previously published MS data sets of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This targeted search strategy improved peptide identifications for both mouse and human ligandomes by greater than 2-fold and is superior...

  18. ER stress affects processing of MHC class I-associated peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meloche Sylvain

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral infection and neoplastic transformation trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Thus, a large proportion of the cells that must be recognized by the immune system are stressed cells. Cells respond to ER stress by launching the unfolded protein response (UPR. The UPR regulates the two key processes that control major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I-peptide presentation: protein synthesis and degradation. We therefore asked whether and how the UPR impinges on MHC I-peptide presentation. Results We evaluated the impact of the UPR on global MHC I expression and on presentation of the H2Kb-associated SIINFEKL peptide. EL4 cells stably transfected with vectors coding hen egg lysozyme (HEL-SIINFEKL protein variants were stressed with palmitate or exposed to glucose deprivation. UPR decreased surface expression of MHC I but did not affect MHC I mRNA level nor the total amount of intracellular MHC I proteins. Impaired MHC I-peptide presentation was due mainly to reduced supply of peptides owing to an inhibition of overall protein synthesis. Consequently, generation of H2Kb-SIINFEKL complexes was curtailed during ER stress, illustrating how generation of MHC I peptide ligands is tightly coupled to ongoing protein synthesis. Notably, the UPR-induced decline of MHC I-peptide presentation was more severe when the protein source of peptides was localized in the cytosol than in the ER. This difference was not due to changes in the translation rates of the precursor proteins but to increased stability of the cytosolic protein during ER stress. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ER stress impairs MHC I-peptide presentation, and that it differentially regulates expression of ER- vs. cytosol-derived peptides. Furthermore, this work illustrates how ER stress, a typical feature of infected and malignant cells, can impinge on cues for adaptive immune recognition.

  19. The structural basis of chicken, swine and bovine CD8αα dimers provides insight into the co-evolution with MHC I in endotherm species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Li, Xin; Qi, Jianxun; Zhang, Nianzhi; Xia, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the pivotal molecules of the adaptive immune system (AIS) maintain their inherent characteristics and relationships with their co-receptors over the course of co-evolution. CD8α, a fundamental but simple AIS component with only one immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain, is a good example with which to explore this question because it can fold correctly to form homodimers (CD8αα) and interact with peptide-MHC I (p/MHC I) with low sequence identities between different species. Hereby, we resolved the crystal structures of chicken, swine and bovine CD8αα. They are typical homodimers consisting of two symmetric IgV domains with distinct species specificities. The CD8αα structures indicated that a few highly conserved residues are important in CD8 dimerization and in interacting with p/MHC I. The dimerization of CD8αα mainly depends on the pivotal residues on the dimer interface; in particular, four aromatic residues provide many intermolecular forces and contact areas. Three residues on the surface of CD8α connecting cavities that formed most of the hydrogen bonds with p/MHC I were also completely conserved. Our data propose that a few key conserved residues are able to ensure the CD8α own structural characteristics despite the great sequence variation that occurs during evolution in endotherms. PMID:27122108

  20. Pivotal molecules of MHC I pathway in human primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Mei-Ying Cai; Da-Peng Wei; Xia Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of several important molecules involved in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and to determine whether cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) vaccine therapy was suitable for HCC. METHODS: Labeled streptavidin biotin (LSAB) method of immunohisto-chemistry was used to study 33 HCC tissue specimens.RESULTS: Most HCC tissues and adjacent histologicalnormal hepatocytes expressed HLA-I antigens,TAP, andB7, expression of B7 was especially strong, and therewas no significant difference between them (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The MHC class I presentation pathway in primary hepatocellular carcinoma may not be abnormal or dysfunctional, and CTL could kill these tumor cells.Thus, it is suitable and practicable to design and construct CTL vaccine against HCC.

  1. Equine herpesvirus type 4 UL56 and UL49.5 proteins downregulate cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I expression independently of each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Abdelrahman; Azab, Walid; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are critically important in the host defense against various pathogens through presentation of viral peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), a process resulting in the destruction of virus-infected cells. Herpesviruses interfere with CTL-mediated elimination of infected cells by various mechanisms, including inhibition of peptide transport and loading, perturbation of MHC-I trafficking, and rerouting and proteolysis of cell surface MHC-I. In this study, we show that equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) modulates MHC-I cell surface expression through two different mechanisms. First, EHV-4 can lead to a significant downregulation of MHC-I expression at the cell surface through the product of ORF1, a protein expressed with early kinetics from a gene that is homologous to herpes simplex virus 1 UL56. The EHV-4 UL56 protein reduces cell surface MHC-I as early as 4 h after infection. Second, EHV-4 can interfere with MHC-I antigen presentation, starting at 6 h after infection, by inhibition of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) through its UL49.5 protein. Although pUL49.5 has no immediate effect on overall surface MHC-I levels in infected cells, it blocks the supply of antigenic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transport of peptide-loaded MHC-I to the cell surface. Taken together, our results show that EHV-4 encodes at least two viral immune evasion proteins: pUL56 reduces MHC-I molecules on the cell surface at early times after infection, and pUL49.5 interferes with MHC-I antigen presentation by blocking peptide transport in the ER.

  2. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, B; Bui, HH; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune

    2006-01-01

    of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, and chimpanzee MHC class I alleles. We use this data to establish a set of benchmark predictions with one...... practice of tool developers having to generate reference predictions themselves, which can lead to underestimating the performance of prediction methods they are not as familiar with as their own. The overall goal of this effort is to provide a transparent prediction evaluation allowing bioinformaticians...

  3. HLA class I donor-specific triplet antibodies detected after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnavidou-Nicolaidou, A; Doxiadis, I I N; Iniotaki-Theodoraki, A; Patargias, T; Stavropoulos-Giokas, C; Kyriakides, G K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether IgG, non-donor-specific anti-HLA class I antibodies (HLAabI) detected after renal transplantation recognize immunogenic amino acid triplets expressed on the foreign graft. In addition, we sought to evaluate the effect of these antibodies as well as other posttransplant HLAabI on graft outcome. Posttransplant sera from 264 renal recipients were tested for the presence of IgG HLAabI and HLA class II-specific alloantibodies (HLAabII) by ELISA. The HLAMatchmaker computer algorithm was used to define the HLA class I non-donor-specific antibodies, which seem to recognize immunogenic amino acid triplets. Donor-specific triplet antibodies (DSTRab) were detected in 16 of 22 (72.7%) recipients based on at least one HLA-A or -B mismatched antigen with the donor. DSTRab were found either without (n = 7) or with (n = 9) HLA donor-specific antibodies (HLA-DSA). The presence of DSTRab alone in the periphery was associated with acute rejection, whereas the presence of both DSTRab and HLA-DSA was associated with chronic rejection and graft failure.

  4. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern Peters

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, and chimpanzee MHC class I alleles. We use this data to establish a set of benchmark predictions with one neural network method and two matrix-based prediction methods extensively utilized in our groups. In general, the neural network outperforms the matrix-based predictions mainly due to its ability to generalize even on a small amount of data. We also retrieved predictions from tools publicly available on the internet. While differences in the data used to generate these predictions hamper direct comparisons, we do conclude that tools based on combinatorial peptide libraries perform remarkably well. The transparent prediction evaluation on this dataset provides tool developers with a benchmark for comparison of newly developed prediction methods. In addition, to generate and evaluate our own prediction methods, we have established an easily extensible web-based prediction framework that allows automated side-by-side comparisons of prediction methods implemented by experts. This is an advance over the current practice of tool developers having to generate reference predictions themselves, which can lead to underestimating the performance of prediction methods they are not as familiar with as their own. The overall goal of this effort is to provide a transparent prediction evaluation allowing bioinformaticians to identify promising features of prediction methods and providing guidance to immunologists regarding the reliability of prediction tools.

  5. Antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A in transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yizhou Zou; Peter Stastny

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the role of polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) gene and antibodies against MICA antigens in transplant immunology.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from our own results and from the relevant English language literatures published from 1999 to 2010. Some data presented in this review are in press.Study selection Articles regarding MICA gene discovery and pioneering finding of antibodies against MICA antigen and allograft rejection were selected. This review chronicles the development of our understanding of the role that MICA antigens and antibodies may play in organ transplantation.Results Polymorphic glycoprotein MICA antigens were detected on freshly isolated human umbilical cord endothelial cells, but not on peripheral lymphocytes. Antibodies were found and typing of recipients and donors by sequencing the MICA alleles has established that de novo antibodies produced in kidney transplant recipients are directed at mismatched MICA epitopes and are associated with acute rejection and chronic transplant failure. The specificity of antibodies against the epitopes of MICA antigens were well characterized by donor MICA typing, single antigen array testing with antibody absorption and elution. Acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in stem-cell recipients who were mismatched for MICA.Conclusions Immunization against mismatched MICA epitopes encountered in donor organs after transplantation may result in antibodies against MICA alleles. Testing for MICA donor-specific antibodies (DSA) which are associated with early failure of kidney transplants may be helpful for identifying some of the targets of antibodies against antigens other than the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and for improving transplantation outcome.

  6. Protein tyrosine kinases p53/56lyn and p72syk in MHC class I-mediated signal transduction in B lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Skov, S

    1998-01-01

    Crosslinking of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on the surface of human B lymphoma cells was shown to induce protein tyrosine phosphorylation and mobilization of intracellular free calcium. Immunoprecipitations indicated that the protein tyrosine kinases p53/56lyn and p72...... and the results indicate that these two kinases have different substrate specificity and regulate intracellular free calcium differently in response to MHC-I crosslinking. In addition MHC-I crosslinking of a sIgM-negative DT40 chicken B cell variant results in less activity of tyrosine kinases and less...... mobilization of intracellular free calcium compared with MHC-I crosslinking of wild-type DT40 cells. Thus, expression of BCR at the cell surface is likely to be important for the signal cascade initiated by MHC-I crosslinking. Our data suggest that signal transduction initiated through ligation of the MHC...

  7. Dynamics of selected MHC class I and II molecule expression in the course of HPV positive CIN treatment with the use of human recombinant IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Marek; Bobek, Malgorzata; Zrubek, HenryK; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2004-03-01

    Studies consistently reveal downregulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules or/and selective loss of individual MHC-I alleles and upregulation of MHC-II molecules in the areas of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and in cervical cancers. In vitro studies demonstrated the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) potential of MHC class I and II molecule upregulation followed by increased cytolytic response against some cervical cancer cell lines. In vivo assessment of the correlation between regression/persistence state of CIN and the IFN-gamma-induced changes in both class of selected MHC molecule expression. Seventeen subjects with CIN I/CIN II associated with high-risk HPV infection underwent uniform IFN-gamma treatment (four intracervical injections over 2-day interval for a total dose of 6,000,000 IU). Immunohistochemical staining has been performed within cervical punch biopsy specimens with the use of monoclonal antibody reacting with HLA-DR, HLA-HC and HLA-Bw4, and the mean proportion of given molecules expressing keratinocytes was counted before, immediately after and 2 months after IFN-gamma treatment The analysis revealed a rapid and significant increase of the HLA-Bw4 proportion in response to IFN-gamma, persistent in the group of complete responders (with CIN clearance). No significant changes in the proportion of HLA-HC 10 positive cells in response to IFN-gamma administration was demonstrated, nor a significant increase in HLA-DR positivity; however, the transient trend towards increasing the proportion of HLA-DR immediately after treatment completion was observed. Upregulation of selected MHC class I allele expression, but not necessary MHC class II or heavy chain fragments of MHC-I, induced by IFN-gamma correlates with the resolution of cervical intraepithelial lesions and high-risk HPV DNA clearance in vivo.

  8. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human......, but not the class I-negative parental line, 221, showed homotypic aggregation in response to an HLA-G specific mAb (87G) and a broad reacting class I-specific mAb (IOT2). Both cell lines responded with aggregation to anti-class II mAb (TU35). The anti-class I mAb, W6/32, had no effect on all cell lines tested...... and two anti-beta 2-microglobulin mAb had variable, weak effects. The aggregation response was an active, temperature-sensitive process which was almost totally abrogated by azide and by cytochalasins B and E, but unaffected by colchicine, EDTA, aphidicolin, actinomycin D and protein tyrosine kinase...

  9. Peptide-independent stabilization of MHC class I molecules breaches cellular quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Zeynep; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Abualrous, Esam Tolba; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Janßen, Linda; Van Hateren, Andy; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Momburg, Frank; Achour, Adnane; Elliott, Tim; Springer, Sebastian; Boulanger, Denise

    2014-07-01

    The intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins is directed by three quality control mechanisms that test for their structural integrity, which is correlated to the binding of high-affinity antigenic peptide ligands. To investigate which molecular features of MHC-I these quality control mechanisms detect, we have followed the hypothesis that suboptimally loaded MHC-I molecules are characterized by their conformational mobility in the F-pocket region of the peptide-binding site. We have created a novel variant of an MHC-I protein, K(b)-Y84C, in which two α-helices in this region are linked by a disulfide bond that mimics the conformational and dynamic effects of bound high-affinity peptide. K(b)-Y84C shows a remarkable increase in the binding affinity to its light chain, beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), and bypasses all three cellular quality control steps. Our data demonstrate (1) that coupling between peptide and β2m binding to the MHC-I heavy chain is mediated by conformational dynamics; (2) that the folded conformation of MHC-I, supported by β2m, plays a decisive role in passing the ER-to-cell-surface transport quality controls; and (3) that β2m association is also tested by the cell surface quality control that leads to MHC-I endocytosis.

  10. Post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibodies as risk factor for late kidney allograft failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, E F; Tedesco-Silva, H; Machado, P G; Franco, M; Medina-Pestana, J O; Gerbase-DeLima, M

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the relationship between the post-transplant anti-HLA class I and/or class II panel reactive antibodies and graft failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). We studied 512 first kidney recipients transplanted at a single center, with a graft functioning for at least 3 years. A single blood sample was collected from each patient for antibody evaluation. The median posttransplant time after blood collection was 4.4 years and did not differ between patients with (n = 91) or without anti-HLA antibodies (n = 421). Female gender, pregnancies and blood transfusions were associated with the presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies. Graft function deterioration was associated with anti-HLA class II antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed independent association for creatinine levels (RR = 7.5), acute rejection (RR = 2.6), recipient male gender (RR = 3.6) and anti-HLA class II antibodies (RR = 2.9) and CAN-associated graft loss. In conclusion, the presence of anti-HLA class II antibodies conferred a risk for graft loss before a decline in renal function and increased the risk of graft failure in patients who already had a decline in graft function. Thus, anti-HLA class II antibody monitoring is a useful tool for the management of long-term kidney recipients.

  11. Major histocompatibility class I molecules present Urtica dioica agglutinin, a superantigen of vegetal origin, to T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, P; Buckle, M; Abastado, J P; Peumans, W J; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1999-05-01

    The Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) shares with the superantigens the property of activating T cell subsets bearing particular Vbeta segments of the TCR. However, UDA is a lectin capable of binding to many glycoproteins on cell membranes. The implication of MHC versus other glycoproteins in UDA presentation was presently studied. Using mutant mice lacking MHC class I (MHC-I), MHC class II (MHC-II) or both MHC antigens, we provided evidence that MHC-I and MHC-II molecules serve as UDA receptors. Presentation by either one of these molecules ensured similar T cell responses and co-stimulatory signals were mandatory for optimal T cell activation and proliferation both in MHC-I and MHC-II contexts. Remarkably, in the absence of MHC molecules, UDA could not be efficiently presented to T cells by other glycosylated proteins. Surface plasmon resonance studies were used to confirm the binding of UDA to MHC-I molecules using a fusion protein consisting of MHC-I domains and beta2-microglobulin. The results indicated that the interaction between UDA and MHC-I molecules implicated lectin-binding site(s) of UDA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that, in addition to MHC-II antigens, MHC-I molecules serve as an alternative ligand for UDA.

  12. A non-proteolytic role for ubiquitin in deadenylation of MHC-I mRNA by the RNA-binding E3-ligase MEX-3C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Florencia; Rapiteanu, Radu; Sebastiaan Winkler, G.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of protein and mRNA turnover is essential for many cellular processes. We recently showed that ubiquitin—traditionally linked to protein degradation—directly regulates the degradation of mRNAs through the action of a newly identified family of RNA-binding E3 ubiquitin ligases. How ubiquitin regulates mRNA decay remains unclear. Here, we identify a new role for ubiquitin in regulating deadenylation, the initial and often rate-limiting step in mRNA degradation. MEX-3C, a canonical member of this family of RNA-binding ubiquitin ligases, associates with the cytoplasmic deadenylation complexes and ubiquitinates CNOT7(Caf1), the main catalytic subunit of the CCR4-NOT deadenylation machinery. We establish a new role for ubiquitin in regulating MHC-I mRNA deadenylation as ubiquitination of CNOT7 by MEX-3C regulates its deadenylation activity and is required for MHC-I mRNA degradation. Since neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitors rescued MEX-3C-mediated MHC-I mRNA degradation, our findings suggest a new non-proteolytic function for ubiquitin in the regulation of mRNA decay. PMID:26471122

  13. TMEM129 is a Derlin-1 associated ERAD E3 ligase essential for virus-induced degradation of MHC-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Boomen, Dick J H; Timms, Richard T; Grice, Guinevere L

    2014-01-01

    role for ubiquitin in this degradation pathway, the responsible E3 ligase is unknown. In a forward genetic screen for host ERAD components hijacked by US11 in near-haploid KBM7 cells, we identified TMEM129, an uncharacterized polytopic membrane protein. TMEM129 is essential and rate-limiting for US11......-mediated MHC-I degradation and acts as a novel ER resident E3 ubiquitin ligase. TMEM129 contains an unusual cysteine-only RING with intrinsic E3 ligase activity and is recruited to US11 via Derlin-1. Together with its E2 conjugase Ube2J2, TMEM129 is responsible for the ubiquitination, dislocation......, and subsequent degradation of US11-associated MHC-I. US11 engages two degradation pathways: a Derlin-1/TMEM129-dependent pathway required for MHC-I degradation and a SEL1L/HRD1-dependent pathway required for "free" US11 degradation. Our data show that TMEM129 is a novel ERAD E3 ligase and the central component...

  14. Detection and specifity of class specific antibodies to whole bacteria cells using a solid phase radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerkinsky, C.; Rees, A.S.; Bergimeier, L.A.; Challacombe, S.J. (Guy' s Hospital Medical and Dental Schools, London (UK))

    1983-07-01

    A solid phase radioimmunoassay has been developed which can be used for the detection of isotype specific antibodies to whole bacteria and other particulate antigens, and is applicable to a variety of species. Bacteria are bound to the solid phase by the use either of antibodies, or of methyl glyoxal. Both methods result in a sensitive and reproducible assay, and bacteria do not appear to desorb from the solid phase. The specificity of antibodies to whole bacteria was examined by absorption of antisera with various species of bacteria and retesting, or by determining the binding of antisera to various bacteria bound to the solid phase. Both methods revealed specificity for the bacteria examined. Inhibition studies showed that antibodies to Streptococcus mutans whole cells could be inhibited by purified cell surface antigens glucosyltransferase and antigen I/II, but only minimally by lipoteichoic acid, c polysaccharide or dextran. In murine antisera antibodies of the IgG, IgM, and IgA classes could be detected at amounts of less than 1 ng/ml.

  15. Class specific antibody responses to newborn larva antigens during Trichinella spiralis human infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendez-Loredo B.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A follow-up study of the class antibody responses to newborn larva (NBL antigens in individuals involved in an outbreak of human trichinellosis was carried out by ELISA assays. The data showed that similar kinetics of antibody responses of different magnitude developed in trichinellosis patients; it was low by week 3, a peak raised by week 5 and decreased from week 7 up to the end of the study. The IgA-ELISA assay was the most sensitive and specific while the IgM was the least sensitive and specific. IgA antibodies to NBL antigens were detected in 80 % of patients while IgE, IgG and IgM responses were observed in 44, 31 and 19 % of the patients by week 3, respectively. From weeks 5 to 7, IgA antibodies were found in 89 to 100 % of the patients while lower percentages (0-82 % were found for the other isotypes. Reactivity of IgA, IgE, IgG and IgM to NBL antigens decreased from week 37 to 57 after infection (0-38 %. These results suggest that detection of IgA antibodies may be useful for early diagnosis and epidemiological studies in human trichinellosis.

  16. The comings and goings of MHC class I molecules herald a new dawn in cross-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blander, J Magarian

    2016-07-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules are the centerpieces of cross-presentation. They are loaded with peptides derived from exogenous sources and displayed on the plasma membrane to communicate with CD8 T cells, relaying a message of tolerance or attack. The study of cross-presentation has been focused on the relative contributions of the vacuolar versus cytosolic pathways of antigen processing and the location where MHC-I molecules are loaded. While vacuolar processing generates peptides loaded onto vacuolar MHC-I molecules, how and where exogenous peptides generated by the proteasome and transported by TAP meet MHC-I molecules for loading has been a matter of debate. The source and trafficking of MHC-I molecules in dendritic cells have largely been ignored under the expectation that these molecules came from the Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or the plasma membrane. New studies reveal a concentrated pool of MHC-I molecules in the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC). These pools are rapidly mobilized to phagosomes carrying microbial antigens, and in a signal-dependent manner under the control of Toll-like receptors. The phagosome becomes a dynamic hub receiving traffic from multiple sources, the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment for delivering the peptide-loading machinery and the ERC for deploying MHC-I molecules that alert CD8 T cells of infection.

  17. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human...... and two anti-beta 2-microglobulin mAb had variable, weak effects. The aggregation response was an active, temperature-sensitive process which was almost totally abrogated by azide and by cytochalasins B and E, but unaffected by colchicine, EDTA, aphidicolin, actinomycin D and protein tyrosine kinase...

  18. Influenza Virus Targets Class I MHC-Educated NK Cells for Immunoevasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Bakur Mahmoud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The immune response to influenza virus infection comprises both innate and adaptive defenses. NK cells play an early role in the destruction of tumors and virally-infected cells. NK cells express a variety of inhibitory receptors, including those of the Ly49 family, which are functional homologs of human killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR. Like human KIR, Ly49 receptors inhibit NK cell-mediated lysis by binding to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules that are expressed on normal cells. During NK cell maturation, the interaction of NK cell inhibitory Ly49 receptors with their MHC-I ligands results in two types of NK cells: licensed ("functional", or unlicensed ("hypofunctional". Despite being completely dysfunctional with regard to rejecting MHC-I-deficient cells, unlicensed NK cells represent up to half of the mature NK cell pool in rodents and humans, suggesting an alternative role for these cells in host defense. Here, we demonstrate that after influenza infection, MHC-I expression on lung epithelial cells is upregulated, and mice bearing unlicensed NK cells (Ly49-deficient NKCKD and MHC-I-deficient B2m-/- mice survive the infection better than WT mice. Importantly, transgenic expression of an inhibitory self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 receptor in NKCKD mice restores WT influenza susceptibility, confirming a direct role for Ly49. Conversely, F(ab'2-mediated blockade of self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 inhibitory receptors protects WT mice from influenza virus infection. Mechanistically, perforin-deficient NKCKD mice succumb to influenza infection rapidly, indicating that direct cytotoxicity is necessary for unlicensed NK cell-mediated protection. Our findings demonstrate that Ly49:MHC-I interactions play a critical role in influenza virus pathogenesis. We suggest a similar role may be conserved in human KIR, and their blockade may be protective in humans.

  19. Leukocyte Ig-Like Receptors – a model for MHC class I disease associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Louise Allen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I polymorphisms are associated with the outcome of some viral infections and autoimmune diseases. MHC-I proteins present antigenic peptides and are recognised by receptors on Natural Killer cells and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes, thus enabling the immune system to detect self-antigens and eliminate targets lacking self or expressing foreign antigens. Recognition of MHC-I, however, extends beyond receptors on cytotoxic leukocytes. Members of the Leukocyte Ig-like receptor (LILR family are expressed on monocytic cells and can recognise both classical and non-classical MHC-I alleles. Despite their relatively broad specificity when compared to the T Cell Receptor or Killer Ig-like Receptors, variations in the strength of LILR binding between different MHC-I alleles have recently been shown to correlate with control of HIV infection. We suggest that LILR recognition may mediate MHC-I disease association in a manner that does not depend on a binary discrimination of self/non-self by cytotoxic cells. Instead, the effects of LILR activity following engagement by MHC-I may represent a degrees of self model, whereby strength of binding to different alleles determines the degree of influence exerted by these receptors on immune cell functions. LILR are expressed by myelomonocytic cells and lymphocytes, extending their influence across antigen presenting cell subsets including dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells. They have been identified as important players in the response to infection, inflammatory diseases and cancer, with recent literature to indicate that MHC-I recognition by these receptors and consequent allelic effects could extend an influence beyond the immune system.

  20. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  1. Molecular cloning and polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex class I genes from grass carp (Ctenophayngodon idellus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Chun; XU Guangxian; LIN Changyou; HU Tuanjun; YAN Ruoqian; George F GAO

    2004-01-01

    In order to clarify the molecular sequences,allelic polymorphism and the tertiary structure of grass carp (Ctenophayngodon idellus) MHC class I,and to further study their relationship with disease resistances,grass carp MHC class I gene (Ctid-MHC I) was cloned from a cDNA library and the allelic polymorphism in the population was investigated.The results showed that most of the variations exist in the peptide-binding domain (PBD) and high polymorphism was identified in the Ctid-MHC I allelic genes from 12 individuals.Based on the genetic distance,Ctid-MHC class I can be classified into 6 types (from Ctid-MHC I-UA to Ctid-MHC I-UF) which were subdivided into 9 lineages (from A to I).Comparison of the Ctid-MHC I among animals and humans showed that the key amino acids of the peptide binding sites are conserved.Analysis of the tertiary structure of the PBD between Grass carp and human crystallographic data of HLA-A2,the variation with insertion or deletion was found in eight regions (A~H).The phylogenetic tree of MHC class I indicates the evolution of MHC class I among grass carp,fish,amphibian,birds,higher vertebrates and humans.

  2. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  3. Post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibodies as risk factor for late kidney allograft failure

    OpenAIRE

    Campos,E.F.; Tedesco-Silva, H.; P.G. Machado; Franco., M; J.O. Medina-Pestana; Gerbase-Delima, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the relationship between the post-transplant anti-HLA class I and/or class II panel reactive antibodies and graft failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). We studied 512 first kidney recipients transplanted at a single center, with a graft functioning for at least 3 years. A single blood sample was collected from each patient for antibody evaluation. the median posttransplant time after blood collection was 4.4 years and did no...

  4. Inefficient Nef-mediated downmodulation of CD3 and MHC-I correlates with loss of CD4+T cells in natural SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schindler

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent data suggest that Nef-mediated downmodulation of TCR-CD3 may protect SIVsmm-infected sooty mangabeys (SMs against the loss of CD4+ T cells. However, the mechanisms underlying this protective effect remain unclear. To further assess the role of Nef in nonpathogenic SIV infection, we cloned nef alleles from 11 SIVsmm-infected SMs with high (>500 and 15 animals with low (<500 CD4+ T-cells/microl in bulk into proviral HIV-1 IRES/eGFP constructs and analyzed their effects on the phenotype, activation, and apoptosis of primary T cells. We found that not only efficient Nef-mediated downmodulation of TCR-CD3 but also of MHC-I correlated with preserved CD4+ T cell counts, as well as with high numbers of Ki67+CD4+ and CD8+CD28+ T cells and reduced CD95 expression by CD4+ T cells. Moreover, effective MHC-I downregulation correlated with low proportions of effector and high percentages of naïve and memory CD8+ T cells. We found that T cells infected with viruses expressing Nef alleles from the CD4low SM group expressed significantly higher levels of the CD69, interleukin (IL-2 and programmed death (PD-1 receptors than those expressing Nefs from the CD4high group. SIVsmm Nef alleles that were less active in downmodulating TCR-CD3 were also less potent in suppressing the activation of virally infected T cells and subsequent cell death. However, only nef alleles from a single animal with very low CD4+ T cell counts rendered T cells hyper-responsive to activation, similar to those of HIV-1. Our data suggest that Nef may protect the natural hosts of SIV against the loss of CD4+ T cells by at least two mechanisms: (i downmodulation of TCR-CD3 to prevent activation-induced cell death and to suppress the induction of PD-1 that may impair T cell function and survival, and (ii downmodulation of MHC-I to reduce CTL lysis of virally infected CD4+ T cells and/or bystander CD8+ T cell activation.

  5. Class and subclass distribution of hantavirus-specific serum antibodies at different times after the onset of nephropathia epidemica.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groen (Jan); M.N. Gerding; J.G.M. Jordans; J.P.G. Clement; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractSera from Dutch and Belgium individuals who suffered from nephropathia epidemica (NE), a mild form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), were tested for the distribution of classes and subclasses of Hantavirus (HV)-specific antibodies at different times after the onset of the

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  7. Antibodies against a class II HLA-peptide complex raised by active immunization of mice with antigen mimicking peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Tuxen, R; Riise, Erik Skjold

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease linked to the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes DRB1*1501, DRB5*0101 and DQB1*0602. T cells reactive towards the DRB1*1501 in complex with various peptides derived from myelin basic protein (MBP), which is the major component of myelin...... of NMRI mice with three different antigen mimicking peptides displayed on M13 bacteriophages. The peptides mimick the epitope of a monoclonal antibody specific for the DR2b-MBP(85-99) complex. The mice developed IgG antibodies not only against the peptides injected, but they also developed antibodies...... against the DR2b complex and specific antibodies against the DR2b-MBP(85-99) complex. These data open up the possibility of designing antigen mimicking peptides for vaccination against MS....

  8. Matching for the non-conventional MHC-I MICA gene significantly reduces the incidence of acute and chronic GVHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carapito, Raphael; Jung, Nicolas; Kwemou, Marius; Untrau, Meiggie; Michel, Sandra; Pichot, Angélique; Giacometti, Gaëlle; Macquin, Cécile; Ilias, Wassila; Morlon, Aurore; Kotova, Irina; Apostolova, Petya; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Cesbron, Anne; Gagne, Katia; Oudshoorn, Machteld; van der Holt, Bronno; Labalette, Myriam; Spierings, Eric; Picard, Christophe; Loiseau, Pascale; Tamouza, Ryad; Toubert, Antoine; Parissiadis, Anne; Dubois, Valérie; Lafarge, Xavier; Maumy-Bertrand, Myriam; Bertrand, Frédéric; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio; Paillard, Catherine; Querol, Sergi; Sierra, Jorge; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Inoko, Hidetoshi; von dem Borne, Peter A; Kuball, Jürgen H E; Ota, Masao; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Michallet, Mauricette; Lioure, Bruno; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Blaise, Didier; Cornelissen, Jan J; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Claas, Frans; Moreau, Philippe; Milpied, Noël; Charron, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Zeiser, Robert; Socié, Gérard; Bahram, Seiamak

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is among the most challenging complications in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The highly polymorphic "MHC class I chain-related gene A", MICA, encodes a stress-induced glycoprotein expressed primarily on epithelia. MICA interacts with the i

  9. Matching for the nonconventional MHC-I MICA gene significantly reduces the incidence of acute and chronic GVHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carapito, R. (Raphael); Jung, N. (Nicolas); Kwemou, M. (Marius); Untrau, M. (Meiggie); Michel, S. (Sandra); Pichot, A. (Angélique); Giacometti, G. (Gaëlle); Macquin, C. (Cécile); Ilias, W. (Wassila); Morlon, A. (Aurore); Kotova, I. (Irina); Apostolova, P. (Petya); Schmitt-Graeff, A. (Annette); Cesbron, A. (Anne); K. Gagne (Katia); M. Oudshoorn (Machteld); B. van der Holt (Bronno); Labalette, M. (Myriam); E. Spierings (E.); Picard, C. (Christophe); P. Loiseau (Pascale); Tamouza, R. (Ryad); Toubert, A. (Antoine); Parissiadis, A. (Anne); V. Dubois (Valerie); Lafarge, X. (Xavier); Maumy-Bertrand, M. (Myriam); Bertrand, F. (Frédéric); Vago, L. (Luca); F. Ciceri (Fabio); Paillard, C. (Catherine); Querol, S. (Sergi); J. Sierra (Jorge); Fleischhauer, K. (Katharina); A. Nagler (Arnon); M. Labopin (Myriam); H. Inoko (Hidetoshi); P.A. von dem Borne (P. A.); J. Kuball (Jürgen); Ota, M. (Masao); Katsuyama, Y. (Yoshihiko); M. Michallet (M.); B. Lioure; De Latour, R.P. (Régis Peffault); D. Blaise (Didier); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); I. Yakoub-Agha (Ibrahim); F.H.J. Claas (Frans); P. Moreau; N. Milpied; Charron, D. (Dominique); M. Mohty (Mohamad); Zeiser, R. (Robert); G. Socie (Gerard); Bahram, S. (Seiamak)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGraft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is among the most challenging complications in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The highly polymorphic MHC class I chain-related gene A, MICA, encodes a stress-induced glycoprotein expressed primarily on epithelia. MICA interacts

  10. Matching for the nonconventional MHC-I MICA gene significantly reduces the incidence of acute and chronic GVHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carapito, R. (Raphael); Jung, N. (Nicolas); Kwemou, M. (Marius); Untrau, M. (Meiggie); Michel, S. (Sandra); Pichot, A. (Angélique); Giacometti, G. (Gaëlle); Macquin, C. (Cécile); Ilias, W. (Wassila); Morlon, A. (Aurore); Kotova, I. (Irina); Apostolova, P. (Petya); Schmitt-Graeff, A. (Annette); Cesbron, A. (Anne); K. Gagne (Katia); M. Oudshoorn (Machteld); B. van der Holt (Bronno); Labalette, M. (Myriam); E. Spierings (E.); Picard, C. (Christophe); P. Loiseau (Pascale); Tamouza, R. (Ryad); Toubert, A. (Antoine); Parissiadis, A. (Anne); V. Dubois (Valerie); Lafarge, X. (Xavier); Maumy-Bertrand, M. (Myriam); Bertrand, F. (Frédéric); Vago, L. (Luca); F. Ciceri (Fabio); Paillard, C. (Catherine); Querol, S. (Sergi); J. Sierra (Jorge); Fleischhauer, K. (Katharina); A. Nagler (Arnon); M. Labopin (Myriam); H. Inoko (Hidetoshi); P.A. von dem Borne (P. A.); J. Kuball (Jürgen); Ota, M. (Masao); Katsuyama, Y. (Yoshihiko); M. Michallet (M.); B. Lioure; De Latour, R.P. (Régis Peffault); D. Blaise (Didier); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); I. Yakoub-Agha (Ibrahim); F.H.J. Claas (Frans); P. Moreau; N. Milpied; Charron, D. (Dominique); M. Mohty (Mohamad); Zeiser, R. (Robert); G. Socie (Gerard); Bahram, S. (Seiamak)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGraft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is among the most challenging complications in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The highly polymorphic MHC class I chain-related gene A, MICA, encodes a stress-induced glycoprotein expressed primarily on epithelia. MICA interacts

  11. Matching for the non-conventional MHC-I MICA gene significantly reduces the incidence of acute and chronic GVHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carapito, Raphael; Jung, Nicolas; Kwemou, Marius; Untrau, Meiggie; Michel, Sandra; Pichot, Angélique; Giacometti, Gaëlle; Macquin, Cécile; Ilias, Wassila; Morlon, Aurore; Kotova, Irina; Apostolova, Petya; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Cesbron, Anne; Gagne, Katia; Oudshoorn, Machteld; van der Holt, Bronno; Labalette, Myriam; Spierings, Eric; Picard, Christophe; Loiseau, Pascale; Tamouza, Ryad; Toubert, Antoine; Parissiadis, Anne; Dubois, Valérie; Lafarge, Xavier; Maumy-Bertrand, Myriam; Bertrand, Frédéric; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio; Paillard, Catherine; Querol, Sergi; Sierra, Jorge; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Inoko, Hidetoshi; von dem Borne, Peter A; Kuball, Jürgen H E; Ota, Masao; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Michallet, Mauricette; Lioure, Bruno; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Blaise, Didier; Cornelissen, Jan J; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Claas, Frans; Moreau, Philippe; Milpied, Noël; Charron, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Zeiser, Robert; Socié, Gérard; Bahram, Seiamak

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is among the most challenging complications in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The highly polymorphic "MHC class I chain-related gene A", MICA, encodes a stress-induced glycoprotein expressed primarily on epithelia. MICA interacts with the

  12. Binding of human beta 2-microglobulin to murine EL4 thymoma cells upregulates MHC class I heavy-chain epitopes, inhibits IL-2 secretion and induces resistance to killing by natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claësson, M H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1994-01-01

    . EL4 cells which had bound h beta 2m decreased their rate of constitutive IL-2 secretion and became resistant to activated natural killer (NK) cell killing. The present data suggest the binding of h beta 2m to mouse T cells leads to conformational changes of MHC-I heavy chains which influence both......A variety of murine tumor cell lines was studied for its binding of exogeneously added human beta 2-microglobulin (h beta 2m). Three T lymphomas and one IL-2-dependent T-cell line (HT-1) bound substantial amounts of h beta 2m, whereas P815 mastocytoma cells, an Abelson virus-infected pre-B cell...... line (ABLS-8), X63 B-lymphoma cells and YAC cells did not bind h beta 2m. In two of the T lymphomas, EL4 and BW5147, binding of h beta 2m led to an increase in major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) heavy-chain epitope expression as measured by anti-H-2K/D antibody binding and FACS analysis...

  13. Real-time, high-throughput measurements of peptide-MHC-I dissociation using a scintillation proximity assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael; Røder, Gustav Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    timed data needed to determine the rate of dissociation is not simple. Ideally, one should use a homogenous assay involving an inexhaustible and label-free assay principle. Here, we present a homogenous, high-throughput peptide-MHC class I dissociation assay, which by and large fulfill these ideal...... requirements. To avoid labeling of the highly variable peptide, we labeled the invariant ß2m and monitored its dissociation by a scintillation proximity assay, which has no separation steps and allows for real-time quantitative measurement of dissociation. Validating this work-around to create a virtually...

  14. Comparison of efficacies of bovine immune colostral antibody and each immunoglobulin class against verotoxin 2, flagellum and somatic cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, Tetsurou; Kuribayashi, Takashi; Honjo, Toshio; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2013-04-01

    The efficacy of bovine immune colostral (colostral) antibodies against verotoxin (VT) 2, flagellum and somatic cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 in mice was determined. Three major immunoglobulin (Ig) classes were isolated from the colostral antibody against VT2 by affinity chromatography and were used for estimation. Mice inoculated with VT2 were administered each Ig class from the colostral antibody, colostral antibody (colostral whey containing antibody) or serum antibody against VT2 at 1 hour after VT2 inoculation. All control mice (20/20) died after administration of sterilized saline instead of the colostral antibody. The survival rate was 93.3% (14/15) after administration of S-IgA or IgM antibody, or colostral antibody. Survival rates for IgG antibody and serum antibody administration were 80% (12/15) and 60% (9/15), respectively. Serum concentrations of VT2, which was absorbed from the small intestine in mice after administration of VT2 and colostral antibody, were measured by fluorescence enzyme immunoassay (FEIA). Serum concentrations of VT2 after administration of colostral antibody were lower than those after administration of sterilized saline. Mice inoculated with VT2-producing E. coli 157:H7 were administered anti-flagellum or anti-somatic colostral antibodies. Survival rates for E. coli O157:H7-infected mice administered the anti-flagellum and anti-somatic colostral antibodies were 52.4% (11/21) and 22.2% (4/18), respectively. Furthermore, survival rates increased to 89.5% (17/19) with combined administration of anti-flagellum and anti-VT2 colostral antibodies. These results suggest that colostral antibodies against VT2, flagellum and somatic cells are effective against E. coli O157:H7 infection. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Expression of class 5 antigens by meningococcal strains obtained from patients in Brazil and evaluation of two new monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N. De Gaspari

    Full Text Available Determining the profile of antigen expression among meningococci is important for epidemiologic surveillance and vaccine development. To this end, two new mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been derived against Neisseria meningitidis proteins (class 5. The MAbs were reactive against outer membrane antigens and were bactericidal. Selected anti-class 5 MAbs [(5.1-3E6-2; (5.3-3BH4-C7; (5.4-1BG11-C7; (5.5-3DH-F5G9 also 5F1F4-T3(5.c], and the two new monoclonal antibodies C14F10Br2 (5.8 and 7F11B5Br3 (5.9, were then tested against different meningococcal strains, (63 strains of serogroup A, 60 strains of serogroup C (from 1972 to 1974; and 136 strains of serogroup B (from 1992 meningococci. Our results demonstrated that the expression of class 5 proteins in the N. meningitidis B Brazilian strains studied is highly heterogeneous. The serotypes and subtypes of B:4:P1.15, B:4:P1.9, B:4:P1.7, B:4:P1.3, B:4:P1.14, B:4:P1.16, B:4:NT, and B:NT:NT were detected in N. meningitidis B serogroups.The strains C:2a:P1.2 and A:4.21:P1.9 were dominant in the C and A serogroups, respectively. Serogroup B organisms expressed the class 5 epitopes 5.4 (18%, 5.5 (22%, 5.8 (3.6%, 5.9 (8.0% and 5c (38%. Serogroup C expressed class 5 epitopes 5.1 (81%, 5.4 (35%, 5.5 (33% and 5.9 (5.0%; and serogroup A showed reactivity directed at the class 5 protein 5c (47%; and reactivity was present with the new monoclonal antibody, 5.9 (5.5%. We conclude that the two new MAbs are useful in detecting important group B, class 5 antigens, and that a broad selection of serogroup B, class 5 proteins would be required for an effective vaccine based on the class 5 proteins.

  16. MHC-I affects infection intensity but not infection status with a frequent avian malaria parasite in blue tits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Westerdahl

    Full Text Available Host resistance against parasites depends on three aspects: the ability to prevent, control and clear infections. In vertebrates the immune system consists of innate and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity is particularly important for preventing infection and eradicating established infections at an early stage while adaptive immunity is slow, but powerful, and essential for controlling infection intensities and eventually clearing infections. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC molecules are central in adaptive immunity, and studies on parasite resistance and MHC in wild animals have found effects on both infection intensity (parasite load and infection status (infected or not. It seems MHC can affect both the ability to control infection intensities and the ability to clear infections. However, these two aspects have rarely been considered simultaneously, and their relative importance in natural populations is therefore unclear. Here we investigate if MHC class I genotype affects infection intensity and infection status with a frequent avian malaria infection Haemoproteus majoris in a natural population of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus. We found a significant negative association between a single MHC allele and infection intensity but no association with infection status. Blue tits that carry a specific MHC allele seem able to suppress H. majoris infection intensity, while we have no evidence that this allele also has an effect on clearance of the H. majoris infection, a result that is in contrast with some previous studies of MHC and avian malaria. A likely explanation could be that the clearance rate of avian malaria parasites differs between avian malaria lineages and/or between avian hosts.

  17. MHC-I affects infection intensity but not infection status with a frequent avian malaria parasite in blue tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Helena; Stjernman, Martin; Råberg, Lars; Lannefors, Mimi; Nilsson, Jan-Åke

    2013-01-01

    Host resistance against parasites depends on three aspects: the ability to prevent, control and clear infections. In vertebrates the immune system consists of innate and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity is particularly important for preventing infection and eradicating established infections at an early stage while adaptive immunity is slow, but powerful, and essential for controlling infection intensities and eventually clearing infections. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules are central in adaptive immunity, and studies on parasite resistance and MHC in wild animals have found effects on both infection intensity (parasite load) and infection status (infected or not). It seems MHC can affect both the ability to control infection intensities and the ability to clear infections. However, these two aspects have rarely been considered simultaneously, and their relative importance in natural populations is therefore unclear. Here we investigate if MHC class I genotype affects infection intensity and infection status with a frequent avian malaria infection Haemoproteus majoris in a natural population of blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus. We found a significant negative association between a single MHC allele and infection intensity but no association with infection status. Blue tits that carry a specific MHC allele seem able to suppress H. majoris infection intensity, while we have no evidence that this allele also has an effect on clearance of the H. majoris infection, a result that is in contrast with some previous studies of MHC and avian malaria. A likely explanation could be that the clearance rate of avian malaria parasites differs between avian malaria lineages and/or between avian hosts.

  18. Matching for the nonconventional MHC-I MICA gene significantly reduces the incidence of acute and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapito, Raphael; Jung, Nicolas; Kwemou, Marius; Untrau, Meiggie; Michel, Sandra; Pichot, Angélique; Giacometti, Gaëlle; Macquin, Cécile; Ilias, Wassila; Morlon, Aurore; Kotova, Irina; Apostolova, Petya; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Cesbron, Anne; Gagne, Katia; Oudshoorn, Machteld; van der Holt, Bronno; Labalette, Myriam; Spierings, Eric; Picard, Christophe; Loiseau, Pascale; Tamouza, Ryad; Toubert, Antoine; Parissiadis, Anne; Dubois, Valérie; Lafarge, Xavier; Maumy-Bertrand, Myriam; Bertrand, Frédéric; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio; Paillard, Catherine; Querol, Sergi; Sierra, Jorge; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Inoko, Hidetoshi; von dem Borne, Peter A; Kuball, Jürgen; Ota, Masao; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Michallet, Mauricette; Lioure, Bruno; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Blaise, Didier; Cornelissen, Jan J; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Claas, Frans; Moreau, Philippe; Milpied, Noël; Charron, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Zeiser, Robert; Socié, Gérard; Bahram, Seiamak

    2016-10-13

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is among the most challenging complications in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The highly polymorphic MHC class I chain-related gene A, MICA, encodes a stress-induced glycoprotein expressed primarily on epithelia. MICA interacts with the invariant activating receptor NKG2D, expressed by cytotoxic lymphocytes, and is located in the MHC, next to HLA-B Hence, MICA has the requisite attributes of a bona fide transplantation antigen. Using high-resolution sequence-based genotyping of MICA, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical effect of MICA mismatches in a multicenter cohort of 922 unrelated donor HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 10/10 allele-matched HCT pairs. Among the 922 pairs, 113 (12.3%) were mismatched in MICA MICA mismatches were significantly associated with an increased incidence of grade III-IV acute GVHD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50-2.23; P < .001), chronic GVHD (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.45-1.55; P < .001), and nonelapse mortality (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.24-1.46; P < .001). The increased risk for GVHD was mirrored by a lower risk for relapse (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.43-0.59; P < .001), indicating a possible graft-versus-leukemia effect. In conclusion, when possible, selecting a MICA-matched donor significantly influences key clinical outcomes of HCT in which a marked reduction of GVHD is paramount. The tight linkage disequilibrium between MICA and HLA-B renders identifying a MICA-matched donor readily feasible in clinical practice.

  19. Matching for the nonconventional MHC-I MICA gene significantly reduces the incidence of acute and chronic GVHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapito, Raphael; Jung, Nicolas; Kwemou, Marius; Untrau, Meiggie; Michel, Sandra; Pichot, Angélique; Giacometti, Gaëlle; Macquin, Cécile; Ilias, Wassila; Morlon, Aurore; Kotova, Irina; Apostolova, Petya; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Cesbron, Anne; Gagne, Katia; Oudshoorn, Machteld; van der Holt, Bronno; Labalette, Myriam; Spierings, Eric; Picard, Christophe; Loiseau, Pascale; Tamouza, Ryad; Toubert, Antoine; Parissiadis, Anne; Dubois, Valérie; Lafarge, Xavier; Maumy-Bertrand, Myriam; Bertrand, Frédéric; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio; Paillard, Catherine; Querol, Sergi; Sierra, Jorge; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Inoko, Hidetoshi; von dem Borne, Peter A.; Kuball, Jürgen; Ota, Masao; Katsuyama, Yoshihiko; Michallet, Mauricette; Lioure, Bruno; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Blaise, Didier; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Claas, Frans; Moreau, Philippe; Milpied, Noël; Charron, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Zeiser, Robert; Socié, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is among the most challenging complications in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The highly polymorphic MHC class I chain–related gene A, MICA, encodes a stress-induced glycoprotein expressed primarily on epithelia. MICA interacts with the invariant activating receptor NKG2D, expressed by cytotoxic lymphocytes, and is located in the MHC, next to HLA-B. Hence, MICA has the requisite attributes of a bona fide transplantation antigen. Using high-resolution sequence-based genotyping of MICA, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical effect of MICA mismatches in a multicenter cohort of 922 unrelated donor HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 10/10 allele-matched HCT pairs. Among the 922 pairs, 113 (12.3%) were mismatched in MICA. MICA mismatches were significantly associated with an increased incidence of grade III-IV acute GVHD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50-2.23; P < .001), chronic GVHD (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.45-1.55; P < .001), and nonelapse mortality (HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.24-1.46; P < .001). The increased risk for GVHD was mirrored by a lower risk for relapse (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.43-0.59; P < .001), indicating a possible graft-versus-leukemia effect. In conclusion, when possible, selecting a MICA-matched donor significantly influences key clinical outcomes of HCT in which a marked reduction of GVHD is paramount. The tight linkage disequilibrium between MICA and HLA-B renders identifying a MICA-matched donor readily feasible in clinical practice. PMID:27549307

  20. Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay Based on a New Monoclonal Antibody for the Detection of the Zearalenone Class of Mycotoxins in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiya; Eremin, Sergei A; Wen, Kai; Yu, Xuezhi; Li, Chenglong; Ke, Yuebin; Jiang, Haiyang; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhanhui

    2017-03-15

    To develop a sensitive fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) for screening the zearalenone class of mycotoxins in maize, two new monoclonal antibodies with uniform affinity to the zearalenone class and four fluorescein-labeled tracers were prepared. After careful selection of appropriate tracer-antibody pairs in terms of sensitivity and specificity, a FPIA that could simultaneously detect the zearalenone class with similar sensitivity was developed. Under optimum conditions, the half maximal inhibitory concentrations of the FPIA in buffer were 1.89, 1.97, 2.43, 1.99, 2.27, and 2.44 μg/L for zearalenone, α-zearalenol, β-zearalenol, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, and zearalanone, respectively. The limit of detection of FPIA for the zearalenone class was around 12 μg/kg in maize, and the recoveries ranged from 84.6 to 113.8%, with coefficients of variation below 15.3% in spiked samples. Finally, the FPIA was applied for screening naturally contaminated maize samples, and the results indicated a good correlation with that of high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

  1. CD27− B-Cells Produce Class Switched and Somatically Hyper-Mutated Antibodies during Chronic HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigi, Alberto; Du, Likun; Dang, Linh Vu Phuong; Grutzmeier, Sven; Atlas, Ann; Chiodi, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation occur in mature B-cells in response to antigen stimulation. These processes are crucial for the generation of functional antibodies. During HIV-1 infection, loss of memory B-cells, together with an altered differentiation of naïve B-cells result in production of low quality antibodies, which may be due to impaired immunoglobulin affinity maturation. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of HIV-1 infection on class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation by studying the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in peripheral B-cells from a cohort of chronically HIV-1 infected patients as compared to a group of healthy controls. In parallel, we also characterized the phenotype of B-cells and their ability to produce immunoglobulins in vitro. Cells from HIV-1 infected patients showed higher baseline levels of AID expression and increased IgA production measured ex-vivo and upon CD40 and TLR9 stimulation in vitro. Moreover, the percentage of CD27−IgA+ and CD27−IgG+ B-cells in blood was significantly increased in HIV-1 infected patients as compared to controls. Interestingly, our results showed a significantly increased number of somatic hypermutations in the VH genes in CD27− cells from patients. Taken together, these results show that during HIV-1 infection, CD27− B-cells can also produce class switched and somatically hypermutated antibodies. Our data add important information for the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the loss of specific antibody production observed during HIV-1 infection. PMID:19412542

  2. CD27(- B-cells produce class switched and somatically hyper-mutated antibodies during chronic HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cagigi

    Full Text Available Class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation occur in mature B-cells in response to antigen stimulation. These processes are crucial for the generation of functional antibodies. During HIV-1 infection, loss of memory B-cells, together with an altered differentiation of naïve B-cells result in production of low quality antibodies, which may be due to impaired immunoglobulin affinity maturation. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of HIV-1 infection on class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation by studying the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID in peripheral B-cells from a cohort of chronically HIV-1 infected patients as compared to a group of healthy controls. In parallel, we also characterized the phenotype of B-cells and their ability to produce immunoglobulins in vitro. Cells from HIV-1 infected patients showed higher baseline levels of AID expression and increased IgA production measured ex-vivo and upon CD40 and TLR9 stimulation in vitro. Moreover, the percentage of CD27(-IgA+ and CD27(-IgG+ B-cells in blood was significantly increased in HIV-1 infected patients as compared to controls. Interestingly, our results showed a significantly increased number of somatic hypermutations in the VH genes in CD27(- cells from patients. Taken together, these results show that during HIV-1 infection, CD27(- B-cells can also produce class switched and somatically hypermutated antibodies. Our data add important information for the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the loss of specific antibody production observed during HIV-1 infection.

  3. T-cell activation. VI. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibodies in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röpke, M; Röpke, C; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1993-01-01

    Murine T splenocytes stimulated in primary allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) were incubated with soluble anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies induced inhibition in the cytotoxicity of the responding population and this inhibition...... was not dependent on the domain on class I molecules recognized by the antibodies. Cross-reactivity of the antibodies between the responder and stimulating cell population caused a marked reduction in the inhibitory effect compared to systems where no such cross-reactivity was present. Saturating levels...... of the antibodies caused a reduction in generation of T-cell cytotoxicity, whereas low concentrations stimulated the same response. These results demonstrate that the MHC class I molecules of T cells are of significant importance in antigen-induced signal transduction....

  4. Establishment of a quantitative ELISA capable of determining peptide - MHC class I interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Kristensen, N; Blicher, T;

    2002-01-01

    Many different assays for measuring peptide-MHC interactions have been suggested over the years. Yet, there is no generally accepted standard method available. We have recently generated preoxidized recombinant MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) which can be purified to homogeneity under denaturing...... dependent manner. Here, we exploit the availability of these molecules to generate a quantitative ELISA-based assay capable of measuring the affinity of the interaction between peptide and MHC-I. This assay is simple and sensitive, and one can easily envisage that the necessary reagents, standards...

  5. Evaluation of antiphospholipid antibody assays using latent class analysis to address the lack of a reference standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Markus A; Bietenbeck, Andreas; Yin, Meng-Xin; Steigerwald, Udo; Holmes, Andrew B; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard; Luppa, Peter B

    2016-12-01

    Method evaluation of new assays for the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) such as anti-cardiolipin (aCL) or anti-β2-glycoprotein I (aβ2-GPI) is challenging, as no internationally accepted reference material is available yet. Besides a lack of standardization, unacceptable inter-laboratory comparability of established tests is regularly observed. Owing to the absence of a commonly accepted reference standard, the evaluation of two research surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor assays was performed using statistical methods from latent class analysis (LCA). aCL and aβ2-GPI IgG and IgM were measured in sera from 63 antiphospholipid syndrome patients, fulfilling the Sydney criteria, and in 34 healthy controls with four commercial assays. LCA was performed on the results and sera were assigned to the antibody-positive or antibody-negative group. Sera were subsequently evaluated in the SPR assays for aCL and aβ2-GPI. Optimal cutoffs and diagnostic performances of the research systems were established employing the LCA-derived gold standard. With area under the curve results of 0.96 and 0.89 for the detection of aCL and aβ2-GPI, the research SPR assays discriminated well between antibody-positive and antibody-negative sera. Their sensitivities and specificities were comparable to the investigated commercial immunoassays. SPR assays are a suitable tool for the detection of aCL and aβ2-GPI with diagnostic performances not different from currently available commercial tests. LCA enabled the calculation of sensitivities and specificities for aPL assays in absence of a reference standard.

  6. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...

  7. Assessment of 188Re marked anti MHC classantibody by peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated by donor alloantigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Guo-ping; CAO Li-ping; LIU Jie; LIU Da-ren; QUE Ri-sheng; ZHU Lin-hua; ZHOU Yi-ming; MAO Ke-jie; HU Jun-an

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that anti MHC-Ⅱ monoclone antibody (MAb) only had partial inhibiting effect of alloreactive mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) in vitro and it was unsteady and non-persistent. The aim of this research was to determine whether radioactive isotope 188Re marked MHC-Ⅱ antibody could benefit the allograft acceptance in transplantation as compared to normal MHC-Ⅱ antibody.Methods 188Re was incorporated to 2E9/13F(ab')2 which is against swine MHC class Ⅱ antigen (MAb-188Re). Porcine peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMC) cells were examined for proliferation and cytokine mRNA expression after stimulation with MHC-Ⅱ MAb or MAb-188Re.Results The proliferative response of recipient PBMCs in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) to donor alloantigen showed that the stimulation index of MAb-188Re group was significantly lower than the MHC-Ⅱ MAb group and control (P<0.05). mRNA expression of interleukin 2, interferon Y and tumor necrosis factor α (type 1 cytokines) was lower in MAb-188Re group than the MHC-Ⅱ MAb group, while interleukin 10 (type 2 cytokines) was higher in MAb-188Re group in the first 24 hours.Conclusion MAb-188Re could help the graft acceptance by inhibiting T cell proliferation, lowering the expression of type 1 cytokines and elevating the type 2 cytokines produced by PBMC.

  8. Serum major-histocompatibility-complex class Ⅰ-related chain A antibody detection for the evaluation of graft dysfunction in renal allograft recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming; LU Fu-ming; QU Lian-xi; HE Jun; YUAN Xiao-niao; GU Yong

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to the well-known antibodies against human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-induced kidney-graft rejection, polymorphic major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) class Ⅰ-related chain A (MICA) antigens can elicit antibodies and have been suggested to play a role in the antibody-mediated allograft rejection (AMR). We carded out a prospective study of MICA antibodies in post-renal transplant patients to determine the association between MICA antibodies, C4d staining, histological features, and graft outcome.Methods We tested 52 patients who had biopsy results due to graft dysfunction. The MICA antibodies in concurrent sera were determined by Luminex. All patients were followed up for one year after renal biopsy. The influence of antibody production on the function of graft was analyzed.Results Antibodies against MICA were positive in 15 out of the 52 patients (28.9%). The presence of MICA antibodies was associated with renal-allograft deterioration. During one-year follow-up, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decreased (24.0±3.4)% among recipients with anti-MICA antibodies. However, among recipients without anti-MICA antibodies, the eGFR has declined only (8.4+3.0)% (P=0.017). The association between C4d staining,histological features and MICA antibody production was found no significant difference.Conclusion Besides anti-HLA antibodies, the presence of post-transplant MICA antibody is associated with poor graft outcome and increases the risk of graft failure.

  9. 红笛鲷主要组织相容性复合物Ⅰα抗原基因的克隆与表达分析%Cloning and expression analysis of histocompatibility complex Ⅰ α antigen (MHC I α)from humphead snapper Lutjanus sanguineus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新中; 鲁义善; 吴灶和; 简纪常

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, full-length cDNA sequences of histocompatibility complex Ⅰ a antigen (MHC Ⅰ α was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique(RACE)from humphead snapper( Lutjanus sanguineus). Full-length cDNA sequence of MHC Ⅰ α is 1 369 bp, encoding 354 amino acids. BLAST analysis revealed that the amino acids sequence of MHC Ⅰ a shared high identity (84% ) with other MHC I . Phylogenetic tree was constructed by the Neighbor-Joining method, and the results suggested that MHC I a of humphead snapper shared the closest genetic relationship with the MHC Ⅰ of Epinephelus coioides. The results of fluorescent real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed that the expression of MHC Ⅰ a mRNA could be detected in head kidney, and the maximum expression appeared in 6 - 15 h post infection. MHC I a was subcloned into pET32a( + )to construct expression plasmids pET32-MHC Ⅰ α. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis indicated that the recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 ( DE3). Then the recombinant proteins were purified and the antiserum was obtained by immunizing rabbits with the purified recombinant proteins emulsified with adjuvant. ELISA analysis showed that the titer of the antiserum prepared in this study was 1:40 000. The results of the Western blot revealed that specific antigen-antibody reaction occurred between the antiserum and the recombinant proteins.%为研究红笛鲷免疫防御相关基因的作用机理和调控机制,实验应用cDNA末端快速扩增技术(rapid amplification of cDNA ends,RACE)成功克隆了红笛鲷组织相容性复合物Ⅰ α(MHC Ⅰ α)抗原基因的全长cDNA序列,MHC Ⅰα的全长序列为1 369 bp,编码354个氨基酸残基.BLAST分析显示,红笛鲷MHC Ⅰ α与其他已知物种MHC Ⅰ α基因的最高同源性为84%.构建的系统进化树显示,红笛鲷MHC Ⅰα与石斑鱼等MHC Ⅰ α亲缘关系较近.Real-time PCR分析表明,MHC Ⅰ α在头肾中的最大

  10. Self-peptides with intermediate capacity to bind and stabilize MHC class I molecules may be immunogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M L M; Ruhwald, Morten; Nissen, M H;

    2003-01-01

    Thirty self-peptides were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to H-2b molecules. The binding of peptides was ascertained experimentally by biochemical (KD measurements) and cellular [major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) stabilization] assays. A weak, but significant, corr...

  11. Age-Dependent Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Class-Specific Antibody Concentrations and Bactericidal Titers in Sera from Young Children from Montana Immunized with a Licensed Polysaccharide Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Maslanka, Susan E; Tappero, Jordan W.; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Brumberg, Robert S.; Dykes, Janet K.; Gheesling, Linda L.; Donaldson, Kimberley B. J.; Schuchat, Anne; Pullman, John; Jones, Maryann; Bushmaker, Julie; Carlone, George M.

    1998-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C bactericidal titers and class-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) antibody concentrations were measured in sera from 173 children (1 to 5 years old) before and 6 weeks and 7 months following vaccination with a quadrivalent (A/C/Y/W-135) polysaccharide vaccine. The immune responses of the children were compared with those of 40 adults 6 weeks postvaccination. Both bactericidal titers and ELISA antibody concentrations were significantly higher i...

  12. BRAFV600E Co-opts a Conserved MHC Class I Internalization Pathway to Diminish Antigen Presentation and CD8+ T-cell Recognition of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sherille D; Chen, Zeming; Melendez, Brenda; Talukder, Amjad; Khalili, Jahan S; Rodriguez-Cruz, Tania; Liu, Shujuan; Whittington, Mayra; Deng, Wanleng; Li, Fenge; Bernatchez, Chantale; Radvanyi, Laszlo G; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick; Lizée, Gregory

    2015-06-01

    Oncogene activation in tumor cells induces broad and complex cellular changes that contribute significantly to disease initiation and progression. In melanoma, oncogenic BRAF(V600E) has been shown to drive the transcription of a specific gene signature that can promote multiple mechanisms of immune suppression within the tumor microenvironment. We show here that BRAF(V600E) also induces rapid internalization of MHC class I (MHC-I) from the melanoma cell surface and its intracellular sequestration within endolysosomal compartments. Importantly, MAPK inhibitor treatment quickly restored MHC-I surface expression in tumor cells, thereby enhancing melanoma antigen-specific T-cell recognition and effector function. MAPK pathway-driven relocalization of HLA-A*0201 required a highly conserved cytoplasmic serine phosphorylation site previously implicated in rapid MHC-I internalization and recycling by activated immune cells. Collectively, these data suggest that oncogenic activation of BRAF allows tumor cells to co-opt an evolutionarily conserved MHC-I trafficking pathway as a strategy to facilitate immune evasion. This link between MAPK pathway activation and the MHC-I cytoplasmic tail has direct implications for immunologic recognition of tumor cells and provides further evidence to support testing therapeutic strategies combining MAPK pathway inhibition with immunotherapies in the clinical setting. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Expressão de antígenos MHC classe I e de células CD4 e CD8 na polimiosite e dermatomiosite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Renata Graça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar as frequências de expressão dos antígenos de complexo principal de histocompatibilidade classe I (MHC-I e células CD4 e CD8 no músculo esquelético na polimiosite (PM e dermatomiosite (DM. Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de 34 casos de PM, oito casos de DM e 29 controles com miopatias não inflamatórias. Resultados: Os antígenos MHC-I expressaram-se no sarcolema e/ou sarcoplasma em 79,4% dos casos de PM, 62,5% dos casos de DM e 27,6% dos controles (a expressão de CD4 foi observada em 76,5%, 75% e 13,8%, respectivamente. Quando os antígenos de MHC-I foram coexpressados com CD4, houve elevada suspeita de PM/DM (principalmente PM. Em 14,3% dos casos de PM/DM, observou-se a expressão isolada dos antígenos MHC-I, sem células inflamatórias. Conclusão: A expressão dos antígenos MHC-I e a positividade do CD4 podem aumentar a suspeita diagnóstica de PM/DM. Não foi observado infiltrado celular em 14,3% dos casos.

  14. Acquired pMHC I Complexes Greatly Enhance CD4+ Th Cell's Stimulatory Effect on CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Diabetes in Transgenic RIP-mOVA Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawaja Ashfaque Ahmed; Yufeng Xie; Xueshu Zhang; Jim Xiang

    2008-01-01

    CD4+ helper T (Th) cells play pivotal roles in induction of CD8+ CTL immunity. However, the mechanism of CD4+ T cell help delivery to CD8+ T cells in vivo is still elusive. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed dendritic cells (DCovA) to activate OT-Ⅱ mouse CD4+ T cells, and then studied the help effect of these CD4+ T cells on CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. We also examined CTL mediated islet β cell destruction which leaded to diabetes in wild-type C57BL/6 mice and transgenic rat insulin promoter (RIP)-mOVA mice expressing β cell antigen OVA with self OVA-specific tolerance, respectively. In adoptive transfer experiments, we demonstrated that help, in the form of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) I acquired from DCovA by DCovA activation, was required for induction of OVA-specific CTL responses in C57BL/6 mice. However, in combination with TCR transgenic OT-I mouse CD8+ T cells, the tolerogenic dosage of CD4+ Th cells with acquired pMHC I, but not CD4+ (Kb-/-) Th cells without acquired pMHC I were able to cause diabetes in 8/10 (80%) RIP-mOVA mice.This study thus expands the current knowledge in T cell-mediated autoimmunity and provides insight into the nature of CD4+ T cell-mediated help in CD8+ CTL induction. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(6):407-415.

  15. A Distinct Class of Antibodies May Be an Indicator of Gray Matter Autoimmunity in Early and Established Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann J. Ligocki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available * These authors contributed equally to the work in this manuscript.We have previously identified a distinct class of antibodies expressed by B cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of early and established relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients that is not observed in healthy donors. These antibodies contain a unique pattern of mutations in six codons along VH4 antibody genes that we termed the antibody gene signature (AGS. In fact, patients who have such B cells in their CSF are identified as either having RRMS or developing RRMS in the future. As mutations in antibody genes increase antibody affinity for particular antigens, the goal for this study was to investigate whether AGS+ antibodies bind to brain tissue antigens. Single B cells were isolated from the CSF of 10 patients with early or established RRMS. We chose 32 of these B cells that expressed antibodies enriched for the AGS for further study. We generated monoclonal full-length recombinant human antibodies (rhAbs and used both immunological assays and immunohistochemistry to investigate the capacity of these AGS+ rhAbs to bind brain tissue antigens. AGS+ rhAbs did not recognize myelin tracts in the corpus callosum. Instead, AGS+ rhAbs recognized neuronal nuclei and/or astrocytes, which are prevalent in the cortical gray matter. This pattern was unique to the AGS+ antibodies from early and established RRMS patients, as AGS+ antibodies from an early neuromyelitis optica patient did not display the same reactivity. Prevalence of CSF-derived B cells expressing AGS+ antibodies that bind to these cell types may be an indicator of gray matter-directed autoimmunity in early and established RRMS patients.

  16. DETECTION OF AUTOREACTIVE CLASS M ANTIBODIES IN PATIENTS WITH RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Z. Krivitskaya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of this study was to detect some features of autoreactive IgM production that interact with IgGs and normal human cellular antigens in blood sera of patients with acute respiratory viral infections caused by various factors, dependent on their age and clinical features of disease. The antibody concentrations were determined by immunoenzyme technique in paired serum samples from 750 patients and single specimens from 97 healthy persons. The results of analysis have shown that the studied types of autoreactive IgM represent a normal component of humoral immunity, since they are detectable in sufficient number of normal sera from healthy persons over 3 years old. In acute respiratory viral infections of different etiology, the rates of appropriate seroconversions comprised 0 to 16% for age cohort of < 3 years old. Incidence of seroconversions reached 37% among older children and adult patients with respiratory syncitial virus (RSV, or adenoviral infection, thus being 1.7 to 5.1-fold higher than in patients with influenza A, or B, or parainfluenza. In cases of clinical complications of RSV or parainfluenza infections (i.e., respiratory tract obstruction, or pneumonia, the rates of seroconversions to autoreactive IgMs was 1.4 to1.8-fold higher than among the patients with uncomplicated clinical course of these infections. (Med. Immunol., 2008, vol. 10, N 2-3, pp 229-238.

  17. NetMHCpan-3.0; improved prediction of binding to MHC class I molecules integrating information from multiple receptor and peptide length datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Andreatta, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    this model, we demonstrate that percentile ranks in contrast to affinity-based thresholds are optimal for ligand identification due to uniform sampling of the MHC space.Conclusions: We have developed a neural network-based machine-learning algorithm leveraging information across multiple receptor......Background: Binding of peptides to MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) is essential for antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells.Results: Here, we demonstrate how a simple alignment step allowing insertions and deletions in a pan-specific MHC-I binding machine-learning model enables combining...

  18. Expressão de antígenos MHC classe I e de células CD4 e CD8 na polimiosite e dermatomiosite

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Renata Graça; João Aris Kouyoumdjian

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Analisar as frequências de expressão dos antígenos de complexo principal de histocompatibilidade classe I (MHC-I) e células CD4 e CD8 no músculo esquelético na polimiosite (PM) e dermatomiosite (DM). Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de 34 casos de PM, oito casos de DM e 29 controles com miopatias não inflamatórias. Resultados: Os antígenos MHC-I expressaram-se no sarcolema e/ou sarcoplasma em 79,4% dos casos de PM, 62,5% dos casos de DM...

  19. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2(-/-) B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2(-/-) mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs.

  20. [MHC class I antigens, CD4 and CD8 expressions in polymyositis and dermatomyositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Carla Renata; Kouyoumdjian, João Aris

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the frequencies of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigens, and CD4 and CD8 cells in skeletal muscle in polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). This was a retrospective study of 34 PM cases, 8 DM cases, and 29 control patients with non-inflammatory myopathies. MHC-I antigens were expressed in the sarcolemma and/or sarcoplasm in 79.4% of PM cases, 62.5% of DM cases, and 27.6% of controls (CD4 expression was observed in 76.5%, 75%, and 13.8%, respectively). There was a high suspicion of PM/DM (mainly PM) in patients in whom MHC-I antigens and CD4 were co-expressed. In 14.3% of PM/DM cases, we observed MHC-I antigens expression alone, without inflammatory cells. MCH-I antigens expression and CD4 positivity might add to strong diagnostic suspicion of PM/DM. No cellular infiltration was observed in 14.3% of such cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. IFNγ producing CD8+ T cells modified to resist major immune checkpoints induce regression of MHC class I-deficient melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buferne, Michel; Chasson, Lionel; Grange, Magali; Mas, Amandine; Arnoux, Fanny; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Naquet, Philippe; Leserman, Lee; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Tumors with reduced expression of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules may be unrecognized by tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and thus constitute a challenge for cancer immunotherapy. Here we monitored development of autochthonous melanomas in TiRP mice that develop tumors expressing a known tumor antigen as well as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter knock in gene. The latter permits non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth by biofluorescence. One developing melanoma was deficient in cell surface expression of MHC-I, but MHC-I expression could be rescued by exposure of these cells to IFNγ. We show that CD8+ T cells specific for tumor antigen/MHC-I were efficient at inducing regression of the MHC-I-deficient melanoma, provided that the T cells were endowed with properties permitting their migration into the tumor and their efficient production of IFNγ. This was the case for CD8+ T cells transfected to express an active form of STAT5 (STAT5CA). The amount of IFNγ produced ex vivo from T cells present in tumors after adoptive transfer of the CD8+ T cells was correlated with an increase in surface expression of MHC-I molecules by the tumor cells. We also show that these CD8+ T cells expressed PD-1 and upregulated its ligand PDL-1 on melanoma cells within the tumor. Despite upregulation of this immunosuppressive pathway, efficient IFNγ production in the melanoma microenvironment was found associated with resistance of STAT5CA-expressing CD8+ T cells to inhibition both by PD-1/PDL-1 engagement and by TGFβ1, two main immune regulatory mechanisms hampering the efficiency of immunotherapy in patients. PMID:25949872

  2. IFNγ producing CD8(+) T cells modified to resist major immune checkpoints induce regression of MHC class I-deficient melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buferne, Michel; Chasson, Lionel; Grange, Magali; Mas, Amandine; Arnoux, Fanny; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Naquet, Philippe; Leserman, Lee; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2015-02-01

    Tumors with reduced expression of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules may be unrecognized by tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and thus constitute a challenge for cancer immunotherapy. Here we monitored development of autochthonous melanomas in TiRP mice that develop tumors expressing a known tumor antigen as well as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter knock in gene. The latter permits non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth by biofluorescence. One developing melanoma was deficient in cell surface expression of MHC-I, but MHC-I expression could be rescued by exposure of these cells to IFNγ. We show that CD8(+) T cells specific for tumor antigen/MHC-I were efficient at inducing regression of the MHC-I-deficient melanoma, provided that the T cells were endowed with properties permitting their migration into the tumor and their efficient production of IFNγ. This was the case for CD8(+) T cells transfected to express an active form of STAT5 (STAT5CA). The amount of IFNγ produced ex vivo from T cells present in tumors after adoptive transfer of the CD8(+) T cells was correlated with an increase in surface expression of MHC-I molecules by the tumor cells. We also show that these CD8(+) T cells expressed PD-1 and upregulated its ligand PDL-1 on melanoma cells within the tumor. Despite upregulation of this immunosuppressive pathway, efficient IFNγ production in the melanoma microenvironment was found associated with resistance of STAT5CA-expressing CD8(+) T cells to inhibition both by PD-1/PDL-1 engagement and by TGFβ1, two main immune regulatory mechanisms hampering the efficiency of immunotherapy in patients.

  3. Th cells promote CTL survival and memory via acquired pMHC-I and endogenous IL-2 and CD40L signaling and by modulating apoptosis-controlling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channakeshava Sokke Umeshappa

    Full Text Available Involvement of CD4(+ helper T (Th cells is crucial for CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity. However, CD4(+ Th's signals that govern CTL survival and functional memory are still not completely understood. In this study, we assessed the role of CD4(+ Th cells with acquired antigen-presenting machineries in determining CTL fates. We utilized an adoptive co-transfer into CD4(+ T cell-sufficient or -deficient mice of OTI CTLs and OTII Th cells or Th cells with various gene deficiencies pre-stimulated in vitro by ovalbumin (OVA-pulsed dendritic cell (DCova. CTL survival was kinetically assessed in these mice using FITC-anti-CD8 and PE-H-2K(b/OVA257-264 tetramer staining by flow cytometry. We show that by acting via endogenous CD40L and IL-2, and acquired peptide-MHC-I (pMHC-I complex signaling, CD4(+ Th cells enhance survival of transferred effector CTLs and their differentiation into the functional memory CTLs capable of protecting against highly-metastasizing tumor challenge. Moreover, RT-PCR, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis demonstrate that increased survival of CD4(+ Th cell-helped CTLs is matched with enhanced Akt1/NF-κB activation, down-regulation of TRAIL, and altered expression profiles with up-regulation of prosurvival (Bcl-2 and down-regulation of proapoptotic (Bcl-10, Casp-3, Casp-4, Casp-7 molecules. Taken together, our results reveal a previously unexplored mechanistic role for CD4(+ Th cells in programming CTL survival and memory recall responses. This knowledge could also aid in the development of efficient adoptive CTL cancer therapy.

  4. Development of a class-specific polyclonal antibody-based indirect competitive ELISA for detecting fluoroquinolone residues in milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-ying FAN; Ruo-song YANG; Jin-qing JIANG; Xin-yao CHANG; Jun-jie CHEN; Yong-hua QI; Shi-xiu WU; Xue-feng YANG

    2012-01-01

    Modified 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) method was employed to synthesize the artificial antigen of norfloxacin (NOR),and New Zealand rabbits were used to produce anti-NOR polyclonal antibody (pAb).Based on the checkerboard titration,an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA)standard curve was established.This assay was sensitive and had a working range from 0.12 to 68.40 ng/ml,with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and limit of detection (LOD) values of 2.7 ng/ml and 0.06 ng/ml,respectively.The produced pAb exhibited high cross-reactivity to fluoroquinolones (FQs) tested,and the IC50 values to enoxacin,ciprofloxacin,and pefloxacin were 3.1,3.4,and 4.1 ng/ml,respectively.It also indicated that the concentrations of NaOH and methanol in assay buffer should not be higher than 10% and 30%.When spiked in milk at 5,20,and 50 ng/ml,the recoveries for NOR,enoxacin,ciprofloxacin,and pefloxacin ranged 90.5%-98.0%,84.0%-95.2%,94.0%-106.0%,and 89.5%-100.0%,respectively.The results suggest that this class-specific pAb-based icELISA could be utilized for the primary screening of FQ residues in animal-original products.

  5. The Presence, Persistence and Functional Properties of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein II Antibodies Are Influenced by HLA Class II Allelic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leticia M.; Lima, Barbara A. S.; Sousa, Taís N.; Alves, Jéssica R. S.; Rocha, Roberto S.; Fontes, Cor J. F.; Sanchez, Bruno A. M.; Adams, John H.; Brito, Cristiana F. A.; Pires, Douglas E. V.; Ascher, David B.; Sell, Ana Maria; Carvalho, Luzia H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax infects red blood cells through a key pathway that requires interaction between Duffy binding protein II (DBPII) and its receptor on reticulocytes, the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC). A high proportion of P. vivax-exposed individuals fail to develop antibodies that inhibit DBPII-DARC interaction, and genetic factors that modulate this humoral immune response are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate if DBPII responsiveness could be HLA class II-linked. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based open cohort study was carried out in an agricultural settlement of the Brazilian Amazon, in which 336 unrelated volunteers were genotyped for HLA class II (DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci), and their DBPII immune responses were monitored over time (baseline, 6 and 12 months) by conventional serology (DBPII IgG ELISA-detected) and functional assays (inhibition of DBPII–erythrocyte binding). The results demonstrated an increased susceptibility of the DRB1*13:01 carriers to develop and sustain an anti-DBPII IgG response, while individuals with the haplotype DRB1*14:02-DQA1*05:03-DQB1*03:01 were persistent non-responders. HLA class II gene polymorphisms also influenced the functional properties of DBPII antibodies (BIAbs, binding inhibitory antibodies), with three alleles (DRB1*07:01, DQA1*02:01 and DQB1*02:02) comprising a single haplotype linked with the presence and persistence of the BIAbs response. Modelling the structural effects of the HLA-DRB1 variants revealed a number of differences in the peptide-binding groove, which is likely to lead to altered antigen binding and presentation profiles, and hence may explain the differences in subject responses. Conclusions/Significance The current study confirms the heritability of the DBPII antibody response, with genetic variation in HLA class II genes influencing both the development and persistence of IgG antibody responses. Cellular studies to increase

  6. P2X7 receptor activation impairs exogenous MHC class I oligopeptides presentation in antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Baroja-Mazo

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I on antigen presenting cells (APCs is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP. P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8(+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8(+ T cell immunity.

  7. Key gp120 Glycans Pose Roadblocks to the Rapid Development of VRC01-Class Antibodies in an HIV-1-Infected Chinese Donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Leopold; Ju, Bin; Chen, Yajing; He, Linling; Ren, Li; Liu, Jiandong; Hong, Kunxue; Su, Bin; Wang, Zheng; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Ji, Xiaolin; Hua, Yuanzi; Chen, Yanli; Deller, Marc C; Hao, Yanling; Feng, Yi; Garces, Fernando; Wilson, Richard; Dai, Kaifan; O'Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Mascola, John R; Ward, Andrew B; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing; Wilson, Ian A; Zhu, Jiang; Shao, Yiming

    2016-04-19

    VRC01-class antibodies neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains by targeting the conserved CD4-binding site. Despite extensive investigations, crucial events in the early stage of VRC01 development remain elusive. We demonstrated how VRC01-class antibodies emerged in a Chinese donor by antigen-specific single B cell sorting, structural and functional studies, and longitudinal antibody and virus repertoire analyses. A monoclonal antibody DRVIA7 with modest neutralizing breadth was isolated that displayed a subset of VRC01 signatures. X-ray and EM structures revealed a VRC01-like angle of approach, but less favorable interactions between the DRVIA7 light-chain CDR1 and the N terminus with N276 and V5 glycans of gp120. Although the DRVIA7 lineage was unable to acquire broad neutralization, longitudinal analysis revealed a repertoire-encoded VRC01 light-chain CDR3 signature and VRC01-like neutralizing heavy-chain precursors that rapidly matured within 2 years. Thus, light chain accommodation of the glycan shield should be taken into account in vaccine design targeting this conserved site of vulnerability.

  8. Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobat, Aurélie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Fermé, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Pendeven, Catherine Le-; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p = 5×10–5 for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p = 0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL. PMID:25025336

  9. Combined linkage and association studies show that HLA class II variants control levels of antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Pedergnana

    Full Text Available Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL. Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p = 5×10(-5 for rs9268403. The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p = 0.02. In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL.

  10. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  11. Breaking confinement: unconventional peptide presentation by major histocompatibility (MHC) class I allele HLA-A*02:01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remesh, Soumya G.; Andreatta, Massimo; Ying, Ge

    2017-01-01

    Peptide antigen-presentation by Major Histocompatibility Class (MHC) I proteins initiates CD8+ T cell mediated immunity against pathogens and cancers. MHC I molecules typically bind peptides with nine amino acids in length with both ends tucked inside the major A and F binding pocket. It has been...... known for a while that longer peptides can also bind by either bulging out of the groove in the middle of the peptide or by binding in a zig-zag fashion inside the groove. In a recent study, we identified an alternative binding conformation of naturally occurring peptides from Toxoplasma gondii bound...... binding modes have properties that fit very poorly to the conventional MHC class I pathway, and suggest they are presented via alternative means, potentially including cross-presentation via the MHC class II pathway....

  12. MHC-I-restricted epitopes conserved among variola and other related orthopoxviruses are recognized by T cells 30 years after vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Wang, M.; Lamberth, K.

    2008-01-01

    It is many years since the general population has been vaccinated against smallpox virus. Here, we report that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted T cell epitopes can be recognized more than 30 years after vaccination. Using bioinformatic methods, we predicted 177 potential cytotoxic T...... lymphocyte epitopes. Eight epitopes were confirmed to stimulate IFN-gamma release by T cells in smallpox-vaccinated subjects. The epitopes were restricted by five supertypes (HLA-A1, -A2, -A24 -A26 and -B44). Significant T cell responses were detected against 8 of 45 peptides with an HLA class I affinity...... of K(D) less than or equal to 5 nM, whereas no T cell responses were detected against 60 peptides with an HLA affinity of K(D) more than 5 nM. All epitopes were fully conserved in seven variola, vaccinia and cowpox strains. Knowledge of the long-term response to smallpox vaccination may lead...

  13. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I, and class II DRB loci of captive and wild Indian leopards (Panthera pardus fusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Drashti R; Mitra, Siuli; Bhadouriya, Snehalata; Rao, Tirupathi; Kunteepuram, Vaishnavi; Gaur, Ajay

    2017-08-22

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), in vertebrate animals, is a multi-genic protein complex that encodes various receptors. During a disease, MHC interacts with the antigen and triggers a cascade of adaptive immune responses to overcome a disease outbreak. The MHC is very important region from immunological point of view, but it is poorly characterized among Indian leopards. During this investigation, we examined genetic diversity for MHC class I (MHC-I) and MHC class II-DRB (MHC-II) among wild and captive Indian leopards. This study estimated a pool of 9 and 17 alleles for MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. The wild group of individuals showed higher nucleotide diversity and amino acid polymorphism compared to the captive group. A phylogenetic comparison with other felids revealed a clustering in MHC-I and interspersed presence in MHC-II sequences. A test for selection also revealed a deviation from neutrality at MHC-II DRB loci and higher non-synonymous substitution rate (dN) among the individuals from wild group. Further, the wild individuals showed higher dN for both MHC I and II genes compared to the group that was bred under captive conditions. These findings suggest the role of micro-evolutionary forces, such as pathogen-mediated selection, to cause MHC variations among the two groups of Indian leopards, because the two groups have been bred in two different environments for a substantial period of time. Since, MHC diversity is often linked with the quality of immunological health; the results obtained from this study fill the gap of knowledge on disease predisposition among wild and captive Indian leopards.

  14. Characterization of duck (Anas platyrhynchos) MHC class I gene in two duck lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIN ZHANG; WEI-JIE LIU; JIA-QIANG WU; MIN-LI XU; ZHENG-JIE KONG; YAN-YAN HUANG; SHAO-HUA YANG

    2017-06-01

    To enrich gene polymorphism ofDuMHCI and provide data for further studies on disease resistance, 14DuMHCI genes from Weishan Ma duck and Cherry Valley duck were cloned, and their characterization were investigated. The overallconservation of the 14 alleles could be observed within the sequences, and relative conservation were also displayed in the peptide-binding domain and CD8 interaction sites. Based on full-length amino acid homology, MHC class I fromdifferent duck lines could be divided into 13 gene groups and three novel gene groups existed.Moreover, 14 key variable residues corresponding to gene groups division were exhibited on the homology modelling constructed based on theresolved protein structure of DuMHC I. This study explicit the characteristics of DuMHC I in the two duck lines and could contribute to design effective diagnostics and vaccines for the species against various infections.

  15. [IgA-class antigliadin antibodies in the screening and follow-up of celiac disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadatou, B; Ferretti, F; Colistro, F; Castellucci, G; Lucidi, V; Ricci, S; Cerminara, R; Bella, S; Colombo, A M; Gambarara, M

    1992-01-01

    IgA antigliadin antibodies (IgA-AGA) have been determined with an enzyme immunoassay in 2.141 pediatric patients. High levels of IgA were found in 98% of 53 celiac patients (1st biopsy), in 81% of 16 celiac patients after gluten challenge, while high levels of these antibodies were not found in 200 patients on gluten-free diet. Moreover high levels of IgA-AGA were found in 29% of 48 patients with normal jejunal biopsy and in 4% of 1.824 patients with gastrointestinal problems other than celiac disease. Our results confirm the data report in literature about the sensibility and the specificity of the IgA-AGA dosage as a screening test for celiac disease, but the possibility of false pathological and false normal values confirms the intestinal biopsy, as the main procedure for the diagnosis of celiac disease.

  16. auristatin类抗体药物偶联物研究进展%Auristatin class antibody drug conjugates:research advances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彦明; 郝伯钧; 钟武; 周辛波; 李松

    2015-01-01

    抗体药物偶联物(antibody drug conjugates,ADC)作为一种新型的生物靶向抗癌药物,结合了单克隆抗体的高靶向选择性和小分子毒素的高效性,在提高抗体药物疗效的同时也扩大了小分子毒素的临床应用范围。auristatin因其较高的生物活性已被广泛用于ADC并取得了巨大成功,在临床在研的ADC中占有主导地位。auristatin类化合物的结构特征不同于其他类毒素,这决定该类ADC对连接子的不同设计要求。本文对auristatin类ADC的各个组成构件及其临床试验进展进行综述,希望对相关药物的研发提供一定的参考。%Antibody drug conjugates(ADC) are a novel biological targeted anti-cancer agents that have the specificity target of monoclonal antibody and the significant cytotoxicity of the drug. It can not only improve the curative effect of the antibody but also expand the scope of clinical application of the small molecule toxins. Auristatins have been widely used in ADC and has achieved great success because of their powerful biological activity. The structure feature of auristatins is different from that of other cytotoxins , which determine the design of this kind of ADC′ linker is different from others′. We review the progress in each component and the latest clinical research of the auristatin class ADC, which may benefit to the further development of ADC.

  17. [Comparison of IgA class reticulin and endomysial antibodies for the diagnosis and dietary control in celiac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotze, L M; Utiyama, S R; Nisihara, R M; Mocelin, V; Carvalho, R F; Zeni, M P; Amarante, H M

    1999-01-01

    Sensibility to gluten is a condition with high immunological reaction against gluten proteins from wheat, barley, rye and oats in individuals genetically susceptible. Celiac disease is its most frequent expression with various forms of clinical presentation. The treatment consists in gluten free diet. Although the biopsy of proximal small bowel is necessary, the importance of serological tests is increasing in the screening, diagnosis and monitoring of gluten free diet in celiac patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of antiendomysium (EmA-IgA) and anti-reticulin (ARA-IgA) antibodies in 56 celiac patients (17 at diagnosis, 24 adherent to the diet and 15 with transgression to the diet). The antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence, using human umbilical cord as substrate for the EmA-IgA and rat liver and kidney for the ARA-IgA. In the patients at diagnosis and in the group with transgression to the diet the total positivity was 100% for EmA-IgA and 59.4% for ARA-IgA. Antibodies were not detected in gluten-free diet patients. Among the 32 positive patients, the concordance of both tests was of 59.4% (19/32), being 40.6% (13/32) negative to ARA-IgA and positive to EmA-IgA. No patient was positive for ARA-IgA and negative for EmA-IgA. Thus, the sensitivity for EmA-IgA was of 100% and 59.4% for ARA-IgA. The association of the two tests did not improve the positivity in the samples. In conclusion, EmA-IgA can be considered the best serological test for diagnosis and follow up of celiac patients, because it presents high predictive value, high specificity and sensibility and is not expensive if using human umbilical cord as substrate.

  18. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide-MHC c...

  19. Specific Capture of Peptide-Receptive Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules by Antibody Micropatterns Allows for a Novel Peptide-Binding Assay in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirscherl, Cindy; Palankar, Raghavendra; Delcea, Mihaela; Kolesnikova, Tatiana A; Springer, Sebastian

    2017-02-02

    Binding assays with fluorescently labeled ligands and recombinant receptor proteins are commonly performed in 2D arrays. But many cell surface receptors only function in their native membrane environment and/or in a specific conformation, such as they appear on the surface of live cells. Thus, receptors on live cells should be used for ligand binding assays. Here, it is shown that antibodies preprinted on a glass surface can be used to specifically array a peptide receptor of the immune system, i.e., the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule H-2K(b) , into a defined pattern on the surface of live cells. Monoclonal antibodies make it feasible to capture a distinct subpopulation of H-2K(b) and hold it at the cell surface. This patterned receptor enables a novel peptide-binding assay, in which the specific binding of a fluorescently labeled index peptide is visualized by microscopy. Measurements of ligand binding to captured cell surface receptors in defined confirmations apply to many problems in cell biology and thus represent a promising tool in the field of biosensors.

  20. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achara Phumyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8. The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3 of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21 were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins.

  1. Increased seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies against cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and varicella-zoster virus in women working in child day care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rijckevorsel Gini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary maternal infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV, parvovirus B19 (B19V, and varicella-zoster virus (VZV may result in adverse pregnancy outcomes like congenital infection or foetal loss. Women working in child day care have an increased exposure to CMV, B19V, and VZV. By comparing the seroprevalence of IgG-class antibodies against CMV, VZV and B19V in female day care workers (DCW with the seroprevalence in women not working in day care this study aimed to assess the association between occupation and infection. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. Out of a random sample of 266 day care centres, demographic data, data on work history, and blood samples were collected from 285 women from 38 centres. In addition, blood samples and basic demographics from women who participated in a cross-sectional survey of the Amsterdam population (2004 were used. All blood samples were tested for IgG-class antibodies against CMV, B19V, and VZV. Results Twenty-seven percent of the DCW were still susceptible to B19V or CMV. Working in day care was independently associated with B19V infection in all DCW (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.2; 95 % CI 1.1–1.3, and with CMV infection in DCW of European origin only (PR 1.7; 95 % CI 1.3–2.3. Almost all women born outside Europe tested seropositive for CMV (96 %. All DCW tested seropositive for VZV, compared to only 94 % of the women not working in day care. Conclusion This study confirms the clear association between employment in child day care centres and infection with CMV and B19V. Intervention policies, like screening of new employees and awareness campaigns emphasizing hygienic measures among DCW, should be implemented urgently to improve the maternal health of these women and the health of their offspring.

  2. The Development of Bispecific Hexavalent Antibodies as a Novel Class of DOCK-AND-LOCKTM (DNLTM Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The DOCK-AND-LOCKTM (DNLTM method provides a modular approach to develop multivalent, multifunctional complexes of defined structures, of which bispecific hexavalent antibodies (bsHexAbs are prominent examples with potential applications in targeted therapy for malignant, autoimmune, and infectious diseases. Currently, bsHexAbs are constructed by derivatizing a divalent IgG, at the carboxyl termini of either the heavy chain (the CH3-format or the light chain (the Ck-format, to contain two stabilized dimers of Fab having a different specificity from the IgG. In this review, we briefly outline the features of the DNLTM method and describe key aspects of bsHexAbs examined with diverse preclinical studies, which include binding affinity to target cells, induction of signaling pathways, effector functions, serum stability, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity in human tumor xenograft models. Our findings favor the selection of the CK- over the CH3-format for further exploration of bsHexAbs in clinical trials.

  3. Possible mechanisms underlying development of transfusion-related acute lung injury: roles of anti-major histocompatibility complex class II DR antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, M; Mitsunaga, S; Ishikawa, Y; Satake, M

    2003-06-01

    Anti-major histocompatibility complex (anti-MHC) antibodies (Abs) and antipolymorphonuclear neutrophil (anti-PMN) Abs are generally considered as the main causes of the development of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), which is one of the most severe and sometimes lethal side effects of transfusion. These Abs are postulated to activate recipient's leucocytes, resulting in the release of soluble factors such as reactive oxygen species and detrimental cytokines and chemokines. The harmful effects on the lung tissues and resident leucocytes of these malignant factors are suspected to be profoundly involved in TRALI reactions. Several reports have indicated the principle effect of biologically active lipids on the pathogenesis of TRALI. However, the precise mechanisms of TRALI development remain unclear. To resolve this issue, we have been investigating cytokines that induce continuous inflammation of the lungs, specifically focusing on the cytokines derived from activated PMNs. We observed that the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) markedly enhances the expression of MHC class II DR in PMNs. Moreover, MHC class II DR-expressing PMNs were also proved to express a high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE) (FcepsilonRI) and to produce tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-18 following a challenge with an anti-MHC class II DR monoclonal Ab (MoAb) or anti-DR antiserum. It is strongly suggested that amongst various inflammatory mediators, at least these three cytokines may contribute to the duration of inflammatory reactions in the lungs. Furthermore, FcepsilonRI expression, in GM-CSF-treated PMNs, suggests the involvement of PMNs in IgE-mediated immune reactions.

  4. Evaluation of three 3ABC ELISAs for foot-and-mouth disease non-structural antibodies using latent class analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malirat Viviane

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious viral disease of even-toed ungulates. Serological diagnosis/surveillance of FMD presents several problems as there are seven serotypes worldwide and in the event of vaccination it may be necessary to be able to identify FMD infected/exposed animals irrespective of their vaccination status. The recent development of non-structural 3ABC protein (NSP ELISA tests has greatly advanced sero-diagnosis/surveillance as these tests detect exposure to live virus for any of the seven serotypes of FMD, even in vaccinated populations. This paper analyses the performance of three NSP tests using a Bayesian formulation of the Hui-Walter latent class model to estimate test sensitivity and specificity in the absence of a "gold-standard" test, using sera from a well described cattle population in Cameroon with endemic FMD. Results The analysis found a high sensitivity and specificity for both the Danish C-ELISA and the World Organisation for Animal Health (O.I.E. recommended South American I-ELISA. However, the commercial CHEKIT kit, though having high specificity, has very low sensitivity. The results of the study suggests that for NSP ELISAs, latent class models are a useful alternative to the traditional approach of evaluating diagnostic tests against a known "gold-standard" test as imperfections in the "gold-standard" may give biased test characteristics. Conclusion This study demonstrates that when applied to naturally infected zebu cattle managed under extensive rangeland conditions, the FMD ELISAs may not give the same parameter estimates as those generated from experimental studies. The Bayesian approach allows for full posterior probabilities and capture of the uncertainty in the estimates. The implications of an imperfect specificity are important for the design and interpretation of sero-surveillance data and may result in excessive numbers of false positives in low prevalence

  5. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends to modulate antibody class-switch DNA recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hong; Tat, Connie; Qiu, Zhifang; Taylor, Julia R.; Guerrero, Justin A.; Shen, Tian; Casali, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Antibody class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is initiated by AID-introduced DSBs in the switch (S) regions targeted for recombination, as effected by Ku70/Ku86-mediated NHEJ. Ku-deficient B cells, however, undergo (reduced) CSR through an alternative(A)-NHEJ pathway, which introduces microhomologies in S–S junctions. As microhomology-mediated end-joining requires annealing of single-strand DNA ends, we addressed the contribution of single-strand annealing factors HR Rad52 and translesion DNA polymerase θ to CSR. Compared with their Rad52+/+ counterparts, which display normal CSR, Rad52−/− B cells show increased CSR, fewer intra-Sμ region recombinations, no/minimal microhomologies in S–S junctions, decreased c-Myc/IgH translocations and increased Ku70/Ku86 recruitment to S-region DSB ends. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends. It also facilitates a Ku-independent DSB repair, which favours intra-S region recombination and mediates, particularly in Ku absence, inter-S–S recombination, as emphasized by the significantly greater CSR reduction in Rad52−/− versus Rad52+/+ B cells on Ku86 knockdown. PMID:28176781

  6. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends to modulate antibody class-switch DNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hong; Tat, Connie; Qiu, Zhifang; Taylor, Julia R; Guerrero, Justin A; Shen, Tian; Casali, Paolo

    2017-02-08

    Antibody class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) is initiated by AID-introduced DSBs in the switch (S) regions targeted for recombination, as effected by Ku70/Ku86-mediated NHEJ. Ku-deficient B cells, however, undergo (reduced) CSR through an alternative(A)-NHEJ pathway, which introduces microhomologies in S-S junctions. As microhomology-mediated end-joining requires annealing of single-strand DNA ends, we addressed the contribution of single-strand annealing factors HR Rad52 and translesion DNA polymerase θ to CSR. Compared with their Rad52(+/+) counterparts, which display normal CSR, Rad52(-/-) B cells show increased CSR, fewer intra-Sμ region recombinations, no/minimal microhomologies in S-S junctions, decreased c-Myc/IgH translocations and increased Ku70/Ku86 recruitment to S-region DSB ends. Rad52 competes with Ku70/Ku86 for binding to S-region DSB ends. It also facilitates a Ku-independent DSB repair, which favours intra-S region recombination and mediates, particularly in Ku absence, inter-S-S recombination, as emphasized by the significantly greater CSR reduction in Rad52(-/-) versus Rad52(+/+) B cells on Ku86 knockdown.

  7. Structural Illumination of Equine MHC Class I Molecules Highlights Unconventional Epitope Presentation Manner That Is Evolved in Equine Leukocyte Antigen Alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shugang; Liu, Jun; Qi, Jianxun; Chen, Rong; Zhang, Nianzhi; Liu, Yanjie; Wang, Junya; Wu, Yanan; Gao, George Fu; Xia, Chun

    2016-02-15

    MHC class I (MHC I)-restricted virus-specific CTLs are implicated as critical components in the control of this naturally occurring lentivirus and in the protective immune response to the successfully applied attenuated equine infectious anemia virus vaccine in the horse. Nevertheless, the structural basis for how the equine MHC I presents epitope peptides remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the binding of several equine infectious anemia virus-derived epitope peptides by the ability to refold recombinant molecules and by thermal stability, and then by determining the x-ray structure of five peptide-MHC I complexes: equine MHC class I allele (Eqca)-N*00602/Env-RW12, Eqca-N*00602/Gag-GW12, Eqca-N*00602/Rev-QW11, Eqca-N*00602/Gag-CF9, and Eqca-N*00601/Gag-GW12. Although Eqca-N*00601 and Eqca-N*00602 differ by a single amino acid, Eqca-N*00601 exhibited a drastically different peptide presentation when binding a similar CTL epitope, Gag-GW12; the result makes the previously reported function clear to be non-cross-recognition between these two alleles. The structures plus Eqca-N*00602 complexed with a 9-mer peptide are particularly noteworthy in that we illuminated differences in apparent flexibility in the center of the epitope peptides for the complexes with Gag-GW12 as compared with Env-RW12, and a strict selection of epitope peptides with normal length. The featured preferences and unconventional presentations of long peptides by equine MHC I molecules provide structural bases to explain the exceptional anti-lentivirus immunity in the horse. We think that the beneficial reference points could serve as an initial platform for other human or animal lentiviruses.

  8. Prevalence of serological markers for celiac disease (IgA and IgG class antigliadin antibodies and IgA class antiendomysium antibodies in patients with autoimmune rheumatologic diseases in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil Pesquisa de anticorpos antigliadina (classes IgA e IgG e anticorpos antiendomísio classe IgA, em pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes em Belo Horizonte, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor de Barros Koehne

    2010-09-01

    to AGA IgA optical density readings or AGA IgG readings. These drugs were associated with fewer positive EmA tests. CONCLUSIONS: Positive AGAA, AGAG or EmA results are probably nonspecific for the presence of celiac disease among autoimmune rheumatologic disease patients. The intake of prednisone and immunosuprressant drugs seems to reduce the prevalence of IgA EmA, but it does not interfere with antigliadin antibodies tests.Further studies are required to estimate more accurately the prevalence of this disease in rheumatologic patients.CONTEXTO: Tanto os pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes quanto os com doença celíaca costumam apresentar vários tipos de autoanticorpos, muitos deles ainda sem papel definido na etiopatogênese dessas afecções. Apesar de tratar-se de assunto controverso, é bastante citada na literatura a maior prevalência da doença celíaca em diversos grupos de pacientes reumatológicos. OBJETIVO: Investigar a prevalência de marcadores sorológicos positivos para doença celíaca: anticorpos antigliadina (AGA classes IgA e IgG (AGAA e AGAG e anticorpos antiendomísio classe IgA (EmA, em pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes. Procurou-se também avaliar a correlação entre a positividade dos testes sorológicos com o uso de prednisona e de medicamentos imunossupressores. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 190 pacientes adultos e pediátricos com doenças reumatólogicas variadas (lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, artrite reumatóide, artrite reumatóide juvenil e espondiloartropatias. Em todos foram realizadas pesquisas de AGAA e AGAG e de EmA, encaminhando-se os casos positivos para biopsias endoscópica duodenal e estudos histológicos. RESULTADOS: Houve quatro soros positivos (2,1% para AGAA, todos com resultados negativos para AGAG e EmA. Três soros (1,6% tiveram resultados positivos para AGAG, todos com resultados negativos para AGAA e EmA. Na pesquisa de EmA, a diluição do soro em 1:2,5 mostrou resultados positivos em

  9. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  10. Participation of L3T4 in T cell activation in the absence of class II major histocompatibility complex antigens. Inhibition by anti-L3T4 antibodies is a function both of epitope density and mode of presentation of anti-receptor antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Fazekas de St Groth, B

    1987-01-01

    in the complete absence of class II MHC, immobilized antibody (either Sepharose-coupled or plastic-adsorbed) being more effective. The induction of IL 3 production by suboptimal doses of either Con A or plastic-adsorbed F23.1 was inhibited by the anti-L3T4 antibody GK1.5, as was the response to F23.1 coupled...... of T cell/antigen interactions. By using antibodies against the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to activate T cells, thereby circumventing the requirement for antigen presenting cells and MHC-associated antigen, we have been able to study the function of L3T4 in the absence of class II MHC. We have used...... two monoclonal antibodies, KJ16-133.18 and F23.1, that recognize a determinant encoded by the T cell receptor V beta 8 gene family. These antibodies were used to select two clones of T cells with surface phenotype Thy-1.2+, L3T4+, Lyt-2-, KJ16-133.18+, F23.1+, IA-, IE-. One of these clones (E9.D4...

  11. A cross-reacting human idiotype (B17) associated with antibodies to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Specificity, immunoglobulin class association, and distribution in the population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmrich, F; Greger, B; Eichmann, K

    1983-04-01

    This report describes the study of the expression of an idiotype in the human population which is associated with antibodies to N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) present in most human sera presumably due to streptococcal infections. The idiotype is identified with antisera and monoclonal antibodies prepared against the IgM (kappa) antibody secreted by the Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B cell line B17. At least 90% of 207 individuals tested had immunoglobulin with B17 idiotypic determinants in their sera, as demonstrated with conventional and one monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody. Another monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody reacted with antibodies in only a few of the sera. No correlation was found between the level of expression of different idiotopes in individual human sera, suggesting molecular heterogeneity of the B17-positive antibody population. B17-positive immunoglobulins are to a large extent specific for GlcNAc but represent only a minor population of all GlcNAc-specific antibodies in human sera. B17 determinants are on IgM (kappa) in all human sera and on IgG and IgA in some. In addition, some lambda-bearing Ig was found to react with anti-B17 antisera, suggesting the detection of VH-associated idiotypic determinants in this experimental system.

  12. Unusual Naturally Occurring Humoral and Cellular Mutated Epitopes of Hepatitis B Virus in a Chronically Infected Argentine Patient with Anti-HBs Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuestas, María L.; Mathet, Verónica L.; Ruiz, Vanesa; Minassian, María L.; Rivero, Cintia; Sala, Andrea; Corach, Daniel; Alessio, Analía; Pozzati, Marcia; Frider, Bernardo; Oubiña, José R.

    2006-01-01

    Serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA was extracted from a chronically infected patient with cocirculation of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HBs antibodies. Direct PCR and clone-derived sequences of the S and overlapped P genes were obtained. DNA sequences and phylogenetic analysis ascribed this isolate to genotype A (serotype adw2). Five of six HBV DNA clones exhibited point mutations inside and outside the major hydrophilic region, while the sixth clone exhibited a genotype A “wild-type” amino acid sequence. Observed replacements included both humoral and/or cellular (major histocompatibility complex class I [MHC-I] and MHC-II) HBV mutated epitopes, such as S45A, P46H, L49H, C107R, T125A, M133K, I152F, P153T, T161S, G185E, A194T, G202R, and I213L. None of these mutants were individually present within a given clone. The I213L replacement was the only one observed in the five clones carrying nonsynonymous mutations in the S gene. Some of the amino acid substitutions are reportedly known to be responsible for the emergence of immune escape mutants. C107R replacement prevents disulfide bonding, thus disrupting the first loop of the HBsAg. Circulation of some of these mutants may represent a potential risk for the community, since neither current hepatitis B vaccines nor hyperimmune hepatitis B immune globulin are effectively prevent the liver disease thereto associated. Moreover, some of the recorded HBsAg variants may influence the accuracy of the results obtained with currently used diagnostic tests. PMID:16757620

  13. Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent Pedergnana; Laurène Syx; Aurélie Cobat; Julien Guergnon; Pauline Brice; Christophe Fermé; Patrice Carde; Olivier Hermine; Catherine Le-Pendeven; Corinne Amiel; Yassine Taoufik; Alexandre Alcaïs; Ioannis Theodorou; Caroline Besson; Laurent Abel

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid an...

  14. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  15. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Baroja-Mazo; Maria Barberà-Cremades; Pablo Pelegrín

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+) T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the a...

  16. Targeting tumor-associated antigens to the MHC class I presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, G; Margalit, A

    2007-06-01

    There is little doubt that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can kill tumor cells in-vivo. However, most CTL-inducing immunization protocols examined so far in cancer patients have yielded only limited clinical benefits, underscoring the urge to improve current approaches for the effective induction of tumor-reactive CTLs. The tumor side of the immunological frontline is armed with large masses, high mutability and an arsenal of immune evasion and suppression mechanisms. Accordingly, the confronting CTLs should come in large numbers, recognize an assortment of MHC class I (MHC-I) bound tumor-associated peptides and be brought into action under effective immunostimulatory conditions. Naïve CTLs are activated to become effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs, following their productive encounter with MHC-I-bound peptides at the surface of dendritic cells (DCs). Therefore, many cancer vaccines under development focus on the optimization of peptide presentation by DCs at this critical stage. The elucidation of discrete steps and the subsequent identification of inherent bottlenecks in the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway have fueled elaborate efforts to enhance vaccine efficacy by the rational targeting of proteins or peptides, formulated into these vaccines, to this pathway. Protein- and gene-based strategies are accordingly devised to deliver tumor-associated peptides to selected cellular compartments, which are essential for the generation of functional CTL ligands. Many of these strategies target the conventional, endogenous route, while others harness the unique pathways that enable DCs to present exogenous antigens, known as cross-presentation. Here we dissect the intricate machinery that produces CTL ligands and examine how knowledge-based cancer vaccines can target the sequence of workstations, biochemical utensils and molecular intermediates comprising this production line.

  17. Safety and Activity of the First-in-Class Sym004 Anti-EGFR Antibody Mixture in Patients with Refractory Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dienstmann, R.; Patnaik, A.; Garcia-Carbonero, R.; Cervantes, A.; Benavent, M.; Rosello, S.; Tops, B.B.J.; Post, R.S. van der; Argiles, G.; Skartved, N.J.; Hansen, U.H.; Hald, R.; Pedersen, M.W.; Kragh, M.; Horak, I.D.; Braun, S.; Cutsem, E. Van; Tolcher, A.W.; Tabernero, J.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor growth in the context of EGFR inhibitor resistance may remain EGFR-dependent and is mediated by mechanisms including compensatory ligand upregulation and de novo gene alterations. Sym004 is a two-antibody mixture targeting nonoverlapping EGFR epitopes. In preclinical models, Sym004 causes sign

  18. Antimitochondrial antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  19. Acute Viral Escape Selectively Impairs Nef-Mediated Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Downmodulation and Increases Susceptibility to Antiviral T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Andrea M; Das, Arpita; Akinyosoye, Oluwasayo; Cui, Sherry; O'Connor, Shelby L; Scheef, Elizabeth A; Reed, Jason S; Panganiban, Antonito T; Sacha, Jonah B; Rakasz, Eva G; Friedrich, Thomas C; Maness, Nicholas J

    2015-12-04

    Nef-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are associated with control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) despite extensive nef variation between and within animals. Deep viral sequencing of the immunodominant Mamu-B*017:01-restricted Nef165-173IW9 epitope revealed highly restricted evolution. A common acute escape variant, T170I, unexpectedly and uniquely degraded Nef's major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) downregulatory capacity, rendering the virus more vulnerable to CD8TL targeting other epitopes. These data aid in a mechanistic understanding of Nef functions and suggest means of immunity-mediated control of lentivirus replication.

  20. IFNγ producing CD8+ T cells modified to resist major immune checkpoints induce regression of MHC class I-deficient melanomas

    OpenAIRE

    Buferne, Michel; Chasson, Lionel; Grange, Magali; Mas, Amandine; Arnoux, Fanny; Bertuzzi, Mélanie; Naquet, Philippe; Leserman, Lee; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Tumors with reduced expression of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules may be unrecognized by tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and thus constitute a challenge for cancer immunotherapy. Here we monitored development of autochthonous melanomas in TiRP mice that develop tumors expressing a known tumor antigen as well as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter knock in gene. The latter permits non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth by biofluorescence. One developing melanoma was deficient in cell s...

  1. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  2. A single-chain fusion molecule consisting of peptide, major histocompatibility gene complex class I heavy chain and beta2-microglobulin can fold partially correctly, but binds peptide inefficiently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    recombinant MHC-I molecules. A convenient source of MHC-I molecules would be a valuable tool in structural and biochemical analysis of MHC-I, and in experiments using MHC-I molecules to enable specific manipulations of experimental and physiological CTL responses. Here we describe the generation...... of a recombinant murine MHC-I molecule, which could be produced in large amounts in bacteria. The recombinant MHC-I protein was expressed as a single molecule (PepSc) consisting of the antigenic peptide linked to the MHC-I heavy chain and further linked to human beta2-microglobulin (hbeta2m). The PepSc molecule...... was denatured, extracted, purified and folded using a recently developed in vitro reiterative refolding strategy. This led to the formation of soluble, recombinant MHC-I molecules, which migrated as monomers of the expected size when submitted to non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...

  3. Re-directing CD4+ T cell responses with the flanking residues of MHC class II-bound peptides: the core is not enough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kenneth Cole

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant αβ T cell receptors (TCRs recognise short peptides presented at the cell surface in complex with MHC molecules. There are two main subsets of αβ T cells: CD8+ T cells that recognise mainly cytosol-derived peptides in the context of MHC class I (pMHC-I, and CD4+ T cells that recognise peptides usually derived from exogenous proteins presented by MHC class II (pMHC-II. Unlike the more uniform peptide lengths (usually 8-13mers bound in the MHC-I closed groove, MHC-II presented peptides are of a highly variable length. The bound peptides consist of a core bound 9mer (reflecting the binding motif for the particular MHC-II type but with variable peptide flanking residues (PFRs that can extend from both the N- and C-terminus of the MHC-II binding groove. Although pMHC-I and pMHC-II play a virtually identical role during T cell responses (T cell antigen presentation and are very similar in overall conformation, there exist a number of subtle but important differences that may govern the functional dichotomy observed between CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Here, we provide an overview of the impact of structural differences between pMHC-I and pMHC-II and the molecular interactions with the TCR including the functional importance of MHC-II peptide flanking residues. We consider how factors such as anatomical location, inflammatory milieu and particular types of APC might, in theory, contribute to the quantitative (i.e. pMHC ligand frequency as well as qualitative (i.e. variable PFR nature of peptide epitopes, and hence offer a means of control and influence of a CD4+ T cell response. Lastly, we review our recent findings showing how modifications to these flanking regions modify CD4+ T cell antigen recognition. These findings may have novel applications for the development of CD4+ T cell peptide vaccines and diagnostics.

  4. Re-Directing CD4(+) T Cell Responses with the Flanking Residues of MHC Class II-Bound Peptides: The Core is Not Enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christopher J; Cole, David K; Godkin, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant αβ T cell receptors, expressed on T cell membranes, recognize short peptides presented at the cell surface in complex with MHC molecules. There are two main subsets of αβ T cells: CD8(+) T cells that recognize mainly cytosol-derived peptides in the context of MHC class I (pMHC-I), and CD4(+) T cells that recognize peptides usually derived from exogenous proteins presented by MHC class II (pMHC-II). Unlike the more uniform peptide lengths (usually 8-13mers) bound in the MHC-I closed groove, MHC-II presented peptides are of a highly variable length. The bound peptides consist of a core bound 9mer (reflecting the binding motif for the particular MHC-II type) but with variable peptide flanking residues (PFRs) that can extend from both the N- and C-terminus of the MHC-II binding groove. Although pMHC-I and pMHC-II play a virtually identical role during T cell responses (T cell antigen presentation) and are very similar in overall conformation, there exist a number of subtle but important differences that may govern the functional dichotomy observed between CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Here, we provide an overview of the impact of structural differences between pMHC-I and pMHC-II and the molecular interactions with the T cell receptor including the functional importance of MHC-II PFRs. We consider how factors such as anatomical location, inflammatory milieu, and particular types of antigen presenting cell might, in theory, contribute to the quantitative (i.e., pMHC ligand frequency) as well as qualitative (i.e., variable PFR) nature of peptide epitopes, and hence offer a means of control and influence of a CD4(+) T cell response. Lastly, we review our recent findings showing how modifications to MHC-II PFRs can modify CD4(+) T cell antigen recognition. These findings may have novel applications for the development of CD4(+) T cell peptide vaccines and diagnostics.

  5. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  6. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs.

  7. "Racializing" Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins of human cells: unique and cross-reacting antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gown, A M; Vogel, A M

    1982-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the intermediate filament proteins of different human cells. The reactivity of these antibodies with the different classes of intermediate filament proteins was determined by indirect immunofluorescence on cultured cells, immunologic indentification on SDS polyacrylamide gels ("wester blot" experiments), and immunoperoxidase assays on intact tissues. The following four antibodies are described: (a) an antivimentin antibody generated against human fibroblast cytoskeleton; (b), (c) two antibodies that recognize a 54-kdalton protein in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells; and (d) an antikeratin antibody made to stratum corneum that recognizes proteins of molecular weight 66 kdaltons and 57 kdaltons. The antivimentin antibody reacts with vimentin (58 kdaltons), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and keratins from stratum corneum, but does not recognize hepatoma intermediate filaments. In immunofluorescence assays, the antibody reacts with mesenchymal cells and cultured epithelial cells that express vimentin. This antibody decorates the media of blood vessels in tissue sections. One antihepatoma filament antibody reacts only with the 54 kdalton protein of these cells and, in immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase assays, only recognizes epithelial cells. It reacts with almost all nonsquamous epithelium. The other antihepatoma filament antibody is much less selective, reacting with vimentin, GFAP, and keratin from stratum corneum. This antibody decorates intermediate filaments of both mesenchymal and epithelial cells. The antikeratin antibody recognizes 66-kdalton and 57-kdalton proteins in extracts of stratum corneum and also identifies proteins of similar molecular weights in all cells tested. However, by immunofluorescence, this antibody decorates only the intermediate filaments of epidermoid carcinoma cells. When assayed on tissue sections, the antibody reacts with squamous epithelium and some, but not all

  9. Distinct interethnic differences in immunoglobulin G class/subclass and immunoglobulin M antibody responses to malaria antigens but not in immunoglobulin G responses to nonmalarial antigens in sympatric tribes living in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolad, A; Farouk, S E; Israelsson, E; Dolo, A; Doumbo, O K; Nebié, I; Maiga, B; Kouriba, B; Luoni, G; Sirima, B S; Modiano, D; Berzins, K; Troye-Blomberg, M

    2005-04-01

    The well-established relative resistance to malaria observed in the Fulani as compared with other sympatric tribes in West Africa has been attributed to their higher levels of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies to malarial antigens. In this study, we confirm and extend the previous findings by analyses of the levels of IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses of anti-malarial antibodies in asymptomatic individuals of different sympatric tribes in Burkina Faso (Fulani/Mossi) and Mali (Fulani/Dogon). The Fulani showed significantly higher median concentrations of anti-malarial IgG and IgM antibodies than the sympatric tribes at both locations. Although the overall subclass pattern of antibodies did not differ between the tribes, with IgG1 and IgG3 as dominant, the Fulani showed consistently significantly higher levels of these subclasses as compared with those of the non-Fulani individuals. No significant differences were seen in the levels of total IgG between the tribes, but the Fulani showed significantly higher levels of total IgM than their neighbours in both countries. While the antibody levels to some nonmalarial antigens showed the same pattern of differences seen for antibody levels to malaria antigens, no significant such differences were seen with antibodies to other nonmalarial antigens. In conclusion, our results show that the Fulani in two different countries show higher levels of anti-malarial antibodies than sympatric tribes, and this appears not to be a reflection of a general hyper-reactivity in the Fulani.

  10. Hepatitis B virus down-regulates expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyan; Cheng, Min; Tian, Zhigang

    2006-10-01

    Chronic HBV infection is associated with a 100-fold high risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Tumor recognition is of the most importance during the immune surveillance process that prevents cancer development in humans. In the present study, the expressions of MHC class I molecules on hepatoplastoma cell line HepG2.2.15 were investigated to indicate the possible effects of HBV on the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. It was found that the expressions of MHC class I molecules HLA-ABC, HLA-E and MICA were much lower in HepG2.2.15 cells compared with HepG2 cells. The expressing HBV in human hepatoplastoma cell line significantly down-regulated the expressions of MHC class I molecules. Additionally, it was observed that in murine chronic HBsAg carriers the expression of classical MHC-I molecule on hepatocytes was down-regulated. These results demonstrated that HBV might affect the immune recognition during HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma such as the recognition of CD8+ T, NK-CTL and NK cells and prevent the immune surveillance against tumors. However, the effects of HBV down-regulation of MHC class I molecules on the target cells in vivo should be further studied.

  11. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; ...

  12. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  13. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development.

  14. Efficient assembly of recombinant major histocompatibility complex class I molecules with preformed disulfide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Hansen, N J

    2001-01-01

    . Recombinant MHC-I heavy chains were produced in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified under denaturing conditions. In contrast to common practice, the molecules were not reduced during the purification. The oxidized MHC-I heavy chain isoforms were highly active with respect to peptide binding...... to be of a quality, which allowed quantitative analysis of peptide binding. The analysis of the specificity of the several hundred human MHC haplotypes, should benefit considerably from the availability of pre-oxidized recombinant MHC-I....

  15. Birthing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first birth and hope to have a vaginal delivery this time, there is a class for that, too. Choose ... t covered in your birthing class, it’s a good idea to take an individual class on it, especially if you are a first-time mother. The health benefits of breastfeeding your baby ...

  16. Comparative genome analysis of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I B/C segments in primates elucidated by genomic sequencing in common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Takashi; Kono, Azumi; Westphal, Nico; Suzuki, Shingo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Kita, Yuki F; Roos, Christian; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Walter, Lutz

    2011-08-01

    Common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) have emerged as important animal models for biomedical research, necessitating a more extensive characterization of their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. However, the genomic information of the marmoset MHC (Caja) is still lacking. The MHC-B/C segment represents the most diverse MHC region among primates. Therefore, in this paper, to elucidate the detailed gene organization and evolutionary processes of the Caja class I B (Caja-B) segment, we determined two parts of the Caja-B sequences with 1,079 kb in total, ranging from H6orf15 to BAT1 and compared the structure and phylogeny with that of other primates. This segment contains 54 genes in total, nine Caja-B genes (Caja-B1 to Caja-B9), two MIC genes (MIC1 and MIC2), eight non-MHC genes, two non-coding genes, and 33 non-MHC pseudogenes that have not been observed in other primate MHC-B/C segments. Caja-B3, Caja-B4, and Caja-B7 encode proper MHC class I proteins according to amino acid structural characteristics. Phylogenetic relationships based on 48 MHC-I nucleotide sequences in primates suggested (1) species-specific divergence for Caja, Mamu, and HLA/Patr/Gogo lineages, (2) independent generation of the "seven coding exon" type MHC-B genes in Mamu and HLA/Patr/Gogo lineages from an ancestral "eight coding exon" type MHC-I gene, (3) parallel correlation with the long and short segmental duplication unit length in Caja and Mamu lineages. These findings indicate that the MHC-B/C segment has been under permanent selective pressure in the evolution of primates.

  17. Epigenetics of the antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and miRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR), and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such as those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasia.

  18. Modified human beta 2-microglobulin (desLys(58)) displays decreased affinity for the heavy chain of MHC class I and induces nitric oxide production and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M; Harhaji, L; Lamberth, K;

    2009-01-01

    -I associated beta2m from the cell surface. In addition, only beta2m is able to restore MHC-I/peptide complex formation on acid-treated cells whereas dbeta2m appears to bind preferentially to denatured MHC-I heavy chains. In cell cultures, exogenously added dbeta2m, but not beta2m, induces apoptotic cell death...

  19. Induction of cross clade reactive specific antibodies in mice by conjugates of HGP-30 (peptide analog of HIV-1(SF2) p17) and peptide segments of human beta-2-microglobulin or MHC II beta chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, D H; Lloyd, J P; Heisey, D; Winship, M D; Siwek, M; Talor, E; Sarin, P S

    2001-09-14

    HGP-30, a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide homologous to a conserved region of HIV-1(SF2) p17 (aa86-115), has previously been shown to elicit both cellular and humoral immune responses when conjugated to KLH and adsorbed to alum. However, the free HGP-30 peptide is not immunogenic in animals. In order to improve the immunogenicity of HGP-30, peptide conjugates consisting of a modified HGP-30 sequence (m-HGP-30/aa82-111) and a peptide segment, residues 38-50, of the MHC I accessory molecule, human beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-M), referred to as Peptide J, or a peptide from the MHC II beta chain (peptide G) were evaluated in mice. The effects of carriers and adjuvants on serum antibody titers, specificities to various HIV-1 clade peptides similar to HGP-30 and isotype patterns were examined. Peptides J or especially G conjugated to modified-HGP-30 (LEAPS 102 and LEAPS 101, respectively) generated comparable or better immune responses to modified HGP-30 than KLH conjugates as judged by the induction of: (1) similar antibody titers; (2) broader HIV clade antigen binding; and (3) antibody isotype response patterns indicative of a TH1 pathway (i.e. increased amounts of IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies). The ISA 51 and MPL(R)-SE adjuvants induced higher antibody responses than alum, with the ISA 51 being more potent. Immune responses to LEAPS 102, as compared to LEAPS 101, were weaker and slower to develop as determined by antibody titers and cross clade reactivity of the antibodies induced. Compared to KLH conjugates which induced significant anti-KLH antibody titers, minimal antibody responses were observed to peptide G, the more immunogenic conjugate, and peptide J. These results suggest that modified HGP-30 L.E.A.P.S. constructs may be useful as HIV vaccine candidates for preferential induction of TH1 directed cell mediated immune responses.

  20. Signal peptide-dependent inhibition of MHC class I heavy chain translation by rhesus cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Colin J; Früh, Klaus

    2008-10-03

    The US2-11 region of human and rhesus cytomegalovirus encodes a conserved family of glycoproteins that inhibit MHC-I assembly with viral peptides, thus preventing cytotoxic T cell recognition. Since HCMV lacking US2-11 is no longer able to block assembly and transport of MHC-I, we examined whether this is also observed for RhCMV lacking the corresponding region. Unexpectedly, recombinant RhCMV lacking US2-11 was still able to inhibit MHC-I expression in infected fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of an additional MHC-I evasion mechanism. Progressive deletion analysis of RhCMV-specific genomic regions revealed that MHC-I expression is fully restored upon additional deletion of rh178. The protein encoded by this RhCMV-specific open reading frame is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In the presence of rh178, RhCMV prevented MHC-I heavy chain (HC) expression, but did not inhibit mRNA transcription or association of HC mRNA with translating ribosomes. Proteasome inhibitors stabilized a HC degradation intermediate in the absence of rh178, but not in its presence, suggesting that rh178 prevents completion of HC translation. This interference was signal sequence-dependent since replacing the signal peptide with that of CD4 or murine HC rendered human HCs resistant to rh178. We have identified an inhibitor of antigen presentation encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus unique in both its lack of homology to any other known protein and in its mechanism of action. By preventing signal sequence-dependent HC translocation, rh178 acts prior to US2, US3 and US11 which attack MHC-I proteins after protein synthesis is completed. Rh178 is the first viral protein known to interfere at this step of the MHC-I pathway, thus taking advantage of the conserved nature of HC leader peptides, and represents a new mechanism of translational interference.

  1. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  2. Transcription variants of SLA-7, a swine non classical MHC class I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Bourneuf, Emmanuelle; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2011-06-03

    In pig, very little information is available on the non classical class I (Ib) genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) i.e. SLA-6, -7 and -8. Our aim was to focus on the transcription pattern of the SLA-7 gene. RT-PCR experiments were carried out with SLA-7 specific primers targeting either the full coding sequence (CDS) from exon 1 to the 3 prime untranslated region (3UTR) or a partial CDS from exon 4 to the 3UTR. We show that the SLA-7 gene expresses a full length transcript not yet identified that refines annotation of the gene with eight exons instead of seven as initially described from the existing RefSeq RNA. These two RNAs encode molecules that differ in cytoplasmic tail length. In this study, another SLA-7 transcript variant was characterized, which encodes a protein with a shorter alpha 3 domain, as a consequence of a splicing site within exon 4. Surprisingly, a cryptic non canonical GA-AG splicing site is used to generate this transcript variant. An additional SLA-7 variant was also identified in the 3UTR with a splicing site occurring 31 nucleotides downstream to the stop codon. In conclusion, the pig SLA-7 MHC class Ib gene presents a complex transcription pattern with two transcripts encoding various molecules and transcripts that do not alter the CDS and may be subject to post-transcriptional regulation.

  3. Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. II. Cross-reaction between a monoclonal antibody and two alpha beta T cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Engberg, J; Stryhn, A;

    2000-01-01

    but is more deeply anchored to the peptide-MHC (pep/MHC) ligand than TCRs, notably through numerous interactions of its heavy chain. The present model accounts well for the experimentally determined binding affinity of a set of 144 single amino acid substituted Ha analogues and the observed shared specificity......-restricted T cell hybridomas has supported this contention. A three-dimensional model of pSAN13.4.1 has been derived by homology modeling techniques. Subsequently, the structure of the pSAN13.4.1 antibody in complex with the antigenic Ha-Kk ligand was derived after a flexible and automated docking of the MHC...

  4. Human placenta: relative content of antibodies of different classes and subclasses (IgG1-IgG4) containing lambda- and kappa-light chains and chimeric lambda-kappa-immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekchnov, Evgenii A; Sedykh, Sergey E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-06-01

    The specific organ placenta is much more than a filter: it is an organ that protects, feeds and regulates the growth of the embryo. Affinity chromatography, ELISA, SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry were used. Using 10 intact human placentas deprived of blood, a quantitative analysis of average relative content [% of total immunoglobulins (Igs)] was carried out for the first time: (92.7), IgA (2.4), IgM (2.5), kappa-antibodies (51.4), lambda-antibodies (48.6), IgG1 (47.0), IgG2 (39.5), IgG3 (8.8) and IgG4 (4.3). It was shown for the first time that placenta contains sIgA (2.5%). In the classic paradigm, Igs represent products of clonal B-cell populations, each producing antibodies recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, similarly to human milk Igs, placenta antibodies undergo extensive half-molecule exchange and the IgG pool consists of 43.5 ± 15.0% kappa-kappa-IgGs and 41.6 ± 17.0% lambda-lambda-IgGs, while 15.0 ± 4.0% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda-light chains. Kappa-kappa-IgGs and lambda-lambda-IgGs contained, respectively (%): IgG1 (47.7 and 34.4), IgG2 (36.3 and 44.5), IgG3 (7.4 and 11.8) and IgG4 (7.5 and 9.1), while chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of (%): 43.5 IgG1, 41.0 IgG2, 5.6 IgG3 and 7.9 IgG4. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between placenta IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens, which explains a very well-known polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of different human IgGs.

  5. Intracellular transport routes for MHC class I and their relevance for antigen cross-presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cézaire Aimé Adiko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-presentation, in which exogenous antigens are presented via MHC I complexes, is involved both in the generation of anti-infectious and anti-tumoral cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. While cross-presentation was described almost four decades ago and while it is now established that some dendritic cell subsets are better than others in processing and cross-presenting internalized antigens, the involved molecular mechanisms remain only partially understood. Some of the least explored molecular mechanisms in cross-presentation concern the origin of cross-presenting MHC I molecules and the cellular compartments where antigenic peptide loading occurs. This review focuses on MHC I molecules and their intracellular trafficking. We discuss the source of cross-presenting MHC I in dendritic cells as well as the role of the endocytic pathway in their recycling from the cell surface. Next, we describe the importance of the TAP peptide transporter for delivering peptides to MHC I during cross-presentation. Finally, we highlight the impact of innate immunity mechanisms on specific antigen cross-presentation mechanisms in which TLR activation modulates MHC I trafficking and TAP localization.

  6. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  7. Word classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of recent literature and research on word classes, focusing in particular on typological approaches to word classification. The cross-linguistic classification of word class systems (or parts-of-speech systems) presented in this article is based on statements found...... a parts-of-speech system that includes the categories Verb, Noun, Adjective and Adverb, other languages may use only a subset of these four lexical categories. Furthermore, quite a few languages have a major word class whose members cannot be classified in terms of the categories Verb – Noun – Adjective...

  8. An immunocytochemical study of pulpal responses to cavity preparation by laser ablation in rat molars by using antibodies to heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 and class II MHC antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu; Ohshima, Hayato

    2004-03-01

    Initial responses of odontoblasts and immunocompetent cells to cavity preparation by laser ablation were investigated in rat molars. In untreated control teeth, intense heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 immunoreactivity was found in the cell bodies of odontoblasts, whereas cells immunopositive for the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen were predominantly located beneath the odontoblast layer in the dental pulp. Cavity preparation caused the destruction of the odontoblast layer and the shift of most class-II-MHC-positive cells from the pulp-dentin border toward the pulp core at the affected site. Twelve hours after cavity preparation, numerous class-II-MHC-positive cells appeared along the pulp-dentin border and extended their processes deep into the exposed dentinal tubules, but subsequently disappeared from the pulp-dentin border together with Hsp-25-immunopositive cells by 24 h after the operation. By 3-5 days postoperation, distinct abscess formation consisting of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was found in the dental pulp. The penetration of masses of oral bacteria was recognizable in the dentinal tubules beneath the prepared cavity. These findings indicate that cavity preparation by laser ablation induces remarkable inflammation by continuous bacterial infections via dentinal tubules in this experimental model, thereby delaying pulpal regeneration.

  9. Repression of MHC class I transcription by HPV16E7 through interaction with a putative RXR{beta} motif and NF-{kappa}B cytoplasmic sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui; Zhan, TaiLan; Li, Chang [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu, Mugen, E-mail: lium@mail.hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Qing K., E-mail: qkwang@mail.hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Center for Cardiovascular Genetics, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Down-regulation of transcription of the MHC class I genes in HPV16 tumorigenic cells is partly due to HPV16E7 associated with the MHC class I promoter and repressed chromatin activation. In this study, we further demonstrated that HPV16E7 is physically associated with a putative RXR{beta} binding motif (GGTCA) of the proximal promoter of the MHC class I genes by using reporter transcriptional assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our data also provide evidence that HPV16E7 inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced up-regulation of MHC class I transcription by impaired nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. More importantly, CaSki tumor cells treated with TSA and transfected with the constitutively active mutant form of IKK-{alpha} (which can activate NF-{kappa}B directly) showed a maximal level of up-regulation of MHC-I expression. Taken together, our results suggest that HPV16E7 may employ two independent mechanisms to ensure that either the constitutive or inducible transcription of MHC class I genes is down-regulated.

  10. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC.1,2 As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The global trends in antibody research and development were discussed, including success stories of recent marketing authorizations of golimumab (Simponi®) and canakinumab (Ilaris®) by Johnson & Johnson and Novartis, respectively, updates on antibodies in late clinical development (obinutuzumab/GA101, farletuzumab/MORAb-003 and itolizumab/T1 h, by Glycart/Roche, Morphotek and Biocon, respectively) and success rates for this fast-expanding class of therapeutics (Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development). Case studies covering clinical progress of girentuximab (Wilex), evaluation of panobacumab (Kenta Biotech), characterization of therapeutic antibody candidates by protein microarrays (Protagen), antibody-drug conjugates (sanofi-aventis, ImmunoGen, Seattle Genetics, Wyeth/Pfizer), radio-immunoconjugates (Bayer Schering Pharma, Université de Nantes) and new scaffolds (Ablynx, AdAlta, Domantis/GlaxoSmithKline, Fresenius, Molecular Partners, Pieris, Scil Proteins, Pfizer, University of Zurich) were presented. Major antibody structural improvements were showcased, including the latest selection engineering of the best isotypes (Abbott, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre), hinge domain (Pierre Fabre), dual antibodies (Abbott), IgG-like bispecific antibodies (Biogen Idec), antibody epitope mapping case studies (Eli Lilly), insights in FcγRII receptor (University of Cambridge), as well as novel tools for antibody fragmentation (Genovis). Improvements

  11. Antibody Isotype Switching in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Kate; Hackney, Jason; Payandeh, Jian; Zarrin, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The humoral or antibody-mediated immune response in vertebrates has evolved to respond to diverse antigenic challenges in various anatomical locations. Diversification of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region via isotype switching allows for remarkable plasticity in the immune response, including versatile tissue distribution, Fc receptor binding, and complement fixation. This enables antibody molecules to exert various biological functions while maintaining antigen-binding specificity. Different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes include IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA, which exist as surface-bound and secreted forms. High-affinity autoantibodies are associated with various autoimmune diseases such as lupus and arthritis, while defects in components of isotype switching are associated with infections. A major route of infection used by a large number of pathogens is invasion of mucosal surfaces within the respiratory, digestive, or urinary tract. Most infections of this nature are initially limited by effector mechanisms such as secretory IgA antibodies. Mucosal surfaces have been proposed as a major site for the genesis of adaptive immune responses, not just in fighting infections but also in tolerating commensals and constant dietary antigens. We will discuss the evolution of isotype switching in various species and provide an overview of the function of various isotypes with a focus on IgA, which is universally important in gut homeostasis as well as pathogen clearance. Finally, we will discuss the utility of antibodies as therapeutic modalities.

  12. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...... bias from omitted variables, the preferred IV results indicate considerable negative effects due to larger class sizes and larger numbers of overage-for-grade peers. The latter, driven by the highly prevalent practices of grade repetition and academic redshirting, should be considered an important...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis... tissue), such as primary biliary cirrhosis (degeneration of liver tissue) and chronic active hepatitis (inflammation of the liver). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ...

  14. Discovery of functional antibodies targeting ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Gardener, Matthew J; Williams, Wendy A

    2015-04-01

    Ion channels play critical roles in physiology and disease by modulation of cellular functions such as electrical excitability, secretion, cell migration, and gene transcription. Ion channels represent an important target class for drug discovery that has been largely addressed, to date, using small-molecule approaches. A significant opportunity exists to target these channels with antibodies and alternative formats of biologics. Antibodies display high specificity and affinity for their target antigen, and they have the potential to target ion channels very selectively. Nevertheless, isolating antibodies to this target class is challenging due to the difficulties in expression and purification of ion channels in a format suitable for antibody drug discovery in addition to the complexity of screening for function. In this article, we will review the current state of ion channel biologics discovery and the progress that has been made. We will also highlight the challenges in isolating functional antibodies to these targets and how these challenges may be addressed. Finally, we also illustrate successful approaches to isolating functional monoclonal antibodies targeting ion channels by way of a number of case studies drawn from recent publications.

  15. Preformed Donor HLA-DP-Specific Antibodies Mediate Acute and Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection Following Renal Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Jolly, E. C.; Key, T; H. Rasheed; Morgan, H; Butler, A; Pritchard, N.; Taylor, C J; Clatworthy, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Donor-specific HLA alloantibodies may cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and significantly compromise allograft survival. The clinical relevance of antibodies directed against some HLA class II antigens, particularly HLA-DP, is less clear with conflicting reports on their pathogenicity. We report two patients with high levels of pretransplant donor-specific HLA-DP antibodies who subsequently developed recurrent acute AMR and graft failure. In both cases, there were no o...

  16. MHC class I phenotype and function of human beta 2-microglobulin transgenic murine lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerager, L; Pedersen, L O; Bregenholt, S;

    1996-01-01

    Lymphoid cells from beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) knockout mice transgenic for human (h) beta 2m (C57BL/10 m beta 2m-/h beta 2m+) were compared with normal mice for their binding to exogenously added h beta 2m, binding to a H-2Db peptide and for functional activity in a one-way allogenic MLC....... Based on data from cellular binding studies, Scatchard analyses and flow cytometry, it is concluded that exogenous h beta 2m does not bind to hybrid MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules composed of mouse heavy chain/h beta 2m molecules expressed on lymphocytes of transgenic mice. Immunoprecipitation and SDS...... binds radiolabelled peptide in the absence of exogenous added h beta 2m suggesting that a stable fraction of hybrid H-2Db molecules is empty or contain peptides with very low affinity. In a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture, transgenic splenocytes were found to be far less stimulatory than...

  17. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  18. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  19. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  20. Next generation of antibody therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenping Zhu; Li Yan

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a major class of therapeutic agents providing effective altematives to treating various human diseases. To date, 15 mAbs have been approved by regulatory agencies in the world for clinical use in oncology indications. The selectivity and specificity, the unique pharmacokinetics, and the ability to engage and activate the host immune system differentiate these biologics from traditional small molecule anticancer drugs. mAb-basod regimens have brought clinical benefits, including improvements in overall survival, to patients with a variety of cancers. Many challenges still remain, however, to fully realize the potential of these new medicines. With our further understanding of cancer biology, mechanism of antibody action, and advancement of antibody engineering technologies, many novel antibody formats or antibody-derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. Carefully designed and engineered, they retain the advantage of specificity and selectivity of original antibodies, but in the meantime acquire additional special features such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced anticancer efficacy. Promising clinical results are being generated with these newly improved antibody-based therapeutics.

  1. Glycosylation profiles of therapeutic antibody pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Christoph; Berger, Christoph N; Girard, Philippe; Meier, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are often used as therapeutics and represent a major class of drug products. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of antibody complexes resulting in the elimination of a target molecule or the modulation of specific signalling pathways. The physiological effects of antibody therapeutics are known to depend on the structural characteristics of the antibody molecule, specifically on the glycosylation which is the result of posttranslational modifications. Hence, production of therapeutic antibodies with a defined and consistent glycoform profile is needed which still remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. To provide an insight into the industries capability to control their manufacturing process and to provide antibodies of highest quality, we conducted a market surveillance study and compared major oligosaccharide profiles of a number of monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals sampled on the Swiss market. Product lot-to-lot variability was found to be generally low, suggesting that a majority of manufacturers have implemented high quality standards in their production processes. However, proportions of G0, G1 and G2 core-fucosylated chains derived from different products varied considerably and showed a bias towards the immature agalactosidated G0 form. Interestingly, differences in glycosylation caused by the production cell type seem to be of less importance compared with process related parameters such as cell growth.

  2. Structure Based Antibody-Like Peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Greene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb and soluble receptors represent new classes of therapeutic agents for treatment of several diseases. High affinity and high specificity biologics can be utilized for variety of clinical purposes. Monoclonal antibodies have been used as diagnostic agents when coupled with radionuclide, immune modulatory agents or in the treatment of cancers. Among other limitations of using large molecules for therapy the actual cost of biologics has become an issue. There is an effort among chemists and biologists to reduce the size of biologics which includes monoclonal antibodies and receptors without a reduction of biological efficacy. Single chain antibody, camel antibodies, Fv fragments are examples of this type of deconstructive process. Small high-affinity peptides have been identified using phage screening. Our laboratory used a structure-based approach to develop small-size peptidomimetics from the three-dimensional structure of proteins with immunoglobulin folds as exemplified by CD4 and antibodies. Peptides derived either from the receptor or their cognate ligand mimics the functions of the parental macromolecule. These constrained peptides not only provide a platform for developing small molecule drugs, but also provide insight into the atomic features of protein-protein interactions. A general overview of the reduction of monoclonal antibodies to small exocyclic peptide and its prospects as a useful diagnostic and as a drug in the treatment of cancer are discussed.

  3. The antibody mining toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew RM; Kiss, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput ...

  4. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...... outcomes. This study uses new microdata from East Africa, incorporating test score data for over 250,000 children, to compare the likely efficacy of these two types of interventions. Endogeneity bias is addressed via fixed effects and instrumental variables techniques. Although these may not fully mitigate...

  5. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen-...... for combating HER2+ breast cancer....

  6. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) Class II is a Xenoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladowski, Joseph M; Reyes, Luz M; Martens, Gregory R; Butler, James R; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Eckhoff, Devin E; Tector, Matt; Tector, A Joseph

    2017-08-24

    Over 130 000 patients in the United States alone need a life-saving organ transplant. Genetically modified porcine organs could resolve the donor organ shortage, but human xenoreactive antibodies destroy pig cells and are the major barrier to clinical application of xenotransplantation. The objective of this study was to determine whether waitlisted patients possess preformed antibodies to swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II, homologs of the class II human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Sera from people currently awaiting solid organ transplant were tested for IgG binding to class II SLA proteins when expressed on mammalian cells. Pig fibroblasts were made positive by transfection with the class II transactivator (CIITA). As a second expression system, transgenes encoding the alpha and beta chains of class II SLA were transfected into Human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Human sera containing IgG specific for class II HLA molecules exhibited greater binding to class II SLA positive cells than to SLA negative cells. Sera lacking antibodies against class II HLA showed no change in binding regardless of the presence of class II SLA. These antibodies could recognize either SLA-DR or SLA-DQ complexes. Class II SLA proteins may behave as xenoantigens for people with humoral immunity towards class II HLA molecules.

  7. Differential recognition of MHC class I molecules of xeno-/allo-endothelial cells by human NK cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) as target cells, human peripheral blood NK cells (PBNK) and NK92 cells as effector cells, the differential cytotoxicities of NK cells to allo- and xeno-endothelial cells were studied. The influence of MHC class I molecules on the cytotoxicity of human NK cells was assayed using acid treatment, and blockades of MHC class I antigens, CD94 and KIR (NKB1). The results indicated that the killing of PAEC by the two kinds of NK cells is higher than that of HUVEC. After acid- treatment, the cytotoxicity of the two kinds of NK cells to PAEC and HUVEC is significantly enhanced, but the magnitude of the enhancement is different. The enhancement of NK killing to acid treated HUVEC is much greater than that to PAEC. Blockade of CD94 mAb did not alter the NK cytotoxicity, while blockade of NKB1 mAb enhanced the cytotoxicity of PBNK to HUVEC and PAEC by 95% and 29% respectively. The results above suggested that the differential recognition of MHC I molecules of xeno-endothelial cells by human NK cells could be the major reason for higher NK cytotoxicity to PAEC. KIR might be the primary molecule that transduced inhibitory signals when endothelial cells were injured by NK cells.

  8. Determination of antibody to Streptococcus mutans from radiation-induced xerostomia patients. Agglutination activity against cariogenic microorganisms, active immunoglobulin classes, and post-irradiation caries activity in cancer patients. Final report 15 jul 77-14 apr 79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.R.; O' Neill, P.A.; Dreizen, S.

    1979-07-01

    The relationship between specific agglutination (Ag) and caries activity during 30 month post radiation was assessed in 36 head and neck cancer patients. Ag titers in 444 saliva and 481 serum samples from these patients and 16 noncancer controls were determined against formalinized cellular antigens of Streptococcus mutans (Sm), Streptococcus sanguis (Ss), Streptococcus mitis, Lactobacillus fermenti (Lf), and Lactobacillus casei. Saliva IgA and IgG levels and Ag titers were significantly higher in cancer patients than in noncancer controls. Post radiation-induced xerostomic changes in saliva IgA reflected changes in specific Ag against oral microbes, particularly Sm serotype c. Patients with high saliva IgA levels had significantly higher saliva Ag titers to Sm, Ss and Lf, lower plaque Sm counts and lower caries activity than patients with low saliva IgA levels. Serum Ag titers, however, showed no significant relationship with either serum Ig levels, microbial counts or caries activity. Chromatographic separation of Ig classes showed that Ag activity in saliva stemmed mainly from secretory IgA. Most serum Ag activity was found in regions corresponding to IgG and 7S IgA.

  9. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  10. Preformed donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies mediate acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection following renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, E C; Key, T; Rasheed, H; Morgan, H; Butler, A; Pritchard, N; Taylor, C J; Clatworthy, M R

    2012-10-01

    Donor-specific HLA alloantibodies may cause acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and significantly compromise allograft survival. The clinical relevance of antibodies directed against some HLA class II antigens, particularly HLA-DP, is less clear with conflicting reports on their pathogenicity. We report two patients with high levels of pretransplant donor-specific HLA-DP antibodies who subsequently developed recurrent acute AMR and graft failure. In both cases, there were no other donor-specific HLA alloantibodies, suggesting that the HLA-DP-specific antibodies may be directly pathogenic.

  11. Class distinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. Catherine

    Typical 101 courses discourage many students from pursuing higher level science and math courses. Introductory classes in science and math serve largely as a filter, screening out all but the most promising students, and leaving the majority of college graduates—including most prospective teachers—with little understanding of how science works, according to a study conducted for the National Science Foundation. Because few teachers, particularly at the elementary level, experience any collegiate science teaching that stresses skills of inquiry and investigation, they simply never learn to use those methods in their teaching, the report states.

  12. Identification of MHC class II restricted T‐cell‐mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Stryhn, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide...... blocking with HLA class I and II subtype antibodies in the ELISPOT assay culture, none of the eight antigenic peptides induced HLA class I restricted CD8+ T‐cell responses. Instead all responses were blocked by pan‐HLA class II and anti‐HLA‐DR antibodies. In addition, CD4+ T‐cell depletion before the 10...

  13. VDRL antibodies enhance phagocytosis of Treponema pallidum by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Zander, S A; Shaffer, J M; Lukehart, S A

    1993-05-01

    Although reactivity in nontreponemal tests develops in patients with untreated syphilis, no immunologic function has been ascribed to these antibodies. This study demonstrates that rabbit antibodies induced by immunization with VDRL antigen and VDRL antibodies affinity-purified from syphilitic rabbit serum enhance phagocytosis of Treponema pallidum. The proportion of macrophages ingesting treponemes in the presence of these antisera was 45% +/- 5% and 27% +/- 4%, respectively, versus 14% +/- 3% for normal serum (P VDRL antibodies from syphilitic serum diminished but did not eliminate opsonization, suggesting at least two classes of target molecules. Despite opsonic capacity, VDRL antibodies fail to facilitate macrophage-mediated killing of T. pallidum. Nevertheless, VDRL-immunized rabbits are partially protected against T. pallidum infection, developing fewer lesions (delayed and smaller) than do unimmunized controls. These results suggest a heretofore unrecognized functional role for VDRL antibodies in syphilis infection.

  14. Considerations in producing preferentially reduced half-antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaraviciute, Asta; Jackson, Carolyn D; Millner, Paul A; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Half-antibody fragments are a promising reagent for biosensing, drug-delivery and labeling applications, since exposure of the free thiol group in the Fc hinge region allows oriented reaction. Despite the structural variations among the molecules of different IgG subclasses and those obtained from different hosts, only generalized preferential antibody reduction protocols are currently available. Preferential reduction of polyclonal sheep anti-digoxin, rabbit anti-Escherichia coli and anti-myoglobin class IgG antibodies to half-antibody fragments has been investigated. A mild reductant 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA) and a slightly stronger reductant tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) were used and the fragments obtained were quantitatively determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. It has been shown that the yields of half-antibody fragments could be increased by lowering the pH of the reduction mixtures. However, antibody susceptibility to the reductants varied. At pH4.5 the highest yield of sheep anti-digoxin IgG half-antibody fragments was obtained with 1M 2-MEA. Conversely, rabbit IgG half-antibody fragments could only be obtained with the stronger reductant TCEP. Preferential reduction of rabbit anti-myoglobin IgG antibodies was optimized and the highest half-antibody yield was obtained with 35 mM TCEP. Finally, it has been demonstrated that produced anti-myoglobin half-IgG fragments retained their binding activity.

  15. Microfluidic biofunctionalisation protocols to form multi-valent interactions for cell rolling and phenotype modification investigations

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we propose a fast, simple method to biofunctionalise microfluidic systems for cellomic investigations based on micro-fluidic protocols. Many available processes either require expensive and time-consuming protocols or are incompatible with the fabrication of microfluidic systems. Our method differs from the existing since it is applicable to an assembled system, uses few microlitres of reagents and it is based on the use of microbeads. The microbeads have specific surface moieties to link the biomolecules and couple cell receptors. Furthermore, the microbeads serve as arm spacer and offer the benefit of the multi-valent interaction. Microfluidics was adapted together with topology and biochemistry surface modifications to offer the microenvironment for cellomic studies. Based on this principle, we exploit the streptavidin-biotin interaction to couple antibodies to the biofunctionalised microfluidic environment within 5 h using 200 μL of reagents and biomolecules. We selected the antibodies able to form complexes with the MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules present on the cell membrane and involved in the immune surveillance. To test the microfluidic system, tumour cell lines (RMA) were rolled across the coupled antibodies to recognise and strip MHC-I molecules. As result, we show that cell rolling performed inside a microfluidic chamber functionalised with beads and the opportune antibody facilitate the removal of MHC class I molecules. We showed that the level of median fluorescent intensity of the MHC-I molecules is 300 for cells treated in a not biofunctionalised surface. It decreased to 275 for cells treated in a flat biofunctionalised surface and to 250 for cells treated on a surface where biofunctionalised microbeads were immobilised. The cells with reduced expression of MHC-I molecules showed, after cytotoxicity tests, susceptibility 3.5 times higher than normal cells. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Comparação dos anticorpos anti-reticulina e antiendomísio classe IGA para diagnóstico e controle da dieta na doença celíaca Comparison of IgA class reticulin and endomysium antibodies for diagnosis and control of the diet in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorete Maria da Silva KOTZE

    1999-12-01

    immunological reaction against gluten proteins from wheat, barley, rye and oats in individuals genetically susceptible. Celiac disease is its most frequent expression with various forms of clinical presentation. The treatment consists in gluten free diet. Although the biopsy of proximal small bowel is necessary, the importance of serological tests is increasing in the screening, diagnosis and monitoring of gluten free diet in celiac patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of antiendomysium (EmA-IgA and anti-reticulin (ARA-IgA antibodies in 56 celiac patients (17 at diagnosis, 24 adherent to the diet and 15 with transgression to the diet. The antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence, using human umbilical cord as substrate for the EmA-IgA and rat liver and kidney for the ARA-IgA. In the patients at diagnosis and in the group with transgression to the diet the total positivity was 100% for EmA-IgA and 59.4% for ARA-IgA. Antibodies were not detected in gluten-free diet patients. Among the 32 positive patients, the concordance of both tests was of 59.4% (19/32, being 40,6% (13/32 negative to ARA-IgA and positive to EmA-IgA. No patient was positive for ARA-IgA and negative for EmA-IgA. Thus, the sensitivity for EmA-IgA was of 100% and 59,4% for ARA-IgA. The association of the two tests did not improve the positivity in the samples. In conclusion, EmA-IgA can be considered the best serological test for diagnosis and follow up of celiac patients, because it presents high predictive value, high specificity and sensibility and is not expensive if using human umbilical cord as substrate.

  17. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  18. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  19. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  20. Identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using IgG platelet antibody detection and crossmatch system assay with Galileo Echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Frassati, Coralie; Montagnie, Rolande; Basire, Agnes; Merieux, Yves; Picard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Fetal/neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia is the most frequent and the most dangerous clinical condition involving anti-human platelet antigens (HPA)-1a allo-antibodies. Anti-HPA-1a allo-immunization requires rapid and accurate diagnosis to determine appropriate treatment. The Capture-P Ready-Screen assay (C-PRS) is a new qualitative immunoassay to detect IgG anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and anti-HPA allo-antibodies. The aim of this study is to assess the identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using the C-PRS assay, associated with HLA class I stripping reagents, on the automated benchtop analyzer Galileo Echo. Forty-nine sera were analyzed: without anti-HLA class I or anti-HPA allo-antibodies, with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies, with anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies, among which with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies. None of the samples without allo-antibodies were reactive. Only anti-HLA antibodies, detected by cytotoxicity-dependent complement and not by Luminex, remained positive before and after stripping reagents. Of the 13 samples, anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies that were correctly identified before and after incubation with HLA assassin reagent were 70% and 85%, respectively. Anti-glycoprotein auto-antibodies and anti-HLA allo-antibodies do not interfere with the detection of anti-HPA-1a antibodies. This preliminary study indicates that further improvement of the test will be helpful in developing a clinically useful assay in the future.

  1. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed.

  2. Detection of serum antitrichomonal antibodies in urogenital trichomoniasis by immunofluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt R

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is a frequently encountered genital pathogen in both males and females. In females, vaginitis due to this parasite is one of the most common manifestation. The indirect fluorescent technique (IFA test was carried out to detect antitrichomonal antibodies in 370 female patients using whole cell antigen. Seventy one (19.18% gave positive reaction for either of the class IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies. The level of the IgG class antibodies was found to be higher i.e. 58 (81.69% than IgM 11 (15.27% antibodies, which may be suggestive of past infection or a prolonged manifestation by the organisms.

  3. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  4. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  5. Inhibitory Mechanism of an Allosteric Antibody Targeting the Glucagon Receptor*

    OpenAIRE

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J.; Madjidi, Azadeh; Jacob E Corn; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M.; Allan, Bernard B.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the ext...

  6. Signal peptide-dependent inhibition of MHC class I heavy chain translation by rhesus cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Powers

    Full Text Available The US2-11 region of human and rhesus cytomegalovirus encodes a conserved family of glycoproteins that inhibit MHC-I assembly with viral peptides, thus preventing cytotoxic T cell recognition. Since HCMV lacking US2-11 is no longer able to block assembly and transport of MHC-I, we examined whether this is also observed for RhCMV lacking the corresponding region. Unexpectedly, recombinant RhCMV lacking US2-11 was still able to inhibit MHC-I expression in infected fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of an additional MHC-I evasion mechanism. Progressive deletion analysis of RhCMV-specific genomic regions revealed that MHC-I expression is fully restored upon additional deletion of rh178. The protein encoded by this RhCMV-specific open reading frame is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In the presence of rh178, RhCMV prevented MHC-I heavy chain (HC expression, but did not inhibit mRNA transcription or association of HC mRNA with translating ribosomes. Proteasome inhibitors stabilized a HC degradation intermediate in the absence of rh178, but not in its presence, suggesting that rh178 prevents completion of HC translation. This interference was signal sequence-dependent since replacing the signal peptide with that of CD4 or murine HC rendered human HCs resistant to rh178. We have identified an inhibitor of antigen presentation encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus unique in both its lack of homology to any other known protein and in its mechanism of action. By preventing signal sequence-dependent HC translocation, rh178 acts prior to US2, US3 and US11 which attack MHC-I proteins after protein synthesis is completed. Rh178 is the first viral protein known to interfere at this step of the MHC-I pathway, thus taking advantage of the conserved nature of HC leader peptides, and represents a new mechanism of translational interference.

  7. Antibody response to the lipopolysaccharide and protein antigens of Salmonella typhi during typhoid infection. II. Measurement of intestinal antibodies by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, P.Y.; Tsang, R.S.W.; Lam, S.K. (Hong Kong Univ.); La Brooy, J.T.; Rowley, D. (Adelaide Univ. (Australia))

    1981-12-01

    Antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and protein antigens of S. typhi in secretions of small intestine obtained from 12 typhoid patients, four typhoid carriers and 16 non-typhoid control subjects were measured by a solid-phase radioimmunoassay technique using /sup 125/I labelled anti-immunoglobulin antibody. Intestinal secretions obtained from typhoid patients as a group had significantly higher anti-LPS and anti-protein antibodies than those from the control group. These antibodies were both IgM and IgA classes. There was no correlation between the IgM or IgA antibody levels in serum and those in the intestinal secretions. In the intestinal secretions obtained from typhoid carriers, on the other hand, only IgA-class antibodies to the LPS and protein antigens of S. typhi were present at high levels.

  8. Antibody elbow angles are influenced by their light chain class

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanfield, R; Zemla, A; Wilson, I; Rupp, B

    2006-01-12

    We have examined the elbow angles for 365 different Fab fragments, and observe that Fabs with lambda light chains have adopted a wider range of elbow angles than their kappa-chain counterparts, and that the lambda light chain Fabs are frequently found with very large (>195{sup o}) elbow angles. This apparent hyperflexibility of lambda-chain Fabs may be due to an insertion in their switch region, which is one residue longer than in kappa chains, with glycine occurring most frequently at the insertion position. A new, web-based computer program that was used to calculate the Fab elbow angles is also described.

  9. Antibody discovery: sourcing of monoclonal antibody variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, William R

    2014-03-01

    Historically, antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies have been sourced primarily from the mouse IgG repertoire, and typically either chimerized or humanized. More recently, human antibodies from transgenic mice producing human IgG, phage display libraries, and directly from human B lymphocytes have been used more broadly as sources of antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies. Of the total 36 antibodies approved by major maket regulatory agencies, the variable domain sequences of 26 originate from the mouse. Of these, four are marketed as murine antibodies (of which one is a mouse-rat hybrid IgG antibody), six are mouse-human chimeric antibodies, and 16 are humanized. Ten marketed antibodies have originated from human antibody genes, three isolated from phage libraries of human antibody genes and seven from transgenic mice producing human antibodies. Five antibodies currently in clinical trials have been sourced from camelids, as well as two from non-human primates, one from rat, and one from rabbit. Additional sources of antibody variable domains that may soon find their way into the clinic are potential antibodies from sharks and chickens. Finally, the various methods for retrieval of antibodies from humans, mouse and other sources, including various display technologies and amplification directly from B cells, are described.

  10. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  11. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutteh, William H; Hinote, Candace D

    2014-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are acquired antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids. Obstetric antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is diagnosed in the presence of certain clinical features in conjunction with positive laboratory findings. Obstetric APS is one of the most commonly identified causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. Thus, obstetric APS is distinguished from APS in other organ systems where the most common manifestation is thrombosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms of action of aPLs have been described. This article discusses the diagnostic and obstetric challenges of obstetric APS, proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms of APS during pregnancy, and the management of women during and after pregnancy.

  12. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  13. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  14. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to confirm the cause of thyroid problems, including Hashimoto thyroiditis . The test is also used to find ... positive test may be due to: Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also ...

  15. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2. HSV-1 most often causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test ... whether a person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  16. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  17. Anti-HLA antibody profile of Turkish patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, G E; Seyhun, Y; Oguz, F; Kekik, C; Onal, E; Caliskan, Y; Bakkaloglu, H; Yazici, H; Turkmen, A; Aydin, A E; Sever, M S; Eldegez, U; Carin, M N

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) via blood transfusions, pregnancies, and previous transplantations can result in anti-HLA antibody production. The presence of anti-HLA antibodies in recipient sera before transplantation is an important risk factor. To demonstrate the anti-HLA antibody status of Turkish end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, 674 patients (mean age, 40.35 +/- 13.15 years; female/male, 328/346) were enrolled into the study. Anti-HLA antibody screening and identification tests were performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. The panel-reactive antibody (PRA)-negative group consisted of 564 (83.6%) and the PRA-positive group consisted of 110 (17.3%) patients. Of the 110 (17.3%) PRA-positive patients, 43 (6.4%) were class I (+) and class II (-); 19 (2.8%) were class I (-) and class II (+); 48 (7.1%) were both class I and II (+). The most frequent antibodies were directed against the A2 crossreactive group (CREG) and the A10 CREG with less frequent reactions against the B7 CREG, indicating antibodies to both frequent (members of A2 CREG) and relatively rare (members of A10 CREG and B7 CREG antigens). These data also suggested that some antibodies occur at greater than expected frequency because of shared epitopes. Our findings confirmed the significant correlation between female gender, pregnancy, failed graft history, long dialysis duration, and blood transfusions with PRA positivity (P < .05).

  18. Nonblocking Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Soluble MIC Revamps Endogenous Innate and Adaptive Antitumor Responses and Eliminates Primary and Metastatic Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shengjun; Zhang, Jinyu; Liu, Dai; Li, Guangfu; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D

    2015-11-01

    The human tumor-derived soluble MHC I-chain-related molecule (sMIC) is highly immune suppressive in cancer patients and correlates with poor prognosis. However, the therapeutic effect of targeting sMIC has not been determined, due to the limitation that mice do not express homologs of human MIC. This study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting sMIC in a clinically relevant transgenic animal model. We treated the engineered MIC-expressing "humanized" TRAMP/MIC bitransgenic mice at advanced disease stages with a sMIC-neutralizing nonblocking anti-MIC mAb and assessed the therapeutic efficacy and associated mechanisms. A sMIC-neutralizing nonblocking anti-MIC mAb effectively induced regression of primary tumors and eliminated metastasis without inducing systemic toxicity. The therapeutic effect is conferred by revamping endogenous antitumor immune responses, exemplified by restoring natural killer (NK) cell homeostasis and function, enhancing susceptibility of MIC(+)-tumor cells to NK cell killing, reviving and sustaining antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses, augmenting CD4 T cells to Th1 responses, priming dendritic cells for antigen presentation, and remodeling tumor microenvironment to be more immune reactive. Therapy with a sMIC-neutralizing nonblocking anti-MIC mAb can effectuate antitumor immune responses against advanced MIC(+) tumors. Our study provided strong rationale for translating sMIC-neutralizing therapeutic mAb into clinics, either alone or in combination with current ongoing standard immunotherapies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia PF4 Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Heparin-PF4 Antibody; HIT Antibody; HIT PF4 Antibody; Heparin Induced Antibody; ...

  20. Teachers in Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Galen, Jane

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I argue for a closer read of the daily "class work" of teachers, as posited by Reay, 1998. In developing exploratory class portraits of four teachers who occupy distinctive social positions (two from working-class homes now teaching upper-middle-class children and two from upper-middle-class homes now teaching poor children), I…

  1. [New antibodies in cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Knuth, A

    2004-09-22

    Since the development of hybridoma technology in 1975 monoclonal antibodies with pre-defined specificity can be produced. Only twenty years later did it become possible to make therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies in oncology. To this end it was necessary to attach the antigen-binding site of a mouse antibody onto the scaffold of a human antibody molecule. Such chimeric or "humanized" antibodies may be used in passive immunotherapy without eliciting an immune response. Rituximab and trastuzumab are such humanized antibodies. They are used today routinely in the treatment of malignant lymphoma and breast cancer, respectively. These antibodies are usually used in combination with conventional cytostatic anticancer drugs.

  2. Engineering antibodies for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Eric T; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The advent of modern antibody engineering has led to numerous successes in the application of these proteins for cancer therapy in the 13 years since the first Food and Drug Administration approval, which has stimulated active interest in developing more and better drugs based on these molecules. A wide range of tools for discovering and engineering antibodies has been brought to bear on this challenge in the past two decades. Here, we summarize mechanisms of monoclonal antibody therapeutic activity, challenges to effective antibody-based treatment, existing technologies for antibody engineering, and current concepts for engineering new antibody formats and antibody alternatives as next generation biopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment.

  3. Mimicking the germinal center reaction in hybridoma cells to isolate temperature-selective anti-PEG antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Cheng; Al-Qaisi, Talal S; Tung, Hsin-Yi; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Chuang, Kuo-Hsiang; Chen, Bing-Mae; Roffler, Steve R

    2014-01-01

    Modification of antibody class and binding properties typically requires cloning of antibody genes, antibody library construction, phage or yeast display and recombinant antibody expression. Here, we describe an alternative "cloning-free" approach to generate antibodies with altered antigen-binding and heavy chain isotype by mimicking the germinal center reaction in antibody-secreting hybridoma cells. This was accomplished by lentiviral transduction and controllable expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to generate somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in antibody genes coupled with high-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of hybridoma cells to detect altered antibody binding properties. Starting from a single established hybridoma clone, we isolated mutated antibodies that bind to a low-temperature structure of polyethylene glycol (PEG), a polymer widely used in nanotechnology, biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. FACS of AID-infected hybridoma cells also facilitated rapid identification of class switched variants of monoclonal IgM to monoclonal IgG. Mimicking the germinal center reaction in hybridoma cells may offer a general method to identify and isolate antibodies with altered binding properties and class-switched heavy chains without the need to carry out DNA library construction, antibody engineering and recombinant protein expression.

  4. RxClass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The RxClass Browser is a web application for exploring and navigating through the class hierarchies to find the RxNorm drug members associated with each class....

  5. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  6. Aggregates in monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rey, María; Lang, Dietmar A

    2011-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proved to be a highly successful class of therapeutic products. Large-scale manufacturing of pharmaceutical antibodies is a complex activity that requires considerable effort in both process and analytical development. If a therapeutic protein cannot be stabilized adequately, it will lose partially or totally its therapeutic properties or even cause immunogenic reactions thus potentially further endangering the patients' health. The phenomenon of protein aggregation is a common issue that compromises the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibodies and can happen at different steps of the manufacturing process, including fermentation, purification, final formulation, and storage. Aggregate levels in drug substance and final drug product are a key factor when assessing quality attributes of the molecule, since aggregation might impact biological activity of the biopharmaceutical. In this review it is analyzed how aggregates are formed during monoclonal antibody industrial production, why they have to be removed and the manufacturing process steps that are designed to either minimize or remove aggregates in the final product. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Radiolabelled peptides and monoclonal antibodies for therapy decision making in inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, G.; Signore, A.; Lagana, B.; Dierckx, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and monoclonal antibodies are an emerging class of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation with clinical implications for several chronic inflammatory disorders for diagnosis, therapy decision making and follow up. In the last decades, a number of novel monoclonal antibo

  8. The role of radiolabeled anti-TNFα monoclonal antibodies for diagnostic purposes and therapy evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaudemans, A. W.J.M.; Dierckx, R. A.J.O.; Kallenberg, C. G.M.; Anzola Fuentes, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Radiolabelled cytokines and monoclonal antibodies are an emerging class of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation. These radiopharmaceuticals bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity and therefore have excellent diagnostic potential for imaging of patients with chronic inflamm

  9. Antibody class capture assay (ACCA) for rubella-specific IgM antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, M; Payne, R A

    1982-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for IgM antirubella were carried out on 1,546 sera, using an IgM capture method with a F (ab')2 conjugate (ACCA). Under the conditions described, sera containing IgM antirubella bound up to 15 times as much enzyme activity as negative specimens. Paired serum specimens from 27 patients, serial serum specimens from 6 patients, and single serum specimens from 15 patients who had had recent rubella were examined by the haemagglutination inhibition test (HAI) in the presence and absence of 2-mercaptoethanol following sucrose density gradient centrifugation (SDGC). ACCA confirmed all the results found with HAI following SDGC. Specimens were examined from ten patients with congenital rubella; ACCA confirmed the results found with both immunofluorescence following SDGC and radioimmunoassay. Pre- and post-vaccination specimens from 123 patients who had been vaccinated against rubella were examined. An IgM response could only be demonstrated in the 57 cases when IgG was absent in the first specimen. The specificity of the assay was confirmed by testing 31 serum specimens from rubella immune patients that also contained rheumatoid factor, 163 serum specimens from patients with acute infections other than rubella, and 12 serum specimens from infants with miscellaneous neonatal abnormalities other than congenital rubella. The ACCA proved a simple, sensitive, and specific test for IgM antirubella and the results compared favourably with those obtained by the SDGC technique.

  10. Vi serology in screening of typhoid carriers: improved specificity by detection of Vi antibodies by counterimmunoelectrophoresis.

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, P. Y.; Tsang, R S

    1982-01-01

    A purified soluble Vi antigen was used in counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE), passive haemagglutination (HA) and solid phase radio-immunoassay (SPRIA) for detection of serum Vi antibody. Serum Vi antibody was detected in 13 of 14 chronic typhoid carriers by both CIE and HA. SPRIA studies showed that Vi antibodies in sera of these carriers were mainly of the IgG class. Successful treatment with amoxycillin in one carrier, who initially showed a positive Vi test, resulted in a reversion in 6 mo...

  11. MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells is important to activate CD4+ T cells that stimulate the B cell to produce antibodies. Besides this, disruption of MHC class II antigen presentation could play a role in immune escape by tumor cells. This thesis describes MHC class II antigen presentation

  12. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper;

    2009-01-01

    present a homogenous, proximity-based assay for detection of peptide binding to HLA class I molecules. It uses a conformation-dependent anti-HLA class I antibody, W6/32, as one tag and a biotinylated recombinant HLA class I molecule as the other tag, and a proximity-based signal is generated through...

  13. Epigenetic Codes Programing Class Switch Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Class switch recombination imparts B cells with a fitness-associated adaptive ­advantage during a humoral immune response by using a precision-tailored DNA excision and ligation process to swap the default constant region gene of the antibody with a new one that has unique effector functions. This secondary diversification of the antibody repertoire is a hallmark of the adaptability of B cells when confronted with environmental and pathogenic challenges. Given that the nucleotide sequence of genes during class switching remains unchanged (genetic constraints), it is logical and necessary therefore, to integrate the adaptability of B cells to an epigenetic state, which is dynamic and can be heritably modulated before, after, or even during an antibody-dependent immune response. Epigenetic regulation encompasses heritable changes that affect function (phenotype) without altering the sequence information embedded in a gene, and include histone, DNA and RNA modifications. Here, we review current literature on how B cells use an epigenetic code language as a means to ensure antibody plasticity in light of pathogenic insults. PMID:26441954

  14. Epigenetic codes programming class switch recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat eVaidyanathan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Class switch recombination imparts B cells with a fitness-associated adaptive advantage during a humoral immune response by using a precision-tailored DNA excision and ligation process to swap the default constant region gene of the antibody with a new one that has unique effector functions. This secondary diversification of the antibody repertoire is a hallmark of the adaptability of B cells when confronted with environmental and pathogenic challenges. Given that the nucleotide sequence of genes during class switching remains unchanged (genetic constraints, it is logical and necessary therefore, to integrate the adaptability of B cells to an epigenetic state, which is dynamic and can be heritably modulated before, after or even during an antibody-dependent immune response. Epigenetic regulation encompasses heritable changes that affect function (phenotype without altering the sequence information embedded in a gene, and include histone, DNA and RNA modifications. Here, we review current literature on how B cells use an epigenetic code language as a means to ensure antibody plasticity in light of pathogenic insults.

  15. Epigenetic Codes Programing Class Switch Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Class switch recombination imparts B cells with a fitness-associated adaptive -advantage during a humoral immune response by using a precision-tailored DNA excision and ligation process to swap the default constant region gene of the antibody with a new one that has unique effector functions. This secondary diversification of the antibody repertoire is a hallmark of the adaptability of B cells when confronted with environmental and pathogenic challenges. Given that the nucleotide sequence of genes during class switching remains unchanged (genetic constraints), it is logical and necessary therefore, to integrate the adaptability of B cells to an epigenetic state, which is dynamic and can be heritably modulated before, after, or even during an antibody-dependent immune response. Epigenetic regulation encompasses heritable changes that affect function (phenotype) without altering the sequence information embedded in a gene, and include histone, DNA and RNA modifications. Here, we review current literature on how B cells use an epigenetic code language as a means to ensure antibody plasticity in light of pathogenic insults.

  16. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide...... linker for yeast surface display of scFv and scFab fragments, we compared a series of different Gly-Ser-based linkers in display and antigen binding proficiency. We show that these formats of the model antibody can accommodate linkers of different lengths and that introduction of alanine or glutamate...... fragments by in vivo homologous recombination large combinatorial antibody libraries can easily be generated. We have optimized ordered assembly of three CDR fragments into a gapped vector and observed increased transformation efficiency in a yeast strain carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase...

  17. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    fragments by in vivo homologous recombination large combinatorial antibody libraries can easily be generated. We have optimized ordered assembly of three CDR fragments into a gapped vector and observed increased transformation efficiency in a yeast strain carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase...... surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide...... linker for yeast surface display of scFv and scFab fragments, we compared a series of different Gly-Ser-based linkers in display and antigen binding proficiency. We show that these formats of the model antibody can accommodate linkers of different lengths and that introduction of alanine or glutamate...

  18. Significance of enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to double stranded and single stranded DNA in patients with lupus nephritis: correlation with severity of renal histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, M; Kanayama, Y; Amastu, K; Negoro, N; Kohda, S; Takeda, T; Inoue, T

    1993-01-01

    The correlation between renal histology and class specific (IgG and IgM) antibodies to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was studied by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 40 untreated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The levels of IgG antibodies to dsDNA were significantly higher in patients with World Health Organisation class IV nephritis than in those with class I, class II, or class III nephritis. IgG antibodies to ssDNA were higher in patients with class IV than in those with class II nephritis. IgG antibodies to dsDNA showed a close correlation with the histological activity score and the amount of electron dense deposit. IgG antibodies to ssDNA showed only a weak correlation with the renal histological activity score. IgM antibodies to dsDNA and IgM antibodies to ssDNA were not correlated with renal histological features. Patients with moderate to severe nephritis had a lower ratio of IgM antibodies to dsDNA to IgG antibodies to dsDNA than those with mild nephritis. These results indicate that the measurement of IgG antibodies to dsDNA is predictive in evaluating renal histological activity in patients with SLE.

  19. Human single chain antibodies against heparin: selection, characterization, and effect on coagulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerlo, E.M.A. van de; Smetsers, T.F.; Dennissen, M.A.B.A.; Linhardt, R.J.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2002-01-01

    Heparin, located in mast cells and basophilic granulocytes, is widely used as an anticoagulant. It belongs to a class of linear polysaccharides called glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Using phage display technology, we have selected 19 unique human antiheparin antibodies. Some antibodies react almost excl

  20. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity...... to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  1. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  2. Specific targeting of tumor cells by lyophilisomes functionalized with antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bracht, Etienne; Stolle, Sarah; Hafmans, Theo G.; Boerman, Otto C.; Oosterwijk, Egbert; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daamen, Willeke F.

    2014-01-01

    Lyophilisomes are a novel class of proteinaceous biodegradable nano/micro drug delivery capsules prepared by freezing, annealing and Iyophilization. In the present study, lyophilisomes were functionalized for active targeting by antibody conjugation in order to obtain a selective drug-carrier system

  3. Phage display-derived human antibodies in clinical development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 3 decades, monoclonal antibodies have become the most important class of therapeutic biologicals on the market. Development of therapeutic antibodies was accelerated by recombinant DNA technologies, which allowed the humanization of murine monoclonal antibodies to make them more similar to those of the human body and suitable for a broad range of chronic diseases like cancer and autoimmune diseases. In the early 1990s in vitro antibody selection technologies were developed that enabled the discovery of "fully" human antibodies with potentially superior clinical efficacy and lowest immunogenicity. Antibody phage display is the first and most widely used of the in vitro selection technologies. It has proven to be a robust, versatile platform technology for the discovery of human antibodies and a powerful engineering tool to improve antibody properties. As of the beginning of 2016, 6 human antibodies discovered or further developed by phage display were approved for therapy. In 2002, adalimumab (Humira®) became the first phage display-derived antibody granted a marketing approval. Humira® was also the first approved human antibody, and it is currently the best-selling antibody drug on the market. Numerous phage display-derived antibodies are currently under advanced clinical investigation, and, despite the availability of other technologies such as human antibody-producing transgenic mice, phage display has not lost its importance for the discovery and engineering of therapeutic antibodies. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview about phage display-derived antibodies that are approved for therapy or in clinical development. A selection of these antibodies is described in more detail to demonstrate different aspects of the phage display technology and its development over the last 25 years.

  4. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a monoclonal anti-protein kinase CK2 beta-subunit antibody of the IgG class for the direct detection of CK2 beta-subunit in tissue cultures of various mammalian species and human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastainczyk, W; Schmidt-Spaniol, I; Boldyreff, B;

    1995-01-01

    -subunit or in the CK2 holoenzyme (alpha 2 beta 2). Here, concentrations of the first antibody of 1 ng/ml still allowed the detection of the subunit. Immunoblotting of crude cellular extracts from various tissue cultures (man, mouse, and hamster), from human tumors, and the nonneoplastic tissue allowed the detection...... of the CK2 beta-subunit. The detected epitope of this antibody was, as determined by the epitope analysis technique, 123GLSDI127....

  6. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  7. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn Thorup;

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  8. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? While it is rare, it is possible for patients to have a negative antibody test results and still have celiac disease. ...

  9. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  10. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test also may be used to help diagnose autoimmune-related hemolytic anemia in conjunction with a DAT. This condition may be caused when a person produces antibodies against his or her own RBC antigens. This can happen with some autoimmune disorders , such as lupus , with diseases such as ...

  11. Recent advances in the construction of antibody-drug conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudasama, Vijay; Maruani, Antoine; Caddick, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) comprise antibodies covalently attached to highly potent drugs using a variety of conjugation technologies. As therapeutics, they combine the exquisite specificity of antibodies, enabling discrimination between healthy and diseased tissue, with the cell-killing ability of cytotoxic drugs. This powerful and exciting class of targeted therapy has shown considerable promise in the treatment of various cancers with two US Food and Drug Administration approved ADCs currently on the market (Adcetris and Kadcyla) and approximately 40 currently undergoing clinical evaluation. However, most of these ADCs exist as heterogeneous mixtures, which can result in a narrow therapeutic window and have major pharmacokinetic implications. In order for ADCs to deliver their full potential, sophisticated site-specific conjugation technologies to connect the drug to the antibody are vital. This Perspective discusses the strategies currently used for the site-specific construction of ADCs and appraises their merits and disadvantages.

  12. On differential characteristic classes

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Man-Ho

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give explicit formulas of differential characteristic classes of principal $G$-bundles with connections and prove their expected properties. In particular, we obtain explicit formulas for differential Chern classes, differential Pontryagin classes and differential Euler class. Furthermore, we show that the differential Chern class is the unique natural transformation from (Simons-Sullivan) differential $K$-theory to (Cheeger-Simons) differential characters that is compatible ...

  13. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1......MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  14. Immunization with a peptide containing MHC class I and II epitopes derived from the tumor antigen SIM2 induces an effective CD4 and CD8 T-cell response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydn T Kissick

    Full Text Available Here, we sought to determine whether peptide vaccines designed harbor both class I as well as class II restricted antigenic motifs could concurrently induce CD4 and CD8 T cell activation against autologous tumor antigens. Based on our prior genome-wide interrogation of human prostate cancer tissues to identify genes over-expressed in cancer and absent in the periphery, we targeted SIM2 as a prototype autologous tumor antigen for these studies. Using humanized transgenic mice we found that the 9aa HLA-A*0201 epitope, SIM2(237-245, was effective at inducing an antigen specific response against SIM2-expressing prostate cancer cell line, PC3. Immunization with a multi-epitope peptide harboring both MHC-I and MHC-II restricted epitopes induced an IFN-γ response in CD8 T cells to the HLA-A*0201-restricted SIM2(237-245 epitope, and an IL-2 response by CD4 T cells to the SIM2(240-254 epitope. This peptide was also effective at inducing CD8+ T-cells that responded specifically to SIM2-expressing tumor cells. Collectively, the data presented in this study suggest that a single peptide containing multiple SIM2 epitopes can be used to induce both a CD4 and CD8 T cell response, providing a peptide-based vaccine formulation for potential use in immunotherapy of various cancers.

  15. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  16. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  17. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  18. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC ... I should know? How is it used? Red blood cell (RBC) antibody identification is used as a follow- ...

  19. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  20. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Adams, Gregory P.; Weiner, Louis M.; Scott, Jamie K.; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M.

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Bi...

  1. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the uni

  2. Inhibition of tumorigenesis driven by different Wnt proteins requires blockade of distinct ligand-binding regions by LRP6 antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenberg, Seth A.; Charlat, Olga; Daley, Michael P.; Liu, Shanming; Vincent, Karen J.; Stuart, Darrin D.; Schuller, Alwin G.; Yuan, Jing; Ospina, Beatriz; Green, John; Yu, Qunyan; Walsh, Renee; Schmitz, Rita; Heine, Holger; Bilic, Sanela; Ostrom, Lance; Mosher, Rebecca; Hartlepp, K. Felix; Zhu, Zhenping; Fawell, Stephen; Yao, Yung-Mae; Stover, David; Finan, Peter M.; Porter, Jeffery A.; Sellers, William R.; Klagge, Ingo M.; Cong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Disregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been linked to various human diseases, including cancers. Inhibitors of oncogenic Wnt signaling are likely to have a therapeutic effect in cancers. LRP5 and LRP6 are closely related membrane coreceptors for Wnt proteins. Using a phage-display library, we identified anti-LRP6 antibodies that either inhibit or enhance Wnt signaling. Two classes of LRP6 antagonistic antibodies were discovered: one class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt1, whereas the second class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt3a. Epitope-mapping experiments indicated that Wnt1 class-specific antibodies bind to the first propeller and Wnt3a class-specific antibodies bind to the third propeller of LRP6, suggesting that Wnt1- and Wnt3a-class proteins interact with distinct LRP6 propeller domains. This conclusion is further supported by the structural functional analysis of LRP5/6 and the finding that the Wnt antagonist Sclerostin interacts with the first propeller of LRP5/6 and preferentially inhibits the Wnt1-class proteins. We also show that Wnt1 or Wnt3a class-specific anti-LRP6 antibodies specifically block growth of MMTV-Wnt1 or MMTV-Wnt3 xenografts in vivo. Therapeutic application of these antibodies could be limited without knowing the type of Wnt proteins expressed in cancers. This is further complicated by our finding that bivalent LRP6 antibodies sensitize cells to the nonblocked class of Wnt proteins. The generation of a biparatopic LRP6 antibody blocks both Wnt1- and Wnt3a-mediated signaling without showing agonistic activity. Our studies provide insights into Wnt-induced LRP5/6 activation and show the potential utility of LRP6 antibodies in Wnt-driven cancer. PMID:20713706

  3. Loosely coupled class families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    are expressed using virtual classes seem to be very tightly coupled internally. While clients have achieved the freedom to dynamically use one or the other family, it seems that any given family contains a xed set of classes and we will need to create an entire family of its own just in order to replace one......Families of mutually dependent classes that may be accessed polymor- phically provide an advanced tool for separation of concerns, in that it enables client code to use a group of instances of related classes safely without depending on the exact classes involved. However, class families which...... of the members with another class. This paper shows how to express class families in such a manner that the classes in these families can be used in many dierent combinations, still enabling family polymorphism and ensuring type safety....

  4. Flow Cytometric Panel-Reactive Antibody Results and the Ability to Find Transfusion-Compatible Platelets after Antibody-Desensitization for Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Eric R; Pandey, Soumya; Harville, Terry O; Drobena, Gina A; Cottler-Fox, Michele

    2016-12-01

    Panel reactive antibody (PRA) reduction protocols are used to decrease anti-HLA antibodies with concomitant PRA monitoring as a measure of successful treatment prior to organ and haploidentical blood and marrow transplant (BMT). We hypothesized that the more sensitive flow cytometry (FC) based assays for PRA [FlowPRA(®) and Luminex(®) based Single Antigen Bead (SAB)] would also correlate with the ability to find compatible platelets for allosensitized recipients. A female patient with myelodysplastic syndrome and a high HLA class I PRA [>90% PRA and cPRA by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay and Flow PRA] required allogeneic BMT. Baseline HLA Class I and class II antigen typing was performed and a matched sibling donor was identified. Although baseline anti-HLA class I and class II antibodies measured by FC and CDC revealed no donor specific antibodies (DSA), the decision was made to attempt antibody desensitization to facilitate platelet transfusion during BMT. FC and CDC assays were performed to determine anti-HLA class I antibodies and cPRA/%PRA prior to starting desensitization and at the end of desensitization. Over the course of desensitization and BMT, a total of 194 apheresis platelet units underwent cross-match (XM) using Capture-P(®). We compared temporally-related PRA results with platelet XM results. High PRA by FC or CDC assays correlates with a high % of XM-positive (incompatible) platelet units. When the CDC PRA fell to 2% after desensitization, platelet XM incompatibility fell from 100% to 63% positive (incompatible). When the FC PRA fell to 5% the positive platelet XM fell to 5%. Antibody desensitization facilitated platelet transfusion. PRA determination by FC appeared better correlated than determination by CDC with the ability to find XM-compatible platelets. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  5. Inhibitory mechanism of an allosteric antibody targeting the glucagon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Susmith; Shang, Yonglei; Clarke, Holly J; Madjidi, Azadeh; Corn, Jacob E; Kates, Lance; Kolumam, Ganesh; Chiang, Vicky; Luis, Elizabeth; Murray, Jeremy; Zhang, Yingnan; Hötzel, Isidro; Koth, Christopher M; Allan, Bernard B

    2013-12-13

    Elevated glucagon levels and increased hepatic glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling contribute to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. We have identified a monoclonal antibody that inhibits GCGR, a class B G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), through a unique allosteric mechanism. Receptor inhibition is mediated by the binding of this antibody to two distinct sites that lie outside of the glucagon binding cleft. One site consists of a patch of residues that are surface-exposed on the face of the extracellular domain (ECD) opposite the ligand-binding cleft, whereas the second binding site consists of residues in the αA helix of the ECD. A docking model suggests that the antibody does not occlude the ligand-binding cleft. We solved the crystal structure of GCGR ECD containing a naturally occurring G40S mutation and found a shift in the register of the αA helix that prevents antibody binding. We also found that alterations in the αA helix impact the normal function of GCGR. We present a model for the allosteric inhibition of GCGR by a monoclonal antibody that may form the basis for the development of allosteric modulators for the treatment of diabetes and other class B GPCR-related diseases.

  6. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin.

  7. Constant domain-regulated antibody catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-10-19

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies.

  8. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic......More and more antibody therapeutics are being approved every year, mainly due to their high efficacy and antigen selectivity. However, it is still difficult to identify the antigen, and thereby the function, of an antibody if no other information is available. There are obstacles inherent...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...

  9. Antiphospholipid Antibody and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴竞生

    2008-01-01

    @@ Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) APA is a big category for all kinds of negative charge phospholipid or lecithin - a protein complex autoantibodies or the same antibody, through its recognition of antigen (target protein) different, and phospholipids or lecithin - protein complex combination of various rely on the interference Phospholipid clotting and anti-coagulation factor, and promote endothelial cells, platelets, complement activation and play a role. APA including lupus anticoagulant(LA) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA), In addition, there are anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI) antibody, anti-prothrombin (a- PT) antibody, anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibody and anti-phosphatidylserine antibody, and so on. APA as the main target of phospholipid-binding protein, including β2-GPI, prothrombin, annexin, protein C (PC) and protein S (PS), plasminogen, and so on.

  10. Engineering antibodies by yeast display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Eric T; Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Price, J Vincent

    2012-10-15

    Since its first application to antibody engineering 15 years ago, yeast display technology has been developed into a highly potent tool for both affinity maturing lead molecules and isolating novel antibodies and antibody-like species. Robust approaches to the creation of diversity, construction of yeast libraries, and library screening or selection have been elaborated, improving the quality of engineered molecules and certainty of success in an antibody engineering campaign and positioning yeast display as one of the premier antibody engineering technologies currently in use. Here, we summarize the history of antibody engineering by yeast surface display, approaches used in its application, and a number of examples highlighting the utility of this method for antibody engineering.

  11. PRCR Classes and Activities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — This data is specific to Parks and Recreation classes, workshops, and activities within the course catalog. It contains an entry for upcoming classes.*This data set...

  12. Class 1 Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A "Class 1" area is a geographic area recognized by the EPA as being of the highest environmental quality and requiring maximum protection. Class I areas are areas...

  13. Doodling in Math Class

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arkenberg, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

      Arkenberg reviews Doodling in Math Class, an Internet resource available at www.youtube.com. Both math and art teachers have recommended the series of YouTube videos "Doodling in Math Class with Vihart...

  14. Analysis of anti-HLA antibodies in sensitized kidney transplant candidates subjected to desensitization with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobashevsky, Andrew L; Higgins, Nancy G; Rosner, Kevin M; Mujtaba, Muhammad A; Goggins, William C; Taber, Tim E

    2013-07-27

    Preexisting donor-specific antibodies against human leukocyte antigens are major risk factors for acute antibody-mediated and chronic rejection of kidney transplant grafts. Immunomodulation (desensitization) protocols may reduce antibody concentration and improve the success of transplant. We investigated the effect of desensitization with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab on the antibody profile in highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates. In 31 transplant candidates (calculated panel-reactive antibody [cPRA], 34%-99%), desensitization included intravenous immunoglobulin on days 0 and 30 and a single dose of rituximab on day 15. Anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies were analyzed before and after desensitization. Reduction of cPRA from 25% to 50% was noted for anti-class I (5 patients, within 20-60 days) and anti-class II (3 patients, within 10-20 days) antibodies. After initial reduction of cPRA, the cPRA increased within 120 days. In 24 patients, decrease in mean fluorescence intensity of antibodies by more than 50% was noted at follow-up, but there was no reduction of cPRA. Rebound occurred in 65% patients for anti-class I antibodies at 350 days and anti-class II antibodies at 101 to 200 days. Probability of rebound effect was higher in patients with mean fluorescence intensity of more than 10,700 before desensitization, anti-class II antibodies, and history of previous transplant. The desensitization protocol had limited efficacy in highly sensitized kidney transplant candidate because of the short period with antibody reduction and high frequency of rebound effect.

  15. Anticardiolipin antibodies in pathogenesis of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disorder clinically characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis and/or specific obstetric complications and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL in the serum. It occurs in 0.3% of pregnant women, while 1% of them have two spontaneous abortions. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of biphospholipid antibodies in pregnant women with recurrent spontaneous abortions. Methods. We analyzed 60 pregnant women who had two or more recurrent miscarriages. The control group included 60 healthy pregnant women. We analyzed titres of anticardiolipin (aCL IgG and/or IgM with high titres (> 20 U/mL, lupus anticoagulant (LAC antibodies and anti-beta-2 glycoprotein (b2-GP1 IgG as well as parameters of coagulation status of pregnant women. Results. Analyzing Spearman's rank correlation coefficient in a group of affected patients, we noticed a slightly positive correlation of lupus anticoagulants (LAC with aCL antibodies of both classes, while the correlation with b2GP1 IgG was negative. Both classes of aCL antibodies and antib2GP1 IgG were in a discrete positive correlation with the given variables. In the control group, there was a lack of consistency in correlation of the study variables with LAC-aCl IgG, compared to the affected patients, and there was a standard negative coefficient of correlation with anti-b2GP1 IgG. The correlation ratio of anti-b2GP1 IgG was negative for all studied test parameters. Analysis of hemostatic parameters showed a statistically significant difference in the concentration of fibrinogen (p < 0.01 and thrombocyte count (p < 0.05 between the study and the control group of pregnant women. Lower mean values of fibrinogen (2.90 ± 0.45 g/L and lower thrombocyte count [(179.20 ± 6.00 × 109] were found in the study group of pregnant women with secondary infertility compared to the mean values of fibrinogen (3.60 ± 0.55 g/L and thrombocyte count

  16. A Virtual Class Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik; Ostermann, Klaus; Cook, William Randall

    2006-01-01

    model for virtual classes has been a long-standing open question. This paper presents a virtual class calculus, vc, that captures the essence of virtual classes in these full-fledged programming languages. The key contributions of the paper are a formalization of the dynamic and static semantics of vc...

  17. Education and Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Galen, Jane A.

    2000-01-01

    The working class is nearly invisible in multicultural education literature. Examines the possibilities of a more careful foregrounding of the complexities of social class in shaping life chances, focusing on the educational experiences of working class students and discussing the poor in order to promote understanding of the potential of teacher…

  18. Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies negatively impact survival of pediatric aplastic anemia patients undergoing HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hua; He, Jun; Cai, Junchao; Yuan, Xiaoni; Jiang, Hua; Luo, Changying; Wang, Jianmin; Luo, Chengjuan; Pan, Zhijuan; Terasaki, Paul I; Ding, Lixia; Chen, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Graft failure and survival are the major problems for patients with aplastic anemia undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Previous studies showed that anti-HLA antibodies negatively impact engraftment in HSCT. This retrospective study of 51 pediatric patients with acquired aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic HSCT at a single institution between 2006 and 2012 investigated the influence of anti-HLA antibodies on the outcome of HSCT. Serum samples collected before HSCT were tested for the presence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies were detected in 54.9% (28/51) of patients, among whom 39.2% (20/51) had anti-HLA class I antibodies. Anti-HLA antibodies were associated with worse five-yr survival (78.6% vs. 100%, p = 0.021) and higher treatment-related mortality (21.4% vs. 0%, p = 0.028) compared with antibody-negative patients. Anti-HLA class I antibody-positive patients had poorer five-yr survival (75.0%) than anti-HLA class I&II antibody-positive and antibody-negative patients (87.5% and 100.0%, respectively, p = 0.039). Presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies (p = 0.024) and older age (10 yr or more; p = 0.027) significantly increased the risk of post-HSCT mortality. Pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies negatively affect the outcome of HSCT in pediatric patients with aplastic anemia. Routine testing for anti-HLA antibodies concurrent with efficient treatment should be conducted prior to HSCT.

  19. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies. PMID:28090318

  20. Persian Preposition Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pantcheva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I present the prepositional system in Persian. I show that Persian prepositions can be divided into three classes (Class 1, Class 2a and Class 2b which exhibit distinct syntactic behavior. Then I examine the question of the categorial status of Class 2 prepositions and demonstrate that they are not to be regarded as nouns. Finally I present the extended PP projection of Persian spatial prepositions and argue for a feature-based analysis of the properties they manifest.

  1. Class, Culture and Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2013-01-01

    Even though contemporary discussions of class have moved forward towards recognizing a multidimensional concept of class, empirical analyses tend to focus on cultural practices in a rather narrow sense, that is, as practices of cultural consumption or practices of education. As a result......, discussions within political sociology have not yet utilized the merits of a multidimensional conception of class. In light of this, the article suggests a comprehensive Bourdieusian framework for class analysis, integrating culture as both a structural phenomenon co-constitutive of class and as symbolic...

  2. Biophysical properties of the clinical-stage antibody landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Tushar; Sun, Tingwan; Durand, Stéphanie; Hall, Amy; Houston, Nga Rewa; Nett, Juergen H.; Sharkey, Beth; Bobrowicz, Beata; Caffry, Isabelle; Yu, Yao; Cao, Yuan; Lynaugh, Heather; Brown, Michael; Baruah, Hemanta; Gray, Laura T.; Krauland, Eric M.; Xu, Yingda; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies are a highly successful class of biological drugs, with over 50 such molecules approved for therapeutic use and hundreds more currently in clinical development. Improvements in technology for the discovery and optimization of high-potency antibodies have greatly increased the chances for finding binding molecules with desired biological properties; however, achieving drug-like properties at the same time is an additional requirement that is receiving increased attention. In this work, we attempt to quantify the historical limits of acceptability for multiple biophysical metrics of “developability.” Amino acid sequences from 137 antibodies in advanced clinical stages, including 48 approved for therapeutic use, were collected and used to construct isotype-matched IgG1 antibodies, which were then expressed in mammalian cells. The resulting material for each source antibody was evaluated in a dozen biophysical property assays. The distributions of the observed metrics are used to empirically define boundaries of drug-like behavior that can represent practical guidelines for future antibody drug candidates. PMID:28096333

  3. Effects of genetic engineering on the pharmacokinetics of antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colcher, D.; Goel, A.; Pavlinkova, G.; Beresford, G.; Booth, B.; Batra, S.K. [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha NE (United States). Dept. of Pathology and Microbiology and Molecular Biology

    1999-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) may be considered 'magic bullets' due to their ability to recognize and eradicate malignant cells. MAbs, however, have practical limitations for their rapid application in the clinics. The structure of the antibody molecules can be engineered to modify functional domains such as antigen-binding sites and/or effectors functions. Advanced in genetic engineering have provided rapid progress the development of new immunoglobulin constructs of MAbs with defined research and therapeutic application. Recombinant antibody constructs are being engineered, such as human mouse chimeric, domain-dispositioned, domain-deleted, humanized and single-chain Fv fragments. Genetically-engineered antibodies differ in size and rate of catabolism. Pharmacokinetics studies show that the intact IgG (150 kD), enzymatically derived fragments Fab' (50 kD) and single chain Fv (28 kD) have different clearance rates. These antibody forms clear 50% from the blood pool in 2.1 days, 30 minutes and 10 minutes, respectively. Genetically-engineered antibodies make a new class of immunotherapeutic tracers for cancer treatment.

  4. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  5. Antibody response in Heterodontus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litman, G W; Erickson, B W; Lederman, L; Mäkelä, O

    1982-05-28

    Appropriately selected phylogenetic models are capable of providing insight into genetic mechanisms which may have become obscured during the passage of evolutionary time. In higher vertebrates a complex multigenic family encodes immunoglobulin-variable regions. The mechanisms involved in the expansion of the gene family and the stable maintenance of large numbers of individual genes presently are not understood. By defining the nature of antibody diversity in lower vertebrate species, it may be possible to approach such issues at a more fundamental level. Analyses of the immunoglobulins in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a representative phylogenetically primitive elasmobranch, indicate that this species may represent a useful developmental model.

  6. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  7. Spinal motoneuron synaptic plasticity after axotomy in the absence of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanon Renata G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Astrocytes play a major role in preserving and restoring structural and physiological integrity following injury to the nervous system. After peripheral axotomy, reactive gliosis propagates within adjacent spinal segments, influenced by the local synthesis of nitric oxide (NO. The present work investigated the importance of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS activity in acute and late glial responses after injury and in major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I expression and synaptic plasticity of inputs to lesioned alpha motoneurons. Methods In vivo analyses were carried out using C57BL/6J-iNOS knockout (iNOS-/- and C57BL/6J mice. Glial response after axotomy, glial MHC I expression, and the effects of axotomy on synaptic contacts were measured using immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. For this purpose, 2-month-old animals were sacrificed and fixed one or two weeks after unilateral sciatic nerve transection, and spinal cord sections were incubated with antibodies against classical MHC I, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein - an astroglial marker, Iba-1 (an ionized calcium binding adaptor protein and a microglial marker or synaptophysin (a presynaptic terminal marker. Western blotting analysis of MHC I and nNOS expression one week after lesion were also performed. The data were analyzed using a two-tailed Student's t test for parametric data or a two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test for nonparametric data. Results A statistical difference was shown with respect to astrogliosis between strains at the different time points studied. Also, MHC I expression by iNOS-/- microglial cells did not increase at one or two weeks after unilateral axotomy. There was a difference in synaptophysin expression reflecting synaptic elimination, in which iNOS-/- mice displayed a decreased number of the inputs to alpha motoneurons, in comparison to that of C57BL/6J. Conclusion The findings herein indicate that i

  8. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  9. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldenberg, D.M. (Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Newark, NJ (US))

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas.

  10. Antibodies to age-β2 glycoprotein I in patients with anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, M; Buttari, B; Capozzi, A; Profumo, E; Facchiano, F; Truglia, S; Recalchi, S; Alessandri, C; Conti, F; Misasi, R; Valesini, G; Riganò, R

    2016-05-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized clinically by arterial and/or venous thromboses, recurrent abortions or fetal loss and serologically by the presence of 'anti-phospholipid antibodies' (aPL). The main target antigen of the antibodies is β2 glycoprotein I (β2 GPI). Post-translational oxidative modifications of the protein have been widely described. In this study we aimed to analyse sera reactivity to glucose-modified β2 GPI (G-β2 GPI). Sera collected from 43 patients with APS [15 primary APS (PAPS) and 28 APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (SAPS)], 30 with SLE, 30 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 40 healthy subjects were analysed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a G-β2 GPI. Nine of 15 consecutive PAPS out-patients (60%) and 16 of 28 SAPS (57.1%) showed serum antibodies [immunoglobulin (Ig)G class] against G-β2 GPI (anti-G-β2 GPI) by ELISA. The occurrence of anti-G-β2 GPI was significantly higher in APS patients compared to patients suffering from SLE. No RA patients or control healthy subjects resulted positive for anti-G-β2 GPI. Of note, aG-β2 GPI prompted to identify some APS patients (four PAPS and seven SAPS), who were negative in the classical anti-β2 GPI test. Moreover, in APS patients, anti-G-β2 GPI titre was associated significantly with venous thrombosis and seizure in APS patients. This study demonstrates that G-β2 GPI is a target antigen of humoral immune response in patients with APS, suggesting that β2 GPI glycation products may contain additional epitopes for anti-β2 GPI reactivity. Searching for these antibodies may be useful for evaluating the risk of clinical manifestations.

  11. Antibody response to the lipopolysaccharide and protein antigens of Salmonella typhi during typhoid infection. I. Measurement of serum antibodies by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, R.S.W.; Chau, P.Y.; Lam, S.K. (Hong Kong Univ.); La Brooy, J.T.; Rowley, D. (Adelaide Univ. (Australia))

    1981-12-01

    Serum antibody responses to the lipopolysaccharide and protein antigens of S. typhi in typhoid patients were studied using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay technique with /sup 125/I labelled anti-immunoglobulin antibody. Sera from 24 adult typhoid patients and 20 non-typhoid adult controls were compared. As a group, sera from typhoid patients showed increased IgA, IgG and IgM immunoglobulin levels and gave significantly higher anti-LPS and anti-protein antibody titres in all three major immunoglobulin classes than did non-typhoid controls. Levels of antibodies against LPS or protein in sera of typhoid patients were highly variable with a skew distribution. A good correlation was found between antibody titres to the LPS antigen and those to a protein antigen. No correlation, however, was found between the anti-LPS antibody titres measured by radioimmunoassay and the anti-O antibody titres measured by the Widal agglutination test. Titration of anti-LPS or anti-protein antibodies by radioimmunoassay was found to be more sensitive and specific than Widal test for the serological diagnosis of typhoid fever. The advantages of measuring antibody response by radioimmunoassay over conventional Widal test are discussed.

  12. GABARAPL1 antibodies: target one protein, get one free!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grand, Jaclyn Nicole; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Seguin-Py, Stéphanie; Fraichard, Annick; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Jouvenot, Michèle; Risold, Pierre-Yves; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël

    2011-11-01

    Atg8 is a yeast protein involved in the autophagic process and in particular in the elongation of autophagosomes. In mammals, several orthologs have been identified and are classed into two subfamilies: the LC3 subfamily and the GABARAP subfamily, referred to simply as the LC3 or GABARAP families. GABARAPL1 (GABARAP-like protein 1), one of the proteins belonging to the GABARAP (GABA(A) receptor-associated protein) family, is highly expressed in the central nervous system and implicated in processes such as receptor and vesicle transport as well as autophagy. The proteins that make up the GABARAP family demonstrate conservation of their amino acid sequences and protein structures. In humans, GABARAPL1 shares 86% identity with GABARAP and 61% with GABARAPL2 (GATE-16). The identification of the individual proteins is thus very limited when working in vivo due to a lack of unique peptide sequences from which specific antibodies can be developed. Actually, and to our knowledge, there are no available antibodies on the market that are entirely specific to GABARAPL1 and the same may be true of the anti-GABARAP antibodies. In this study, we sought to examine the specificity of three antibodies targeted against different peptide sequences within GABARAPL1: CHEM-CENT (an antibody raised against a short peptide sequence within the center of the protein), PTG-NTER (an antibody raised against the N-terminus of the protein) and PTG-FL (an antibody raised against the full-length protein). The results described in this article demonstrate the importance of testing antibody specificity under the conditions for which it will be used experimentally, a caution that should be taken when studying the expression of the GABARAP family proteins.

  13. Human anti-mouse antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, G G

    2000-06-01

    Human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) are human immunoglobulins with specificity for mouse immunoglobulins. This topic currently is of interest because of the increased use of monoclonal mouse antibodies as diagnostic reagents both for in vitro laboratory measurements and for in vivo imaging studies. Monoclonal mouse antibodies also are being used therapeutically. This short article reviews the production of HAMA in patients receiving monoclonal antibodies and illustrates the potential ways that HAMA can interfere with immunoassay measurements. Methods for measuring and neutralizing HAMA also are discussed.

  14. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN DE NOVO DONOR SPECIFIC HLA ANTIBODY, C4D STAINING IN RENAL GRAFT BIOPSY AND GRAFT OUTCOME: A SINGLE CENTER EXPERIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciarelli, James; Cho, Yong W; Koss, Michael; Helstab-Houston, Kathryn; Mendez, Robert; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Hutchinson, Ian V; Shah, Tariq

    2009-01-01

    In 69 renal transplant recipients (RTR), all had a functioning graft (SCr HLA antibodies and 41 (59%) had DSA. The proportion of C4d positivity was significantly higher in patients with DSA (HLA Class I only, II only, and I & II) in comparison to patients without post-transplant HLA antibodies. The incidence of graft failure (including current SCr > 4.0) in RTR with HLA Class II antibodies (Class II only or I & II) was significantly higher than in RTR without post-transplant HLA antibodies (P=0.03).Even after amelioration of rejection, the RTR with Class II DSA group continued to fail beyond 2 years after transplantation when compared with the other 2 groups (None/NDSA or HLA Class I only), however, the difference in graft survival between HLA Class II and None/NDSA groups did not reach statistical significance (log-rank P=0.32). Significant association between C4d staining, post-transplant HLA Class II antibodies and graft failure strongly suggests the importance of post-transplant HLA antibodies. HLA Class II DSAs may be an indicator of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) proceeding to graft loss. We propose that amelioration of CAN graft loss may be affected by monitoring and identification of DSA with appropriate immunosuppression of these antibodies.

  15. MHC class I signaling in T cells leads to tyrosine kinase activity and PLC-gamma 1 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Odum, Niels; Claesson, M H

    1995-01-01

    phosphorylation and the subsequent calcium response. The early tyrosine kinase activity was found to be dependent on expression of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD45 molecule on the surface of the T cells. Furthermore, MHC-I cross-linking was shown to tyrosine phosphorylate PLC-gamma 1 (phospholipase C-gamma 1...

  16. Prevalence of antibodies to canine parvovirus and distemper virus in wolves in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brynn; Hebblewhite, Mark; Ezenwa, Vanessa; Shury, Todd; Merrill, Evelyn H; Paquet, Paul C; Schmiegelow, Fiona; Seip, Dale; Skinner, Geoff; Webb, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Wild carnivores are often exposed to diseases via contact with peridomestic host species that travel through the wildland-urban interfaces. To determine the antibody prevalences and relationships to human activity for two common canid pathogens, we sampled 99 wolves (Canis lupus) from 2000 to 2008 for antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) in Banff and Jasper National Parks and surrounding areas of the Canadian Rockies. This population was the source for wolves reintroduced into the Northern Rockies of the US. Of 99 wolves sampled, 94 had detectable antibody to CPV (95%), 24 were antibody-positive for CDV (24%), and 24 had antibodies to both pathogens (24%). We tested whether antibody prevalences for CPV and CDV were higher closer to human activity (roads, town sites, First Nation reserves) and as a function of sex and age class. Wolves ≥2 yr old were more likely to be have antibodies to CPV. For CDV, male wolves, wolves ≥2 yr, and those closer to First Nation reserves were more likely to have antibodies. Overall, however, we found minimal support for human influence on antibody prevalence for CDV and CPV. The similarity between our antibody prevalence results and results from recent studies in Yellowstone National Park suggests that at least in the case of CDV, and perhaps CPV, these could be important pathogens with potential effects on wolf populations.

  17. Class network routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  18. Culture and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuri

    2017-08-08

    A large body of research in Western cultures has demonstrated the psychological and health effects of social class. This review outlines a cultural psychological approach to social stratification by comparing psychological and health manifestations of social class across Western and East Asian cultures. These comparisons suggest that cultural meaning systems shape how people make meaning and respond to material/structural conditions associated with social class, thereby leading to culturally divergent manifestations of social class. Specifically, unlike their counterparts in Western cultures, individuals of high social class in East Asian cultures tend to show high conformity and other-orientated psychological attributes. In addition, cultures differ in how social class impacts health (i.e. on which bases, through which pathways, and to what extent). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibodies against antibodies: immunogenicity of adalimumab as a model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schouwenburg, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Upon repeated adalimumab exposure part of the patients start to produce ADA. The antibody response is polyclonal and consists mainly of antibodies of IgG1 and IgG4 isotype. In the majority of ADA positive patients ADA are already produced within the first 28 weeks of treatment and in part of the pat

  20. Fostering a Middle Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO BIN

    2011-01-01

    Though there is no official definition of "middle class" in China,the tag has become one few Chinese people believe they deserve anyway.In early August,the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences released a report on China's urban development,saying China had a middle-class population of 230 million in 2009,or 37 percent of its urban residents.It also forecast half of city dwellers in China would be part of the middle class by 2023.

  1. Tailor-Made Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreirer, Barbara A.

    1978-01-01

    Adapted teaching materials and procedures were developed at Florida State University to help visually handicapped students in the public schools participate in a mainstreamed home economics class. (MF)

  2. Language, Culture, Class, Gender, and Class Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrick, Stephanie

    This paper explores reasons why some students with English as a Second Language (ESL) feel less entitled to speak out in class than others, discussing ways in which teachers can widen the definition of participation. The first section explains how student background can affect participation. For students who are non-native English speakers and who…

  3. An association between ABO group and HLA antibody detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Nancy M; Yazer, Mark H; Bravo, Marjorie D; Kamel, Hany T; Gorlin, Jed; Norris, Philip J; Williamson, Phillip C; Vassallo, Ralph R

    2017-02-01

    US blood centers can screen female plateletpheresis donors with a history of one or more pregnancies for both Class I and Class II anti-HLA antibodies using one of two platforms. One is a flow-based assay that yields a quantitative result and the other an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that yields either a positive or a negative result (above or below cutoff). The results of HLA antibody screening tests were analyzed by donor ABO group. Results from large and small American blood collection centers using both platforms were analyzed. Positivity rates were compared by chi-square test and the results stratified by parity using the Mann-Whitney test. No differences in parity were noted among donors of different ABO groups, but a significantly higher rate of HLA antibody positivity was observed among group O donors for the ELISA (31% of group O donors vs. 21% of non-group O donors, p testing are unknown, this could result from test system characteristics or differences in group O donor antibody strength or specificity. © 2016 AABB.

  4. New engineered antibodies against prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  5. Pathogenic role of antiphospholipid antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, J. E.; de Groot, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is characterized by recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy in association with antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The pathogenic mechanisms in APS that lead to in vivo injury are incompletely understood. Recent evidence suggests that AP

  6. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  7. Antibodies and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Ramasamy, M; Yasawardena, S

    There is considerable interest in using merozoite proteins in a vaccine against falciparum malaria. Observations that antibodies to merozoite surface proteins block invasion are a basis for optimism. This article draws attention to important and varied aspects of how antibodies to Plasmodium

  8. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA a

  9. Characterization of Notch1 antibodies that inhibit signaling of both normal and mutated Notch1 receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Aste-Amézaga

    Full Text Available Notch receptors normally play a key role in guiding a variety of cell fate decisions during development and differentiation of metazoan organisms. On the other hand, dysregulation of Notch1 signaling is associated with many different types of cancer as well as tumor angiogenesis, making Notch1 a potential therapeutic target.Here we report the in vitro activities of inhibitory Notch1 monoclonal antibodies derived from cell-based and solid-phase screening of a phage display library. Two classes of antibodies were found, one directed against the EGF-repeat region that encompasses the ligand-binding domain (LBD, and the second directed against the activation switch of the receptor, the Notch negative regulatory region (NRR. The antibodies are selective for Notch1, inhibiting Jag2-dependent signaling by Notch1 but not by Notch 2 and 3 in reporter gene assays, with EC(50 values as low as 5+/-3 nM and 0.13+/-0.09 nM for the LBD and NRR antibodies, respectively, and fail to recognize Notch4. While more potent, NRR antibodies are incomplete antagonists of Notch1 signaling. The antagonistic activity of LBD, but not NRR, antibodies is strongly dependent on the activating ligand. Both LBD and NRR antibodies bind to Notch1 on human tumor cell lines and inhibit the expression of sentinel Notch target genes, including HES1, HES5, and DTX1. NRR antibodies also strongly inhibit ligand-independent signaling in heterologous cells transiently expressing Notch1 receptors with diverse NRR "class I" point mutations, the most common type of mutation found in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL. In contrast, NRR antibodies failed to antagonize Notch1 receptors bearing rare "class II" or "class III" mutations, in which amino acid insertions generate a duplicated or constitutively sensitive metalloprotease cleavage site. Signaling in T-ALL cell lines bearing class I mutations is partially refractory to inhibitory antibodies as compared to cell

  10. Detection of anti-HLA antibodies with flow cytometry in needle core biopsies of renal transplants recipients with chronic allograft nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laurent; Guignier, Fredy; Bocrie, Olivier; D'Athis, Philippe; Rageot, David; Rifle, Gérard; Justrabo, Eve; Mousson, Christiane

    2005-05-27

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from needle core biopsies of renal transplants with chronic allograft nephropathy. Two methods of screening, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry (FlowPRA) were compared. Twenty renal transplants with CAN were removed after irreversible graft failure. To assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in small samples, needle core biopsies were sampled at the same place as surgical samples and at a second cortical area. Antibodies were eluted with an acid elution kit and anti-class I and class II IgG HLA antibodies detected using ELISA and flow cytometry. Flow cytometry was found to be more sensitive than ELISA for detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from renal transplants with CAN (95% vs. 75% of positive cases). Detection of anti-HLA antibodies showed good agreement between surgical samples and needle core biopsies performed at the same place for anti-class I (80% vs. 65%, r=0.724 PHLA antibodies (70% vs. 55%, r=0.827 PHLA antibodies in needle core biopsies sampled at different sites suggests that immunization to class I donor antigen could be underestimated in needle core biopsy samples. These data indicate that anti-HLA antibodies can be detected in needle core biopsies from renal transplants. Provided further evaluation is done, elution might be a complementary method to detect anti-HLA antibodies when they are bound to the transplant.

  11. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed.

  12. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive...... and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...

  13. The Question of Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    For too long, educators' approach to understanding the relationships between poverty, class and education has been framed by studying the behaviors and cultures of poor students and their families. If only people--in the middle and upper-middle classes--can understand "their" culture, why "those people" do not value education, why "those parents"…

  14. The Conversation Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Acy L.

    2012-01-01

    The conversation class occupies a unique place in the process of learning English as a second or foreign language. From the author's own experience in conducting special conversation classes with Persian-speaking adults, he has drawn up a number of simple but important guidelines, some of which he hopes may provide helpful suggestions for the…

  15. Class II Microcins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, Gaëlle; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Peduzzi, Jean

    Class II microcins are 4.9- to 8.9-kDa polypeptides produced by and active against enterobacteria. They are classified into two subfamilies according to their structure and their gene cluster arrangement. While class IIa microcins undergo no posttranslational modification, class IIb microcins show a conserved C-terminal sequence that carries a salmochelin-like siderophore motif as a posttranslational modification. Aside from this C-terminal end, which is the signature of class IIb microcins, some sequence similarities can be observed within and between class II subclasses, suggesting the existence of common ancestors. Their mechanisms of action are still under investigation, but several class II microcins use inner membrane proteins as cellular targets, and some of them are membrane-active. Like group B colicins, many, if not all, class II microcins are TonB- and energy-dependent and use catecholate siderophore receptors for recognition/­translocation across the outer membrane. In that context, class IIb microcins are considered to have developed molecular mimicry to increase their affinity for their outer membrane receptors through their salmochelin-like posttranslational modification.

  16. Class in disguise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Stine Thidemann; Prieur, Annick

    This paper asks how class can have importance in one of the worlds’ most equal societies: Denmark. The answer is that class here appears in disguised forms. The field under study is a city, Aalborg, in the midst of transition from a stronghold of industrialism to a post industrial economy...

  17. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  18. DEFINING THE MIDDLE CLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Classifying the middle class remains controversial despite its alleged growth China’s cities housed more than 230 million middle-class residents in 2009 or 37 percent of the urban population,according to the 2011 Blue Book of Cities in China released on August 3.

  19. DEFINING THE MIDDLE CLASS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HAIRONG

    2011-01-01

    China's cities housed more than 230 million middle-class residents in 2009ot 37 percent of the urban population,according to the 2011 Blue Book of Cities in China released on August 3.In China's main urban centers,Beijing and Shanghai,the middle class accounted for 46 percent and 38 percent,respectively,of the local population.

  20. Universality classes of inflation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We investigate all single-field, slow-roll inflationary models whose slow-roll parameters scale as 1/N in the limit of a large number of e-folds N. We proof that all such models belong to two universality classes, characterised by a single parameter. One class contains small field models like hillto

  1. Teaching Social Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablante, Courtney B.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Discussing socioeconomic status in college classes can be challenging. Both teachers and students feel uncomfortable, yet social class matters more than ever. This is especially true, given increased income inequality in the United States and indications that higher education does not reduce this inequality as much as many people hope. Resources…

  2. Generalized Fourier transforms classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend; Møller, Steen

    2002-01-01

    The Fourier class of integral transforms with kernels $B(\\omega r)$ has by definition inverse transforms with kernel $B(-\\omega r)$. The space of such transforms is explicitly constructed. A slightly more general class of generalized Fourier transforms are introduced. From the general theory...

  3. DARPins: a true alternative to antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpp, Michael T; Amstutz, Patrick

    2007-03-01

    Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) are a promising class of non-immunoglobulin proteins that can offer advantages over antibodies for target binding in drug discovery and drug development. DARPins have been successfully used, for example, for the inhibition of kinases, proteases and drug-exporting membrane proteins. DARPins specifically targeting the cancer marker HER2 have also been generated and were shown to function in both in vitro diagnostics and in vivo tumor targeting. DARPins are ideally suited for in vivo imaging or delivery of toxins or other therapeutic payloads because of their favorable molecular properties, including small size and high stability. The low-cost production in bacteria and the rapid generation of many target-specific DARPins make the DARPin approach useful for drug discovery. Additionally, DARPins can be easily generated in multispecific formats, offering the potential to target an effector DARPin to a specific organ or to target multiple receptors with one molecule composed of several DARPins.

  4. Mass spectrometry for structural characterization of therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongqi; Pan, Hai; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies, also known as immunoglobulins, have emerged as one of the most promising classes of therapeutics in the biopharmaceutical industry. The need for complete characterization of the quality attributes of these molecules requires sophisticated techniques. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an essential analytical tool for the structural characterization of therapeutic antibodies, due to its superior resolution over other analytical techniques. It has been widely used in virtually all phases of antibody development. Structural features determined by MS include amino acid sequence, disulfide linkages, carbohydrate structure and profile, and many different post-translational, in-process, and in-storage modifications. In this review, we will discuss various MS-based techniques for the structural characterization of monoclonal antibodies. These techniques are categorized as mass determination of intact antibodies, and as middle-up, bottom-up, top-down, and middle-down structural characterizations. Each of these techniques has its advantages and disadvantages in terms of structural resolution, sequence coverage, sample consumption, and effort required for analyses. The role of MS in glycan structural characterization and profiling will also be discussed.

  5. Antibodies to Phospholipids and Liposomes: Binding of Antibodies to Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    LIPOSOMES: BINDING OF ANTIBODIES TO CELLS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) W.E. FOGLER , G. M. SWARTZ, AND C.R. ALVING 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...Elsevier BBA 73693 Antibodies to phospholipids and liposomes: binding of antibodies to cells William E. Fogler *, Glenn M. Swartz, Jr. and Carl R. Alving...Immunol. 21. Research Associateship from the U.S. National 12863-86812Hall. T. and Esser, K. (1984) 3. Immunol. 132. 2059-2063 Research Council. 13 Fogler

  6. Simultaneous expression of displayed and secreted antibodies for antibody screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanping Zhou

    Full Text Available The display of full-length antibody on the cell surface was achieved by fusing a transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR to the C-terminus of the heavy chain constant region. We also incorporated a furin cleavage site between the constant region and PDGFR transmembrane domain to obtain secreted antibodies. As a result, antibodies can be expressed simultaneously on the cell surface in a membrane-anchored version for screening and selecting through fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis, as well as in conditioned medium in a secreted version for function analysis.

  7. Antibodies in falciparum malaria: what matters most, quantity or quality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasnaa Bouharoun-Tayoun

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the recent demonstration that antibodies that are protective agains Plasmodium falciparum malaria may act in collaboration with blood monocytes, we have investigated the isotype content of sera from individuals with defined clinical states of resistance or susceptibility to malaria. Profound differences in the distribution of each Ig subclass and particulary in the ratio of cytophilic versus noncytophilic antibodies were found. In protected subjects, two cytophilic isotypes, IgG1 and IgG3 were found to predominate. In non-protected subjects, i.e. children and primary attack adults, three different situations were encountered: a an imbalance in which IgG2, a non-cytophilic class, predominated (mostly seen in primary attacks; b imbalance in which mostly IgM antibodies predominated (a frequent event in children or c less frequently, an overall low level of antimalarial antibodies. Of 33 non immune subjects studied all, except one, had one of the above defects. The function of total Ig presenting such an isotype imbalance was studied in vitro in Antibody-Dependent -Cellular-Inhibition assays. Not only did IgG from protected subjects cooperate efficiently with blood monocytes, whilst IgG from non-protected groups did not, but moreover the latter inhibit the in vitro effect of the former: in competition assays whole IgG from primary attack cases with increased IgG2 content, competed with IgG from immune adults, thus suggesting that non-protected subjects had antibodies to epitopes critical for protection, but that these antibodies are non functional.

  8. Properties of a general PK/PD model of antibody-ligand interactions for therapeutic antibodies that bind to soluble endogenous targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davda, Jasmine P; Hansen, Ryan J

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies that target endogenous soluble ligands are an important class of biotherapeutic agents. While much focus has been placed on characterization of antibody pharmacokinetics, less emphasis has been given to characterization of antibody effects on their soluble targets. We describe here the properties of a generalized mechanism-based PK/PD model used to characterize the in vivo interaction of an antibody and an endogenous soluble ligand. The assumptions and properties of the model are explored, and situations are described when deviations from the basic assumptions may be necessary. This model is most useful for in vivo situations where both antibody and ligand levels are available following drug administration. For a given antibody exposure, the extent and duration of suppression of free ligand is impacted by the apparent affinity of the interaction, as well as by the rate of ligand turnover. The applicability of the general equilibrium model of in vivo antibody-ligand interaction is demonstrated with an anti-Aß antibody.

  9. Antibodies with thiol-S-transferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, E.; Oei, Yoko; Sweet, E.; Uno, Tetsuo; Schultz, P.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-06-12

    A major detoxification pathway used by aerobic organisms involves the conjugation of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) to the electrophilic center of toxic substances. This reaction is catalyzed by a class of enzymes referred to as the glutathione S-transferases (GST) (EC 2.5.1.18). These enzymes activate the cysteine thiol group of GSH for nucleophilic addition to a variety of substrates, including aryl halides, {alpha}{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones, and epoxides. Despite the availability of X-ray crystal structures, the mechanism whereby glutathione transferases catalyze these addition reactions remains unclear. In order to gain a greater understanding of this important biological transformation, as well as to generate new detoxification catalysts, we have asked whether antibodies can be generated that catalyze similar nucleophilic addition reactions. Our initial efforts focused on the addition reaction of thiol nucleophiles to the nitro-substituted styrene derivative 1. The ratio of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} reported for the reaction of the isozyme 4-4` of rat liver GST with the good substance, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, is approximately 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} compared to a calculated pseudo-first-order rate constant for the uncatalyzed reaction of approximately 3 x 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} (60 mM GSH, pH = 80). These comparisons suggest that with further improvements in hapten design, catalytic antibodies may prove a good source of detoxification catalysts. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Affinity enhancement of antibodies: how low-affinity antibodies produced early in immune responses are followed by high-affinity antibodies later and in memory B-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Herman N

    2014-05-01

    The antibodies produced initially in response to most antigens are high molecular weight (MW) immunoglobulins (IgM) with low affinity for the antigen, while the antibodies produced later are lower MW classes (e.g., IgG and IgA) with, on average, orders of magnitude higher affinity for that antigen. These changes, often termed affinity maturation, take place largely in small B-cell clusters (germinal center; GC) in lymphoid tissues in which proliferating antigen-stimulated B cells express the highly mutagenic cytidine deaminase that mediates immunoglobulin class-switching and sequence diversification of the immunoglobulin variable domains of antigen-binding receptors on B cells (BCR). Of the large library of BCR-mutated B cells thus rapidly generated, a small minority with affinity-enhancing mutations are selected to survive and differentiate into long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. BCRs are also endocytic receptors; they internalize and cleave BCR-bound antigen, yielding peptide-MHC complexes that are recognized by follicular helper T cells. Imperfect correlation between BCR affinity for antigen and cognate T-cell engagement may account for the increasing affinity heterogeneity that accompanies the increasing average affinity of antibodies. Conservation of mechanisms underlying mutation and selection of high-affinity antibodies over the ≈200 million years of evolution separating bird and mammal lineages points to the crucial role of antibody affinity enhancement in adaptive immunity.

  11. Immunogenicity assessment of monoclonal antibody products: A simulated case study correlating antibody induction with clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Ivana; Kang, Hye-Na; Thorpe, Robin

    2015-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are large molecules with complex structure and functions. They have a wide application for treatment of a broad range of chronic diseases and represent the largest class of biotherapeutic products. Given that biotherapeutic products may induce unwanted humoral and/or cellular immune responses in recipients, it is essential to investigate the immunogenicity of a product prior to licensure. The immune response is influenced by many factors and data generated in the pre-licensure studies are usually somewhat difficult for regulatory review. The knowledge and expertise required for this requires a thorough understanding of animal and human immunology as well as specific product characteristics, including mechanism of action, antibody assays and assessment of results in a given clinical context. The appropriate interpretation of immunogenicity data is of critical importance for defining the safety profile of a monoclonal antibody. Two case studies described in this paper were prepared to mimic a real situation in which regulators need to evaluate immunogenicity studies conducted by manufacturers of monoclonal antibody products. The specific objective of the case studies was to illustrate assessment of unwanted immunogenicity and the important factors that need to be considered in this context. Regulators and manufacturers who attended the World Health Organization (WHO) implementation workshop on Evaluation of Biotherapeutic Products, held in Seoul, Republic of Korea, in May 2014, participated in the case studies and provided valuable input. This article outlines the main aspects of immunogenicity discussed in these case studies and a summary of the lessons learned at this occasion. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Exceptional hyperthyroidism and a role for both major histocompatibility class I and class II genes in a murine model of Graves' disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M McLachlan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease, can be induced by immunizing susceptible strains of mice with adenovirus encoding the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR or its A-subunit. Studies in two small families of recombinant inbred strains showed that susceptibility to developing TSHR antibodies (measured by TSH binding inhibition, TBI was linked to the MHC region whereas genes on different chromosomes contributed to hyperthyroidism. We have now investigated TSHR antibody production and hyperthyroidism induced by TSHR A-subunit adenovirus immunization of a larger family of strains (26 of the AXB and BXA strains. Analysis of the combined AXB and BXA families provided unexpected insight into several aspects of Graves' disease. First, extreme thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism in one remarkable strain, BXA13, reflected an inability to generate non-functional TSHR antibodies measured by ELISA. Although neutral TSHR antibodies have been detected in Graves' sera, pathogenic, functional TSHR antibodies in Graves' patients are undetectable by ELISA. Therefore, this strain immunized with A-subunit-adenovirus that generates only functional TSHR antibodies may provide an improved model for studies of induced Graves' disease. Second, our combined analysis of linkage data from this and previous work strengthens the evidence that gene variants in the immunoglobulin heavy chain V region contribute to generating thyroid stimulating antibodies. Third, a broad region that encompasses the MHC region on mouse chromosome 17 is linked to the development of TSHR antibodies (measured by TBI. Most importantly, unlike other strains, TBI linkage in the AXB and BXA families to MHC class I and class II genes provides an explanation for the unresolved class I/class II difference in humans.

  13. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  14. Semantic Analysis of Virtual Classes and Nested Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Virtual classes and nested classes are distinguishing features of BETA. Nested classes originated from Simula, but until recently they have not been part of main stream object- oriented languages. C++ has a restricted form of nested classes and they were included in Java 1.1. Virtual classes...... the central elements of the semantic analysis used in the Mjølner BETA compiler....

  15. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  16. Properties of MHC class I presented peptides that enhance immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg J A Calis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available T-cells have to recognize peptides presented on MHC molecules to be activated and elicit their effector functions. Several studies demonstrate that some peptides are more immunogenic than others and therefore more likely to be T-cell epitopes. We set out to determine which properties cause such differences in immunogenicity. To this end, we collected and analyzed a large set of data describing the immunogenicity of peptides presented on various MHC-I molecules. Two main conclusions could be drawn from this analysis: First, in line with previous observations, we showed that positions P4-6 of a presented peptide are more important for immunogenicity. Second, some amino acids, especially those with large and aromatic side chains, are associated with immunogenicity. This information was combined into a simple model that was used to demonstrate that immunogenicity is, to a certain extent, predictable. This model (made available at http://tools.iedb.org/immunogenicity/ was validated with data from two independent epitope discovery studies. Interestingly, with this model we could show that T-cells are equipped to better recognize viral than human (self peptides. After the past successful elucidation of different steps in the MHC-I presentation pathway, the identification of variables that influence immunogenicity will be an important next step in the investigation of T-cell epitopes and our understanding of cellular immune responses.

  17. Antigen recognition by IgG4 antibodies in human trichinellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinelli E.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The antibody isotype response to Trichinella spiralis excretory/secretory (ES products of muscle larva was examined using sera from patients with confirmed trichinellosis. Using Western blots we identify components of the ES antigen that are recognized by IgM and IgG antibodies. A 45 kDa component was strongly recognized by different antibody classes and subclasses. We observed a 45 kDa-specific lgG4 response that was detected exclusively using sera of patients with trichinellosis and not of patients with echinococcosis, filariasis, cysticercosis, ascariasis, strongyloidiasis or toxocariasis. These results are relevant for the diagnosis of human trichinellosis.

  18. MHC class I ligation of human T cells activates the ZAP70 and p56lck tyrosine kinases, leads to an alternative phenotype of the TCR/CD3 zeta-chain, and induces apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    that the ZAP70 tyrosine kinase is tyrosine phosphorylated in Jurkat T cells and in purified peripheral T cells after MHC-I ligation. The tyrosine-phosphorylated ZAP70 kinase exhibits a particular phenotype with low affinities for proteins at 21, 40, 60, and 120 kDa, proteins normally co-precipitated with ZAP70...... after TCR/CD3 stimulation. The phosphorylation of ZAP70 after MHC-I ligation was dependent on TCR/CD3 surface expression. One of the natural substrates for ZAP70 is the zeta-chain dimer of the TCR/CD3 complex. MHC-I cross-linking induces a phosphorylated zeta-protein that migrates as a dimer at 42 k...... of the zeta-chain and the ZAP70 kinase following MHC-I ligation. Previous studies have demonstrated that lack or diminished activation of ZAP70 is involved in the induction of anergy or apoptosis in T cells. Likewise, MHC-I cross-linking of Jurkat T cells results in growth arrest and induction of apoptosis...

  19. IELP Class Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈了了

    2010-01-01

    @@ As an exchange student majoring in English, I am curious about how English is taught to international students here in America. Therefore, I observed an IELP (Intensive English Learning Program) class in Central Connecticut State University where I study.

  20. Teaching Heterogeneous Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millrood, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Discusses an approach to teaching heterogeneous English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classes. Draws on classroom research data to describe the features of a success-building lesson context. (Author/VWL)

  1. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Classes of Heart Failure Updated:Sep 28,2016 Doctors usually classify patients' ... Blood Pressure Tracker Find additional helpful resources here Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  2. MKT 438 Complete Class

    OpenAIRE

    admin

    2015-01-01

      To purchase this material click below link   http://www.assignmentcloud.com/MKT-438/MKT-438-Complete-Class-Guide   For more classes visit www.assignmentcloud.com   MKT 438 Week 1 Individual Assignment Defining Public Relation Paper MKT 438 Week 2 Team Assignment Public Relations Campaign Overview Paper MKT 438 Week 3 Individual Assignment Functions of Public Relation Paper MKT 438 Week 3 Team Assignment Public Relations Campaig...

  3. A class in astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airieau, S. A.

    1999-09-01

    The goal of this class is to provide basic astrobiology knowledge to upper division science students. The scope is broad and in-depth coverage is not possible in this introductory course. Instead, science students from various branches of academia can acquire a broad basis and understanding of the other fields: astronomy, biology, geology, biochemistry, planetary and space sciences. The class is highly modular and allows instructors to concentrate on or eliminate topics according to their priorities and preferences.

  4. Nordic Walking Classes

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  5. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  6. Clinical utility of quantitative multi-antibody Polycheck immunoassays in the diagnosis of coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Ewa; Grzywnowicz, Maciej; Oralewska, Beata; Cielecka-Kuszyk, Joanna; Trojanowska, Ilona; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2016-05-06

    To evaluate the clinical utility of multi-antibody strategies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease (CD), the new quantitative Polycheck immunoassays were analysed. Polycheck Celiac Panels (PCPs) are immunoenzyme screening assays for the quantitative measurement of coeliac-specific immunoglobulin class G (IgG) or class A (IgA) in serum. Lines of relevant antigens are coated together with five IgG or IgA standard lines used for the standard curve as positive control. PCP IgA consists of human recombinant human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) as targets to detect IgA antibodies. PCP IgG consists of tTG, DGP and IF (intrinsic factor) antigens to detect antibodies in IgG class. PCPs were performed on 50 CD patients, including 6 cases with selective IgA deficiency, and 50 non-coeliac controls. CD diagnosis was performed according to the ESPGHAN recommendations: The presence of specific anti-tTG-IgA or anti-DGP-IgG (in the case of IgA deficiency) antibodies, typical histopathological changes in duodenal mucosa described in Marsh-Oberhüber classification as at least grade 2. The diagnosis of the majority of the control subjects was functional gastrointestinal disorders. The PCP results were compared with reference EliA Celikey. The usage of PCPs led to the correct identification of all CD patients. In our study, PCPs showed 100% agreement with the histopathological results. PCP IgA test showed a 98% concordance and correlated positively (R = 0.651, P = 0.0014) with EliA Celikey test. The highest specificity and positive predictive value (both 100%) were observed for the detection of Polycheck anti-tTG-IgA antibodies. The highest sensitivity and negative predictive value (both 100%) were achieved by Polycheck anti-DGP-IgG antibody detection. The best performance (98% sensitivity and negative predictive value, 100% specificity and positive predictive value, diagnostic accuracy - AU ROC 99%) was observed for the strategy of using both PCP

  7. Antibodies to watch in 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, ar...

  8. Evolution of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baviskar, Rutuja R; Amonkar, Gayathri P; Chaudhary, Vinod A; Balasubramanian, Meenakshi; Mohite, Shailesh C; Puranik, Gururaj V

    2012-12-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a very important cause of cerebral infarction, myocardial infarction, and repeated pregnancy losses in women. We present an extremely rare case of a 44-year-old man with antiphospholipid syndrome who collapsed and died suddenly. At autopsy, he was found to have both cerebral and myocardial infarction. In all young patients with cerebral infarction, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, recurrent miscarriages, and unexplained low platelet count, one must consider the strong possibility of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

  9. Development of mass spectrometry based techniques for the identification and determination of compositional variability in recombinant polyclonal antibody products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Pia; Engström, Anders; Rasmussen, Lone K; Holmberg, Erland; Frandsen, Torben P

    2010-09-01

    Recombinant polyclonal antibodies are a new class of protein biologics, combining a defined number of target-specific antibodies, developed for therapeutic use across various indications. Development, manufacture, and release of recombinant polyclonal antibodies as well characterized biological products have required development of new chemistry, manufacturing, and control (CMC) technologies. Sym001 is a recombinant polyclonal antibody product containing 25 unique antibodies specific for the Rhesus D antigen. Sym001 drug substance is manufactured using a single batch technology, Sympress. Here, we describe the development of two novel mass spectrometry based methods that allows identification of individual antibodies in the Sym001 drug substance, through the determination of unique marker peptides or antibody light chains. The two methods provide an unambiguous identification of the 25 unique antibodies comprised in the Sym001 drug substance. Furthermore, the light chain liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method has been developed to allow the determination of the relative distribution of the 25 antibodies. The light chain LC-MS method has demonstrated linearity, specificity, precision, and accuracy, thus qualifying it for use in the quality control of recombinant polyclonal antibodies for human use. The development of such quantitative methods is central for the development and quality control of additional therapeutic recombinant polyclonal antibody products.

  10. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  11. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Strict major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule class-specific binding by co-receptors enforces MHC-restricted αβTCR recognition during T lineage subset commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-long eLi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of co-receptor dependent αβTCR recognition, considerable effort has been spent on elucidating the basis of CD4 and CD8 lineage commitment in the thymus. The latter is responsible for generating mature CD4 helper and CD8αβ cytotoxic T cell subsets. Although CD4+ and CD8+ T cell recognition of peptide antigens is known to be MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted, respectively, the mechanism of single positive (SP thymocyte lineage commitment from bipotential double positive (DP progenitors is not fully elucidated. Classical models to explain thymic CD4 versus CD8 fate determination have included a stochastic selection model or instructional models. The latter are based either on strength of signal or duration of signal impacting fate. More recently, differential co-receptor gene imprinting has been shown to be involved in expression of transcription factors impacting cytotoxic T cell development. Here, we address commitment from a structural perspective, focusing on the nature of co-receptor binding to MHC molecules. By surveying 58 MHC class II and 224 MHC class I crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, it becomes clear that CD4 cannot bind to MHC I molecules, nor can CD8αβ or CD8αα bind to MHC II molecules. Given that the co-receptor delivers Lck to phosphorylate exposed CD3 ITAMs within a peptide/MHC (pMHC-ligated TCR complex to initiate cell signaling, this strict co-receptor recognition fosters MHC class-restricted SP thymocyte lineage commitment at the DP stage even though both co-receptors are expressed on a single cell. In short, the binding preference of an αβTCR for a peptide complexed with an MHC molecule dictates which co-receptor subsequently binds, thereby supporting development of that subset lineage. How function within the lineage is linked further to biopotential fate determination is discussed.

  13. Alloantibodies to human platelet glycoprotein antigens (HPA) and HLA class 1 in a cross section of Nigerian antenatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah, Zaccheaus Awortu; Atiegoba, Anne Ifeanyi; Mgbere, Osaro

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to human platelet antigens (HPA) and human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class 1 antigens among Nigerian pregnant women has not been reported in our country. This study was therefore aimed at screening the obstetric population for evidence of alloimmunization due to human platelet and HLA class 1 antigens. One hundred and forty four (144) pregnant women attending the obstetric clinic of Military Hospital, Port Harcourt, participated in the study. Their sera were tested for antibodies to HPA and HLA class 1 antigens using GTI PakPlus solid phase ELISA Kit. The total prevalence rate of antibody production was 60.5% (87 out of 144). Among the positive samples, 60 had platelet glycoprotein specific antibodies (41.7%) and 27 had HLA class 1 antibodies (18.8%). In 39.6% of the pregnant women, both platelet specific antibodies and HLA class 1 antibodies appeared. The prevalence of platelet specific glycoprotein antibodies were obtained as follows: GP 11b/111a 12 (8.3%), GP 1a/11a 35 (20.8%), GP Ib/IX 18 (12.5%) and GP IV 9 (6.3%). The prevalence of each platelet antibody subgroup was obtained as follows: anti-HPA-1a,-3a,-4a (4.2%), anti-HPA-1b,-3b,-4a (4.2%), anti-HPA-30 5a and anti-GP Ib/IX (12.5% each), anti-HPA-5b (8.3%) and anti-GP IV (6.3%). A high prevalence rate of human platelet arid cytotoxic antibodies has been observed in our obstetric population. There is need to establish platelet serology laboratory for the proper antenatal and postnatal management of pregnant mothers in this region.

  14. Engagement of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules up-regulates intercellular adhesion of human B cells via a CD11/CD18-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcover, A; Juillard, V; Acuto, O

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the regulation of intercellular adhesion of human B cells. We found that molecules able to bind to MHC class II molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or staphylococcal enterotoxins, induced rapid and sustained homotypic adhesion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell lines as well as peripheral blood B lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibodies also stimulated intercellular adherence. Adhesion induced upon MHC engagement was faster and stronger than that triggered by phorbol esters. It needed active metabolism, but divalent cations were not required. Monoclonal antibodies directed against LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) or its ligand ICAM-1 (CD54) did not inhibit MHC class II-induced homotypic adhesion of various EBV-transformed B cell lines, nor of a variant of the B cell line Raji expressing very low LFA-1 surface levels. Moreover, EBV-transformed B cells from a severe lymphocyte adhesion deficiency patient, lacking surface CD11/CD18, also aggregated in response to anti-MHC class I or class II monoclonal antibodies. Together these data indicate that engagement of MHC molecules may transduce signals to B cells resulting in up-regulation of intercellular adhesion, via an LFA-1-independent mechanism. This may play a role in the stabilization of T cell/antigen-presenting cell conjugates at the moment of antigen recognition.

  15. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  16. Validating Antibodies to the Cannabinoid CB2 Receptor: Antibody Sensitivity Is Not Evidence of Antibody Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchalant, Yannick; Brownjohn, Philip W; Bonnet, Amandine; Kleffmann, Torsten; Ashton, John C

    2014-06-01

    Antibody-based methods for the detection and quantification of membrane integral proteins, in particular, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), have been plagued with issues of primary antibody specificity. In this report, we investigate one of the most commonly utilized commercial antibodies for the cannabinoid CB2 receptor, a GPCR, using immunoblotting in combination with mass spectrometry. In this way, we were able to develop powerful negative and novel positive controls. By doing this, we are able to demonstrate that it is possible for an antibody to be sensitive for a protein of interest-in this case CB2-but still cross-react with other proteins and therefore lack specificity. Specifically, we were able to use western blotting combined with mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify CB2 protein in over-expressing cell lines. This shows that a common practice of validating antibodies with positive controls only is insufficient to ensure antibody reliability. In addition, our work is the first to develop a label-free method of protein detection using mass spectrometry that, with further refinement, could provide unequivocal identification of CB2 receptor protein in native tissues.

  17. 15th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas. 14-16 April 2010, Tiara Park Atlantico Hotel, Porto, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlan, Beatrix

    2010-11-01

    Antibodies and antibody conjugates are currently one of the largest classes of new drug entities under development. These versatile molecules are being investigated for the treatment of many pathological conditions, such as cancer and infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Antibodies can exert biological effects as naked antibodies by themselves, or can be used as delivery agents conjugated with various drugs (e.g., immunoconjugates) and as tools of multistep targeting. Site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents has been the ultimate goal of the pharmaceutical industry, as it has the potential to maximize drug efficiency while minimizing side effects. Antibodies have much potential for this objective. Thus, it is useful to summarize some of the main strategies currently being employed for the development of these diverse therapeutic molecules and to highlight the recent novelties in the field. These goals were the focus of the 15th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas, held during 14-16 April 2010 in Porto, Portugal.

  18. [Antibody response following Campylobacter infections determined by ELISA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, Jørgen H; Strid, Mette Aagaard; Mølbak, Kåre; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2003-06-09

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was adapted to measure immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA classes of human serum antibody to Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. A total of 631 sera from 210 patients with verified Campylobacter enteritis were examined at various intervals after infection, and a control group of 164 sera were tested to determine the cut-off for negative results. With 90 percentile specificity, IgG, IgM, and IgA showed a sensitivity of 71, 60, and 80%, respectively. By combining all three antibody classes, the sensitivity was 92% within 35 days after infection, whereas within 90 days after infection, a combined sensitivity of 90% was found (IgG 68%, IgM 52%, and IgA 76%). Furthermore, we showed that 16% of the patients developed rheumatological symptoms after their Campylobacter gastrointestinal infection. We conclude that measurement of Campylobacter antibodies is a useful diagnostic tool to determine Campylobacter infections preceeding Guillain-Barré syndrome and for the investigation of post-enteritis reactive arthritis.

  19. Production and Purification of Polyclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami; Mukumoto, Mari; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies consist of a mixture of antibodies produced by multiple B-cell clones that have differentiated into antibody-producing plasma cells in response to an immunogen. Polyclonal antibodies raised against an antigen recognize multiple epitopes on a target molecule, which results in a signal amplification in indirect immunoassays including immune-electron microscopy. In this chapter, we present a basic procedure to generate polyclonal antibodies in rabbits.

  20. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  1. Frontier of therapeutic antibody discovery:The challenges and how to face them

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Jian; Lu; Su-Jun; Deng; Da-Gang; Huang; Yun; He; Ming; Lei; Li; Zhou; Pei; Jin

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have become an important class of modern medicines.The established technologies for therapeutic antibody discovery such as humanization of mouse antibodies,phage display of human antibody libraries and transgenic animals harboring human IgG genes have been practiced successfully so far,and many incremental improvements are being made constantly.These methodologies are responsible for currently marketed therapeutic antibodies and for the biopharma industry pipeline which are concentrated on only a few dozen targets.A key challenge for wider application of biotherapeutic approaches is the paucity of truly validated targets for biotherapeutic intervention.The efforts to expand the target space include taking the pathway approach to study the disease correlation.Since many new targets are multi-spanning and multimeric membrane proteins there is a need to develop more effective methods to generate antibodies against these difficult targets.The pharmaceutical properties of therapeutic antibodies are an active area for study concentrating on biophysical characteristics such as thermal stability and aggregation propensity.The immunogenicity of biotherapeutics in humans is a very complex issue and there are no truly predictive animal models to rely on.The in silico and T-cell response approaches identify the potential for immunogenicity;however,one needs contingency plans for emergence of antiproduct antibody response for clinical trials.

  2. The Efficacy of an anti-CD4 Monoclonal Antibody for HIV-1 Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Anderson, Brooke; Follansbee, Stephen E.; Winters, Mark A.; Lewis, Stanley; Weinheimer, Steven; Christos J Petropoulos; Shafer, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    The availability of 24 antiretroviral (ARV) drugs within six distinct drug classes has transformed HIV-1 infection (AIDS) into a treatable chronic disease. However, the ability of HIV-1 to develop resistance to multiple classes continues to present challenges to the treatment of many ARV treatment-experienced patients. In this case report, we describe the response to ibalizumab, an investigational CD4-binding monoclonal antibody (mAb), in a patient with advanced immunodeficiency and high-leve...

  3. Natural and Immune Human Antibodies Reactive with Antigens of Virulent Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Immunoglobulins G, M, and A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Irun R.

    1967-01-01

    Natural and immune human antibodies reactive with heat-labile and heat-stable antigens of virulent Neisseria gonorrhoeae were studied by use of an indirect fluorescent-antibody (IFA) procedure. The immunoglobulin class of the reactive antibodies was identified by using fluorescein-conjugated antisera specific for human IgG, IgA, or IgM in the IFA procedure. The effects of heat and mercaptoethanol on IFA reactivities were also studied. It appeared that antibodies of the IgG, IgM, and IgA classes present in the sera of both infected persons (immune antibodies) and normal persons with no history of gonococcal infection (natural antibodies) react with heat-stable somatic antigens. Immune IgG antibodies, however, were distinguishable from natural IgG antibodies by their ability to recognize heat-labile surface antigens. The distinction between natural and immune IgM antibodies was less obvious. IgM antibodies from both infected and normal persons appeared to react with heat-labile antigens. Some, but not all, infected persons had immune IgA antibodies to heat-labile as well as to heat-stable antigens. Treatment of sera with mercaptoethanol had no effect on IgG antibodies. The IFA activity of IgM antibodies was decreased, but not abolished. The effects of mercaptoethanol on IgA antibodies were variable. Some sera showed a decrease in IgA titer, and others showed an increase in IgA activity to certain antigens. Immune IgG antibodies were more resistant to heating than were natural IgG antibodies. Natural and immune IgM antibodies appeared equally sensitive to heating. IgA activity, on the other hand, was increased by heating sera at 60 C, but was decreased at higher temperatures. Thus, it appears that natural and immune human IgG antibodies to N. gonorrhoeae may be distinguished by their interactions with heat-labile antigens and by their resistance to heating. Images PMID:4961630

  4. T cell activation. II. Activation of human T lymphoma cells by cross-linking of their MHC class I antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, S; Geisler, C; Rubin, B;

    1990-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that antibody-induced cross-linking of MHC class I antigens on Jurkat T lymphoma cells leads to a rise in intracellular calcium (Cai2+) and, in the presence of phorbol ester (PMA), to IL-2 production and IL-2 receptor expression. The rise in Cai2+ exhibited a profile...... very different from that obtained after anti-CD3 antibody-induced activation suggesting that activation signals are transduced differently after binding of anti-CD3 antibody and class I cross-linking, respectively. However, when Cai2+ was examined in individual Jurkat cells by means of a digital image...

  5. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010: November 29-December 1, 2010, Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alain; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC. As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration FDA. The global trends in antibody research and development were discussed, including success stories of recent marketing authorizations of golimumab (Simponi®) and canakinumab (Ilaris®) by Johnson & Johnson and Novartis, respectively, updates on antibodies in late clinical development (obinutuzumab/GA101, farletuzumab/MORAb-003 and itolizumab/T1 h, by Glycart/Roche, Morphotek and Biocon, respectively) and success rates for this fast-expanding class of therapeutics (Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development). Case studies covering clinical progress of girentuximab (Wilex), evaluation of panobacumab (Kenta Biotech), characterization of therapeutic antibody candidates by protein microarrays (Protagen), antibody-drug conjugates (sanofi-aventis, ImmunoGen, Seattle Genetics, Wyeth/Pfizer), radio-immunoconjugates (Bayer Schering Pharma, Université de Nantes) and new scaffolds (Ablynx, AdAlta, Domantis/GlaxoSmithKline, Fresenius, Molecular Partners, Pieris, Scil Proteins, Pfizer, University of Zurich) were presented. Major antibody structural improvements were showcased, including the latest selection engineering of the best isotypes (Abbott, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre), hinge domain (Pierre Fabre), dual antibodies (Abbott), IgG-like bispecific antibodies (Biogen Idec), antibody epitope mapping case studies (Eli Lilly), insights in FcγRII receptor (University of Cambridge), as well as novel tools for antibody fragmentation (Genovis). Improvements of

  6. Talking Class in Tehroon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, Rasmus Christian; Rezakhani, Khodadad

    2016-01-01

    Persian, like any other language, is laced with references to class, both blatant and subtle. With idioms and metaphors, Iranians can identify and situate others, and thus themselves, within hierarchies of social status and privilege, both real and imagined. Some class-related terms can be traced...... back to medieval times, whereas others are of modern vintage, the linguistic legacy of television shows, pop songs, social media memes or street vernacular. Every day, it seems, an infectious set of phrases appears that make yesterday’s seem embarrassingly antiquated....

  7. NR 512 Entire Class

    OpenAIRE

    Laynebaril1

    2017-01-01

     NR 512 Entire Class   Click Link Below To Buy:   http://hwcampus.com/shop/nr-512-entire-class/ Or Visit www.hwcampus.com   NR512 Week 1 Discussion Latest 2017 Integration of Nursing Informatics Skills and Competencies (graded) • Reflect on your own practice. Discuss how informatics is used in your practice. What is your primary area where you would use informatics? NR512 Week 2 Discussion Latest 2017 Wisdom Versus Judgment (graded) How does the conc...

  8. Class Actions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the relatively new Danish Act on Class Action (Danish: gruppesøgsmål) which was suggested by The Permanent Council on Civil procedure (Retsplejerådet) of which the article's author is a member. The operability of the new provisions is illustrated through some wellknown Dani...... cases: Hafnia case (investment prospectus), and Danish Eternit (roof elements) where the existence of Danish provisions on class actions might have made a difference, and the article also deals with the delicate questions of opt-in and opt-out....

  9. Resonance classes of measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Torres De Squire

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend F. Holland's definition of the space of resonant classes of functions, on the real line, to the space R(Φpq (1≦p, q≦∞ of resonant classes of measures, on locally compact abelian groups. We characterize this space in terms of transformable measures and establish a realatlonship between R(Φpq and the set of positive definite functions for amalgam spaces. As a consequence we answer the conjecture posed by L. Argabright and J. Gil de Lamadrid in their work on Fourier analysis of unbounded measures.

  10. MIDDLE CLASS MOVEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. K. Sravana Kumar

    2016-01-01

                The middle class is placed between labour and capital. It neither directly awns the means of production that pumps out the surplus generated by wage labour power, nor does it, by its own labour, produce the surplus which has use and exchange value. Broadly speaking, this class consists of the petty bourgeoisie and the white-collar workers. The former are either self-employed or involved in the distribution of commodities and t...

  11. MIDDLE CLASS MOVEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. K. Sravana Kumar

    2016-01-01

                The middle class is placed between labour and capital. It neither directly awns the means of production that pumps out the surplus generated by wage labour power, nor does it, by its own labour, produce the surplus which has use and exchange value. Broadly speaking, this class consists of the petty bourgeoisie and the white-collar workers. The former are either self-employed or involved in the distribution of commodities and t...

  12. BUSN 460 Complete Class

    OpenAIRE

    Laynebaril1

    2017-01-01

    BUSN 460 Complete Class Click Link Below To Buy:   http://hwcampus.com/shop/busn-460-complete-class/     Week 1 DQ 1 Selling your team’s services to CanGo  Week 1 DQ 2 Mission, Vision & Values  Week 2 DQ 1 Planning a Technological Solution  Week 2 DQ 2 Cost Benefit Analysis  Week 3 DQ 1 Flow Charting Processes  Week 3 DQ 2 Implementing Technology  Week 4 DQ 1 Group vs Team  Week  4 DQ 2 Matrixed Employee Environments  Week 5 DQ 1 Pe...

  13. On the middle class

    OpenAIRE

    MacLennan, Michael; Magalhães, Beatrix Judice

    2013-01-01

    The Middle class as a concept has evolved over time, taking on various meanings at various points throughout history, becoming an object to aspire to for poor people, an object of desire for a strong government, a buzzword for politicians the world over, and the source of new customers for firms, and the global economy more broadly. This special issue of Poverty in Focus, exclusively devoted to the exploration of themes related to the middle class is part of a larger endeavour initiated by Th...

  14. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  15. Mechanisms of Resistance to Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganzo, Frank; Sung, Matthew; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2016-12-01

    Drug resistance limits the effectiveness of cancer therapies. Despite attempts to develop curative anticancer treatments, tumors evolve evasive mechanisms limiting durable responses. Hence, diverse therapies are used to attack cancer, including cytotoxic and targeted agents. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are biotherapeutics designed to deliver potent cytotoxins to cancer cells via tumor-specific antigens. Little is known about the clinical manifestations of drug resistance to this class of therapy; however, recent preclinical studies reveal potential mechanisms of resistance. Because ADCs are a combination of antibody and small molecule cytotoxin, multifactorial modes of resistance are emerging that are inherent to the structure and function of the ADC. Decreased cell-surface antigen reduces antibody binding, whereas elevated drug transporters such as MDR1 and MRP1 reduce effectiveness of the payload. Inherent to the uniqueness of the ADC, other novel resistance mechanisms are emerging, including altered antibody trafficking, ADC processing, and intracellular drug release. Most importantly, the modular nature of the ADC allows components to be switched and replaced, enabling development of second-generation ADCs that overcome acquired resistance. This review is intended to highlight recent progress in our understanding of ADC resistance, including approaches to create preclinical ADC-refractory models and to characterize their emerging mechanisms of resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2825-34. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  17. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  18. Efficient generation of human IgA monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Valérie; Mouquet, Hugo

    2015-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody isotype produced in humans. IgA antibodies primarily ensure immune protection of mucosal surfaces against invading pathogens, but also circulate and are present in large quantities in blood. IgAs are heterogeneous at a molecular level, with two IgA subtypes and the capacity to form multimers by interacting with the joining (J) chain. Here, we have developed an efficient strategy to rapidly generate human IgA1 and IgA2 monoclonal antibodies in their monomeric and dimeric forms. Recombinant monomeric and dimeric IgA1/IgA2 counterparts of a prototypical IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 10-1074, targeting the HIV-1 envelope protein, were produced in large amounts after expression cloning and transient transfection of 293-F cells. 10-1074 IgAs were FPLC-purified using a novel affinity-based resin engrafted with anti-IgA chimeric Fabs, followed by a monomers/multimers separation using size exclusion-based FPLC. ELISA binding experiments confirmed that the artificial IgA class switching of 10-1074 did not alter its antigen recognition. In summary, our technical approach allows the very efficient production of various forms of purified recombinant human IgA molecules, which are precious tools in dissecting IgA B-cell responses in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and studying the biology, function and therapeutic potential of IgAs.

  19. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015.

  20. De novo transcriptome assembly facilitates characterisation of fast-evolving gene families, MHC class I in the bank vole (Myodes glareolus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migalska, M; Sebastian, A; Konczal, M; Kotlík, P; Radwan, J

    2017-04-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune response and is the most polymorphic gene family in vertebrates. Although high-throughput sequencing has increasingly been used for genotyping families of co-amplifying MHC genes, its potential to facilitate early steps in the characterisation of MHC variation in nonmodel organism has not been fully explored. In this study we evaluated the usefulness of de novo transcriptome assembly in characterisation of MHC sequence diversity. We found that although de novo transcriptome assembly of MHC I genes does not reconstruct sequences of individual alleles, it does allow the identification of conserved regions for PCR primer design. Using the newly designed primers, we characterised MHC I sequences in the bank vole. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial MHC I coding sequence (2-4 exons) of the bank vole revealed a lack of orthology to MHC I of other Cricetidae, consistent with the high gene turnover of this region. The diversity of expressed alleles was characterised using ultra-deep sequencing of the third exon that codes for the peptide-binding region of the MHC molecule. High allelic diversity was demonstrated, with 72 alleles found in 29 individuals. Interindividual variation in the number of expressed loci was found, with the number of alleles per individual ranging from 5 to 14. Strong signatures of positive selection were found for 8 amino acid sites, most of which are inferred to bind antigens in human MHC, indicating conservation of structure despite rapid sequence evolution.

  1. Large-scale detection of antigen-specific T cells using peptide-MHC-I multimers labeled with DNA barcodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Marquard, Andrea Marion; Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    cell therapy in melanoma patients, we observe a greater number of melanoma-specific T-cell populations compared with cytometry-based approaches. Furthermore, we detect neoepitope-specific T cells in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and peripheral blood from patients with non-small cell lung cancer...

  2. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated “Missing-Self” Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells’ ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated “missing-self” reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors. PMID:27054584

  3. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated "Missing-Self" Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells' ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated "missing-self" reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors.

  4. Anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development of a growth hormone receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hainan; Zheng, Xin; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Li, Steven

    2015-11-01

    In general, traditional growth hormone receptor antagonist can be divided into two major classes: growth hormone (GH) analogues and anti-growth hormone receptor (GHR) antibodies. Herein, we tried to explore a new class of growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonist that may have potential advantages over the traditional antagonists. For this, we developed a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody growth hormone, termed CG-86. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate this antibody, and the results from a competitive receptor-binding assay, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) and epitope mapping demonstrate that CG-86 behaved as a typical Ab2β. Next, we examined its antagonistic activity using in vitro cell models, and the results showed that CG-86 could effectively inhibit growth hormone receptor-mediated signalling and effectively inhibit growth hormone-induced Ba/F3-GHR638 proliferation. In summary, these studies show that an anti-idiotypic antibody (CG-86) has promise as a novel growth hormone receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the current findings also suggest that anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy to produce a new class of growth hormone receptor antagonist, and this strategy may be applied with other cytokines or growth factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Decreased humoral antibody episodes of acute renal allograft rejection in recipients expressing the HLA-DQβ1*0202 allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannam, Venkat K R; Santos, Mark; Lewis, Robert E; Cruse, Julius M

    2012-10-01

    The present investigation was designed to show the effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecular allelic specificities in the recipient on the induction of humoral antibody rejection, identified by C4d peritubular capillary staining, as well as specific antibody identified by Luminex technology. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are expressed on dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes and they present antigenic peptides to CD4 positive T lymphocytes. Human renal peritubular and glomerular capillaries express class II MHC molecules upon activation. Expression of class II molecules on renal microvascular endothelial cells exposes them to possible interaction with specific circulating antibodies. We hypothesize that HLA-DQβ1*0202 expression in recipients decreases the likelihood of antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection. We found that 80% (=25) of DQ2 positive haplotype recipients failed to induce humoral antibody renal allograft rejection and 20% (n=25) of DQ2 positive haplotype recipients induced humoral antibody renal allograft rejection (p=0.008). By contrast, 48% (n=46) of DQ2 negative haplotype recipients failed to induce a humoral antibody component of renal allograft rejection and 52% (n=46) of DQ2 negative haplotype recipients induced humoral antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection. Our results suggest that recipients who express the DQβ1*0202 allele are less likely to induce a humoral antibody component of acute renal allograft rejection than are those expressing DQ1, DQ3, or DQ4 alleles. DQβ1*0202 allele expression in recipients could possibly be protective against acute humoral allograft rejection and might serve as a future criterion in recipient selection and in appropriate therapy for acute renal rejection episodes.

  6. Class, Cultism, and Multiculturalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Peter; Farahmandpur, Ramin

    2001-01-01

    Globalization has hurt both developed and developing countries. Capitalism's relations of exploitation can hurt people of color in disabling ways. Discusses the relationships among race, gender, ethnic, and class identities in order to articulate a political framework that moves toward transnational ethnic alliances, abolishing the role of capital…

  7. Teaching Very Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRogatis, Amy; Honerkamp, Kenneth; McDaniel, Justin; Medine, Carolyn; Nyitray, Vivian-Lee; Pearson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The editor of "Teaching Theology and Religion" facilitated this reflective conversation with five teachers who have extensive experience and success teaching extremely large classes (150 students or more). In the course of the conversation these professors exchange and analyze the effectiveness of several active learning strategies they…

  8. Communication, "Class," and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffres, Leo W.

    A study was conducted to examine the relationships among communication, social class, and ethnic heritage. Eleven of thirteen ethnic groups in a Midwestern metropolitan area who had been studied in 1976 were surveyed again in late 1980 and early 1981. Groups surveyed were Irish, Greek, Czech, Italian, Lebanese, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Polish,…

  9. Shrinking Your Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron-Thorpe, Farren L.; Olson, Jo Clay; Davis, Denny

    2010-01-01

    Toys in the classroom was the result of a National Science Foundation grant that brought two engineering graduate students to a middle school math class. The graduate students and teachers collaborated in an effort to enhance students' mathematical learning. An engineering context was theorized as a way to further develop students' understanding…

  10. Openers for Biology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridley, C. Robert R.

    This teaching guide contains 200 activities that are suitable for openers and demonstrations in biology classes. Details are provided regarding the use of these activities. Some of the broad topics under which the activities are organized include algae, amphibians, bacteria, biologists, crustaceans, dinosaurs, ecology, evolution, flowering plants,…

  11. Reference class forecasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    Underbudgettering og budgetoverskridelser forekommer i et flertal af større bygge- og anlægsprojekter. Problemet skyldes optimisme og/eller strategisk misinformation i budgetteringsprocessen. Reference class forecasting (RCF) er en prognosemetode, som er udviklet for at reducere eller eliminere...

  12. IQ and Social Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbein, Siv

    1980-01-01

    Swedish longitudinal studies of twins support Scarr-Salapatek's explanation of nature-nurture influences on intelligence. This model predicts more genetic variance in test results for advantaged than disadvantaged groups. Jensen's work, however, suggests equal amounts of variance among different social classes. (Author/CP)

  13. An "expanded" class perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steur, Luisa Johanna

    2014-01-01

    -back of Adivasis against their age-old colonization or the work of ‘external’ agitators. Capitalist restructuring and ‘globalization’ was generally seen as simply the latest chapter in the suffering of these Adivasis. Little focused attention was paid to the recent class trajectory of their lives under changing...

  14. Fostering a Middle Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Though there is no official definition of "middle class" in China, the tag has become one few Chinese people believe they deserve anyway.In early August, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences released a report on China’s urban development,

  15. Antibodies to watch in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The transitions of antibody therapeutics to late-stage clinical development, regulatory review and the market are proceeding at a rapid pace in 2013. Since late 2012, two monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics (itolizumab, trastuzumab emtansine) received their first approvals, first marketing applications for three mAbs (vedolizumab, ramucirumab, obinutuzumab) were submitted to regulatory agencies, and five mAbs (brodalumab, MABp1, moxetumomab pasudotox, tildrakizumab, rilotumumab) entered their first Phase 3 studies. The current total of commercially-sponsored antibody therapeutics undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies is 30. Recently announced study results for farletuzumab, naptumomab estafenatox, and tabalumab indicate that clinical endpoints were not met in some Phase 3 studies of these product candidates. PMID:23727858

  16. A combined prediction strategy increases identification of peptides bound with high affinity and stability to porcine MHC class I molecules SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Søren; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-02-01

    Affinity and stability of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are important factors in presentation of peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). In silico prediction methods of peptide-MHC binding followed by experimental analysis of peptide-MHC interactions constitute an attractive protocol to select target peptides from the vast pool of viral proteome peptides. We have earlier reported the peptide binding motif of the porcine MHC-I molecules SLA-1*04:01 and SLA-2*04:01, identified by an ELISA affinity-based positional scanning combinatorial peptide library (PSCPL) approach. Here, we report the peptide binding motif of SLA-3*04:01 and combine two prediction methods and analysis of both peptide binding affinity and stability of peptide-MHC complexes to improve rational peptide selection. Using a peptide prediction strategy combining PSCPL binding matrices and in silico prediction algorithms (NetMHCpan), peptide ligands from a repository of 8900 peptides were predicted for binding to SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01 and validated by affinity and stability assays. From the pool of predicted peptides for SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01, a total of 71, 28, and 38% were binders with affinities below 500 nM, respectively. Comparison of peptide-SLA binding affinity and complex stability showed that peptides of high affinity generally, but not always, produce complexes of high stability. In conclusion, we demonstrate how state-of-the-art prediction and in vitro immunology tools in combination can be used for accurate selection of peptides for MHC class I binding, hence providing an expansion of the field of peptide-MHC analysis also to include pigs as a livestock experimental model.

  17. Adsorption of antibody and globulin onto glass surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, T

    1980-10-01

    The amount of globulin adsorbed onto surfaces (97 m2) of porous glass (1 g) in phospate-buffered saline (pH 7.2) was estimated to be 83 mg by frontal analysis. In the adsorption chromatography of rabbit antiserum (the immunoglobulin G class) to horse serum albumin on a porous glass column, immunoglobulin G was not eluted with saline but was eluted with 0.2 M glycine (pH 9) with a recovery of 12%. The yield of immunoglobulin M antibody to sheep red blood cells recovered by elution with saline was 12.3%, and the total yield of immunoglobulin M was 15.8%. Thus, antibody and globulin were well adsorbed onto glass surfaces in physiological saline; immunoglobulin G had a stronger affinity to glass surfaces than did immunglobulin M. These facts should be considered when glass containers are used for purified antiserum.

  18. Engineering therapeutic antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Migyeong; Jung, Sang Taek

    2016-02-05

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most attractive therapeutic target classes because of their critical roles in intracellular signaling and their clinical relevance to a variety of diseases, including cancer, infection and inflammation. However, high conformational variability, the small exposed area of extracellular epitopes and difficulty in the preparation of GPCR antigens have delayed both the isolation of therapeutic anti-GPCR antibodies as well as studies on the structure, function and biochemical mechanisms of GPCRs. To overcome the challenges in generating highly specific anti-GPCR antibodies with enhanced efficacy and safety, various forms of antigens have been successfully designed and employed for screening with newly emerged systems based on laboratory animal immunization and high-throughput-directed evolution.

  19. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies.

  20. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  1. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  2. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  3. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  4. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  5. Exploring an orbitrap analyzer for the characterization of intact antibodies by native mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rose, R.J.; Thompson, N.J.; Van Duijn, E.; Damoc, E.; Denisov, E.; Makarov, A.; Heck, A.J.R

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent a major class of therapeutic biomolecules being developed by the biopharmaceutical industry, their popularity largely being a result of their high specificity towards targets. Therapeutic mAbs are being developed for various diseases, with a strong focus on

  6. Coincidence classes in nonorientable manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study Nielsen coincidence theory for maps between manifolds of same dimension regardless of orientation. We use the definition of semi-index of a class, review the definition of defective classes, and study the occurrence of defective root classes. We prove a semi-index product formula for lifting maps and give conditions for the defective coincidence classes to be the only essential classes.

  7. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Rochella A; Robinson, John A

    2008-02-01

    The arbitrary division between antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and secondary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome has not proven useful. Antiphospholipid antibodies in the absence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome often occur as epiphenomena in many autoimmune diseases. They are very common in systemic lupus erythematosus. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a significant comorbidity in lupus but is uncommon in Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and systemic vasculitis. Evidence is growing that antiphospholipid antibodies may have a pathogenic role in pulmonary hypertension and accelerated atherosclerosis of autoimmune diseases.

  8. Mathematical and experimental analyses of antibody transport in hollow-fiber-based specific antibody filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hout, Mariah S; Federspiel, William J

    2003-01-01

    We are developing hollow fiber-based specific antibody filters (SAFs) that selectively remove antibodies of a given specificity directly from whole blood, without separation of the plasma and cellular blood components and with minimal removal of plasma proteins other than the targeted pathogenic antibodies. A principal goal of our research is to identify the primary mechanisms that control antibody transport within the SAF and to use this information to guide the choice of design and operational parameters that maximize the SAF-based antibody removal rate. In this study, we formulated a simple mathematical model of SAF-based antibody removal and performed in vitro antibody removal experiments to test key predictions of the model. Our model revealed three antibody transport regimes, defined by the magnitude of the Damköhler number Da (characteristic antibody-binding rate/characteristic antibody diffusion rate): reaction-limited (Da /= 10). For a given SAF geometry, blood flow rate, and antibody diffusivity, the highest antibody removal rate was predicted for diffusion-limited antibody transport. Additionally, for diffusion-limited antibody transport the predicted antibody removal rate was independent of the antibody-binding rate and hence was the same for any antibody-antigen system and for any patient within one antibody-antigen system. Using SAF prototypes containing immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), we measured anti-BSA removal rates consistent with transport in the intermediate regime (Da approximately 3). We concluded that initial SAF development work should focus on achieving diffusion-limited antibody transport by maximizing the SAF antibody-binding capacity (hence maximizing the characteristic antibody-binding rate). If diffusion-limited antibody transport is achieved, the antibody removal rate may be raised further by increasing the number and length of the SAF fibers and by increasing the blood flow rate through the SAF.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to Treponema Pallidum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; J.D.A. van Embden; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThree successive fusions of mouse myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes of a mouse immunized with Treponema Pallidum resulted in one hybridoma producing anti T. pallidum antibodies for each fusion. The mice were immunized with live pallidum cells respectively 1, 3 and 5 months before fusi

  10. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  11. Development of Antibody Against Sulfamethazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZi-ying; XUWen-ge; LIUYi-bing; ZHANGLi-ling; GUOWei-zheng; HANShi-quan

    2003-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies(PcAbs) against sulfamethazine(SMT) are obtained by immunizing rabbits with SMT-conjugated bovine serum albumin(BSA). The affinity constants (Ka) of the PcAbs are higher than 1×108 and the cross-reactivities with sulfadiazine(SD), sulfaquinoxaline (SQX) are lower than 0.05% (R/A).

  12. Herbicide-resistance conferred by expression of a catalytic antibody in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Yael; Shulman, Avidor; Ben Shir, Irina; Keinan, Ehud; Wolf, Shmuel

    2006-06-01

    Engineering herbicide resistance in crops facilitates control of weed species, particularly those that are closely related to the crop, and may be useful in selecting lines that have undergone multiple transformation events. Here we show that herbicide-resistant plants can be engineered by designing an herbicide and expressing a catalytic antibody that destroys the herbicide in planta. First, we developed a carbamate herbicide that can be catalytically destroyed by the aldolase antibody 38C2. This compound has herbicidal activity on all three plant species tested. Second, the light chain and half of the heavy chain (Fab) of the catalytic antibody were targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum in two classes of Arabidopsis thaliana transformants. Third, the two transgenic plants were crossed to produce an herbicide-resistant F1 hybrid. The in vitro catalytic activity of the protein from F1 hybrids corroborates that catalytic antibodies can be constitutively expressed in transgenic plants, and that they can confer a unique trait.

  13. Out about class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L; Sell, I

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lesbian activist Léonie Walker traces the evolution of her involvement in social change philanthropy and her work to bring together activists of diverse class and racial backgrounds. She shows how she was trained as an activist, discusses conscious and socially responsible ways to steward wealth, and gives voice to the seldom-heard experiences of LGBT people with inherited wealth. The co-founder of the Women Managing Wealth program at the Ms. Foundation and a board member of Astraea Lesbian Action Foundation, she has also developed and facilitated numerous Dismantling Classism workshops. In this article, she discusses the importance of, and ways of implementing, cross-class, cross-race dialogue that can further understanding among activists of different backgrounds.

  14. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  15. Flexible Word Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    • First major publication on the phenomenon • Offers cross-linguistic, descriptive, and diverse theoretical approaches • Includes analysis of data from different language families and from lesser studied languages This book is the first major cross-linguistic study of 'flexible words', i.e. words...... that cannot be classified in terms of the traditional lexical categories Verb, Noun, Adjective or Adverb. Flexible words can - without special morphosyntactic marking - serve in functions for which other languages must employ members of two or more of the four traditional, 'specialised' word classes. Thus......, flexible words are underspecified for communicative functions like 'predicating' (verbal function), 'referring' (nominal function) or 'modifying' (a function typically associated with adjectives and e.g. manner adverbs). Even though linguists have been aware of flexible world classes for more than...

  16. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  17. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 Human IgG Antibody Produced by AnaptysBio, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ECBC-TR-1339 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR ANTIBODY...CHARACTERIZATION: CHARACTERIZATION OF AN MS2 HUMAN IGG ANTIBODY PRODUCED BY ANAPTYSBIO, INC. DARPA ATP Standardized Test Bed for Antibody...Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 human IgG antibody produced by AnaptysBio DARPA ATP Standardized Test Bed for Antibody

  18. Antibody Engineering for Pursuing a Healthier Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Abdullah F. U. H.; Wang, Rongzhi; Ling, Sumei; Wang, Shihua

    2017-01-01

    Since the development of antibody-production techniques, a number of immunoglobulins have been developed on a large scale using conventional methods. Hybridoma technology opened a new horizon in the production of antibodies against target antigens of infectious pathogens, malignant diseases including autoimmune disorders, and numerous potent toxins. However, these clinical humanized or chimeric murine antibodies have several limitations and complexities. Therefore, to overcome these difficulties, recent advances in genetic engineering techniques and phage display technique have allowed the production of highly specific recombinant antibodies. These engineered antibodies have been constructed in the hunt for novel therapeutic drugs equipped with enhanced immunoprotective abilities, such as engaging immune effector functions, effective development of fusion proteins, efficient tumor and tissue penetration, and high-affinity antibodies directed against conserved targets. Advanced antibody engineering techniques have extensive applications in the fields of immunology, biotechnology, diagnostics, and therapeutic medicines. However, there is limited knowledge regarding dynamic antibody development approaches. Therefore, this review extends beyond our understanding of conventional polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, recent advances in antibody engineering techniques together with antibody fragments, display technologies, immunomodulation, and broad applications of antibodies are discussed to enhance innovative antibody production in pursuit of a healthier future for humans.

  19. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  20. A Rising Consumer Class

    OpenAIRE

    Manish Sonthalia

    2010-01-01

    India has had two stages of growth, both related to consumption since 1947. The first was based on developing economic self sufficiency; the second on rising disposable income. It is now entering its third period of consumption growth which sees it entering the world stage as one of the largest consumers in the world. This paper explains the factors that are driving this dramatic shift from the emerging middle classes to the patterns of consumption and investment in India today.

  1. [Social classes and poverty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benach, Joan; Amable, Marcelo

    2004-05-01

    Social classes and poverty are two key social determinants fundamental to understand how disease and health inequalities are produced. During the 90's in Spain there has been a notable oscillation in the inequality and poverty levels, with an increase in the middle of the decade when new forms of social exclusion, high levels of unemployment and great difficulties in accessing the labour market, especially for those workers with less resources, emerged. Today society is still characterized by a clear social stratification and the existence of social classes with a predominance of high levels of unemployment and precarious jobs, and where poverty is an endemic social problem much worse than the EU average. To diminish health inequalities and to improve the quality of life will depend very much on the reduction of the poverty levels and the improvement of equal opportunities and quality of employment. To increase understanding of how social class and poverty affect public health, there is a need to improve the quality of both information and research, and furthermore planners and political decision makers must take into account those determinants when undertaking disease prevention and health promotion.

  2. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  3. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  4. [Neuroimmunological diseases associated with VGKC complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels(VGKC) were first identified by radioimmunoassay of radioisotope labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were found only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in Morvan's syndrome and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins(for example LGI-1, Caspr-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. Caspr-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability.

  5. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  6. Chemical engineering of cell penetrating antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Lou, D; Burkett, J; Kohler, H

    2001-08-01

    Antibodies, being exquisitely specific tools in biology, are routinely used to detect and identify intra-cellular structures. However, current intra-cellular application of antibodies requires that the membrane be rendered leaky, resulting in the death of cells. Here, we present a novel method to allow antibodies to penetrate the cellular membrane of living cells without affecting cell viability. A peptide (MTS, membrane transport sequence) that facilitates transport across membranes has been site-specifically attached to antibodies. MTS-antibodies enter the living cells in culture and can be detected by immunofluorescence and ELISA after extraction. Cellular structures are visualized in living cells using a specific MTS-antibody. Antibodies with membrane penetrating properties can become an important tool for the study of intra-cellular processes in living cells. Furthermore, such membrane penetrating antibodies can be used to selectively stimulate or suppress functions of the cellular machinery.

  7. Recombinant bispecific antibodies for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roland E KONTERMANN

    2005-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies can serve as mediators to retarget effector mechanisms to disease-associated sites. Studies over the past two decades have revealed the potentials but also the limitations of conventional bispecific antibodies. The development of recombinant antibody formats has opened up the possibility of generating bispecific molecules with improved properties. This review summarizes recent developments in the field of recombinant bispecific antibodies and discusses further requirements for clinical development.

  8. Engineered single chain antibody fragments for radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhalov, A.; Chester, K. A. [Cancer Research UK Imaging and Targeting Group Royal Free, London (United Kingdom). Department of Oncology; University College Medical School Royal Free Campus, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    An ideal molecule to deliver radioimmunotherapy (RIT) would be target specific and have prolonged residence time at high concentrations in the tumour with rapid clearance from normal tissues. It would also be non-immunogenic. These features can be rationally introduced into recombinant antibody-based proteins using antibody engineering techniques. This reviews focuses on the use of antibody engineering in the design and development of RIT molecules which have single chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragments as building blocks.

  9. New connections: Cell to cell HIV-1 transmission, resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies, and an envelope sorting motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S Abigail; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 infection from cell to cell may provide an efficient mode of viral spread in vivo and could therefore present a significant challenge for preventative or therapeutic strategies based on broadly neutralizing antibodies. Indeed, Li et al show that the potency and magnitude of multiple HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody classes are decreased during cell to cell infection in a context dependent manner. A functional motif in gp41 appears to contribute to this differential susceptibility by modulating exposure of neutralization epitopes.

  10. Characteristics of Monoclonal Antibody Against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYan-Fei; WangWei; 等

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen strains of monoclonal antibodies(McAbs) against infections bursal disease virus(IBDV) were obtained by using hydridoma technique and their characteristics were studied by double immunodiffusion,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA),virus neutralization test(VNT) and Western-blotting assay (WBA).The result showed that nine of the thirteen McAbs belonged to IgG class and four of them belonged to IgM class.No crossreactions were detected betwween the McAbs and Newscastle disease virus (NDV),infectious bronchitis virus(IBV) and Marek's disease virus(MDV).All of McAbs were positively specific reactive with IBDV and five of them can neutralize viral infectivity.Their recognized epitopes of the neutralizing McAbs were all presented on VP2 of the IBDV.

  11. Characteristics of Monoclonal Antibody Against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen strains of monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were obtained by using hybridoma technique and their characteristics were studied by double immunodiffusion,en- zyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), virus neutralization test (VNT) and Western- blotting assay (WBA). The result showed that nine of the thirteen McAbs belonged to IgG class and four of them belonged to IgM class. No crossreactions were detected betwween the McAbs and Newscastle disease virus (NDV) ,in- fectious bronchitis virus(IBV) and Marek's disease virus(MDV). All of McAbs were positively specific reac- tive with IBDV and five of them can neutralize viral infectivity. Their recognized epitopes of the neutralizing McAbs were all presented on VP2 of the IBDV.

  12. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  13. Antibodies to staphylococcal enterotoxin in laboratory personnel.

    OpenAIRE

    Jozefczyk, Z; Robbins, R N; Spitz, J M; Bergdoll, M S

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five percent of laboratory personnel working with staphylococcal enterotoxin had antibodies to enterotoxin in their sera, whereas only 23% of the control group had antibodies specific for enterotoxin. Two persons who carried enterotoxin B-producing staphylococci in their noses, throats, or both, had antibodies to enterotoxin B in their sera.

  14. Nanoparticles for the delivery of therapeutic antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, Flávia; Castro, Pedro; Fonte, Pedro;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Over the past two decades, therapeutic antibodies have demonstrated promising results in the treatment of a wide array of diseases. However, the application of antibody-based therapy implies multiple administrations and a high cost of antibody production, resulting in costly therapy...

  15. Class Action and Class Settlement in a European Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses the options for introducing common European rules on class action lawsuits with an opt-out-model in individual cases. An analysis is made of how the risks of misuse of class actions can be prevented. The article considers the Dutch rules on class settlements (the WCAM procedure...

  16. Classroom contexts: connections between class size and within class grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatchford, P; Baines, E; Kutnick, P; Martin, C

    2001-06-01

    There has been a vigorous debate for many years about the educational effects of class size differences, but even if differences have an impact on pupils' academic progress this still leaves unanswered important questions about what mediates the effect. This paper is informed by a classroom contextual perspective, and examines associations between class size and within class groupings (in terms of size and number of groups, adult presence in groups, and type of interaction between grouping members). Age differences in these relationships are also explored. The quantitative study is based on analysis of 3157 groupings, from 672 Reception, Year 2 and Year 5 classes in 331 schools. The qualitative study was based on 12 classes in 8 case study schools, and questionnaire responses completed by over 100 class teachers. Links between size of class and within class groupings were examined on the basis of a 'grouping mapping survey', in which teachers at a given time in the school day provided information on group size and number, adult presence, and type of interaction between pupils, and complementary qualitative analyses of data from teacher-completed questionnaires, and interviews. The number of groups in a class increased with the size of the class. Over all three year groups, small classes had on average just over three groups, while large classes approached six groups. The size of groups in the class decreased with size of class. In class sizes over 25, pupils were more likely to be in a large group of 7-10, while in classes under 25 they were more likely to be in whole class groupings. Qualitative analyses showed that teachers felt that groups of 7-10 pupils had negative educational effects, for example, in terms of the quality and quantity of teaching and children's concentration and contribution in groups. Results suggest that the effects of class size can be best seen as through the size and number of groups, which will then have implications for learning

  17. Anomalia de Classe III

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Projeto de Pós-Graduação/Dissertação apresentado à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Medicina Dentária Introdução: A anomalia de classe III, é uma má oclusão que afeta os indivíduos psicologicamente, pois hoje em dia, a estética é socialmente valorizada. Deste modo, o diagnóstico deve ser executado precocemente para que os indivíduos portadores desta anomalia, possam ser acompanhados desde criança, pelos profissionais área da Medicina...

  18. MHC class I molecules are enriched in caveolae but do not enter with simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H A; Chen, Y; Norkin, L C

    1998-06-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) binds to MHC class I molecules anywhere on the cell surface and then enters through caveolae. The fate of class I molecules after SV40 binding is not known. Sensitivity of 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules to papain cleavage was used to distinguish internalized class I molecules from class I molecules remaining at the cell surface. Whereas the caveolae-enriched membrane microdomain was found to also be enriched for class I molecules, no internalized papain-resistant 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules could be detected at any time in either control cells or in cells preadsorbed with saturating amounts of SV40. Instead, 125I-surface-labelled class I molecules, as well as preadsorbed 125I-labelled anti-class I antibodies, accumulated in the medium, coincident with the turnover of class I molecules at the cell surface. The class I heavy chains that accumulated in the medium were truncated and their release was specifically prevented by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline. Thus, whereas class I molecules mediate SV40 binding, they do not appear to mediate SV40 entry.

  19. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-07-30

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  20. Antisperm antibodies and human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H

    2010-01-01

    To present strategies in diagnosing and treating infertility related to antisperm antibodies. Antisperm antibodies (ASA) were detected on sperm using the direct immunobead (IBD) test. Treatments included intrauterine insemination (IUI) with pretreatment with chymotrypsin/galactose vs. in vitro fertilization (IVF) with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Intrauterine insemination with protein digestive enzyme treatment was much more effective than IUI without enzymatic therapy. However IVF with ICSI provided three times the pregnancy rate for males with sperm coated with ASA than IUI with chymotrypsin treated sperm. It is advisable to include measurement for ASA on the initial semen analysis. However, another option is to perform it initially only with an abnormal post-coital test. The decision for IUI with chymotrypsin pretreatment of the sperm vs. IVF with ICSI may depend on insurance and financial issues.

  1. Different Somatic Hypermutation Levels among Antibody Subclasses Disclosed by a New Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Antibody Repertoire Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Kitaura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A diverse antibody repertoire is primarily generated by the rearrangement of V, D, and J genes and subsequent somatic hypermutation (SHM. Class-switch recombination (CSR produces various isotypes and subclasses with different functional properties. Although antibody isotypes and subclasses are considered to be produced by both direct and sequential CSR, it is still not fully understood how SHMs accumulate during the process in which antibody subclasses are generated. Here, we developed a new next-generation sequencing (NGS-based antibody repertoire analysis capable of identifying all antibody isotype and subclass genes and used it to examine the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 12 healthy individuals. Using a total of 5,480,040 sequences, we compared percentage frequency of variable (V, junctional (J sequence, and a combination of V and J, diversity, length, and amino acid compositions of CDR3, SHM, and shared clones in the IgM, IgD, IgG3, IgG1, IgG2, IgG4, IgA1, IgE, and IgA2 genes. The usage and diversity were similar among the immunoglobulin (Ig subclasses. Clonally related sequences sharing identical V, D, J, and CDR3 amino acid sequences were frequently found within multiple Ig subclasses, especially between IgG1 and IgG2 or IgA1 and IgA2. SHM occurred most frequently in IgG4, while IgG3 genes were the least mutated among all IgG subclasses. The shared clones had almost the same SHM levels among Ig subclasses, while subclass-specific clones had different levels of SHM dependent on the genomic location. Given the sequential CSR, these results suggest that CSR occurs sequentially over multiple subclasses in the order corresponding to the genomic location of IGHCs, but CSR is likely to occur more quickly than SHMs accumulate within Ig genes under physiological conditions. NGS-based antibody repertoire analysis should provide critical information on how various antibodies are generated in the immune system.

  2. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays.

  3. Phenotypic screening: the future of antibody discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Munoz, Andrea L; Minter, Ralph R; Rust, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Most antibody therapeutics have been isolated from high throughput target-based screening. However, as the number of validated targets diminishes and the target space becomes increasingly competitive, alternative strategies, such as phenotypic screening, are gaining momentum. Here, we review successful phenotypic screens, including those used to isolate antibodies against cancer and infectious agents. We also consider exciting advances in the expression and phenotypic screening of antibody repertoires in single cell autocrine systems. As technologies continue to develop, we believe that antibody phenotypic screening will increase further in popularity and has the potential to provide the next generation of therapeutic antibodies.

  4. Team Learning in Large Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Information and suggestions are provided on the use of team learning in large college classes. Introductory material discusses the negative cycle of student-teacher interaction that may be provoked by large classes, and the use of permanent, heterogeneous, six- or seven-member student learning groups as the central focus of class activity as a…

  5. Reconciling Virtual Classes with Genericity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2006-01-01

    classes. As a result, a kind of type parameters have been introduced, but they are simple and only used where they excel. Conversely, final definitions of virtual classes have been re- moved from the language, thus making virtual classes more flexible. The result- ing language presents a clearer and more...

  6. Understanding Class in Contemporary Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that claims about the death of class and the coming of the classless society are premature. Such claims are seldom genuinely empirical, and the theoretical argument often refers to a simple and therefore easily dismissible concept of class. By rejecting the concept of class...

  7. Bovine milk antibodies for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, H; Marnila, P; Gill, H S

    2000-11-01

    The immunoglobulins of bovine colostrum provide the major antimicrobial protection against microbial infections and confer a passive immunity to the newborn calf until its own immune system matures. The concentration in colostrum of specific antibodies against pathogens can be raised by immunising cows with these pathogens or their antigens. Immune milk products are preparations made of such hyperimmune colostrum or antibodies enriched from it. These preparations can be used to give effective specific protection against different enteric diseases in calves and suckling pigs. Colostral immunoglobulin supplements designed for farm animals are commercially available in many countries. Also, some immune milk products containing specific antibodies against certain pathogens have been launched on the market. A number of clinical studies are currently in progress to evaluate the efficacy of immune milks in the prevention and treatment of various human infections, including those caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria. Bovine colostrum-based immune milk products have proven effective in prophylaxis against various infectious diseases in humans. Good results have been obtained with products targeted against rotavirus, Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, Streptococcus mutans, Cryptosporidium parvum and Helicobacter pylori. Some successful attempts have been made to use immune milk in balancing gastrointestinal microbial flora. Immune milk products are promising examples of health-promoting functional foods, or nutraceuticals. This review summarises the recent progress in the development of these products and evaluates their potential as dietary supplements and in clinical nutrition.

  8. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: Pathogenesis, Prevention, Treatment, and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia R. Blume

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a major cause of late kidney transplant failure. It is important to have an understanding of human-leukocyte antigen (HLA typing including well-designed studies to determine anti-MHC-class-I-related chain A (MICA and antibody rejection pathogenesis. This can allow for more specific diagnosis and treatment which may improve long-term graft function. HLA-specific antibody detection prior to transplantation allows one to help determine the risk for AMR while detection of DSA along with a biopsy confirms it. It is now appreciated that biopsy for AMR does not have to include diffuse C4d, but does require a closer look at peritubular capillary microvasculature. Although plasmapheresis (PP is effective in removing alloantibodies (DSAs from the circulation, rebound synthesis of alloantibodies can occur. Splenectomy is used in desensitization protocols for ABO incompatible transplants as well as being found to treat AMR refractory to conventional treatment. Also used are agents targeted for plasma cells, B cells, and the complement cascade which are bortezomib rituximab and eculizumab, respectively.

  9. Flow cytometric detection of anti-gliadin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presani, G; Perticarari, S; Mangiarotti, M A

    1989-05-12

    A very sensitive solid-phase fluorescent immunoassay to detect anti-alpha-gliadin IgA class antibodies is described. The solid phase consisted of polystyrene carboxylated microspheres, of 5 microns diameter, coated with alpha-gliadin. Serum-specific antibodies bound to the alpha-gliadin were measured by flow cytometry using fluorescein-conjugated anti-human IgA. 41 samples were tested and the results compared with those obtained by a standard method: an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A good correlation was found between the two techniques (r = 0.96). The sera of untreated coeliac children showed significantly higher antibody values than the sera of children on a gluten-free diet or healthy control groups. The flow cytometric method was more sensitive when the Kolgomorov/Smirnov test was used to analyse the histograms. This method provides an alternative screening test for coeliac disease and may also be used to confirm borderline results obtained in the ELISA test.

  10. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies has long been considered a potential treatment modality for infectious diseases, including HIV. Early efforts to use antibodies to suppress HIV replication, however, were largely unsuccessful, as the antibodies that were studied neutralized only a relatively narrow spectrum of viral strains and were not very potent. Recent advances have led to the discovery of a large portfolio of human monoclonal antibodies that are broadly neutralizing across many HIV-1 subtypes and are also substantially more potent. These antibodies target multiple different epitopes on the HIV envelope, thus allowing for the development of antibody combinations. In this review, we discuss the application of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for HIV treatment and HIV eradication strategies. We highlight bNAbs that target key epitopes, such as the CD4 binding site and the V2/V3-glycan-dependent sites, and we discuss several bNAbs that are currently in the clinical development pipeline.

  11. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  12. Germinal centre hypoxia and regulation of antibody qualities by a hypoxia response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Hoon; Raybuck, Ariel L; Stengel, Kristy; Wei, Mei; Beck, Thomas C; Volanakis, Emmanuel; Thomas, James W; Hiebert, Scott; Haase, Volker H; Boothby, Mark R

    2016-09-08

    Germinal centres (GCs) promote humoral immunity and vaccine efficacy. In GCs, antigen-activated B cells proliferate, express high-affinity antibodies, promote antibody class switching, and yield B cell memory. Whereas the cytokine milieu has long been known to regulate effector functions that include the choice of immunoglobulin class, both cell-autonomous and extrinsic metabolic programming have emerged as modulators of T-cell-mediated immunity. Here we show in mice that GC light zones are hypoxic, and that low oxygen tension () alters B cell physiology and function. In addition to reduced proliferation and increased B cell death, low impairs antibody class switching to the pro-inflammatory IgG2c antibody isotype by limiting the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID). Hypoxia induces HIF transcription factors by restricting the activity of prolyl hydroxyl dioxygenase enzymes, which hydroxylate HIF-1α and HIF-2α to destabilize HIF by binding the von Hippel-Landau tumour suppressor protein (pVHL). B-cell-specific depletion of pVHL leads to constitutive HIF stabilization, decreases antigen-specific GC B cells and undermines the generation of high-affinity IgG, switching to IgG2c, early memory B cells, and recall antibody responses. HIF induction can reprogram metabolic and growth factor gene expression. Sustained hypoxia or HIF induction by pVHL deficiency inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in B lymphoblasts, and mTORC1-haploinsufficient B cells have reduced clonal expansion, AID expression, and capacities to yield IgG2c and high-affinity antibodies. Thus, the normal physiology of GCs involves regional variegation of hypoxia, and HIF-dependent oxygen sensing regulates vital functions of B cells. We propose that the restriction of oxygen in lymphoid organs, which can be altered in pathophysiological states, modulates humoral immunity.

  13. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  14. Hirzebruch classes of complex hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain E; Schuermann, Joerg; Shaneson, Julius L

    2009-01-01

    The Milnor-Hirzebruch class of a locally complete intersection X in an algebraic manifold M measures the difference between the (Poincare dual of the) Hirzebruch class of the virtual tangent bundle of X and, respectively, the Brasselet-Schuermann-Yokura (homology) Hirzebruch class of X. In this note, we calculate the Milnor-Hirzebruch class of a globally defined algebraic hypersurface X in terms of the corresponding Hirzebruch invariants of singular strata in a Whitney stratification of X. Our approach is based on Schuermann's specialization property for the motivic Hirzebruch class transformation of Brasselet-Schuermann-Yokura.

  15. A genecentric Human Protein Atlas for expression profiles based on antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Lisa; Björling, Erik; Oksvold, Per; Fagerberg, Linn; Asplund, Anna; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Persson, Anja; Ottosson, Jenny; Wernérus, Henrik; Nilsson, Peter; Lundberg, Emma; Sivertsson, Asa; Navani, Sanjay; Wester, Kenneth; Kampf, Caroline; Hober, Sophia; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias

    2008-10-01

    An attractive path forward in proteomics is to experimentally annotate the human protein complement of the genome in a genecentric manner. Using antibodies, it might be possible to design protein-specific probes for a representative protein from every protein-coding gene and to subsequently use the antibodies for systematical analysis of cellular distribution and subcellular localization of proteins in normal and disease tissues. A new version (4.0) of the Human Protein Atlas has been developed in a genecentric manner with the inclusion of all human genes and splice variants predicted from genome efforts together with a visualization of each protein with characteristics such as predicted membrane regions, signal peptide, and protein domains and new plots showing the uniqueness (sequence similarity) of every fraction of each protein toward all other human proteins. The new version is based on tissue profiles generated from 6120 antibodies with more than five million immunohistochemistry-based images covering 5067 human genes, corresponding to approximately 25% of the human genome. Version 4.0 includes a putative list of members in various protein classes, both functional classes, such as kinases, transcription factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, etc., and project-related classes, such as candidate genes for cancer or cardiovascular diseases. The exact antigen sequence for the internally generated antibodies has also been released together with a visualization of the application-specific validation performed for each antibody, including a protein array assay, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and, for a large fraction, immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy. New search functionalities have been added to allow complex queries regarding protein expression profiles, protein classes, and chromosome location. The new version of the protein atlas thus is a resource for many areas of biomedical research, including protein science and biomarker discovery.

  16. Class Attendance in Undergraduate Classes: Why and When Do Students Miss Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blerkom, Malcolm L.

    The first part of this study examined class attendance of 959 students in 17 sections of undergraduate psychology classes. It was found that class attendance decreased from the beginning to the end of the semester. An investigation of 117 of the students found that attendance displayed moderate correlations with course grades. Students missed…

  17. Class Discovery in Galaxy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Bazell, D; Bazell, David; Miller, David J.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, automated, supervised classification techniques have been fruitfully applied to labeling and organizing large astronomical databases. These methods require off-line classifier training, based on labeled examples from each of the (known) object classes. In practice, only a small batch of labeled examples, hand-labeled by a human expert, may be available for training. Moreover, there may be no labeled examples for some classes present in the data, i.e. the database may contain several unknown classes. Unknown classes may be present due to 1) uncertainty in or lack of knowledge of the measurement process, 2) an inability to adequately ``survey'' a massive database to assess its content (classes), and/or 3) an incomplete scientific hypothesis. In recent work, new class discovery in mixed labeled/unlabeled data was formally posed, with a proposed solution based on mixture models. In this work we investigate this approach, propose a competing technique suitable for class discovery in neural network...

  18. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mixin based class and method combination mechanism with block structure propagation. Traditionally, mixins can be composed to form new classes, possibly merging the implementations of methods (as in CLOS). In our approach, a class or method combination operation may cause any...... number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...... for each member of the class family, and again by propagation implicitly compose each method from its aspects. As opposed to CLOS, this is type-checked statically; and as opposed to other systems for advanced class combination/ merging/weaving, it is integrated directly in the language, ensuring a clear...

  19. Pseudo Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance "modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow," some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  20. Effects of Newcastle disease virus vaccine antibodies on the shedding and transmission of challenge viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L; El Attrache, John; Dorsey, Kristi M; Courtney, Sean C; Guo, Zijing; Kapczynski, Darrell R

    2013-12-01

    Different genotypes of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 virus (APMV-1) circulate in many parts of the world. Traditionally, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is recognized as having two major divisions represented by classes I and II, with class II being further divided into sixteen genotypes. Although all NDV are members of APMV-1 and are of one serotype, antigenic and genetic diversity is observed between the different genotypes. Reports of vaccine failure from many countries and reports by our lab on the reduced ability of classical vaccines to significantly decrease viral replication and shedding have created renewed interest in developing vaccines formulated with genotypes homologous to the virulent NDV (vNDV) circulating in the field. We assessed how the amount and specificity of humoral antibodies induced by inactivated vaccines affected viral replication, clinical protection and evaluated how non-homologous (heterologous) antibody levels induced by live NDV vaccines relate to transmission of vNDV. In an experimental setting, all inactivated NDV vaccines protected birds from morbidity and mortality, but higher and more specific levels of antibodies were required to significantly decrease viral replication. It was possible to significantly decrease viral replication and shedding with high levels of antibodies and those levels could be more easily reached with vaccines formulated with NDV of the same genotype as the challenge viruses. However, when the levels of heterologous antibodies were sufficiently high, it was possible to prevent transmission. As the level of humoral antibodies increase in vaccinated birds, the number of infected birds and the amount of vNDV shed decreased. Thus, in an experimental setting the effective levels of humoral antibodies could be increased by (1) increasing the homology of the vaccine to the challenge virus, or (2) allowing optimal time for the development of the immune response.

  1. Network class superposition analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A B Pearson

    Full Text Available Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30 for the yeast cell cycle process, considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses.

  2. Functional characterization of two scFv-Fc antibodies from an HIV controller selected on soluble HIV-1 Env complexes: a neutralizing V3- and a trimer-specific gp41 antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trott

    Full Text Available HIV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs represent an important tool in view of prophylactic and therapeutic applications for HIV-1 infection. Patients chronically infected by HIV-1 represent a valuable source for nAbs. HIV controllers, including long-term non-progressors (LTNP and elite controllers (EC, represent an interesting subgroup in this regard, as here nAbs can develop over time in a rather healthy immune system and in the absence of any therapeutic selection pressure. In this study, we characterized two particular antibodies that were selected as scFv antibody fragments from a phage immune library generated from an LTNP with HIV neutralizing antibodies in his plasma. The phage library was screened on recombinant soluble gp140 envelope (Env proteins. Sequencing the selected peptide inserts revealed two major classes of antibody sequences. Binding analysis of the corresponding scFv-Fc derivatives to various trimeric and monomeric Env constructs as well as to peptide arrays showed that one class, represented by monoclonal antibody (mAb A2, specifically recognizes an epitope localized in the pocket binding domain of the C heptad repeat (CHR in the ectodomain of gp41, but only in the trimeric context. Thus, this antibody represents an interesting tool for trimer identification. MAb A7, representing the second class, binds to structural elements of the third variable loop V3 and neutralizes tier 1 and tier 2 HIV-1 isolates of different subtypes with matching critical amino acids in the linear epitope sequence. In conclusion, HIV controllers are a valuable source for the selection of functionally interesting antibodies that can be selected on soluble gp140 proteins with properties from the native envelope spike.

  3. Generation of monospecific antibodies based on affinity capture of polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Barbara; Forsström, Björn; Igel, Ulrika; Johannesson, Henrik; Stadler, Charlotte; Lundberg, Emma; Ponten, Fredrik; Sjöberg, Anna; Rockberg, Johan; Schwenk, Jochen M; Nilsson, Peter; Johansson, Christine; Uhlén, Mathias

    2011-11-01

    A method is described to generate and validate antibodies based on mapping the linear epitopes of a polyclonal antibody followed by sequential epitope-specific capture using synthetic peptides. Polyclonal antibodies directed towards four proteins RBM3, SATB2, ANLN, and CNDP1, potentially involved in human cancers, were selected and antibodies to several non-overlapping epitopes were generated and subsequently validated by Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. For all four proteins, a dramatic difference in functionality could be observed for these monospecific antibodies directed to the different epitopes. In each case, at least one antibody was obtained with full functionality across all applications, while other epitope-specific fractions showed no or little functionality. These results present a path forward to use the mapped binding sites of polyclonal antibodies to generate epitope-specific antibodies, providing an attractive approach for large-scale efforts to characterize the human proteome by antibodies.

  4. Characterization of M2 antibodies in asymptomatic Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hua Jiang; Ren-Qian Zhong; Xiao-Yun Fan; Yin Hu; Feng An; Jian-Wen Sun; Xian-Tao Kong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of M2 antibodies specific for pdmary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) in asymptomatic Chinese and identify patients with early PBC.METHODS: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ElISA)tests for M2 antibodies to recombinant protein were performed in 5 011 subjects (age range, 26-85 years; mean age: 45.81±15.02 years) who took an annual physical examination. M2-positive subjects were further analyzed for immunoglobulin (Ig) classes and subclasses of M2 antibodies.Clinical, biochemical and immunological data were obtained for M2-positive subjects. In addition, ultrasonography (US)or endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP)was performed to exclude any disorders other than PBC.RESULTS: M2 antibodies were detected in 8 (0.16%) of the 5 0LL subjects studied. Of the 8 subjects, 7 were female and 1 was male (age range: 40-74 years). An unexplained increase of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) values, often to striking levels,was detected in 4 M2-positive subjects, 3 of them accorded with the diagnostic criteria recommended by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, even though they had no symptoms of PBC (such as fatigue, pruritus or jaundice).Liver biopsy was performed in two M2-positive subjects and the histology was compatible with PBC in both cases.CONCLUSION: Our data, while not assessing the true prevalence of asymptomatic PBC in the general population,suggest that asymptomatic PBC is much more common in China than has been supposed.

  5. Cyclic peptide formation catalyzed by an antibody ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrud, David B.; Benkovic, Patricia A.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Roberts, Victoria; Liu, Josephine; Neagu, Irina; Iwama, Seiji; Phillips, Barton W.; Smith, Amos B.; Hirschmann, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic hexapeptides represent a class of compounds with important, diverse biological activities. We report herein that the antibody 16G3 catalyzes the cyclization of d-Trp-Gly-Pal-Pro-Gly-Phe⋅p-nitrophenyl ester (8a) to give c-(d-Trp-Gly-Pal-Pro-Gly-l-Phe) (11a). The antibody does not, however, catalyze either epimerization or hydrolysis. The resulting rate enhancement of the cyclization by 16G3 (22-fold) was sufficient to form the desired product in greater than 90% yield. In absolute rate terms, the turnover of 16G3 is estimated to be 2 min−1. The background rate of epimerization of 8a was reduced from 10 to 1% and hydrolysis from 50 to 4% in the presence of 16G3. As expected, the catalytic effects of 16G3 were blocked by the addition of an amount of the hapten equal to twice the antibody concentration. We also synthesized three diastereomers of 8a: the d-Trp1-d-Phe6 (8b), l-Trp1-l-Phe6 (8c), and l-Trp1-d-Phe6 (8d) hexapeptides as well as d-Trp′-l-Trp6 (12) and d-Phe′-l-Phe6 (13). As expected, the rate enhancement by 16G3 was greatest for 8a, because the stereochemistry of Trp1 and Phe6 matches that of the corresponding residues on the hapten used to induce the biosynthesis of 16G3. A model of the variable domain of 16G3 was generated from the primary sequence using the antibody structural database to guide the model construction. The resulting model provided support for some previously proposed interpretations of the kinetic data, while providing valuable new insights for others. PMID:10688882

  6. Surface activity of a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Senner, Frank; Maeder, Karsten; Mueller, Robert

    2009-12-01

    The development of high concentration antibody formulations presents a major challenge for the formulation scientist, as physical characteristics and stability behavior change compared to low concentration protein formulations. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential correlation between surface activity and shaking stress stability of a model antibody-polysorbate 20 formulation. The surface activities of pure antibody and polysorbate 20 were compared, followed by a study on the influence of a model antibody on the apparent critical micelle concentration (CMC) of polysorbate 20 over a protein concentration range from 10 to 150 mg/mL. In a shaking stress experiment, the stability of 10, 75, and 150 mg/mL antibody formulations was investigated containing different concentrations of polysorbate 20, both below and above the CMC. The antibody increased significantly the apparent CMC of antibody-polysorbate 20 mixtures in comparison to the protein-free buffer. However, the concentration of polysorbate required for stabilization of the model antibody in a shaking stress experiment did not show dependence on the CMC. A polysorbate 20 level of 0.005% was found sufficient to stabilize both at low and high antibody concentration against antibody aggregation and precipitation.

  7. [Anti-NEP and anti-PLA2R antibodies in membranous nephropathy: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdzik, A A; Debiec, H; I Brochériou; Husson, C; Rorive, S; Broeders, N; Le Moine, A; Ronco, P; Nortier, J

    2015-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is the most common cause for nephrotic syndrome in adults and occurs as an idiopathic (primary) or secondary disease. Since the early 2000's, substantial advances have been made in the understanding of the molecular bases of MN. The neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and the receptor for secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2R) have been identified as target antigens for circulating and deposited antibodies in allo-immune neonatal and adult " idiopathic " MN, respectively. These antibodies recognize specific antigens of podocytes, precipitate as subepithelial immune complexes and activate complement leading to proteinuria. Anti-PLA2R antibodies are of particular clinical importance. Indeed, they are detected in approximately 70% of primary MN in adults, demonstrating that MN actually is an autoimmune condition specific to the kidney. In Europeans, genome-wide studies have shown an association between alleles of PLA2R1 and HLA DQA1 (class II genes of tissue histocompatibility complex) genes and idiopathic MN. Newly developed diagnostic tests detecting circulating anti-PLA2R antibody and PLA2R antigen in glomerular deposits have induced a change in paradigm in the diagnostic approach of idiopathic MN. Measurement of circulating anti-PLA2R antibody is also very useful for the monitoring of MN activity. However, the mechanisms responsible for the formation of anti-PLA2R antibodies as well as those involved in the progression of MN to end-stage renal disease remain to be defined.

  8. Production and Purification of Monoclonal Antibody Against Tumor Marker of TPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Amir Abbas Ghodrat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the invasive nature of cancer cells, one of the most important and best indicator of them is the markers inside them. One of the most important markers that observed in some types of cancer cells in various parts of the body is the Cytokeratin. Tissue plasminogen activator antigen (TPA is a Cytokeratin composed of molecules with various molecular weights. The level of TPA serum as associated with cellular growth level and tumorization of cells. In this research, the hybrid of spleen cells in BALB/c female mouse with myeloma cells was conducted with a ratio of 10:1. The resulting monoclonal antibodies were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blot. Protein G chromatography was utilized to purify monoclonal antibodies. The results for determining isotypes showed IgM and IgG classes. The titer of the antibody obtained from various clones was capable of identifying Cytokeratin antigen with a dilution of 1/10000. The resulting antibodies were finally confirmed by western blot and all the 5 resulting monoclonal antibodies were capable of identifying a 48 kDa protein. The results indicate that with the help of TPA marker and the monoclonal antibodies produced against them, this marker can be recognized quickly with great accuracy in suspicious cases of cancer. Thus, appropriate measures will be taken to prevent and fight off its probable side effects. This factor can be further used to build a diagonal kit with high sensitivity.

  9. [Platelet allo-antibodies identification strategies for preventing and managing platelet refractoriness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basire, A; Picard, C

    2014-11-01

    Platelet refractoriness is a serious complication for patients receiving recurrent platelet transfusions, which can be explained by non-immune and immune causes. Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) allo-immunization, especially against HLA class I, is the major cause for immune platelet refractoriness. To a lesser extent, allo-antibodies against specific Human Platelet Antigen (HPA) are also involved. Pregnancy, transplantation and previous transfusions can lead to allo-immune reaction against platelet antigens. After transfusion, platelet count is decreased by accelerated platelet destruction related to antibodies fixation on incompatible platelet antigens. New laboratory tests for allo-antibodies identification were developed to improve sensibility and specificity, especially with the LUMINEX(®) technology. The good use and interpretation of these antibodies assays can improve strategies for platelet refractoriness prevention and management with a patient adapted response. Compatible platelets units can be selected according to their identity with recipient typing or immune compatibility regarding HLA or HPA antibodies or HLA epitope compatibility. Prospective studies are needed to further confirm the clinical benefit of new allo-antibodies identification methods and consensus strategies for immune platelet refractoriness management.

  10. Class Action and Class Settlement in a European Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses the options for introducing common European rules on class action lawsuits with an opt-out-model in individual cases. An analysis is made of how the risks of misuse of class actions can be prevented. The article considers the Dutch rules on class settlements (the WCAM procedure......) and the advantage of integrating equivalent rules into a European rule set. The Danish rules, which have now been in effect for some years, are then considered....

  11. EXPRESSION OF HLA-CLASS Ⅱ GENESOF IDDM PATIENTS ON THE SURFACE OF THE LTK- CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王姮; 孙琦

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the function of HLA-class Ⅱ genes in the autoimmune response of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus(DDM),the HLA-class Ⅱ gene of IDDM patients was introd uced into Ltk-cells with pSV2-neo plas-mid,using the calcium phosphate precipitation technique.We obtained a stable cell line expressing the HLA-class Ⅱ gene from lymphocytes of IDDM patients.Expression was identified by direct ox erythocyte-CrCl3-HLA DR monoclonal antibody rosetting.

  12. Carrier induced epitopic suppression of antibody responses induced by virus-like particles is a dynamic phenomenon caused by carrier-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegerlehner, Andrea; Wiesel, Melanie; Dietmeier, Klaus; Zabel, Franziska; Gatto, Dominique; Saudan, Philippe; Bachmann, Martin F

    2010-07-26

    Pre-existing immunity against vaccine carrier proteins has been reported to inhibit the immune response against antigens conjugated to the same carrier by a process termed carrier induced epitopic suppression (CIES). Hence understanding the phenomenon of CIES is of major importance for the development of conjugate vaccines. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a novel class of potent immunological carriers which have been successfully used to enhance the antibody response to virtually any conjugated antigen. In the present study we investigated the impact of a pre-existing VLP-specific immune response on the development of antibody responses against a conjugated model peptide after primary, secondary and tertiary immunization. Although VLP-specific immune responses led to reduced peptide-specific antibody titers, we showed that CIES against peptide-VLP conjugates could be overcome by high coupling densities, repeated injections and/or higher doses of conjugate vaccine. Furthermore we dissected VLP-specific immunity by adoptively transferring VLP-specific antibodies, B-cells or T(helper) cells separately into naïve mice and found that the observed CIES against peptide-VLP conjugates was mainly mediated by carrier-specific antibodies.

  13. Anti-HLA and Anti-MICA Antibodies in Liver Transplant Recipients: Effect on Long-Term Graft Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Ciszek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Presence of anti-HLA antibodies has a well-known impact on kidney grafts survival; however their role in liver transplantation has not been fully elucidated. We conducted a 7-year prospective study to show correlation between presence of anti-HLA and anti-MICA antibodies and liver graft survival. Methods. Blood samples from 123 liver transplant recipients were collected during patients routine visits. Time from transplantation to blood sample collection was different for each patient. Blood samples were tested for anti-HLA (separately class I and II and MICA antibodies using Luminex assays. Results. There were 32 (26% patients with positive anti-HLA and 37 (30% with positive anti-MICA antibodies. Graft loss occurred in 7 cases (23% in anti-HLA positive group compared to 20 (22% in anti-HLA negative group ( and in 8 cases (22% in anti-MICA positive group but 19 (23% in anti-MICA negative group (. No correlations were detected between presence of antibodies and acute graft rejection (AGR. Presence of any antibodies (anti-HLA or anti-MICA antibodies correlated with late graft rejection (. Conclusion. Presence of anti-HLA or anti-MICA had no impact on long-term liver graft survival; however, detection of any antibodies was correlated with episodes of late graft rejection.

  14. Screening for genes involved in antibody response to sheep red blood cells in the chicken, Gallus gallus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tuoyu; Guan, Xiaojing; Smith, Edward J

    2015-09-01

    Antibody response, an important trait in both agriculture and biomedicine, plays a part in protecting animals from infection. Dissecting molecular basis of antibody response may improve artificial selection for natural disease resistance in livestock and poultry. A number of genetic markers associated with antibody response have been identified in the chicken and mouse by linkage-based association studies, which only define genomic regions by genetic markers but do not pinpoint genes for antibody response. In contrast, global expression profiling has been applied to define the molecular bases of a variety of biological traits through identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Here, we employed Affimetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays to identify differentially expressed genes for antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) using chickens challenged with and without SRBC or chickens with high and low anti-SRBC titers. The DEGs include those with known (i.e., MHC class I and IgH genes) or unknown function in antibody response. Classification test of these genes suggested that the response of the chicken to intravenous injection of SRBC involved multiple biological processes, including response to stress or other different stimuli, sugar, carbohydrate or protein binding, and cell or soluble fraction, in addition to antibody response. This preliminary study thus provides an insight into molecular basis of antibody response to SRBC in the chicken.

  15. Single antigen flow beads for identification of human leukocyte antigen antibody specificities in hypersensitized patients with chronic renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Soyöz, Mustafa; Kılıçaslan-Ayna, Tülay; Özkızılcık-Koçyiğit, Aslı; Güleç, Derya; Pirim, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aims of this study Aims of this study were to identify class I and class II antibodies in highly sensitized patients by flow cytometry single antigen bead (FC-SAB) assay and to evaluate according to donor HLA type in order to increase their kidney transplantation chance. Material and methods We analyzed 60 hypersensitive patients of 351 individuals, who applied to our laboratory for PRA test in November 2013-December 2014. Flow cytometric PRA screening and single antigen bead commercial kits ...

  16. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  17. Organizing MHC Class II Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Fooksman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules are ligands for CD4+ T cells and are critical for initiating the adaptive immune response. This review is focused on what is currently known about MHC class II organization at the plasma membrane of antigen presenting cells and how this affects antigen presentation to T cells. The organization and diffusion of class II molecules have been measured by a variety of biochemical and microscopic techniques. Membrane lipids and other proteins have been implicated in MHC class II organization and function. However, when compared with the organization of MHC class I or TCR complexes, much less is known about MHC class II. Since clustering of T cell receptors occurs during activation, the organization of MHC molecules prior to recognition and during synapse formation may be critical for antigen presentation.

  18. Antibody response to measles immunization in India*

    OpenAIRE

    Job, J. S.; John, T J; Joseph, A.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody response to measles vaccine was measured in 238 subjects aged 6-15 months. Seroconversion rates ranged from 74% at 6 months of age to 100% at 13-15 months; the differences in age-specific rates were not statistically significant. The postimmunization antibody titres increased with increasing age of the vaccinee. Seroconversion rates and antibody titres in 49 subjects with grades I and II malnutrition were not significantly different from those in the 189 normal subjects.

  19. Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Systemic Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awa Oumar Touré

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLs could be associated with an increased risk of vascular pathologies in systemic scleroderma. The aim of our study was to search for APLs in patients affected by systemic scleroderma and to evaluate their involvement in the clinical manifestations of this disease. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study, from January 2009 until August 2010, with patients received at the Department of Dermatology (Dakar, Senegal. Blood samples were taken at the hematology laboratory and were analyzed for the presence of APLs. Results: Forty patients were recruited. Various types of either isolated or associated APLs were found in 23 patients, i.e. 57.5% of the study population. The most frequently encountered antibody was IgG anti-β2 GPI (37.5% of the patients, followed by anticardiolipins (17.5% and lupus anticoagulants (5%. No statistically significant association of positive antiphospholipid-related tests to any of the scleroderma complications could be demonstrated. Conclusion: A high proportion of patients showing association of systemic scleroderma and APLs suggests the presence of a morbid correlation between these 2 pathologies. It would be useful to follow a cohort of patients affected by systemic scleroderma in order to monitor vascular complications following confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  20. Weil classes on abelian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Moonen, B J J; Zarhin, Yu. G.

    1996-01-01

    Consider a complex abelian variety X on which a field F acts. Generalizing a construction of A. Weil, one associates to this a subspace W_F of the cohomology of X, which we call the space of Weil classes w.r.t. F. The purpose of this paper is to answer the following two questions: Q1: under what conditions on F does the space W_F contain, or even consist of, Hodge classes?, Q2: if W_F contains Hodge classes, under what conditions on F are these exceptional? In case X is defined over a number field, we also answer the analogous questions for Tate classes.

  1. On uniqueness of characteristic classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda

    2011-01-01

    We give an axiomatic characterization of maps from algebraic K-theory. The results apply to a large class of maps from algebraic K-theory to any suitable cohomology theory or to algebraic K-theory. In particular, we obtain comparison theorems for the Chern character and Chern classes and for the ......We give an axiomatic characterization of maps from algebraic K-theory. The results apply to a large class of maps from algebraic K-theory to any suitable cohomology theory or to algebraic K-theory. In particular, we obtain comparison theorems for the Chern character and Chern classes...

  2. Duodenal biopsy may be avoided when high transglutaminase antibody titers are present

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santiago Vivas; Jose G Ruiz de Morales; Sabino Riestra; Laura Arias; Dolores Fuentes; Noemi Alvarez; Sara Calleja; Mercedes Hernando; Blanca Herrero; Javier Casqueiro; Luis Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the predictive value of tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies for villous atrophy in adult and pediatric populations to determine if duodenal biopsy can be avoided. METHODS: A total of 324 patients with celiac disease(CD; 97 children and 227 adults) were recruited prospectively at two tertiary centers. Human IgA class anti-tTG antibody measurement and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were performed at diagnosis.A second biopsy was performed in 40 asymptomatic adults on a gluten-free diet (GFD) and with normal tTG levels.RESULTS: Adults showed less severe histopathology (26% vs 63%; P < 0.0001) and lower tTG antibody titers than children. Levels of tTG antibody correlated with Marsh type in both populations ( r = 0.661; P < 0.0001). Multiple logistic regression revealed that only tTG antibody was an independent predictor for Marsh type 3 lesions, but clinical presentation type and age were not. A cut-off point of 30 U tTG antibody yielded the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.854). Based on the predictive value of this cut-off point, up to 95% of children and 53% of adults would be correctly diagnosed without biopsy. Despite GFDs and decreased tTG antibody levels, 25% of the adults did not recover from villous atrophy during the second year after diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Strongly positive tTG antibody titers might be sufficient for CD diagnosis in children. However, duodenal biopsy cannot be avoided in adults because disease presentation and monitoring are different.

  3. Tau passive immunotherapy in mutant P301L mice: antibody affinity versus specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina d'Abramo

    Full Text Available The use of antibodies to treat neurodegenerative diseases has undergone rapid development in the past decade. To date, immunotherapeutic approaches to Alzheimer's disease have mostly targeted amyloid beta as it is a secreted protein that can be found in plasma and CSF and is consequently accessible to circulating antibodies. Few recent publications have suggested the utility of treatment of tau pathology with monoclonal antibodies to tau. Our laboratory has begun a systematic study of different classes of tau monoclonal antibodies using mutant P301L mice. Three or seven months old mutant tau mice were inoculated weekly with tau monoclonal antibodies at a dose of 10 mg/Kg, until seven or ten months of age were reached respectively. Our data strongly support the notion that in P301L animals treated with MC1, a conformational monoclonal antibody specific for PHF-tau, the rate of development of tau pathology is effectively reduced, while injecting DA31, a high affinity tau sequence antibody, does not exert such benefit. MC1 appears superior to DA31 in overall effects, suggesting that specificity is more important than affinity in therapeutic applications. Unfortunately the survival rate of the P301L treated mice was not improved when immunizing either with MC1 or PHF1, a high affinity phospho-tau antibody previously reported to be efficacious in reducing pathological tau. These data demonstrate that passive immunotherapy in mutant tau models may be efficacious in reducing the development of tau pathology, but a great deal of work remains to be done to carefully select the tau epitopes to target.

  4. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Gearhart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  5. Isoimmunization with anti-U antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R J; Holder, W T; McCord, D L

    1984-03-01

    Isoimmunization with anti-U antibody is a rare but significant cause of hemolytic disease in black newborns. In this case report, an lgG antibody stimulated by fetomaternal transfusion produced a positive direct Coombs' test on cord blood but not neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. A review of the literature suggests the pathophysiology is similar to Rh isoimmunization. The anti-U antibody may develop as a result of pregnancy or blood transfusion in the 1.2 percent of American blacks who are at risk for developing the antibody. The principles of treatment employed in Rh isoimmunization can be successfully used in isoimmunization due to anti-U.

  6. Type Families with Class, Type Classes with Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano, Alejandro; Hage, Jurriaan; Bahr, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Type classes and type families are key ingredients in Haskell programming. Type classes were introduced to deal with ad-hoc polymorphism, although with the introduction of functional dependencies, their use expanded to type-level programming. Type families also allow encoding type-level functions...

  7. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates.

  8. Alloactivated HLA class II-positive T-cell lines induce IL-2 reactivity but lack accessory cell function in mixed leukocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Dickmeiss, E; Hofmann, B

    1989-01-01

    ). From 70 to 90% of the Ta were HLA class II-positive as judged by the reactions with HLA class II-reactive monoclonal antibodies, and the Ta carried the DR allospecificities of the original T-cell donor when typed in the microcytotoxic test using DR-specific alloantisera. Neither irradiated nor...

  9. The in vitro biological activity of the HLA-DR-binding clinical IgG4 antibody 1D09C3 is a consequence of the disruption of cell aggregates and can be abrogated by Fab arm exchange.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, K.; Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Glauner, H.B.; Becker, F.; Brock, R.E.; Hannus, S.

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies of the IgG4 subclass, directed against cell surface antigens have received attention as therapeutic molecules due to their poor induction of the complement system. The MHC class II-directed IgG4 antibody 1D09C3 has been explored for the treatment of lymphomas. The mechanism-of-action is s

  10. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  11. Humoral Reactivity of Renal Transplant-Waitlisted Patients to Cells From GGTA1/CMAH/B4GalNT2, and SLA Class I Knockout Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Gregory R; Reyes, Luz M; Butler, James R; Ladowski, Joseph M; Estrada, Jose L; Sidner, Richard A; Eckhoff, Devin E; Tector, Matt; Tector, A Joseph

    2017-04-01

    Antipig antibodies are a barrier to clinical xenotransplantation. We evaluated antibody binding of waitlisted renal transplant patients to 3 glycan knockout (KO) pig cells and class I swine leukocyte antigens (SLA). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from SLA identical wild type (WT), α1, 3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) KO, GGTA1/ cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH) KO, and GGTA1/ CMAH /b1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyl transferase (B4GalNT2) KO pigs were screened for human antibody binding using flow cytometric crossmatch (FCXM). Sera from 820 patients were screened on GGTA1/CMAH/B4GalNT2 KO cells and a subset with elevated binding was evaluated further. FCXM was performed on SLA intact cells and GGTA1/SLA class I KO cells after depletion with WT pig RBCs to remove cell surface reactive antibodies, but leave SLA antibodies. Lastly, human and pig reactive antibodies were eluted and tested for cross-species binding and reactivity to single-antigen HLA beads. Sequential glycan KO modifications significantly reduce antibody binding of waitlisted patients. Sera exhibiting elevated binding without reduction after depletion with WT RBCs demonstrate reduced binding to SLA class I KO cells. Human IgG, eluted from human and pig peripheral blood mononuclear cells, interacted across species and bound single-antigen HLA beads in common epitope-restricted patterns. Many waitlisted patients have minimal xenoreactive antibody binding to the triple KO pig, but some HLA antibodies in sensitized patients cross-react with class I SLA. SLA class I is a target for genome editing in xenotransplantation.

  12. HLA antibody detection with solid phase assays: great expectations or expectations too great?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebel, H M; Bray, R A

    2014-09-01

    Alloantibodies directed against HLA antigens, are a barrier to long-term solid organ allograft survival. The clinical impact of preformed, donor-directed HLA alloantibodies range from acceptable risk to unequivocal contraindication for organ transplantation. HLA antibodies are key factors that limit patient access to donor organs. Serological methods were once the only approach to identify HLA antigens and antibodies. Limitations in these technologies led to the development of solid phase approaches. In the early 1990s, the development of the polymerase chain reaction enabled DNA-based HLA antigen testing to be performed. By the mid-1990s, microparticle-based technology that utilized flow cytometry for analysis was developed to detect both classes I and II HLA antibodies. These methodologies revolutionized clinical histocompatibility testing. The strengths and weaknesses of these assays are described in detail in this review.

  13. Global and Local Conformation of Human IgG Antibody Variants Rationalizes Loss of Thermodynamic Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgeworth, Matthew J; Phillips, Jonathan J; Lowe, David C; Kippen, Alistair D; Higazi, Daniel R; Scrivens, James H

    2015-12-07

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a major class of medicines, with high specificity and affinity towards targets spanning many disease areas. The antibody Fc (fragment crystallizable) region is a vital component of existing antibody therapeutics, as well as many next generation biologic medicines. Thermodynamic stability is a critical property for the development of stable and effective therapeutic proteins. Herein, a combination of ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) approaches have been used to inform on the global and local conformation and dynamics of engineered IgG Fc variants with reduced thermodynamic stability. The changes in conformation and dynamics have been correlated with their thermodynamic stability to better understand the destabilising effect of functional IgG Fc mutations and to inform engineering of future therapeutic proteins.

  14. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saccucci Matteo; D’Attilio Michele; Rodolfino Daria; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Tecco Simona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). ...

  15. Antibodies to Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis in the sera of ankylosing spondylitis patients with/without iritis and enthesitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Ikola, O; Lehtinen, K; Toivanen, P; Granfors, K

    1995-05-01

    IgM, IgG and IgA class serum antibodies against the whole Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis bacteria, as well as against K. pneumoniae and E. coli lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) were studied earlier in the sera of 98 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and in 102 healthy blood donors by enzyme immunoassay. In this study the patients were divided into groups according to the clinical picture, i.e. presence or absence of iritis and enthesitis. The previous major finding of increased IgA class antibody levels against the whole K. pneumoniae bacteria in AS patients when compared to the healthy controls was not specifically associated with any single patient group in the present study. However, the patients with iritis had higher levels of IgA class antibodies to LPS of K. pneumoniae and E. coli when compared to the patients without iritis. In addition, the patients without enthesitis had higher level of IgG class antibodies against whole K. pneumoniae bacteria compared to the patients with enthesitis. The increased IgA class antibody levels against K. pneumoniae and E. coli LPS in AS patients with iritis may reflect an inflammatory process in the gut area. Furthermore, there were certain other differences in the immunological parameters between the AS patients with and without iritis or enthesitis and the possibility that they reflect different mechanisms involved in the disease processes cannot be excluded.

  16. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  17. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  18. Antibodies to watch in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    Over 50 investigational monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics are currently undergoing evaluation in late-stage clinical studies, which is expected to drive a trend toward first marketing approvals of at least 6-9 mAbs per year in the near-term. In the United States (US), a total of 6 and 9 mAbs were granted first approvals during 2014 and 2015, respectively; all these products are also approved in the European Union (EU). As of December 1, 2016, 6 mAbs (atezolizumab, olaratumab, reslizumab, ixekizumab, bezlotoxumab, oblitoxaximab) had been granted first approvals during 2016 in either the EU or US. Brodalumab, was granted a first approval in Japan in July 2016. Regulatory actions on marketing applications for brodalumab in the EU and US are not expected until 2017. In 2017, first EU or US approvals may also be granted for at least nine mAbs (ocrelizumab, avelumab, Xilonix, inotuzumab ozogamicin, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, romosozumab) that are not yet approved in any country. Based on announcements of company plans for regulatory submissions and the estimated completion dates for late-stage clinical studies, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 6 antibody therapeutics (benralizumab, tildrakizumab, emicizumab, galcanezumab, ibalizumab, PRO-140) that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted during December 2016* or 2017. Other 'antibodies to watch' in 2017 include 20 mAbs are undergoing evaluation in pivotal studies that have estimated primary completion dates in late 2016 or during 2017. Of these, 5 mAbs are for cancer (durvalumab, JNJ-56022473, ublituximab, anetumab ravtansine, glembatumumab vedotin) and 15 mAbs are for non-cancer indications (caplacizumab, lanadelumab, roledumab, tralokinumab, risankizumab, SA237, emapalumab, suptavumab, erenumab, eptinezumab, fremanezumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, lampalizumab, brolucizumab). Positive results from these studies may

  19. Development of therapeutic antibodies to G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels: Opportunities, challenges and their therapeutic potential in respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Finch, Donna K; Mustelin, Tomas; Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2017-01-01

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics continues to be a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Therapeutic drug targets such as soluble cytokines, growth factors and single transmembrane spanning receptors have been successfully targeted by recombinant monoclonal antibodies and the development of new product candidates continues. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important disease targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to the complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these important regulators of cell function. Given this opportunity, a significant effort has been applied to address the challenges of targeting these complex molecules and a number of targets are linked to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases. In this review, we provide a summary of the importance of GPCRs and ion channels involved in respiratory disease and discuss advantages offered by antibodies as therapeutics at these targets. We highlight some recent GPCRs and ion channels linked to respiratory disease mechanisms and describe in detail recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional antibodies against challenging membrane protein targets such as GPCRs and ion channels.

  20. Translanguaging in a Reading Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Viniti; Subhan, Aidil

    2015-01-01

    Using translanguaging as a theoretical foundation, this paper analyses findings from a Grade 2 reading class for low achieving students, where Malay was used as a scaffold to teach English. Data come from one class in one school in Singapore and its Learning Support Programme (LSP), which is part of a larger research project on biliteracy. The LSP…