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Sample records for mg isotopic systematics

  1. Mg isotope systematics during magmatic processes: Inter-mineral fractionation in mafic to ultramafic Hawaiian xenoliths

    Stracke, A.; Tipper, E. T.; Klemme, S.; Bizimis, M.

    2018-04-01

    Observed differences in Mg isotope ratios between bulk magmatic rocks are small, often on a sub per mill level. Inter-mineral differences in the 26Mg/24Mg ratio (expressed as δ26Mg) in plutonic rocks are on a similar scale, and have mostly been attributed to equilibrium isotope fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Here we report Mg isotope data on minerals in spinel peridotite and garnet pyroxenite xenoliths from the rejuvenated stage of volcanism on Oahu and Kauai, Hawaii. The new data are compared to literature data and to theoretical predictions to investigate the processes responsible for inter-mineral Mg isotope fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Theory predicts up to per mill level differences in δ26Mg between olivine and spinel at magmatic temperatures and a general decrease in Δ26Mgolivine-spinel (=δ26Mgolivine - δ26Mgspinel) with increasing temperature, but also with increasing Cr# in spinel. For peridotites with a simple petrogenetic history by melt depletion, where increasing depletion relates to increasing melting temperatures, Δ26Mgolivine-spinel should thus systematically decrease with increasing Cr# in spinel. However, most natural peridotites, including the Hawaiian spinel peridotites investigated in this study, are overprinted by variable extents of melt-rock reaction, which disturb the systematic primary temperature and compositionally related olivine-spinel Mg isotope systematics. Diffusion, subsolidus re-equilibration, or surface alteration may further affect the observed olivine-spinel Mg isotope fractionation in peridotites, making Δ26Mgolivine-spinel in peridotites a difficult-to-apply geothermometer. The available Mg isotope data on clinopyroxene and garnet suggest that this mineral pair is a more promising geothermometer, but its application is restricted to garnet-bearing igneous (garnet pyroxenites) and metamorphic rocks (eclogites). Although the observed δ26Mg variation is on a sub per mill range in bulk magmatic rocks

  2. Resetting of Mg isotopes between calcite and dolomite during burial metamorphism: Outlook of Mg isotopes as geothermometer and seawater proxy

    Hu, Zhongya; Hu, Wenxuan; Wang, Xiaomin; Lu, Yizhou; Wang, Lichao; Liao, Zhiwei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium isotopes are an emerging tool to study the geological processes recorded in carbonates. Calcite, due to its ubiquitous occurrence and the large Mg isotope fractionation associated with the mineral, has attracted great interests in applications of Mg isotope geochemistry. However, the fidelity of Mg isotopes in geological records of carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite and dolomite) against burial metamorphism remains poorly constrained. Here we report our investigation on the Mg isotope systematics of a dolomitized Middle Triassic Geshan carbonate section in eastern China. Magnesium isotope analysis was complemented by analyses of Sr-C-O isotopic compositions, major and trace element concentrations, and petrographic and mineralogical features. Multiple lines of evidence consistently indicated that post-depositional diagenesis of carbonate minerals occurred to the carbonate rocks. Magnesium isotope compositions of the carbonate rocks closely follow a mixing trend between a high δ26Mg dolomite end member and a low δ26Mg calcite end member, irrespective of sample positions in the section and calcite/dolomite ratio in the samples. By fitting the measured Mg isotope data using a two-end member mixing model, an inter-mineral Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation of 0.72‰ was obtained. Based on the experimentally derived Mg isotope fractionation factors for dolomite and calcite, a temperature of 150-190 °C was calculated to correspond to the 0.72‰ Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation. Such temperature range matches with the burial-thermal history of the local strata, making a successful case of Mg isotope geothermometry. Our results indicate that both calcite and dolomite had been re-equilibrated during burial metamorphism, and based on isotope mass balance of Mg, the system was buffered by dolomite in the section. Therefore, burial metamorphism may reset Mg isotope signature of calcite, and Mg isotope compositions in calcite should be dealt with caution in

  3. High-precision Al-Mg isotopic systematics in USNM 3898 - The benchmark "ALL" for initial 87Sr/86Sr in the earliest Solar System

    MacPherson, G. J.; Defouilloy, C.; Kita, N. T.

    2018-06-01

    The Allende CAI USNM 3898 is the basis for "ALL", the lowest measured initial 87Sr/86Sr value in any solar system material including other CAIs (Gray et al., 1973). If the value ALL is correct (debated), then USNM 3898 must be 1-2 million years older than other CAIs (Podosek et al., 1991). This would require in turn that it have a much higher initial 26Al/27Al value than other CAIs, on the order of 4 × 10-4. Podosek et al. (1991) showed that this is not the case, with initial 26Al/27Al = (4.5 ± 0.7) × 10-5, but their Mg-isotopic data had large error bars and there was clear isotopic disturbance in the data having the highest 27Al/24Mg. Without the latter data, the slope of their isochron is higher (5.10 ± 1.19) × 10-5) and within (large) error of being supracanonical. We used high-precision SIMS to re-determine the initial 26Al/27Al in this CAI and obtained a value of (5.013 ± 0.099) × 10-5, with an intercept δ26Mg* = - 0.008 ± 0.048 and MSWD = 1.3. This value is indistinguishable from that measured in many other CAIs and conclusively shows that USNM 3898 is not uniquely ancient. We also confirmed evidence of later isotopic disturbance, similar to what Podosek et al. found, indicating a re-melting and evaporation event some 200,000 years after initial CAI solidification.

  4. The magnesium isotope (δ26Mg) signature of dolomites

    Geske, A.; Goldstein, R. H.; Mavromatis, V.; Richter, D. K.; Buhl, D.; Kluge, T.; John, C. M.; Immenhauser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dolomite precipitation models and kinetics are debated and complicated due to the complex and temporally fluctuating fluid chemistry and different diagenetic environments. Using well-established isotope systems (δ18O, δ13C, 87Sr/86Sr), fluid inclusions and elemental data, as well as a detailed sedimentological and petrographic data set, we established the precipitation environment and subsequent diagenetic pathways of a series of Proterozoic to Pleistocene syn-depositional marine evaporative (sabkha) dolomites, syn-depositional non-marine evaporative (lacustrine and palustrine) dolomites, altered marine ("mixing zone") dolomites and late diagenetic hydrothermal dolomites. These data form the prerequisite for a systematic investigation of dolomite magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mgdol). Dolomite δ26Mg ratios documented here range, from -2.49‰ to -0.45‰ (δ26Mgmean = -1.75 ± 1.08‰, n = 42). The isotopically most depleted end member is represented by earliest diagenetic marine evaporative sabkha dolomites (-2.11 ± 0.54‰ 2σ, n = 14). In comparing ancient compositions to modern ones, some of the variation is probably due to alteration. Altered marine (-1.41 ± 0.64‰ 2σ, n = 4), and earliest diagenetic lacustrine and palustrine dolomites (-1.25 ± 0.86‰ 2σ, n = 14) are less negative than sabkha dolomites but not distinct in composition. Various hydrothermal dolomites are characterized by a comparatively wide range of δ26Mg ratios, with values of -1.44 ± 1.33‰ (2σ, n = 10). By using fluid inclusion data and clumped isotope thermometry (Δ47) to represent temperature of precipitation for hydrothermal dolomites, there is no correlation between fluid temperature (∼100 to 180 °C) and dolomite Mg isotope signature (R2 = 0.14); nor is there a correlation between δ26Mgdol and δ18Odol. Magnesium-isotope values of different dolomite types are affected by a complex array of different Mg sources and sinks, dissolution/precipitation and non

  5. Tracing subduction zone fluid-rock interactions using trace element and Mg-Sr-Nd isotopes

    Wang, Shui-Jiong; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Li, Shu-Guang; Zhang, Li-Fei; Du, Jin-Xue; He, Yong-Sheng; Niu, Yaoling

    2017-10-01

    Slab-derived fluids play a key role in mass transfer and elemental/isotopic exchanges in subduction zones. The exhumation of deeply subducted crust is achieved via a subduction channel where fluids from various sources are abundant, and thus the chemical/isotopic compositions of these rocks could have been modified by subduction-zone fluid-rock interactions. Here, we investigate the Mg isotopic systematics of eclogites from southwestern Tianshan, in conjunction with major/trace element and Sr-Nd isotopes, to characterize the source and nature of fluids and to decipher how fluid-rock interactions in subduction channel might influence the Mg isotopic systematics of exhumed eclogites. The eclogites have high LILEs (especially Ba) and Pb, high initial 87Sr/86Sr (up to 0.7117; higher than that of coeval seawater), and varying Ni and Co (mostly lower than those of oceanic basalts), suggesting that these eclogites have interacted with metamorphic fluids mainly released from subducted sediments, with minor contributions from altered oceanic crust or altered abyssal peridotites. The positive correlation between 87Sr/86Sr and Pb* (an index of Pb enrichment; Pb* = 2*PbN/[CeN + PrN]), and the decoupling relationships and bidirectional patterns in 87Sr/86Sr-Rb/Sr, Pb*-Rb/Sr and Pb*-Ba/Pb spaces imply the presence of two compositionally different components for the fluids: one enriched in LILEs, and the other enriched in Pb and 87Sr/86Sr. The systematically heavier Mg isotopic compositions (δ26Mg = - 0.37 to + 0.26) relative to oceanic basalts (- 0.25 ± 0.07) and the roughly negative correlation of δ26Mg with MgO for the southwestern Tianshan eclogites, cannot be explained by inheritance of Mg isotopic signatures from ancient seafloor alteration or prograde metamorphism. Instead, the signatures are most likely produced by fluid-rock interactions during the exhumation of eclogites. The high Rb/Sr and Ba/Pb but low Pb* eclogites generally have high bulk-rock δ26Mg values

  6. Magnesium isotope systematics in Martian meteorites

    Magna, Tomáš; Hu, Yan; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Mezger, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium isotope compositions are reported for a suite of Martian meteorites that span the range of petrological and geochemical types recognized to date for Mars, including crustal breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034. The δ26Mg values (per mil units relative to DSM-3 reference material) range from -0.32 to -0.11‰; basaltic shergottites and nakhlites lie to the heavier end of the Mg isotope range whereas olivine-phyric, olivine-orthopyroxene-phyric and lherzolitic shergottites, and chassignites have slightly lighter Mg isotope compositions, attesting to modest correlation of Mg isotopes and petrology of the samples. Slightly heavier Mg isotope compositions found for surface-related materials (NWA 7034, black glass fraction of the Tissint shergottite fall; δ26Mg > -0.17‰) indicate measurable Mg isotope difference between the Martian mantle and crust but the true extent of Mg isotope fractionation for Martian surface materials remains unconstrained. The range of δ26Mg values from -0.19 to -0.11‰ in nakhlites is most likely due to accumulation of clinopyroxene during petrogenesis rather than garnet fractionation in the source or assimilation of surface material modified at low temperatures. The rather restricted range in Mg isotope compositions between spatially and temporally distinct mantle-derived samples supports the idea of inefficient/absent major tectonic cycles on Mars, which would include plate tectonics and large-scale recycling of isotopically fractionated surface materials back into the Martian mantle. The cumulative δ26Mg value of Martian samples, which are not influenced by late-stage alteration processes and/or crust-mantle interactions, is - 0.271 ± 0.040 ‰ (2SD) and is considered to reflect δ26Mg value of the Bulk Silicate Mars. This value is robust taking into account the range of lithologies involved in this estimate. It also attests to the lack of the Mg isotope variability reported for the inner Solar System bodies at current

  7. Calculation of relativistic and isotope shifts in Mg I

    Berengut, J.C.; Flambaum, V.V.; Kozlov, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    We present an ab initio method of calculation of the isotope and relativistic shifts in atoms with a few valence electrons. It is based on an energy calculation involving the combination of the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory. This work is motivated by analyses of quasar absorption spectra that suggest that the fine-structure constant α was smaller at an early epoch. Relativistic shifts are needed to measure this variation of α, while isotope shifts are needed to resolve systematic effects in this study. The isotope shifts can also be used to measure isotopic abundances in gas clouds in the early universe, which are needed to study nuclear reactions in stars and supernovae and test models of chemical evolution. This paper shows that the isotope shift in magnesium can be calculated to very high precision using our method

  8. PETROCHEMISTRY, Pb ISOTOPE SYSTEMATICS, AND ...

    The petrology, geochemistry, geotectonic setting and common Pb isotope model ages for the granite gneisses in Ilesha schist belt have been studied and presented in this paper. These gneisses, apart from the normal rock-forming silicates, contain apatite, monazite, ilmenite and zircon in trace amounts. The occurrence of ...

  9. Mg-Fe Isotope Systems of Mantle Xenoliths: Constrains on the Evolution of Siberian Craton

    An, Y.; Kiseeva, E. S.; Sobolev, N. V.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths bring to the surface a variety of lithologies (dunites, lherzolites, harzburgites, wehrlites, eclogites, pyroxenites, and websterites) and represent snapshots of the geochemical processes that occur deep within the Earth. Recent improvements in the precision of the MC-ICP-MS measurements have allowed us to expand the amount of data on Mg and Fe isotopes for mantle-derived samples. For instance, to constrain the isotopic composition of the Earth based on the study of spinel and garnet peridotites (An et al., 2017; Teng et al., 2010), to trace the origin and to investigate the isotopic fractionation mechanism during metamorphic process using cratonic or orogenic eclogites (Li et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2012) and to reveal the metasomatism-induced mantle heterogeneity by pyroxenites (Hu et al., 2016). Numerous multi-stage modification events and mantle layering are detected in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle under the Siberian craton (Ashchepkov et al., 2008a; Sobolev et al., 1975, etc). Combined analyses of Mg and Fe isotopic systems could provide new constraints on the formation and evolution of the ancient cratonic mantle. In order to better constrain the magnitude and mechanism of inter-mineral Mg and Fe isotopic fractionations at high temperatures, systematic studies of mantle xenoliths are needed. For example, theoretical calculations and natural samples measurements have shown that large equilibrium Mg isotope fractionations controlled by the difference in coordination number of Mg among minerals could exist (Huang et al., 2013; Li et al., 2011). Thus, the Mg isotope geothermometer could help us trace the evolution history of ancient cratons. In this study we present Mg and Fe isotopic data for whole rocks and separated minerals (clinopyroxene (cpx) and garnet (grt)) from different types of mantle xenoliths (garnet pyroxenites, eclogites, grospydites and garnet peridotites) from a number of kimberlite pipes in Siberian craton (Udachnaya

  10. Concentration effect on inter-mineral equilibrium isotope fractionation: insights from Mg and Ca isotopic systems

    Huang, F.; Wang, W.; Zhou, C.; Kang, J.; Wu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Many naturally occurring minerals, such as carbonate, garnet, pyroxene, and feldspar, are solid solutions with large variations in chemical compositions. Such variations may affect mineral structures and modify the chemical bonding environment around atoms, which further impacts the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors among minerals. Here we investigated the effects of Mg content on equilibrium Mg and Ca isotope fractionation among carbonates and Ca content on equilibrium Ca isotope fractionation between orthopyroxene (opx) and clinopyroxene (cpx) using first-principles calculations. Our results show that the average Mg-O bond length increases with decreasing Mg/(Mg+Ca) in calcite when it is greater than 1/48[1] and the average Ca-O bond length significantly decreases with decreasing Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) in opx when it ranges from 2/16 to 1/48[2]. Equilibrium isotope fractionation is mainly controlled by bond strengths, which could be measured by bond lengths. Thus, 103lnα26Mg/24Mg between dolomite and calcite dramatically increases with decreasing Mg/(Mg+Ca) in calcite [1] and it reaches a constant value when it is lower than 1/48. 103lnα44Ca/40Ca between opx and cpx significantly increases with decreasing Ca content in opx when Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) ranges from 2/16 to 1/48 [2]. If Ca/(Ca+Mg+Fe) is below 1/48, 103lnα44Ca/40Ca is not sensitive to Ca content. Based on our results, we conclude that the concentration effect on equilibrium isotope fractionation could be significant within a certain range of chemical composition of minerals, which should be a ubiquitous phenomenon in solid solution systems. [1] Wang, W., Qin, T., Zhou, C., Huang, S., Wu, Z., Huang, F., 2017. GCA 208, 185-197. [2] Feng, C., Qin, T., Huang, S., Wu, Z., Huang, F., 2014. GCA 143, 132-142.

  11. Water isotope systematics: Improving our palaeoclimate interpretations

    Jones, M. D.; Dee, S.; Anderson, L.; Baker, A.; Bowen, G.; Noone, D.

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, measured in a variety of archives, are widely used proxies in Quaternary Science. Understanding the processes that control δ18O change have long been a focus of research (e.g. Shackleton and Opdyke, 1973; Talbot, 1990 ; Leng, 2006). Both the dynamics of water isotope cycling and the appropriate interpretation of geological water-isotope proxy time series remain subjects of active research and debate. It is clear that achieving a complete understanding of the isotope systematics for any given archive type, and ideally each individual archive, is vital if these palaeo-data are to be used to their full potential, including comparison with climate model experiments of the past. Combining information from modern monitoring and process studies, climate models, and proxy data is crucial for improving our statistical constraints on reconstructions of past climate variability.As climate models increasingly incorporate stable water isotope physics, this common language should aid quantitative comparisons between proxy data and climate model output. Water-isotope palaeoclimate data provide crucial metrics for validating GCMs, whereas GCMs provide a tool for exploring the climate variability dominating signals in the proxy data. Several of the studies in this set of papers highlight how collaborations between palaeoclimate experimentalists and modelers may serve to expand the usefulness of palaeoclimate data for climate prediction in future work.This collection of papers follows the session on Water Isotope Systematics held at the 2013 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Papers in that session, the breadth of which are represented here, discussed such issues as; understanding sub-GNIP scale (Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation, (IAEA/WMO, 2006)) variability in isotopes in precipitation from different regions, detailed examination of the transfer of isotope signals from precipitation to geological archives, and the

  12. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isotope systematics of the lunar Mg-suite: the age of the lunar crust and its relation to the time of Moon formation.

    Carlson, Richard W; Borg, Lars E; Gaffney, Amy M; Boyet, Maud

    2014-09-13

    New Rb-Sr, (146,147)Sm-(142,143)Nd and Lu-Hf isotopic analyses of Mg-suite lunar crustal rocks 67667, 76335, 77215 and 78238, including an internal isochron for norite 77215, were undertaken to better define the time and duration of lunar crust formation and the history of the source materials of the Mg-suite. Isochron ages determined in this study for 77215 are: Rb-Sr=4450±270 Ma, (147)Sm-(143)Nd=4283±23 Ma and Lu-Hf=4421±68 Ma. The data define an initial (146)Sm/(144)Sm ratio of 0.00193±0.00092 corresponding to ages between 4348 and 4413 Ma depending on the half-life and initial abundance used for (146)Sm. The initial Nd and Hf isotopic compositions of all samples indicate a source region with slight enrichment in the incompatible elements in accord with previous suggestions that the Mg-suite crustal rocks contain a component of KREEP. The Sm/Nd-(142)Nd/(144)Nd correlation shown by both ferroan anorthosite and Mg-suite rocks is coincident with the trend defined by mare and KREEP basalts, the slope of which corresponds to ages between 4.35 and 4.45 Ga. These data, along with similar ages for various early Earth differentiation events, are in accord with the model of lunar formation via giant impact into Earth at ca 4.4 Ga. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Mg and Ca isotope fractionation during CaCO3 biomineralisation

    Chang, Veronica T.-C.; Williams, R.J.P.; Makishima, Akio; Belshawl, Nick S.; O'Nions, R. Keith

    2004-01-01

    The natural variation of Mg and Ca stable isotopes of carbonates has been determined in carbonate skeletons of perforate foraminifera and reef coral together with Mg/Ca ratios to assess the influence of biomineralisation processes. The results for coral aragonite suggest its formation, in terms of stable isotope behaviour, approximates to inorganic precipitation from a seawater reservoir. In contrast, results for foraminifera calcite suggest a marked biological control on Mg isotope ratios presumably related to its low Mg content compared with seawater. The bearing of these observations on the use of Mg and Ca isotopes as proxies in paleoceanography is considered

  14. Systematics of even-a polonium isotopes

    Younes, W.; Cizewski, J.A.; Bernstein, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    Polonium nuclei, with two valence protons, provide fertile ground for the study of the onset of collectivity: from the textbook two-particle levels of 210 Po to the phonon-like multiplets of 196 Po. In their earlier work the authors described the low-lying structure of even-A Po nuclei down to 196 Po as two protons interacting via a surface-δ interaction and adiabatically coupled to a vibrating core. However, this particle-core model (PCM) fails to adequately describe the recently measured level scheme of 194 Po. Also because it assumes a pre-existing vibrational core, this model does not help to understand the single particle contributions to the collective motion. Therefore, the authors have also studied the Po systematics using a more microscopic model: the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA). They will present a phenomenological analysis of the rapidity of the onset of collectivity for the Po isotopes as well as results of both PCM and QRPA calculations. The microscopic nature of the collectivity for the even-A Po isotopes will be discussed

  15. Textural and isotopic evidence for Ca-Mg carbonate pedogenesis

    Diaz-Hernandez, J. L.; Sánchez-Navas, A.; Delgado, A.; Yepes, J.; Garcia-Casco, A.

    2018-02-01

    Models for evaluating the terrestrial carbon cycle must take into account not only soil organic carbon, represented by a mixture of plant and animal remains, but also soil inorganic carbon, contained in minerals, mainly in calcite and dolomite. Thick soil caliches derived from weathering of mafic and ultramafic rocks must be considered as sinks for carbon storage in soils. The formation of calcite and dolomite from pedogenic alteration of volcanic tephras under an aridic moisture regime is studied in an unusually thick 3-m soil profile on Gran Canaria island (Canary Islands, Spain). The biological activity of the pedogenic environment (soil respiration) releases CO2 incorporated as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in waters. It drives the formation of low-magnesian calcite and calcian dolomite over basaltic substrates, with a δ13C negative signature (-8 to -6‰ vs. V-PDB). Precipitation of authigenic carbonates in the soil is accompanied by the formation of Mg-rich clay minerals and quartz after the weathering of basalts. Mineralogical, textural, compositional, and isotopic variations throughout the soil profile studied indicate that dolomite formed at greater depths and earlier than the calcite. The isotopic signatures of the surficial calcite and deeper dolomite crusts are primary and resulted from the dissolution-precipitation cycles that led to the formation of both types of caliches under different physicochemical conditions. Dolomite formed within a clay-rich matrix through diffusive transport of reactants. It is precipitated from water with more negative δ18O values (-1.5 to -3.5‰ vs. V-SMOW) in the subsoil compared to those of water in equilibrium with surficial calcite. Thus, calcite precipitated after dolomite, and directly from percolating solutions in equilibrium with vadose water enriched in δ18O (-0.5 to +1.5‰) due to the evaporation processes. The accumulation of inorganic carbon reaches 586.1 kg m-2 in the soil studied, which means that the

  16. Revisiting 26Al-26Mg systematics of plagioclase in H4 chondrites

    Telus, M.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.; Ogliore, R. C.

    2014-06-01

    Zinner and Göpel found clear evidence for the former presence of 26Al in the H4 chondrites Ste. Marguerite and Forest Vale. They assumed that the 26Al-26Mg systematics of these chondrites date "metamorphic cooling of the H4 parent body." Plagioclase in these chondrites can have very high Al/Mg ratios and low Mg concentrations, making these ion probe analyses susceptible to ratio bias, which is inversely proportional to the number of counts of the denominator isotope (Ogliore et al.). Zinner and Göpel used the mean of the ratios to calculate the isotope ratios, which exacerbates this problem. We analyzed the Al/Mg ratios and Mg isotopic compositions of plagioclase grains in thin sections of Ste. Marguerite, Forest Vale, Beaver Creek, and Sena to evaluate the possible influence of ratio bias on the published initial 26Al/27Al ratios for these meteorites. We calculated the isotope ratios using total counts, a less biased method of calculating isotope ratios. The results from our analyses are consistent with those from Zinner and Göpel, indicating that ratio bias does not significantly affect 26Al-26Mg results for plagioclase in these chondrites. Ste. Marguerite has a clear isochron with an initial 26Al/27Al ratio indicating that it cooled to below 450 °C 5.2 ± 0.2 Myr after CAIs. The isochrons for Forest Vale and Beaver Creek also show clear evidence that 26Al was alive when they cooled, but the initial 26Al/27Al ratios are not well constrained. Sena does not show evidence that 26Al was alive when it cooled to below the Al-Mg closure temperature. Given that metallographic cooling rates for Ste. Marguerite, Forest Vale, and Beaver Creek are atypical (>5000 °C/Myr at 500 °C) compared with most H4s, including Sena, which have cooling rates of 10-50 °C/Myr at 500 °C (Scott et al.), we conclude that the Al-Mg systematics for Ste. Marguerite, Forest Vale, and Beaver Creek are the result of impact excavation of these chondrites and cooling at the surface of the

  17. The influence of room temperature on Mg isotope measurements by MC-ICP-MS.

    Zhang, Xing-Chao; Zhang, An-Yu; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Huang, Fang; Yu, Hui-Min

    2018-03-24

    We observed that the accuracy and precision of magnesium (Mg) isotope analyses could be affected if the room temperature oscillated during measurements. To achieve high quality Mg isotopic data, it is critical to evaluate how the unstable room temperature affects Mg isotope measurements by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). We measured the Mg isotopes for the reference material DSM-3 using MC-ICP-MS under oscillating room temperatures in spring. For a comparison, we also measured the Mg isotopes under stable room temperatures, which was achieved by the installation of an improved temperature control system in the laboratory. The δ 26 Mg values measured under oscillating room temperatures have a larger deviation (δ 26 Mg from -0.09 to 0.08‰, with average δ 26 Mg = 0.00 ± 0.08 ‰) than those measured under a stable room temperature (δ 26 Mg from -0.03 to 0.03‰, with average δ 26 Mg = 0.00 ± 0.02 ‰) using the same MC-ICP-MS system. The room temperature variation can influence the stability of MC-ICP-MS. Therefore, it is critical to keep the room temperature stable to acquire high precise and accurate isotopic data when using MC-ICP-MS, especially when using the sample-standard bracketing (SSB) correction method. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of the magnetic isotope of magnesium, 25Mg, on post-radiation recovery of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.; Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.; Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.

    2011-01-01

    Among three stable magnesium isotopes, 24 Mg, 25 Mg, and 26 Mg with natural abundance 79, 10, and 11%, only 25 Mg has the nuclear spin (I=5/2) and, therefore, the nuclear magnetic moment. Two other isotopes are spinless (I=0) and, hence, have no magnetic moment. We have revealed that magnetic isotope 25 Mg, by comparison to nonmagnetic isotope 24 Mg, essentially stimulates the recovery process in the yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, after UV irradiation. Thus, we have first documented the magnetic isotope effect in radiation biology. This finding opens up the way to the development of novel radio-protectors based on the stable magnetic isotopes.

  19. Chronology of formation of early solar system solids from bulk Mg isotope analyses of CV3 chondrules

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Claydon, Jennifer L.; Elliott, Tim; Coath, Christopher D.; Lai, Yi-Jen; Russell, Sara S.

    2018-04-01

    We have analysed the petrography, major element abundances and bulk Al-Mg isotope systematics of 19 ferromagnesian chondrules from the CV3 chondrites Allende, Mokoia, and Vigarano, together with an Al-rich chondrule and refractory olivine from Mokoia. Co-variations of Al/Mg with Na/Mg and Ti/Mg in our bulk chondrules suggest their compositions are dominantly controlled by reworking of different proportions of chondrule components (e.g. mafic minerals and mesostatis); their precursors are thus fragments from prior generations of chondrules. Our samples show a range in fractionation corrected 26Mg/24Mg (Δ‧26Mg) ∼ 60 ppm, relative to precisions behaviour once 26Al was effectively extinct ((26Al/27Al)0 3.4 ± 0.6 × 10-5. Overall, our samples record a sequence of events from the formation of ferromagnesian objects within 0.5 Ma of CAI to re-equilibration of chondrules and silicate vapour >2 Ma post CAI, assuming an initially homogeneous 26Al/27Al. Metamorphism on the asteroid parent body may have played a subsequent role in affecting Mg isotope composition, but we argue this had a minor influence on the observations here.

  20. Correlated O and Mg isotopic anomalies in Allende inclusions: II. Magnesium

    Wasserburg, G.J.; Lee, T.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mg in two Allende Ca-Al rich inclusions shows large isotopic, mass-dependent fractionation which enriched the heavier isotopes. After normalization, Mg in these inclusions shows negative delta 26 Mg which appears to require the presence of nuclear effects in Mg distinct from 26 Al decay. The Mg mass fractionation is correlated with distinct but smaller fractionation effects for O reported by Clayton and Mayeda for the same inclusions (see companion paper). The observation of distinctive but uniform Mg isotopic composition in different phases within single Allende inclusions indicates that nuclear effects in O and Mg are not due to the entrapment of interstellar carrier grains as discrete entities, which are preserved as remnants, but are instead due to a homogenized mixture of components of extraordinary isotopic composition mixed with a component of ordinary solar system material and subjected to isotopic fractionation. The distinct O isotopic composition of different phases within a single inclusion is believed to be due to incomplete back-reaction of the higher temperature condensates with a cooler solar nebula of ''normal '' composition. The processes responsible for the O and Mg nuclear effects and the astrophysical site of their occurrence remain undefined

  1. Iron isotope systematics of the Skaergaard intrusion

    Lesher, Charles; Lundstrom, C.C.; Barfod, Gry

    crystallization on non-traditional stable isotope systems, particularly iron. FeTi oxide minerals (titanomagnetite and ilmenite) appear after ~60% of the magma had solidified. This was a significant event affecting the liquid line of descent and potentially accompanied by iron isotope fractionation. Here we...... report the results of a broad study of the iron isotope compositions of gabbros within the layered and upper border series of the Skaergaard intrusion, pegmatite and granophyre associated with these gabbroic rocks, and the sandwich horizon thought to represent the product of extreme differentiation and...

  2. Pyroxene Homogenization and the Isotopic Systematics of Eucrites

    Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.

    1996-01-01

    The original Mg-Fe zoning of eucritic pyroxenes has in nearly all cases been partly homogenized, an observation that has been combined with other petrographic and compositional criteria to establish a scale of thermal "metamorphism" for eucrites. To evaluate hypotheses explaining development of conditions on the HED parent body (Vesta?) leading to pyroxene homogenization against their chronological implications, it is necessary to know whether pyroxene metamorphism was recorded in the isotopic systems. However, identifying the effects of the thermal metamorphism with specific effects in the isotopic systems has been difficult, due in part to a lack of correlated isotopic and mineralogical studies of the same eucrites. Furthermore, isotopic studies often place high demands on analytical capabilities, resulting in slow growth of the isotopic database. Additionally, some isotopic systems would not respond in a direct and sensitive way to pyroxene homogenization. Nevertheless, sufficient data exist to generalize some observations, and to identify directions of potentially fruitful investigations.

  3. Stable Isotope Systematics of Martian Perchlorate

    Martin, P.; Farley, K. A.; Archer, D., Jr.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairen, A.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine isotopic compositions in HCl released during evolved gas analysis (EGA) runs have been detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity rover ranging from approximately -9‰ to -50‰ δ37Cl, with two spatially and isotopically separated groups of samples averaging -15‰ and -45‰. These extremely low values are the first such detection of any known natural material; common terrestrial values very rarely exceed ±5‰, and the most extreme isotopic signature yet detected elsewhere in the solar system are values of around +24‰ on the Moon. The only other known location in the solar system with large negative chlorine isotopes is the Atacama Desert, where perchlorate with -14‰ δ37Cl has been detected. The Atacama perchlorate has unusual Δ17O signatures associated with it, indicating a formation mechanism involving O3, which suggests an atmospheric origin of the perchlorate and associated large isotopic anomalies. Identification of non-zero positive Δ17O signatures in the O2 released during EGA runs would allow definitive evidence for a similar process having occurred on Mars. Perchlorate is thought to be the most likely source of HCl in EGA runs due to the simultaneous onset of O2 release. If perchlorate is indeed the HCl source, atmospheric chemistry could be responsible for the observed isotopic anomalies, with variable extents of perchlorate production producing the isotopic variability. However, chloride salts have also been observed to release HCl upon heating; if the timing of O2 release is merely coincidental, observed HCl could be coming from chlorides. At thermodynamic equilibrium, the fractionation factor of perchlorate reduction is 0.93, meaning that differing amounts of post-deposition reduction of isotopically normal perchlorate to chloride could account for the highly variable Cl isotopes. Additionally, post-deposition reduction could account for the difference between the two Cl isotopic groups if perchlorate

  4. Iron isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Dauphas, Nicolas; Huang, Shichun; Marty, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    The iron isotopic compositions of 93 well-characterized basalts from geochemically and geologically diverse mid-ocean ridge segments, oceanic islands and back arc basins were measured. Forty-three MORBs have homogeneous Fe isotopic composition, with δ56Fe ranging from +0.07‰ to +0.14‰ and an average of +0.105 ± 0.006‰ (2SD/√n, n = 43, MSWD = 1.9). Three back arc basin basalts have similar δ56Fe to MORBs. By contrast, OIBs are slightly heterogeneous with δ56Fe ranging from +0.05‰ to +0.14‰ in samples from Koolau and Loihi, Hawaii, and from +0.09‰ to +0.18‰ in samples from the Society Islands and Cook-Austral chain, French Polynesia. Overall, oceanic basalts are isotopically heavier than mantle peridotite and pyroxenite xenoliths, reflecting Fe isotope fractionation during partial melting of the mantle. Iron isotopic variations in OIBs mainly reflect Fe isotope fractionation during fractional crystallization of olivine and pyroxene, enhanced by source heterogeneity in Koolau samples.

  5. Investigating the effects of abyssal peridotite alteration on Si, Mg and Zn isotopes

    Savage, P. S.; Wimpenny, J.; Harvey, J.; Yin, Q.; Moynier, F.

    2013-12-01

    Around 1/3 of Earth's divergent ridge system is now classified as "slow" spreading [1], exposing ultramafic rocks (abyssal peridotites) at the seafloor. Such material is often highly altered by serpentinisation and steatisation (talc formation). It is crucial to understand such processes in order to access the original composition of the mantle, and to quantify any impact on ocean composition. Here we examine the effect of both serpentinisation and steatisation on Si, Mg and Zn isotopes. Hydrothermal alteration and seafloor weathering are both sources of oceanic Si [2] and weathering of abyssal peridotites is a source of oceanic Mg [3]; hence isotopic fractionation as a result of seafloor alteration could affect oceanic Si and Mg isotope composition. Zinc isotopes can provide complimentary information; the magnitude and direction of fractionation is highly dependent on complexing ligand [4] and can provide compositional information on the fluids driving metasomatism. For this study, two cores from the well-characterised abyssal peridotites recovered on ODP Leg 209 were examined [5]. Hole 1274a peridotites exhibit variable serpentinisation at ~200°C, whereas samples from Hole 1268a have been comprehensively serpentinised and then subsequently steatised to talc facies at ~350°C, by a low Mg/Si, low pH fluid. The Si, Mg and Zn isotope compositions of 1274a samples are extremely homogeneous, identical to that of pristine mantle rocks (BSE) i.e., serpentinisation at this locality was predominantly isochemical [5]. In contrast, samples from 1268a show greater isotopic variability. In all samples, Mg is enriched in the heavier isotopes relative to BSE, consistent with formation of isotopically heavy secondary phases [6]. For Si, serpentinised samples are slightly enriched in the lighter isotopes compared to BSE, again consistent with the behaviour of Si during formation of secondary phases [7]. Within the steatised samples, some exhibit enrichments in the lighter Si

  6. Tracing alteration of mantle peridotite in the Samail ophiolite using Mg isotopes

    de Obeso, J. C.; Kelemen, P. B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Magnesium is one of the main constituents of mantle peridotite ( 22.8 wt%), which has a homogeneous Mg isotopic composition (d26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.04 ‰ (2 sd) DSM3, Teng et al 2010 GCA). Mg isotopes are used as tracers of continental and oceanic weathering as they exhibit variable degrees of fractionation during alteration depending on the lithology. Here we report some of the first Mg isotopic compositions of the mantle section of the Samail ophiolite in Oman and its alteration products. The mantle section of the ophiolite is composed mainly of depleted harzburgites and dunites with mantle-like d26Mg (-0.25, -0.21 ‰). Mantle peridotite is far from equilibrium in near surface conditions leading to rapid, extensive serpentinization, carbonation and oxidation, as well as other geochemical changes. Our analyzed samples encompass most of the alteration of peridotite products observed in Oman including listvenites (completely carbonated peridotite) near the basal thrust of the ophiolite, massive magnesite veins within peridotite outcrops, and heavily altered harzburgites. Magnesite listvenites have d26Mg slightly below mantle values (-0.33, -0.33‰) while dolomite listvenites are significantly lighter (-1.46, -0.89‰). This suggests that heavy Mg isotopes were removed from the listvenites during ophiolite emplacement. Heavily altered peridotite from Wadi Fins exhibit alteration halos with drastic changes in composition. The most oxidized areas are enriched in Fe and depleted in Mg compared to the cores of the samples. These variations in Mg concentrations are complemented by a shift to heavy Mg isotopic compositions (0.74, 0.86‰), among the heaviest d26Mg values that have been reported in altered peridotite. Potential sinks for light isotopes removed from such alteration zones are massive magnesite veins with very light compositions (-3.39, -3.14‰). The fractionation of Mg isotopes observed in the mantle section of the ophiolite spans more than 50% of the known

  7. Al-Mg Isotope Study of Allende 5241

    Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Jeffcoat, C. R.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    The defining characteristic of type B1 CAIs is a large (.5- 3mm) concentric melilite mantle [1]. In [2] we presented two isochrons from separate traverses across the melilite mantle of Allende EK 459-5-1. The primary petrographic differences between the traverses was the preservation of strong oscillatory zoning. The traverse that crossed the distinctive oscillatory zone produced a pristine internal isochron, while the other that did not have a strongly preserved oscillatory zone produced a disturbed isochron indicated by more scatter (higher MSWD) and a positive (delta)26Mg* intercept. The implication simply being that the oscillatory zone may represent varying conditions during the mantle formation event. We targeted a similar texture in Allende 5241 using the same methodology in an attempt to achieve similar results.

  8. Effect of Interband Interaction on Isotope Effect Coefficient of Mg B2 Superconductors

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Kumvongsa, C.; Burakorn, A.; Changkanarth, P.; Maneeratanakul, S.

    2005-10-01

    In this research, the exact formula of Tc s equation and the isotope effect coefficient of two-band s-wave superconductors in weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of interband interaction .In each band ,our model consist of two paring interactions : the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction . According to the numerical calculation, we find that the isotope effect coefficient of MgB 2 , α=3 . 0 with T c 40 K can be found in the weak coupling regime and interband interaction of electron-phonon show more effect on isotope effect coefficient than interband interaction of non-phonon-electron

  9. Non-traditional Stable Isotope Systematics of Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Rouxel, O. J.

    2009-05-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges is one of the fundamental processes controlling the chemistry of the oceans and the altered oceanic crust. Past studies have demonstrated the complexity and diversity of seafloor hydrothermal systems and have highlighted the importance of subsurface environments in controlling the composition of hydrothermal fluids and mineralization types. Traditionally, the behavior of metals in seafloor hydrothermal systems have been investigated by integrating results from laboratory studies, theoretical models, mineralogy and fluid and mineral chemistry. Isotope ratios of various metals and metalloids, such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Sb have recently provided new approaches for the study of seafloor hydrothermal systems. Despite these initial investigations, the cause of the isotopic variability of these elements remains poorly constrained. We have little understanding of the isotope variations between vent types (black or white smokers) as well as the influence of source rock composition (basalt, felsic or ultrabasic rocks) and alteration types. Here, I will review and present new results of metal isotope systematics of seafloor hydrothermal systems, in particular: (1) determination of empirical isotope fractionation factors for Zn, Fe and Cu-isotopes through isotopic analysis of mono-mineralic sulfide grains lining the internal chimney wall in contact with hydrothermal fluid; (2) comparison of Fe- and Cu-isotope signatures of vent fluids from mid- oceanic and back-arc hydrothermal fields, spanning wide ranges of pH, temperature, metal concentrations and contributions of magmatic fluids enriched in SO2. Ultimately, the use of complementary non-traditional stable isotope systems may help identify and constrain the complex interactions between fluids,minerals, and organisms in seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  10. Laser spectroscopy and beta-NMR measurements of short-lived Mg isotopes

    Kowalska, M

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of studying the neutron-rich 29Mg, 31Mg and 33Mg isotopes has been demonstrated with the laser and beta-NMR spectroscopy setup at ISOLDE/CERN. The values of the magnetic moment and the nuclear spin of 31Mg are reported and reveal an intruder ground state. This proves the weakening of N=20 shell gap and places this nucleus inside the so called "island of inversion". The experimental setup and technique, as well as the results, are presented.

  11. Isotope disequilibria 4n series in the Morro do Ferro System, Pocos de Caldas (MG)

    Bonotto, D.M.; Fujimori, K.

    1986-01-01

    Thorium isotopic analyses were performed on well spoils of the main ore body at Morro do Ferro, Pocos de Caldas (MG), on groundwaters from several boreholes in the area and surface waters from a stream that originates at the base of the hill. For extraction of thorium a long chemical process was applied to samples; activities of Th-228 and Th-232 isotopes (4n series) were determined by alpha spectrometry method. The rations Th-228/Th-232 determined for well spoils did not show marked disequilibria between these isotopes. In ground and surface waters, the ratios Th-228/Th-232 showed marked isotopic fractionation between these nuclides, not related to selective leaching of Th-228 in relation to Th-232 or recoil of Th-228 nucleons. (author) [pt

  12. Constraining Thermal Histories by Monte Carlo Simulation of Mg-Fe Isotopic Profiles in Olivine

    Sio, C. K. I.; Dauphas, N.

    2016-12-01

    In thermochronology, random time-temperature (t-T) paths are generated and used as inputs to model fission track data. This random search method is used to identify a range of acceptable thermal histories that can describe the data. We have extended this modeling approach to magmatic systems. This approach utilizes both the chemical and stable isotope profiles measured in crystals as model constraints. Specifically, the isotopic profiles are used to determine the relative contribution of crystal growth vs. diffusion in generating chemical profiles, and to detect changes in melt composition. With this information, tighter constraints can be placed on the thermal evolution of magmatic bodies. We use an olivine phenocryst from the Kilauea Iki lava lake, HI, to demonstrate proof of concept. We treat this sample as one with little geologic context, then compare our modeling results to the known thermal history experienced by that sample. To complete forward modeling, we use MELTS to estimate the boundary condition, initial and quench temperatures. We also assume a simple relationship between crystal growth and cooling rate. Another important parameter is the isotopic effect for diffusion (i.e., the relative diffusivity of the light vs. heavy isotope of an element). The isotopic effects for Mg and Fe diffusion in olivine have been estimated based on natural samples; experiments to better constrain these parameters are underway. We find that 40% of the random t-T paths can be used to fit the Mg-Fe chemical profiles. However, only a few can be used to simultaneously fit the Mg-Fe isotopic profiles. These few t-T paths are close to the independently determined t-T history of the sample. This modeling approach can be further extended other igneous and metamorphic systems where data exist for diffusion rates, crystal growth rates, and isotopic effects for diffusion.

  13. Mg isotopes and the disappearance of magic N=20 - Laser and beta-NMR studies

    Kowalska, M

    2006-01-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy and beta-NMR spectroscopy with optical pumping were applied at ISOLDE/CERN to measure for the first time the magnetic moments of neutron-rich 27Mg, 29Mg, 31Mg and 33Mg, along with the spins of the two latter. The magnetic moment of 27Mg was derived from its hyperfine structure detected in UV fluorescent light, whereas the nuclear magnetic resonance observed in beta-decay asymmetry from a polarised ensemble of nuclei gave the magnetic moment of 29Mg. For 31Mg and 33Mg, the hyperfine structure and nuclear magnetic resonance gave the spin and the magnetic moment. The preliminary results for 27Mg and 29Mg are consistent with a large neutron shell gap at N=20, whereas data on 31Mg show that for this nucleus N=20 is not a magic number, which is also the case for 33Mg, based on preliminary analysis. Thus, the two latter isotopes belong to the island of inversion.

  14. Stable Isotope Systematics of Coalbed Gas during Desorption and Production

    Martin Niemann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The stable carbon isotope ratios of coalbed methane (CBM demonstrate diagnostic changes that systematically vary with production and desorption times. These shifts can provide decisive, predictive information on the behaviour and potential performance of CBM operations. Samples from producing CBM wells show a general depletion in 13C-methane with increasing production times and corresponding shifts in δ13C-CH4 up to 35.8‰. Samples from canister desorption experiments show mostly enrichment in 13C for methane with increasing desorption time and isotope shifts of up to 43.4‰. Also, 13C-depletion was observed in some samples with isotope shifts of up to 32.1‰. Overall, the magnitudes of the observed isotope shifts vary considerably between different sample sets, but also within samples from the same source. The δ13C-CH4 values do not have the anticipated signature of methane generated from coal. This indicates that secondary processes, including desorption and diffusion, can influence the values. It is also challenging to deconvolute these various secondary processes because their molecular and isotope effects can have similar directions and/or magnitudes. In some instances, significant alteration of CBM gases has to be considered as a combination of secondary alteration effects.

  15. Speleothem Mg-isotope time-series data from different climate belts

    Riechelmann, S.; Buhl, D.; Richter, D. K.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Riechelmann, D. F. C.; Niedermayr, A.; Vonhof, H. B.; Wassenburg, J.; Immenhauser, A.

    2012-04-01

    Speleothem Mg-isotope time-series data from different climate belts Sylvia Riechelmann (1), Dieter Buhl(1), Detlev K. Richter (1), Andrea Schröder-Ritzrau (2), Dana F.C. Riechelmann (3), Andrea Niedermayr (1), Hubert B. Vonhof (4) , Jasper Wassenburg (1), Adrian Immenhauser (1) (1) Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute for Geology, Mineralogy and Geophysics, Universitätsstraße 150, D-44801 Bochum, Germany (2) Heidelberg Academy of Sciences, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany (3) Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Institute of Geography, Johann-Joachim-Becher-Weg 21, D-55128 Mainz, Germany (4) Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands The Magnesium isotope proxy in Earth surface research is still underexplored. Recently, field and laboratory experiments have shed light on the complex suite of processes affecting Mg isotope fractionation in continental weathering systems. Magnesium-isotope fractionation in speleothems depends on a series of factors including biogenic activity and composition of soils, mineralogy of hostrock, changes in silicate versus carbonate weathering ratios, water residence time in the soil and hostrock and disequilibrium factors such as the precipitation rate of calcite in speleothems. Furthermore, the silicate (here mainly Mg-bearing clays) versus carbonate weathering ratio depends on air temperature and rainfall amount, also influencing the soil biogenic activity. It must be emphasized that carbonate weathering is generally dominant, but under increasingly warm and more arid climate conditions, silicate weathering rates increase and release 26Mg-enriched isotopes to the soil water. Furthermore, as shown in laboratory experiments, increasing calcite precipitation rates lead to elevated delta26Mg ratios and vice versa. Here, data from six stalagmite time-series Mg-isotope records (Thermo Fisher Scientific Neptune MC-ICP-MS) are shown. Stalagmites

  16. Crystallization history of enriched shergottites from Fe and Mg isotope fractionation in olivine megacrysts

    Collinet, Max; Charlier, Bernard; Namur, Olivier; Oeser, Martin; Médard, Etienne; Weyer, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Martian meteorites are the only samples available from the surface of Mars. Among them, olivine-phyric shergottites are basalts containing large zoned olivine crystals with highly magnesian cores (Fo 70-85) and rims richer in Fe (Fo 45-60). The Northwest Africa 1068 meteorite is one of the most primitive "enriched" shergottites (high initial 87Sr/86Sr and low initial ε143Nd). It contains olivine crystals as magnesian as Fo 77 and is a major source of information to constrain the composition of the parental melt, the composition and depth of the mantle source, and the cooling and crystallization history of one of the younger magmatic events on Mars (∼180 Ma). In this study, Fe-Mg isotope profiles analyzed in situ by femtosecond-laser ablation MC-ICP-MS are combined with compositional profiles of major and trace elements in olivine megacrysts. The cores of olivine megacrysts are enriched in light Fe isotopes (δ56FeIRMM-14 = -0.6 to -0.9‰) and heavy Mg isotopes (δ26MgDSM-3 = 0-0.2‰) relative to megacryst rims and to the bulk martian isotopic composition (δ56Fe = 0 ± 0.05‰, δ26Mg = -0.27 ± 0.04‰). The flat forsterite profiles of megacryst cores associated with anti-correlated fractionation of Fe-Mg isotopes indicate that these elements have been rehomogenized by diffusion at high temperature. We present a 1-D model of simultaneous diffusion and crystal growth that reproduces the observed element and isotope profiles. The simulation results suggest that the cooling rate during megacryst core crystallization was slow (43 ± 21 °C/year), and consistent with pooling in a deep crustal magma chamber. The megacryst rims then crystallized 1-2 orders of magnitude faster during magma transport toward the shallower site of final emplacement. Megacryst cores had a forsterite content 3.2 ± 1.5 mol% higher than their current composition and some were in equilibrium with the whole-rock composition of NWA 1068 (Fo 80 ± 1.5). NWA 1068 composition is thus close to a

  17. Systematics of the electric dipole response in stable tin isotopes

    Bassauer, Sergej; von Neumann-Cosel, Peter; Tamii, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

    The electric dipole is an important property of heavy nuclei. Precise information on the electric dipole response provides information on the electric dipole polarisability which in turn allows to extract important constraints on neutron-skin thickness in heavy nuclei and parameters of the symmetry energy. The tin isotope chain is particularly suited for a systematic study of the dependence of the electric dipole response on neutron excess as it provides a wide mass range of accessible isotopes with little change of the underlying structure. Recently an inelastic proton scattering experiment under forward angles including 0º on 112,116,124Sn was performed at the Research Centre for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Japan with a focus on the low-energy dipole strength and the polarisability. First results are presented here. Using data from an earlier proton scattering experiment on 120Sn the gamma strength function and level density are determined for this nucleus.

  18. Systematics of the electric dipole response in stable tin isotopes

    Bassauer Sergej

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The electric dipole is an important property of heavy nuclei. Precise information on the electric dipole response provides information on the electric dipole polarisability which in turn allows to extract important constraints on neutron-skin thickness in heavy nuclei and parameters of the symmetry energy. The tin isotope chain is particularly suited for a systematic study of the dependence of the electric dipole response on neutron excess as it provides a wide mass range of accessible isotopes with little change of the underlying structure. Recently an inelastic proton scattering experiment under forward angles including 0º on 112,116,124Sn was performed at the Research Centre for Nuclear Physics (RCNP, Japan with a focus on the low-energy dipole strength and the polarisability. First results are presented here. Using data from an earlier proton scattering experiment on 120Sn the gamma strength function and level density are determined for this nucleus.

  19. High-precision Mg isotope measurements of terrestrial and extraterrestrial material by HR-MC-ICPMS—implications for the relative and absolute Mg isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth

    Bizzarro, Martin; Paton, Chad; Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn

    2011-01-01

    -isotope composition for Earth’s mantle – and hence that of the bulk silicate Earth – to be 25Mg/24Mg 1/4 0.126896 ¿ 0.000025 and 26Mg/24Mg 1/4 0.139652 ¿ 0.000033. Given the restricted range of m25Mg obtained for bulk planetary material by the sample-standard bracketing technique and the excellent agreement between...

  20. Isotope systematic of contaminant leads in Monterey Bay

    Flegal, A.R.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Stephenson, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of stable lead ( 204 Pb, 206 Pb, 207 Pb, and 208 Pb) were utilized to identify a lead slag deposit as the principal source of contaminant lead in Monterey Bay. This point source had been indicated by anomalously high lead concentrations in native mussels (Mytilus californianus) near that deposit, which were orders of magnitude above the base-line concentration of the species (0.5 μg/g). Subsequent analyses revealed that the lead concentrations of both transplanted mussels and intertidal sediments were positively correlated with their proximity to the slag deposit. Complementary lead isotopic compositions substantiated those empirical correlations by demonstrating that the slag was the predominant source of contaminant lead in both the mussels and the sediments. Analyses of the digestive tracts of mussels from the slag deposit indicated that ingested slag particulates accounted for their elevated lead concentrations, while analyses of their gonads indicated that dissolved lead from other industrial sources was also being bioaccumulated by passive adsorption on exposed surfaces. Therefore, this study has demonstrated the potential of lead isotope systematics both to identify sources of lead contamination in marine organisms and to trace its biogeochemical cycle in the marine environment. 26 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  1. Evolution of Single Particle and Collective properties in the Neutron-Rich Mg Isotopes

    Reiter, P; Wiens, A; Fitting, J; Lauer, M; Van duppen, P L E; Finke, F

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study the single particle and collective properties of the neutron-rich Mg isotopes in transfer reactions and Coulomb excitation using REX-ISOLDE and MINIBALL. From the Coulomb excitation measurement precise and largely model independent B( E2 ; 0$^{+}_{g.s.}\\rightarrow$ 2$^{+}_{1}$ ) will be determined for the even-even isotopes. For the odd isotopes the distribution of the E2 strength over a few low-lying states will be measured. The sign of the M1/E2 mixing ratio, extracted from angular distributions, is characteristic of the sign of the deformation, as is the resulting level scheme. The neutron-pickup channel in the transfer reactions will allow for a determination of the single particle properties (spin, parity, spectroscopic factors) of these nuclei. This information will give new insights in changes of nuclear structure in the vicinity of the island of deformation around $^{32}$Mg. A total of 24 shifts of REX beam time is requested.

  2. Sr-Nd-Hf Isotopic Analysis of <10 mg Dust Samples: Implications for Ice Core Dust Source Fingerprinting

    Ujvari, Gabor; Wegner, Wencke; Klötzli, Urs

    2018-01-01

    Combined Sr‐Nd‐Hf isotopic data of two reference materials (AGV‐1/BCR2) and 50, 10, and 5 mg aliquots of carbonate‐free fine grain (isotopic...... compositions (ICs) demonstrate that robust isotopic ratios can be obtained from 5 to 10 mg size rock samples using the ion exchange/mass spectrometry techniques applied. While 87Sr/86Sr ratios of dust aluminosilicate fractions are affected by even small changes in pretreatments, Nd isotopic ratios are found...... to be insensitive to acid leaching, grain‐size or weathering effects. However, the Nd isotopic tracer is sometimes inconclusive in dust source fingerprinting (BEI and NUS both close to ɛNd(0) –10). Hafnium isotopic values (

  3. Mineral dissolution and precipitation in carbonate dominated terranes assessed using Mg isotopes

    Tipper, E.; Calmels, D.; Gaillardet, J.; Galy, A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonate weathering by carbonic acid consumes atmospheric CO2 during mineral dissolution, fixing it as aqueous bicarbonate over millennial time-scales. Ocean acidification has increased the solubility of CO2 in seawater by changing the balance of pH to alkalinity (the oceanic reservoir of carbon). This has lengthened the time-scale for CO2 sequestration by carbonate weathering to tens of thousands of years. At a global scale, the net consumption of CO2 is at least equal to that from silicate weathering, but there is far less work on carbonate weathering compared to silicate weathering because it has generally been assumed to be CO2 neutral on geological time-scales. Carbonate rocks are more readily dissolved than silicate rocks, meaning that their dissolution will likely respond much more rapidly to global environmental change when compared with the dissolution of silicate minerals. Although far less concentrated than Ca in many carbonates, Mg substitutes for Ca and is more concentrated than any other metal ion. Tracing the behavior of Mg in river waters, using Mg stable isotopes (26Mg/24Mg ratio expressed as delta26Mg in per mil units) is therefore a novel way to understand the complex series of dissolution/precipitation reactions that govern solute concentrations of Ca and Mg, and hence CO2 transfer by carbonate weathering. We present new Mg isotope data on a series of river and spring waters from the Jura mountains in North-East France. The stratigraphic column is relatively uniform throughout the Jura mountains and is dominated by limestones. As the limestone of the Jura Mountains were deposited in high-energy shallow water environments (shore line, lagoon and coral reefs), they are usually clay and organic poor. The delta26Mg of the local rocks is very constant at circa -4permil. The delta26Mg of the river waters is also fairly constant, but offset from the rock at -2.5permil. This is an intriguing observation because the dissolution of limestones is expected

  4. Ground-water pollution determined by boron isotope systematics

    Vengosh, A.; Kolodny, Y.; Spivack, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Boron isotopic systematics as related to ground-water pollution is reviewed. We report isotopic results of contaminated ground water from the coastal aquifers of the Mediterranean in Israel, Cornia River in north-western Italy, and Salinas Valley, California. In addition, the B isotopic composition of synthetic B compounds used for detergents and fertilizers was investigated. Isotopic analyses were carried out by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The investigated ground water revealed different contamination sources; underlying saline water of a marine origin in saline plumes in the Mediterranean coastal aquifer of Israel (δ 11 B=31.7 per mille to 49.9 per mille, B/Cl ratio ∼1.5x10 -3 ), mixing of fresh and sea water (25 per mille to 38 per mille, B/Cl∼7x10 -3 ) in saline water associated with salt-water intrusion to Salinas Valley, California, and a hydrothermal contribution (high B/Cl of ∼0.03, δ 11 B=2.4 per mille to 9.3 per mille) in ground water from Cornia River, Italy. The δ 11 B values of synthetic Na-borate products (-0.4 per mille to 7.5 per mille) overlap with those of natural Na-borate minerals (-0.9 per mille to 10.2 per mille). In contrast, the δ 11 B values of synthetic Ca-borate and Na/Ca borate products are significantly lower (-15 per mille to -12.1 per mille) and overlap with those of the natural Ca-borate minerals. We suggest that the original isotopic signature of the natural borate minerals is not modified during the manufacturing process of the synthetic products, and it is controlled by the crystal chemistry of borate minerals. The B concentrations in pristine ground-waters are generally low ( 11 B=39 per mille), salt-water intrusion and marine-derived brines (40 per mille to 60 per mille) are sharply different from hydrothermal fluids (δ 11 B=10 per mille to 10 per mille) and anthropogenic sources (sewage effluent: δ 11 B=0 per mille to 10 per mille; boron-fertilizer: δ 11 B=-15 per mille to 7 per mille). some

  5. Doping-Induced Isotopic Mg11B2 Bulk Superconductor for Fusion Application

    Qi Cai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Superconducting wires are widely used for fabricating magnetic coils in fusion reactors. Superconducting magnet system represents a key determinant of the thermal efficiency and the construction/operating costs of such a reactor. In consideration of the stability of 11B against fast neutron irradiation and its lower induced radioactivation properties, MgB2 superconductor with 11B serving as the boron source is an alternative candidate for use in fusion reactors with a severe high neutron flux environment. In the present work, the glycine-doped Mg11B2 bulk superconductor was synthesized from isotopic 11B powder to enhance the high field properties. The critical current density was enhanced (103 A·cm−2 at 20 K and 5 T over the entire field in contrast with the sample prepared from natural boron.

  6. Photodissociation spectroscopy of the Mg + -CO2 complex and its isotopic analogs

    Yeh, C. S.; Willey, K. F.; Robbins, D. L.; Pilgrim, J. S.; Duncan, M. A.

    1993-02-01

    Mg+-CO2 ion-molecule cluster complexes are produced by laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle cluster source. The vibronic spectroscopy in these complexes is studied with mass-selected photodissociation spectroscopy in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Two excited electronic states are observed (2) 2Σ+ and 2Π. The 2Π state has a vibrational progression in the metal-CO2 stretching mode (ωe'=381.8 cm-1). The complexes are linear (Mg+-OCO) and are bound by the charge-quadrupole interaction. The dissociation energy (D0`) is 14.7 kcal/mol. Corresponding spectra are measured for each of the 24, 25, and 26 isotopes of magnesium. These results are compared to theoretical predictions made by Bauschlicher and co-workers.

  7. Correlations Among Microstructure, Morphology, Chemistry, and Isotopic Systematics of Hibonite in CM Chondrites

    Han, J.; Liu, M.-C..; Keller, L. P.; Davis, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hibonite is a primary refractory phase occurring in many CAIs, typically with spinel and perovskite. Our microstructural studies of CAIs from carbonaceous chondrites reveal a range of stacking defect densities and correlated non-stoichiometry in hibonite. We also conducted a series of annealing experiments, demonstrating that the Mg-Al substitution stabilized the formation of defect-structured hibonite. Here, we continue a detailed TEM analysis of hibonite-bearing inclusions from CM chondrites that have been well-characterized isotopically. We examine possible correlations of microstructure, morphology, mineralogy, and chemical and isotopic systematics of CM hibonites in order to better understand the formation history of hibonite in the early solar nebula. Methods: Fifteen hibonite-bearing inclusions from the Paris CM chondrite were analyzed using a JEOL 7600F SEM and a JEOL 8530F electron microprobe. In addition to three hibonite-bearing inclusions from the Murchison CM chondrite previously reported, we selected three inclusions from Paris, Pmt1-6, 1-9, and 1-10, representing a range of 26Al/27Al ratios and minor element concentrations for a detailed TEM study. We extracted TEM sections from hibonite grains using a FEI Quanta 3D field emission gun SEM/FIB. The sections were then examined using a JEOL 2500SE field-emission scanning TEM equipped with a Thermo-Noran thin window EDX spectrometer. Results and Discussion: A total of six hibonite-bearing inclusions, including two platy hibonite crystals (PLACs) and four spinel-hibonite inclusions (SHIBs), were studied. There are notable differences in chemical and isotopic compositions between the inclusions (Table 1), indicative of their different formation environment or timing. Our TEM observations show perfectly-ordered, stoichiometric hibonite crystals without stacking defects in two PLACs, 2-7-1 and 2-8-2, and in three SHIBs, Pmt1-6, 1-9, and 1-10. In contrast, SHIB 1-9-5 hibonite grains contain a

  8. Systematic investigation of electromagnetic properties of all stable hafnium isotopes

    Napiorkowski, T.J.; Choinski, J.; Czosnyka, T.; Iwanicki, J.; Kownacki, J.; Zemlo, L.; Srebrny, J.; Starosta, K.; Boer, J. de.; Gollwitzer, A.; Loewe, M.; Wuerkner, M.; Guenther, C.; Weber, T.; Hagemann, G.; Sletten, G.

    1996-01-01

    In a systematic investigation of the electromagnetic structure of hafnium stable isotopes enriched targets of 176, 177, 178, 179, 180 Hf were Coulomb exciting using: 67 MeV 19 F beam from NBITAL FN Tandem, 125 MeV 32 S beam from MP Tandem in Accelerator Laboratory LMU and TU Munich, 225 MeV 58 Ni beam from NBITAL FN Tandem plus 2 Liniac Boosters complex. Scattered particle-gamma as well as p-γ-γ coincidence were registered. A further simultaneous analysis of Coulomb excitation cross section as a function of scattering angle of 19 F, 32 S, 58 Ni projectiles should be sufficient to deduce reduced probabilities of E2 transitions in ground state band

  9. Eocene greenhouse climate revealed by coupled clumped isotope-Mg/Ca thermometry.

    Evans, David; Sagoo, Navjit; Renema, Willem; Cotton, Laura J; Müller, Wolfgang; Todd, Jonathan A; Saraswati, Pratul Kumar; Stassen, Peter; Ziegler, Martin; Pearson, Paul N; Valdes, Paul J; Affek, Hagit P

    2018-02-06

    Past greenhouse periods with elevated atmospheric CO 2 were characterized by globally warmer sea-surface temperatures (SST). However, the extent to which the high latitudes warmed to a greater degree than the tropics (polar amplification) remains poorly constrained, in particular because there are only a few temperature reconstructions from the tropics. Consequently, the relationship between increased CO 2 , the degree of tropical warming, and the resulting latitudinal SST gradient is not well known. Here, we present coupled clumped isotope (Δ 47 )-Mg/Ca measurements of foraminifera from a set of globally distributed sites in the tropics and midlatitudes. Δ 47 is insensitive to seawater chemistry and therefore provides a robust constraint on tropical SST. Crucially, coupling these data with Mg/Ca measurements allows the precise reconstruction of Mg/Ca sw throughout the Eocene, enabling the reinterpretation of all planktonic foraminifera Mg/Ca data. The combined dataset constrains the range in Eocene tropical SST to 30-36 °C (from sites in all basins). We compare these accurate tropical SST to deep-ocean temperatures, serving as a minimum constraint on high-latitude SST. This results in a robust conservative reconstruction of the early Eocene latitudinal gradient, which was reduced by at least 32 ± 10% compared with present day, demonstrating greater polar amplification than captured by most climate models.

  10. Early Disk dynamics Inferred from Isotope Systematics of Individual Chrondules

    Bollard, Jean Francois André

    imply that they must be the product of one of the most energetic processes that operated in the early Solar System. Chondrules are the only samples available to investigate the early Solar System and the chemical and thermal evolution of the Solar protoplanetary disk. Although relative 26Al-26Mg dating....../or reservoirs over time. Finally, the fifth chapter explores the Solar System 26Al homogeneity paradigm by comparing of Al-Mg systematics in chondrules with their respective Pb-Pb ages. We report a consistent age offset between the two chronometers that we infer reflects a reduced abundance of 26Al relative...... to different reservoirs. Lastly, a reduced abundance of 26Al relative to 27Al in inner Solar System objects implies that asteroid accretion must have occurred very early in the Solar System’s formation, to allow melting and differentiation driven by 26Al decay. With respect to our Pb-Pb chondrule chronology...

  11. Biogeochemical cycling of Mg and its isotopes in a sugar maple forest in Québec

    Kimmig, Sara R.; Holmden, Chris; Bélanger, Nicolas

    2018-06-01

    A Mg isotope study of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) in a field site in southern Québec, Canada, and seedlings grown in sterile soil substrate in the laboratory, both demonstrate per mil level within-tree Mg isotope fractionation. However, only sugar maple seedlings grown in the laboratory fractionate Mg isotopes during uptake into fine roots, favoring heavy isotope enrichment in the plant compared to the growth medium. Absence of uptake-related Mg isotope fractionation in field stands of sugar maple is tentatively attributed to the activities of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize fine roots of the trees in the field, but were absent from the laboratory grown specimens. The fungi facilitate nutrient uptake for the tree, while the tree provides valuable carbohydrates to the fungi. Without the symbiotic fungi, pot-grown trees in the laboratory are visibly stressed and often die. The mechanisms responsible for Mg isotopic fractionation in stressed trees remain to be elucidated. Rivers are isotopically light compared to bedrock weathering sources of Mg, and this has bearing on the δ26Mg value of the continental weathering flux of Mg to the oceans, which is an important parameter in studies of ocean Mg cycling in the geological past. If uptake-related fractionation is negligible in many other naturally growing tree species, as it is in sugar maple, then forest growth will exert little or no influence on the δ26Mg value of the export flux of Mg to first-order streams and rivers, and in turn the ocean Mg cycle. Above the tree line, preferential retention of heavy Mg isotopes in clay minerals formed during silicate weathering has been linked to the low δ26Mg values in rivers. In the forested catchment of this study there is no clear evidence for these effects. The 1 N HNO3 leach of the Bf-BC and C mineral soils, which are often used to identify minerals that may be releasing Mg and other base cations to plant-available pools, have the same average δ26

  12. Isotope ratio 87Sr/86Sr in limestones from Bambui group, Brazil (MG)

    Kawashita, K.; Mizusaki, A.M.P.; Kiang, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Sr composition of ancient seawater can be estimated from the analysis of carbonate rocks and, in some cases, used to estimate the age of the analyzed carbonate. The normalized 87Sr/86Sr ratios in calcium carbonate fractions from 14 core samples in the Bambui Group near Montalvania, MG, were found to range between .7077 and .7280. The higher values are attributable to Sr isotopic exchange between silicate and carbonate phases during diagenesis. The ratio of .7077 obtained in two pure calcium carbonate samples is here suggested as the best aproximation for the 87Sr/86Sr value for the Bambui sea. This ratio is compatible with an age of about 700 Ma., estimated from the published 87Sr/86Sr curve of Veizer and others, an age in accordance with Quadros recent (1987, in preparation) identification of marine acritarchs from the latest Precambrian (Vendian). (author) [pt

  13. Sr and Nd isotope systematics in fish teeth

    Staudigel, H.; Zindler, A.

    1985-01-01

    High concentrations of Sr and Nd in fish teeth apatite (up to 2000 and 3800 ppm, respectively) make them relatively impervious to diagenetic overprints and allow high-precision analysis of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr and 143 Nd/ 144 Nd of very small amounts of material. 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of 14 Cenozoic samples ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr stratigraphic dating. A compilation of published 143 Nd/ 144 Nd data from recent Mn-nodules and marine Fe/Mn deposits shows that the North-Central Pacific Ocean and the major portion of the Atlantic Ocean display distinctly different, narrow ranges in isotopic compositions. Between these two areas, the 143 Nd/ 144 Nd of Mn-nodules vary systematically towards intermediate compositions in the Southern Oceans, reflecting the communication between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans through the eastward moving Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The 143 Nd/ 144 Nd of the 2-55 Ma old fish teeth analyzed are typically close to the range of 143 Nd/ 144 Nd in Recent Mn-nodules and seawater for the respective ocean and, thus, indicate no significant change through this time period. The 143 Nd/ 144 Nd of fish teeth from the North Pacific Ocean are highest during periods of high aeolian sedimentation. (orig.)

  14. Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals

    Oerter, Erik; Finstad, Kari; Schaefer, Justin; Goldsmith, Gregory R.; Dawson, Todd; Amundson, Ronald

    2014-07-01

    In isotope-enabled hydrology, soil and vadose zone sediments have been generally considered to be isotopically inert with respect to the water they host. This is inconsistent with knowledge that clay particles possessing an electronegative surface charge and resulting cation exchange capacity (CEC) interact with a wide range of solutes which, in the absence of clays, have been shown to exhibit δ18O isotope effects that vary in relation to the ionic strength of the solutions. To investigate the isotope effects caused by high CEC clays in mineral-water systems, we created a series of monominerallic-water mixtures at gravimetric water contents ranging from 5% to 32%, consisting of pure deionized water of known isotopic composition with homoionic (Mg, Ca, Na, K) montmorillonite. Similar mixtures were also created with quartz to determine the isotope effect of non-, or very minimally-, charged mineral surfaces. The δ18O value of the water in these monominerallic soil analogs was then measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) after direct headspace CO2 equilibration. Mg- and Ca-exchanged homoionic montmorillonite depleted measured δ18O values up to 1.55‰ relative to pure water at 5% water content, declining to 0.49‰ depletion at 30% water content. K-montmorillonite enriched measured δ18O values up to 0.86‰ at 5% water content, declining to 0.11‰ enrichment at 30% water. Na-montmorillonite produces no measureable isotope effect. The isotope effects observed in these experiments may be present in natural, high-clay soils and sediments. These findings have relevance to the interpretation of results of direct CO2-water equilibration approaches to the measurement of the δ18O value of soil water. The adsorbed cation isotope effect may bear consideration in studies of pedogenic carbonate, plant-soil water use and soil-atmosphere interaction. Finally, the observed isotope effects may prove useful as molecular scale probes of the nature of mineral

  15. Vibrational spectra of 1-hydroxy- and 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinones and their magnesium chelate complexes. I. Isotopic effects of OH/OD and 24Mg/26Mg substitutions

    Kirszenbaum, Marek

    1977-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of 1-hydroxy- and 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinones, their deuterated derivatives and their 24 Mg/ 26 Mg chelate complexes are examined in the spectral region 1700-250cm -1 . The study of deuteroxyanthraquinones allow an assignment of the OH/OD group vibrations and show the multiple coupling of the delta OH vibrations with the vCC and delta CH quinonic vibrations. These results lead to a modification of some spectral assignments of magnesium chelate complexe of 1-OH-AQ. The isotopic 24 Mg/ 26 Mg substitution enables the chelate ring vibrations which depend on the motions of the magnesium atom to be observed. The vC=O and vC-O vibrations frequencies of magnesium chelate complexe [Mg(1,4-O 2 -AQ)]sub(n) show an important difference of the chelate ring electronic state in comparison of those of 1,4-(OH) 2 -AQ. The discussion of the infrared and Raman spectra in the Mg-O vibrations region lead to the conclusion that the configuration of oxygens arround the magnesium is tetrahedral [fr

  16. Calcium and magnesium isotope systematics in rivers draining the Himalaya-Tibetan-Plateau region: Lithological or fractionation control?

    Tipper, Edward T.; Galy, Albert; Bickle, Mike J.

    2008-02-01

    is overwhelmingly derived from carbonate weathering. The average δ44Ca value in HHCS rivers is within uncertainty of silicate rock at 0.39‰. The widespread hot springs of the High Himalaya have an average δ26Mg value of -0.46‰ and an average δ44Ca value of 0.5‰, distinct from riverine values for δ26Mg but similar to riverine δ44Ca values. Although rivers draining each major rock type have δ44Ca and δ26Mg values in part inherited from bedrock, there is no correlation with proxies for carbonate or silicate lithology such as Na/Ca ratios, suggesting that Ca and Mg are in part recycled. However, in spite of the vast contrast in vegetation density between the arid Tibetan Plateau and the tropical Lesser Himalaya, the isotopic fractionation factor for Ca and Mg between solute and rocks are not systematically different suggesting that vegetation may only recycle a small amount of Ca and Mg in these catchments. The discrepancy between solute and solid Ca and Mg isotope ratios in these rivers from diverse weathering environments highlight our lack of understanding concerning the origin and subsequent path of Ca and Mg, bound as minerals in rock, and released as cations in rivers. The fractionation of Ca and Mg isotope ratios may prove useful for tracing mechanisms of chemical alteration. Ca isotope ratios of solute riverine Ca show a greater variability than previously acknowledged. The variability of Ca isotope ratios in modern rivers will need to be better quantified and accounted for in future models of global Ca cycling, if past variations in oceanic Ca isotope ratios are to be of use in constraining the past carbon cycle.

  17. Experimental study of the Mg and Sr isotopic evolution of seawater interacting with basalt between 150 and 300 ° C.

    Voigt, Martin; Pearce, Christopher R.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    The chemical exchange of material between seawater and the oceanic crust plays a major role in marine geochemical cycles [1]. Isotopic signatures provide an important means of tracing elemental transfer in hydrothermal environments, yet only a limited amount of experimental data on the extent of isotopic fractionation under these conditions is currently available. This study consequently investigated the extent of δ26/24Mg and 87Sr/86Sr isotopic variation during a seawater-basalt interaction experiments at 150, 250 and 290 ° C. A suite of closed system experiments were run for several months at each temperature under saturated water pressure, using either crystalline or glassy basalt as the starting material and a water/rock ratio of 10 or 25. Our results demonstrate that the dissolution of basaltic material in hydrothermal environments occurs at the same time as the precipitation of alteration minerals (mainly smectite and anhydrite), which is consistent with results from similar studies in the past (e.g. [2]). As expected, the rate of reaction using crystalline basalt was slower than with basaltic glass, and both sample types reacted faster at higher temperatures. The 87Sr/86Sr composition of the experimental fluids decreased from the initial seawater value (0.70916) towards the lower basaltic signature during the experiments (0.70317), demonstrating the progressive release of Sr during basalt dissolution. Magnesium was steadily removed from the fluid via the precipitation of clay minerals, with the residual fluids having progressively lighter δ26/24Mg compositions. The mean Mg isotope fractionation factor (αsolid-solution) observed at 250 oC was 1.0005±0.0002, supporting low-temperature evidence that clay minerals preferentially incorporate isotopically heavy magnesium [3]. These experiments provide quantitative information on the extent of Mg isotopic fractionation between fluids and secondary silicate minerals in hydrothermal systems, and demonstrate the

  18. 500 kyr of Indian Ocean Walker Circulation Variability Using Foraminiferal Mg/Ca and Stable Isotopes

    Groeneveld, J.; Mohtadi, M.; Lückge, A.; Pätzold, J.

    2017-12-01

    The tropical Indian Ocean is a key location for paleoclimate research affected by different oceanographic and atmospheric processes. Annual climate variations are strongly controlled by the Indian and Asian Monsoon characterized by bi-annually reversing trade winds. Inter-annual climate variations in the Walker circulation are caused by the Indian Ocean Dipole and El Niño-Southern Oscillation resulting in either heavy flooding or severe droughts like for example the famine of 2011 in eastern Africa. Oceanographically the tropical western Indian Ocean receives water masses from the Indonesian Gateway area, sub-Antarctic waters that upwell south of the equator, and the outflow waters from the highly saline Red Sea. On the other hand, the tropical western Indian Ocean is a major source for providing water masses to the Agulhas Current system. Although the eastern Indian Ocean has been studied extensively, the tropical western Indian Ocean is still lacking in high quality climate-archives that have the potential to provide important information to understand how the ocean and atmospheric zonal circulation have changed in the past, and possibly will change in the future. Until now there were no long sediment cores available covering several glacial-interglacial cycles in the tropical western Indian Ocean. Core GeoB 12613-1, recovered during RV Meteor Cruise M75/2 east of the island of Pemba off Tanzania, provides an open-ocean core with well-preserved sediments covering the last five glacial-interglacial cycles ( 500 kyr). Mg/Ca and stable isotopes on both surface- and thermocline dwelling foraminifera have been performed to test how changes in sea water temperatures and relative sea water salinity were coupled on orbital time scales. The results are compared with similar records generated for the tropical eastern Indian Ocean in core SO139-74KL off Sumatra. Water column stratification on both sides of the Indian Ocean and the cross-basin gradients in sea water

  19. Systematics of new isotopic production cross sections from neon projectiles

    Chen, C.X.; Guzik, T.G.; McMahon, M.; Wefel, J.P.; Flores, I.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Tull, C.E.; Mitchell, J.W.; Cronqvist, M.; Crawford, H.J.

    1996-02-01

    New isotopic production cross sections from 22 Ne projectiles at 377,581 and 891 MeV/nucleon in a liquid hydrogen target have been measured. These data allow to investigate the projectile energy and nuclear composition dependence of the cross sections. The comparisons between data and predictions can have important consequences in source abundance investigations. (K.A.)

  20. Systematics of new isotopic production cross sections from neon projectiles

    Chen, C X; Guzik, T G; McMahon, M; Wefel, J P [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Flores, I; Lindstrom, P J; Tull, C E [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mitchell, J W [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Cronqvist, M; Crawford, H J [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Space Sciences Lab.; and others

    1996-02-01

    New isotopic production cross sections from {sup 22}Ne projectiles at 377,581 and 891 MeV/nucleon in a liquid hydrogen target have been measured. These data allow to investigate the projectile energy and nuclear composition dependence of the cross sections. The comparisons between data and predictions can have important consequences in source abundance investigations. (K.A.). 9 refs.

  1. Environmental isotopes and chemistry characterization of the rainfall at the CDTN GNIP Station, MG, Brazil

    Cota, Stela; Peixoto, Claudia M.; Dias, Vagner S.; Barreto, Alberto A.; Moreira, Leandro; Palmieri, Helena E.L.

    2011-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in collaboration with the Worldwide Meteorological Organization (WMO), for the last 50 years, has been keeping a network of Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) stations. The main objective is to survey the content of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in precipitation samples in order to allow the establishment of patterns of temporal and spatial variation of the environmental isotopes as result of natural processes that affect isotope fractionation. Since October/2008, CDTN, as a response to IAEA initiatives for reactivating the Brazilian GNIP program, has started collecting precipitation samples for environmental isotopes analysis. This paper aims to present the lessons-learned of the CDTN (Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear) GNIP Station implementation process, as well as the results of the first year (2008-2009) of sampling. We present the sampling procedure in place at the CDTN GNIP Station, based on the IAEA sampling protocols, and an analysis of the temporal variation of the environmental isotopes in the rainfall in Belo Horizonte. It is also presented the results of a chemical survey of the 2010's precipitation samples in order to assess the chemistry characteristics and quality of the Belo Horizonte precipitation in the CDTN's region. (author)

  2. U-Pb isotope systematics in josephinites and associated rocks

    Goepel, C.; Manhes, G.; Allegre, C.J. (Lab. Geochimie et Cosmochimie, I.P.G., 75 - Paris (France))

    1990-02-01

    Josephinite nodules, composed of metallic nickel iron alloy intergrown with andradite garnet, are found in the peridotitic section of an obducted ophiolite in SW Oregon. The origin of josephinite is widely debated: for example, previous investigation have proposed it as a byproduct of low temperature synserpentinization processes linked to the intrusion of dikes or and its derivation from primitive mantle, conceivably from as deep as the core mantle boundary. We report U-Pb data from josephinites, wyrdite (a rock associated with josephinite) consisting of rutile and ilmente intergrown with silicates, and their surrounding rocks (hornblende diorites and harzburgites). The measured Pb isotopic composition of all decontaminated, leached josephinite metal samples plots in the Pb-Pb diagram just above/in the MORB field, while the first leachates are characterized by higher {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios. The isotopic Pb composition measured in the leachates of the wyrdite defines a line whose slope corresponds to an age of 159{plus minus}8 Myr. The harzburgites show a wide spread in Pb isotopic compositions; all samples lie above the MORB field and three samples plot to the left side of the 4.55 AE geochron. The hornblende diorite dikes, characterized by the highest U and Pb concentrations of all studied rocks, plot in the MORB field. None of these different rocks is characterized by a single or homogeneous Pb composition. All samples are affected by secondary alteration processes: the circulation of hydrothermal fluids disturbed the dikes and ultramafic rocks and serpentinization processes have affected harzburgites, josephinites, and wyrdites. Thus the Pb isotopic composition measured today represents a mixture of initial Pb, radiogenic Pb and inherited Pb in variable proportions. Concerning the origin of josephinite these results show a close relationship between josephinite, wyrdite, and the dikes. (orig./WB).

  3. Effect of interband interaction on isotope effect exponent of MgB2 ...

    The interband interaction of the electron–phonon interaction shows more effect on the isotope exponent than on the non-phonon interaction. Acknowledgement. The authors would like to thank Thailand Research Fund for financial support and the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce for partial financial support and.

  4. Triple oxygen isotope systematics of structurally bonded water in gypsum

    Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Voigt, Claudia; Assonov, Sergey; Staubwasser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum mother water (gmw) is recorded in structurally bonded water in gypsum (gsbw). Respective fractionation factors have been determined experimentally for 18O/16O and 17O/16O. By taking previous experiments into account we suggest using 18αgsbw-gmw = 1.0037; 17αgsbw-gmw = 1.00195 and θgsbw-gmw = 0.5285 as fractionation factors in triple oxygen isotope space. Recent gypsum was sampled from a series of 10 ponds located in the Salar de Llamara in the Atacama Desert, Chile. Total dissolved solids (TDS) in these ponds show a gradual increase from 23 g/l to 182 g/l that is accompanied by an increase in pond water 18O/16O. Gsbw falls on a parallel curve to the ambient water from the saline ponds. The offset is mainly due to the equilibrium fractionation between gsbw and gmw. However, gsbw represents a time integrated signal biased towards times of strong evaporation, hence the estimated gmw comprises elevated 18O/16O compositions when compared to pond water samples taken on site. Gypsum precipitation is associated with algae mats in the ponds with lower salinity. No evidence for respective vital effects on the triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water is observed, nor are such effects expected. In principle, the array of δ18Ogsbw vs. 17Oexcess can be used to: (1) provide information on the degree of evaporation during gypsum formation; (2) estimate pristine meteoric water compositions; and (3) estimate local relative humidity which is the controlling parameter of the slope of the array for simple hydrological situations. In our case study, local mining activities may have decreased deep groundwater recharge, causing a recent change of the local hydrology.

  5. Systematic measurement of beta-decay half-lives of short-lived isotopes

    Hirose, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawade, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Iida, T.; Takahashi, A.; Kasugai, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1997-03-01

    We have measured the half-lives of short-lived isotopes for past decade and deduced the half-lives of 6 isotopes further. These results demonstrated that most of the literature values shorter than 10 min systematically deviated from our measurement ones. The cause seems to be that a large number of the previous half-life studies were performed with scintillation counters before 1970 and they had a difficulty in distinguishing the interest {gamma}-ray from the contamination and correcting for pile-up and dead-time losses. Moreover, the deviated data found to be quoted for evaluation. (author)

  6. The porphyrin-fullerene nanoparticles to promote the ATP overproduction in myocardium: 25Mg2+-magnetic isotope effect.

    Rezayat, S M; Boushehri, S V S; Salmanian, B; Omidvari, A H; Tarighat, S; Esmaeili, S; Sarkar, S; Amirshahi, N; Alyautdin, R N; Orlova, M A; Trushkov, I V; Buchachenko, A L; Liu, K C; Kuznetsov, D A

    2009-04-01

    This is a first case ever reported on the fullerene-based low toxic nanocationite particles (porphyrin adducts of cyclohexyl fullerene-C(60)) designed for targeted delivery of the paramagnetic magnesium stable isotope to the heart muscle providing a sharp clinical effect close to about 80% recovery of the tissue hypoxia symptoms in less than 24 h after a single injection (0.03-0.1 LD(50)). A whole principle of this therapy is novel: (25)Mg(2+)-magnetic isotope effect selectively stimulates the ATP overproduction in the oxygen-depleted cells due to (25)Mg(2+) released by the nanoparticles. Being membranotropic cationites, these "smart nanoparticles" release the overactivating paramagnetic cations only in response to the metabolic acidic shift. The resulting positive changes in the heart cell energy metabolism may help to prevent and/or treat the local myocardial hypoxic disorders and, hence, protect the heart muscle from a serious damage in a vast variety of the hypoxia-caused clinical situations including both doxorubicin and 1-methylnicotineamide cardiotoxic side effects. Both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the drug proposed make it suitable for safe and efficient administration in either single or multi-injection (acute or chronic) therapeutic schemes.

  7. A Formation Timescale of the Galactic Halo from Mg Isotopes in Dwarf Stars

    Carlos, Marília; Karakas, Amanda I.; Cohen, Judith G.; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Meléndez, Jorge

    2018-04-01

    We determine magnesium isotopic abundances of metal-poor dwarf stars from the galactic halo, to shed light on the onset of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star nucleosynthesis in the galactic halo and constrain the timescale of its formation. We observed a sample of eight new halo K dwarfs in a metallicity range of ‑1.9 ‑1.4 are somewhat higher (1–3σ) than previous chemical evolution model predictions, indicating perhaps higher yields of the neutron-rich isotopes. Our results using only AGB star enrichment suggest a timescale for formation for the galactic halo of about 0.3 Gyr, but considering also supernova enrichment, the upper limit for the timescale formation is about 1.5 Gyr. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. CHROMIUM ISOTOPE SYSTEMATICS OF ACHONDRITES: CHRONOLOGY AND ISOTOPIC HETEROGENEITY OF THE INNER SOLAR SYSTEM BODIES

    Yamakawa, Akane; Yamashita, Katsuyuki; Makishima, Akio; Nakamura, Eizo

    2010-01-01

    The standard planetary formation models assume that primitive materials, such as carbonaceous chondrites, are the precursor materials of evolved planetesimals. Past chronological studies have revealed that planetesimals of several hundred kilometers in size, such as the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite (HED) parent body (Vesta) and angrite parent body, began their differentiation as early as ∼3 million years of the solar system formation, and continued for at least several million years. However, the timescale of planetesimal formation in distinct regions of the inner solar system, as well as the isotopic characteristics of the reservoirs from which they evolved, remains unclear. Here we present the first report for the precise 53 Mn- 53 Cr ages of monomict ureilites. Chemically separated phases from one monomict ureilite (NWA 766) yielded the Mn-Cr age of 4564.60 ± 0.67 Ma, identical within error to the oldest age preserved in other achondrites, such as angrites and eucrites. The 54 Cr isotopic data for this and seven additional bulk ureilites show homogeneous ε 54 Cr of ∼-0.9, a value distinct from other achondrites and chondrites. Using the ε 54 Cr signatures of Earth, Mars, and Vesta (HED), we noticed a linear decrease in the ε 54 Cr value with the heliocentric distance in the inner region of the solar system. If this trend can be extrapolated into the outer asteroid belt, the ε 54 Cr signatures of monomict ureilites will place the position of the ureilite parent body at ∼2.8 AU. These observations imply that the differentiation of achondrite parent bodies began nearly simultaneously at ∼4565 Ma in different regions of the inner solar system. The distinct ε 54 Cr value between ureilite and carbonaceous chondrite also implies that a genetic link commonly proposed between the two is unlikely.

  9. Hydrogeochemical utilization of natural isotopes from U(4n+2) and Th(4n) series at Morro do Ferro, Pocos de Caldas (MG)

    Bonotto, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Uranium and thorium isotopic analysis were performed on well spoils of the main ore body at Morro do Ferro, Pocos de Caldas (MG), using groundwater from several boreholes in the area and surface water from a steam that originates at the base of the hill. For extraction of uranium and thorium a long chemical process was applied to samples; activities of 228Th and 232 Th isotopes (4n series) and also of 238U, 234U and 230Th isotopes (4n+2 series)were determined by the alpha spectrometry method. The ratios 234U?238U determined for well spoils did not show marked disequilibria between these isotopes. However, the ratios 228Th/232Th and 230Th/234U obtained in some samples showed a high disequilibrium between these isotopes, associated with the presence of possible zones of removal of uranium and precipitation of radium.(author)

  10. Origin and Distribution of 26Al and Mg Isotopes in the Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn

    of short-lived radioactive nuclides in these ancient materials is a direct reflection of their recent nucleosynthetic origin prior to or during formation of our young solar system 4.6 Myr ago. Disentangling the origin and distribution of this nucleosynthetic heritage provides a fossil record of the dynamic......Understanding when and how our solar system formed is perhaps one of the most fundamental questions in natural sciences. The prime cosmochemical tools to achieve this goal are the remnants of the earliest stages of planet formation; meteorites and their components. Evidence for the former presence...... birth environment of our Sun and a unique time-window into the very earliest history of our solar system. Ever since the discovery of its decay product, 26Mg, in primitive solar system objects more than 30 years ago, the short-lived radioactive nuclide, 26Al (t1/2 = 0.73 Myr), has been the optimal...

  11. A method for combined Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic analysis of <10 mg dust samples: implication for ice core science

    Ujvari, Gabor; Wegner, Wencke; Klötzli, Urs

    2017-04-01

    Aeolian mineral dust particles below the size of 10-20 μm often experience longer distance transport in the atmosphere, and thus Aeolian dust is considered an important tracer of large-scale atmospheric circulation. Since ice core dust is purely Aeolian in origin, discrimination of its potential source region(s) can contribute to a better understanding of past dust activity and climatic/environmental causes. Furthermore, ice core dust source information provides critical experimental constraints for model simulations of past atmospheric circulation patterns [1,2]. However, to identify dust sources in past dust archives such as ice cores, the mineralogy and geochemistry of the wind-blown dust material must be characterized. While the amount of dust in marine cores or common terrestrial archives is sufficient for different types of analyses and even for multiple repeat measurements, dust content in ice cores is usually extremely low even for the peak dusty periods such as the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (5-8 mg dust/kg ice; [3]). Since the most powerful dust fingerprinting methods, such as REE composition and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic analyses are destructive there is a clear need to establish sequential separation techniques of Sr, Nd, Pb and other REEs to get the most information out of small (5-10 mg) dust samples recovered from ice cores. Although Hf isotopes have recently been added as a robust tool of aerosol/dust source discrimination (e.g. [4,5,6,7]), precise Hf isotopic measurements of small (reliable 176Hf/177Hf (and also 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd) ratios. Along with the standards 50, 10 and 5 mg aliquots of the fine (affected by acid treatment and these signatures are extremely stable both within run (0.000008 variability for the three aliquots, i.e. 0.15 ɛNd unit) and between runs of different laboratories (0.00006, ca 1 ɛNd unit). Hf isotopic compositions varied within 1 (NUS) and 5 ɛHf units (BEI) between the three aliquots, but the BEI sample always gave more

  12. U-Th isotopic systematics at 13deg N east Pacific Ridge segment

    Ben Othman, D.; Allegre, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fresh basaltic glasses have been analyzed for U-Th disequilibrium systematics as part of an extensive study on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 12deg 45'N. These samples are well described in terms of major and trace elements as well as in Nd, Pb and Sr isotopes. Our results show significant heterogeneities in the mantle source at a small scale, and show heterogeneities at larger scales also when compared to other EPR data. U and Th concentration and isotopic data rule out fractional crystallization as a main process and support a mixing model in agreement with the marble cake model developed by Allegre and Turcotte and constrained by trace elements and Nd, Sr and Pb isotopes on the same samples by Prinzhofer et al. Based on the high ( 230 Th/ 232 Th) isotopic ratios on recent tholeiites especially the Th/U values inferred for their sources clearly show that the upper mantle Th/U has decreased with time. (orig.)

  13. 187Os-186Os and He Isotope Systematics of Iceland Picrites

    Brandon, A. D.; Brandon, A. D.; Graham, D.; Gautason, B.

    2001-12-01

    Iceland is one of the longest-lived modern plumes, and seismic imaging supports a model where the roots of this plume are at the base of the lower mantle. Hence, Os isotopic data for lavas from this plume are ideal for further testing the role of core-mantle chemical exchange at the site of plume generation in the lower mantle, and for addressing the origin of Os-He isotopic variation in plumes. Recent work has shown that lavas from some plume systems (Hawaii, Noril'sk-Siberia, Gorgona) show coupled enrichments in 186Os/188Os and 187Os/188Os, not observed in upper mantle materials including abyssal peridotites. Picrites from Hawaii display a positive correlation between 186Os/188Os and He isotopes (R/Ra), where range in 186Os/188Os of 0.119834+/-28 to 0.1198475+/-29 and corresponding R/Ra from +7 to +25. These systematics are consistent with a lower mantle source for the radiogenic 186Os signal in the Hawaiian plume. The coupled Os enrichments in these plumes has been attributed to core-mantle chemical exchange, consistent with generation of the Hawaiian plume at the base of the lower mantle in D". Other potentially viable models await additional scrutiny. New He isotope and high precision 186Os/188Os and 187Os/188Os measurements for Iceland picrites show unique systematics compared to Hawaii. These picrites have 187Os/188Os ranging from 0.1297 to 0.1381 and R/Ra of +9 to +18, with generally higher R/Ra correlating with higher 187Os/188Os. Unlike the Hawaiian picrites from Hualalai and Loihi, which have coupled enrichments in 186Os/188Os and 187Os/188Os, the Iceland picrites show no enrichment 186Os/188Os - 0.1198363+/-28 (2s, n=14). Such Os-He isotopic variations require one end-member source that has high R/Ra, coupled with a long term elevated Re/Os and Pt/Os similar to that of the upper mantle. These systematics are inconsistent with either known upper mantle materials or those purported for ancient recycled slabs and may be a previously unidentified component

  14. Preliminary Report on U-Th-Pb Isotope Systematics of the Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Yokoyama, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical studies of shergottites suggest that their parental magmas reflect mixtures between at least two distinct geochemical source reservoirs, producing correlations between radiogenic isotope compositions, and trace element abundances.. These correlations have been interpreted as indicating the presence of a reduced, incompatible-element- depleted reservoir and an oxidized, incompatible-element-rich reservoir. The former is clearly a depleted mantle source, but there has been a long debate regarding the origin of the enriched reservoir. Two contrasting models have been proposed regarding the location and mixing process of the two geochemical source reservoirs: (1) assimilation of oxidized crust by mantle derived, reduced magmas, or (2) mixing of two distinct mantle reservoirs during melting. The former clearly requires the ancient martian crust to be the enriched source (crustal assimilation), whereas the latter requires a long-lived enriched mantle domain that probably originated from residual melts formed during solidification of a magma ocean (heterogeneous mantle model). This study conducts Pb isotope and U-Th-Pb concentration analyses of the olivine-phyric shergottite Tissint because U-Th-Pb isotope systematics have been intensively used as a powerful radiogenic tracer to characterize old crust/sediment components in mantle- derived, terrestrial oceanic island basalts. The U-Th-Pb analyses are applied to sequential acid leaching fractions obtained from Tissint whole-rock powder in order to search for Pb isotopic source components in Tissint magma. Here we report preliminary results of the U-Th-Pb analyses of acid leachates and a residue, and propose the possibility that Tissint would have experienced minor assimilation of old martian crust.

  15. Ground state properties of neutron-rich Mg isotopes the "island of inversion" studied with laser and $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy

    Kowalska, M

    2006-01-01

    Studies in regions of the nuclear chart in which the model predictions of properties of nuclei fail can bring a better understanding of the strong interaction in the nuclear medium. To such regions belongs the so called "island of inversion" centered around Ne, Na and Mg isotopes with 20 neutrons in which unexpected ground-state spins, large deformations and dense low-energy spectra appear. This is a strong argument that the magic N=20 is not a closed shell in this area. In this thesis investigations of isotope shifts of stable $^{24-26}$Mg, as well as spins and magnetic moments of short-lived $^{29,31}$Mg are presented. The successful studies were performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN using collinear laser and $\\beta$-NMR spectroscopy techniques. The isotopes were investigated as single-charged ions in the 280 nm transition from the atomic ground state $^2\\!$S$_{1/2}$ to one of the two lowest excited states $^2\\!$P$_{1/2 ,\\,3/2}$ using continuous wave laser beams. The isotope-shift measurements with fluor...

  16. Ion-microprobe measurements of Mg, Ca, Ti and Fe isotopic ratios and trace element abundance in hibonite-bearing inclusions in primitive meteorites

    Fahey, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis reports the isotopic abundances of Mg, Ca, and Ti and rare earth element (REE) abundances in 19 hibonite-bearing inclusions from primative meteorites. The isotopic ratios of Fe were measured in one of the samples, Lance HH-1. These measurements were made by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (CAMECA IMS-3f). The novel hardware and software developments that made this work possible are described in detail. The samples were studied in thin section in order to investigate the relationship between the inclusions and their mineralogical environments. Inclusions from a number of different meteorites, specifically, Mighei, Murray, Murchison, Lance, Efremovka, Vigarano, Qingzhen, Dhajala, and Semarkona, were studied. The isotopes of Ca and Ti show large and correlated abundance anomalies in their most neutron-rich isotopes, 48 Ca and 50 Ti. The largest anomalies among the samples studied here are in the Murray inclusion MY-F6, with a 4.6% deficit in 48 Ca and a 5.2% deficit in 50 Ti, and Lance HH-1, with 3.3% and 6.0% deficits in 48 Ca and 50 Ti respectively. Correlated excesses of 48 Ca and 50 Ti, up to 2.4% and 1.4% respectively, are found in some other samples studied here. The fact that there is a correlation of isotopic anomalies in two different elements is clear evidence for a nucleosynthetic origin of these effects. Various possibilities for the origin of these isotopic anomalies are discussed and it is shown that a Cosmic Chemical Memory-like model of the incomplete mixing of dust grains from one or several supernovae is sufficient to explain the data. Magnesium isotopes show excesses of 26 Mg, attributable to the in-situ decay of 26 Al, in 7 of these inclusions

  17. Oxygen isotope systematics of chondrules in the Murchison CM2 chondrite and implications for the CO-CM relationship

    Chaumard, Noël; Defouilloy, Céline; Kita, Noriko T.

    2018-05-01

    High-precision oxygen three-isotope measurements of olivine and pyroxene were performed on 29 chondrules in the Murchison CM2 chondrite by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The oxygen isotope ratios of analyzed chondrules all plot very close to the primitive chondrule minerals (PCM) line. In each of 24 chondrules, the olivine and/or pyroxene grains analyzed show indistinguishable oxygen isotope ratios. Exceptions are minor occurrences of isotopically distinguished relict olivine grains, which were found in nine chondrules. The isotope homogeneity of these phenocrysts is consistent with a co-magmatic crystallization of olivine and pyroxene from the final chondrule melts and a significant oxygen isotope exchange between the ambient gas and the melts. Homogeneous type I chondrules with Mg#'s of 98.9-99.5 have host chondrule Δ17O values ranging from -6.0‰ to -4.1‰, with one exception (Δ17O: -1.2‰; Mg#: 99.6). Homogeneous chondrules with Mg#'s poor H2O ice (∼0.3-0.4× the CI dust; Δ17O > 0‰) and at dust enrichments of ∼300-2000×. Regarding the Mg# and oxygen isotope ratios, the chondrule populations sampled by CM and CO chondrites are similar and indistinguishable. The similarity of these 16O-rich components in CO and CM chondrites is also supported by the common Fe/Mn ratio of olivine in type II chondrules. Although they accreted similar high-temperature silicates, CO chondrites are anhydrous compared to CM chondrites, suggesting they derived from different parent bodies formed inside and outside the snow line, respectively. If chondrules in CO and CM chondrites formed at the same disk locations but the CM parent body accreted later than the CO parent body, the snow line might have crossed the common chondrule-forming region towards the Sun between the time of the CO and CM parent bodies accretion.

  18. Systematic analysis of hot Yb{sup *} isotopes using the energy density formalism

    Jain, Deepika; Sharma, Manoj K.; Rajni [Thapar University, School of Physics and Materials Science, Patiala (India); Kumar, Raj [University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Padova (Italy); Gupta, Raj K. [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (India)

    2014-10-15

    A systematic study of the spin-orbit density interaction potential is carried out, with spherical as well as deformed choices of nuclei, for a variety of near-symmetric and asymmetric colliding nuclei leading to various isotopes of the compound nucleus Yb{sup *}, using the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi formulation (ETF) of the Skyrme energy density formalism (SEDF). We observe that the spin-orbit density interaction barrier height (V{sub JB}) and barrier position (R{sub JB}) increase systematically with the increase in number of neutrons in both the projectile and target, for spherical systems. On allowing deformation effects with optimum orientations, the barrier-height increases by a large order of magnitude, as compared to the spherical case, in going from {sup 156}Yb{sup *} to {sup 172}Yb{sup *} nuclear systems formed via near-symmetric Ni+Mo or asymmetric O+Sm colliding nuclei, except that for the oblate-shaped nuclei, the V{sub JB} is the highest and R{sub JB} shifts towards a smaller (compact) interaction radius. The temperature does not change the behavior of spin-orbit density dependent (V{sub J}) and independent (V{sub P}) interaction potentials, except for some minor changes in the magnitude. The orientation degree of freedom also plays an important role in modifying the barrier characteristics and hence produces a large effect on the fusion cross section. The fusion excitation function of the compound nuclei {sup 160,} {sup 164}Yb{sup *} formed in different incoming channels, show clearly that the new forces GSkI and KDE0v1 respond better than the old SIII force. Among the first two, KDE0v1 seems to perform better. The fusion cross-sections are also predicted for a few other isotopes of Yb{sup *}. (orig.)

  19. High-precision 27Al/24Mg ratio determination using a modified isotope-dilution approach

    Paton, Chad; Schiller, Martin; Ulfbeck, David Garf

    2012-01-01

    saves time and minimises the risk of contamination of other samples with spike (which is added immediately prior to analysis). Repeat measurements of the BHVO-2, BCR-2, and BIR-1 international rock standards, as well as a gravimetrically prepared Al–Mg reference solution, indicate that our method......The precision of the 26Al–26Mg system—one of the most widely used chronometers for constraining the relative timing of events in the early solar system—is presently limited by methods for the determination of 27Al/24Mg ratios, which have seen little improvement in the last decade. We present...... a novel method for the measurement of 27Al/24Mg ratios in unpurified sample solutions by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Because Al is monoisotopic we use a modified isotope dilution approach that employs a mixed spike containing isotopically enriched 25Mg and natural 27Al...

  20. Unravelling the sulphur isotope systematics of an alkaline magmatic province: implications for REE mineralization and exploration

    Hutchison, W.; Finch, A.; Boyce, A.; Friis, H.; Borst, A. M.; Horsburgh, N. J.

    2017-12-01

    Some of the world's best alkaline rare earth element (REE) deposits are formed in magmatic systems that are sealed (i.e., those that are autometasomatised and maintain reducing conditions). Conversely, in open systems where oxidizing fluids infiltrate, it is commonly assumed that REE are redistributed over a wider (less concentrated) zone. Sulphur isotope fractionation is sensitive to variations in temperature and redox, and, although sulphide minerals are relatively abundant in alkaline systems, there have been few attempts to test these hypotheses and develop a sulphur isotope proxy for alkaline metasomatism and formation of associated REE deposits. The Gardar Rift Province in southern Greenland was volcanically active in two periods between 1300 and 1100 Ma and is an ideal natural laboratory to explore sulphur isotope systematics because a near-complete alkaline magmatic lineage is exposed. We present new δ34S from across the province with a particular focus on three alkaline systems (Ilímaussaq, Motzfeldt and Ivigtût) that also host major REE deposits. Primitive mafic rocks from regional Gardar dykes and lavas have a restricted range of δ34S between 0 and 3 ‰ and fractional crystallization imparts no observable change in δ34S. In a few cases high-δ34S rocks (>15 ‰) occur when intrusive units have assimilated local sedimentary crust (δ34S = 25 ‰). Most δ34S variation takes place in the roof zones of alkaline intrusions during late-magmatic and hydrothermal stages, and we identify clear differences between the complexes. At Ilímaussaq, where the magmatic series is exceptionally reduced (below QFM buffer), roof zone δ34S remains narrow (0-3 ‰). At Motzfeldt, a more open oxidizing roof zone (MH buffer), δ34S ranges from -12 ‰ in late-stage fluorite veins to +12 ‰ where local crust has been assimilated. Ivigtût is intermediate between these end-members varying between -5 to +5 ‰. The δ34S variations primarily relate to temperature and

  1. Warfarin Dosing Algorithms Underpredict Dose Requirements in Patients Requiring ≥7 mg Daily: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Saffian, S M; Duffull, S B; Wright, Dfb

    2017-08-01

    There is preliminary evidence to suggest that some published warfarin dosing algorithms produce biased maintenance dose predictions in patients who require higher than average doses. We conducted a meta-analysis of warfarin dosing algorithms to determine if there exists a systematic under- or overprediction of dose requirements for patients requiring ≥7 mg/day across published algorithms. Medline and Embase databases were searched up to September 2015. We quantified the proportion of over- and underpredicted doses in patients whose observed maintenance dose was ≥7 mg/day. The meta-analysis included 47 evaluations of 22 different warfarin dosing algorithms from 16 studies. The meta-analysis included data from 1,492 patients who required warfarin doses of ≥7 mg/day. All 22 algorithms were found to underpredict warfarin dosing requirements in patients who required ≥7 mg/day by an average of 2.3 mg/day with a pooled estimate of underpredicted doses of 92.3% (95% confidence interval 90.3-94.1, I 2 = 24%). © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  2. Decoupling of stream and vegetation solutes during the late stages of weathering: insights from elemental and Mg isotope trends at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico

    Chapela Lara, M.; Schuessler, J. A.; Buss, H. L.; McDowell, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    During the evolution of the critical zone, the predominant source of nutrients to the vegetation changes from bedrock weathering to atmospheric inputs and biological recycling. In parallel, the architecture of the critical zone changes with time, promoting a change in water flow regime from near-surface porous flow during early weathering stages to more complex flow regimes modulated by clay-rich regolith during the late stages of weathering. As a consequence of these two concurrent processes, we can expect the predominant sources and pathways of solutes to the streams to also change during critical zone evolution. If this is true, we would observe a decoupling between the solutes used by the vegetation and those that determine the composition of the streams during the late stages of weathering, represented by geomorphically stable tropical settings. To test these hypotheses, we are analyzing the elemental and Mg isotopic composition of regolith and streams at the humid tropical Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory. We aim to trace the relative contributions of the surficial, biologically mediated pathways and the deeper, weathering controlled nutrient pathways. We also investigate the role of lithology on the solute decoupling between the vegetation and the stream, by examining two similar headwater catchments draining two different bedrocks (andesitic volcaniclastic and granitic). Our preliminary elemental and Mg isotope results are consistent with atmospheric inputs in the upper 2 m of regolith in both lithologies and with bedrock weathering at depth. During a short storm event ( 6 h), a headwater stream draining volcaniclastic bedrock showed a large variation in Mg and δ26Mg, correlated with total suspended solids, while another similar headwater granitic stream showed a much narrower variation. A larger stream draining volcaniclastic bedrock showed changes in Mg concentration in response to rain during the same storm event, but did not change in δ26Mg

  3. Hydrogeochemical applications of natural isotope of the U (4n+2) and Th(4n) series in Morro do Ferro, Pocos de Caldas (MG), Brazil

    Bonotto, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium and thorium isotopic analysis were performed on well spoils of the ore body at Morro do Ferro, Pocos de Caldas (MG), Brazil, using groundwater from several boreholes in the area and surface water from a stream and that originates at the base of the hill. For uranium and thorium extraction, a chemical process was applied to samples; activites of 228 Th and 232 Th radioisotopes (4n+2 series) were determined by alpha spectrometry. The uranium concentration and 234 U/ 238 U isotope ratio in groundwater were applied to developed models for deducing proportions of water in a mixture and for characterizing uranium accumulation. The correlation between variability in concentration of uranium dissolved in groundwater and alteration of the level of the water table due to infiltration of rainfall was observed. Chemical analysis of the major and minor compounds for groundwater of the ore body zone were done. (Author) [pt

  4. Investigating the hydrological significance of stalagmite geochemistry (Mg, Sr) using Sr isotope and particulate element records across the Late Glacial-to-Holocene transition

    Belli, R.; Borsato, A.; Frisia, S.; Drysdale, R.; Maas, R.; Greig, A.

    2017-02-01

    The trace element and Sr isotope records in two coeval stalagmites characterized by different growth rates and flow regimes at Savi cave (Grotta Savi, NE Italy) reveal different sources and incorporation mechanisms for Mg and Sr. Mg is sourced primarily from dissolved cave host rock while particulate Mg derived from soil plays a subordinate role. The presence of particulate-borne Mg is inferred from the co-variation of Mg and particle-associated elements (Th, Al and Mn) which are preferentially concentrated in open columnar calcite layers. Variation in Mg concentrations corrected for particle-influenced components, the Mgc parameter, is controlled by water-rock interaction, with higher and lower Mgc during dry and wet phases, respectively. This is thought to reflect incongruent dissolution of Mg-rich phases. Correction of Sr concentrations for contributions from airborne exogenic Sr, based on 87Sr/86Sr ratios, yields the bedrock-only contribution (Src). Src variation in stalagmite calcite is influenced by speleothem growth rate and by variation of the calcite-water Sr partitioning in wet and dry phases, and only to a minor extent by incongruent dissolution of Mg-rich phases. Concentration profiles for Mgc and Srcg (corrected for growth rate effects) show inverse correlations and are inferred to show hydrological significance which is captured in a hydrological index, HI. We suggest HI provides robust information on water-rock interaction related to hydrological changes and can be utilized in both wet and semi-arid environments, provided the corrections for soil Mg and exogenic Sr can be applied with confidence. Application of the HI index allows correction of Grotta Savi oxygen isotope data, to yield a δ18Oc time series that shows when changes in moisture sources and atmospheric reorganization, or changes in moisture amount, were significant. This is especially evident during the Younger Dryas (YD). The Savi record supports the concept of a two-phase YD, marked by

  5. Decoupling of Mg-C and Sr-Nd-O isotopes traces the role of recycled carbon in magnesiocarbonatites from the Tarim Large Igneous Province

    Cheng, Zhiguo; Zhang, Zhaochong; Hou, Tong; Santosh, M.; Chen, Lili; Ke, Shan; Xu, Lijuan

    2017-04-01

    The Tarim Large Igneous Province in NW China hosts numerous magmatic carbonatite dikes along its northern margin. The carbonatites are composed mainly of dolomite (90 vol.%) and minor calcite (5 vol.%), with apatite, barite, celestine, aegirine, monazite and bastnaesite as accessory minerals. The rocks correspond to magnesiocarbonatites with a compositional range of 13.73-19.59 wt.% MgO, and 20.03-30.11 wt.% CaO, along with 1.65-3.31 wt.% total Fe2O3, 0.02-2.39 wt.% SiO2 and other minor elements, such as P2O5, Na2O and K2O. These magnesiocarbonatites are characterized by extreme enrichment in incompatible elements with high total rare earth element (REE) contents of 372-36965 ppm. The strontium [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.70378-0.70386], neodymium [εNd(t) = +2.51 - +3.59] and oxygen (δ18OV-SMOW = 5.9‰-8.0‰) isotope values of these rocks are consistent with a mantle origin, whereas the magnesium (δ26Mg = -1.09‰ to -0.85‰) and carbon (δ13CV-PDB = -4.1‰ to -5.9‰) isotopes are decoupled from mantle values and reflect signature of recycled sedimentary carbonates. Global plate tectonic models predict that sedimentary carbonates in convergent margins are subducted to deep domains in the mantle, with phase transitions from calcite/dolomite to magnesite, and eventually to periclase/perovskite. The involvement of a mantle plume enhances the normal mantle geotherms and promotes decomposition reactions of magnesite. The decoupling of Mg-C and Sr-Nd-O isotopes in the mangesiocarbonatites provides insights on the origin of carbonatites, and also illustrates a case of interaction between mantle plume and subduction-related components.

  6. Considerations on the age of the Bambui Group (MG, Brazil) based on isotopic analyses of Sr and Pb

    Couto, J.G.P.; Cordani, U.G.; Kawashita, K.

    1981-01-01

    Based on radiometric ages, the Bambui Group deposition time is related to the end of the Precambrian. However, the ages determined and released through scientific magazines are mot in agreement (600-1350 m.y.) and many doubts about the geochrological picture of this important lithostratigraphic unit remained for a long time. As a result of the work developed by Metamig, CPGeo (IG-USP) and IPEN (SP), Rb/Sr and Pb/Pb isotopic determinations were done on 31 rocks samples and 17 galenas collected from the Bambui Basin distributed in Minas Gerais State. The Rb/Sr ages of 590 m.y. for Pirapora Formation, 620 m.y. for Tres Marias Formation, and 640 m.y. for the Paraopeba Formation situated in the stable area are linked to sedimentation processes. In the Paracatu region the age of 680 m.y. found for the Paraopeba Formation is related to metamorphic events. The lead isotopic ratios from the galenas suggest an isotopic evolution in two stages. The first ended with the lead separation from the mantle and its incorporation to the crust during events of the Transamazonic Cycle. The second ended when the lead were incorporated to the galenas and seems to be related to one or more events of the Brazilian Cycle. (Author) [pt

  7. Geology and Isotope Systematics of the Jianchaling Au Deposit, Shaanxi Province, China: Implications for Mineral Genesis

    Su-Wei Yue

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The giant Jianchaling Au (52 t Au deposit is located in the Mian-Lue-Yang Terrane in the southern part of the Qinling Orogen of central China and is hosted by metamorphosed carbonate rocks of the Late Neoproterozoic Duantouya Formation. The deposit consists of multiple generations of mineralised quartz(-carbonate veins in WNW-trending extensional ductile-brittle shear zones. Based on the mineral assemblages and cross-cutting relationships between the quartz(-carbonate veins, the paragenesis is characterised by an early coarse-grained pyrite-pyrrhotite-pentlandite-dolomite-quartz assemblage (I, followed by pyrite-sphalerite-galena-carbonate-arsenopyrite-fuchsite-carbonate-quartz containing gold (II, and fine-grained pyrite-dolomite-calcite-quartz-realgar (As2S2-orpiment (As2S3 (III. The H-O-C isotope systematics for the three vein sets indicate that the mineralising fluid is probably sourced from the metamorphic dehydration of carbonate rocks in the Duantouya Formation, and gradually mixed with meteoric water during the emplacement of the third vein set. The δ34S values for sulfides (6.3–16.6‰ from the second auriferous vein set are greater than zero, indicating sulfates reduction from the Neoproterozoic metamorphic rocks (Duantouya Fm. The (206Pb/204Pbi ratios from pyrite (17.521–18.477 from each of the vein sets overlap those of the ultramafic rocks (18.324–18.717 and the Bikou Group (17.399–18.417, indicating that the units are possible sources for the sulfides in the mineralisation. Both εNd(t and Isr(t of sulfide overlap with the meta-ultramafic field and Duantouya formation and dominated with mature Sr-Nd character, which indicated that the Duantouya may play an important role during the ore formation and there may exist a minor ultramafic source that is involved in the ore fluid. The S-Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic ratios are closely related to those of the Bikou Group and Duantouya Formation, which indicates that the mineralised fluid has

  8. The Systematics of Activity-Composition Relations in Mg-Fe2+ Oxide and Silicate Solid Solutions

    O'Neill, H. S.

    2006-12-01

    accuracy including possible systematic errors of 0.5 kJ/mol (1 st. dev.). Any asymmetry is unambiguously constrained to be very small. These results were combined with experimental data (all at or above 900ºC), for partitioning of Mg and Fe between olivine and one of ilmenite (Pownceby and O'Neill, in prep.), Ti-, Al- or Cr-spinel (O'Neill, unpublished) and pyroxenes, garnet, and various high-pressure phases (literature). Internal consistency can be checked using other available partitioning data between pairs of these phases (i.e., without olivine). Except for some of the high-pressure phases, the ferromagnesian solutions are symmetrical with W Mg-Fe decreasing with the difference in the volumes of the end-members, which in turn depends on the atomic (Mg+Fe)/O ratio. This suggests that mixing in binary amphiboles, micas and other complex ferromagnesian silicates should be nearly ideal. The discrepancies shown by the high-pressure phases may be due to Fe3+ substitutions. As a working hypothesis, it is proposed that solid solutions between cations of the same charge and roughly similar size have simple thermodynamic mixing properties, with little asymmetry, modest excess entropies and excess enthalpies proportional to the volume difference of the end-members. Order-disorder phenomena have surprisingly little effect in the high temperature regime for which experimental data are available. Refs: [1] Davies and Navrotsky, J Sol State Chem 46, 1-22, 1983. [2] O'Neill et al., CMP 146, 308-325, 2003.

  9. Use of Sr and Pb isotopes in gneissic-migmatic rocks in Itacambira-Barrocao, MG, Brazil

    Siga Junior, O.; Cordani, U.G.; Basei, M.A.S.; Kawashita, K.

    1987-01-01

    This work tries to show the potential of the Rb-Sr, Pb-Pb and K-Ar methods applied to basic geological mapping. The different interpretative values of these methodologies contribute to the understanding of the tectonic processes developed in the southeastern border of the Sao Francisco Craton. The Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb isotopic data for the gneissic-migmatitic unit of this sector indicates their generation during the Archean (-2.7 Ga) and Early Proterozoic (-2.1 Ga.). The high (Sr 87 /Sr 86 ) and μ 1 values also suggest an origin through reworking of older crustal rocks. The K-Ar data (and one fission track age) allow the thermal history of this domain to be delineated and suggest a vertical tectonic in the Late Brazilian Cycle, putting side by side blocks formed in different depths. (M.V.M.)

  10. Lu-Hf isotope systematics of fossil biogenic apatite and their effects on geochronology

    Herwartz, Daniel; Münker, Carsten; Tütken, Thomas; Hoffmann, J. Elis; Wittke, Andreas; Barbier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Reliable methods for direct dating of biogenic apatite from pre-Pleistocene fossils are currently not available, and recent attempts using the Lu-Hf decay system yielded highly inaccurate ages for both bones and teeth. The geological processes accounting for this poor accuracy of Lu-Hf chronometry are not yet understood. Here we explore Lu-Hf systematics in fossil bones and teeth in detail, by applying five different sample digestion techniques that are tested on bones and composites of bone and sediment. Our current dataset implies that dissolution methods only slightly affect the resulting Lu-Hf ages, while clear differences between the individual digestion techniques became apparent for element concentrations. By analysing the insoluble leftovers from incomplete sample dissolution, four main reservoirs of Hf in fossil bones were identified: (1) a radiogenic end-member associated with apatite; (2) an unradiogenic end-member represented by the authigenic minerals or the embedding sediment; (3) a highly unradiogenic end-member that can be attributed to detrital zircon; and (4) a moderately soluble phase (probably a Zr(Hf)-phosphate) that yielded very low Lu/Hf but a highly radiogenic Hf isotope composition at the same time. This Zr(Hf)-phase must have been precipitated within the fossil bone sample at a late stage of burial history, thereby incorporating radiogenic 176Hf released from apatite surfaces over geological timescales. A second focus of our study is the effect of different sediment matrices and of crystal size on the preservation of pristine Lu-Hf isotope compositions in bioapatite. Because near-depositional Lu-Hf ages of phosphate fossils have previously been reported for the London Clay (England) and a calcareous marl from Tendaguru (Tanzania), we herein investigate specimens fossilised in carbonate matrices (calcareous marl from Oker, Germany; carbonate concretions from the Santana Formation, Brazil; carbonate from the Eifel, Germany) and argillaceous

  11. Role of deformation in odd-even staggering in reaction cross sections for 30,31,32Ne and 36,37,38Mg isotopes

    Urata, Y.; Hagino, K.; Sagawa, H.

    2017-12-01

    We discuss the role of pairing antihalo effect in the observed odd-even staggering in reaction cross sections for 30,31,32Ne and 36,37,38Mg isotopes by taking into account the ground-state deformation of these nuclei. To this end, we construct the ground-state density for the Ne,3130 and Mg,3736 nuclei based on a deformed Woods-Saxon potential, while for the 32Ne and 38Mg nuclei we also take into account the pairing correlation using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method. We demonstrate that, when the one-neutron separation energy is small for the odd-mass nuclei, a significant odd-even staggering still appears even with finite deformation, although the degree of staggering is somewhat reduced compared to the spherical case. This implies that the pairing antihalo effect in general plays an important role in generating the odd-even staggering in reaction cross sections for weakly bound nuclei.

  12. Oxygen isotope systematics of chondrules in the Allende CV3 chondrite: High precision ion microprobe studies

    Rudraswami, N.G.; Ushikubo, T.; Nakashima, D.; Kita, N.T.

    grains and some of them were derived from precursors related to refractory inclusions. However, most relict olivine grains show oxygen isotope ratios that overlap with those in homogeneous chondrules. The delta sup(17)O values of four barred olivine...

  13. Stable Isotope Systematics in Grasshopper Assemblages Along an Elevation Gradient, Colorado

    Kohn, M. J.; Evans, S.; Dean, J.; Nufio, C.

    2012-12-01

    Insects comprise over three quarters of all animal species, yet studies of body water isotopic composition are limited to only the cockroach, the hoverfly, and chironomid flies. These studies suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions in body water are primarily controlled by dietary water sources, with modification from respiratory and metabolic processes. In particular, outward diffusion of isotopically depleted water vapor through insect spiracles at low humidity enriches residual body water in 18O and 2H (D). Stable isotope compositions (δ18O and δD) also respond to gradients in elevation and humidity, but these influences remain poorly understood. In this study, we measured grasshopper body water and local vegetation isotopic compositions along an elevation gradient in Colorado to evaluate three hypotheses: 1) Insect body water isotopic composition is directly related to food source water composition 2) Water vapor transport alters body water isotopic compositions relative to original diet sources, and 3) Elevation gradients influence isotopic compositions in insect body water. Thirty-five species of grasshopper were collected from 14 locations in Colorado grasslands, ranging in elevation from 450 to 800 meters (n=131). Body water was distilled from previously frozen grasshopper specimens using a vacuum extraction line, furnaces (90 °C), and liquid nitrogen traps. Water samples were then analyzed for δ18O and δD on an LGR Liquid Water Isotope Analyzer, housed in the Department of Geosciences, Boise State University. Grasshopper body water isotopic compositions show wide variation, with values ranging between -76.64‰ to +42.82‰ in δD and -3.06‰ to +26.78‰ in δ18O. Precipitation δ18O values over the entire Earth excluding the poles vary by approximately 30‰, comparable to the total range measured in our single study area. Most grasshopper values deviate from the global meteoric water line relating δ18O and δD in precipitation

  14. Sr-Nd isotope systematics of xenoliths in Cenozoic volcanic rocks from SW Japan

    Kagami, Hiroo; Iwata, Masatoshi; Iizumi, Shigeru; Nureki, Terukazu.

    1993-01-01

    Based on new and previously published Sr and Nd isotope data, we examined the petrogenetic relationship between deep crust- and upper mantle-derived xenoliths contained in Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Cretaceous-Paleogene granitoid rocks in SW Japan. The deep crust- and upper mantle-derived mafic to ultramafic xenoliths contained in Cenozoic volcanic rocks from SW Japan have comparable initial Sr and Nd isotope ratios to the Cretaceous-Paleogene granitoid rocks in their respective districts. This may suggest that these xenoliths were genetically related to the Cretaceous-Paleogene granitoid rocks in SW Japan, and that regional variations in Sr and Nd isotope ratios observed in the granitoid rocks are attributed to differences in the geochemistry of the magma sources. (author)

  15. Strontium isotope systematics of mixing groundwater and oil-field brine at Goose Lake in northeastern Montana, USA

    Peterman, Zell E.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Futa, Kiyoto; Preston, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater, surface water, and soil in the Goose Lake oil field in northeastern Montana have been affected by Cl−-rich oil-field brines during long-term petroleum production. Ongoing multidisciplinary geochemical and geophysical studies have identified the degree and local extent of interaction between brine and groundwater. Fourteen samples representing groundwater, surface water, and brine were collected for Sr isotope analyses to evaluate the usefulness of 87Sr/86Sr in detecting small amounts of brine. Differences in Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr are optimal at this site for the experiment. Strontium concentrations range from 0.13 to 36.9 mg/L, and corresponding 87Sr/86Sr values range from 0.71097 to 0.70828. The local brine has 168 mg/L Sr and a 87Sr/86Sr value of 0.70802. Mixing relationships are evident in the data set and illustrate the sensitivity of Sr in detecting small amounts of brine in groundwater. The location of data points on a Sr isotope-concentration plot is readily explained by an evaporation-mixing model. The model is supported by the variation in concentrations of most of the other solutes.

  16. Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic systematics in a three-component mantle: a new perspective

    Zindler, A.; Goldstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Average Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic compositions for oceanic basalts indicate that the present day mantle consists of three chemically independent components. The recognition of a third mantle component obviates geochemical arguments which have been used to support chemical stratification and convective decoupling within the mantle, and the transport of lead to the core throughout geological time. (author)

  17. Stable isotope systematics in mesozoic granites of Central and Northern California and Southwestern Oregon

    Masi, U.; O'Neil, J.R.; Kistler, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    18O, D, and H2O+ contents were measured for whole-rock specimens of granitoid rocks from 131 localitics in California and southwestern Oregon. With 41 new determinations in the Klamath Mountains and Sierra Nevada, initial strontium isotope ratios are known for 104 of these samples. Large variations in ??18O (5.5 to 12.4), ??D (-130 to -31), water contents (0.14 to 2.23 weight percent) and initial strontium isotope ratios (0.7028 to 0.7095) suggest a variety of source materials and identify rocks modified by secondary processes. Regular patterns of variation in each isotopic ratio exist over large geographical regions, but correlations between the ratios are generally absent except in restricted areas. For example, the regular decrease in ??D values from west to east in the Sierra Nevada batholith is not correlative with a quite complex pattern of ??18O values, implying that different processes were responsible for the isotopic variations in these two elements. In marked contrast to a good correlation between (87Sr/86Sr)o and ??18O observed in the Peninsular Ranges batholith to the south, such correlations are lacking except in a few areas. ??D values, on the other hand, correlate well with rock types, chemistry, and (87Sr/86Sr)o except in the Coast Ranges where few of the isotopic signatures are primary. The uniformly low ??D values of samples from the Mojave Desert indicate that meteoric water contributed much of the hydrogen to the rocks in that area. Even so, the ??18O values and 18O fractionations between quartz and feldspar are normal in these same rocks. This reconnaissance study has identified regularities in geochemical parameters over enormous geographical regions. These patterns are not well understood but merit more detailed examination because they contain information critical to our understanding of the development of granitoid batholiths. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Tracking seasonal subglacial drainage evolution of alpine glaciers using radiogenic Nd and Sr isotope systematics: Lemon Creek Glacier, Alaska

    Clinger, A. E.; Aciego, S.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The transport pathways of water beneath a glacier are subject to change as melt seasons progress due to variability in the balance between basal water pressure and water flux. Subglacial hydrology has been well studied, but the understanding of spatial distribution is less well constrained. Whereas radiogenic isotopic tracers have been traditionally used as proxies to track spatial variability and weathering rates in fluvial and riverine systems, these techniques have yet to be applied extensively to the subglacial environment and may help resolve ambiguity in subglacial hydrology. Research has shown the 143Nd/144Nd values can reflect variation in source provenance processes due to variations in the age of the continental crust. Correlating the 143Nd/144Nd with other radiogenic isotope systematics such as strontium (87Sr/86Sr) provides important constraints on the role of congruent and incongruent weathering processes. Our study presents the application of Nd and Sr systematics using isotopic ratios to the suspended load of subglacial meltwater collected over a single melt season at Lemon Creek Glacier, USA (LCG). The time-series data show an average ɛNd ~ -6.83, indicating a young bedrock (~60 MYA). Isotopic variation helps track the seasonal expansion of the subglacial meltwater channels and subsequent return to early season conditions due to the parabolic trend towards less radiogenic Nd in June and towards more radiogenic Nd beginning in mid-August. However, the high variability in July and early August may reflect a mixture of source as the channels diverge and derive sediment from differently aged lithologies. We find a poor correlation between 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr (R2= 0.38) along with a slight trend towards more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values with time ((R2= 0.49). This may indicate that, even as the residence time decreases over the melt season, the LCG subglacial system is relatively stable and that the bedrock is congruently weathered. Our study

  19. Systematic NMR Analysis of Stable Isotope Labeled Metabolite Mixtures in Plant and Animal Systems: Coarse Grained Views of Metabolic Pathways

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Suto, Michitaka; Nishihara, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic phenotyping has become an important ‘bird's-eye-view’ technology which can be applied to higher organisms, such as model plant and animal systems in the post-genomics and proteomics era. Although genotyping technology has expanded greatly over the past decade, metabolic phenotyping has languished due to the difficulty of ‘top-down’ chemical analyses. Here, we describe a systematic NMR methodology for stable isotope-labeling and analysis of metabolite mixtures in plant and animal systems. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis method includes a stable isotope labeling technique for use in living organisms; a systematic method for simultaneously identifying a large number of metabolites by using a newly developed HSQC-based metabolite chemical shift database combined with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy; Principal Components Analysis; and a visualization method using a coarse-grained overview of the metabolic system. The database contains more than 1000 1H and 13C chemical shifts corresponding to 142 metabolites measured under identical physicochemical conditions. Using the stable isotope labeling technique in Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and Bombyx mori, we systematically detected >450 HSQC peaks in each 13C-HSQC spectrum derived from model plant, Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and the invertebrate animal model Bombyx mori. Furthermore, for the first time, efficient 13C labeling has allowed reliable signal assignment using analytical separation techniques such as 3D HCCH-COSY spectra in higher organism extracts. Conclusions/Significance Overall physiological changes could be detected and categorized in relation to a critical developmental phase change in B. mori by coarse-grained representations in which the organization of metabolic pathways related to a specific developmental phase was visualized on the basis of constituent changes of 56 identified metabolites. Based on the observed intensities of 13C atoms of

  20. Lifetimes of excited states in 196198Pt; application of interacting bason approximation model to even Pt isotopes systematics

    Bolotin, H.H.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Morrison, I.; Kennedy, D.L.; Ryan, C.G.; Sie, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The lifetimes and lifetime limits of the low-lying excited states up to and including the 6 1 + levels in 196 198 Pt were determined by the rcoil-distance method (RDM). Gamma-ray angular distributions in 198 Pt were also measured. These states were populated by multiple Coulomb excitation using 220-MeV 58 Ni ion beams and the measurements carried out in coincidence with backscattered projectiles. The measured mean lives of the states and B(E2) values inferred for the transitions between levels are presented. These specific findings, and the observed structure systematics obtained from the combination of the present results and those of prior workers for the even 194 - 198 Pt isotopes, are critically compared with our structure calculations employing the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) model incorporating a symmetry-breaking quadrupole force. Evaluative comparisons are also made with Boson Expansion Theory (BET) calculations

  1. Lifetimes of excited states in 196, 198Pt; Application of interacting boson approximation model to even Pt isotopes systematics

    Bolotin, H. H.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Morrison, I.; Kennedy, D. L.; Ryan, C. G.; Sie, S. H.

    1981-11-01

    The lifetimes and lifetime limits of the low-lying excited states up to and including the 6 1+ levels in 196, 198Pt were determined by the recoil-distance method (RDM). Gamma-ray angular distributions in 198Pt were also measured. These states were populated by multiple Coulomb excitation using 220 MeV 58Ni ion beams and the measurements were carried out in coincidence with back-scattered projectiles. The measured mean lives of the states and B(E2) values inferred for the transitions between levels are presented. These specific findings, and the observed structure systematics obtained from the combination of the present results and those of prior workers for the even 194-198Pt isotopes, are critically compared with our structure calculations employing the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model incorporating a symmetry-breaking quadrupole force; evaluative comparisons are also made with boson expansion theory (BET) calculations.

  2. Lifetimes of excited states in 196,198Pt; application of interacting boson approximation model to even Pt isotopes systematics

    Bolotin, H.H.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Morrison, I.; Kennedy, D.L.; Ryan, C.G.; Sie, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The lifetimes and lifetime limits of the low-lying excited states up to and including the 6 + 1 levels in sup(196, 198)Pt were determined by the recoil-distance method (RDM). Gamma-ray angular distributions in 198 Pt were also measured. These states were populated by multiple Coulomb excitation using 220 MeV 58 Ni ion beams and the measurements were carried out in coincidence with backscattering projectiles. The measured mean lives of the states and B(E2) values inferred for the transitions between levels are presented. These specific findings, and the observed structure systematics obtained from the combination of the present results and those of prior workers for the even sup(194-198)Pt isotopes, are critically compared with our structure calculations employing the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model incorporating a symmetry-breaking quadrupole force; evaluative comparisons are also made with boson expansion theory (BET) calculations. (orig.)

  3. Western Indian Ocean circulation and climate variability on different time scales. A study based on stable oxygen and carbon isotopes, benthic foraminiferal assemblages and Mg/Ca paleothermometry

    Romahn, Sarah

    2014-08-19

    In order to understand the Earth's climate evolution it is crucial to evaluate the role of low-latitude oceans in the global climate system, as they are connected to both hemispheres via atmospheric and oceanic circulation and thus hold the potential to disentangle the asynchronicity of short-term Pleistocene climate variability. However, the potential of low latitude oceans to respond to and force large-scale changes of the climate system is still debated. The aim of this thesis is to examine and to understand the causal relationship of both atmospheric and oceanic changes in the tropical western Indian Ocean on centennial-, millennial and glacial-interglacial timescales. For this purpose I investigated stable oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of both planktic and benthic foraminiferal tests, Mg/Ca ratios of planktic foraminiferal tests as well as benthic foraminiferal assemblages and sedimentary geochemical parameters on two sediment cores (GeoB12615-4, 446 m and GeoB12616-4, 1449 m) from the continental slope off Tanzania, East Africa.

  4. Western Indian Ocean circulation and climate variability on different time scales. A study based on stable oxygen and carbon isotopes, benthic foraminiferal assemblages and Mg/Ca paleothermometry

    Romahn, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the Earth's climate evolution it is crucial to evaluate the role of low-latitude oceans in the global climate system, as they are connected to both hemispheres via atmospheric and oceanic circulation and thus hold the potential to disentangle the asynchronicity of short-term Pleistocene climate variability. However, the potential of low latitude oceans to respond to and force large-scale changes of the climate system is still debated. The aim of this thesis is to examine and to understand the causal relationship of both atmospheric and oceanic changes in the tropical western Indian Ocean on centennial-, millennial and glacial-interglacial timescales. For this purpose I investigated stable oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of both planktic and benthic foraminiferal tests, Mg/Ca ratios of planktic foraminiferal tests as well as benthic foraminiferal assemblages and sedimentary geochemical parameters on two sediment cores (GeoB12615-4, 446 m and GeoB12616-4, 1449 m) from the continental slope off Tanzania, East Africa.

  5. Hydrochemical and isotopic study of groundwater impacted by the acid drainage of UrÂnio Mine - Osamu Utsumi, PoÇos de Caldas Plateau (MG), Brazil

    Alberti, Heber Luiz Caponi

    2017-01-01

    The Osamu Utsumi Mine - MOU, belonging to the Brazilian Nuclear Industries - INB, began in 1977 with pickling activities and remained in operation until 1995. During this period, 94 million tons of rocks were removed, which caused the generation of large wasted rock piles. The intense drainage and precipitation in the study region favored the oxidation and leaching of the wasted rock piles, causing the Acid Drainage of Mine - DAM and generating effluents with low pH and high concentrations of fluoride, aluminum, iron, manganese, sulfate, zinc, uranium and Radio, among others. Currently the MOU is in the process of decommissioning and environmental remediation. The understanding of the hydrogeochemical processes and the behavior of the water flow through different aquifers is extremely important so that the actions of environmental remediation and control of the DAM are really effective. In this sense, in this work, geoprocessing and hydrochemical techniques were used to propose a conceptual hydrogeochemical model in the MOU cavity system and wasted rock pile number 4 - BF4. The geoprocessing techniques allowed to characterize and size the area under study and to integrate information on geology and mineralogy with the hydrochemical data. The hydrochemical studies were based on three groundwater sampling campaigns, using the low flow method in 17 monitoring wells, as well as 3 water reservoirs in the study area. In the collected samples were determined: (1) the main cations and anions for groundwater classification using Piper and Stiff diagrams and multivariate statistical methods (cluster and Principal Component Analysis); (2) the major long half radionuclides and 222 Rn to assess radioactivity and imbalance between them; (3) the stable isotopes of 18 O and 2 H to provide information on the underground flows and water source; (4) the Tritium values found in the samples to estimate the age of the groundwater; (V) the sulfur and oxygen isotopes present in the

  6. Pb and O isotope systematics in granulite facies xenoliths, French Massif Central: Implications for crustal processes

    Downes, H.; Kempton, P.D.; Harmon, R.S.; Briot, D.; Leyreloup, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    Pb and O isotope data are represented for a suite of granulite facies xenoliths found within Tertiary alkaline volcanic rocks of the Massif Central, France. The suite consists of ultramafic and mafic cumulates, metagabbros which are considered to represent basic liquids, felsic meta-igneous lithologies (charnockites) and metasediments. Ranges of δ 18 O values are +6.9 to +9.8per mille for mafic xenoliths, +9.3 to +10.2per mille for felsic meta-igneous samples and +6.1 to +11.8per mille for the metasediments. By comparison, δ 18 O values for mantle peridotites from the same region range from +5.1 to +6.9per mille, whilst local Hercynian granitoids vary from +8.6 to +12.0per mille. The 206 Pb/ 204 Pb ratios of the granulite xenoliths are between 17.77 and 19.19, 207 Pb/ 204 Pb ratios vary from 15.51 to 15.69, and 208 Pb/ 204 Pb ratios range from 38.07 to 40.07. In general, metasedimentary granulites have the more radiogenic Pb isotope compositions, whereas mafic meta-igneous samples are less radiogenic. These isotopic characteristics can be explained as the result of the interaction of mafic magmas with the metasedimentary crust into which they intruded. The release of heat also provoked melting of the more fusible parts of the lower crust and led to the formation of late-orogenic Hercynian granitoids. However, an additional component which provides less radiogenic Pb is also needed in the source of the granitoids; this may be the felsic meta-igneous xenoliths or middle/upper crustal gneisses. (orig.)

  7. Carbon isotope systematics of Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica, using a portable cavity ring-down spectrometer

    Malowany, K. S.; Stix, J.; de Moor, J. M.; Chu, K.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2017-07-01

    Over the past two decades, activity at Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica, has shifted from hydrothermal to increasingly magmatic in character, with enhanced degassing and eruption potential. We have conducted a survey of the δ13C signatures of gases at Turrialba using a portable field-based CRDS with comparison to standard IRMS techniques. Our δ13C results of the volcanic plume, high-temperature vents, and soil gases reveal isotopic heterogeneity in the CO2 gas composition at Turrialba prior to its recent phase of eruptive activity. The isotopic value of the regional fault system, Falla Ariete (-3.4 ± 0.1‰), is in distinct contrast with the Central crater gases (-3.9 ± 0.1‰) and the 2012 high-temperature vent (-4.4 ± 0.2‰), an indication that spatial variability in δ13C may be linked to hydrothermal transport of volcanic gases, heterogeneities in the source composition, or magmatic degassing. Isotopic values of CO2 samples collected in the plume vary from δ13C of -5.2 to -10.0‰, indicative of mixing between atmospheric CO2 (-9.2 ± 0.1‰), and a volcanic source. We compare the Keeling method to a traditional mixing model (hyperbolic mixing curve) to estimate the volcanic source composition at Turrialba from the plume measurements. The predicted source compositions from the Keeling and hyperbolic methods (-3.0 ± 0.5‰ and -3.9 ± 0.4‰, respectively) illustrate two potential interpretations of the volcanic source at Turrialba. As of the 29 October 2014, Turrialba has entered a new eruptive period, and continued monitoring of the summit gases for δ13C should be conducted to better understand the dominant processes controlling δ13C fractionation at Turrialba.

  8. Chromium stable isotope systematic – implications for the redox evolution of the earth

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye

    and thus indicate the presence of oxidizing redox species. To track paleo-redox processes deep in the Earth’s history, a number of ancient soil horizons (e.g. the Drakenstein and Nsuze paleosols) formed ~2.2 and ~3.0 billion years ago have been analyzed. These horizons document similar behavior of Cr...... isotopes as modern soil profiles and indicate that oxidative weathering in the terrestrial environment started well before and after the Great Oxidation Event ~2.3 billion years ago. The signals of oxidative weathering on land are traceable in contemporaneous marine sediments such as Banded Iron Formations...

  9. Carbon Isotope Systematics in Mineral-Catalyzed Hydrothermal Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperature and Pressures

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques. Reduction of CO2 and/or CO during serpentization by mineral surface catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars. With the evidence a recent study has discovered for serpentinization in deeply buried carbon rich sediments, and more showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history, it seems likely that abiotic methane generation via serpentinization reactions may have been common on Mars. Experiments involving mineral-catalyzed hydrothermal organic synthesis processes were conducted at 750 C and 5.5 Kbars. Alkanes, alcohols and carboxylic acids were identified as organic compounds. No "isotopic reversal" of delta C-13 values was observed for alkanes or carboxylic acids, suggesting a different reaction pathway than polymerization. Alcohols were proposed as intermediaries formed on mineral surfaces at experimental conditions. Carbon isotope data were used in this study to unravel the reaction pathways of abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems at high temperatures and pressures. They are instrumental in constraining the origin and evolution history of organic compounds on Mars and other planets.

  10. Re-Os isotope systematics of the Radio Hill Ni-Cu-PGE complex, West Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    Frick, L.R.; McBride, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    ), that contamination of a komatiite (Re = 0.48 ppb, Os 1.3 ppb, gOs = 0) with 15% 3.5 Ga crust of granodioritic composition (Re 0.1 ppb, Os = 0.005 ppb, gOs = +890) can yield a SHMB magma (Re = 0.16 ppb, Os 0.20 ppb, gOs +18.5) which could be parental to the Radio Hill Complex ore system. Os concentrations in the silicate samples are much lower, from 0.039 to 1.1 ppb Os, with relatively higher Re/Os ratios, up to 18. These samples have experienced post-intrusion disturbance of the Re-Os isotope systematics and yield a poorly constrained isochron of ca 2.0 Ga age which coincides with the development of the Capricorn Orogen to the south. The massive ores were apparently not disturbed by this event, potentially due to the very high concentration of Os in the ores relative to metamorphic fluids. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  11. Determination of long-lived natural Ra isotopes, 226Ra, in mineral and spring waters from Caxambu (MG) and Aguas de Lindoia (SP) spas

    Negrao, Sergio Garcia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the long-lived Ra isotopes, 226 Ra and 228 Ra, natural distribution in mineral and spring waters from Caxambu (MG) and Aguas de Lindoia (SP) water parks. In Caxambu mineral waters it was observed 228 Ra activity concentrations slightly higher than those of 226 Ra. The elevated content of carbonates and bicarbonates of these waters can result in an increased solubility of the both Ra isotopes and may play an important role for the fate of 228 Ra and its equilibrium distribution between solid and liquid phases. In Caxambu Thermal Spa, arithmetic mean activities ranged from 83 mBq L -1 to 3599 mBq L -1 and from 60 mBq L -1 to 4481 mBq L -1 for 226 Ra and 228 Ra, respectively. The highest 226 Ra activity was found in Venancio Spring, while the maximum 228 Ra activity value was determined in Ernestina Guedes. 228 Ra/ 226 Ra activity ratios varied from 0.079 (Conde D'Eau and Princesa Isabel Spring) to 4.2 (Mairink II Spring). In Aguas de Lindoia, arithmetic mean activities ranged from 4.6 mBq L -1 to 41 mBq L -1 and from 30 mBq L -1 to 54 mBq L -1 for 226 Ra and 228 Ra, respectively. The maximum 226 Ra activity concentration was found in the bottled mineral water Sao Jorge, while the higher 228 Ra activity concentration was determined in Santa Filomena Spring (public station 2). 228 Ra/ 226 Ra activity ratios varied from 1.2 (bottled mineral water Sao Jorge) to 9.1 (bottled mineral water Jatoba 1). This work also performed the dose assessment due to the ingestion of 226 Ra and 228 Ra in Caxambu and Aguas de Lindoia mineral and spring waters. The committed effective doses were estimated by using a conservative dosimetric model and taking into account the results over a lifetime (70 years) following intake of both long-lived Ra isotopes. The results from this radiological evaluation showed that the guidance committed effective dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 recommended by World Health Organization was exceeded in almost all samples studied in

  12. Constraining Mantle Differentiation Processes with La-Ce and Sm-Nd Isotope Systematics

    Willig, M.; Stracke, A.

    2016-12-01

    Cerium (Ce) and Neodymium (Nd) isotopic ratios in oceanic basalts reflect the time integrated La-Ce and Sm-Nd ratios, and hence the extent of light rare earth element element (LREE) depletion or enrichment of their mantle sources. New high precision Ce-Nd isotope data from several ocean islands define a tight array in ԑCe-ԑNd space with ԑNd = -8.2±0.4 ԑCe + 1.3±0.9 (S.D.), in good agreement with previous data [1, 2]. The slope of the ԑCe-ԑNd array and the overall isotopic range are sensitive indicators of the processes that govern the evolution of the mantle's LREE composition. A Monte Carlo approach is employed to simulate continuous mantle-crust differentiation by partial melting and recycling of crustal materials. Partial melting of mantle peridotites produces variably depleted mantle and oceanic crust, which evolve for different time periods, before the oceanic crust is recycled back into the mantle including small amounts of continental crust (GLOSS [3]). Subsequently, depleted mantle and recycled materials of variable age and composition melt, and the respective melts mix in different proportions. Mixing lines strongly curve towards depleted mantle, and tend to be offset from the data for increasingly older and more depleted mantle. Observed ԑCe-ԑNd in ridge [1] and ocean island basalts and the slope of the ԑCe-ԑNd array therefore define upper limits for the extent and age of LREE depletion preserved in mantle peridotites. Very old average mantle depletion ages (> ca. 1-2 Ga) for the bulk of the mantle are difficult to reconcile with the existing ԑCe-ԑNd data, consistent with the range of Nd-Hf-Os model ages in abyssal peridotites [4-6]. Moreover, unless small amounts of continental crust are included in the recycled material, it is difficult to reproduce the relatively shallow slope of the ԑCe-ԑNd array, consistent with constraints from the ԑNd - ԑHf mantle array [7]. [1] Makishima and Masuda, 1994 Chem. Geol. 118, 1-8. [2] Doucelance et al

  13. U Isotope Systematics on Groundwaters from Southwestern France : Mixing Processes and Residence Times

    Innocent, C.; Malcuit, E.; Négrel, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Eocene Sands Aquifer of the Aquitanian Basin (Southwestern France) has been extensively studied for its hydrology, hydrogeochemistry and also for stable isotopes (André, 2002; André et al., 2005). 14C dates were also obtained in the southern part of the aquifer (André, 2002). Recently, in the framework of the CARISMEAU research project (Négrel et al., 2007), groundwaters have been analyzed for their U activity ratio in order to put some constraints on their residence time in the aquifer. A excellent correlation has been found between 234U/238U ratios (which can be as high as 13.5) and 14C dates, which allowed to propose residence times for the analyzed groundwaters at the scale of the whole aquifer (including the city of Bordeaux and its suburb) (Innocent and Négrel, 2008; submitted). The second step of the CARISMEAU research project (CARISMEAU 2) now focusses on the restricted "Entre-Deux-Mers" area. New groundwaters have been recovered and analyzed for their U isotopic composition. As for previous data, U activity ratios are typically very high, ranging from 2.9 to 8.6. Owing to additional 14C ages from the northern part of the aquifer, it is shown that most of the measured uranium activity ratios correlate with these 14C dates and fall on or close to the straight line defined previously (see above). As a consequence, residence times derived from U isotopic compositions fairly agree with 14C data, with only one exception from a groundwater which plots apart from the correlation line. Pumping tests have been done at a selected site (EMZM 7), involving pumping times of 1 hour, 8 hours and 16 hours. For each pumping time, waters have been recovered at different, increasing pumping rates of 80 m3 per hour, 120 m3 per hour, 160 m3 per hour, and 120 m3 per hour. The chemical composition of these twelve waters has not been found to vary significantly. Uranium activities are constant for ten of the twelve groundwaters (around 6.5, with a U concentration around

  14. Helium and carbon isotope systematics of Rungwe geothermal gases and fluids; southern Tanzania

    Barry, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    P. H. BARRY1*, D. R. HILTON1, T. P. FISCHER2, J. M. DE MOOR2, F. MANGASINI3 C. RAMIREZ4 1 Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, California 92093-0244, USA (*Correspondence: pbarry@ucsd.edu) 2 Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, MSC 03 2040, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001, USA. 3 Department of Mining and Mineral Processing Engineering, University of Dar Es Salaam, PO Box 35131, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. 4 Centro de Investigaciones en Ciencias Geologicas, Escuela Centroamericana de Geologia, Universidad de Costa Rica. The East African Rift (EAR) is the largest modern example of continental rifting, extending from the Afar depression in the north to the Rungwe region in southern Tanzania. EAR volcanism is attributed to the presence of one or more mantle plumes [1]. Late Miocene to recent volcanism and geothermal activity mark the Rungwe region [2], with mafic eruptions as recently as 200 years ago. Our aim is to delineate the southern geographical extent of plume influence on the propagating EAR by investigating the He-CO2 characteristics of geothermal fluids in the Rungwe region. We report new helium (He) and carbon (C) isotopes (3He/4He, δ13C) and relative abundance (CO2/3He) characteristics for a suite of 20 geothermal gas and fluid samples from 11 different localities in the Rungwe region. He-isotopes are in good agreement with previous reports [3], and range from ~1 RA to ~7 RA (MORB-like values), indicating admixture between upper mantle He and variable proportions of radiogenic He. C-isotopes ranges from -2.8 to -6.5 ‰ (vs. PDB) with all falling in the MORB range (~4.5 ± 2‰). CO2/3He ratios vary over 5 orders of magnitude from ~3 x 10^9 (MORB-like) to higher values (up to ~3 x 10^13) normally associated with crustal lithologies. Taken together, the He-CO2 data can be explained by 2-component mixing of a deep-seated mantle source with crustal component(s). There are no

  15. Determination of fission products and actinides by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry using isotope dilution analysis. A study of random and systematic errors

    Ignacio Garcia Alonso, Jose

    1995-01-01

    The theory of the propagation of errors (random and systematic) for isotope dilution analysis (IDA) has been applied to the analysis of fission products and actinide elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Systematic errors in ID-ICP-MS arising from mass-discrimination (mass bias), detector non-linearity and isobaric interferences in the measured isotopes have to be corrected for in order to achieve accurate results. The mass bias factor and the detector dead-time can be determined by using natural elements with well-defined isotope abundances. A combined method for the simultaneous determination of both factors is proposed. On the other hand, isobaric interferences for some fission products and actinides cannot be eliminated using mathematical corrections (due to the unknown isotope abundances in the sample) and a chemical separation is necessary. The theory for random error propagation in IDA has been applied to the determination of non-natural elements by ICP-MS taking into account all possible sources of uncertainty with pulse counting detection. For the analysis of fission products, the selection of the right spike isotope composition and spike to sample ratio can be performed by applying conventional random propagation theory. However, it has been observed that, in the experimental determination of the isotope abundances of the fission product elements to be determined, the correction for mass-discrimination and the correction for detector dead-time losses contribute to the total random uncertainty. For the instrument used in the experimental part of this study, it was found that the random uncertainty on the measured isotope ratios followed Poisson statistics for low counting rates whereas, for high counting rates, source instability was the main source of error

  16. Boron isotope systematics during magma-carbonate interaction: an experimental study from Merapi (Indonesia) and Vesuvius (Italy)

    Deegan, F. M.; Jolis, E. M.; Troll, V. R.; Freda, C.; Whitehouse, M.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate assimilation is increasingly recognized as an important process affecting the compositional evolution of magma and its inherent ability to erupt explosively due to release of carbonate-derived CO2 [e.g., 1, 2, 3]. In order to gain insights into this process, we performed short time-scale carbonate dissolution experiments in silicate melt using natural starting materials from Merapi and Vesuvius volcanoes at magmatic pressure and temperature [2, 4]. The experiments enable us to resolve in detail the timescales, textures and chemical features of carbonate assimilation. Three compositionally distinct glass domains have been defined: i) Ca-normal glass, similar in composition to the starting material; ii) Ca-rich, contaminated glass; and iii) a diffusional glass interface between the Ca-normal and Ca-rich glass, characterized by steady interchange between SiO2 and CaO. Here we present new boron isotope data for the experimental products obtained by SIMS. The glasses show distinct and systematic variation in their δ11B (%) values. The contaminated glasses generally show extremely negative δ11B values (down to -41 %) relative to both the uncontaminated experimental glass and fresh arc volcanics (-7 to +7 % [5]). Considering that carbonates have δ11B values of +9 to +26 [6], the data cannot be explained by simple mixing processes between the end-members alone. This implies that the δ11B of the original contaminant was drastically modified before being incorporated into the melt, which can be explained by B isotope fractionation during breakdown and degassing of the carbonate. Our data represents the first B isotope analyses of experimental products of carbonate assimilation. They provide novel and well constrained insights into the behavior of boron upon degassing of carbonate. This, in turn, has implications for both i) late stage contamination and volatile addition to hazardous volcanic systems located over carbonate basement (cf. [7]) and ii) studies of

  17. Uranium-lead isotope systematics in a regionally metamorphosed tonalite from the Eastern Alps

    Cliff, R A; Cohen, A [Leeds Univ. (UK). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1980-10-01

    U-Pb isotopic analyses were made on sphene, three epidote fractions, apatite, K-feldspar and plagioclase from a 314-m.y.-old tonalite member of the Zentralgneis plutonic suite in the southeast Tauern Window. The tonalite reached temperatures in excess of 550/sup 0/C during the Tertiary Alpine metamorphism. Apatite, fine-grained clinozoisite and feldspars equilibrated during the metamorphism, and the apatite yields an age of 22 m.y. which is 6 m.y. older than the Rb-Sr age of coexisting biotite. Sphene and coarse-grained iron-rich epidote did not reach equilibrium during Alpine metamorphism and the sphene data indicate crystallisation before 215 m.y. These minerals contain a large proportion of the uranium and thorium in the rock and the data thus imply that the present distribution of heat-producing elements in the tonalite was established long before the Alpine metamorphism. The very high closure temperatures for sphene and epidote implied by the data suggest they may be of value in dating metamorphism.

  18. Petrology and isotope systematics of magma mushes: some porphyritic granitoids of northeastern Brazil

    McMurry, J.; Long, L.E.; Sial, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    More than 80 coarsely porphyritic granitoid plutons with K-feldspar megacrysts (Itaporanga-type granites) intrude metamorphic rocks of Northeastern Brazil. Textural evidence for filter pressing and flow foliation indicates that these bodies were emplaced as viscous, crystal-laden mushes. A representative Itaporanga-type pluton, the Monte das Gameleiras intrusion, consists of a variety of rock types with SiO 2 ranging from 49.5 to 71.6 weight percent. Chemically and petrographically, this hornblende-bearing pluton has I-type characteristics with some S-type affinities. Whole-rock oxygen isotope data are in keeping with the distribution of δO 18 , for unaltered granitic rocks. Similarly, REE data suggest a single magmatic process, at least for the more felsic rock types, without post-intrusive effects. A 5-point, whole-rock Rb-Sr isochron for the Monte das Gameleiras pluton gives t = 511 ± 26 Ma andan initial, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7099 ± 0.0004. This is contrasted with disparate ages calculated from texturally similar bodies such as the Fazenda Nova pluton, for which a 5-point whole-rock isochron gives t = 630 ± 24 Ma with initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7065 ± 0.0005, and the type locality Itaporanga pluton, for which a 6-point isochron gives t= 625 ± 22 Ma. (author) [pt

  19. A systematic study of mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of AZ31B Mg alloy after ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification.

    Hou, Xiaoning; Qin, Haifeng; Gao, Hongyu; Mankoci, Steven; Zhang, Ruixia; Zhou, Xianfeng; Ren, Zhencheng; Doll, Gary L; Martini, Ashlie; Sahai, Nita; Dong, Yalin; Ye, Chang

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium alloys have tremendous potential for biomedical applications due to their good biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and degradability, but can be limited by their poor mechanical properties and fast corrosion in the physiological environment. In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM), a recently developed surface processing technique that utilizes ultrasonic impacts to induce plastic strain on metal surfaces, was applied to an AZ31B magnesium (Mg) alloy. The mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility of the alloy after UNSM treatment were studied systematically. Significant improvement in hardness, yield stress and wear resistance was achieved after the UNSM treatment. In addition, the corrosion behavior of UNSM-treated AZ31B was not compromised compared with the untreated samples, as demonstrated by the weight loss and released element concentrations of Mg and Al after immersion in alpha-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) for 24h. The in vitro biocompatibility of the AZ31B Mg alloys toward adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) before and after UNSM processing was also evaluated using a cell culture study. Comparable cell attachments were achieved between the two groups. These studies showed that UNSM could significantly improve the mechanical properties of Mg alloys without compromising their corrosion rate and biocompatibility in vitro. These findings suggest that UNSM is a promising method to treat biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Osmium isotope and highly siderophile element systematics of the lunar crust

    Day, J.M.D.; Walker, R.J.; James, O.B.; Puchtel, I.S.

    2010-01-01

    Coupled 187Os/188Os and highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re) abundance data are reported for pristine lunar crustal rocks 60025, 62255, 65315 (ferroan anorthosites, FAN) and 76535, 78235, 77215 and a norite clast in 15455 (magnesian-suite rocks, MGS). Osmium isotopes permit more refined discrimination than previously possible of samples that have been contaminated by meteoritic additions and the new results show that some rocks, previously identified as pristine, contain meteorite-derived HSE. Low HSE abundances in FAN and MGS rocks are consistent with derivation from a strongly HSE-depleted lunar mantle. At the time of formation, the lunar floatation crust, represented by FAN, had 1.4 ?? 0.3 pg g- 1 Os, 1.5 ?? 0.6 pg g- 1 Ir, 6.8 ?? 2.7 pg g- 1 Ru, 16 ?? 15 pg g- 1 Pt, 33 ?? 30 pg g- 1 Pd and 0.29 ?? 0.10 pg g- 1 Re (??? 0.00002 ?? CI) and Re/Os ratios that were modestly elevated (187Re/188Os = 0.6 to 1.7) relative to CI chondrites. MGS samples are, on average, characterised by more elevated HSE abundances (??? 0.00007 ?? CI) compared with FAN. This either reflects contrasting mantle-source HSE characteristics of FAN and MGS rocks, or different mantle-crust HSE fractionation behaviour during production of these lithologies. Previous studies of lunar impact-melt rocks have identified possible elevated Ru and Pd in lunar crustal target rocks. The new results provide no supporting evidence for such enrichments. If maximum estimates for HSE in the lunar mantle are compared with FAN and MGS averages, crust-mantle concentration ratios (D-values) must be ??? 0.3. Such D-values are broadly similar to those estimated for partitioning between the terrestrial crust and upper mantle, with the notable exception of Re. Given the presumably completely different mode of origin for the primary lunar floatation crust and tertiary terrestrial continental crust, the potential similarities in crust-mantle HSE partitioning for the Earth and Moon are somewhat

  1. Nd-Sr isotopic and geochemical systematics in Cambrian boninites and tholeiites from Victoria, Australia

    Nelson, D. R.; Crawford, A. J.; McCulloch, M. T.

    1984-11-01

    Rocks with boninitic affinities have been recognised in a number of “ophiolites”, including the Cambrian Heathcote and Mt Wellington Greenstone Belts of Victoria. Boninites and high-Mg andesites from the Heathcote Greenstone Belt show a restricted range of initial ɛ Nd values of between +3.3 to +5.8. Extremely refractory boninites from the Mt Wellington Greenstone Belt have ɛ Nd ranging from +1.3 to -9. Ti/Zr is positively correlated with Sm/Nd with the Heathcote lavas generally possessing greater depletion of Ti and enrichment of Zr relative to the middle and heavy REE with increasing LREE/HREE. These data are consistent with the generation of boninites by partial melting of refractory peridotite following invasion by LREE- and Zr-enriched, low ɛ Nd fluids. Tholeiites overlying the boninites in both greenstone belts have flat REE patterns and ɛ Nd˜+5, lower than that anticipated for lavas derived from depleted MORB source reservoirs in the Cambrian, suggesting that their source was also contaminated by a LREE-enriched, low ɛ Nd component similar to that involved in the generation of the Howqua boninites. The added components have characteristics compatible with their derivation from subducted altered oceanic crust and/or from wet subducted sediments. The identification of boninites and other low-Ti lavas in the Victorian greenstone belts is strong evidence for island arc development in southeastern Australia during the Lower Cambrian and provides further support for a subduction-related origin for many ophiolites.

  2. Consistent evaluations of (n,2n) and (n,np) reaction excitation functions for some even-even isotopes using empirical systematics

    Manokhin, Vassily N. [Russian Nuclear Data Center, Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Odano, Naoteru; Hasegawa, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    An approach for consistent evaluation of (n,2n) and (n,np) reaction excitation functions for some even-even isotopes with the (n,np) reaction thresholds lower than (n,2n) reaction ones is described. For determination of cross sections in the maximum of the (n,2n) and (n,np) reaction excitation functions some empirical systematics developed by Manokhin were used together with trends in dependence of gaps between the (n,2n) and (n,np) thresholds on atomic mass number A. The shapes of the (n,2n) and (n,np) reaction excitation functions were calculated using the normalized functions from the Manokhin's systematics. Excitation functions of (n,2n) and (n,np) reactions were evaluated for several nuclei by using the systematics and it was found that the approach used for the present study gives reasonable results. (author)

  3. A systematic neutron reflectometry study on hydrogen absorption in thin Mg{sub 1-x}Al{sub x} alloy films

    Fritzsche, H.; Poirier, E., E-mail: helmut.fritzsche@nrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Haagsma, J.; Ophus, C.; Luber, E.; Harrower, C.; Mitlin, D. [Univ. of Alberta, and National Research Council Canada, Chemical and Materials Engineering, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    In this article, we show how neutron reflectometry (NR) can provide deep insight into the absorption and desorption properties of commercially promising hydrogen storage materials. NR benefits from the large negative scattering length of hydrogen atoms, which changes the reflectivity curve substantially, so that NR can determine not only the total amount of stored hydrogen but also the hydrogen distribution along the film normal, with nanometer resolution. To use NR, the samples must have smooth surfaces, and the film thickness should range between 10 and 200 nm. We performed a systematic study on thin Mg{sub 1-x}Al{sub x} alloy films (x = 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.67) capped with a Pd catalyst layer. Our NR experiments showed that Mg{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3} is the optimum alloy composition with the highest amount of stored hydrogen and the lowest desorption temperature. All the thin films expand by about 20% because of hydrogen absorption, and the hydrogen is stored only in the MgAl layer with no hydrogen content in the Pd layer. (author)

  4. The isotope systematics of a juvenile intraplate volcano: Pb, Nd, and Srisotope ratios of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Staudigel, H.; Zindler, A.; Leslie, T.

    1984-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for a representative suite of 15 basanites, alkali basalts, transitional basalts and tholeiites from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, display unusually large variations for a single volcano, but lie within known ranges for Hawaiian basalts. Nd isotope ratios in alkali basalts show the largest relative variation (0.51291 - 0.51305), and include the nearly constant tholeiite value (approx.= 0.51297). Pb isotope ratios show similarly large ranges for tholeiites and alkali basalts and continue Tatsumoto's [31] 'Loa' trend towards higher 206 Pb/ 204 Pb, ratios, resulting in a substantial overlap with the 'Kea' trend. 206 Pb/ 204 Pb ratios for Loihi and other volcanoes along the Loa and Kea trends [31] are observed to correlate with the age of the underlying lithosphere suggesting lithosphere involvement in the formation of Hawaiian tholeiites. Loihi lavas display no correlation of Nd, Sr, or Pb isotope ratios with major element compositions or eruptive age, in contrast with observations of some other Hawaiian volcanoes. Isotope data for Loihi, as well as average values for Hawaiian volcanoes, are not adequately explained by previously proposed two-end-member models; new models for the origin and the development of Hawaiian volcanoes must include mixing of at least three geochemically distinct source regions and allow for the involvement of heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere. (orig.)

  5. Stable isotope oxygen-18 and deuterium analysis in surface and groundwater of the Jequitibá Creek Basin, Sete Lagoas, MG

    Linhares, Giovanna Maria Gardini; Moreira, Rubens Martins; Pimenta, Rafael Colombo; Scarpelli, Raquel Pazzini; Santos, Elizangela Augusta dos, E-mail: giovannagardini@gmail.com, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br, E-mail: colombopimenta@gmail.com, E-mail: raquelscarpelli@gmail.com, E-mail: elizangela.augusta@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Groundwater is an important source of public and industrial supplies, and inadequate exploitation of water reflects negatively on its quality and production of wells, especially when located in karstic aquifers. The study area includes the Maize and Sorghum National Research / Embrapa, located in the karst region of Sete Lagoas, within of the Jequitibá creek sub-basin, an affluent of the Velhas River. The evaluation of the content of stable isotopes of hydrogen ({sup 2}H), or deuterium, and oxygen ({sup 18}O) of surface waters (lagoons) and groundwater (production and monitoring wells) collected from the study area allowed to know directly the origin of these waters, active climatic processes and interactions between different aquifers and surface bodies, as possible mixtures of water from different sources. The collected samples were analyzed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry, IRMS Advantege - Thermo Science, from the Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN). The mean values found for δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H in the waters of the monitoring wells were -6.40‰ and -43.21‰, respectively. For the production wells, mean values for δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H of -5.87 ‰ and -40.09‰, respectively, were obtained. When compared to GMWL, the collected groundwater originates attributed to the precipitations. The lagoon waters had mean values for δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H of -3.73‰ and -30.08‰. The water collected in the crystalline fissured aquifer presented mean values δ{sup 18}O and δ{sup 2}H of -6.91‰ and -40.26 ‰ respectively, in its rockier portion, and -6.09‰ and -43.05‰. (author)

  6. Stable isotope oxygen-18 and deuterium analysis in surface and groundwater of the Jequitibá Creek Basin, Sete Lagoas, MG

    Linhares, Giovanna Maria Gardini; Moreira, Rubens Martins; Pimenta, Rafael Colombo; Scarpelli, Raquel Pazzini; Santos, Elizangela Augusta dos

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater is an important source of public and industrial supplies, and inadequate exploitation of water reflects negatively on its quality and production of wells, especially when located in karstic aquifers. The study area includes the Maize and Sorghum National Research / Embrapa, located in the karst region of Sete Lagoas, within of the Jequitibá creek sub-basin, an affluent of the Velhas River. The evaluation of the content of stable isotopes of hydrogen ( 2 H), or deuterium, and oxygen ( 18 O) of surface waters (lagoons) and groundwater (production and monitoring wells) collected from the study area allowed to know directly the origin of these waters, active climatic processes and interactions between different aquifers and surface bodies, as possible mixtures of water from different sources. The collected samples were analyzed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry, IRMS Advantege - Thermo Science, from the Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN). The mean values found for δ 18 O and δ 2 H in the waters of the monitoring wells were -6.40‰ and -43.21‰, respectively. For the production wells, mean values for δ 18 O and δ 2 H of -5.87 ‰ and -40.09‰, respectively, were obtained. When compared to GMWL, the collected groundwater originates attributed to the precipitations. The lagoon waters had mean values for δ 18 O and δ 2 H of -3.73‰ and -30.08‰. The water collected in the crystalline fissured aquifer presented mean values δ 18 O and δ 2 H of -6.91‰ and -40.26 ‰ respectively, in its rockier portion, and -6.09‰ and -43.05‰. (author)

  7. Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of Alkali-Rich Fragments in the Yamato-74442 LL-Chondritic Breccia

    Yokoyama, T.; Misawa, K.; Okano, O.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simo, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2012-01-01

    Alkali-rich igneous fragments were identified in the brecciated LL-chondrites, Kr henberg (LL5)], Bhola (LL3-6) and Yamato (Y)-74442 (LL4), and show characteristic fractionation patterns of alkaline elements. The K-Rb-Cs-rich fragments in Kr henberg, Bhola, and Y-74442 are very similar in mineralogy and petrography (olivine + pyroxene + glass), suggesting that they could have come from related precursor materials. We have undertaken Rb-Sr isotopic studies on alkali-rich fragments in Y-74442 to precisely determine their crystallization ages and the isotopic signatures of their precursor material(s).

  8. Strontium isotope systematics of scheelite and apatite from the Felbertal tungsten deposit, Austria - results of in-situ LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis

    Kozlik, Michael; Gerdes, Axel; Raith, Johann G.

    2016-02-01

    The in-situ Sr isotopic systematics of scheelite and apatite from the Felbertal W deposit and a few regional Variscan orthogneisses ("Zentralgneise") have been determined by LA-MC-ICP-MS. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of scheelite and apatite from the deposit are highly radiogenic and remarkably scattering. In the early magmatic-hydrothermal scheelite generations (Scheelite 1 and 2) the 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.72078 to 0.76417 and from 0.70724 to 0.76832, respectively. Metamorphic Scheelite 3, formed by recrystallisation and local mobilisation of older scheelite, is characterised by even higher 87Sr/86Sr values between 0.74331 and 0.80689. Statistics allows discriminating the three scheelite generations although there is considerable overlap between Scheelite 1 and 2; they could be mixtures of the same isotopic reservoirs. The heterogeneous and scattering 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the two primary scheelite generations suggest modification of the Sr isotope system due to fluid-rock interaction and isotopic disequilibrium. Incongruent release of 87Sr from micas in the Early Palaeozoic host rocks of the Habach Complex contributed to the solute budget of the hydrothermal fluids and may explain the radiogenic Sr isotope signature of scheelite. Spatially resolved analyses revealed isotopic disequilibrium even on a sub-mm scale within zoned Scheelite 2 crystals indicating scheelite growth in an isotopic dynamical hydrothermal system. Zoned apatite from the W mineralised Early Carboniferous K1-K3 orthogneiss in the western ore field yielded 87Sr/86Sr of 0.72044-0.74514 for the cores and 0.74535-0.77937 for the rims. Values of magmatic apatite cores from the K1-K3 orthogneiss are comparable to those of primary Scheelite 1; they are too radiogenic to be magmatic. The Sr isotopic composition of apatite cores was therefore equally modified during the hydrothermal mineralisation processes, therefore supporting the single-stage genetic model in which W mineralisation is associated with

  9. Microscopic study of low-lying yrast spectra and deformation systematics of even-even barium isotopes

    Sarswat, S.P.; Bharti, Arun; Khosa, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    The yrast spectra has been obtained in the variation-after-projection framework using pairing-plus-quadrupole- quadrupole model for the two body interaction. Besides the low-lying yrast spectra, the calculated values of intrinsic quadrupole moments of some of the barium isotopes i.e. 124-134 Ba are presented

  10. Evaluating crustal contributions to enriched shergottites from the petrology, trace elements, and Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotope systematics of Northwest Africa 856

    Ferdous, J.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.; Pirotte, Z.

    2017-08-01

    The origin of the incompatible trace element (ITE) characteristics of enriched shergottites has been critical for examining two contradicting scenarios to explain how these Martian meteorites form. The first scenario is that it reflects ITE enrichment in an early-formed mantle reservoir whereas the second scenario attributes it to assimilation of ancient Martian crust (∼4-4.5 Ga) by ITE-depleted magmas. Strongly differentiated shergottite magmas may yield added constraints for determining which scenario can best explain this signature in enriched shergottites. The meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 856 is a basaltic shergottite that, unlike many enriched shergottites, lacks olivine and has undergone extensive differentiation from more primitive parent magma. In similarity to other basaltic shergottites, NWA 856 is comprised primarily of compositionally zoned clinopyroxenes (45% pigeonite and 23% augite), maskelynite (23%) and accessory minerals such as ulvöspinel, merrillite, Cl-apatite, ilmenite, pyrrhotite, baddeleyite and silica polymorph. The CI-chondrite normalized rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns for its maskelynite, phosphates, and its whole rock are flat with corresponding light-REE depletions in clinopyroxenes. The 87Rb-87Sr and 147Sm-143Nd internal isochron ages are 162 ± 14 (all errors are ±2σ) Ma and 162.7 ± 5.5 Ma, respectively, with an initial εNdI = -6.6 ± 0.2. The Rb-Sr isotope systematics are affected by terrestrial alteration resulting in larger scatter and a less precise internal isochron age. The whole rock composition is used in MELTS simulations to model equilibrium and fractional crystallization sequences to compare with the crystallization sequence from textural observations and to the mineral compositions. These models constrain the depth of initial crystallization to a pressure range of 0.4-0.5 GPa (equivalent to 34-42 km) in anhydrous conditions at the Fayalite-Magnetite-Quartz buffer, and consistently reproduce the

  11. Geochemistry and Nd-isotope systematics of chemical and terrigenous sediments from the Dun Mountain Ophiolite, New Zealand

    Sivell, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    . Metalliferous contributions to red and green TA in the overlying terrigenous sedimentary sequence also link these facies to early DMOB back-arc eruptives. The red and green TA pass upwards into ungraded Atomodesmid-bearing grey TA, implying turbidite deposition in a shallowing marine environment. The (mainly andesitic) TA show systematic trends of decreasing Eu/Eu* and ε Nd (T) with increasing Ε-REE, La/Y, Th/Sc, and SiO 2 . Th abundances and Th/Sc ratios (up to 1.6) in the TA are akin to those of calc-alkaline magmas in continental arcs, and are significantly greater than island-arc or ophiolitic volcanics. A narrow range of positive ε Nd (T) values (+0.5 to +2.0) for the TA suggests a young differentiated continental arc source, less dissected than the quartzofeldspathic plutonic provenance for the Torlesse (ε Nd (T) N /Yb N = 2.5-2.8) in the sandstones resemble island-arc tholeiites (IAT). The breccias have low Eu/Eu* (c. 0.72), Ce N /Yb N = 1.6, Th/Sc (0.1-0.2), and Tb N /Yb N c. 1.0, features transitional between the sandstones and DMOB plagiogranites. Importantly, the sandstones and breccias show high positive initial Nd ratios (ε Nd (T) = +5 to +8) akin to values for Brook Street IAT (ε Nd (T) = +9). This implies juvenile (mantle-derived) source rocks for both the mafic and felsic younger terrigenous sediments, compatible with crustal residence (mean provenance) ages less than for the TA. Little continental input is permitted by Nd-isotopic data for these rocks. Whereas the early DMOB pillow basalt - chemical sediment - TA assemblage was emplaced in a back-arc setting, with influx of detritus in part from an active continental margin (possibly within the New England Orogen), the younger DMOB terrigenous sediment association shows a close kinship with bimodal DMOB magmatism related to infant arc volcanic centres in an extensional forearc regime. Turbidite sands and mass-flow deposits were shed into proximal fault-bound basins isolated from continental clastic

  12. Differentiation among Multiple Sources of Anthropogenic Nitrate in a Complex Groundwater System using Dual Isotope Systematics: A case study from Mortandad Canyon, New Mexico

    Larson, T. E.; Perkins, G.; Longmire, P.; Heikoop, J. M.; Fessenden, J. E.; Rearick, M.; Fabyrka-Martin, J.; Chrystal, A. E.; Dale, M.; Simmons, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    The groundwater system beneath Los Alamos National Laboratory has been affected by multiple sources of anthropogenic nitrate contamination. Average NO3-N concentrations of up to 18.2±1.7 mg/L have been found in wells in the perched intermediate aquifer beneath one of the more affected sites within Mortandad Canyon. Sources of nitrate potentially reaching the alluvial and intermediate aquifers include: (1) sewage effluent, (2) neutralized nitric acid, (3) neutralized 15N-depleted nitric acid (treated waste from an experiment enriching nitric acid in 15N), and (4) natural background nitrate. Each of these sources is unique in δ18O and δ15N space. Using nitrate stable isotope ratios, a mixing model for the three anthropogenic sources of nitrate was established, after applying a linear subtraction of the background component. The spatial and temporal variability in nitrate contaminant sources through Mortandad Canyon is clearly shown in ternary plots. While microbial denitrification has been shown to change groundwater nitrate stable isotope ratios in other settings, the redox potential, relatively high dissolved oxygen content, increasing nitrate concentrations over time, and lack of observed NO2 in these wells suggest minimal changes to the stable isotope ratios have occurred. Temporal trends indicate that the earliest form of anthropogenic nitrate in this watershed was neutralized nitric acid. Alluvial wells preserve a trend of decreasing nitrate concentrations and mixing models show decreasing contributions of 15N-depleted nitric acid. Nearby intermediate wells show increasing nitrate concentrations and mixing models indicate a larger component derived from 15N-depleted nitric acid. These data indicate that the pulse of neutralized 15N-depleted nitric acid that was released into Mortandad Canyon between 1986 and 1989 has infiltrated through the alluvial aquifer and is currently affecting two intermediate wells. This hypothesis is consistent with previous

  13. Pb and Sr isotopic systematics of some basalts and sulfides from the East Pacific Rise at 210N (project RITA)

    Vidal, P.; Clauer, N.

    1981-01-01

    Tholeiitic basalts and sulfide deposits from the 'Cyana' and 'Alvin' diving programs (RITA project) on the East Pacific Rise were analyzed for Pb and Sr isotopes. The basalt data plot within the field defined previously by other East Pacific Rise basalts ( 206 Pb/ 204 Pb: 18.35-18.58; 207 Pb/ 204 Pb: 15.48-15.53; 208 Pb/ 204 Pb: 37.8-38.1; 87 Sr/ 86 Sr: 0.7022-0.7025). Pb, U and Sr contents (approx. equal to 0.5, approx. equal to 0.05 and approx. equal to 110 ppm, respectively) and μ values (approx. equal to 6) are typical of MORB, whereas Th/U ratios (approx. equal to 3.5) are significantly higher. The Pb isotopic ratios of the sulfide samples are very homogeneous ( 206 Pb/ 204 Pb approx. equal to 18.47, 207 Pb/ 204 Pb approx. equal to 15.49, 208 Pb/ 204 Pb approx. equal to 37.90), and plot in the middle of the basalt field. This indicates that the sulfide Pb was derived from the basaltic crust without any significant contribution from either seawater or hemipelagic sediments, and the solutions from which the sulfiedes were deposited had uniform Pb isotopic composition. The Pb contents of three sulfide samples is relatively high (170-1310 ppm). The Sr contents of five sulfide samples are widely scattered from 12 to 210 ppm, with 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios intermediate between basaltic and seawater values (0.70554 +- 0.00005 to 0.70795 +- 0.00011). Leaching experiments show that both basalt-derived Sr and seawater Sr were present in the solutions which deposited the sulfides. In some cases, Sr was also adsorbed from seawater onto the sulfides following their deposition. Basalt-derived Sr and seawater Sr are also present in associated non-sulfide phases. (orig.)

  14. Calcium Isotope Systematics of Diagenetically Altered Carbonates: Example from the Proterozoic Carbonates of Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    Farkas, J.; Jacobsen, S.; Frauenstein, F.; Veizer, J.

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed mass-dependent (δ44/40Ca) and radiogenic (ɛCa) calcium isotope variations of diagenetically altered carbonates collected from the Duitschland Formation (~2.45 Ga) of the Transvaal Supergroup in a vicinity of the younger Bushveld Igneous Complex (Frauenstein, 2005, PhD Thesis, Ruhr Univ. Bochum). Textural, trace element and isotope data measured on these samples provide convincing evidence for extensive post-depositional alteration and diagenetic resetting. Samples selected for the Ca isotope study have Mn/Sr ratios from 0.8 to 33, 87Sr/86Sr from 0.704 to 0.719 and their δ18O and δ18C scatter from -20 to -2.8‰ and from 9.7 to -1.1‰, respectively. The δ44/40Ca (NIST) of carbonates range from 0.3 to 1.3‰ and their ɛCa indicate no radiogenic 40Ca excesses larger than the analytical uncertainty of ~1.5 ɛ-unit, confirming that the δ44/40Ca variation is exclusively due to mass-dependent fractionation. There is a difference between δ44/40Ca of limestones and dolostones, the former range from ~0.3 to 1.2‰ and the latter cluster tightly around 1.1. Using Mn/Sr as an index for diagenetic alteration (Brand and Veizer, 1980, J. Sed. Petrol., 50, 1219-1236) the δ44/40Ca of limestones becomes progressively heavier with an increasing degree of alteration (δ44/40Ca vs. Mn/Sr, r = .84, p element data. Finally, we propose that in a suite of coeval marine limestones, samples with the lowest δ44/40Ca, Mn/Sr and 87Sr/86Sr should, in most cases, represent the least altered components.

  15. Oxygen and sulfur isotope systematics of sulfate produced during abiotic and bacterial oxidation of sphalerite and elemental sulfur

    Balci, N.; Mayer, B.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Mandernack, K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of metal sulfide oxidation in acid mine drainage (AMD) systems have primarily focused on pyrite oxidation, although acid soluble sulfides (e.g., ZnS) are predominantly responsible for the release of toxic metals. We conducted a series of biological and abiotic laboratory oxidation experiments with pure and Fe-bearing sphalerite (ZnS & Zn 0.88Fe 0.12S), respectively, in order to better understand the effects of sulfide mineralogy and associated biogeochemical controls of oxidation on the resultant ?? 34S and ?? 18O values of the sulfate produced. The minerals were incubated in the presence and absence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans at an initial solution pH of 3 and with water of varying ?? 18O values to determine the relative contributions of H 2O-derived and O 2-derived oxygen in the newly formed sulfate. Experiments were conducted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using O 2 and Fe(III) aq as the oxidants, respectively. Aerobic incubations with A. ferrooxidans, and S o as the sole energy source were also conducted. The ??34SSO4 values from both the biological and abiotic oxidation of ZnS and ZnS Fe by Fe(III) aq produced sulfur isotope fractionations (??34SSO4-ZnS) of up to -2.6???, suggesting the accumulation of sulfur intermediates during incomplete oxidation of the sulfide. No significant sulfur isotope fractionation was observed from any of the aerobic experiments. Negative sulfur isotope enrichment factors (??34SSO4-ZnS) in AMD systems could reflect anaerobic, rather than aerobic pathways of oxidation. During the biological and abiotic oxidation of ZnS and ZnS Fe by Fe(III) aq all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water, with measured ?? 18OSO 4-H 2O values of 8.2??0.2??? and 7.5??0.1???, respectively. Also, during the aerobic oxidation of ZnS Fe and S o by A. ferrooxidans, all of the sulfate oxygen was derived from water with similar measured ?? 18OSO 4-H 2O values of 8.1??0.1??? and 8.3??0.3???, respectively. During biological oxidation

  16. Excitation Energies of Superdeformed States in 196Pb: Towards a Systematic Study of the Second Well in Pb Isotopes

    Wilson, A.N.; Singh, A.K.; Huebel, H.; Rossbach, D.; Schonwasser, G.; Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Lane, G.J.; Goergen, A.; Korichi, A.; Hannachi, F.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Astier, A.; Azaiez, F.; Bourgeois, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Kroell, T.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Buforn, N.; Redon, N.

    2005-01-01

    The excitation energy of the lowest-energy superdeformed band in 196 Pb is established using the techniques of time-correlated γ-ray spectroscopy. Together with previous measurements on 192 Pb and 194 Pb, this result allows superdeformed excitation energies, binding energies, and two-proton and two-neutron separation energies to be studied systematically, providing stringent tests for current nuclear models. The results are examined for evidence of a 'superdeformed shell gap'

  17. Influence of liquid structure on diffusive isotope separation in molten silicates and aqueous solutions

    Watkins, James M.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Ryerson, Frederick J.; Peterson, Brook T.

    2011-06-01

    Molecular diffusion in natural volcanic liquids discriminates between isotopes of major ions (e.g., Fe, Mg, Ca, and Li). Although isotope separation by diffusion is expected on theoretical grounds, the dependence on mass is highly variable for different elements and in different media. Silicate liquid diffusion experiments using simple liquid compositions were carried out to further probe the compositional dependence of diffusive isotopic discrimination and its relationship to liquid structure. Two diffusion couples consisting of the mineral constituents anorthite (CaAl 2Si 2O 8; denoted AN), albite (NaAlSi 3O 8; denoted AB), and diopside (CaMgSi 2O 6; denoted DI) were held at 1450 °C for 2 h and then quenched to ambient pressure and temperature. Major-element as well as Ca and Mg isotope profiles were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. In both experiments, Ca diffuses rapidly with respect to Si. In the AB-AN experiment, D Ca/ D Si ≈ 20 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Ca is much greater than in natural liquid experiments where D Ca/ D Si ≈ 1. In the AB-DI experiment, D Ca/ D Si ≈ 6 and the efficiency of isotope separation is between that of the natural liquid experiments and the AB-AN experiment. In the AB-DI experiment, D Mg/ D Si ≈ 1 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Mg is smaller than it is for Ca yet similar to that observed for Mg in natural liquids. The results from the experiments reported here, in combination with results from natural volcanic liquids, show clearly that the efficiency of diffusive separation of Ca isotopes is systematically related to the solvent-normalized diffusivity - the ratio of the diffusivity of the cation ( D Ca) to the diffusivity of silicon ( D Si). The results on Ca isotopes are consistent with available data on Fe, Li, and Mg isotopes in silicate liquids, when considered in terms of the parameter D cation/ D Si. Cations diffusing in aqueous solutions display a similar relationship

  18. Simultaneous spectroscopy of $\\gamma$- rays and conversion electrons: Systematic study of EO transitions and intruder states in close vicinity of mid-shell point in odd-Au isotopes

    Venhart, M; Grant, A F; Petrik, K

    This proposal focuses on detailed systematic studies of the $\\beta$ /EC-decays of $^{179,181,183,185}$Hg leading to excited states in the neutron-deficient Au isotopes in the vicinity of the N=104 midshell. $\\gamma$-ray, X-ray and conversion electron de-excitations of odd-A Au isotopes will be studied simultaneously. These studies will address important structural questions such as the excitation energies of coexisting states, properties of multiple intruder states (i.e. intruder particles coupled to intruder cores) and mixing of coexisting structures. The unique combination of Hg beam purity and yields make ISOLDE a unique facility for these experiments.

  19. Barren Miocene granitoids in the Central Andean metallogenic belt, Chile: Geochemistry and Nd-Hf and U-Pb isotope systematics

    Deckart, Katja; Godoy, Estanislao; Bertens, Alfredo; Jerez, Daniela; Saeed, Ayesha

    2010-01-01

    Four Middle-to-Late Miocene barren plutonic complexes that occur between the giant porphyry copper deposits of the central Chilean Andes were selected for U-Pb LA-ICPMS geochronology and Hf-isotope systematics on single zircon grains. Major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope whole rock geochemical studies were undertaken to compare with slightly younger or coeval barren and fertile intrusive rocks between 32 o and 34 o S. The studied granitoids yield resolvable crystallization ages of 11.3±0.1 Ma (Cerro Meson Alto massif), 10.3±0.2 Ma (La Gloria pluton), 14.9±0.2 Ma/14.9±0.1 Ma (Yerba Loca stock) and 11.2±0.1 Ma/14.7±0.1 Ma (San Francisco Batholith). Major and trace elements discard an adakitic signature as suggested for coeval porphyric intrusions at 32 o S, slightly younger mineralized porphyries at Rio Blanco-Los Bronces deposit and other Cenozoic adakites. Volcanic host rocks are less fractionated than the intrusive rock units. The same observation can be made for the unmineralized northern plutons compared to the southern ones. Initial Sr-Nd isotope data show insignificant variation (0.703761-0.704118 and 0.512758- 0.512882), plotting in the mantle array. Trace element enrichment can be explained by addition of subducted-slab fluids and/or terrigenous sediments to the mantle wedge prior to and/or slight crustal input during magma ascent. Zircon grains separated from these barren intrusives share a similar initial εHf-data variation for the younger age group (10-12 Ma; 7.04-9.54) and show a more scattered range for the older one (14-15 Ma; 8.50-15.34); both sets plot between the DM and CHUR evolution lines. There is evidence that magma evolution was slightly distinct through time from older to younger barren magmatism, compared to a few fertile porphyritic rocks from Rio Blanco-Los Bronces porphyry copper deposit. It is suggested that chronological inconsistencies within these complexes might be related to differential shortening across the NE

  20. Hydrologic Cycle Response to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum at Austral, High-Latitude Site 690 as Revealed by In Situ Measurements of Foraminiferal Oxygen Isotope and Mg/Ca Ratios

    Kozdon, R.; Kelly, D.; Fournelle, J.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Earth surface temperatures warmed by ~5°C during an ancient (~55.5 Ma) global warming event termed the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). This transient (~200 ka) "hyperthermal" climate state had profound consequences for the planet's surficial processes and biosphere, and is widely touted as being an ancient analog for climate change driven by human activities. Hallmarks of the PETM are pervasive carbonate dissolution in the ocean basins and a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) recorded in variety of substrates including soil and marine carbonates. Together these lines of evidence signal the rapid (≤30 ka) release of massive quantities (≥2000 Gt) of 13C-depleted carbon into the exogenic carbon cycle. Paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on pedogenic features in paleosols, clay mineralogy and sedimentology of coastal and continental deposits, and land-plant communities indicate that PETM warmth was accompanied by a major perturbation to the hydrologic cycle. Micropaleontological evidence and n-alkane hydrogen isotope records indicate that increased poleward moisture transport reduced sea-surface salinities (SSSs) in the central Arctic Ocean during the PETM. Such findings are broadly consistent with predictions of climate model simulations. Here we reassess a well-studied PETM record from the Southern Ocean (ODP Site 690) in light of new δ18O and Mg/Ca data obtained from planktic foraminiferal shells by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), respectively. The unparalleled spatial resolution of these in situ techniques permits extraction of more reliable δ18O and Mg/Ca data by targeting of minute (≤10 μm spots), biogenic domains within individual planktic foraminifera that retain the original shell chemistry (Kozdon et al. 2011, Paleocean.). In general, the stratigraphic profile and magnitude of the δ18O decrease (~2.2‰) delimiting PETM warming in our SIMS-generated record are similar to those of

  1. The origin of high-Mg magmas in Mt Shasta and Medicine Lake volcanoes, Cascade Arc (California): higher and lower than mantle oxygen isotope signatures attributed to current and past subduction

    Martin, E.; Bindeman, I.; Grove, T. L.

    2011-11-01

    We report the oxygen isotope composition of olivine and orthopyroxene phenocrysts in lavas from the main magma types at Mt Shasta and Medicine Lake Volcanoes: primitive high-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT), basaltic andesites (BA), primitive magnesian andesites (PMA), and dacites. The most primitive HAOT (MgO > 9 wt%) from Mt. Shasta has olivine δ18O (δ18OOl) values of 5.9-6.1‰, which are about 1‰ higher than those observed in olivine from normal mantle-derived magmas. In contrast, HAOT lavas from Medicine Lake have δ18OOl values ranging from 4.7 to 5.5‰, which are similar to or lower than values for olivine in equilibrium with mantle-derived magmas. Other magma types from both volcanoes show intermediate δ18OOl values. The oxygen isotope composition of the most magnesian lavas cannot be explained by crustal contamination and the trace element composition of olivine phenocrysts precludes a pyroxenitic mantle source. Therefore, the high and variable δ18OOl signature of the most magnesian samples studied (HAOT and BA) comes from the peridotitic mantle wedge itself. As HAOT magma is generated by anhydrous adiabatic partial melting of the shallow mantle, its 1.4‰ range in δ18OOl reflects a heterogeneous composition of the shallow mantle source that has been influenced by subduction fluids and/or melts sometime in the past. Magmas generated in the mantle wedge by flux melting due to modern subduction fluids, as exemplified by BA and probably PMA, display more homogeneous composition with only 0.5‰ variation. The high-δ18O values observed in magnesian lavas, and principally in the HAOT, are difficult to explain by a single-stage flux-melting process in the mantle wedge above the modern subduction zone and require a mantle source enriched in 18O. It is here explained by flow of older, pre-enriched portions of the mantle through the slab window beneath the South Cascades.

  2. The Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) biotic crisis: Insights from δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics

    Chen, Daizhao; Qing, Hairuo; Li, Renwei

    2005-06-01

    A severe biotic crisis occurred during the Late Devonian Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) transition (± 367 Myr). Here we present δ13C carb, δ13C org and 87Sr / 86Sr isotopic systematics, from identical samples of two sections across F/F boundary in South China, which directly demonstrate large and frequent climatic fluctuations (˜200 kyr) from warming to cooling during the F/F transition. These climate fluctuations are interpreted to have been induced initially by increased volcanic outgassing, and subsequent enhanced chemical weathering linked to the rapid expansion of vascular plants on land, which would have increased riverine delivery to oceans and primary bioproductivity, and subsequent burial of organic matter, thereby resulting in climate cooling. Such large and frequent climatic fluctuations, together with volcanic-induced increases in nutrient (e.g., biolimiting Fe), toxin (sulfide) and anoxic water supply, and subsequent enhanced riverine fluxes and microbial bloom, were likely responsible for the stepwise faunal demise of F/F biotic crisis.

  3. Frequency metrology on the Mg 3s21S→3s4p 1P line for comparison with quasar data

    Hannemann, S.; Salumbides, E. J.; Witte, S.; Zinkstok, R. Th.; Duijn, E.-J. van; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.

    2006-01-01

    We report a frequency metrology study on the Mg 3s 2 1 S→3s4p 1 P transition near 202.5 nm. For this purpose, the fourth harmonic of the output from an injection-seeded Ti:sapphire pulsed laser is employed in a Mg atomic beam experiment with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Absolute frequency calibration with a frequency comb laser is performed on the cw seeding radiation, while the chirp-induced frequency shift between the pulsed output and the seed light is monitored on line. The resulting transition frequency for the main isotope 24 Mg is determined at 49 346.756 809(35) m -1 . This value is three orders of magnitude more precise than the best value in the literature. The line positions of the other isotopes 25 Mg and 26 Mg are also measured at comparable accuracy, giving rise to very exact values for the isotopic shifts. The achieved precision for the transition frequency at the 7x10 -10 level makes this second resonance line of Mg I an additional candidate for inclusion in many-multiplet methods, aimed at detecting a possible temporal variation of the fine-structure constant α from comparison with quasar spectra. The isotopic shifts obtained are also important to correct for possible systematic shifts due to evolution of isotopic abundances, which may mimic α-variation effects

  4. The estuarine chemistry and isotope systematics of 234,238U in the Amazon and Fly Rivers

    Swarzenski, P.; Campbell, P.; Porcelli, D.; McKee, B.

    2004-01-01

    Natural concentrations of 238U and ??234U values were determined in estuarine surface waters and pore waters of the Amazon and Fly (Papua New Guinea) Rivers to investigate U transport phenomena across river-dominated land-sea margins. Discharge from large, tropical rivers is a major source of dissolved and solid materials transported to the oceans, and are important in defining not only oceanic mass budgets, but also terrestrial weathering rates. On the Amazon shelf, salinity-property plots of dissolved organic carbon, pH and total suspended matter revealed two vastly contrasting water masses that were energetically mixed. In this mixing zone, the distribution of uranium was highly non-conservative and exhibited extensive removal from the water column. Uranium removal was most pronounced within a salinity range of 0-16.6, and likely the result of scavenging and flocculation reactions with inorganic (i.e., Fe/Mn oxides) and organic colloids/particles. Removal of uranium may also be closely coupled to exchange and resuspension processes at the sediment/water interface. An inner-shelf pore water profile indicated the following diagenetic processes: extensive (???1 m) zones of Fe(III) - and, to a lesser degree, Mn(IV) - reduction in the absence of significant S(II) concentrations appeared to facilitate the formation of various authigenic minerals (e.g., siderite, rhodocrosite and uraninite). The pore water dissolved 238U profile co-varied closely with Mn(II). Isotopic variations as evidenced in ??234U pore waters values from this site revealed information on the origin and history of particulate uranium. Only after a depth of about 1 m did the ??234U value approach unity (secular equilibrium), denoting a residual lattice bound uranium complex that is likely an upper-drainage basin weathering product. This suggests that the enriched ??234U values represent a riverine surface complexation product that is actively involved in Mn-Fe diagenetic cycles and surface

  5. The estuarine chemistry and isotope systematics of 234,238U in the Amazon and Fly Rivers

    Swarzenski, Peter; Campbell, Pamela; Porcelli, Don; McKee, Brent

    2004-12-01

    Natural concentrations of 238U and δ234U values were determined in estuarine surface waters and pore waters of the Amazon and Fly (Papua New Guinea) Rivers to investigate U transport phenomena across river-dominated land-sea margins. Discharge from large, tropical rivers is a major source of dissolved and solid materials transported to the oceans, and are important in defining not only oceanic mass budgets, but also terrestrial weathering rates. On the Amazon shelf, salinity-property plots of dissolved organic carbon, pH and total suspended matter revealed two vastly contrasting water masses that were energetically mixed. In this mixing zone, the distribution of uranium was highly non-conservative and exhibited extensive removal from the water column. Uranium removal was most pronounced within a salinity range of 0-16.6, and likely the result of scavenging and flocculation reactions with inorganic (i.e., Fe/Mn oxides) and organic colloids/particles. Removal of uranium may also be closely coupled to exchange and resuspension processes at the sediment/water interface. An inner-shelf pore water profile indicated the following diagenetic processes: extensive (˜1 m) zones of Fe(III)—and, to a lesser degree, Mn(IV)—reduction in the absence of significant S(II) concentrations appeared to facilitate the formation of various authigenic minerals (e.g., siderite, rhodocrosite and uraninite). The pore water dissolved 238U profile co-varied closely with Mn(II). Isotopic variations as evidenced in δ234U pore waters values from this site revealed information on the origin and history of particulate uranium. Only after a depth of about 1 m did the δ234U value approach unity (secular equilibrium), denoting a residual lattice bound uranium complex that is likely an upper-drainage basin weathering product. This suggests that the enriched δ234U values represent a riverine surface complexation product that is actively involved in Mn-Fe diagenetic cycles and surface

  6. Metallogenesis of the lode gold deposit in Ilesha area of southwestern Nigeria: inferences from lead isotope systematics

    Oyinloye, A.O.

    2006-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the geochemistry of 18 representative samples of the granite gneiss host rock, common Pb dates on six granite gneiss whole rock samples, six feldspar sample separates, and six samples from the lode gold deposit in the Ilesha schist belt. The AFM plot for the biotite granite gneiss indicated that its potlatch was derived from a subduction related tectonic setting. The granite gneiss had low U/Pb and Th/Pb ratios (0.10 to 0.31 and 0.33 to 1.31, respectively), and upper crystal Pb content of 30-47 ppm. The /sup 207/Pb/sup 204/Pb, /sup 206/Pb /sup 204/Pb, /sup 208/Pb/sup 204/Pb, were extremely homogeneous in the host rock, the feldspar, and the pyrite indicating derivation from a subduction related environment like a back arc or island arc. The two-stage Stacy and Kramers (1975) Pb-Pb model dating method of interpretation adopted in this study indicated that the granite gneiss was emplaced at 2750 +- 25 Ma in an orogen. On analysis, common Pb in pyrite yielded an average model age of 550 Ma. This Pb systematic indicated that Au was derived from the volcanics in the lIesha schist belt by hydrothermal leaching, transported through the same medium and deposited in the massive quartz veins as thio-complexes from which native gold was liberated through interaction of the ore fluid and spinals in the host rock. Studies were carried out on the geochemistry of 18 representative samples of the granite gneiss host rock, common Pb dates on six granite gneiss whole rock samples, six feldspar sample separates, and six samples from the lode gold deposit in the Ilesha schist belt. The AFM plot for the biotite granite gneiss indicated that its potlatch was derived from a subduction related tectonic setting. The granite gneiss had low U/Pb and Th/Pb ratios (0.10 to 0.31 and 0.33 to 1.31, respectively), and upper crustal Pb content of 30-47 ppm. The /sup 207/Pb /sup 204/Pb, /sup 206/Pb /sup 204/Pb, /sup 208/Pb /sup 204/Pb, were extremely homogeneous in the

  7. Calcium isotopes in wine

    Holmden, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The δ 44/40Ca values of bottled wine vary between -0.76% to -1.55% on the seawater scale and correlate weakly with inverse Ca concentration and Mg/Ca ratio, such that the lowest δ 44/40Ca values have the highest Ca concentrations and lowest Mg/Ca ratios. The correlation is notable in the sense that the measured wines include both whites and reds sampled from different wine growing regions of the world, and cover a wide range of quality. Trends among the data yield clues regarding the cause of the observed isotopic fractionation. White wines, and wines generally perceived to be of lower quality, have lower δ 44/40Ca values compared to red wines and wines of generally perceived higher quality. Quality was assessed qualitatively through sensory evaluation, price, and scores assigned by critics. The relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality was most apparent when comparing wines of one varietal from one producer from the same growing region. In the vineyard, wine quality is related to factors such as the tonnage of the crop and the ripeness of the grapes at the time of harvesting, the thickness of the skins for reds, the age of the vines, as well as the place where the grapes were grown (terroir). Quality is also influenced by winemaking practices such as fermentation temperature, duration of skin contact, and barrel ageing. Accordingly, the relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality may originate during grape ripening in the vineyard or during winemaking in the cellar. We tested the grape ripening hypothesis using Merlot grapes sampled from a vineyard in the Okanagan, British Columbia, using sugar content (degrees Brix) as an indicator of ripeness. The grapes were separated into pulp, skin, and pip fractions and were analyzed separately. Thus far, there is no clear evidence for a systematic change in δ 44/40Ca values associated with progressive ripening of grapes in the vineyard. On the day of harvesting, the δ 44/40Ca value of juice squeezed from

  8. Magnesium isotope compositions of Solar System materials determined by double spiking

    Hin, R.; Lai, Y. J.; Coath, C.; Elliott, T.

    2015-12-01

    As a major element, magnesium is of interest for investigating large scale processes governing the formation and evolution of rocky planetary bodies. Determining the Mg isotope composition of the Earth and other planetary bodies has hence been a topic of interest ever since mass-dependent fractionation of 'non-traditional' stable isotopes has been used to study high-temperature processes. Published results, however, suffer from disagreement on the Mg isotope compositions of the Earth and chondrites [1-5], which is attributed to residual matrix effects. Nonetheless, most recent studied have converged towards a homogeneous (chondritic) Mg isotope composition in the Solar System [2-5]. However, in several of the recent studies there is a hint of a systematic difference of about 0.02-0.06‰ in the 26Mg/24Mg isotope compositions of chondrites and Earth. Such difference, however, is only resolvable by taking standard errors, which assumes robust data for homogenous sample sets. The discrepancies between various studies unfortunately undermine the confidence in such robustness and homogeneity. The issues with matrix effects during isotopic analyses can be overcome by using a double spike approach. Such methodology generally requires three isotope ratios to solve for three unknowns, a requirement that cannot be met for Mg. However, using a newly developed approach, we present Mg isotope compositions obtained by critical mixture double spiking. This new approach should allow greater confidence in the robustness of the data and hence enable improvement of. Preliminary data indicate that chondrites have a resolvable ~0.04‰ lighter 26Mg/24Mg than (ultra)mafic rocks from Earth, Mars and the eucrite parent body, which appear indistinguishable from each other. It seems implausible that this difference is caused by magmatic process such as partial melting or crystallisation. More likely, Mg isotopes are fractionated by a non-magmatic process during the formation of planets, e

  9. Systematic Study of Au6 to Au12 Gold Clusters on MgO(100) F Centers Using Density-Functional Theory

    Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Hammer, Bjørk

    2012-01-01

    We present an optimized genetic algorithm used in conjunction with density-functional theory in the search for stable gold clusters and O2 adsorption ensembles in F centers at MgO(100). For Au8 the method recovers known structures and identifies several more stable ones. When O2 adsorption...

  10. A systematic neutron reflectometry study on hydrogen absorption in thin Mg{sub 1-x}Al{sub x} alloy films

    Fritzsche, H.; Poirier, E. [National Research Council of Canada, Chalk River, ON (Canada). Canadian Neutron Beam Centre; Haagsma, J.; Ophus, C.; Luber, E.; Harrower, C.T.; Mitlin, D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, AB (Canada). National Inst. for Nanotechnology

    2010-10-15

    Various methods for storing hydrogen have been examined in an effort to find ways to store hydrogen in increasingly smaller volumes with decreasing weight of the whole hydrogen storage system. Metal hydrides, in which hydrogen is chemically bound to a metal atom, are considered to be very promising candidates for hydrogen storage because they have high gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities. This study investigated the effect of different magnesium (Mg) and aluminium (Al) ratios on the absorption and desorption properties of thin films. Neutron reflectometry (NR) was used in this study to better understand the absorption and desorption properties of commercially promising hydrogen storage materials. The large negative scattering length of hydrogen atoms changes the reflectivity curve substantially, so that NR can determine the total amount of stored hydrogen as well as the hydrogen distribution along the film normal, with nanometer resolution. In order to use NR, the samples must have smooth surfaces, and the film thickness should range between 10 and 200 nm. Thin Mg{sub 1-x}Al{sub x} alloy films (x = 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.67) capped with a palladium (Pd) catalyst layer were used in this study. The NR experiments revealed that Mg{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3} is the optimum composition for this binary alloy system, with the highest amount of stored hydrogen and the lowest desorption temperature. All the thin films expanded by approximately 20 percent due to hydrogen absorption. The hydrogen was stored only in the MgAl layer without any hydrogen in the Pd layer. It was concluded that NR can be used to effectively determine the hydrogen profile in thin MgAl films. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Amalgam-chromatographic separation of magnesium isotopes

    Klinskij, G.D.; Levkin, A.V.; Ivanov, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Separation of magnesium isotopes within Mg(Hg)-MgI 2 system (in dimethylformamide) is conducted under amalgam-chromatographic conditions. Separation maximal degree, that is (1.09), for 24 Mg and 26 Mg and separation coefficient (α = 1.0089±0.006) are determined. Light isotopes are found to concentrate in the amalgam. Technique of thermal conversion of flows within amalgam-dimethylformamide system is suggested on the basis of reversible reaction of Ca-Mg element exchange

  12. APPLICATION OF O-H-B-Sr ISOTOPE SYSTEMATICS TO THE EXPLORATION OF SALINIZATION AND FLUSHING IN COASTAL AQUIFERS : PRELIMINARY DATA FROM THE PIALASSA BAIONA ECOSYSTEM (ADRIATIC SEA

    Riccardo Petrini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available O, H, B and Sr isotopes were identified from surface-waters, ground-waters and waters percolating in soils at the Pialassa Baiona lagoon and nearby inland areas. The preliminary data demonstrate the occurrence of both conservative mixtures between seawater and freshwaters and cation exchange at the salt/fresh water interface during the intrusion. The O and H isotopes indicate that the freshwater component in the binary mixing had the isotopic features of the rainwater from Apennine catchments. Coupled O-H-B isotopes also show that the major contribution of the moving seawater was confined to the deeper aquifers and some of the soil waters. The Sr isotopes highlight the role of cation exchanges when seawater flushes freshwater aquifers, and allow the recognition of the different components of the solute. Deviations from these processes as revealed by B isotopes are interpreted as the evidence of possible anthropogenic inputs.

  13. Constraining the role of iron in environmental nitrogen transformations. Dual stable isotope systematics of abiotic NO2- reduction by Fe(II) and its production of N2O

    Johnston, David [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wankel, Scott David [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Buchwald, Carolyn [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States); Hansel, Colleen [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., MA (United States)

    2015-09-16

    Redox reactions involving nitrogen and iron have been shown to have important implications for mobilization of priority contaminants. Thus, an understanding of the linkages between their biogeochemical cycling is critical for predicting subsurface mobilization of radionuclides such as uranium. Despite mounting evidence for biogeochemical interactions between iron and nitrogen, our understanding of their environmental importance remains limited. Here we present an investigation of abiotic nitrite (NO2-) reduction by Fe(II) or ‘chemodenitrification,’ and its relevance to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), specifically focusing on dual (N and O) isotope systematics under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions. We observe a range of kinetic isotope effects that are regulated by reaction rates, with faster rates at higher pH (~8), higher concentrations of Fe(II) and in the presence of mineral surfaces. A clear non-linear relationship between rate constant and kinetic isotope effects of NO2- reduction was evident (with larger isotope effects at slower rates) and is interpreted as reflecting the dynamics of Fe(II)-N reaction intermediates. N and O isotopic composition of product N2O also suggests a complex network of parallel and/or competing pathways. Our findings suggest that NO2- reduction by Fe(II) may represent an important abiotic source of environmental N2O, especially in iron-rich environments experiencing dynamic redox variations. This study provides a multi-compound, multi-isotope framework for evaluating the environmental occurrence of abiotic NO2- reduction and N2O formation, helping future studies constrain the relative roles of abiotic and biological N2O production pathways.

  14. Magnesium isotopic composition of the mantle

    Teng, F.; Li, W.; Ke, S.; Marty, B.; Huang, S.; Dauphas, N.; Wu, F.; Helz, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of Mg isotopic composition of the Earth not only are important for understanding its geochemistry but also can shed light on the accretion history of the Earth as well as the evolution of the Earth-Moon system. However, to date, the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth is still poorly constrained and highly debated. There is uncertainty in the magnitude of Mg isotope fractionation at mantle temperatures and whether the Earth has a chondritic Mg isotopic composition or not. To constrain further the Mg isotopic composition of the mantle and investigate the behavior of Mg isotopes during igneous differentiation, we report >200 high-precision (δ26Mg French Polynesian volcanoes (Society island and Cook Austral chain); 3) olivine grains from Hawaiian volcanoes (Kilauea, Koolau and Loihi) and 4) peridotite xenoliths from Australia, China, France, Tanzania and USA. Global oceanic basalts and peridotite xenoliths have a limited (<0.2 ‰) variation in Mg isotopic composition, with an average δ26Mg = -0.25 relative to DSM3. Olivines from Hawaiian lavas have δ26Mg ranging from -0.43 to +0.03, with most having compositions identical to basalts and peridotites. Therefore, the mantle’s δ26Mg value is estimated to be ~ -0.25 ± 0.1 (2SD), different from that reported by Wiechert and Halliday (2007; δ26Mg = ~ 0) but similar to more recent studies (δ26Mg = -0.27 to -0.33) (Teng et al. 2007; Handler et al. 2009; Yang et al., 2009). Moreover, we suggest the Earth, as represented by the mantle, has a Mg isotopic composition similar to chondrites (δ26Mg = ~-0.33). The need for a model such as that of Wiechert and Halliday (2007) that involves sorting of chondrules and calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions in the proto planetary disc is thus not required to explain the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth.

  15. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  16. Stable isotope analysis of Dacryoconarid carbonate microfossils: a new tool for Devonian oxygen and carbon isotope stratigraphy.

    Frappier, Amy Benoit; Lindemann, Richard H; Frappier, Brian R

    2015-04-30

    Dacryoconarids are extinct marine zooplankton known from abundant, globally distributed calcite microfossils in the Devonian, but their shell stable isotope composition has not been previously explored. Devonian stable isotope stratigraphy is currently limited to less common invertebrates or bulk rock analyses of uncertain provenance. As with Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera, isotopic analysis of dacryoconarid shells could facilitate higher-resolution, geographically widespread stable isotope records of paleoenvironmental change, including marine hypoxia events, climate changes, and biocrises. We explored the use of Dacryoconarid isotope stratigraphy as a viable method in interpreting paleoenvironments. We applied an established method for determining stable isotope ratios (δ(13) C, δ(18) O values) of small carbonate microfossils to very well-preserved dacryoconarid shells. We analyzed individual calcite shells representing five common genera using a Kiel carbonate device coupled to a MAT 253 isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Calcite shell δ(13) C and δ(18) O values were compared by taxonomic group, rock unit, and locality. Single dacryoconarid calcite shells are suitable for stable isotope analysis using a Kiel-IRMS setup. The dacryoconarid shell δ(13) C values (-4.7 to 2.3‰) and δ(18) O values (-10.3 to -4.8‰) were consistent across taxa, independent of shell size or part, but varied systematically through time. Lower fossil δ(18) O values were associated with warmer water temperature and more variable δ(13) C values were associated with major bioevents. Dacryoconarid δ(13) C and δ(18) O values differed from bulk rock carbonate values. Dacryoconarid individual microfossil δ(13) C and δ(18) O values are highly sensitive to paleoenvironmental changes, thus providing a promising avenue for stable isotope chemostratigraphy to better resolve regional to global paleoceanographic changes throughout the upper Silurian to the upper Devonian. Our results

  17. Primary Data on U/Pb-Isotope Ages and Lu/Hf-Isotope Geochemical Systematization of Detrital Zircons from the Lopatinskii Formation (Vendian-Cambrian Transition Levels) and the Tectonic Nature of Teya-Chapa Depression (Northeastern Yenisei Ridge)

    Kuznetsov, N. B.; Priyatkina, N. S.; Rud'ko, S. V.; Shatsillo, A. V.; Collins, W. J.; Romanyuk, T. V.

    2018-03-01

    The main results are presented on U/Pb-isotope dating of 100 detrital zircons and, selectively, on the Lu/Hf-isotope system of 43 grains from sandstones of the Lopatinskii formation (the lower stratigraphic level of the Chingasan group). Ages from 896 ± 51 to 2925 ± 38 Ma were obtained with a pronounced maximum of 1890 Ma in the curve of probability density, along with ɛHf estimates from +8.4 to-15.1, which allow one to throw doubt upon the molasse nature of the Lopatinskii formation.

  18. Isotopic clusters

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  19. Stable isotopes

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  20. Insights From Magnesium Isotopic Compositions on the Oceanic Hydrothermal Circulation: Is Seamount Weathering the Solution?

    Galy, A.; Carder, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2006-12-01

    It has been long recognised that the input of Mg in the ocean by river is removed by precipitation of Mg-rich bearing phases, either directly from the ocean such as dolomite or through hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic crust. The sampling of hydrothermal fluids demonstrated the efficiency of Mg consumption by the alteration of the oceanic crust, even at temperatures as low as 15°. For high-temperature fluids vented through black or white smokers in the vicinity of the ridge, the Mg concentration is up to 50 time lower than in seawater, and the close relationship between chlorine and Mg led to the idea that seawater was feeding the hydrothermal system and that Mg is quantitatively removed from it during high-T° alteration, the so called zero Mg hypothesis. Despite some hint for a non zero Mg hydrothermal end-member for a handful sites, the low concentration of Mg in oceanic hydrothermal fluids (around 1 mmol/l) has been mainly attributed to contamination by seawater during the sampling. Here we present Mg isotopic composition of 14 seawater samples from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans and the Mediterranean and Red Seas and covering a range of depth of almost 5km and 26 hydrothermal fluids from 7 sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with temperature from 15° to 380°C. We find the magnesium isotope composition of seawater to be constant, with a δ^{26}Mg = -0.82±0.10 ‰ relative to the DSM3 standard. This value is consistent with a long residence time for Mg in seawater. In addition, out of the 26 hydrothermal fluids studied, more than 58% differ from seawater for their Mg isotopic composition by more than 2σ. This number rises up to 88% at 2σmean level and the shift is systematic with the fluids being either indistinguishable from seawater or enriched in light isotopes by up to 2.4‰ in δ^{26}Mg. This clearly demonstrates that fluids having low Mg concentrations are not solely bearing Mg added by contamination during sampling. The isotopic

  1. Isotope separation

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  2. Chlorine isotopes potential as geo-chemical tracers

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Pradhan, U.K.; Banerjee, R.

    The potential of chlorine isotopes as tracers of geo-chemical processes of earth and the oceans is highlighted based on systematic studies carried out in understanding the chlorine isotope fractionation mechanism, its constancy in seawater and its...

  3. Carbon isotope systematics of the Cambrian–Vendian aquifer system in the northern Baltic Basin: Implications to the age and evolution of groundwater

    Raidla, Valle; Kirsimäe, Kalle; Vaikmäe, Rein; Kaup, Enn; Martma, Tõnu

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater in the Cambrian–Vendian aquifer system has a strongly depleted stable isotope composition (δ 18 O values of about −22‰) and a low radiocarbon concentration, which suggests that the water is of glacial origin from the last Ice Age. The aim of this paper was to elucidate the timing of infiltration of glacial waters and to understand the geochemical evolution of this groundwater. The composition of the dissolved inorganic C (DIC) in Cambrian–Vendian groundwater is influenced by complex reactions and isotope exchange processes between water, organic materials and rock matrix. The δ 13 C composition of dissolved inorganic C in Cambrian–Vendian water also indicates a bacterial modification of the isotope system. The corrected radiocarbon ages of groundwater are between 14,000 and 27,000 radiocarbon years, which is coeval with the advance of the Weichselian Glacier in the area.

  4. A subduction wedge origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds and harzburgites from the Panda kimberlite, Slave craton: evidence from Re-Os isotope systematics

    Westerlund, K. J.; Shirey, S. B.; Richardson, S. H.; Carlson, R. W.; Gurney, J. J.; Harris, J. W.

    2006-09-01

    An extensive study of peridotitic sulfide inclusion bearing diamonds and their prospective harzburgitic host rocks from the 53 Ma Panda kimberlite pipe, Ekati Mine, NWT Canada, has been undertaken with the Re-Os system to establish their age and petrogenesis. Diamonds with peridotitic sulfide inclusions have poorly aggregated nitrogen (bearing diamonds and indicates residence in the cooler portion of the Slave craton lithospheric mantle. For most of the sulfide inclusions, relatively low Re contents (average 0.457 ppm) and high Os contents (average 339 ppm) lead to extremely low 187Re/188Os, typically << 0.05. An age of 3.52 ± 0.17 Ga (MSWD = 0.46) and a precise initial 187Os/188Os of 0.1093 ± 0.0001 are given by a single regression of 11 inclusions from five diamonds that individually provide coincident internal isochrons. This initial Os isotopic composition is 6% enriched in 187Os over 3.5 Ga chondritic or primitive mantle. Sulfide inclusions with less radiogenic initial Os isotopic compositions reflect isotopic heterogeneity in diamond forming fluids. The harzburgites have even lower initial 187Os/188Os than the sulfide inclusions, some approaching the isotopic composition of 3.5 Ga chondritic mantle. In several cases isotopically distinct sulfides occur in different growth zones of the same diamond. This supports a model where C-O-H-S fluids carrying a radiogenic Os signature were introduced into depleted harzburgite and produced diamonds containing sulfides conforming to the 3.5 Ga isochron. Reaction of this fluid with harzburgite led to diamonds with less radiogenic inclusions while elevating the Os isotope ratios of some harzburgites. Subduction is a viable way of introducing such fluids. This implies a role for subduction in creating early continental nuclei at 3.5 Ga and generating peridotitic diamonds.

  5. Kinetic α-deuterium isotope effect as a probe of transition state structure and reaction mechanism in nucleoside hydrolysis

    Stein, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical equilibrium α-deuterium isotope effects were calculated for systems modeling nucleoside and glycoside hydrolyses using a computer program (Burton, G.W., Sims, L.B., Wilson, J.C., and Fry, A.J., J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 99, 3374(1977)) which computes isotope effects directly from the expression of Biegeleisen and Mayer (Biegeleisen, J. and Mayer, M.G., J. Chem. Phys., 17, 675(1949)). For nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate, KH/KD = 1.21 to 1.25; while for nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate KH/KD = 1.15 to 1.19. The models used in the calculations were generated systematically and involved a minimum of subjectivity in the selection of molecular parameters. The isotope effects calculated formed the basis for the interpretation of experimental kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects for nucleoside and glycoside hydrolysis

  6. Lithium Isotopes in Geothermal Fluids from Iceland

    Millot, R.; Asmundsson, R.; Sanjuan, B.

    2008-12-01

    One of the main objectives of the HITI project (HIgh Temperature Instruments for supercritical geothermal reservoir characterization and exploitation), partially funded by the European Union, is to develop methods to characterize the reservoir and fluids of deep and very high temperature geothermal systems. The chemical composition of geothermal waters in terms of major and trace elements is related to the temperature, the degree of water/rock interaction and the mineralogical assemblage of the bedrock. Traditional geothermometers, such as silica, Na-K, Na-K-Ca or K-Mg applied to geothermal waters, make it possible to estimate the temperature at depth of the reservoir from which the waters are derived. However, the values estimated for deep temperature are not always concordant. The chemical geothermometer Na/Li which presents the singularity of associating two chemical elements, one a major element (sodium) and the other a trace element (Li), can be also used and gives an additional temperature estimation. The primary objective of this work was to better understand the behavior of this last geothermometer using the isotopic systematics of Li in order to apply it at very high temperature Icelandic geothermal systems. One particularly important aspect was to establish the nature, extent and mechanism of Li isotope fractionation between 100 and 350°C during water/rock interaction. For that purpose, we measured Li isotopes of about 25 geothermal waters from Iceland by using a Neptune MC-ICP-MS that enabled the analysis of Li isotopic ratios in geothermal waters with a level of precision of ±0.5‰ (2 standard deviations) on quantities of 10-50 ng of Li. Geothermal waters from Reykjanes, Svartsengi, Nesjavellir, Hveragerdi, Namafjall and Krafla geothermal systems were studied and particular emphasis was placed on the characterization of the behavior of Li isotopes in this volcanic context at high temperature with or without the presence of seawater during water

  7. Probing the N = 14 subshell closure: g factor of the 26Mg (21+) state

    McCormick, B. P.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Kibédi, T.; Lane, G. J.; Reed, M. W.; Eriksen, T. K.; Hota, S. S.; Lee, B. Q.; Palalani, N.

    2018-04-01

    The first-excited state g factor of 26Mg has been measured relative to the g factor of the 24Mg (21+) state using the high-velocity transient-field technique, giving g = + 0.86 ± 0.10. This new measurement is in strong disagreement with the currently adopted value, but in agreement with the sd-shell model using the USDB interaction. The newly measured g factor, along with E (21+) and B (E 2) systematics, signal the closure of the νd5/2 subshell at N = 14. The possibility that precise g-factor measurements may indicate the onset of neutron pf admixtures in first-excited state even-even magnesium isotopes below 32Mg is discussed and the importance of precise excited-state g-factor measurements on sd shell nuclei with N ≠ Z to test shell-model wavefunctions is noted.

  8. Magnesium isotope fractionation in cation-exchange chromatography

    Oi, T.; Yanase, S.; Kakihana, H.

    1987-01-01

    Band displacement chromatography of magnesium has been carried out successfully for the purpose of magnesium isotope separation by using a strongly acidic cation-exchange resin and the strontium ion as the replacement ion. A small but definite accumulation of the heavier isotopes ( 25 Mg, 26 Mg) has been observed at the front parts of the magnesium chromatograms. The heavier isotopes have been fractionated preferentially into the solution phase. The single-stage separation factors have been calculated for the 25 Mg/ 24 Mg and 26 Mg/ 24 isotopic pairs at 25 0 C. The reduced partition function ratios of magnesium species involved in the present study have been estimated

  9. Isotope enrichment

    Garbuny, M.

    1979-01-01

    The invention discloses a method for deriving, from a starting material including an element having a plurality of isotopes, derived material enriched in one isotope of the element. The starting material is deposited on a substrate at less than a critical submonatomic surface density, typically less than 10 16 atoms per square centimeter. The deposit is then selectively irradiated by a laser (maser or electronic oscillator) beam with monochromatic coherent radiation resonant with the one isotope causing the material including the one istope to escape from the substrate. The escaping enriched material is then collected. Where the element has two isotopes, one of which is to be collected, the deposit may be irradiated with radiation resonant with the other isotope and the residual material enriched in the one isotope may be evaporated from the substrate and collected

  10. Stable isotope genealogy of meteorites

    Pillinger, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    One of the oldest problems in meteoritics is that of taxonomically grouping samples. In recent years the use of isotopes, particularly oxygen isotopes has proved very successful in this respect. Other light-element systematics potentially can perform the same function. For example, nitrogen in iron meteorites, and nitrogen and carbon in ureilites and SNC meteorites. These measurements will serve to extend and augment existing classification schemes and provide clues to the nature of meteorite parent bodies. They can also aid in the recognition of the isotopic signatures relating to inaccessible regions of the Earth. (author)

  11. Magnesium isotopic composition of the Earth and chondrites

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Li, Wang-Ye; Ke, Shan; Marty, Bernard; Dauphas, Nicolas; Huang, Shichun; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Pourmand, Ali

    2010-07-01

    To constrain further the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth and chondrites, and investigate the behavior of Mg isotopes during planetary formation and magmatic processes, we report high-precision (±0.06‰ on δ 25Mg and ±0.07‰ on δ 26Mg, 2SD) analyses of Mg isotopes for (1) 47 mid-ocean ridge basalts covering global major ridge segments and spanning a broad range in latitudes, geochemical and radiogenic isotopic compositions; (2) 63 ocean island basalts from Hawaii (Kilauea, Koolau and Loihi) and French Polynesia (Society Island and Cook-Austral chain); (3) 29 peridotite xenoliths from Australia, China, France, Tanzania and USA; and (4) 38 carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondrites including 9 chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CV, L, LL, H, EH and EL). Oceanic basalts and peridotite xenoliths have similar Mg isotopic compositions, with average values of δ 25Mg = -0.13 ± 0.05 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.26 ± 0.07 (2SD) for global oceanic basalts ( n = 110) and δ 25Mg = -0.13 ± 0.03 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.04 (2SD) for global peridotite xenoliths ( n = 29). The identical Mg isotopic compositions in oceanic basalts and peridotites suggest that equilibrium Mg isotope fractionation during partial melting of peridotite mantle and magmatic differentiation of basaltic magma is negligible. Thirty-eight chondrites have indistinguishable Mg isotopic compositions, with δ 25Mg = -0.15 ± 0.04 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.28 ± 0.06 (2SD). The constancy of Mg isotopic compositions in all major types of chondrites suggest that primary and secondary processes that affected the chemical and oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites did not significantly fractionate Mg isotopes. Collectively, the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle, based on oceanic basalts and peridotites, is estimated to be -0.13 ± 0.04 for δ 25Mg and -0.25 ± 0.07 for δ 26Mg (2SD, n = 139). The Mg isotopic composition of the Earth, as represented by the mantle, is similar to chondrites

  12. Stable isotopes

    Brazier, J.L.; Guinamant, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    According to the progress which has been realised in the technology of separating and measuring isotopes, the stable isotopes are used as preferable 'labelling elements' for big number of applications. The isotopic composition of natural products shows significant variations as a result of different reasons like the climate, the seasons, or their geographic origins. So, it was proved that the same product has a different isotopic composition of alimentary and agriculture products. It is also important in detecting the pharmacological and medical chemicals. This review article deals with the technology, like chromatography and spectrophotometry, adapted to this aim, and some important applications. 17 refs. 6 figs

  13. Isotope separation

    Bartlett, R.J.; Morrey, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated

  14. General effect of low-dose tamsulosin (0.2 mg) as a first-line treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Shim, Sung Ryul; Kim, Jae Heon; Choi, Hoon; Lee, Won Jin; Kim, Hae Joon; Bae, Min Young; Hwang, Sung Dong; Kim, Khae Hwan; Bae, Jae Hyun; Yoon, Sang Jin

    2015-02-01

    In Asian countries, low-dose tamsulosin (0.2 mg) is used widely but this dose has been less popular than 0.4 mg tamsulosin or other types of alpha blockers. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of low-dose tamsulosin by systematic review and meta-analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of improvements of lower urinary tract symptoms using International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximal urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-voided residual volume (PVR), and quality of life (QOL). Relevant studies were found using MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane library. Final inclusion was determined by randomized controlled trials (RCT) and performance of IPSS. A total of fourteen studies were included, with a total sample size of 2147 subjects (1044 experimental and 1103 controls). Study durations ranged from 4 to 52 weeks. The mean change of IPSS improvement from baseline for tamsulosin was -7.18 (95% CI: -7.83, -6.54). The mean change of QOL improvement from baseline was -1.34 (95% CI: -1.46, -1.22). The overall Qmax improvement from baseline was 2.32 ml/sec (95% CI: 1.95, 2.70). The mean change of PVR improvement from baseline was -11.12 ml (95% CI: -17.61, -4.64). Regarding safety, four studies did not report any adverse events while others reported that adverse events were all tolerated. Although this study did not consider placebo effect and has high IPSS baseline scores, this study clarifies that low-dose tamsulosin has generally positive effect and safety in treatment of LUTS and could be a suitable option as an initial treatment, especially for patients with low body mass index, as is typical of Asian people.

  15. Two band superconductivity for MgB{sub 2}: T{sub c} and isotope exponent {alpha} as a function of the carrier number n and the role of the center of the band

    Rodriguez-Nunez, J J [Lab. SUPERCOMP, Departamento de Fisica - FACYT - UC, Valencia (Venezuela) and Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Schmidt, A A [Departamento de Matematica, UFSM, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bianconi, A [Physics Department, Universita di Roma, Rome (Italy); Perali, A [Physics Department, University of Camerino, Camerino - MC (Italy)

    2005-08-15

    We study a two band superconducting, assuming that we have two tight binding bands, {epsilon}{sub 2}(k-vector) = {epsilon}{sub 2}{sup (0)} - t{sub 2}[cos(k{sub x}) + cos(k{sub y}) + s{sub 2} cos(k{sub z})] - {mu} and {epsilon}{sub 3}(k-vector) {epsilon}{sub 3}{sup (0)} - t{sub 3} [cos(k{sub x}) + cos(k{sub y})+s{sub 3} cos(k{sub z})] - {mu}. We solve the two gap equations at T = T{sub c} and calculate T{sub c} x n and {mu} x n for various values of pairing interaction, V, and Debye frequency, {omega}{sub D}. Also, from an expression developed in a previous paper by two of the present authors, we calculate {alpha} x n, where n is the number of carriers per site per band and {alpha} is the isotope exponent. We take only interband scattering, V, as a first approach. We find that in order to have superconductivity (T{sub c} {ne} 0), large values of V are necessary. Also, for V/{omega}{sub D} > 1, we obtain {alpha} > 1.00 and for V/{omega}{sub D}>1.00, the isotope exponent becomes less than 1. (author)

  16. Two band superconductivity for MgB2: Tc and isotope exponent α as a function of the carrier number n and the role of the center of the band

    Rodriguez-Nunez, J.J.; Schmidt, A.A.; Bianconi, A.; Perali, A.

    2005-08-01

    We study a two band superconducting, assuming that we have two tight binding bands, ε 2 (k-vector) = ε 2 (0) - t 2 [cos(k x ) + cos(k y ) + s 2 cos(k z )] - μ and ε 3 (k-vector) ε 3 (0) - t 3 [cos(k x ) + cos(k y )+s 3 cos(k z )] - μ. We solve the two gap equations at T = T c and calculate T c x n and μ x n for various values of pairing interaction, V, and Debye frequency, ω D . Also, from an expression developed in a previous paper by two of the present authors, we calculate α x n, where n is the number of carriers per site per band and α is the isotope exponent. We take only interband scattering, V, as a first approach. We find that in order to have superconductivity (T c ≠ 0), large values of V are necessary. Also, for V/ω D > 1, we obtain α > 1.00 and for V/ω D >1.00, the isotope exponent becomes less than 1. (author)

  17. Isotopic anomalies - chemical memory of Galactic evolution

    Clayton, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    New mechanisms for the chemical memory of isotopic anomalies are proposed which are based on the temporal change during the chemical evolution of the Galaxy of the isotopic composition of the mean ejecta from stars. Because of the differing temporal evolution of primary and secondary products of nucleosynthesis, the isotopic composition of the bulk interstellar medium changes approximately linearly with time, and thus any dust component having an age different from that of average dust will be isotopically anomalous. Special attention is given to C, O, Mg, Si, and isotopically heavy average-stellar condensates of SiC. 20 references

  18. Morphology versus U-Pb systematics in zircon: A high-resolution isotopic study of a zircon population from a Variscan dike in the Central Alps

    Bossart, P.J.; Meier, M.; Oberli, F.; Steiger, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    U/Pb isotopic measurements on individual zircon crystals combined with morphological analyses permit the identification of three distinct components within the zircon population of the Saedelhorn diorite, a Variscan dike from the western Gotthard (Central Alps, Switzerland): (i) 94% of the grains in the zircon population are elongate crystals with pronounced skeletal morphology indicative of rapid growth from a supercooled melt. (ii) 5% of the population consist of turbid, mostly subhedral zircons frequently showing D-type morphology and elevated uranium contents compared to the skeletal variety. Single-crystal and multi-grain U-Pb isotopic data of group (i) and (ii) zircons define an intrusion age of 293 + 5/ -4 m.y. for the dike. (iii) Rare, transparent zircon crystals (< 1% of the zircons population) yield apparent U-Pb ages in the range of 370-490 m.y. and display morphological and isotopic characteristics closely resembling those of a Caledonian orthogneiss intruded by the dike. This implies presence of assimilated wall-rock components in the macroscopically homogeneous dike sample. (orig./WB)

  19. Low-energy fission systematics of the fermium isotopes: the transition from mass asymmetry at fermium-254 to symmetry at fermium-259

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    Recent measurements have shown that 259 Fm gives the highest total kinetic energy release and the most symmetric mass division so far observed for spontaneous fission. These results continue the trends observed previously in the fermium isotopes toward higher total kinetic energies and more symmetric mass division with increasing mass of the fermium isotopes. The transition from asymmetric mass division ( 254 Fm) to highly favored symmetric mass division ( 259 Fm) now appears to have been completed. These features are consistent with the simple postulate that the more neutron-rich fermium isotopes show an increase in the yield of symmetric fragments and in the total kinetic energy because symmetric mass division of fermium (Z = 100) nuclei results in two fragments which have the magic proton number of 50 and are close to the magic neutron number of 82. The proximity of the fragments to the doubly magic configuration seems to have a profound effect on the mass division and total kinetic energy release in fission

  20. Sistematização da Assistência de Enfermagem na Rede Hospitalar de Uberaba: MG Sistematización de la asistencia de enfermería en la Red Hospitalaria de Uberaba: MG Systematization of Nursing Care in the Uberaba: MG hospital network

    Karoline Faria de Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    ón de la SAE en un hospital privado. Resultados: la mayoría de los enfermeros tenía un incentivo institucional para la implantación de la SAE (60,29% e informó conocerla desde su graduación (91,18%, revelando desconexión entre conocimiento adquirido en la graduación y su práctica profesional. Obstáculos para el uso de la SAE: dificultad en realizar examen físico (47,06%, diagnóstico de enfermer��a (36,76% y acceso a los cursos de capacitación (85,71%. La implantación de la SAE ocurrió en el Centro de Terapia Intensiva (CTI de un hospital privado del municipio. Fueron identificados los diagnósticos de enfermería más frecuentes en el CTI, lo que originó un documento que se incorporó al expediente de los pacientes, que contenía igualmente las prescripciones de enfermería, las cuales después de implementadas fueron verificadas.The planning of nursing care has as its objective the organization of care using a systematic method, the nurse being responsible for the development of this. Goals: to describe the perception;of nurses of the Nursing Assistance Systematization (NAS in the Uberaba hospital network and to implement the NAS in a private hospital in the city. Method: descriptive exploratory study with an intervention. First stage: nurses answered a semi-structured questionnaire about their perceptions in relation to the NAS. Second stage: NAS implementation in a private hospital. Results: the majority of the nurses had an institutional incentive for NAS implementation (60,29% and were familiar with it since graduation (91,18%, revealing disconnection between NAS knowledge acquired during graduation and professional practice. Obstacles to NAS use: difficulty in carrying out the physical examination (47,06% and identifying the nursing diagnosis (36,76%, and access to training courses (85,71%. Implementation of the NAS was carried out in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of a private hospital in a city. We identified the most frequent nursing diagnoses

  1. Isotopic separation

    Castle, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to molecular and atomic isotope separation and is particularly applicable to the separation of 235 U from other uranium isotopes including 238 U. In the method described a desired isotope is separated mechanically from an atomic or molecular beam formed from an isotope mixture utilising the isotropic recoil momenta resulting from selective excitation of the desired isotope species by radiation, followed by ionization or dissociation by radiation or electron attachment. By forming a matrix of UF 6 molecules in HBr molecules so as to collapse the V 3 vibrational mode of the UF 6 molecule the 235 UF 6 molecules are selectively excited to promote reduction of UF 6 molecules containing 235 U and facilitate separation. (UK)

  2. Isotopic separation

    Chen, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic species in an isotopic mixture including a first species having a first isotope and a second species having a second isotope are separated by selectively exciting the first species in preference to the second species and then reacting the selectively excited first species with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product having a mass different from the original species and separating the product from the balance of the mixture in a centrifugal separating device such as centrifuge or aerodynamic nozzle. In the centrifuge the isotopic mixture is passed into a rotor where it is irradiated through a window. Heavier and lighter components can be withdrawn. The irradiated mixture experiences a large centrifugal force and is separated in a deflection area into lighter and heavier components. (UK)

  3. Influence of liquid structure on diffusive isotope separation in molten silicates and aqueous solutions

    Watkins, J.M.; DePaolo, D.J.; Ryerson, F.J.; Peterson, B.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular diffusion in natural volcanic liquids discriminates between isotopes of major ions (e.g., Fe, Mg, Ca, and Li). Although isotope separation by diffusion is expected on theoretical grounds, the dependence on mass is highly variable for different elements and in different media. Silicate liquid diffusion experiments using simple liquid compositions were carried out to further probe the compositional dependence of diffusive isotopic discrimination and its relationship to liquid structure. Two diffusion couples consisting of the mineral constituents anorthite (CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}; denoted AN), albite (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}; denoted AB), and diopside (CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}; denoted DI) were held at 1450°C for 2 h and then quenched to ambient pressure and temperature. Major-element as well as Ca and Mg isotope profiles were measured on the recovered quenched glasses. In both experiments, Ca diffuses rapidly with respect to Si. In the AB–AN experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 20 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Ca is much greater than in natural liquid experiments where D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 1. In the AB–DI experiment, D{sub Ca}/D{sub Si} ~ 6 and the efficiency of isotope separation is between that of the natural liquid experiments and the AB–AN experiment. In the AB–DI experiment, D{sub Mg}/D{sub Si} ~ 1 and the efficiency of isotope separation for Mg is smaller than it is for Ca yet similar to that observed for Mg in natural liquids. The results from the experiments reported here, in combination with results from natural volcanic liquids, show clearly that the efficiency of diffusive separation of Ca isotopes is systematically related to the solvent-normalized diffusivity—the ratio of the diffusivity of the cation (D{sub Ca}) to the diffusivity of silicon (D{sub Si}). The results on Ca isotopes are consistent with available data on Fe, Li, and Mg isotopes in silicate liquids, when considered in terms of the parameter D{sub cation

  4. Re-Os, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, and stepwise lead leaching isotope systematics in shear-zone hosted gold mineralization: genetic tracing and age constraints of crustal hydrothermal activity

    Frei, R.; Nägler, Th. F.; Schönberg, R.; Kramers, J. D.

    1998-06-01

    A combined Re-Os, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, and stepwise Pb leaching (PbSL) isotope study of hydrothermal (Mo-W)-bearing minerals and base metal sulfides from two adjacent shear zone hosted gold deposits (RAN, Kimberley) in the Harare-Shamva greenstone belt (Zimbabwe) constrain the timing of the mineralizing events to two periods. During an initial Late Archean event (2.60 Ga) a first molybdenite-scheelite bearing paragenesis was deposited in both shear zone systems, followed by a local reactivation of the shear systems during an Early Proterozoic (1.96 Ga) tectono-thermal overprint, during which base metal sulfides and most of the gold was (re-)deposited. While PbSL has revealed an open-system behavior of the U-Pb systematics in molybdenite and wolframite from the RAN mine, initial Archean Re-Os ages are still preserved implying that this system in these minerals was more resistant to the overprint. A similar retentivity could be shown for the Sm-Nd system in scheelite and powellite associated with the above ore minerals. Re-Os isotopic data from the Proterozoic mineralization in the Kimberley mine point to a recent gain of Re, most pronouncedly affecting Fe-rich sulfides such as pyrrhotite. A significant Re-loss in powellitic scheelite (an alteration phase of molybdenite-bearing scheelite), coupled with a marked loss of U in W-Mo ore minerals, complements the observation of a major Re uptake in Fe-sulfides during oxidizing conditions in a weathering environment. Pyrrhotite under these conditions behaves as an efficient Re-sink. Lead isotope signatures from PbSL residues of molybdenite, powellite, and quartz indicate a continental crustal source and/or contamination for the mineralizing fluid by interaction of the fluids with older sedimentary material as represented by the direct host country rocks. Our investigation reveals the potential of the Re-Os isotopic system applied to crustal hydrothermal ore minerals for genetic tracing and dating purposes. The simplified chemical

  5. The composition and distribution of the rejuvenated component across the Hawaiian plume: Hf-Nd-Sr-Pb isotope systematics of Kaula lavas and pyroxenite xenoliths

    Bizimis, Michael; Salters, Vincent J. M.; Garcia, Michael O.; Norman, Marc D.

    2013-10-01

    Rejuvenated volcanism refers to the reemergence of volcanism after a hiatus of 0.5-2 Ma following the voluminous shield building stage of Hawaiian volcanoes. The composition of the rejuvenated source and its distribution relative to the center of the plume provide important constraints on the origin of rejuvenated volcanism. Near-contemporaneous lavas from the Kaula-Niihau-Kauai ridge and the North Arch volcanic field that are aligned approximately orthogonally to the plume track can constrain the lateral geochemical heterogeneity and distribution of the rejuvenated source across the volcanic chain. Nephelinites, phonolites and pyroxenite xenoliths from Kaula Island have radiogenic Hf, Nd and unradiogenic Sr isotope compositions consistent with a time-integrated depleted mantle source. The pyroxenites and nephelinites extend to the lowest 208Pb/204Pb reported in Hawaiian rocks. These data, along with new Pb isotope data from pyroxenites from the Salt Lake Crater (Oahu) redefine the composition of the depleted end-member of the Hawaiian rejuvenated source at 208Pb/204Pb=37.35±0.05, 206Pb/204Pb = 17.75±0.03, ɛNd = 9-10, ɛHf ˜16-17 and 87Sr/88Sr Niihau-Kauai-North Arch transect are consistent with a larger proportion of the rejuvenated depleted component in the periphery of the plume track rather than along its axis.

  6. Isotope angiocardiography

    Stepinska, J.; Ruzyllo, W.; Konieczny, W.

    1979-01-01

    Method of technetium isotope 99 m pass through the heart recording with the aid of radioisotope scanner connected with seriograph and computer is being presented. Preliminary tests were carried out in 26 patients with coronary disease without or with previous myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, ventricular septal defect and in patients with artificial mitral and aortic valves. The obtained scans were evaluated qualitatively and compared with performed later contrast X-rays of the heart. Size of the right ventricle, volume and rate of left atrial evacuation, size and contractability of left ventricle were evaluated. Similarity of direct and isotope angiocardiographs, non-invasional character and repeatability of isotope angiocardiography advocate its usefulness. (author)

  7. Isotope ratio in stellar atmospheres and nucleosynthesis

    Barbuy, B.L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios in stellar atmospheres is studied. The isotopic shift of atomic and molecular lines of different species of a certain element is examined. CH and MgH lines are observed in order to obtain the 12 C: 13 C and 24 Mg: 25 Mg: 26 Mg isotpic ratios. The formation of lines in stellar atmospheres is computed and the resulting synthetic spectra are employed to determine the isotopic abundances. The results obtained for the isotopic ratios are compared to predictions of nucleosynthesis theories. Finally, the concept of primary and secondary element is discussed, and these definitions are applied to the observed variations in the abundance of elements as a function of metallicity. (author) [pt

  8. Leatherback Isotopes

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  9. Isotope Identification

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  10. Isotope laboratories

    1978-01-01

    This report from the Dutch Ministry of Health is an advisory document concerned with isotope laboratories in hospitals, in connection with the Dutch laws for hospitals. It discusses which hospitals should have isotope laboratories and concludes that as many hospitals as possible should have small laboratories so that emergency cases can be dealt with. It divides the Netherlands into regions and suggests which hospitals should have these facilities. The questions of how big each lab. is to be, what equipment each has, how each lab. is organised, what therapeutic and diagnostic work should be carried out by each, etc. are discussed. The answers are provided by reports from working groups for in vivo diagnostics, in vitro diagnostics, therapy, and safety and their results form the criteria for the licences of isotope labs. The results of a questionnaire for isotope labs. already in the Netherlands are presented, and their activities outlined. (C.F.)

  11. Hydrochemical and isotopic study of groundwater impacted by the acid drainage of UrÂnio Mine - Osamu Utsumi, PoÇos de Caldas Plateau (MG), Brazil; Estudo hidroqímico e isotópico das águas subterrâneas impactadas pela drenagem ácida da Mina de Urânio - OSAMU UTSUMI, planalto de Poço de Caldas, MG

    Alberti, Heber Luiz Caponi

    2017-07-01

    The Osamu Utsumi Mine - MOU, belonging to the Brazilian Nuclear Industries - INB, began in 1977 with pickling activities and remained in operation until 1995. During this period, 94 million tons of rocks were removed, which caused the generation of large wasted rock piles. The intense drainage and precipitation in the study region favored the oxidation and leaching of the wasted rock piles, causing the Acid Drainage of Mine - DAM and generating effluents with low pH and high concentrations of fluoride, aluminum, iron, manganese, sulfate, zinc, uranium and Radio, among others. Currently the MOU is in the process of decommissioning and environmental remediation. The understanding of the hydrogeochemical processes and the behavior of the water flow through different aquifers is extremely important so that the actions of environmental remediation and control of the DAM are really effective. In this sense, in this work, geoprocessing and hydrochemical techniques were used to propose a conceptual hydrogeochemical model in the MOU cavity system and wasted rock pile number 4 - BF4. The geoprocessing techniques allowed to characterize and size the area under study and to integrate information on geology and mineralogy with the hydrochemical data. The hydrochemical studies were based on three groundwater sampling campaigns, using the low flow method in 17 monitoring wells, as well as 3 water reservoirs in the study area. In the collected samples were determined: (1) the main cations and anions for groundwater classification using Piper and Stiff diagrams and multivariate statistical methods (cluster and Principal Component Analysis); (2) the major long half radionuclides and {sup 222}Rn to assess radioactivity and imbalance between them; (3) the stable isotopes of {sup 18}O and {sup 2}H to provide information on the underground flows and water source; (4) the Tritium values found in the samples to estimate the age of the groundwater; (V) the sulfur and oxygen isotopes

  12. A mantle origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, Slave Craton: Evidence from 13C-, 15N- and 33,34S-stable isotope systematics

    Cartigny, Pierre; Farquhar, James; Thomassot, Emilie; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Wing, Bozwell; Masterson, Andy; McKeegan, Kevin; Stachel, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    In order to address diamond formation and origin in the lithospheric mantle underlying the Central Slave Craton, we report N- and C-stable isotopic compositions and N-contents and aggregation states for 85 diamonds of known paragenesis (73 peridotitic, 8 eclogitic and 4 from lower mantle) from the Panda kimberlite (Ekati Mine, Lac de Gras Area, Canada). For 12 peridotitic and two eclogitic sulfide inclusion-bearing diamonds from this sample set, we also report multiple-sulfur isotope ratios. The 73 peridotitic diamonds have a mean δ13C-value of - 5.2‰ and range from - 6.9 to - 3.0‰, with one extreme value at - 14.1‰. The associated δ15N-values range from - 17.0 to + 8.5‰ with a mean value of - 4.0‰. N-contents range from 0 to 1280 ppm. The 8 eclogitic diamonds have δ13C-values ranging from - 11.2 to - 4.4‰ with one extreme value at - 19.4‰. Their δ15N ranges from - 2.1 to + 7.9‰ and N-contents fall between 0 and 3452 ppm. Four diamonds with an inferred lower mantle origin are all Type II (i.e. nitrogen-free) and have a narrow range of δ13C values, between - 4.5 and - 3.5‰. The δ34S of the 14 analyzed peridotitic and eclogitic sulfide inclusions ranges from - 3.5 to +5.7‰. None of them provide evidence for anomalous δ33S-values; observed variations in δ33S are from +0.19 to - 0.33‰, i.e. within the 2 sigma uncertainties of mantle sulfur ( δ33S = 0‰). At Panda, the N contents and the δ13C of sulfide-bearing peridotitic diamonds show narrower ranges than silicate-bearing peridotitic diamonds. This evidence supports the earlier suggestion established from eclogitic diamonds from the Kaapvaal that sulfide-(±silicate) bearing diamonds sample a more restricted portion of sublithospheric mantle than silicate-(no sulfide) bearing diamonds. Our findings at Panda suggest that sulfide-bearing diamonds should be considered as a specific diamond population on a global-scale. Based on our study of δ34S, Δ 33S, δ15N and δ13C, we find no

  13. Pb and Sr isotopic systematics of some basalts and sulfides from the East Pacific Rise at 21/sup 0/N (project RITA)

    Vidal, P. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 35 - Rennes (France). Centre Armoricain d' Etude Structurale des Socles); Clauer, N. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 67 - Strasbourg (France). Centre de Sedimentologie et Geochimie de la Surface)

    1981-10-01

    Tholeiitic basalts and sulfide deposits from the 'Cyana' and 'Alvin' diving programs (RITA project) on the East Pacific Rise were analyzed for Pb and Sr isotopes. The basalt data plot within the field defined previously by other East Pacific Rise basalts (/sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb: 18.35-18.58; /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pb: 15.48-15.53; /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pb: 37.8-38.1; /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr: 0.7022-0.7025). Pb, U and Sr contents (approx. equal to 0.5, approx. equal to 0.05 and approx. equal to 110 ppm, respectively) and ..mu.. values (approx. equal to 6) are typical of MORB, whereas Th/U ratios (approx. equal to 3.5) are significantly higher. The Pb isotopic ratios of the sulfide samples are very homogeneous (/sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb approx. equal to 18.47, /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pb approx. equal to 15.49, /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pb approx. equal to 37.90), and plot in the middle of the basalt field. This indicates that the sulfide Pb was derived from the basaltic crust without any significant contribution from either seawater or hemipelagic sediments, and the solutions from which the sulfiedes were deposited had uniform Pb isotopic composition. The Pb contents of three sulfide samples is relatively high (170-1310 ppm). The Sr contents of five sulfide samples are widely scattered from 12 to 210 ppm, with /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios intermediate between basaltic and seawater values (0.70554 +- 0.00005 to 0.70795 +- 0.00011). Leaching experiments show that both basalt-derived Sr and seawater Sr were present in the solutions which deposited the sulfides. In some cases, Sr was also adsorbed from seawater onto the sulfides following their deposition. Basalt-derived Sr and seawater Sr are also present in associated non-sulfide phases.

  14. Isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems

    Kotaka, M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the isotope anomalies in oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium systems, according to the calculations of the equilibrium constants for oxygen isotopic exchange reactions, and the calculations of the oxygen isotope separation factors between two phases. The equilibrium constants (K65, K67, K68 and K69) of 16 O- 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O exchange reactions between diatomic oxides were calculated in a wide temperature range on the basis of quantum statistical mechanics. Many equilibrium constants showed the anomalous mass effects, and then had the crossover temperatures and the mass independent fractionation (MIF) temperatures which held K67 = K65, K67 = K68, or K67 = K69, etc. For example, the equilibrium constants for the reactions between OH and the other diatomic oxides (MO) showed the anomalous mass effects, when M was Li, Na, Mg, K, Fe, Al, Ge, Zr, Pt, etc. The 16 O 15 O, 16 O 17 O, 16 O- 18 O, and 16 O- 19 O oxygen isotope separation factors (S65, S67, S68 and S69) between two phases were calculated, when OH and CO were in the first phase, and SiO was in the second phase. Although the oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria in the two phases had no MIF and crossover temperatures, the separation factors showed the anomalous mass effects and had the temperatures. According to what is called the normal mass effects for the equilibrium constant of isotopic exchange reaction, the value of InK68/InK67 is 1.885. Therefore, the value of InS68/InS67 should be 1.885 too. The value calculated, however, widely changed. It can be concluded from the results obtained in the present work that some oxygen isotopic exchange equilibria cause the anomalous mass effects, the anomalous oxygen isotope separation factors, and then isotope anomalies

  15. Isotopic chirality

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  16. Isotopic separation

    Chen, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for separating isotopes in which photo-excitation of selected isotope species is used together with the reaction of the excited species with postive ions of predetermined ionization energy, other excited species, or free electrons to produce ions or ion fragments of the selected species. Ions and electrons are produced by an electrical discharge, and separation is achieved through radial ambipolar diffusion, electrostatic techniques, or magnetohydrodynamic methods

  17. Isotope enrichment

    Lydtin, H-J.; Wilden, R.J.; Severin, P.J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The isotope enrichment method described is based on the recognition that, owing to mass diffusion and thermal diffusion in the conversion of substances at a heated substrate while depositing an element or compound onto the substrate, enrichment of the element, or a compound of the element, with a lighter isotope will occur. The cycle is repeated for as many times as is necessary to obtain the degree of enrichment required

  18. A systematic study of band structure and electromagnetic properties of neutron rich odd mass Eu isotopes in the projected shell model framework

    Pandit, Rakesh K.; Devi, Rani [University of Jammu, Department of Physics and Electronics, Jammu (India); Khosa, S.K. [Central University of Jammu, Department of Physics and Astronomical Sciences, Jammu (India); Bhat, G.H.; Sheikh, J.A. [University of Kashmir, Department of Physics, Srinagar (India)

    2017-10-15

    The positive and negative parity rotational band structure of the neutron rich odd mass Eu isotopes with neutron numbers ranging from 90 to 96 are investigated up to the high angular momentum. In the theoretical analysis of energy spectra, transition energies and electromagnetic transition probabilities we employ the projected shell model. The calculations successfully describe the formation of the ground and excited band structures from the single particle and multi quasiparticle configurations. Calculated excitation energy spectra, transition energies, exact quantum mechanically calculated B(E2) and B(M1) transition probabilities are compared with experimental data wherever available and a reasonably good agreement is obtained with the observed data. The change in deformation in the ground state band with the increase in angular momentum and the increase in neutron number has also been established. (orig.)

  19. Hf-Nd isotope decoupling in the oceanic lithosphere: constraints from spinel peridotites from Oahu, Hawaii

    Bizimis, Michael; Sen, Gautam; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed geochemical investigation on the Hf, Nd and Sr isotope compositions and trace and major element contents of clinopyroxene mineral separates from spinel lherzolite xenoliths from the island of Oahu, Hawaii. These peridotites are believed to represent the depleted oceanic lithosphere beneath Oahu, which is a residue of a MORB-related melting event some 80-100 Ma ago at a mid-ocean ridge. Clinopyroxenes from peridotites from the Salt Lake Crater (SLC) show a large range of Hf isotopic compositions, from ɛHf=12.2 (similar to the Honolulu volcanics series) to extremely radiogenic, ɛHf=65, at nearly constant 143Nd/ 144Nd ratios ( ɛNd=7-8). None of these samples show any isotopic evidence for interaction with Koolau-type melts. A single xenolith from the Pali vent is the only sample with Hf and Nd isotopic compositions that falls within the MORB field. The Hf isotopes correlate positively with the degree of depletion in the clinopyroxene (e.g. increasing Mg#, Cr#, decreasing Ti and heavy REE contents), but also with increasing Zr and Hf depletions relative to the adjacent REE in a compatibility diagram. The Lu/Hf isotope systematics of the SLC clinopyroxenes define apparent ages of 500 Ma or older and these compositions cannot be explained by mixing between any type of Hawaiian melts and the depleted Pacific lithosphere. Metasomatism of an ancient (e.g. 1 Ga or older) depleted peridotite protolith can, in principle, explain these apparent ages and the Nd-Hf isotope decoupling, but requires that the most depleted samples were subject to the least amount of metasomatism. Alternatively, the combined isotope, trace and major element compositions of these clinopyroxenes are best described by metasomatism of the 80-100 Ma depleted oceanic lithosphere by melts products of extensive mantle-melt interaction between Honolulu Volcanics-type melts and the depleted lithosphere.

  20. Expanding the isotopic toolbox: Applications of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to food web studies

    Hannah B Vander Zanden; David X Soto; Gabriel J Bowen; Keith A Hobson; Keith A Hobson

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applicat...

  1. Expanding the Isotopic Toolbox: Applications of Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotope Ratios to Food Web Studies

    Vander Zanden, Hannah B.; Soto, David X.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Hobson, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applicatio...

  2. Strontium isotope geochemistry of alluvial groundwater: a tracer for groundwater resources characterisation

    P. Négrel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents strontium isotope and major ion data of shallow groundwater and river water from the Ile du Chambon catchment, located on the Allier river in the Massif Central (France. There are large variations in the major-element contents in the surface- and groundwater. Plotting of Na vs. Cl contents and Ca, Mg, NO3, K, SO4, HCO3, Sr concentrations reflect water–rock interaction (carbonate dissolution for Ca, Mg, HCO3 and Sr because the bedrock contains marly limestones, agricultural input (farming and fertilising and sewage effluents (for NO3, K, SO4, although some water samples are unpolluted. Sr contents and isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr vary from 0.70892 to 0.71180 along the hydrological cycle in the groundwater agree with previous work on groundwater in alluvial aquifers in the Loire catchment. The data plot along three directions in a 87Sr/86Sr v. 1/Sr diagram as a result of mixing, involving at least three geochemical signatures–Allier river water, and two distinct signatures that might be related to different water-rock interactions in the catchment. Mixing proportions are calculated and discussed. The alluvial aquifer of the Ile du Chambon catchment is considered, within the Sr isotope systematic, in a larger scheme that includes several alluvial aquifers of the Loire Allier catchment. Keywords: : Loire river, major and trace elements, Sr isotopic ratio, alluvial aquifer, hydrology

  3. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unidentified nuclear effects (FUN CAIs): II. Heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the early Solar System inferred from in situ high-precision magnesium-isotope measurements

    Park, Changkun; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Davis, Andrew M.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with isotopic mass fractionation effects and unidentified nuclear isotopic anomalies (FUN CAIs) have been studied for more than 40 years, but their origins remain enigmatic. Here we report in situ high precision measurements of aluminum-magnesium isotope systematics of FUN CAIs by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual minerals were analyzed in six FUN CAIs from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrites Axtell (compact Type A CAI Axtell 2271) and Allende (Type B CAIs C1 and EK1-4-1, and forsterite-bearing Type B CAIs BG82DH8, CG-14, and TE). Most of these CAIs show evidence for excess 26Mg due to the decay of 26Al. The inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] and the initial magnesium isotopic compositions (δ26Mg0) calculated using an exponential law with an exponent β of 0.5128 are (3.1 ± 1.6) × 10-6 and 0.60 ± 0.10‰ (Axtell 2271), (3.7 ± 1.5) × 10-6 and -0.20 ± 0.05‰ (BG82DH8), (2.2 ± 1.1) × 10-6 and -0.18 ± 0.05‰ (C1), (2.3 ± 2.4) × 10-5 and -2.23 ± 0.37‰ (EK1-4-1), (1.5 ± 1.1) × 10-5 and -0.42 ± 0.08‰ (CG-14), and (5.3 ± 0.9) × 10-5 and -0.05 ± 0.08‰ (TE) with 2σ uncertainties. We infer that FUN CAIs recorded heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the CAI-forming region(s). Comparison of 26Al-26Mg systematics, stable isotope (oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium) and trace element studies of FUN and non-FUN igneous CAIs indicates that there is a continuum among these CAI types. Based on these observations and evaporation experiments on CAI-like melts, we propose a generic scenario for the origin of igneous (FUN and non-FUN) CAIs: (i) condensation of isotopically normal solids in an 16O-rich gas of approximately solar composition; (ii) formation of CAI precursors by aggregation of these solids together with variable abundances of isotopically anomalous grains-possible carriers of unidentified nuclear (UN) effects; and (iii) melt evaporation of these precursors

  4. SHRIMP-RG U-Pb isotopic systematics of zircon from the Angel Lake orthogneiss, East Humboldt Range, Nevada: Is this really archean crust?

    Premo, Wayne R.; Castineiras, Pedro; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    New SHRIMP-RG (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry) data confirm the existence of Archean components within zircon grains of a sample from the orthogneiss of Angel Lake, Nevada, United States, previously interpreted as a nappe of Archean crust. However, the combined evidence strongly suggests that this orthogneiss is a highly deformed, Late Cretaceous monzogranite derived from melting of a sedimentary source dominated by Archean detritus. Zircon grains from the same sample used previously for isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) isotopic work were analyzed using the SHRIMP-RG to better define the age and origin of the orthogneiss. Prior to analysis, imaging revealed a morphological variability and intragrain, polyphase nature of the zircon population. The SHRIMP-RG yielded 207Pb/206Pb ages between ca. 2430 and 2580 Ma (a best-fit mean 207Pb/206Pb age of 2531 ± 19 Ma; 95% confidence) from mostly rounded to subrounded zircons and zircon components (cores). In addition, several analyses from rounded to subrounded cores or grains yielded discordant 207Pb/206Pb ages between ca. 1460 and ca. 2170 Ma, consistent with known regional magmatic events. All cores of Proterozoic to latest Archean age were encased within clear, typically low Th/U (206Pb/238U ages between 72 and 91 Ma, consistent with magmatic ages from Lamoille Canyon to the south. An age of ca. 90 Ma is suggested, the younger 206Pb/238U ages resulting from Pb loss. The Cretaceous and Precambrian zircon components also have distinct trace element characteristics, indicating that these age groups are not related to the same igneous source. These results support recent geophysical interpretations and negate the contention that the Archean-Proterozoic boundary extends into the central Great Basin area. They further suggest that the world-class gold deposits along the Carlin Trend are not underlain by Archean cratonal crust, but rather by the Proterozoic Mojave

  5. The origin of the Tongkeng-Changpo tin deposit, Dachang metal district, Guangxi, China: clues from fluid inclusions and He isotope systematics

    Minghai, Cai; Jingwen, Mao; Ting, Liang; Pirajno, Franco; Huilan, Huang

    2007-08-01

    Tongkeng-Changpo is the largest tin deposit within the giant Dachang polymetallic tin ore field in Guangxi, southern China, which is part of a large skarn system associated with Cretaceous granitoids. The Tongkeng-Changpo mineralization consists of veins and stockworks in the upper levels and replacement stratiform orebodies (mantos) at lower levels. Based on textural relationships, three major mineralizing stages can be recognized: stage I with cassiterite, sulphides, stannite, tourmaline, and quartz; stage II with cassiterite, sulphides, sulphosalts, quartz, and calcite; and stage III with calcite as the main phase. The study of fluid inclusions has shown that there are two main fluid types: CO2 and NaCl-H2O. Homogenization temperatures are 270 to 365°C, 210 to 240°C, and 140 to 190°C for stages I, II, and III, respectively. Salinities range from 1 to 7 wt.% NaCl equiv. in the early ore stage and 3 to 10 wt.% NaCl equiv. in the late stages. Laser Raman Spectroscopy indicates that the inclusion fluids in stages I and II were of carbono-aqueous composition, with minor amounts of CH4 and H2S, whereas those in stage III were aqueous. Helium isotopic analyses of inclusion fluids indicate that the 3He/4He ratios in the ore veins are in between 1.2 to 2.9 Ra (Ra = 1.4 × 10-6, modern atmospheric ratio), and range from 1.6 to 2.5 Ra in the stratiform orebodies. This range of 3He/4He ratios is significantly higher than that of crustal fluids (0.01-0.05 Ra). The similar characteristics of fluid inclusions and their He isotopic composition, as well as age constraints, indicate that the ore veins and stratiform orebodies of the Tongkeng-Changpo deposit formed from the same hydrothermal system, likely related to granite intrusions of the Mesozoic Yanshanian tectono-thermal event. In addition, the high R/Ra ratios indicate a mantle contribution in the ore fluids.

  6. Systematic sulfur stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies on veinlet groups in the Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper deposit: based on new data

    Mohammad Maanijou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mineralization occurred by intrusion of granodioritic stock of middle Miocene in volcano–sedimenrary rocks in Sarcheshmeh of early Tertiary age. This research is based on samples of new drilled boreholes and benches of 2500m elevation. Based on mineralogy and crosscutting relationships, at least four groups of veinlets pertaining to four stages of mineralization were recognized. Sulfur isotope studies in the Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper deposit were conducted on pyrite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite and anhydrites of four groups of veinlets. The δ34S values in the sulfides and sulfates range from -2.2 to 1.27‰ and from 10.2 to 14.5 ‰, respectively. The average δ34S value in the sulfides is 1‰ and that for the sulfates is about 13‰. Considering these results, it can be concluded that the sulfides made up of a fluid that its sulfur has a magmatic origin. Also, fluid inclusions of different veinlet groups were studied, showing high temperature, high salinity and the occurrence of boiling in the mineralizing fluids. Moreover, these studies indicate presence of three types of fluids including magmatic, meteoritic and mixture of these two fluids in alteration and mineralizion processes.

  7. Isotopes Project

    Dairiki, J.M.; Browne, E.; Firestone, R.B.; Lederer, C.M.; Shirley, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Isotopes Project compiles and evaluates nuclear structure and decay data and disseminates these data to the scientific community. From 1940-1978 the Project had as its main objective the production of the Table of Isotopes. Since publication of the seventh (and last) edition in 1978, the group now coordinates its nuclear data evaluation efforts with those of other data centers via national and international nuclear data networks. The group is currently responsible for the evaluation of mass chains A = 167-194. All evaluated data are entered into the International Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and are published in Nuclear Data Sheets. In addition to the evaluation effort, the Isotopes Project is responsible for production of the Radioactivity Handbook

  8. Isotope production

    Lewis, Dewi M.

    1995-07-15

    Some 2 0% of patients using radiopharmaceuticals receive injections of materials produced by cyclotrons. There are over 200 cyclotrons worldwide; around 35 are operated by commercial companies solely for the production of radio-pharmaceuticals with another 25 accelerators producing medically useful isotopes. These neutron-deficient isotopes are usually produced by proton bombardment. All commonly used medical isotopes can be generated by 'compact' cyclotrons with energies up to 40 MeV and beam intensities in the range 50 to 400 microamps. Specially designed target systems contain gram-quantities of highly enriched stable isotopes as starting materials. The targets can accommodate the high power densities of the proton beams and are designed for automated remote handling. The complete manufacturing cycle includes large-scale target production, isotope generation by cyclotron beam bombardment, radio-chemical extraction, pharmaceutical dispensing, raw material recovery, and labelling/packaging prior to the rapid delivery of these short-lived products. All these manufacturing steps adhere to the pharmaceutical industry standards of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Unlike research accelerators, commercial cyclotrons are customized 'compact' machines usually supplied by specialist companies such as IBA (Belgium), EBCO (Canada) or Scanditronix (Sweden). The design criteria for these commercial cyclotrons are - small magnet dimensions, power-efficient operation of magnet and radiofrequency systems, high intensity extracted proton beams, well defined beam size and automated computer control. Performance requirements include rapid startup and shutdown, high reliability to support the daily production of short-lived isotopes and low maintenance to minimize the radiation dose to personnel. In 1987 a major step forward in meeting these exacting industrial requirements came when IBA, together with the University of Louvain-La-Neuve in Belgium, developed the Cyclone-30

  9. Os-Hf-Sr-Nd isotope and PGE systematics of spinel peridotite xenoliths from Tok, SE Siberian craton: Effects of pervasive metasomatism in shallow refractory mantle

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Shirey, Steven B.; Weis, Dominique; Brügmann, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Os-Hf-Sr-Nd isotopes and PGE were determined in peridotite xenoliths carried to the surface by Quaternary alkali basaltic magmas in the Tokinsky Stanovik Range on the Aldan shield. These data constrain the timing and nature of partial melting and metasomatism in the lithospheric mantle beneath SE Siberian craton. The xenoliths range from the rare fertile spinel lherzolites to the more abundant, strongly metasomatised olivine-rich (70-84%) rocks. Hf-Sr-Nd isotope compositions of the xenoliths are mainly within the fields of oceanic basalts. Most metasomatised xenoliths have lower 143Nd / 144Nd and 176Hf / 177Hf and higher 87Sr / 86Sr than the host basalts indicating that the metasomatism is older and has distinct sources. A few xenoliths have elevated 176Hf / 177Hf (up to 0.2838) and plot above the Hf-Nd mantle array defined by oceanic basalts. 187Os / 188Os in the poorly metasomatised, fertile to moderately refractory (Al2O3 ≥ 1.6%) Tok peridotites range from 0.1156 to 0.1282, with oldest rhenium depletion ages being about 2 Ga. The 187Os / 188Os in these rocks show good correlations with partial melting indices (e.g. Al2O3, modal cpx); the intercept of the Al-187Os / 188Os correlation with lowest Al2O3 estimates for melting residues (∼0.3-0.5%) has a 187Os / 188Os of ∼0.109 suggesting that these peridotites may have experienced melt extraction as early as 2.8 Gy ago. 187Os / 188Os in the strongly metasomatised, olivine-rich xenoliths (0.6-1.3% Al2O3) ranges from 0.1164 to 0.1275 and shows no apparent links to modal or chemical compositions. Convex-upward REE patterns and high abundances of heavy to middle REE in these refractory rocks indicate equilibration with evolved silicate melts at high melt / rock ratios, which may have also variably elevated their 187Os / 188Os. This inference is supported by enrichments in Pd and Pt on chondrite-normalised PGE abundance patterns in some of the rocks. The melt extraction ages for the Tok suite of 2.0 to 2.8 Ga are

  10. Isotopically modified compounds

    Kuruc, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter the nomenclature of isotopically modified compounds in Slovak language is described. This chapter consists of following parts: (1) Isotopically substituted compounds; (2) Specifically isotopically labelled compounds; (3) Selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (4) Non-selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (5) Isotopically deficient compounds.

  11. The Distinct Genetics of Carbonaceous and Non-Carbonaceous Meteorites Inferred from Molybdenum Isotopes

    Budde, G.; Burkhardt, C.; Kleine, T.

    2017-07-01

    Mo isotope systematics manifest a fundamental dichotomy in the genetic heritage of carbonaceous and non-carbonaceous meteorites. We discuss its implications in light of the most recent literature data and new isotope data for primitive achondrites.

  12. Isotope generator

    1979-01-01

    The patent describes an isotope generator incorporating the possibility of stopping elution before the elution vessel is completely full. Sterile ventilation of the whole system can then occur, including of both generator reservoir and elution vessel. A sterile, and therefore pharmaceutically acceptable, elution fluid is thus obtained and the interior of the generator is not polluted with non-sterile air. (T.P.)

  13. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  14. The isotope correlation experiment

    Koch, L.; Schoof, S.

    1983-01-01

    The ESARDA working group on Isotopic Correlation Techniques, ICT and Reprocessing Input Analysis performed an Isotope Correlation Experiment, ICE with the aim to check the feasibility of the new technique. Ten input batches of the reprocessing of the KWO fuel at the WAK plant were analysed by 4 laboratories. All information to compare ICT with the gravimetric and volumetric methods was available. ICT combined with simplified reactor physics calculation was included. The main objectives of the statistical data evaluation were detection of outliers, the estimation of random errors and of systematic errors of the measurements performed by the 4 laboratories. Different methods for outlier detection, analysis of variances, Grubbs' analysis for the constant-bias model and Jaech's non-constant-bias model were applied. Some of the results of the statistical analysis may seem inconsistent which is due to the following reasons. For the statistical evaluations isotope abundance data (weight percent) as well as nuclear concentration data (atoms/initial metal atoms) were subjected to different outlier criteria before being used for further statistical evaluations. None of the four data evaluation groups performed a complete statistical data analysis which would render possible a comparison of the different methods applied since no commonly agreed statistical evaluation procedure existed. The results prove that ICT is as accurate as conventional techniques which have to rely on costly mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. The potential of outlier detection by ICT on the basis of the results from a single laboratory is as good as outlier detection by costly interlaboratory comparison. The application of fission product or Cm-244 correlations would be more timely than remeasurements at safeguards laboratories

  15. Exploring the isotopic niche: isotopic variance, physiological incorporation, and the temporal dynamics of foraging

    Justin Douglas Yeakel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer foraging behaviors are dynamic, changing in response to prey availability, seasonality, competition, and even the consumer's physiological state. The isotopic composition of a consumer is a product of these factors as well as the isotopic `landscape' of its prey, i.e. the isotopic mixing space. Stable isotope mixing models are used to back-calculate the most likely proportional contribution of a set of prey to a consumer's diet based on their respective isotopic distributions, however they are disconnected from ecological process. Here we build a mechanistic framework that links the ecological and physiological processes of an individual consumer to the isotopic distribution that describes its diet, and ultimately to the isotopic composition of its own tissues, defined as its `isotopic niche’. By coupling these processes, we systematically investigate under what conditions the isotopic niche of a consumer changes as a function of both the geometric properties of its mixing space and foraging strategies that may be static or dynamic over time. Results of our derivations reveal general insight into the conditions impacting isotopic niche width as a function of consumer specialization on prey, as well as the consumer's ability to transition between diets over time. We show analytically that moderate specialization on isotopically unique prey can serve to maximize a consumer's isotopic niche width, while temporally dynamic diets will tend to result in peak isotopic variance during dietary transitions. We demonstrate the relevance of our theoretical findings by examining a marine system composed of nine invertebrate species commonly consumed by sea otters. In general, our analytical framework highlights the complex interplay of mixing space geometry and consumer dietary behavior in driving expansion and contraction of the isotopic niche. Because this approach is established on ecological mechanism, it is well-suited for enhancing the

  16. Calcium isotopic anomalies in the Allende meteorite

    Lee, T.; Papanastassiou, D.A.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    We report isotopic anomalies in Ca which were found in two Ca-Al-rich inclusions of the Allende meteorite. These inclusions previously had been shown to contain special anomalies for Mg and O which were attributed to fractionation and unknown nuclear effects. The Ca data, when corrected for mass fractionation by using 40 Ca/ 44 Ca as a standard, show nonlinear isotopic effects in 48 Ca of +13.5 per mil and in 42 Ca of +1.7 per mil for one sample. The second sample shows a 48 Ca depletion of -2.9 per mil, but all other isotopes are normal. Samples with large excesses in 26 Mg show no Ca anomalies. The effects demonstrate that isotopic anomalies exist for higher-atomic-number refractory elements in solar-system materials and do not appear to be readily explainable by a simple model. The correlation of O, Mg, and Ca results on the same inclusions requires the addition and preservation in the solar system of components from idverse nucleosynthetic sources. Observed anomalous Mg and Ca compositions for coexisting mineral phases are uniform within each inclusion, and require initial isotopic homogeneity within an inclusion but the preservation of wide variations between inclusions. Assuming formation of these inclusions by condensation from a gaseous part of the solar nebula, this implies isotopic heterogeneity on a scale of 10-10 2 km within the nebula

  17. Isotope hydrology

    Drost, W.

    1978-01-01

    The International Symposium on Isotope Hydrology was jointly organized by the IAEA and UNESCO, in co-operation with the National Committee of the Federal Republic of Germany for the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) and the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH (GSF). Upon the invitation of the Federal Republic of Germany the Symposium was held from 19-23 June 1978 in Neuherberg on the GSF campus. The Symposium was officially opened by Mr. S. Eklund, Director General of the IAEA. The symposium - the fifth meeting held on isotope hydrology - was attended by over 160 participants from 44 countries and four international organizations and by about 30 observers from the Federal Republic of Germany. Due to the absence of scientists from the USSR five papers were cancelled and therefore only 46 papers of the original programme were presented in ten sessions

  18. Zircon Lu-Hf isotope systematics and U-Pb geochronology, whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopes and geochemistry of the early Jurassic Gokcedere pluton, Sakarya Zone-NE Turkey: a magmatic response to roll-back of the Paleo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere

    Karsli, Orhan; Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Kandemir, Raif

    2017-05-01

    The early Mesozoic was a critical era for the geodynamic evolution of the Sakarya Zone as transition from accretion to collision events in the region. However, its complex evolutionary history is still debated. To address this issue, we present new in situ zircon U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf isotope data, whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopes, and mineral chemistry and geochemistry data of plutonic rocks to better understand the magmatic processes. The Gokcedere pluton is mainly composed of gabbro and gabbroic diorite. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating reveals that the pluton was emplaced in the early Jurassic (177 Ma). These gabbros and gabbroic diorites are characterized by relatively low SiO2 content of 47.09 to 57.15 wt% and high Mg# values varying from 46 to 75. The samples belong to the calc-alkaline series and exhibit a metaluminous I-type character. Moreover, they are slightly enriched in large ion lithophile elements (Rb, Ba, Th and K) and light rare earth elements and depleted in high field strength elements (Nb and Ti). Gabbroic rocks of the pluton have a depleted Sr-Nd isotopic composition, including low initial 87Sr/86Sr ranging from 0.705124 to 0.705599, relatively high ɛ Nd ( t) values varying from 0.1 to 3.5 and single-stage Nd model ages ( T DM1 = 0.65-0.95 Ga). In situ zircon analyses show that the rocks have variable and positive ɛ Hf ( t) values (4.6 to 13.5) and single-stage Hf model ages ( T DM1 = 0.30 to 0.65 Ga). Both the geochemical signature and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic composition of the gabbroic rocks reveal that the magma of the studied rocks was formed by the partial melting of a depleted mantle wedge metasomatized by slab-derived fluids. The influence of slab fluids is mirrored by their trace-element characteristics. Trace-element modeling suggests that the primary magma was generated by a low and variable degree of partial melting ( 5-15%) of a depleted and young lithospheric mantle wedge consisting of phlogopite- and spinel-bearing lherzolite. Heat to melt the

  19. Stable isotope analysis in primatology: a critical review.

    Sandberg, Paul A; Loudon, James E; Sponheimer, Matt

    2012-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become an important tool in ecology over the last 25 years. A wealth of ecological information is stored in animal tissues in the relative abundances of the stable isotopes of several elements, particularly carbon and nitrogen, because these isotopes navigate through ecological processes in predictable ways. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been measured in most primate taxonomic groups and have yielded information about dietary content, dietary variability, and habitat use. Stable isotopes have recently proven useful for addressing more fine-grained questions about niche dynamics and anthropogenic effects on feeding ecology. Here, we discuss stable carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics and critically review the published stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data for modern primates with a focus on the problems and prospects for future stable isotope applications in primatology. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Isotope analytics for the evaluation of the feeding influence on the isotope ratio in beef samples

    Herwig, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    Information about the origin of food and associated production systems has a high significance for food control. An extremely promising approach to obtain such information is the determination of isotope ratios of different elements. In this study the correlation of the isotope ratios C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, Mg-25/Mg-24, and Sr-87/Sr-86 in bovine samples (milk and urine) and the corresponding isotope ratios in feed was investigated. It was shown that in the bovine samples all four isotope ratios correlate with the isotope composition of the feed. The isotope ratios of strontium and magnesium have the advantage that they directly reflect the isotope ratios of the ingested feed since there is no isotope fractionation in the bovine organism which is in contrast to the case of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. From the present feeding study it is evident, that a feed change leads to a significant change in the delta C-13 values in milk and urine within 10 days already. For the deltaN-15 values the feed change was only visible in the bovine urine after 49 days. Investigations of cows from two different regions (Berlin/Germany and Goestling/Austria) kept at different feeding regimes revealed no differences in the N-15/N-14 and Mg-26/Mg-24 isotope ratios. The strongest correlation between the isotope ratio of the bovine samples and the kind of ingested feed was observed for the carbon isotope ratio. With this ratio even smallest differences in the feed composition were traceable in the bovine samples. Since different regions usually coincide with different feeding regimes, carbon isotope ratios can be used to distinguish bovine samples from different regions if the delta C-13 values of the ingested feed are different. Furthermore, the determination of strontium isotope ratios revealed significant differences between bovine and feed samples of Berlin and Goestling due to the different geologic realities. Hence the carbon and strontium isotope ratios allow the best

  1. Diagenetic alteration in low-Mg calcite from macrofossils

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Korte, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    microscopy) and chemical (trace element abundances, isotopic ratios) screening techniques used to assess the alteration degree of low-Mg calcite macrofossils and summarize the findings on diagenetic trends observed for elemental and isotopic systems in such materials. For a robust evaluation...... of the preservation state of biogenic calcite, it is advisable to combine a set of complementary techniques. Absolute limiting values of element and isotope ratios for discarding diagenetically altered materials cannot be universally applied, but should rather be evaluated on a case to case basis. The evaluation can...

  2. Ca isotopes in refractory inclusions

    Niederer, F.R.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute isotope abundance of Ca in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites. Improved high precision measurements are reported also for 46 Ca. We find that nonlinear isotope effects in Ca are extremely rare in these inclusions. The absence of nonlinear effects in Ca, except for the effects in FUN inclusions, is in sharp contrast to the endemic effects in Ti. One fine-grained inclusion shows an excess of 46 Ca of (7 +- 1) per mille, which is consistent with addition of only 46 Ca or of an exotic (*) component with 46 Ca* approx. 48 Ca*. FUN inclusion EK-1-4-1 shows a small 46 Ca excess of (3.3 +- 1.0) per mille; this confirms that the exotic Ca components in EK-1-4-1 were even more deficient in 46 Ca relative to 48 Ca than is the case for normal Ca. The Ca in the Ca-Al-rich inclusions shows mass dependent isotope fractionation effects which have a range from -3.8 to +6.7 per mille per mass unit difference. This range is a factor of 20 wider than the range previously established for bulk meteorites and for terrestrial and lunar samples. Ca and Mg isotope fractionation effects in the Ca-Al-rich inclusions are common and attributed to kinetic isotope effects. (author)

  3. Natural isotopes

    Vogel, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    14 C dates between 600 and 900 AD were obtained for early Iron Age sites in Natal, and from 1300 to 1450 AD for rock engraving sites in Bushmanland. Palaeoenvironmental data derived from the dating of samples related to sedimentary and geomorphic features in the central and northern Namib Desert enabled the production of a tentative graph for the changes in humidity in the region over the past 40000 years. These results suggest that relatively humid conditions came to an end in the Namib at ±25000 BP (before present). The increased precision of the SIRA mass spectrometer enabled the remeasurement of 13 C and 18 O in the Cango stalagmite. This data confirmed that the environmental temperatures in the Southern Cape remained constant to within ±1 o C during the past 5500 years. Techniques and applications for environmental isotopes in hydrology were developed to determine the origin and movement of ground water. Isotopic fractionation effects in light elements in nature were investigated. The 15 N/ 14 N ratio in bones of animals and humans increases in proportion to the aridity of the environment. This suggests that 15 N in bone from dated archaeological sites could be used to detect changes in past climatic conditions as naturally formed nitrate minerals are higly soluble and are only preserved in special, very dry environments. The sources and sinks of CO 2 on the South African subcontinent were also determined. The 13 C/ 12 C ratios of air CO 2 obtained suggest that the vegetation provides the major proportion of respired CO 2 . 9 refs., 1 fig

  4. Heavy stable isotopes of oxyanion-forming metals and metalloids (Cr, Se, U, Sb, and Te) as indicators of redox reactions: Theory, systematics, and the outlook for practical applications.

    Johnson, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    The complex chemical behaviors of Cr, Se, U, Sb, and Te present challenges as we try to understand, predict, and/or manipulate their mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity in the environment. Redox reactions are particularly important and complex. In natural systems, aqueous concentrations and speciation can be used to infer the occurrence and rates of redox reactions, but are often of limited usefulness, for example when a reaction product is insoluble and its production is not readily observed in the field. Stable isotope ratio shifts in these elements can provide direct evidence for the occurrence of reduction, a critically important process that usually renders their soluble and mobile oxidized forms insoluble (or less soluble, in the case of Sb). Reduction kinetics differ between isotopes, and the remaining unreacted, oxidized contaminant becomes progressively shifted in its isotope ratio as reduction proceeds, providing a direct indicator of reduction in natural systems. Estimates of the extent of reduction are possible, but carry considerable uncertainty: The magnitude of isotopic fractionation induced by a reaction depends on the reaction mechanism and conditions, and thus prediction of fractionation factors for specific locations is uncertain. Furthermore, the simple Rayleigh distillation model is inaccurate due to complex reactive transport dynamics in aquifers and surface water systems. Nonetheless, useful estimates of reduction rates have been made and should be increasingly helpful as they are combined with other methods in environmental studies. Oxidation is less consistent in generating isotopic fractionation; this can be understood in terms of fundamental kinetic considerations. Furthermore, the reduced forms are usually solid and this further limits isotopic fractionation during oxidation. Sorption processes in some cases induce isotopic fractionation, but generally of smaller magnitude than reduction because bonding changes are relatively small

  5. Application of heavy stable isotopes in forensic isotope geochemistry: A review

    Aggarwal, Jugdeep; Habicht-Mauche, Judith; Juarez, Chelsey

    2008-01-01

    Light stable isotopes have been used for many years to characterize the source and transport of materials. More recently heavy isotope systems such as Sr, Nd and Pb have been added to this list in order to aid source identification. With the advent of multiple collector ICP-MS, the range of isotopic tools now available has increased considerably, however, until the isotope systematics of these new non-traditional isotope systems have become better understood, they will not be as useful in characterizing material source and transportation. Applications using heavy metal stable isotopes (mostly traditional heavy isotopes) have reached most avenues in science, including earth sciences, archaeology, anthropology, animal physiology, ecology and toxicology. This field will continue to grow as new applications are developed and techniques become simpler and quicker. This paper provides a review of how this field has grown and presents two new applications using Pb and Sr isotopes in glazes to determine the source of ore used in glazes, and using Sr isotopes to determine the origin of undocumented deceased Mexican border crossers

  6. Application of heavy stable isotopes in forensic isotope geochemistry: A review

    Aggarwal, Jugdeep [W.M. Keck Isotope Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)], E-mail: jaggarwal@pmc.ucsc.edu; Habicht-Mauche, Judith; Juarez, Chelsey [Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    Light stable isotopes have been used for many years to characterize the source and transport of materials. More recently heavy isotope systems such as Sr, Nd and Pb have been added to this list in order to aid source identification. With the advent of multiple collector ICP-MS, the range of isotopic tools now available has increased considerably, however, until the isotope systematics of these new non-traditional isotope systems have become better understood, they will not be as useful in characterizing material source and transportation. Applications using heavy metal stable isotopes (mostly traditional heavy isotopes) have reached most avenues in science, including earth sciences, archaeology, anthropology, animal physiology, ecology and toxicology. This field will continue to grow as new applications are developed and techniques become simpler and quicker. This paper provides a review of how this field has grown and presents two new applications using Pb and Sr isotopes in glazes to determine the source of ore used in glazes, and using Sr isotopes to determine the origin of undocumented deceased Mexican border crossers.

  7. Organic carbon isotope systematics of coastal marshes

    Middelburg, J.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Lubberts, R.K.; Van de Plassche, O.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of nitrogen, organic carbon and delta(13)C are presented for Spartina-dominated marsh sediments from a mineral marsh in SW Netherlands and from a peaty marsh in Massachusetts, U.S.A. delta(13)C Of organic carbon in the peaty marsh sediments is similar to that of Spartina material,

  8. Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron Rich Bismuth Isotopes

    2002-01-01

    %IS344 :\\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experiment is to measure the optical isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of bismuth isotopes across the N=126 shell closure in order to extract the change in mean square charge radii ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle$) and static moments. These include the first isotones of lead to be measured directly above the shell closure and will provide new information on the systematics of the kink ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle)$ seen in the lead isotopic chain. After two very successful runs the programme has been extended to include the neutron deficient isotopes below $^{201}$Bi to study the systematics across the $i_{13/2}$ neutron sub-shell closure at N=118.\\\\ \\\\ During the initial 2 runs (9 shifts) the isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of three new isotopes, $ ^{210,212,213}$Bi and the 9$^{-}$ isomer of $^{210}$Bi have been measured. The accuracy of the previous measurements of $^{205,206,208}$Bi have been greatly improved. The samples of $ ^{208,210,210^{m}}$Bi were prepared by c...

  9. Stable isotope studies

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  10. Method for separating isotopes

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-01-01

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether

  11. Mg and 18O Variations in the Shell of the Chilean Gastropod Concholepas concholepas Reflect SST and Growth Rate variations

    Guzman, N.; Lazareth, C. E.; Poitrasson, F.; Cuif, J.; Ortlieb, L.

    2004-12-01

    To validate the use of fossil mollusc shells as recorders of environmental conditions, a primary calibration study was carried out on modern shells of the Chilean gastropod Concholepas concholepas, the so-called southern hemisphere abalone which is particularly abundant in Holocene archaeological sites. Organisms were maintained in culture tanks and feed with live mytilids. The sea water temperature in the tank was recorded every half-an-hour by an automatic device. The experiment lasted several months. Periodical marking with calcein provided a precise chronological control of the shell growth. Thus, well-dated high resolution chemical profiles could be directly compared with temperatures during shell formation. Geochemical analyses of the calcite layers include Mg, Sr and 16O/18O composition. Trace elements were analysed using Laser Ablation ICP-MS and Electron Microprobe while stable isotopes were measured on a Secondary Ion Mass spectrometry (SIMS). The shell growth rate during two months of formation varied between 30 and 140 µm/day which allows us to reach a temporal resolution for chemical profiles between a few hours and three days. The growth rate variations do not seem to be related to temperature fluctuations. Only Mg content was analytically reproducible and showed significant variations across the shells. The Mg high-resolution profiles display a grossly sinusoidal shape. Shells from different sites along the coasts of Chile showed mean Mg contents of 300 ppm and 500 ppm for mean temperatures of 17 and 20° C, respectively. This suggests a gross correlation between Mg and temperature. However, high resolution Mg results do not show an exact fitting neither with temperature nor with growth rates. Other parameters, like shell ageing as suggested by an amplitude increase observed near the edge of one of the shells, or other complex biological factors, may influence Mg incorporation into the shell. \\delta 18O values of the calcite vary between -1,5 and 2

  12. Magnesium Isotopic Evidence for Ancient Subducted Oceanic Crust in LOMU-Like Potassium-Rich Volcanic Rocks

    Sun, Yang; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Ying, Ji-Feng; Su, Ben-Xun; Hu, Yan; Fan, Qi-Cheng; Zhou, Xin-Hua

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the role of subducted oceanic crust in the genesis of potassium-rich magmas, we report high-precision Mg isotopic data for a set of Cenozoic volcanic rocks from Northeast China. These rocks overall are lighter in Mg isotopic composition than the normal mantle and display considerable Mg isotopic variations, with δ26Mg ranging from -0.61 to -0.23. The covariation of δ26Mg with TiO2 in these rocks suggests that their light Mg isotopic compositions were derived from recycled oceanic crust in the form of carbonated eclogite in the source region. The strong correlations between δ26Mg and (Gd/Yb)N ratio as well as Sr-Pb isotopes further indicate a multicomponent and multistage origin of these rocks. Magnesium isotopes may thus be used as a novel tracer of recycled oceanic crust in the source region of mantle-derived magmas.

  13. Contribution of stable isotopes to the study of pharmacokinetics of magnesium salts; Apport des isotopes stables a l'etude de la pharmacocinetique de sels de magnesium

    Benech, H

    1999-05-28

    The use of stable isotopes as labels is becoming an attractive tool for the study of magnesium behavior in humans. It has been used two stable isotopes of magnesium, {sup 25}Mg and {sup 26}Mg, to measure the absolute bioavailability of a pharmaceutical form of magnesium. (N.C.)

  14. Contribution of stable isotopes to the study of pharmacokinetics of magnesium salts; Apport des isotopes stables a l'etude de la pharmacocinetique de sels de magnesium

    Benech, H

    1999-05-28

    The use of stable isotopes as labels is becoming an attractive tool for the study of magnesium behavior in humans. It has been used two stable isotopes of magnesium, {sup 25}Mg and {sup 26}Mg, to measure the absolute bioavailability of a pharmaceutical form of magnesium. (N.C.)

  15. Plume-related mantle source of super-large rare metal deposits from the Lovozero and Khibina massifs on the Kola Peninsula, Eastern part of Baltic Shield: Sr, Nd and Hf isotope systematics

    Kogarko, L. N.; Lahaye, Y.; Brey, G. P.

    2010-03-01

    The two world’s largest complexes of highly alkaline nepheline syenites and related rare metal loparite and eudialyte deposits, the Khibina and Lovozero massifs, occur in the central part of the Kola Peninsula. We measured for the first time in situ the trace element concentrations and the Sr, Nd and Hf isotope ratios by LA-ICP-MS (laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer) in loparite, eudialyte an in some other pegmatitic minerals. The results are in aggreement with the whole rock Sr and Nd isotope which suggests the formation of these superlarge rare metal deposits in a magmatic closed system. The initial Hf, Sr, Nd isotope ratios are similar to the isotopic signatures of OIB indicating depleted mantle as a source. This leads to the suggestion that the origin of these gigantic alkaline intrusions is connected to a deep seated mantle source—possibly to a lower mantle plume. The required combination of a depleted mantle and high rare metal enrichment in the source can be explained by the input of incompatible elements by metasomatising melts/fluids into the zones of alkaline magma generation shortly before the partial melting event (to avoid ingrowth of radiogenic isotopes). The minerals belovite and pyrochlore from the pegmatites are abnormally high in 87Sr /86Sr ratios. This may be explained by closed system isotope evolution as a result of a significant increase in Rb/Sr during the evolution of the peralkaline magma.

  16. Method for separating isotopes

    Jepson, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for separating different isotopes of elements from each other by contacting a feed solution containing the different isotopes with a macrocyclic polyether to preferentially form a macrocyclic polyether complex with the lighter of the different isotopes. The macrocyclic polyether complex is then separated from the lighter isotope depleted feed solution. A chemical separation of isotopes is carried out in which a constant refluxing system permits a continuous countercurrent liquid-liquid extraction. (LL)

  17. Method for separating isotopes

    Schlenker, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    A vortex tube for separating isotopes is described. A gas mixture containing the isotopic molecules enters the vortex tube under pressure and is separated into a hot discharge flow stream and a cold discharge flow stream. The hot discharge is enriched in lighter isotopic molecules whereas the cold discharge flow stream is enriched in the heavier isotopic molecules. The vortex tube can be used in a single stage or multistage isotope separation apparatus

  18. GEOCHEMICAL AND ISOTOPIC INVESTIGATION OF LAKES IN THE TRENTO PROVINCE (ITALY

    Marco Natale

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the geochemical composition and the stable isotope signature (18O/16O and 2H/1H of waters sampled from six lakes (Caldonazzo, Levico, Lases, Santa Colomba, Lamar and Santo located in the Province of Trento. The chemical compositions invariably revealed a HCO3-Ca hydrochemical facies; however slight differences were observed among the lakes, in relation to the lithologies distinguishing each lakes’drainage basin. Elemental ratios and in particular the Rb/Sr provide a discriminative tool to recognize the rocks that have been weathered; for example this ratio is high in water that interacted with volcanic ignimbrites (rhyolites, and low in rocks that interacted with carbonate rocks. Many other trace elements were analyzed, thus providing baseline data, and only arsenic displayed concentrations higher than the legislative threshold defined for drinking water (10mg/l, especially in Lake Levico (10-19 mg/l. As concerns the stable isotopes δD and δ18O, the obtained results approach the meteoric signature for waters sampled during the 2012 winter season. The waters sampled during two summers (2011 and 2012 displayed distinctive trends, reflecting the significant influence of evaporative processes. We emphasize that the annual differences recorded in the isotopic composition of distinct years are plausibly related to temperature changes and type of precipitation that recharged the lakes. In this light, the peculiar isotopic signature recorded in the year 2011 is possibly related to a significant snowy period, which greatly contributed to the lakes’ water budget. Interestingly, waters from Lake Santa Colomba were systematically different from all the other samples, possibly due to more effective evaporative processes, or to the involvement of deep underground recharge including fossil waters.

  19. Compound-specific nitrogen and carbon isotope analysis of nitroaromatic compounds in aqueous samples using solid-phase microextraction coupled to GC/IRMS.

    Berg, Michael; Bolotin, Jakov; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2007-03-15

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used to determine the delta15N and delta13C signatures of selected nitroaromatic contaminants such as the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) for derivation of isotopic enrichment factors of contaminant transformation. Parameters for efficient extraction of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) and substituted anilines from water samples were evaluated by SPME-GC/MS. delta13C signatures determined by SPME-GC/IRMS and elemental analyzer IRMS (EA-IRMS) were in good agreement, generally within +/-0.7 per thousand, except for 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and TNT, which showed slight deviations (IRMS were between 73 and 780 microg L-1 and correlated with the extraction efficiencies of the compounds determined by SPME-GC/MS. Nitrogen isotope measurements by SPME-GC/IRMS were of similar precision (standard deviations IRMS within +/-1.3 per thousand (+2.5 per thousand for TNT), but no systematic trend was found for the deviations. LODs of delta15N measurements ranged from 1.6 to 9.6 mg L-1 for nitrotoluenes, chlorinated NACs and DNTs (22 mg L-1 for TNT). The SPME-GC/IRMS method is well suited for the determination of isotopic enrichment factors of various NAC transformation processes and provides so far unexplored possibilities to elucidate behavior and degradation mechanisms of nitroaromatic contaminants in soils and groundwaters.

  20. Seawater sulfate reduction and sulfur isotope fractionation in basaltic systems: interaction of seawater with fayalite and magnetite at 200-3500C

    Shanks, W.C. III; Bischoff, J.L.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Sulfate reduction during seawater reaction with fayalite and with magnetite was rapid at 350 0 C, producing equilibrium assemblages of talc-pyrite-hematite-magnetite at low water/rock ratios and talc-pyrite-hematite-anhydrite at higher water/rock ratios. At 250 0 C, seawater reacting with fayalite produced detectable amounts of dissolved H 2 S. At 200 0 C, dissolved H 2 S was not detected, even after 219 days. Reaction stoichiometry indicates that sulfate reduction requires large amounts of H + , which, in subseafloor hydrothermal systems is provided by Mg metasomatism. Seawater contains sufficient Mg to supply all the H + necessary for quantitative reduction of seawater sulfate. Systematics of sulfur isotopes in the 250 and 350 0 C experiments indicate that isotopic equilibrium is reached and can be modeled as a Rayleigh distillation process. Isotopic composition of hydrothermally produced H 2 S in natural systems is strongly dependent upon the seawater/basalt ratio in the geothermal system, which controls the relative sulfide contributions from the two important sulfur sources, seawater sulfate and sulfide phases in basalt. Anhydrite precipitation during geothermal heating severely limits sulfate ingress into high temperature interaction zones. Quantitative sulfate reduction can thus be accomplished without producing strongly oxidized rocks and resultant sulfide sulfur isotope values represent a mixture of seawater and basaltic sulfur. (author)

  1. Barren Miocene granitoids in the Central Andean metallogenic belt, Chile: Geochemistry and Nd-Hf and U-Pb isotope systematics Granitoides estériles del Mioceno en la franja metalogénica de los Andes Centrales, Chile: geoquímica e isotopía de Nd-Hf y U-Pb

    Katja Deckart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Four Middle-to-Late Miocene barren plutonic complexes that occur between the giant porphyry copper deposits of the central Chilean Andes were selected for U-Pb LA-ICPMS geochronology and Hf-isotope systematics on single zircon grains. Major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope whole rock geochemical studies were under-taken to compare with slightly younger or coeval barren and fertile intrusive rocks between 32° and 34°S. The studied granitoids yield resolvable crystallization ages of 11.3±0.1 Ma (Cerro Mesón Alto massif, 10.3±0.2 Ma (La Gloria pluton, 14.9±0.2 Ma/14.9±0.1 Ma (Yerba Loca stock and 11.2±0.1 Ma/14.7±0.1 Ma (San Francisco Batholith. Major and trace elements discard an adakitic signature as suggested for coeval porphyric intrusions at 32°S, slightly younger mineralized porphyries at Río Blanco-Los Bronces deposit and other Cenozoic adakites. Volcanic host rocks are less fractionated than the intrusive rock units. The same observation can be made for the unmineralized northern plutons compared to the southern ones. Initial Sr-Nd isotope data show insignificant variation (0.703761-0.704118 and 0.512758-0.512882, plotting in the mantle array. Trace element enrichment can be explained by addition of subducted-slab fluids and/or terrigenous sediments to the mantle wedge prior to and/or slight crustal input during magma ascent. Zircon grains separated from these barren intrusives share a similar initial εHf i-data variation for the younger age group (10-12 Ma; 7.04-9.54 and show a more scattered range for the older one (14-15 Ma; 8.50-15.34; both sets plot between the DM and CLTUR evolution lines. There is evidence that magma evolution was slightly distinct through time from older to younger barren magmatism, compared to a few fertile porphyritic rocks from Río Blanco-Los Bronces porphyry copper deposit. It is suggested that chronological inconsistencies within these complexes might be related to differential shortening

  2. Isotope puzzle in sputtering

    Zheng Liping

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms affecting multicomponent material sputtering are complex. Isotope sputtering is the simplest in the multicomponent materials sputtering. Although only mass effect plays a dominant role in the isotope sputtering, there is still an isotope puzzle in sputtering by ion bombardment. The major arguments are as follows: (1) At the zero fluence, is the isotope enrichment ejection-angle-independent or ejection-angle-dependent? (2) Is the isotope angular effect the primary or the secondary sputter effect? (3) How to understand the action of momentum asymmetry in collision cascade on the isotope sputtering?

  3. A high resolution atlas of Mg II profiles

    Ewald, R.; Nichols-Bohlin, Joy Y.; Kondo, Yoji

    1990-01-01

    An atlas of high dispersion Mg II profiles for standard stars of spectral types B0 through G9 is presented. The atlas contains plots of the Mg II profiles for approximately 65 stars and associated equivalent width measurements for both absorption and emission components, and the subordinate lines. The atlas is used to investigate systematic behavior of the Mg II profiles and correlation of the behavior with spectral classification.

  4. Availability of enriched stable isotopes: present status and future prospects

    Hoff, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Isotope Enrichment Facility (EMIEF) is currently used to produce 225 enriched stable isotopes of 50 elements. Among these are included most of the known elements with stable isotopes except for the noble gases, certain light elements, monisotopic elements, etc. The EMIEF can also be used to produce enriched samples of radioactive species, most notably the isotopes of uranium and plutonium. These enriched materials are placed in either the Sales Inventory of in the Research Materials Collection (RMC). The materials in the Sales Inventory are for sale to anyone on a first come, first served basis. Prices in the most recent catalog range from $0.05/mg for 99.8% 140 Ce to $1,267/mg for 98.5% 176 Lu. The materials in the RMC are made available to US researchers (or groups that include a US investigator) on a loan basis for use in non-destructive experiments and applications. In addition, certain samples have been provided to European investigators for cross-section studies through the auspices of EURATOM and the European-American Nuclear Data Committee. The status of the enriched isotopes included in the Sales Inventory is tabulated where isotopes are listed that are either not available or are in insufficient quantity or quality to meet current requests, as of 6/30/86. These can be summarized in the following subcategories: isotopes with zero inventory (22), Isotopes of insufficient quantity (17), and isotopes with insufficient enrichment quality (10). Of these 49 species, the supplies of 10 will be replenished by the scheduled FY86 enrichments in process (isotopes of bromine, calcium, nickel, potassium, rubidium, and strontium). In Table 3 are listed isotopes where the current inventory is less than the average annual sales level for the past five years. There are 47 isotopes listed, representing 25 different elements. Thus, there exists considerable potential for a substantial increase in the number of isotopes with zero inventory

  5. Contribution of stable isotopes to the study of pharmacokinetics of magnesium salts

    Benech, H.

    1999-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes as labels is becoming an attractive tool for the study of magnesium behavior in humans. It has been used two stable isotopes of magnesium, 25 Mg and 26 Mg, to measure the absolute bioavailability of a pharmaceutical form of magnesium. (N.C.)

  6. Isotopically exchangeable phosphorus

    Barbaro, N.O.

    1984-01-01

    A critique revision of isotope dilution is presented. The concepts and use of exchangeable phosphorus, the phosphate adsorption, the kinetics of isotopic exchange and the equilibrium time in soils are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  7. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    Eastham, D.A.; Walker, P.M.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Evans, D.E.; Grant, I.S.; England, J.G.; Fawcett, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144 Sm and 154 Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  8. Pseudopotential approach to superconductivity in MgB2

    Sharma, K.S.; Bhargava, Nidhi; Jain, Ritu; Goyal, Varsha; Sharma, Ritu; Sharma, Smita

    2010-01-01

    Superconductivity in MgB 2 has been re-examined in BCS-Eliashberg framework by employing Mc-Millan's T c -equation and form factors of MgB 2 computed from the form factors of component metals (Model-I). The empty core model pseudopotential due to Ashcroft and random phase approximation form of dielectric screening due to Gellmann and Brueckner are used in the present work. An excellent agreement between the present values and other theoretically computed values of T c and with the relevant experimental data for MgB 2 confirms the validity of the present approach. The explicit dependence of λ and T c on the isotopic masses of Mg and B, as revealed from the present work, confirms the role of lattice vibrations in the superconducting behaviour of MgB 2 and the high value of T c in it may be attributed to the phonon mediated e-e interaction coupled with higher values of phonon frequencies due to light mass of B atoms. It has also been observed that the pseudo-atom model (Model-II) with appropriate choice of the potential parameter r c successfully explains high value of T c and isotope effect in MgB 2 , confirming the prominent role played by electron-phonon interaction in the high-T c superconductivity observed in MgB 2 . The isotope effect exponent α-values obtained from the two models are in complete agreement with each other and the present value α = 0.46 is also much closer to the BCS value of 0.5. Interaction strength N 0 V values obtained from the two models are also in perfect agreement with each other and the present value N 0 V = 0.48 suggests that MgB 2 is a strong coupling superconductor. (author)

  9. Isotope chemistry of an extensively nitrate-contaminated urban aquifer

    Kracht, O.; de Souza, L. C.; de Queiros, M. A.; Stegemann, C.; Hunziker, J.

    2003-04-01

    The supply of drinking water for the approximately 800.000 inhabitants of the city of Natal (Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil) is strongly dependent on the use of local groundwater from the Barreiras Aquifer. Over 70 % of the public production are served by a system of about 130 tubular wells, that are distributed all over the urban area. Yet, no groundwater protection zones have been declared. In addition, a comparable number of private wells also depend on the cities underground water resources. Depending on the local topography, the groundwater table is located several tens of meters below surface. Useable groundwater occurrences are bound to an up to hundred meters thick series of unconsolidated clastic sediments from the younger tertiary (Barreiras Formation), that is underlain by less permeable cretaceous carbonates. Natals topography is dominated by impressive quaternary dunes formations, that play an important role for the infiltration of rain as the only source of recharge for the local groundwater. During the last decades, an extensive and rapidly growing groundwater-contamination with up to over 100 mg/l nitrate was observed by the local authorities. Hydrochemical data indicate this deterioration to be due to a massive spill of sanitary effluents over septic pits, as only 20 % of the city is yet served by a sewer system. The isotopic composition of Natals groundwater shows only small variations, with an average δ18O value of -2,3 per mill and δ2H value of -10,5 per mill vs. SMOW. Its origin from recent local precipitation is revealed by a good correspondence with the annual weighted means for precipitation in Ceara Mirim (nearest GNIP station, situated 45 km NE of Natal). In contrast, a set of samples from different regional surface waters indicated a strong evaporation trend with systematic enrichment in the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition. Samples from 33 production wells with a wide variation of nitrate concentrations were investigated for their

  10. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  11. Geochemistry of silicon isotopes

    Ding, Tiping; Li, Yanhe; Gao, Jianfei; Hu, Bin [Chinese Academy of Geological Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Mineral Resources; Jiang, Shaoyong [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China).

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and silicon isotope geochemistry is important in identifying the silicon source for various geological bodies and in studying the behavior of silicon in different geological processes. This book starts with an introduction on the development of silicon isotope geochemistry. Various analytical methods are described and compared with each other in detail. The mechanisms of silicon isotope fractionation are discussed, and silicon isotope distributions in various extraterrestrial and terrestrial reservoirs are updated. Besides, the applications of silicon isotopes in several important fields are presented.

  12. Applications of stable isotopes

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  13. Titanium isotopic anomalies in meteorites

    Niemeyer, S.; Lugmair, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    High-precision analyses of Ti are reported for samples from a variety of meteorite classes. The expanded data base for Allende inclusions still shows Ti isotope anomalies in every inclusion. All the coarse-grained inclusions give quite similar patterns, but fine-grained inclusions show more variable, and sometimes larger, anomalies. One inclusion, 3675A, was analyzed because others identified it as a possible 'FUN' inclusion due to its mass-fractionated Mg. This designation is supported by the significantly more complex Ti isotopic pattern for 3675A compared to all our other Allende inclusions. Available data fail to suggest that any particular Allende mineral phase, including a chromite-carbon fraction from an acid residue, is especially rich in anomalous Ti. We also find anomalous Ti in a bulk sample of a C1 chondrite and in matrix separates from C2 chondrites. The excesses of 50 Ti are smaller than for Allende inclusions, and subtle differences in Ti isotopic patterns tentatively suggest that parent materials for C1-C2 matrix and Allende inclusions are not directly related. Analyses of chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites did not yield clear evidence for anomalous Ti, but some 'larger than usual' deficits at 50/46 give encouragement for future work in this direction. (author)

  14. Effect of different seawater Mg

    Mewes, A.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bijma, J.; Reichart, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium, incorporated in foraminiferal calcite (Mg/CaCC), is used intensively to reconstruct past seawater temperatures but, in addition to temperature, the Mg/CaCC of foraminiferal tests also depends on the ratio of Mg and Ca in seawater (Mg/CaSW). The physiological mechanisms responsible for

  15. Nuclear structure of light Ca and heavy Cr isotopes

    Buerger, A.

    2007-01-01

    In the present thesis, the shell structure in exotic nuclei has been investigated. The focus of the work was on finding new experimental data in neutron-rich Cr and proton-rich Ca isotopes. The investigation of light Ca isotopes concentrated on the nucleus 36 Ca which was produced in a knockout reaction from a radioactive 37 Ca beam. For 36 Ca, the excitation energy of the first 2 + state has been measured for the first time. Furthermore, momentum distributions were analyzed using a Monte-Carlo simulation of the knockout reaction. This analysis yielded the contributions of neutrons from individual orbitals to the total knockout cross section. In principle, these may be used to calculate spectroscopic factors, but such a calculation is hampered by difficulties of present knockout-reaction models in predicting precise single-particle cross sections. The measured branching ratio to the ground and excited states, on the other hand, is close to the predicted value. A remaining difference might be due to emission of protons which cannot be detected with the present experimental setup. Both the branching ratio and the large excitation energy are compatible with a large N=16 gap in 36 Ca that leads to relatively pure configurations both in the ground state and the excited 2 + state. As a by-product of the experiment, two excitation energies in the T=2 nuclei 32 Ar and 28 S have been confirmed, and two γ-ray transitions have been observed for the first time in 37 Ca. While the mirror energy differences in the T=2 pairs 36 Ca- 36 S, 32 Ar- 32 Si, and 28 S- 28 Mg can be reproduced in shell model calculations using a modified USD interaction, these modifications are not sufficient to explain the mirror energy differences for the pair 37 Ca- 37 Cl. In the heavy Cr isotopes, new experimental evidence for a sub-shell closure at N=32 was found in a measurement of B(E2) values using high-energy Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams. Prior to this experiment, the assumption of a

  16. Nuclear structure of light Ca and heavy Cr isotopes

    Buerger, A.

    2007-07-01

    In the present thesis, the shell structure in exotic nuclei has been investigated. The focus of the work was on finding new experimental data in neutron-rich Cr and proton-rich Ca isotopes. The investigation of light Ca isotopes concentrated on the nucleus {sup 36}Ca which was produced in a knockout reaction from a radioactive {sup 37}Ca beam. For {sup 36}Ca, the excitation energy of the first 2{sup +} state has been measured for the first time. Furthermore, momentum distributions were analyzed using a Monte-Carlo simulation of the knockout reaction. This analysis yielded the contributions of neutrons from individual orbitals to the total knockout cross section. In principle, these may be used to calculate spectroscopic factors, but such a calculation is hampered by difficulties of present knockout-reaction models in predicting precise single-particle cross sections. The measured branching ratio to the ground and excited states, on the other hand, is close to the predicted value. A remaining difference might be due to emission of protons which cannot be detected with the present experimental setup. Both the branching ratio and the large excitation energy are compatible with a large N=16 gap in {sup 36}Ca that leads to relatively pure configurations both in the ground state and the excited 2{sup +} state. As a by-product of the experiment, two excitation energies in the T=2 nuclei {sup 32}Ar and {sup 28}S have been confirmed, and two {gamma}-ray transitions have been observed for the first time in {sup 37}Ca. While the mirror energy differences in the T=2 pairs {sup 36}Ca-{sup 36}S, {sup 32}Ar-{sup 32}Si, and {sup 28}S-{sup 28}Mg can be reproduced in shell model calculations using a modified USD interaction, these modifications are not sufficient to explain the mirror energy differences for the pair {sup 37}Ca-{sup 37}Cl. In the heavy Cr isotopes, new experimental evidence for a sub-shell closure at N=32 was found in a measurement of B(E2) values using high

  17. What can Fe stable isotopes tell us about magmas?

    Stausberg, Niklas

    the differentiation of magmas from the perspective of Fe stable isotopes, integrated with petrology, by studying igneous rocks and their constituent phases (minerals and glasses) from the Bushveld Complex, South Africa, Thingmuli, Iceland, Pantelleria, Italy, and the Bishop Tuff, USA. The findings are interpreted......The majority of the Earth’s crust is formed by magmas, and understanding their production and differentiation is important to interpret the geologic rock record. A powerful tool to investigate magmatic processes is the distribution of the stable isotopes of the major redox-sensitive element...... in magmas, Fe. Fe isotope compositions of magmatic rocks exhibit systematic differences, where the heaviest compositions are found in rhyolites and granites. Understanding of these systematics is complicated by a lack of constraints on Fe isotope fractionation among minerals and liquids under magmatic...

  18. Zircon U-Pb geochronology, Sm-Nd and Pb-Pb isotope systematics of Ediacaran post-collisional high-silica Acampamento Velho volcanism at the Tupanci area, NW of the Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield, Brazil

    Sommer, Carlos Augusto; Leitzke, Felipe Padilha; Lima, Evandro Fernandes de; Barreto, Carla Joana Santos; Matté, Vinicius; Philipp, Ruy Paulo; Conceição, Rommulo Vieira, E-mail: casommer@sinos.net, E-mail: eflgeologo@gmail.com, E-mail: ruy.philipp@ufrgs.br, E-mail: rommulo.conceicao@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Geociências; Lafon, Jean Michel, E-mail: lafonjm@ufpa.br [Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Belém, PA (Brazil). Laboratório de Geologia Isotópica; Basei, Miguel Ângelo Stipp, E-mail: baseimas@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (CPGeo/IGc/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    We present new U-Pb zircon ages and Sm-Nd-Pb isotopic data for volcanic and hypabyssal acid rocks from the northernmost exposure of the Acampamento Velho Formation in the NW portion of the Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield, Brazil. The first volcanic episode, grouped in the high-Ti rhyolites from the Tupanci hill, shows age of 579 ± 5.6 Ma, which is in agreement with the post-collisional Acampamento Velho Formation volcanism in the Bom Jardim Group of the Camaquã Basin. A poorly constrained age of 558+/- 39Ma was obtained for rhyolites from the low-Ti group at the Picados Hill, which may indicate a younger acid volcanism, or a greater time span for the volcanism of the Acampamento Velho Formation in southernmost Brazil. Regarding magmatic sources, Sm/Nd isotopic data coupled to Pb isotopes and a review of trace element geochemistry indicate different amounts of Paleoproterozoic (Dom Feliciano, Pinheiro Machado Suite) to Neoproterozoic (Rio Vacacaí terrane) lower crust melting. Our data, coupled with literature data, contribute to a better understanding of the stratigraphic evolution for the Neoproterozoic post-collisional volcanic successions of the Camaquã Basin in the Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield. (author)

  19. Stable water isotope patterns in a climate change hotspot: the isotope hydrology framework of Corsica (western Mediterranean).

    van Geldern, Robert; Kuhlemann, Joachim; Schiebel, Ralf; Taubald, Heinrich; Barth, Johannes A C

    2014-06-01

    The Mediterranean is regarded as a region of intense climate change. To better understand future climate change, this area has been the target of several palaeoclimate studies which also studied stable isotope proxies that are directly linked to the stable isotope composition of water, such as tree rings, tooth enamel or speleothems. For such work, it is also essential to establish an isotope hydrology framework of the region of interest. Surface waters from streams and lakes as well as groundwater from springs on the island of Corsica were sampled between 2003 and 2009 for their oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions. Isotope values from lake waters were enriched in heavier isotopes and define a local evaporation line (LEL). On the other hand, stream and spring waters reflect the isotope composition of local precipitation in the catchment. The intersection of the LEL and the linear fit of the spring and stream waters reflect the mean isotope composition of the annual precipitation (δP) with values of-8.6(± 0.2) ‰ for δ(18)O and-58(± 2) ‰ for δ(2)H. This value is also a good indicator of the average isotope composition of the local groundwater in the island. Surface water samples reflect the altitude isotope effect with a value of-0.17(± 0.02) ‰ per 100 m elevation for oxygen isotopes. At Vizzavona Pass in central Corsica, water samples from two catchments within a lateral distance of only a few hundred metres showed unexpected but systematic differences in their stable isotope composition. At this specific location, the direction of exposure seems to be an important factor. The differences were likely caused by isotopic enrichment during recharge in warm weather conditions in south-exposed valley flanks compared to the opposite, north-exposed valley flanks.

  20. Reaction dynamics of {sup 34-38}Mg projectile with carbon target using Glauber model

    Shama, Mahesh K., E-mail: maheshphy82@gmail.com [School of Physics and Material Sciences, Thapar University Patiala-147004 (India); Department of Applied Sciences, Chandigarh Engineering College, Landran Mohali-140307 (India); Panda, R. N. [Department of Physics, ITER, Shiksha O Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar-751030 (India); Sharma, Manoj K. [School of Physics and Material Sciences, Thapar University Patiala-147004 (India); Patra, S. K. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya marg Bhubneswar-751005 (India)

    2015-08-28

    We have studied nuclear reaction cross-sections for {sup 34-38}Mg isotopes as projectile with {sup 12}C target at projectile energy 240AMeV using Glauber model with the conjunction of densities from relativistic mean filed formalism. We found good agreement with the available experimental data. The halo status of {sup 37}Mg is also investigated.

  1. The three shapes of 32Mg

    Poves, A.; Nowacki, F.; Caurier, E.

    2014-01-01

    The N=20 and N=28 'islands of inversion' are described by large scale shell model calculations which mix configurations with different Nℎω or equivalently with different number of particles promoted from the sd-shell to the p f-shell. We pay particular attention to the properties of the states at fix Nℎω which turn out to be the real protagonists of the physics at N=20. In particular we study the appearance of spherical, deformed and superdeformed structures in 32 Mg at fixed 0p-0h, 2p-2h and 4p-4h configurations. Finally we show that the islands of deformation at N=20 and N=28 merge in a single one for Magnesium isotopes. (authors)

  2. Regional lead isotope study of a polluted river catchment: River Wear, Northern England, UK

    Shepherd, Thomas J.; Chenery, Simon R.N.; Pashley, Vanessa; Lord, Richard A.; Ander, Louise E.; Breward, Neil; Hobbs, Susan F.; Horstwood, Matthew; Klinck, Benjamin A.; Worrall, Fred

    2009-01-01

    High precision, lead isotope analyses of archived stream sediments from the River Wear catchment, northeast England (1986-88), provide evidence for three main sources of anthropogenic lead pollution; lead mining, industrial lead emissions and leaded petrol. In the upper catchment, pollution is totally controlled and dominated by large lead discharges from historic mining centres in the North Pennine Orefield ( 208 Pb/ 206 Pb, 207 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios range from 2.0744-2.0954 and 0.8413-0.8554 respectively). In the lower catchment, co-extensive with the Durham Coalfield and areas of high population density, pollution levels are lower and regionally more uniform. Isotope ratios are systematically higher than in the upper catchment ( 208 Pb/ 206 Pb, 207 Pb/ 206 Pb ratios range from 2.0856-2.1397 and 0.8554-0.8896 respectively) and far exceed values determined for the geogenic regional background. Here, the pollution is characterised by the atmospheric deposition of industrial lead and petrol lead. Lead derived from the combustion of coal, although present, is masked by the other two sources. Recent sediments from the main channel of the River Wear are isotopically indistinguishable from older, low order stream sediments of the North Pennine Orefield, indicating that contamination of the river by lead mining waste (up to several 1000 mg/kg Pb at some locations) continues to pose an environmental problem; a pattern that can be traced all the way to the tidal reach. Using within-catchment isotope variation and sediment lead concentrations, estimates can be made of the discharges from discrete mines or groups of mines to the overall level of lead pollution in the River Wear. As well as providing information pertinent to source apportionment and on-going catchment remediation measures, the database is a valuable resource for epidemiologists concerned with the health risks posed by environmental lead.

  3. Regional lead isotope study of a polluted river catchment: River Wear, Northern England, UK

    Shepherd, Thomas J., E-mail: shepherdtj@aol.com [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Science Laboratories, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Chenery, Simon R.N. [British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Pashley, Vanessa [NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Lord, Richard A. [School of Science and Technology, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, Tees Valley TS1 3BA (United Kingdom); Ander, Louise E.; Breward, Neil; Hobbs, Susan F. [British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Horstwood, Matthew [NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Klinck, Benjamin A. [British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Worrall, Fred [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Science Laboratories, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    High precision, lead isotope analyses of archived stream sediments from the River Wear catchment, northeast England (1986-88), provide evidence for three main sources of anthropogenic lead pollution; lead mining, industrial lead emissions and leaded petrol. In the upper catchment, pollution is totally controlled and dominated by large lead discharges from historic mining centres in the North Pennine Orefield ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb ratios range from 2.0744-2.0954 and 0.8413-0.8554 respectively). In the lower catchment, co-extensive with the Durham Coalfield and areas of high population density, pollution levels are lower and regionally more uniform. Isotope ratios are systematically higher than in the upper catchment ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb ratios range from 2.0856-2.1397 and 0.8554-0.8896 respectively) and far exceed values determined for the geogenic regional background. Here, the pollution is characterised by the atmospheric deposition of industrial lead and petrol lead. Lead derived from the combustion of coal, although present, is masked by the other two sources. Recent sediments from the main channel of the River Wear are isotopically indistinguishable from older, low order stream sediments of the North Pennine Orefield, indicating that contamination of the river by lead mining waste (up to several 1000 mg/kg Pb at some locations) continues to pose an environmental problem; a pattern that can be traced all the way to the tidal reach. Using within-catchment isotope variation and sediment lead concentrations, estimates can be made of the discharges from discrete mines or groups of mines to the overall level of lead pollution in the River Wear. As well as providing information pertinent to source apportionment and on-going catchment remediation measures, the database is a valuable resource for epidemiologists concerned with the health risks posed by environmental lead.

  4. Process for isotope separation

    Emile, B.F.M.

    1983-11-01

    A process is claimed for isotopic separation applied to isotopes of elements that can be placed in at least a physicochemical form in which the isotopic atoms or the molecules containing these atoms can be easily displaced and for which there are selective radiations preferentially absorbed by the isotopes of a certain type or by the molecules containing them, said absorption substantially increasing the probability of ionization of said atoms or molecules relative to the atoms or molecules that did not absorb the radiation. The process consists of placing the isotopic mixture in such a form, subjecting it in a separation zone to selective radiations and to an electrical field that produces migration of positive ions toward the negative electrodes and negative ions toward the positive electrodes, and withdrawing from certain such zones the fractions thus enriched in certain isotopes

  5. Isotope yield ratios as a probe of the reaction dynamics

    Trautmann, W.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Lynen, U.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Rabe, H.J.; Sann, H.; Stelzer, H.; Trockel, R.; Wada, R.; Brummund, N.; Glasow, R.; Kampert, K.H.; Santo, R.; Eckert, E.M.; Pochodzalla, J.; Bock, I.; Pelte, D.

    1987-04-01

    Isotopically resolved yields of particles and complex fragments from 12 C and 18 O induced reactions on 53 Ni, 54 Ni, Ag, and 197 Au in the intermediate range of bombarding energies 30 MeV ≤ E/A ≤ 84 MeV were measured. The systematic variation of the deduced isotope yield ratios with projectile and target is used to determine the degree of N/Z equilibration achieved and to establish time scales for the reaction process. A quantum statistical model is employed in order to derive entropies of the emitting systems from the measured isotope yield ratios. (orig.)

  6. Isotopic marking and tracers

    Morel, F.

    1997-01-01

    The use of radioactive isotopes as tracers in biology has been developed thanks to the economic generation of the required isotopes in accelerators and nuclear reactors, and to the multiple applications of tracers in the life domain; the most usual isotopes employed in biology are carbon, hydrogen, phosphorus and sulfur isotopes, because these elements are present in most of organic molecules. Most of the life science knowledge appears to be dependent to the extensive use of nuclear tools and radioactive tracers; the example of the utilization of radioactive phosphorus marked ATP to study the multiple reactions with proteins, nucleic acids, etc., is given

  7. Isotopes in oxidation reactions

    Stewart, R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of isotopes in the study of organic oxidation mechanisms is discussed. The help provided by tracer studies to demonstrate the two-equivalent path - hydride transfer, is illustrated by the examples of carbonium oxidants and the Wacker reaction. The role of kinetic isotope effects in the study of the scission of carbon-hydrogen bonds is illustrated by hydride abstraction, hydrogen atom abstraction, proton abstraction and quantum mechanical tunnelling. Isotopic studies on the oxidation of alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines and hydrocarbons are discussed. The role of isotopes in the study of biochemical oxidation is illustrated with a discussion on nicotinamide and flavin coenzymes. (B.R.H.)

  8. Isotope separation process

    Lyon, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The instant invention relates to a process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in said material. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by selective dissociation of said excited molecules by the absorption of a single photon of visible or ultraviolet light. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium. 11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures

  9. Hydrogen isotope analysis of amino acids and whole cells reflects biosynthetic processing of nutrient- and water-derived hydrogen

    Griffin, P.; Newsome, S.; Steele, A.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen (H) isotopes serve as sensitive tracers of biochemical processes that can be exploited to answer critical questions in biogeochemistry, ecology, and microbiology. Despite this apparent utility, relatively little is known about the specific mechanisms of H isotope fractionation involved in biosynthesis. In order to understand how organisms incorporate hydrogen from their chemical milieu into biomass, we have cultured the model bacterium E. coli MG1655 in a variety of media composed of deuterium-labeled nutrients and waters. Isotopic analysis of bulk cell mass reveals that the H fractionation between media water and cell material varies as a function of the nutrient source, with commonly used organic food sources (glucose and tryptone) leading to far smaller fractionation signals than non-standard ones (such as formamide, adenine, and urea). In addition, we have completed compound specific isotope analysis of amino acids using combined GC-IRMS. Amino acids harvested from E. coli cultured on glucose in water of varied D/H composition posses an extraordinary range of isotopic compositions (400-600 %). Furthermore, these amino acids follow a systematic distribution of D/H where proline is always heaviest and glycine is always lightest. However, when the short-chain peptide tryptone is used in place of glucose, only the non-essential amino acids reflect media water D/H values, suggesting the direct incorporation of some media-borne amino acids into cellular protein. These observations provide a foundation for understanding the cellular routing of hydrogen obtained from food and water sources and indicate that D/H analysis can serve as a powerful probe of biological function.

  10. Effects of cleaning methods upon preservation of stable isotopes and trace elements in shells of Cyprideis torosa (Crustacea, Ostracoda): Implications for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction

    Roberts, L. R.; Holmes, J. A.; Leng, M. J.; Sloane, H. J.; Horne, D. J.

    2018-06-01

    The trace element (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca) and stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) geochemistry of fossil ostracod valves provide valuable information, particularly in lacustrine settings, on palaeo-water composition and palaeotemperature. The removal of sedimentary and organic contamination prior to geochemical analysis is essential to avoid bias of the results. Previous stable isotope and trace element work on ostracod shells has, however, employed different treatments for the removal of contamination beyond simple 'manual' cleaning using a paint brush and methanol under a low-power binocular microscope. For isotopic work pre-treatments include chemical oxidation, vacuum roasting and plasma ashing, and for trace element work sonication, chemical oxidation and reductive cleaning. The impact of different treatments on the geochemical composition of the valve calcite has not been evaluated in full, and a universal protocol has not been established. Here, a systematic investigation of the cleaning methods is undertaken using specimens of the ubiquitous euryhaline species, Cyprideis torosa. Cleaning methods are evaluated by undertaking paired analyses on a single carapace (comprising two valves); in modern ostracods, whose valves are assumed to be unaltered, the two valves should have identical geochemical and isotopic composition. Hence, when one valve is subjected to the chosen treatment and the other to simple manual cleaning any difference in composition can confidently be assigned to the treatment method. We show that certain cleaning methods have the potential to cause alteration to the geochemical signal, particularly Mg/Ca and δ18O, and hence have implications for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. For trace-element determinations we recommend cleaning by sonication and for stable isotope analysis, oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. These methods remove contamination, yet do not significantly alter the geochemical signal.

  11. Isotopes produced by galactic cosmic rays in iron meteorites

    Birck, J.L.; Allegre, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The elements Li, Mg, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr have been investigated in the iron meteorites Grant and Carbo. Their isotopic ratios show clearly the effects of spallation by galactic cosmic rays. Our experimental technique allows us to determine the concentration of spallation products with a precision close to 1 per mil for a number of isotopes. The effects of shielding are clearly evidenced in the calcium data and the exposure ages are calculated by using the 40 K measurements

  12. Band structure of semiconductor compounds of Mg sub 2 Si and Mg sub 2 Ge with strained crystal lattice

    Krivosheeva, A V; Shaposhnikov, V L; Krivosheev, A E; Borisenko, V E

    2002-01-01

    The effect of isotopic and unaxial deformation of the crystal lattice on the electronic band structure of indirect band gap semiconductors Mg sub 2 Si and Mg sub 2 Ge has been simulated by means of the linear augmented plane wave method. The reduction of the lattice constant down to 95 % results in a linear increase of the direct transition in magnesium silicide by 48%. The stresses arising under unaxial deformation shift the bands as well as result in splitting of degenerated states. The dependence of the interband transitions on the lattice deformation is nonlinear in this case

  13. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  14. Discovery of the iron isotopes

    Schuh, A.; Fritsch, A.; Heim, M.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-eight iron isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Discovery of the silver isotopes

    Schuh, A.; Fritsch, A.; Ginepro, J.Q.; Heim, M.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-eight silver isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Discovery of the cadmium isotopes

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  17. Quasicrystal-reinforced Mg alloys.

    Kyun Kim, Young; Tae Kim, Won; Hyang Kim, Do

    2014-04-01

    The formation of the icosahedral phase (I-phase) as a secondary solidification phase in Mg-Zn-Y and Mg-Zn-Al base systems provides useful advantages in designing high performance wrought magnesium alloys. The strengthening in two-phase composites (I-phase + α -Mg) can be explained by dispersion hardening due to the presence of I-phase particles and by the strong bonding property at the I-phase/matrix interface. The presence of an additional secondary solidification phase can further enhance formability and mechanical properties. In Mg-Zn-Y alloys, the co-presence of I and Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 phases by addition of Ca can significantly enhance formability, while in Mg-Zn-Al alloys, the co-presence of the I-phase and Mg 2 Sn phase leads to the enhancement of mechanical properties. Dynamic and static recrystallization are significantly accelerated by addition of Ca in Mg-Zn-Y alloy, resulting in much smaller grain size and more random texture. The high strength of Mg-Zn-Al-Sn alloys is attributed to the presence of finely distributed Mg 2 Sn and I-phase particles embedded in the α -Mg matrix.

  18. Mg/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.; Marco-Barba, J.; Mezquita, F.

    2007-12-01

    Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative ion concentrations. Hence, waters with identical Mg/Ca may have very different concentrations of Mg and Ca and very different anions. Here we use two examples to focus on the effects of ion chemistry on Mg/Ca partitioning in continental ostracode shells and we ignore the complexities of solute evolution, which can change Mg/Ca over timescales of minutes to millennia. Palacios-Fest and Dettman (2001) conducted a monthly study of ,Cypridopsis vidua at El Yeso Lake in Sonora, Mexico. They established a relation between temperature and average shell Mg/Ca using regression analyses on averaged data. When their Mg/Ca-temperature relation is applied to monthly ,C. vidua data from Page Pond near Cleveland, Ohio, water temperatures of -8 to -1°C are obtained. The observed Mg/Ca ranges for El Yeso Lake (0.31 to 0.46) and Page Pond (0.33 to 0.46) are similar, as are their specific conductivities (700 to 850μS for El Yeso Lake; 400 to 600μS for Page Pond). However, [Ca] is 140-260 mg/L for El Yeso, but only 70-90 mg/L for Page Pond. Page Pond data, in fact, shows a good temperature shell Mg/Ca relation for .C. vidua, but the relation is different from that at El Yeso. Hence, shell Mg/Ca is a multi-valued, family of curves function of temperature and Mg/Ca of water that depends on the [Mg] and [Ca] values in water and perhaps other factors. Our second example comes from sites near Valencia, Spain and involves shell data for ,Cyprideis torosa, an estuarine ostracode that is tolerant of a wide range of salinity and can live in continental waters as long as the carbonate alkalinity to Ca ratio is

  19. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of brines - comparing isotope ratio mass spectrometry and isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy

    Ahrens, Christian; Koeniger, Paul; van Geldern, Robert; Stadler, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Today's standard analytical methods for high precision stable isotope analysis of fluids are gas-water equilibration and high temperature pyrolysis coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS). In recent years, relatively new laser-based analytical instruments entered the market that are said to allow high isotope precision data on nearly every media. This optical technique is referred to as isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). The objective of this study is to evaluate the capability of this new instrument type for highly saline solutions and a comparison of the analytical results with traditional IRMS analysis. It has been shown for the equilibration method that the presence of salts influences the measured isotope values depending on the salt concentration (see Lécuyer et al, 2009; Martineau, 2012). This so-called 'isotope salt effect' depends on the salt type and salt concentration. These factors change the activity in the fluid and therefore shift the isotope ratios measured by the equilibration method. Consequently, correction factors have to be applied to these analytical data. Direct conversion techniques like pyrolysis or the new laser instruments allow the measurement of the water molecule from the sample directly and should therefore not suffer from the salt effect, i.e. no corrections of raw values are necessary. However, due to high salt concentrations this might cause technical problems with the analytical hardware and may require labor-intensive sample preparation (e.g. vacuum distillation). This study evaluates the salt isotope effect for the IRMS equilibration technique (Thermo Gasbench II coupled to Delta Plus XP) and the laser-based IRIS instruments with liquid injection (Picarro L2120-i). Synthetic salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, MgSO4, CaSO4) and natural brines collected from the Stassfurt Salt Anticline (Germany; Stadler et al., 2012) were analysed with both techniques. Salt concentrations ranged from seawater salinity

  20. Boron geochemistry from some typical Tibetan hydrothermal systems: Origin and isotopic fractionation

    Zhang, Wenjie; Tan, Hongbing; Zhang, Yanfei; Wei, Haizhen; Dong, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tibetan plateau is characterized by intense hydrothermal activity and abnormal enrichment of trace elements in geothermal waters. Hydrochemistry and B isotope samples from geothermal waters in Tibet were systematically measured to describe the fractionation mechanisms and provide constraints on potential B reservoirs. B concentrations range from 0.35 to 171.90 mg/L, and isotopic values vary between −16.57 ‰ and +0.52 ‰. Geothermal fields along the Indus-Yarlung Zangbo suture zone and N–S rifts are observed with high B concentrations and temperatures. The similar hydrochemical compositions of high-B geothermal waters with magmatic fluid and consistent modeling of B isotopic compositions with present δ"1"1B values imply that the B in high-B geothermal waters is mainly contributed by magmatic sources, probably through magma degassing. In contrast, geothermal fields in other regions of the Lhasa block have relatively low B concentrations and temperatures. After considering the small fractionation factor and representative indicators of Na/Ca, Cl/HCO_3, Na + K and Si, the conformity between modeling results and the isotopic compositions of host rocks suggests that the B in low-temperature geothermal fields is mainly sourced from host rocks. According to simulated results, the B in some shallow geothermal waters not only originated from mixing of cold groundwater with deep thermal waters, but it was also contributed by equilibration with marine sedimentary rocks with an estimated proportion of 10%. It was anticipated that this study would provide useful insight into the sources and fractionation of B as well as further understanding of the relationships between B-rich salt lakes and geothermal activities in the Tibetan plateau. - Highlights: • Chemical and boron isotopic data of geothermal waters in Tibetan plateau were introduced. • Unusual enrichment of boron in Tibetan geothermal waters is related to magmatic and host rocks. • Boron

  1. Periodicity of the stable isotopes

    Boeyens, J C A

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all stable (non-radioactive) isotopes are formally interrelated as the products of systematically adding alpha particles to four elementary units. The region of stability against radioactive decay is shown to obey a general trend based on number theory and contains the periodic law of the elements as a special case. This general law restricts the number of what may be considered as natural elements to 100 and is based on a proton:neutron ratio that matches the golden ratio, characteristic of biological and crystal growth structures. Different forms of the periodic table inferred at other proton:neutron ratios indicate that the electronic configuration of atoms is variable and may be a function of environmental pressure. Cosmic consequences of this postulate are examined. (author)

  2. Isotopic research in Antarctica

    Schuetze, H.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1978 scientists of the Central Institute of Isotope- and Radiation Research of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR have participated in antarctic research. Substantial results have been achieved in research on isotope ratios, on the dynamics of water resources, on concentration of deuterium in lichens, and on age determination of a mummified seal and a penguin colony

  3. Uses of stable isotopes

    Axente, Damian

    1998-01-01

    The most important fields of stable isotope use with examples are presented. These are: 1. Isotope dilution analysis: trace analysis, measurements of volumes and masses; 2. Stable isotopes as tracers: transport phenomena, environmental studies, agricultural research, authentication of products and objects, archaeometry, studies of reaction mechanisms, structure and function determination of complex biological entities, studies of metabolism, breath test for diagnostic; 3. Isotope equilibrium effects: measurement of equilibrium effects, investigation of equilibrium conditions, mechanism of drug action, study of natural processes, water cycle, temperature measurements; 4. Stable isotope for advanced nuclear reactors: uranium nitride with 15 N as nuclear fuel, 157 Gd for reactor control. In spite of some difficulties of stable isotope use, particularly related to the analytical techniques, which are slow and expensive, the number of papers reporting on this subject is steadily growing as well as the number of scientific meetings organized by International Isotope Section and IAEA, Gordon Conferences, and regional meeting in Germany, France, etc. Stable isotope application development on large scale is determined by improving their production technologies as well as those of labeled compound and the analytical techniques. (author)

  4. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  6. ICT: isotope correction toolbox.

    Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Neubauer, Stefan; Mairinger, Teresa; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Hann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Isotope tracer experiments are an invaluable technique to analyze and study the metabolism of biological systems. However, isotope labeling experiments are often affected by naturally abundant isotopes especially in cases where mass spectrometric methods make use of derivatization. The correction of these additive interferences--in particular for complex isotopic systems--is numerically challenging and still an emerging field of research. When positional information is generated via collision-induced dissociation, even more complex calculations for isotopic interference correction are necessary. So far, no freely available tools can handle tandem mass spectrometry data. We present isotope correction toolbox, a program that corrects tandem mass isotopomer data from tandem mass spectrometry experiments. Isotope correction toolbox is written in the multi-platform programming language Perl and, therefore, can be used on all commonly available computer platforms. Source code and documentation can be freely obtained under the Artistic License or the GNU General Public License from: https://github.com/jungreuc/isotope_correction_toolbox/ {christian.jungreuthmayer@boku.ac.at,juergen.zanghellini@boku.ac.at} Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Separation of uranium isotopes

    Porter, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for separation of uranium isotopes by selective isotopic excitation of photochemically reactive uranyl salt source material at cryogenic temperatures, followed by chemical separation of selectively photochemically reduced U+4 thereby produced from remaining uranyl source material

  8. Isotope research materials

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Preparation of research isotope materials is described. Topics covered include: separation of tritium from aqueous effluents by bipolar electrolysis; stable isotope targets and research materials; radioisotope targets and research materials; preparation of an 241 Am metallurgical specimen; reactor dosimeters; ceramic and cermet development; fission-fragment-generating targets of 235 UO 2 ; and wire dosimeters for Westinghouse--Bettis

  9. Isotope separation process

    Lyon, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption after which more of the excited molecules than nonexcited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium

  10. Superdeformation in Pb isotopes

    Naz, Tabassum; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2017-01-01

    The Relatvistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) theory is used to explore the structure of superdeformed (SD) 190,212 Pb isotopes using the non-linear NL3* and density dependent (DD-ME2, DD-PC1) interactions. We have studied the the excitation energy, the potential depth and the deformation of these Pb isotopes

  11. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    Bayne, C. K.; Smith, D. H.

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers.

  12. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers

  13. Isotope dilution analysis

    Fudge, A.

    1978-12-15

    The following aspects of isotope dilution analysis are covered in this report: fundamental aspects of the technique; elements of interest in the nuclear field, choice and standardization of spike nuclide; pre-treatment to achieve isotopic exchange and chemical separation; sensitivity; selectivity; and accuracy.

  14. Wide angle isotope separator

    Kantrowitz, A.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for particle separation. The method uses a wide angle radially expanding vapor of a particle mixture. In particular, selective ionization of one isotope type in the particle mixture is produced in a multichamber separator and the ionized isotope type is accelerated out of the path of the vapor expansion for separate collection

  15. Environmental isotope hydrology

    1973-01-01

    Environmental isotope hydrology is a relatively new field of investigation based on isotopic variations observed in natural waters. These isotopic characteristics have been established over a broad space and time scale. They cannot be controlled by man, but can be observed and interpreted to gain valuable regional information on the origin, turnover and transit time of water in the system which often cannot be obtained by other techniques. The cost of such investigations is usually relatively small in comparison with the cost of classical hydrological studies. The main environmental isotopes of hydrological interest are the stable isotopes deuterium (hydrogen-2), carbon-13, oxygen-18, and the radioactive isotopes tritium (hydrogen-3) and carbon-14. Isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen are ideal geochemical tracers of water because their concentrations are usually not subject to change by interaction with the aquifer material. On the other hand, carbon compounds in groundwater may interact with the aquifer material, complicating the interpretation of carbon-14 data. A few other environmental isotopes such as 32 Si and 238 U/ 234 U have been proposed recently for hydrological purposes but their use has been quite limited until now and they will not be discussed here. (author)

  16. Laser assisted aerodynamic isotope separation

    Berg, H. van den

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the efficiency of conventional aerodynamic isotope seperation can be improved by two orders of magnitude with the aid of a relatively weak cw infrared laser which is used to induce isotopically selective condensation. Overall isotope enrichment factors in excess of 2 are obtained as compared to about 1.02 in the conventional seperation. Sulphur isotopes in SF 6 as well as Silicon isotopes in SiF 4 and Bromine isotopes in CF 3 Br are seperated on a laboratory scale. Infrared vibrational predissociation by itself and in combination with isotopically selective condensation are also shown to be effective new ways of isotope separation. (orig.) [de

  17. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    Greenland ice cores offer a unique opportunity to investigate the climate system behaviour. The objective of this PhD project is to investigate isotope modelling of present- day conditions and conduct model-data comparison using Greenland ice cores. Thus this thesis investigates how the integration...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  18. Applications of isotopes

    Kirby-Smith, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    Current and potential applications of stable isotopes as tracers in a number of biomedical and environmental areas are discussed. It is pointed out that a wide variety of problems exist in these fields whose solutions in principle are amenable to the isotopic approach. The number and diversity of these problems as well as the unique role stable isotopes can play in their solution illustrate the importance of achieving and maintaining a broad inventory of isotopic species. Experience has demonstrated unequivocally an additional overriding requirement for widespread exploration of stable isotopes by the scientific and technical community, i.e., the need for low cost availability of the materials in quantity. Some representative applications of 12 C, 13 C, 14 N, 15 N, 16 O, 17 O, and 18 O are discussed

  19. Retention characteristics of hydrogen isotopes in JT-60U

    Masaki, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Hayashi, T.; Ochiai, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Shibahara, T.; Hirohata, Y.; Oya, Y.; Miya, N.; Tanabe, T.

    2005-01-01

    Erosion/deposition distribution and hydrogen isotope behavior in the JT-60U plasma-facing wall were investigated. Distribution of the tritium, which was produced by D-D nuclear reaction, was not correlated with erosion/deposition distribution. The tritium distribution can be explained by the distribution of high-energy tritium ion-implantation due to ripple loss. Deuterium distribution in the divertor region was different from the tritium distribution and not well correlated with the deposition. The highest D/C was ∼0.05 at the bottom of the outer dome wing, which is much less than that observed in other tokamaks. For the deuterium retention, at least two retention processes (ion-implantation and co-deposition) were found on the dome region. The systematic dust collection gave the small amount of dust (∼7 g: 0.2 mg/s production) in the whole vessel of JT-60U. Deposition was observed at the remote area of the outer divertor region

  20. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope systematics of the Permian volcanic rocks in the northern margin of the Alxa Block (the Shalazhashan Belt) and comparisons with the nearby regions: Implications for a Permian rift setting?

    Shi, Guanzhong; Wang, Hua; Liu, Entao; Huang, Chuanyan; Zhao, Jianxin; Song, Guangzeng; Liang, Chao

    2018-04-01

    The petrogenesis of the Permian magmatic rocks in the Shalazhashan Belt is helpful for us to understand the tectonic evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) in the northern margin of the Alxa Block. The Permian volcanic rocks in the Shalazhashan Belt include basalts, trachyandesites and trachydacites. Our study shows that two basalt samples have negative εNd(t) values (-5.4 to -1.5) and higher radiogenic Pb values, which are relevant to the ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle. One basalt sample has positive εNd(t) value (+10) representing mafic juvenile crust and is derived from depleted asthenosphere. The trachyandesites are dated at 284 ± 3 Ma with εNd(t) = +2.7 to +8.0; ISr = 0.7052 to 0.7057, and they are generated by different degrees of mixing between mafic magmas and crustal melts. The trachydacites have high εNd(t) values and slightly higher ISr contents, suggesting the derivation from juvenile sources with crustal contamination. The isotopic comparisons of the Permian magmatic rocks of the Shalazhashan Belt, the Nuru-Langshan Belt (representing the northern margin of the Alxa Block), the Solonker Belt (Mandula area) and the northern margin of the North China Craton (Bayan Obo area) indicate that the radiogenic isotopic compositions have an increasingly evolved trend from the south (the northern margins of the Alxa Block and the North China Craton) to the north (the Shalazhashan Belt and the Solonker Belt). Three end-member components are involved to generate the Permian magmatic rocks: the ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle, the mafic juvenile crust or newly underplated mafic rocks that were originated from depleted asthenosphere, and the ancient crust. The rocks correlative with the mafic juvenile crust or newly underplated mafic rocks are predominantly distributed along the Shalazhashan Belt and the Solonker Belt, and the rocks derived from ancient, enriched subcontinental lithospheric mantle are mainly distributed along

  1. Geochemical gradients within modern and fossil shells of Concholepas concholepas from northern Chile: an insight into U-Th systematics and diagenetic/authigenic isotopic imprints in mollusk shells

    Labonne, Maylis; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    2000-05-01

    Seriate geochemical measurements through shells of one modern, one Holocene, and two Sangamonian Concholepas concholepas, from marine terraces of Northern Chile, were performed to document diagenetic vs. authigenic geochemical signatures, and to better interpret U-series ages on such material. Subsamples were recovered by drilling from the outer calcitic layer to the inner aragonitic layer of each of the studied shells. Unfortunately, this sampling procedure induces artifacts, notably the convertion of up to ˜20% of calcite into aragonite, and of up to ˜6% of aragonite into calcite, as well as in the epimerization of a few percent of isoleucine into D-alloisoleucine/ L-isoleucine. Negligible sampling artifacts were noticed for stable isotope and total amino acid contents. Diagenetic effects on the geochemical properties of the shells are particularly pronounced in the inner aragonitic layer and more discrete in the outer calcitic layer. The time-dependent decay of the organic matrix of the shell is illustrated by a one order of magnitude lower total amino acid content in the Sangamonian specimens by comparison with the modern shell. Conversely, the Sangamonian shells U contents increase by a similar factor and 13C- 18O enrichments as high as 2 to 3‰ seem also to occur through the same time interval possibly due to partial replacement of aragonite by gypsum. The decay of the organic matrix of the aragonitic layer of the shell is thought to play a major role with respect to U-uptake processes and stable isotope shifts. Nevertheless, asymptotic 230Th-ages (˜100 ka) in the inner U-rich layers of the Sangamonian shells, and 234U/ 238U ratios compatible with a marine origin for U, suggest U-uptake within a short diagenetic interval, when marine waters were still bathing the embedding sediment. Thus, U-series ages on fossil mollusks from such a hyper-arid environment should not differ much from the age of the corresponding marine unit deposition. However, the

  2. THE MAGNESIUM ISOTOPOLOGUES OF MgH IN THE A 2Π-X 2Σ+ SYSTEM

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Wallace, Lloyd; Ram, Ram S.; Bernath, Peter F.; Sneden, Christopher; Lucatello, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Using laboratory hollow cathode spectra we have identified lines of the less common magnesium isotopologues of MgH, 25 MgH and 26 MgH, in the A 2 Π-X 2 Σ + system. Based on the previous analysis of 24 MgH, molecular lines have been measured and molecular constants derived for 25 MgH and 26 MgH. Term values and linelists, in both wavenumber and wavelength units, are presented. The A 2 Π-X 2 Σ + system of MgH is important for measuring the magnesium isotope ratios in stars. Examples of analysis using the new linelists to derive the Mg isotope ratio in a metal poor dwarf and giant are shown

  3. Age and isotopic systematics of Cretaceous borehole and surface samples from the greater Los Angeles Basin region: Implications for the types of crust that might underlie Los Angeles and their distribution along late Cenozoic fault systems

    Premo, Wayne R.; Morton, Douglas M.; Kistler, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    Nine U-Pb zircon ages were determined on plutonic rocks sampled from surface outcrops and rock chips of drill core from boreholes within the greater Los Angeles Basin region. In addition, lead-strontium-neodymium (Pb-Sr-Nd) whole-rock isotopic data were obtained for eight of these samples. These results help to characterize the crystalline basement rocks hidden in the subsurface and provide information that bears on the tectonic history of the myriad of fault systems that have dissected the Los Angeles region over the past 15 m.y. Seven of the nine samples have U-Pb ages ranging from 115 to 103 Ma and whole-rock Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic characteristics that indicate the crystalline basement underneath the greater Los Angeles Basin region is mostly part of the Peninsular Ranges batholith. Furthermore, these data are interpreted as evidence for (1) the juxtaposition of mid-Cretaceous, northern Peninsular Ranges batholith plutonic rocks against Late Cretaceous plutonic rocks of the Transverse Ranges in the San Fernando Valley, probably along the Verdugo fault; (2) the juxtaposition of older northwestern Peninsular Ranges batholith rocks against younger northeastern Peninsular Ranges batholith rocks in the northern Puente Hills, implying transposition of northeastern Peninsular Ranges batholith rocks to the west along unrecognized faults beneath the Chino Basin; and (3) juxtaposition of northern Peninsular Ranges batholith plutonic rocks against Late Cretaceous plutonic rocks of the Transverse Ranges along the San Jose fault in the northern San Jose Hills at Ganesha Park. These mainly left-lateral strike-slip faults of the eastern part of the greater Los Angeles Basin region could be the result of block rotation within the adjacent orthogonal, right-lateral, Elsinore-Whittier fault zone to the west and the subparallel San Jacinto fault zone to the east. The San Andreas fault system is the larger, subparallel, driving force further to the east.

  4. Isotopic variations in primitive meteorites

    Clayton, R.N.; Chicago Univ., IL; Chicago Univ., IL

    1981-01-01

    The presence of large internal 16 O variability in ordinary chondrites greatly extends the range of meteorite types in which this phenomenon has been observed. These results may lead to identification of major gas and dust reservoirs in the cloud from which the Solar System formed. The demonstration that live 107 Pd was present in the differentiated parent bodies of some iron meteorites supports the million year time scale between a major nucleosynthetic event and Solar System formation, as implied by the presence of live 26 Al in carbonaceous chondrites. However, the variability of radiogenic 26 Mg abundances in these meteorites makes it clear that the data cannot be interpreted simply in terms of time variations. Models of nucleosynthesis for elements from calcium to the iron peak should be aided by the new observations of abundances of titanium isotopes. Progress has been made in establishing the carrier phases of isotopically anomalous xenon and krypton. The apparent location of anomalous xenon and 14 N-rich nitrogen in identical carriers supports the notion that nucleosynthetic anomalies in nitrogen are also present in Allende. (author)

  5. Nonparametric inference from the M/G/1 workload

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted; Pitts, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    Consider an M/G/1 queue with unknown service-time distribution and unknown traffic intensity ρ. Given systematically sampled observations of the workload, we construct estimators of ρ and of the service-time distribution function, and we study asymptotoic properties of these estimators....

  6. Nonparametric inference from the M/G/1 workload

    Hansen, Martin Bøgsted; Pitts, Susan M.

    Consider an M/G/1 queue with unknown service-time distribution and unknown traffic intensity $\\rho$. Given systematically sampled observations of the workload, we construct estimators of $\\rho$ and of the service-time distribution function, and we study asymptotic properties of these estimators....

  7. Photoluminescence of Mg_2Si films fabricated by magnetron sputtering

    Liao, Yang-Fang; Xie, Quan; Xiao, Qing-Quan; Chen, Qian; Fan, Meng-Hui; Xie, Jing; Huang, Jin; Zhang, Jin-Min; Ma, Rui; Wang, Shan-Lan; Wu, Hong-Xian; Fang, Di

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • High quality Mg_2Si films were grown on Si (111) and glass substrates with magnetron sputtering, respectively. • The first observation of Photoluminescence (PL) of Mg_2Si films was reported. • The Mg_2Si PL emission wavelengths are almost independence on temperature in the range of 77–300 K. • The strongest PL emissions may be attributed to interstitial Mg donor level to valence band transitions. • The activation energy of Mg_2Si is determined from the quenching of major luminescence peaks. - Abstract: To understand the photoluminescence mechanisms and optimize the design of Mg_2Si-based light-emitting devices, Mg_2Si films were fabricated on silicon (111) and glass substrates by magnetron sputtering technique, and the influences of different substrates on the photoelectric properties of Mg_2Si films were investigated systematically. The crystal structure, cross-sectional morphology, composition ratios and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) of the Mg_2Si films were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and PL measurement system, respectively. XRD results indicate that the Mg_2Si film on Si (111) displays polycrystalline structure, whereas Mg_2Si film on glass substrate is of like-monocrystalline structure.SEM results show that Mg_2Si film on glass substrate is very compact with a typical dense columnar structure, and the film on Si substrate represents slight delamination phenomenon. EDS results suggest that the stoichiometry of Mg and Si is approximately 2:1. Photoluminescence (PL) of Mg_2Si films was observed for the first time. The PL emission wavelengths of Mg_2Si are almost independence on temperature in the range of 77–300 K. The PL intensity decreases gradually with increasing temperature. The PL intensity of Mg_2Si films on glass substrate is much larger than that of Mg_2Si film on Si (111) substrate. The activation energy of 18 meV is

  8. Chromium isotope variations

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    the δ53Cr value of continental runoff into the ocean. The major findings were that river water is characterised by heavy δ53Cr values (+0.1‰ to +1.6‰), while soils are characterised by light δ53Cr values (-0.3‰), relative to the catchment bedrock (-0.17‰ to -0.21‰), indicating that Cr isotopes......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify......Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...

  9. Adsorption of arginine, glycine and aspartic acid on Mg and Mg-based alloy surfaces: A first-principles study

    Fang, Zhe; Wang, Jianfeng; Yang, Xiaofan; Sun, Qiang; Jia, Yu; Liu, Hairong; Xi, Tingfei; Guan, Shaokang

    2017-07-01

    Studying the adsorption behaviors of biomolecules on the surface of Mg and Mg-based alloy has a fundamental and important role for related applications in biotechnology. In the present work, we systematically investigate and compare the adsorption properties of three typical amino acids, i.e., Arg (arginine), Gly (glycine) and Asp (aspartic acid), which form RGD tripeptide, on the Mg (0 0 0 1) surface with various doping (Zn, Y, and Nd), and aim to realize proper binding between biomolecules and Mg and Mg-based biomedical materials. Our results show that flat adsorption configurations of the functional groups binding to the surfaces are favored in energy for all the three selected amino acids. In specific, for the amino acids adsorped on clean Mg (0 0 0 1) surface, the adsorption energy (Eads) of Arg is found to be -1.67 eV for the most stable configuration, with amino and guanidyl groups binding with the surface. However, Gly (Asp) is found to binding with the surface through amino and carboxyl groups, with a -1.16 eV (-1.15 eV) binding energy. On the 2% Zn doped Mg (0 0 0 1) alloy surface (Mg-Zn (2%)), the Eads are significantly increased to be -1.91 eV, -1.32 eV and -1.35 eV for Arg, Gly and Asp, respectively. While the Mg-Y (1%) and Mg-Nd (1%) slightly weaken the adsorption of three amino acids. Moreover, we have performed detail discussions of the binding properties between amino acids and surfaces by projected density of states (PDOS) combined with charge transfer analyses. Our studies provide a comprehensive understanding on the interactions between amino acids and Mg and Mg-based alloy surfaces, with respect to facilitate the applications of Mg and Mg-based biomedical alloys in biosensing, drug delivery, biomolecule coating and other fields in biotechnology.

  10. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  11. Magnesium stable isotope ecology using mammal tooth enamel

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Geochemical inferences on ancient diet using bone and enamel apatite rely mainly on carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) and to a lesser extent on strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium/calcium (Ba/Ca) elemental ratios. Recent developments in nontraditional stable isotopes provide an unprecedented opportunity to use additional paleodietary proxies to disentangle complex diets such as omnivory. Of particular relevance for paleodietary reconstruction are metals present in large quantity in bone and enamel apatite, providing that biologically mediated fractionation processes are constrained. Calcium isotope ratios (δ44Ca) meet these criteria but exhibit complex ecological patterning. Stable magnesium isotope ratios (δ26Mg) also meet these criteria but a comprehensive understanding of its variability awaits new isotopic data. Here, 11 extant mammal species of known ecology from a single locality in equatorial Africa were sampled for tooth enamel and, together with vegetation and feces, analyzed for δ26Mg, δ13C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios. The results demonstrate that δ26Mg incorporated in tooth enamel becomes heavier from strict herbivores to omnivores/faunivores. Using data from experimentally raised sheep, we suggest that this 26Mg enrichment up the trophic chain is due to a 26Mg enrichment in muscle relative to bone. Notably, it is possible to distinguish omnivores from herbivores, using δ26Mg coupled to Ba/Ca ratios. The potential effects of metabolic and dietary changes on the enamel δ26Mg composition remain to be explored but, in the future, multiproxy approaches would permit a substantial refinement of dietary behaviors or enable accurate trophic reconstruction despite specimen-limited sampling, as is often the case for fossil assemblages.

  12. MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE RATIOS IN ω CENTAURI RED GIANTS

    Da Costa, G. S.; Norris, John E.; Yong, David

    2013-01-01

    We have used the high-resolution observations obtained at the Anglo-Australian Telescope with Ultra-High Resolution Facility (R ∼ 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R ∼ 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven ω Cen red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = –1.78 to –0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The ω Cen stars sample both the ''primordial'' (i.e., O-rich, Na- and Al-poor) and the ''extreme'' (O-depleted, Na- and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both ω Cen and M4 show ( 25 Mg, 26 Mg)/ 24 Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the ω Cen extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the 26 Mg/ 24 Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] 26 Mg in the extreme population stars is notably higher than that of 25 Mg, in contrast to model predictions. The 25 Mg/ 24 Mg isotopic ratio in fact does not show any obvious dependence on either [Fe/H] or [Al/Fe] nor, intriguingly, any obvious difference between the primordial and extreme population stars.

  13. Isotope separation process

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for separating a given material into two or more parts, in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in the said material. More particularly, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase UF 6 by infrared photon absorption followed by selective reaction of said excited UF 6 with atomic chlorine, bromine, or iodine to form a product which may be separated by means known in the art

  14. Radiation gradient isotope separator

    Hughes, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    A system is described for transporting, separating and storing charged particles, charged antiparticles and fully or partially ionized isotopes of any element comprising a laser beam generator, laser beam intensity profiler, a laser beam variable intensity attenuator, and means for injecting charged particles, charged antiparticles and ionized isotopes into the beam and extracting them from the system as required. The invention is particularly useful for channelling electrons and ions used for fuel pellet compression in inertial fusion systems, for separating the isotopes of elements and for the confinement of charged antiparticles and particle/antiparticle plasmas

  15. Atomic and molecular isotope separation

    Melamed, N.T.

    1979-01-01

    A method for differentially exciting a selected isotopic species in a mixture of isotopic species is described characterized in that almost the entire isotopic mixture is placed in an excited gaseous state; and a preselected isotopic species is then selectively de-excited through stimulated emission

  16. Kinetic isotopic fractionation during diffusion of ionic species in water

    Richter, Frank M.; Mendybaev, Ruslan A.; Christensen, John N.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Williams, Ross W.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Beloso, Abelardo D.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments specifically designed to measure the ratio of the diffusivities of ions dissolved in water were used to determine DLi/DK,D/D,D/D,D/D,andD/D. The measured ratio of the diffusion coefficients for Li and K in water (D Li/D K = 0.6) is in good agreement with published data, providing evidence that the experimental design being used resolves the relative mobility of ions with adequate precision to also be used for determining the fractionation of isotopes by diffusion in water. In the case of Li, we found measurable isotopic fractionation associated with the diffusion of dissolved LiCl (D/D=0.99772±0.00026). This difference in the diffusion coefficient of 7Li compared to 6Li is significantly less than that reported in an earlier study, a difference we attribute to the fact that in the earlier study Li diffused through a membrane separating the water reservoirs. Our experiments involving Mg diffusing in water found no measurable isotopic fractionation (D/D=1.00003±0.00006). Cl isotopes were fractionated during diffusion in water (D/D=0.99857±0.00080) whether or not the co-diffuser (Li or Mg) was isotopically fractionated. The isotopic fractionation associated with the diffusion of ions in water is much smaller than values we found previously for the isotopic fractionation of Li and Ca isotopes by diffusion in molten silicate liquids. A major distinction between water and silicate liquids is that water surrounds dissolved ions with hydration shells, which very likely play an important but still poorly understood role in limiting the isotopic fractionation associated with diffusion.

  17. Geochemistry of the stable isotopes of silicon

    Douthitt, C B [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    1982-08-01

    One hundred thirty two new measurements of the relative abundances of the stable isotopes of silicon in terrestrial materials are presented. The total variation of delta/sup 30/Si found is 6.2 parts per thousand, centered on the mean of terrestrial mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks, delta/sup 30/Si = -0.4 parts per thousand. Igneous rocks show limited variation; coexisting minerals exhibit small, systematic silicon isotopic fractionations that are roughly 1/3 the magnitude of concomitant oxygen isotopic fractionations at 1150/sup 0/C. In both igneous minerals and rocks, delta/sup 30/Si shows a positive correlation with silicon content, as does delta/sup 18/O. Opal from both sponge spicules and sinters is light, with delta/sup 30/Si = -2.3 and -1.4 parts per thousand respectively. Large delta/sup 30/Si values of both positive and negative sign are reported for the first time from clay minerals, opaline phytoliths, and authigenic quartz. All highly fractionated samples were precipitated from solution at low temperatures; however, aqueous silicon is not measurably fractionated relative to quartz at equilibrium. A kinetic isotope fractionation of approximately 3.5 parts per thousand is postulated to occur during the low temperature precipitation of opal and, possibly, poorly ordered phyllosilicates, with the silicate phase being enriched in /sup 28/Si. This fractionation, coupled with a Rayleigh precipitation model, is capable of explaining most non-magmatic delta/sup 30/Si variations.

  18. Measurement system analysis (MSA) of the isotopic ratio for uranium isotope enrichment process control

    Medeiros, Josue C. de; Barbosa, Rodrigo A.; Carnaval, Joao Paulo R., E-mail: josue@inb.gov.br, E-mail: rodrigobarbosa@inb.gov.br, E-mail: joaocarnaval@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Rezende, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Currently, one of the stages in nuclear fuel cycle development is the process of uranium isotope enrichment, which will provide the amount of low enriched uranium for the nuclear fuel production to supply 100% Angra 1 and 20% Angra 2 demands. Determination of isotopic ration n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) in uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6} - used as process gas) is essential in order to control of enrichment process of isotopic separation by gaseous centrifugation cascades. The uranium hexafluoride process is performed by gas continuous feeding in separation unit which uses the centrifuge force principle, establishing a density gradient in a gas containing components of different molecular weights. The elemental separation effect occurs in a single ultracentrifuge that results in a partial separation of the feed in two fractions: an enriched on (product) and another depleted (waste) in the desired isotope ({sup 235}UF{sub 6}). Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB) has used quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) by electron impact (EI) to perform isotopic ratio n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) analysis in the process. The decision of adjustments and change te input variables are based on the results presented in these analysis. A study of stability, bias and linearity determination has been performed in order to evaluate the applied method, variations and systematic errors in the measurement system. The software used to analyze the techniques above was the Minitab 15. (author)

  19. Temperature and isotopic composition of seawater in the epicontinental sea (Central Paratethys) during the Middle Miocene Climate Transition based on Mg/Ca, δ.sup.18./sup.O and δ.sup.13./sup.C from foraminiferal tests

    Scheiner, Filip; Holcová, K.; Milovský, R.; Kuhnert, H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 495, 15 April 2018 (2018), s. 60-71 ISSN 0031-0182 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Central Paratethys * Langhian * Mg/Ca offset * water mass hydrography * δ 18 O seawater Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Paleontology Impact factor: 2.578, year: 2016

  20. Isotope Production Facility (IPF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive isotopes for medicine and research since the mid 1970s, when targets were first irradiated using the 800...

  1. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  2. Isotope separation process

    Lyon, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The instant invention relates to a process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in said material. More particularly, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by a step wherein more of the excited molecules than nonexcited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium. 15 claims, 1 figure

  3. Isotope separation process

    Thomas, W.R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The instant invention relates to an improved process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same element in said material. More particularly, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by a step wherein more of the excited molecules than non-excited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium

  4. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Gausonne, Nikolaus; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree; Heuser, Alexander; Wombacher, Frank; Dietzel, Martin; Tipper, Edward; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  5. Laser separation of uranium isotopes

    Porter, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for separating uranium isotopes are claimed. The method comprises the steps of irradiating a uranyl source material at a wavelength selective to a desired isotope and at an effective temperature for isotope spectral line splitting below about 77 deg.K., further irradiating the source material within the fluorescent lifetime of the source material to selectively photochemically reduce the excited isotopic species, and chemically separating the reduced isotope species from the remaining uranyl salt compound

  6. High mass isotope separation arrangement

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the isotope separation art and, more particularly, to a selectively photon-induced energy level transition of an isotopic molecule containing the isotope to be separated and a chemical reaction with a chemically reactive agent to provide a chemical compound containing atoms of the isotope desired. In particular a description is given of a method of laser isotope separation applied to the separation of 235 UF 6 from 238 UF 6 . (U.K.)

  7. Iron isotope fractionation during pyrite formation in a sulfidic Precambrian ocean analogue

    Rolison, John M.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Middag, Rob; Gault-Ringold, Melanie; George, Ejin; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.

    2018-04-01

    The chemical response of the Precambrian oceans to rising atmospheric O2 levels remains controversial. The iron isotope signature of sedimentary pyrite is widely used to trace the microbial and redox states of the ocean, yet the iron isotope fractionation accompanying pyrite formation in nature is difficult to constrain due to the complexity of the pyrite formation process, difficulties in translating the iron isotope systematics of experimental studies to natural settings, and insufficient iron isotope datasets for natural euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic) marine basins where pyrite formation occurs. Herein we demonstrate, that a large, permil-level shift in the isotope composition of dissolved iron occurs in the Black Sea euxinic water column during syngenetic pyrite formation. Specifically, iron removal to syngenetic pyrite gives rise to an iron isotope fractionation factor between Fe(II) and FeS2 of 2.75 permil (‰), the largest yet reported for reactions under natural conditions that do not involve iron redox chemistry. These iron isotope systematics offer the potential to generate permil-level shifts in the sedimentary pyrite iron isotope record due to partial drawdown of the oceanic iron inventory. The implication is that the iron stable isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrites may record fundamental regime shifts between pyrite formation under sulfur-limited conditions and pyrite formation under iron-limited conditions. To this end, the iron isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrite may best represent the extent of euxinia in the past global ocean, rather than its oxygenation state. On this basis, the reinterpreted sedimentary pyrite Fe isotope record suggests a fundamental shift towards more sulfidic oceanic conditions coincident with the 'Great Oxidation Event' around 2.3 billion years ago. Importantly, this does not require the chemical state of the ocean to shift from mainly de-oxygenated to predominantly oxygenated in parallel with the permanent rise

  8. Emission spectrometric isotope analyzer

    Mauersberger, K.; Meier, G.; Nitschke, W.; Rose, W.; Schmidt, G.; Rahm, N.; Andrae, G.; Krieg, D.; Kuefner, W.; Tamme, G.; Wichlacz, D.

    1982-01-01

    An emission spectrometric isotope analyzer has been designed for determining relative abundances of stable isotopes in gaseous samples in discharge tubes, in liquid samples, and in flowing gaseous samples. It consists of a high-frequency generator, a device for defined positioning of discharge tubes, a grating monochromator with oscillating slit and signal converter, signal generator, window discriminator, AND connection, read-out display, oscillograph, gas dosing device and chemical conversion system with carrier gas source and vacuum pump

  9. Isotope toolbox turns 10

    Wenander, Fredrik; Riisager, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes.......REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes....

  10. Laser isotope separation

    1976-01-01

    The claimed invention is a method of isotope separation based on the unimolecular decomposition of vibrationally excited negative ions which are produced in the reaction of thermal electrons and molecules which have been vibrationally excited in an isotope selective manner. This method is especially applicable to molecules represented by the formula MF 6 wherein M is selected from the group consisting of U, S, W, Se, Te, Mo, Re and Tc

  11. UWIS isotope separator

    Wojtasiewicz, A. [Warsaw Univ., Inst. of Experimental Physics, Nuclear Physics Div., Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Since 1995 the University of Warsaw Isotope Separator group has participated in the ISOL/IGISOL project at the Heavy Ion Cyclotron. This project consists in installation of an isotope separator (on line with cyclotron heavy ion beam) with a hot plasma ion source (ISOL system) and/or with an ion guide source (IGISOL system). In the report the short description of the present status of the project is presented. 2 figs, 10 refs.

  12. Laser isotope separation process

    Kaldor, A.

    1976-01-01

    The claimed invention is a method of isotope separation based on the unimolecular decomposition of vibrationally excited negative ions which are produced in the reaction of thermal electrons and molecules which have been vibrationally excited in an isotope selective manner. This method is especially applicable to molecules represented by the formula MF 6 wherein M is selected from the group consisting of U, S, W, Se, Te, Mo, Re, and Tc. 9 claims, 1 drawing figure

  13. Isotopes in environmental research

    Bowen, G.; Rozanski, K.; Vose, P.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive and stable isotopes have long been considered a very efficient tool for studying physical and biological aspects of how the global ecosystem functions. Their applications in environmental research are numerous, embracing research at all levels. This article looks at only a few of the approaches to environmental problems that involve the use of isotopes. Special attention is given to studies of the Amazon Basin. Environmental isotopes are very efficient tools in water cycle studies. Tritium, a radioactive tracer, is especially useful in studying dynamics of water movement in different compartments of the hydrosphere, both on the local and global scales. Heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen (deuterium and oxygen-18) provide information about steady-state characteristics of the water cycle. Isotope methods, some relatively new, have a major role in site-specific studies. Some indicative examples include: Studying turnover of organic matter. Changes in the carbon-13/carbon-12 isotopic ratio of organic matter were used to determine the respective contributions of organic carbon derived from forest and pasture. Studying biological nitrogen fixation. One of the ways nitrogen levels in soil can be maintained for productivity is by biological nitrogen fixation. Studying nitrogen availability and losses. The experimental use of nitrogen-15 is invaluable for defining losses of soil nitrogen to the atmosphere and to groundwater. Studies can similarly be done with stable and radioactive sulphur isotopes. This article indicates some potential uses of isotopes in environmental research. While the major problem of global climate change has not been specifically addressed here, the clearing of the Amazon forest, one focus of the IAEA's environmental programme, may have serious consequences for the global climate. These include substantial reduction of the amount of latent heat transported to the regions outside the tropics and acceleration of the greenhouse

  14. Isotopes in everyday life

    Seligman, H.; Gillen, V.A.

    1990-12-01

    Isotopes represent a tool which can do certain jobs better, easier, quicker, more simply and cheaper than competitive methods. Some measurements could not be done at all without the use of isotopes as there are no alternative methods available. A short review of these tools of science in their different fields is given: food and agriculture, human health applications, industry, hydrology, geology, geochemistry, geophysics and dating, environment, basic scientific research

  15. Isotope separation process

    Cabicar, J.; Stamberg, K.; Katzer, J.

    1983-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by the method of controlled distribution is claimed. A first phase is either a solution of isotopic components and a ligand (from 10 - 6 M to a saturated solution), or a gaseous mixture of isotopic components, or a gaseous mixture of isotopic components and an inert gas. The isotopes are in the starting mixture in molar ratio from 1:10 5 to 1:10 - 5 . The second phase is a solid sorbent such as styrene-divinylbenzene ion exchangers, or bio-sorbents on the basis of mycelium of lower fungi and sorbents on the basis of cellulose, or an extraction agent such as tributyl phosphate and trioctyl amine, if need be, kept by a carrier such as teflon, silica gel and cellulose. The two-phase system exhibits non-linear equilibrium isotherm for sorption and/or desorption or for extraction and/or re-extraction. After bringing both phases into contact the rate of transport of isotopic components from one phase into another is not equal. Retardation of isotopic exchange takes place by complexation of isotopes with ligands such as cabonate, sulphate, citrate, chloride and ethylenediamine tetraacetate ions, or by using sorbents and extraction agents with chelating functional groups such as carboxyl and hyroxyl groups, groups on the basis of phosphorus, nitrogen and sulphur and/or by operating in darkness, or in the light having wave length between 2.5x10 2 and 10 9 nm. The contact time is between 10 - 2 and 10 6 s, temperature between 10 2 and 10 3 K, the number of stirrer revolutions between 10 - 2 and 10 4 revolutions per s, flow rate at column arrangement between 10 - 6 and 10 - 1 m/s and the size of particles of sorbent between 10 - 6 and 10 - 2 m

  16. Permeability of hydrogen isotopes through Pd-Ag membrane

    Yoshida, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    This paper represents the permeabilities, diffusion coefficients and isotope effects for hydrogen and deuterium through Pd-25 wt.% Ag alloy tubes The feed gas H 2 or D 2 flowing into the permeation cell was preheated before it reached to the outer surface of the permeation tube made of palladium-silver alloy. Permeation time lag method could be successfully carried out with the present apparatus to measure both permeability and diffusion coefficient. The square-root pressure dependence for the permeation of hydrogen isotopes was observed. The observed systematic temperature dependence indicates that the approximation of the Arrhenius' relation was effective within this experimental conditions. Some tendency of permeation fluxes in relation to the reciprocal temperature, 1/T, was seen. The permeability ratio was larger than the square root of isotopic mass ratio, and it decreased with temperature rise. On the contrary, the diffusion coefficient ratio was much smaller than the square root of isotopic mass ratio. (Kato, T.)

  17. Isotopic and chemical characterization of coal in Pakistan

    Qureshi, R.M.; Hasany, S.M.; Javed, T.; Sajjad, M.I.; Shah, Z.; Rehman, H.

    1993-11-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (delta/sup 13/C PDB) and toxic/trace element concentration levels are determined for Tertiary coal samples collected from seven coal fields in Pakistan. No systematic isotope effects are found in the process of coal liquefaction from peat to Tertiary lignites and sub bituminous coal. Similarly, no age effects are observed during the Tertiary regime. The observed variations in the carbon isotopic composition of coal obtained from 'Sharigh coal field' and the 'Sor-Range/Degari coal field' in Baluchistan are attributed to the depositional environments. More sampling of stable carbon isotope analysis are required to validate these observations. Significant concentrations of toxic elements such as S, Cr, Cd and Pb in Makarwal coal may pose environmental and engineering/operational problems for thermal power plants. (author)

  18. Inverse isotope effect in iron-based superconductor

    Shirage, Parasharam M.; Kihou, Kunihiro; Miyazawa, Kiichi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kito, Hijiri; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasumoto; Iyo, Akira

    2010-01-01

    We have found that (Ba, K)Fe 2 As 2 superconductor (a transition temperature, T c ∼ 38 K) shows an inverse Iron isotope effect (α Fe = -0.18 ± 0.03, where T c ∼ M -αFe and M is the iron isotope mass), i.e. the sample containing the larger iron mass depicts higher T c . Systematic studies using three types of Fe-isotopes ( 54 Fe, natural Fe and 57 Fe) reveal a clear inverse shift on T c by measurements of temperature dependent magnetization and resistivity. The inverse isotope effect that is the first case in high-T c superconductors strongly suggests that superconducting mechanism of the iron-based system is not explained by conventional BCS theory mediated by phonons.

  19. Tritium isotope fractionation in biological systems and in analytical procedures

    Kim, M.A.; Baumgaertner, Franz

    1989-01-01

    The organically bound tritium (OBT) is evaluated in biological systems by determining the tritium distribution ratio (R-value), i.e. tritium concentrations in organic substance to cell water. The determination of the R-value always involves isotope fractionation is applied analytical procedures and hence the evaluation of the true OBT -value in a given biological system appears more complicated than hitherto known in the literature. The present work concentrates on the tritium isotope fractionation in the cell water separation and on the resulting effects on the R-value. The analytical procedures examined are vacuum freeze drying under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions and azeotropic distillation. The vaporization isotope effects are determined separately in the phase transition of solid or liquid to gas in pure tritium water systems as well as in real biological systems, e.g. corn plant. The results are systematically analyzed and the influence of isotope effects on the R-value is rigorously quantified

  20. Isotopic composition of fission gases in LWR fuel

    Jonsson, T.

    2000-01-01

    Many fuel rods from power reactors and test reactors have been punctured during past years for determination of fission gas release. In many cases the released gas was also analysed by mass spectrometry. The isotopic composition shows systematic variations between different rods, which are much larger than the uncertainties in the analysis. This paper discusses some possibilities and problems with use of the isotopic composition to decide from which part of the fuel the gas was released. In high burnup fuel from thermal reactors loaded with uranium fuel a significant part of the fissions occur in plutonium isotopes. The ratio Xe/Kr generated in the fuel is strongly dependent on the fissioning species. In addition, the isotopic composition of Kr and Xe shows a well detectable difference between fissions in different fissile nuclides. (author)

  1. Isotope separation apparatus

    Lyon, R.K.; Eisner, P.N.; Thomas, W.R.I.

    1983-01-01

    This application discloses a method for and an apparatus in which isotopes of an element in a compared are separated from each other while that compound, i.e., including a mixture of such isotopes, flows along a predetermined path. The apparatus includes a flow tube having a beginning and an end. The mixture of isotopes is introduced into the flow tube at a first introduction point between the beginning and the end thereof to flow the mixture toward the end thereof. A laser irradiates the flow tube dissociating compounds of a preselected one of said isotopes thereby converting the mixture in an isotopically selective manner. The dissociation products are removed from the tube at a first removal point between the first introduction point and the end. The dissociation product removed at the the first removal point are reconverted back into the comound thereby providing a first stage enriched compound. This first stage enriched compound is reintroduced into the flow tube at a second introduction point between the beginning thereof and the first introduction point. Further product is removed from the flow tube at a second removal point between the second introduction point and the first introduction point. The second introduction point is chosen so that the isotope composition of the first stage enriched compound is approximately the same as that of the compound in the flow tube

  2. International Isotopes Markets

    Stanislaw Z. Zhiznin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies world markets of stable and radioactive isotopes. Isotopes have found various applications in science, industry, agriculture and other sectors of the economy, but especially - in medicine. Nuclear medicine is developing intensively all over the world thanks to the success in the treatment of various diseases with the help of radioactive pharmaceuticals (radiopharmaceuticals. The article uses empirical data from a forecast study of the global radiopharmaceuticals market made in 2015 by a research company «Markets and Markets» for the European, North American and global markets. The paper also analyzes the statistical data on the global export and import of natural uranium, enriched and depleted uranium, plutonium, thorium and some stable isotopes of non-medical purposes, presented by a company «Trend economy» in 2014. Despite a unique industrial base for the production of isotopes created in the Soviet Union Russia occupies a modest position on the world market of nuclear medicine except for certain areas. More than 80% of isotopes, produced in USSR were consumed domestically, the export of the stable and radioactive isotopes was in equal proportions. Now the country's domestic radiopharmaceuticals market is poorly developed. To radically change the situation, it is necessary to carry out reforms that stimulate the development of nuclear medicine.

  3. Beneficial use of isotopes

    Bertel, E.; Stevens, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper gives an outlook on the main isotopes currently used for beneficial applications, provides an overview on geographic distribution of isotope production capabilities and identifies the main suppliers world-wide. It analyses trends in different countries and regions, including the refurbishment and/or replacement of ageing facilities and the implementation of new capabilities. Issues related to adequate supply of isotopes and potential under or over capacity of production for some key products are discussed. The evolution of the isotope production sector is analysed. Issues such as lowering of governmental support to production facilities, emergence of international co-operation and agreements on production capabilities, and developments in non-OECD/NEA countries are addressed. The paper offers some concluding remarks on the importance of maintaining and enhancing beneficial uses of isotopes, the role of government policies, the need for co-operation between countries and between the private and public sectors. The paper addresses the role of international cooperation in making efficient use of existing isotope production capacity and investigates ways for reducing the need for investment in additional capacity. (author)

  4. Isotope and multiband effects in layered superconductors.

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Keller, Hugo

    2012-06-13

    In this review we consider three classes of superconductors, namely cuprate superconductors, MgB(2) and the new Fe based superconductors. All of these three systems are layered materials and multiband compounds. Their pairing mechanisms are under discussion with the exception of MgB(2), which is widely accepted to be a 'conventional' electron-phonon interaction mediated superconductor, but extending the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory to account for multiband effects. Cuprates and Fe based superconductors have higher superconducting transition temperatures and more complex structures. Superconductivity is doping dependent in these material classes unlike in MgB(2) which, as a pure compound, has the highest values of T(c) and a rapid suppression of superconductivity with doping takes place. In all three material classes isotope effects have been observed, including exotic ones in the cuprates, and controversial ones in the Fe based materials. Before the area of high-temperature superconductivity, isotope effects on T(c) were the signature for phonon mediated superconductivity-even when deviations from the BCS value to smaller values were observed. Since the discovery of high T(c) materials this is no longer evident since competing mechanisms might exist and other mediating pairing interactions are discussed which are of purely electronic origin. In this work we will compare the three different material classes and especially discuss the experimentally observed isotope effects of all three systems and present a rather general analysis of them. Furthermore, we will concentrate on multiband signatures which are not generally accepted in cuprates even though they are manifest in various experiments, the evidence for those in MgB(2), and indications for them in the Fe based compounds. Mostly we will consider experimental data, but when possible also discuss theoretical models which are suited to explain the data.

  5. Mass spectrometric determination of magnesium isotopic ratios and its corrections for electron multiplier discrimination and mass fractionation

    Deng Zhongguo

    1989-01-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of magnesium isotopic ratios by the use of uranyl nitrate added to magnesium samples to act as a binding agent is reported. Prebaking empty filaments and preheating filaments with deposited magnesium samples on its surface in a vacuum are employed to reduce the Na signal from the thenium-ribbon. Methods for correcting magnesium isotopic ratios for electron multiplier discrimination and mass fractionation are described in detail. The results of the determination of natural magnesium isotopic ratios are 25 Mg/ 24 Mg = 0.12660 (1±0.01%) and 26 Mg/ 24 Mg = 0.13938 (1±0.10%). The magnesium isotopic ratios of rich - 26 Mg-2 sample and rich- 25 Mg-1 sample are 24 Mg/ 26 Mg = 0.003463 (1±0.2%), 25 Mg/ 26 Mg = 0.001656 (±0.2%) and 24 Mg/ 25 Mg = 0.006716 (1±0.2%), 26 Mg/ 25 Mg = 0.007264 (1±0.2%) respectively

  6. Nickel distribution and isotopic fractionation in a Brazilian lateritic regolith: Coupling Ni isotopes and Ni K-edge XANES

    Ratié, G.; Garnier, J.; Calmels, D.; Vantelon, D.; Guimarães, E.; Monvoisin, G.; Nouet, J.; Ponzevera, E.; Quantin, C.

    2018-06-01

    Ultramafic (UM) rocks are known to be nickel (Ni) rich and to weather quickly, which makes them a good candidate to look at the Ni isotope systematics during weathering processes at the Earth's surface. The present study aims at identifying the Ni solid speciation and discussing the weathering processes that produce Ni isotope fractionation in two deep laterite profiles under tropical conditions (Barro Alto, Goiás State, Brazil). While phyllosilicates and to a lower extent goethite are the main Ni-bearing phases in the saprolitic part of the profile, iron (Fe) oxides dominate the Ni budget in the lateritic unit. Nickel isotopic composition (δ60Ni values) has been measured in each unit of the regolith, i.e., rock, saprock, saprolite and laterite (n = 52). δ60Ni varies widely within the two laterite profiles, from -0.10 ± 0.05‰ to 1.43 ± 0.05‰, showing that significant Ni isotope fractionation occurs during the weathering of UM rocks. Overall, our results show that during weathering, the solid phase is depleted in heavy Ni isotopes due to the preferential sorption and incorporation of light Ni isotopes into Fe oxides; the same mechanisms likely apply to the incorporation of Ni into phyllosilicates (type 2:1). However, an isotopically heavy Ni pool is observed in the solid phase at the bottom of the saprolitic unit. This feature can be explained by two hypotheses that are not mutually exclusive: (i) a depletion in light Ni isotopes during the first stage of weathering due to the preferential dissolution of light Ni-containing minerals, and (ii) the sorption or incorporation of isotopically heavy Ni carried by percolating waters (groundwater samples have δ60Ni of 2.20 and 2.27‰), that were enriched in heavy Ni isotopes due to successive weathering processes in the overlying soil and laterite units.

  7. Pb isotopic composition of the atmosphere of the Sao Paulo city, Brazil, and isotopic characterization of some pollutant sources

    Aily, C.; Babinski, M.; Ruiz, I.R.; Sato, K

    2001-01-01

    Lead isotopes are known to be good tools for surveying lead origin in atmospheric samples (Chow et al., 1975). Lead has four naturally occurring stable isotopes: 206 Pb, 207 Pb, 208 Pb and 204 Pb. The first three isotopes are end products of radioactive decay chains from 238 U, 235 U and 232 Th, respectively, and the last one is non-radiogenic. Therefore, their abundance and the ratios among the four isotopes gradually change with time. Lead in the atmosphere comes from various sources, such as leaded gasoline, industrial emissions and coal combustion. Thus, lead isotope ratios different from those of the mother rock in the region are often observed in the atmosphere (Tatsumoto and Patterson, 1963). Lead is emitted to the atmosphere in fine particles, which can be transported within air masses for very long distances, e. g. from mid latitude regions to the Artic and Antarctica (Sturges and Barrie, 1989). Lead isotopes have been used to trace the pollutant sources in many cities of the world. However, a systematic study using this methodology has not been done in any Brazilian city. The main purpose of the present work is to characterize the Pb isotope composition in the atmosphere in Sao Paulo city, and suggest the possible pollutant sources. For our study lead isotopes were measured in different samples: aerosols and rainwater which would yield the Pb isotope composition of the atmosphere. Samples of gasoline and ethanol, gutter sweepings, soot from vehicle exhaust pipes, and filters containing particulate material from industrial emissions were also analyzed, since they were considered potential pollutant sources of the atmosphere. In order to obtain the local geogenic Pb isotopic composition we also analyzed rock and K-feldspar samples. Lead concentrations were only determined on aerosols and rainwater samples (au)

  8. Using Fast Hot Shock Wave Consolidation Technology to Produce Superconducting MgB2

    T. Gegechkori

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The original hot shock wave assisted consolidation method combining high temperature was applied with the two-stage explosive process without any further sintering to produce superconducting materials with high density and integrity. The consolidation of MgB2 billets was performed at temperatures above the Mg melting point and up to 1000oC in partially liquid condition of Mg-2B blend powders. The influence of the type of boron (B isotope in the composition on critical temperature and superconductive properties was evaluated. An example of a hybrid Cu-MgB2–Cu superconducting tube is demonstrated and conclusions are discussed.

  9. Al-doped MgB_2 materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB_2) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB_2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB_2. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB_2 disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  10. Isotope analytics for the evaluation of the feeding influence on the isotope ratio in beef samples; Isotopenanalytik zur Bestimmung des Einflusses der Ernaehrung auf die Isotopenzusammensetzung in Rinderproben

    Herwig, Nadine

    2010-11-17

    Information about the origin of food and associated production systems has a high significance for food control. An extremely promising approach to obtain such information is the determination of isotope ratios of different elements. In this study the correlation of the isotope ratios C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, Mg-25/Mg-24, and Sr-87/Sr-86 in bovine samples (milk and urine) and the corresponding isotope ratios in feed was investigated. It was shown that in the bovine samples all four isotope ratios correlate with the isotope composition of the feed. The isotope ratios of strontium and magnesium have the advantage that they directly reflect the isotope ratios of the ingested feed since there is no isotope fractionation in the bovine organism which is in contrast to the case of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. From the present feeding study it is evident, that a feed change leads to a significant change in the delta C-13 values in milk and urine within 10 days already. For the deltaN-15 values the feed change was only visible in the bovine urine after 49 days. Investigations of cows from two different regions (Berlin/Germany and Goestling/Austria) kept at different feeding regimes revealed no differences in the N-15/N-14 and Mg-26/Mg-24 isotope ratios. The strongest correlation between the isotope ratio of the bovine samples and the kind of ingested feed was observed for the carbon isotope ratio. With this ratio even smallest differences in the feed composition were traceable in the bovine samples. Since different regions usually coincide with different feeding regimes, carbon isotope ratios can be used to distinguish bovine samples from different regions if the delta C-13 values of the ingested feed are different. Furthermore, the determination of strontium isotope ratios revealed significant differences between bovine and feed samples of Berlin and Goestling due to the different geologic realities. Hence the carbon and strontium isotope ratios allow the best

  11. Myasthenia Gravis (MG): Medical Management

    ... take effect, prior to surgery or for myasthenic crisis. However, some people receive regular plasmapheresis or IVIg as a supplement to immunosuppressant drugs. Pregnancy In rare cases, pregnancy appears to trigger the onset of MG. ...

  12. Trace-element and Nd-isotope systematics in detrital apatite of the Po river catchment: Implications for provenance discrimination and the lag-time approach to detrital thermochronology

    Malusà, Marco G.; Wang, Jiangang; Garzanti, Eduardo; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Villa, Igor M.; Wittmann, Hella

    2017-10-01

    Detrital thermochronology is often employed to assess the evolutionary stage of an entire orogenic belt using the lag-time approach, i.e., the difference between the cooling and depositional ages of detrital mineral grains preserved in a stratigraphic succession. The impact of different eroding sources to the final sediment sink is controlled by several factors, including the short-term erosion rate and the mineral fertility of eroded bedrock. Here, we use apatite fertility data and cosmogenic-derived erosion rates in the Po river catchment (Alps-Apennines) to calculate the expected percentage of apatite grains supplied to the modern Po delta from the major Alpine and Apenninic eroding sources. We test these predictions by using a cutting-edge dataset of trace-element and Nd-isotope signatures on 871 apatite grains from 14 modern sand samples, and we use apatite fission-track data to validate our geochemical approach to provenance discrimination. We found that apatite grains shed from different sources are geochemically distinct. Apatites from the Lepontine dome in the Central Alps show relative HREE enrichment, lower concentrations in Ce and U, and higher 147Sm/144Nd ratios compared to apatites derived from the External Massifs. Derived provenance budgets point to a dominant apatite contribution to the Po delta from the high-fertility Lepontine dome, consistent with the range independently predicted from cosmonuclide and mineral-fertility data. Our results demonstrate that the single-mineral record in the final sediment sink can be largely determined by high-fertility source rocks exposed in rapidly eroding areas within the drainage. This implies that the detrital thermochronology record may reflect processes affecting relatively small parts of the orogenic system under consideration. A reliable approach to lag-time analysis would thus benefit from an independent provenance discrimination of dated mineral grains, which may allow to proficiently reconsider many

  13. Study of yrast bands and electromagnetic properties in neutron-rich 114-128Cd isotopes

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Pandit, Rakesh K.; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2018-02-01

    The projected shell model framework has been employed to carry out a systematic study on the deformation systematics of E (21+) and E (41+) / E (21+) values, BCS subshell occupation numbers, yrast spectra, backbending phenomena and electromagnetic quantities in 114-128Cd isotopes. Present calculations reproduce the observed systematics of the E (21+), R42 and B (E 2 ;2+ →0+) values for 114-128Cd isotopic mass chain and give the evidence that deformation increases as one moves from 114Cd to 118Cd, thereafter it decreases up to 126Cd. This in turn confirms 118Cd to be the most deformed nucleus in this set of isotopic mass chain. The emergence of backbending, decrease in B (E 2) values and change in g-factors in all these isotopes are intimately related to the crossing of g-band by 2-qp bands.

  14. Salt effects on isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications: An overview

    Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Fortier, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Essential to the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers and geothermometers is the knowledge of equilibrium isotope partitioning between different phases and species, which is usually a function of temperature only. The one exception known to date is oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation between liquid water and other phases (steam, gases, minerals), which changes upon the addition of salts to water, i.e., the isotope salt salt effect. Our knowledge of this effect, the difference between activity and composition (a-X) of isotopic water molecules in salt solutions, is very limited and controversial, especially at elevated temperatures. For the last several years, we have been conducting a detailed, systematic experimental study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the isotope salt effects from room temperature to elevated temperatures (currently to 500 degree C). From this effort, a simple, coherent picture of the isotope salt effect is emerging, that differs markedly from the complex results reported in the literature. In this communication, we present an overview on the isotope salt effect, obtained chiefly from our study. Observed isotope salt effects in salt solutions are significant even at elevated temperatures. The importance and implications of the isotope salt effect for isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems are also discussed in general terms

  15. Diffusion-driven magnesium and iron isotope fractionation in Hawaiian olivine

    Teng, F.-Z.; Dauphas, N.; Helz, R.T.; Gao, S.; Huang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion plays an important role in Earth sciences to estimate the timescales of geological processes such as erosion, sediment burial, and magma cooling. In igneous systems, these diffusive processes are recorded in the form of crystal zoning. However, meaningful interpretation of these signatures is often hampered by the fact that they cannot be unambiguously ascribed to a single process (e.g., magmatic fractionation, diffusion limited transport in the crystal or in the liquid). Here we show that Mg and Fe isotope fractionations in olivine crystals can be used to trace diffusive processes in magmatic systems. Over sixty olivine fragments from Hawaiian basalts show isotopically fractionated Mg and Fe relative to basalts worldwide, with up to 0.4??? variation in 26Mg/24Mg ratios and 1.6??? variation in 56Fe/54Fe ratios. The linearly and negatively correlated Mg and Fe isotopic compositions [i.e., ??56Fe=(??3.3??0.3)????26Mg], co-variations of Mg and Fe isotopic compositions with Fe/Mg ratios of olivine fragments, and modeling results based on Mg and Fe elemental profiles demonstrate the coupled Mg and Fe isotope fractionation to be a manifestation of Mg-Fe inter-diffusion in zoned olivines during magmatic differentiation. This characteristic can be used to constrain the nature of mineral zoning in igneous and metamorphic rocks, and hence determine the residence times of crystals in magmas, the composition of primary melts, and the duration of metamorphic events. With improvements in methodology, in situ isotope mapping will become an essential tool of petrology to identify diffusion in crystals. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Contamination risk of stable isotope samples during milling.

    Isaac-Renton, M; Schneider, L; Treydte, K

    2016-07-15

    Isotope analysis of wood is an important tool in dendrochronology and ecophysiology. Prior to mass spectrometry analysis, wood must be homogenized, and a convenient method involves a ball mill capable of milling samples directly in sample tubes. However, sample-tube plastic can contaminate wood during milling, which could lead to biological misinterpretations. We tested possible contamination of whole wood and cellulose samples during ball-mill homogenization for carbon and oxygen isotope measurements. We used a multi-factorial design with two/three steel milling balls, two sample amounts (10 mg, 40 mg), and two milling times (5 min, 10 min). We further analyzed abrasion by milling empty tubes, and measured the isotope ratios of pure contaminants. A strong risk exists for carbon isotope bias through plastic contamination: the δ(13) C value of polypropylene deviated from the control by -6.77‰. Small fibers from PTFE filter bags used during cellulose extraction also present a risk as the δ(13) C value of this plastic deviated by -5.02‰. Low sample amounts (10 mg) showed highest contamination due to increased abrasion during milling (-1.34‰), which is further concentrated by cellulose extraction (-3.38‰). Oxygen isotope measurements were unaffected. A ball mill can be used to homogenize samples within test tubes prior to oxygen isotope analysis, but not prior to carbon or radiocarbon isotope analysis. There is still a need for a fast, simple and contamination-free sample preparation procedure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. High-precision masses of 29-33Mg and the N=20 shell ''closure''

    Lunney, D.; Audi, G.; Gaulard, C.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Vieira, N.

    2006-01-01

    High-precision mass measurements have been performed on the exotic magnesium isotopes 29-33 Mg using the MISTRAL radiofrequency spectrometer, especially suited for very short-lived nuclides. This method, combined with the powerful tool of resonant laser ionization at ISOLDE, has provided a significant reduction of uncertainty for the masses of the most exotic Mg isotopes: a relative error of 7 x 10 -7 was achieved for the weakly produced 33 Mg that has a half-life of only 90 ms. Moreover, the mass of 33 Mg is found to change by over 250 keV. Verifying and minimizing binding energy uncertainties in this region of the nuclear chart is important for understanding the lack of binding energy that is normally associated with magic numbers. (orig.)

  18. Genesis of Cenozoic intraplate high Mg# andesites in Northeast China

    Liu, J. Q.; Chen, L. H.; Zhong, Y.; Wang, X. J.

    2017-12-01

    High-Mg# andesites (HMAs) are usually generated in the converged plate boundary and have genetic relationships with slab subduction. However, it still remained controversial about the origin of those HMAs erupted in the intra-plate setting. Here we present major, trace element, and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions for the Cenozoic intra-plate HMAs from Northeast China to constrain their origin and formation process. Cenozoic Xunke volcanic rocks are located in the northern Lesser Khingan Range, covering an area of about 3, 000 km2. These volcanic rocks are mainly basaltic andesite and basaltic trachyandesite, with only several classified as trachyandesite and andesites. They have high SiO2 contents (54.3-57.4 wt%) and Mg# (49.6-57.8), falling into the scope of high Mg# andesites. The Xunke HMAs are enriched in large ion lithophile elements but depleted in high field strength elements, with positive Ba, K, Sr and negative Zr-Hf, and Ti anomalies. Their trace element absolute concentrations are between those of potassic basalts and Wuchagou HMAs. The Xunke HMAs have relatively enriched Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes (87Sr/86Sr = 0.705398-0.705764, ɛNd=-8.8-3.8, ɛHf=0.5-11.7), and low radiogenic Pb isotopes (206Pb/204Pb = 16.701-17.198), towards to the EM1 end-member, which indicates that they are ultimately derived from ancient, recycled crustal components. Primitive silica-rich melts were generated from higher degrees of partial melting of recycled crustal materials (relative to potassic basalts) and then interacted with the peridotite to produce the Xunke HMAs.

  19. Transportation of medical isotopes

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  20. Isotope separation process

    Wexler, Sol; Young, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    Description is given of method for separating a specific isotope from a mixture of isotopes of an actinide element present as MF 6 , wherein M is the actinide element. It comprises: preparing a feed gas mixture of MF 6 in a propellant gas; passing the feed gas mixture under pressure through an expansion nozzle while heating the mixture to about 600 0 C; releasing the heated gas mixture from the nozzle into an exhaust chamber having a reduced pressure, whereby a gas jet of MF 6 molecules, MF 6 molecular clusters and propellant gas molecules is formed, the MF 6 molecules having a translational energy of about 3 eV; converting the MF 6 molecules to MF 6 ions by passing the jet through a cross jet of electron donor atoms so that an electron transfer takes place between the MF 6 - molecules and the electron donor atoms whereby the jet is now quasi-neutral, containing negative MF 6 - ions and positive donor ions; passing the quasi-neutral jet through a radiofrequency mass filter tuned to separate the MF 6 ions containing the specific isotope from the MF 6 - ions of the other isotopes and neutralizing and collecting the MF 6 molecules of the specific isotope [fr

  1. Noncovalent Hydrogen Isotope Effects

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Breslavskaya, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Zero-point energies (ZPE) and isotope effects, induced by intermolecular, noncovalent vibrations, are computed and tested by experimental data. The ZPE differences of H- and D-complexes of water with hydrogen, methane, and water molecules are about 100-300 cal/mol; they result to isotope effects IE of 1.20-1.70. Semi-ionic bonds between metal ions and water ligands in M(H2O) 6 2+ complexes are much stronger; their ZPEs are about 12-14 kcal/mol per molecule and result to IE of 1.9-2.1 at 300 K. Protonated (deuterated) water and biwater exhibit the largest ZPE differences and isotope effects; the latter are 25-28 and 12-13 for water and biwater, respectively. Noncovalent IEs contribute markedly into the experimentally measured effects and explain many anomalous and even magic properties of the effects, such as the dependence of IE on the solvents and on the presence of the third substances, enormously large isotope effects at the mild conditions, the difference between IEs measured in the reactions of individual protiated and deuterated compounds and those measured in their mixture. Noncovalent IEs are not negligible and should be taken into account to make correct and substantiated conclusions on the reaction mechanisms. The kinetic equations are derived for the total isotope effects, which include noncovalent IEs as additive factors.

  2. Transportation of medical isotopes

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document

  3. Isotope methods in hydrology

    Moser, H.; Rauert, W.

    1980-01-01

    Of the investigation methods used in hydrology, tracer methods hold a special place as they are the only ones which give direct insight into the movement and distribution processes taking place in surface and ground waters. Besides the labelling of water with salts and dyes, as in the past, in recent years the use of isotopes in hydrology, in water research and use, in ground-water protection and in hydraulic engineering has increased. This by no means replaces proven methods of hydrological investigation but tends rather to complement and expand them through inter-disciplinary cooperation. The book offers a general introduction to the application of various isotope methods to specific hydrogeological and hydrological problems. The idea is to place the hydrogeologist and the hydrologist in the position to recognize which isotope method will help him solve his particular problem or indeed, make a solution possible at all. He should also be able to recognize what the prerequisites are and what work and expenditure the use of such methods involves. May the book contribute to promoting cooperation between hydrogeologists, hydrologists, hydraulic engineers and isotope specialists, and thus supplement proven methods of investigation in hydrological research and water utilization and protection wherever the use of isotope methods proves to be of advantage. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Calcium and Titanium Isotope Fractionation in CAIS: Tracers of Condensation and Inheritance in the Early Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    Simon, J. I.; Jordan, M. K.; Tappa, M. J.; Kohl, I. E.; Young, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) can be used to understand the conditions present in the protoplantary disk where they formed. The isotopic compositions of these early-formed nebular materials are largely controlled by chemical volatility. The isotopic effects of evaporation/sublimation, which are well explained by both theory and experimental work, lead to enrichments of the heavy isotopes that are often exhibited by the moderately refractory elements Mg and Si. Less well understood are the isotopic effects of condensation, which limits our ability to determine whether a CAI is a primary condensate and/or retains any evidence of its primordial formation history.

  5. Separation of uranium isotopes by accelerated isotope exchange reactions

    Seko, M.; Miyake, T.; Inada, K.; Ochi, K.; Sakamoto, T.

    1977-01-01

    A novel catalyst for isotope exchange reaction between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) compounds enables acceleration of the reaction rate as much as 3000 times to make industrial separation of uranium isotopes economically possible

  6. Pb and Sr isotopic compositions of ancient pottery: a method to discriminate production sites

    Zhang Xun; Chen Jiangfeng; Ma Lin; He Jianfeng; Wang Changsui; Qiu Ping

    2004-01-01

    The discriminating of production sites of ancient pottery samples using multi-isotopic systematics was described. Previous work has proven that Pb isotopic ratios can be used for discriminating the production sites of ancient pottery under certain conditions. The present work suggests that although Nd isotopic ratios are not sensitive to the production sites of ancient pottery, Sr isotopic ratios are important for the purpose. Pb isotopic ratios are indistinguishable for the pottery excavated from the Jiahu relict, Wuyang, Henan Province and for famous Qin Terra-cotta Figures. But, the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios for the former (about 0.715) are significantly lower than that of the latter (0.717-0.718). The authors concluded that a combined use of Pb and Sr isotopes would be a more powerful method for discriminating the production site of ancient pottery. (authors)

  7. Variations in Urine Calcium Isotope: Composition Reflect Changes in Bone Mineral Balance in Humans

    Skulan, Joseph; Anbar, Ariel; Bullen, Thomas; Puzas, J. Edward; Shackelford, Linda; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in bone mineral balance cause rapid and systematic changes in the calcium isotope composition of human urine. Urine from subjects in a 17 week bed rest study was analyzed for calcium isotopic composition. Comparison of isotopic data with measurements of bone mineral density and metabolic markers of bone metabolism indicates the calcium isotope composition of urine reflects changes in bone mineral balance. Urine calcium isotope composition probably is affected by both bone metabolism and renal processes. Calcium isotope. analysis of urine and other tissues may provide information on bone mineral balance that is in important respects better than that available from other techniques, and illustrates the usefulness of applying geochemical techniques to biomedical problems.

  8. Stable Isotope Group 1982 progress report

    Stewart, M.K.

    1983-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences during 1982, in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and mass spectrometer instrumentation, is described

  9. Stable Isotope Group 1983 progress report

    Stewart, M.K.

    1984-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and related fields, and mass spectrometer instrumentation, during 1983, is described

  10. Isotope separation system

    Lehmann, J.-C.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of an isotope separation device comprising a system for converting into gaseous form a first and second isotope to be separated, a monochromatic excitation light source to excite the gaseous molecules of these two isotopes in a distinct manner, a first and second receiver to collect selectively the molecules of the first and second distinctly excited isotopes. The frequency FL of the excitation light is selected between a lower limit and a higher limit F2 + 1/2 LD, depending on the frequences F1 and F2 of two absorption lines near this first and second isotope. The difference DF between these two frequencies F1 and F2 is less than the Doppler width LD of each one of these lines and greater than the natural width LN of each of these two lines and also the width of line LR of the excitation light source. The probability that the molecules will be excited by this light depends on the direction of their displacement to a major and different extent for both isotopes. An ionising light source LI is set up to irradiate the seat of interaction between the excitation light and the gaseous molecules with an ionisation light able to ionise the excited molecules without ionising the molecules that are not excited. The receivers are able to collect selectively the ionised molecules. A sufficiently low gas pressure is selected for the distance between the place of interaction and the first receiver to be less than double the free mean travel of the molecules in the gas [fr

  11. Climate and isotopic tracers

    Jean-Baptiste, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The applications of natural radioactivity and isotopic measurements in the sciences concerning Earth and its atmosphere, are numerous: carbon 14 dating with the Tandetron apparatus at the Cea, measurement of oxygen 18 in coral or sediment limestone for the determination of ocean temperature and salinity, carbon 14 dating of corals for the determination of sea level variations, deuterium content in polar ice-cap leads to temperature variations determination; isotopic measurements also enable the determination of present climate features such as global warming, oceanic general circulation

  12. Method to separate isotopes

    Coenen, H.; Neuschuetz, D.

    1980-01-01

    An extraction by means of supercritical pure gases (e.g. CD 2 ) or gas mixtures is proposed to separate isotopes, especially H/D, Li-6/Li-7, and U-235/U-238, and water or benzol is used as entrainer. The extraction shall be carried out at pressure rates of about 350 bar above the critical pressure with the temperature being by up to 100 0 C above the critical temperature. A NaCl-solution and the change of the isotopic ratio Cl-35/Cl-37 are investigated for example purpose. (UWI) [de

  13. Environmental isotope survey

    Jacovides, J.S.

    1979-03-01

    Work was initiated on the 1st of September 1971 with the objective of finding out how best to use environmental isotopes in the interpretation of the hydrology, particularly subsurface hydrology, of Cyprus through a sparse reconnaissance sampling of all the major aquifers and springs covering the whole island. The distribution of sampling was such that the survey in itself could assist in clarifying particular hydrogeologic problems, provide a better understanding of the water systems of the island, establish a general environmental isotope - framework of the hydrologic regimen of Cyprus as well as to provide the basis for specific, more detailed, studies to be undertaken subsequently

  14. Lectures in isotope geology

    Jaeger, E.; Hunziker, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Designed for a introductory course in geochronology and the geochemistry of stable isotopes, this text has been written by recognized experts in the field. Emphasis is on the interpretation and on applications, and examples of these are offered along with each technique. Extraterrestrial applications have been avoided and the treatment of pure experimentation has been kept at a minimum. This text will be appreciated by geologists who want to learn more about methods used in isotope geology, how they can be applied, and how to gauge their usefulness. (orig.) [de

  15. Excitation energy of the lowest 2+ and 3- levels in 32Mg and 146Gd

    Barranco, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    1978-06-01

    The excitation energy of the lowest 2 + and 3 - levels are calculated for neutron rich Mg-isotopes as well as for N=82 isotones. The calculations are made by assuming quadrupole-quadrupole and octupole-octupole forces. The quasi-particles energies and occupation numbers are taken from the energy density method

  16. 26Al-26Mg dating of asteroidal magmatism in the young Solar System

    Schiller, Martin; Baker, Joel A.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We present high-precision Mg isotope data for most classes of basaltic meteorites including eucrites, mesosiderite silicate clasts, angrites and the ungrouped Northwest Africa (NWA) 2976 measured by pseudo-high-resolution multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and utilisi...

  17. High mass isotope separation arrangement

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    An isotope separation arrangement for separating a preselected isotope from a mixture of chemically-identical but isotopically-different molecules by either photon-induced pure revibrational or vibronic selective excitation of the molecules containing the atoms of the isotope to be separated from a lower to a higher energy state, and a chemical reaction of the higher energy state molecules with a chemically-reactive agent to form a chemical compound containing primarily the atoms of the isotope to be separated in a physicochemical state different from the physicochemical state of the mixture of chemically-identical but isotopically-different molecules. The chemical compound containing the atoms of the isotope to be separated may be subsequently processed to obtain the isotope. The laser configuration used to generate the photon beam is fully described

  18. Isotope separation method and apparatus

    Lyon, R.K.; Eisner, P.N.; Thomas, W.R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are specified for separating a mixture of isotopes present in a compound, preferably a gaseous compound, into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes differ from the natural abundances of the isotopes in the compound. The invention particularly relates to carrying out a laser induced, isotopically selective conversion of gaseous molecules in such a manner as to achieve more than one stage of isotope separation along the length of the laser beam. As an example, the invention is applied to the separation of the isotopes of uranium in UF 6 , in which either the U-235 or U-238 isotope is selectively excited by means of irradiation from an infrared laser, and the selectively excited isotope converted into a product that can be recovered from UF 6 by one of a variety of methods that are described. (U.K.)

  19. The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae. II. Magnesium isotopes and pollution scenarios

    Thygesen, A. O.; Sbordone, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Ventura, P.; Yong, D.; Collet, R.; Christlieb, N.; Melendez, J.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The phenomenon of multiple populations in globular clusters is still far from understood, with several proposed mechanisms to explain the observed behaviour. The study of elemental and isotopic abundance patterns are crucial for investigating the differences among candidate pollution mechanisms. Aims: We derive magnesium isotopic ratios for 13 stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to provide new, detailed information about the nucleosynthesis that has occurred within the cluster. For the first time, the impact of 3D model stellar atmospheres on the derived Mg isotopic ratios is investigated. Methods: Using both tailored 1D atmospheric models and 3D hydrodynamical models, we derive magnesium isotopic ratios from four features of MgH near 5135 Å in 13 giants near the tip of the red giant branch, using high signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectra. Results: We derive the magnesium isotopic ratios for all stars and find no significant offset of the isotopic distribution between the pristine and the polluted populations. Furthermore, we do not detect any statistically significant differences in the spread in the Mg isotopes in either population. No trends were found between the Mg isotopes and [Al/Fe]. The inclusion of 3D atmospheres has a significant impact on the derived 25Mg/24Mg ratio, increasing it by a factor of up to 2.5, compared to 1D. The 26Mg/24Mg ratio, on the other hand, essentially remains unchanged. Conclusions: We confirm the results seen from other globular clusters, where no strong variation in the isotopic ratios is observed between stellar populations, for observed ranges in [Al/Fe]. We see no evidence for any significant activation of the Mg-Al burning chain. The use of 3D atmospheres causes an increase of a factor of up to 2.5 in the fraction of 25Mg, resolving part of the discrepancy between the observed isotopic fraction and the predictions from pollution models. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope

  20. Isotopic diversity in nebular dust: The distribution of Ti isotopic anomalies in carbonaceous chondrites

    Niemeyer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Average Ti isotopic patterns are derived for each class of carbonaceous chondrite from a chemically characterized suite of whole-rock samples. There is a well-resolved excess of 50 Ti in a subset of CI meteorites. Mean values of the 50 Ti excess for the four classes span a range of only 2 ε-units, with an apparent positive correlation with Al content. Previous evidence for anomalies in chondrules is augmented here by demonstrating that: (1) the more pristine Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in Efremovka show the same isotopic pattern as the typical Allende CAI; and, (2) CM and CV matrix carry 50 Ti excesses of about 2 ε-units. The distribution of Ti isotopic anomalies among matrix, chondrules, and CAIs suggests a model in which all three constituents formed from precursor-assemblages in which some chemical memories were still intact; the isotopic differences reflect fractionations among the carrier phases of the different isotopic components. Chondrules formed by a mostly closed-system melting of their precursors, and thus provide a recording of the extent of nebular heterogeneity on the mg-size scale. The larger anomalies in CAIs, compared to matrix and most (but not all) chondrules, are attributed primarily to an open- rather than closed-system processing of the CAI precursors. Precursors of both FUN and normal CAIs experienced an episode of intense processing, perhaps partial melting, that created the FUN characteristics, but for normal CAIs the FUN effects were erased by subsequent isotopic equilibration and exchange

  1. Techniques for preparing isotopic targets

    Xu Guoji; Guan Shouren; Luo Xinghua; Sun Shuhua

    1987-12-01

    The techniques of making isotopic targets for nuclear physics experiments are introduced. Vacuum evaporation, electroplating, centrifugal precipitation, rolling and focused heavy-ion beam sputtering used to prepare various isotopic targets at IAE are described. Reduction-distillation with active metals and electrolytic reduction for converting isotope oxides to metals are mentioned. The stripping processes of producing self-supporting isotopic targets are summarized. The store methods of metallic targets are given

  2. Mg doping of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy

    Lieten, R R; Buchowicz, G; Dubon, O; Motsnyi, V; Zhang, L; Cheng, K; Leys, M; Degroote, S; Borghs, G

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic study on the influence of growth conditions on the incorporation and activation of Mg in GaN layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We show that high quality p-type GaN layers can be obtained on GaN-on-silicon templates. The Mg incorporation and the electrical properties have been investigated as a function of growth temperature, Ga : N flux ratio and Mg : Ga flux ratio. It was found that the incorporation of Mg and the electrical properties are highly sensitive to the Ga : N flux ratio. The highest hole mobility and lowest resistivity were achieved for slightly Ga-rich conditions. In addition to an optimal Ga : N ratio, an optimum Mg : Ga flux ratio was also observed at around 1%. We observed a clear Mg flux window for p-type doping of GaN : 0.31% 17 cm -3 and a mobility of 15 cm 2 V -1 s -1 . Temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements indicate an acceptor depth in these samples of 100 meV for a hole concentration of 5.5 x 10 17 cm -3 . The corresponding Mg concentration is 5 x 10 19 cm -3 , indicating approximately 1% activation at room temperature. In addition to continuous growth of Mg-doped GaN layers we also investigated different modulated growth procedures. We show that a modulated growth procedure has only limited influence on Mg doping at a growth temperature of 800 deg. or higher. This result is thus in contrast to previously reported GaN : Mg doping at much lower growth temperatures of 500 deg. C.

  3. Isotope separation using tunable lasers

    Snavely, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    Various processes for laser isotope separation based upon the use of the spectroscopic isotope effect in atomic and molecular vapors are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon processes which are suitable for uranium enrichment. A demonstration process for the separation of uranium isotopes using selective photoionization is described. (U.S.)

  4. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  5. Isotope shifting capacity of rock

    Blattner, P.; Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt

    1980-01-01

    Any oxygen isotope shifted rock volume exactly defines a past throughput of water. An expression is derived that relates the throughput of an open system to the isotope shift of reservoir rock and present-day output. The small isotope shift of Ngawha reservoir rock and the small, high delta oxygen-18 output are best accounted for by a magmatic water source

  6. Uranium Isotopic Analysis with the FRAM Isotopic Analysis Code

    Vo, D.T.; Sampson, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    FRAM is the acronym for Fixed-Energy Response-Function Analysis with Multiple efficiency. This software was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory originally for plutonium isotopic analysis. Later, it was adapted for uranium isotopic analysis in addition to plutonium. It is a code based on a self-calibration using several gamma-ray peaks for determining the isotopic ratios. The versatile-parameter database structure governs all facets of the data analysis. User editing of the parameter sets allows great flexibility in handling data with different isotopic distributions, interfering isotopes, and different acquisition parameters such as energy calibration and detector type

  7. Re-partitioning of Cu and Zn isotopes by modified protein expression

    Ragnarsdottir K Vala

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cu and Zn have naturally occurring non radioactive isotopes, and their isotopic systematics in a biological context are poorly understood. In this study we used double focussing mass spectroscopy to determine the ratios for these isotopes for the first time in mouse brain. The Cu and Zn isotope ratios for four strains of wild-type mice showed no significant difference (δ65Cu -0.12 to -0.78 permil; δ66Zn -0.23 to -0.48 permil. We also looked at how altering the expression of a single copper binding protein, the prion protein (PrP, alters the isotope ratios. Both knockout and overexpression of PrP had no significant effect on the ratio of Cu isotopes. Mice brains expressing mutant PrP lacking the known metal binding domain have δ65Cu isotope values of on average 0.57 permil higher than wild-type mouse brains. This implies that loss of the copper binding domain of PrP increases the level of 65Cu in the brain. δ66Zn isotope values of the transgenic mouse brains are enriched for 66Zn to the wild-type mouse brains. Here we show for the first time that the expression of a single protein can alter the partitioning of metal isotopes in mouse brains. The results imply that the expression of the prion protein can alter cellular Cu isotope content.

  8. High precision isotopic ratio analysis of volatile metal chelates

    Hachey, D.L.; Blais, J.C.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-01-01

    High precision isotope ratio measurements have been made for a series of volatile alkaline earth and transition metal chelates using conventional GC/MS instrumentation. Electron ionization was used for alkaline earth chelates, whereas isobutane chemical ionization was used for transition metal studies. Natural isotopic abundances were determined for a series of Mg, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Zn chelates. Absolute accuracy ranged between 0.01 and 1.19 at. %. Absolute precision ranged between +-0.01-0.27 at. % (RSD +- 0.07-10.26%) for elements that contained as many as eight natural isotopes. Calibration curves were prepared using natural abundance metals and their enriched 50 Cr, 60 Ni, and 65 Cu isotopes covering the range 0.1-1010.7 at. % excess. A separate multiple isotope calibration curve was similarly prepared using enriched 60 Ni (0.02-2.15 at. % excess) and 62 Ni (0.23-18.5 at. % excess). The samples were analyzed by GC/CI/MS. Human plasma, containing enriched 26 Mg and 44 Ca, was analyzed by EI/MS. 1 figure, 5 tables

  9. Magnesium absorption in human subjects from leafy vegetables, intrinsically labeled with stable 26Mg

    Schwartz, R.; Spencer, H.; Welsh, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Collards, turnip greens, leaf lettuce, and spinach, grown in nutrient solution so that their Mg content was 80 to 90% 26 Mg, were tested in ambulant male volunteers stabilized on a constant metabolic diet. The freeze-dried vegetables were incorporated in bran muffins in which the vegetables replaced part of the bran. Bran muffins without vegetables were consumed for breakfast each day. They were also used as a standard test meal to which the vegetable muffins were compared. All subjects participated in three consecutive isotope absorption tests: one of the standard test meal and two of the vegetables. The standard test was carried out after at least 30 days on the controlled diet. Subsequent tests of vegetables followed at 4-wk intervals. Each test meal contained 30 microCi 28 MgCl2 and 50 mg stable 26 Mg, the latter either as the intrinsic label of a test vegetable or as 26 MgCl 2 in solution taken with the standard bran muffins. Net absorption of both isotopes was measured to establish exchangeability and to determine relative Mg absorption from the vegetables. Exchangeability was 90% or higher from all meals tested. Relative Mg absorption was highest from collards and least from the standard test meal. Net absorption values ranged from 40 to 60%

  10. Isotopes in aquaculture research

    Ayyappan, S.; Dash, B.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The applications of isotopes in aquaculture research include areas like aquatic production process, nutrient cycles and food chain dynamics, fish nutrition, fish physiology, genetics and immunology. The radioisotopes commonly used are beta emitters. The use of different radioisotopes in aquaculture research are presented. 2 tabs

  11. Process for isotope separation

    Schuster, E.; Kersting, A.; Gebauhr, W.

    1980-01-01

    Isotope separation in UF 6 gas takes place on the principle of selective excitation by laser irradiation and separation by chemical conversion with a partner in a reaction. Atomic H, N or O or the CH 3 or CHO radicals are suitable partners in the reaction. The recombination takes place by catalytic acceleration on leaving the reaction area. (DG) [de

  12. SHELL ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

    ABSTRACT: The land snail Limicolaria kambeul chudeaui Germain was collected ... Key words/phrases: Ethiopia, isotope geochemistry, Lake Tilo, Limicolaria .... 1984), (c) 6'80 values of precipitation at Addis Ababa, with i 1 S.D. bars for the .... (breakfast cereal), deionised water and cuttlefish bone, the carbon and oxygen.

  13. Isotope separation process

    Cox, D.M.; Maas, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    Processes are disclosed for the separation of isotopes of an element comprising vaporizing uranyl compounds having the formula (UO2a2)n, where a is a monovalent anion and n in an integer from 2 to 4, the compounds having an isotopically shifted infrared absorption spectrum associated with uranyl ions containing said element which is to be separated, and then irradiating the uranyl compound with infrared radiation which is preferentially absorbed by a molecular vibration of uranyl ions of the compound containing a predetermined isotope of that element so that excited molecules of the compound are provided which are enriched in the molecules of the compound containing that predetermined isotope, thus enabling separation of these excited molecules. The processes disclosed include separation of the excited molecules by irradiating under conditions such that the excited molecules dissociate, and also separating the excited molecules by a discrete separation step. The latter includes irradiating the excited molecules by a second infrared laser in order to convert the excited molecules into a separable product, or also by chemically converting the excited molecules, preferably by reaction with a gaseous reactant

  14. Isotopes in action

    1987-01-01

    For most people the obvious application of nuclear technology is in power generation. But there are many other uses for radioactive materials or for products made with their help. They are found in our factories, hospitals, offices and homes. ''Isotopes in Action'' looks at the many applications of radioisotopes in our society. (author)

  15. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  16. Isotopes and atomic weights

    Zhang Qinglian

    1990-01-01

    A review of the chemical and mass spectrometric methods of determining the atomic weights of elements is presented. A, special discussion is devoted to the calibration of the mass spectrometer with highly enriched isotopes. It is illustrated by the recent work on europium. How to choose the candidate element for new atomic weight determination forms the last section of the article

  17. Actinide isotopic analysis systems

    Koenig, Z.M.; Ruhter, W.D.; Gunnink, R.

    1990-01-01

    This manual provides instructions and procedures for using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's two-detector actinide isotope analysis system to measure plutonium samples with other possible actinides (including uranium, americium, and neptunium) by gamma-ray spectrometry. The computer program that controls the system and analyzes the gamma-ray spectral data is driven by a menu of one-, two-, or three-letter options chosen by the operator. Provided in this manual are descriptions of these options and their functions, plus detailed instructions (operator dialog) for choosing among the options. Also provided are general instructions for calibrating the actinide isotropic analysis system and for monitoring its performance. The inventory measurement of a sample's total plutonium and other actinides content is determined by two nondestructive measurements. One is a calorimetry measurement of the sample's heat or power output, and the other is a gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of its relative isotopic abundances. The isotopic measurements needed to interpret the observed calorimetric power measurement are the relative abundances of various plutonium and uranium isotopes and americium-241. The actinide analysis system carries out these measurements. 8 figs

  18. Application of the isotopic index in isotope geochemical investigation

    Schuetze, H.

    1982-06-01

    A method is described which allows to calculate approximately isotope exchange equilibria between different crystalline silicates. The algorithm uses a newly introduced isotopic index. It is defined using isotopic increments of the variant types of silicatic bonds. This isotopic index gives a quantitative measure of the ability to enrich 18 O or 30 Si, respectively. The dependence of isotopic fractionations on temperature can be calculated approximately by means of the isotopic index, too. On this theoretical base some problems of magmatism and two varieties of an isotope geochemical model of the evolution of the Earth's crust are treated. Finally, the possibility is demonstrated to give prognostic statements about the likelihood of ore bearing of different granites. (author)

  19. Electric quadrupole moments of {beta}-emitter {sup 21}F and {sup 23}Mg

    Onishi, Takashi; Matsuta, Kensaku; Fukuda, Mitsunori [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Faculty of Science] [and others

    1997-03-01

    For the systematic study of nuclear electromagnetic moments, electric quadrupole moments Q of {beta}-emitting nuclei {sup 21}F and {sup 23}Mg have been measured for the first time through combined technique of the polarized nuclear beams and {beta}-NMR technique. From the quadrupole coupling constants of {sup 21}F and {sup 23}Mg in MgF{sub 2} single crystal, the ratios of the Q`s with the known Q were determined as |Q({sup 21}F)|/|Q({sup 19}F{sup *})|=1.001{+-}0.034 and |Q({sup 23}Mg)|/|Q({sup 25}Mg)|=0.571{+-}0.017. (author)

  20. Isotopic separation by ion chromatography

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1994-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction and the isotopic separation factor are first recalled; the principles of ion chromatography applied to lithium isotope separation are then reviewed (displacement chromatography) and the process is modelled in the view of dimensioning and optimizing the industrial process; the various dimensioning parameters are the isotopic separation factor, the isotopic exchange kinetics and the material flow rate. Effects of the resin type and structure are presented. Dimensioning is also affected by physico-chemical and hydraulic parameters. Industrial implementation features are also discussed. 1 fig., 1 tab., 5 refs

  1. Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Haller, E.E.

    1994-08-01

    Control of the isotopic composition of semiconductors offers a wide range of new scientific opportunities. In this paper a number of recent results obtained with isotopically pure as well as deliberately mixed diamond and Ge bulk single crystals and Ge isotope superlattices will be reviewed. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, bandstructure and lattice constant in subtle but theoretically well understood ways. Large effects are observed for thermal conductivity, local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping (NTD). Several experiments which could profit greatly from isotope control are proposed

  2. Nuclear moments and charge radii of magnesium isotopes from N=8 up to (and beyond) N=20

    Mattolat, C F; Mallion, S N; Himpe, P

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the nuclear monopole, dipole and quadrupole moments of magnesium isotopes from the neutron deficient nuclei near the N=8 shell closure ($^{21}$Mg), up to the neutron rich Mg nuclei beyond N=20 ($^{33}$Mg). The physics issues that will be addressed in this project are related to: \\begin{itemize} \\item The properties of mirror nuclei (e.g. $^{21}$Mg - $^{21}$F being members of a T=3/2 multiplet) \\item The evolution of shell structure and deformation with isospin. \\item Changes in the shell structure in the "island of inversion" around $^{32}$Mg and along the N=9 isotones. \\end{itemize} Radioactive beams of Mg isotopes will be produced by the RILlS ion source. The Mg isotopes will be resonantly polarized at the COLLAPS set-up. With $\\beta$-NMR techniques, precision measurements of g-factors and quadrupole moments of the radioactive $^{21,23}$Mg and $^{29,31,33}$Mg isotopes will be performed. Isotope shifts, thus changes in mean square charge radii, will be deduced from hyperfine spectra mea...

  3. SIMS analysis of isotopic impurities in ion implants

    Sykes, D.E.; Blunt, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    The n-type dopant species Si and Se used for ion implantation in GaAs are multi-isotopic with the most abundant isotope not chosen because of potential interferences with residual gases. SIMS analysis of a range of 29 Si implants produced by several designs of ion implanter all showed significant 28 Si impurity with a different depth distribution from that of the deliberately implanted 29 Si isotope. This effect was observed to varying degrees with all fifteen implanters examined and in every 29 Si implant analysed to date 29 Si + , 29 Si ++ and 30 Si implants all show the same effect. In the case of Se implantation, poor mass resolution results in the implantation of all isotopes with the same implant distribution (i.e. energy), whilst implants carried out with good mass resolution show the implantation of all isotopes with the characteristic lower depth distribution of the impurity isotopes as found in the Si implants. This effect has also been observed in p-type implants into GaAs (Mg) and for Ga implanted in Si. A tentative explanation of the effect is proposed. (author)

  4. New Isotopic clues to solar system formation

    Lee, T.

    1979-01-01

    The presence of two new extinct nuclides 26 Al and 107 Pd with half-lives approx.10 6 years in the early solar system implies that there were nucleosynthetic activities involving a great many elements almost at the instant of solar system formation. Rare gas and oxygen isotopic abundance variations [''anomalies''] relative to the ''cosmic'' composition were observed in a variety of planetary objects indicating that isotopic heterogeneities caused by the incomplete mixing of distinct nucleosynthetic components permeate of the entire solar system. The correlated nuclear [''FUN''] anomalies in O, Mg, Si, Ca, Sr, Ba, Nd, and Sm were found in three rare inclusions in the Allende meteorite, which show large mass-dependent isotopic fractionation effects. The signature of the nuclear component required to explain these anomalies suggests a source which has received a catastrophic neutron burst [e.g., an r-process event]. These extinct nuclides and nucleosynthetic anomalies provide new clues to solar system formation. In particular, these results have led to the speculation that a nearby supernova had injected freshly synthesized material into the early solar nebula and possibly triggered the collapse of the proto-solar interstellar cloud. Furthermore, these new results have major implications on cosmochronology, nucleosynthesis theory, star formation, planetary heating, and the genetic relationship between different planetary bodies

  5. Electromagnetic separator for light and middle isotope elements

    Bernas, R.

    1952-01-01

    We describe a separator of isotope with a 60 deg magnetic sector that permits, thanks to a process of neutralization of the space charge, to use efficiently intense ion beams. The ion source for solid is essentially constituted by a discharge of hot cathode in a magnetic field and provides an ion beam focused of more than 10 mA. The result of the first separations (Zn, Sb, Hg) indicates that the isotopes of various elements can be obtained in quantities varying from 10 to 100 mg/24 hours. (author) [fr

  6. Level structures of neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The level structures of neutron-rich Xe isotopes were determined by observing prompt gamma-ray coincidences in {sup 248}Cm fission fragments. A 5-mg {sup 248}Cm, in the form of {sup 248}Cm-KCl pellet, was placed inside Eurogam array which consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. Transitions in Xe isotopes were identified by the appearance of new peaks in the {gamma}-ray spectra obtained by gating on the gamma peaks of the complementary Mo fragments.

  7. Neutron capture cross section of $^{25}$Mg and its astrophysical implications

    We propose to measure the neutron capture cross section of the stable $^{25}$Mg isotope. This experiment aims at the improvement of existing results for nuclear astrophysics.The measurement will be carried out under similar conditions as for the Mgexperiment that was completed at n_TOF during 2003. A metal $^{25}$Mg-enriched sample will be used in the proposed experiment instead of a MgO powder sample, which was used in the previous measurement and prevented us to minimize the uncertainty of the measured cross section. This experiment will be part of an ongoing study for a comprehensive discussion of the s-process abundances in massive stars.

  8. Isotopic composition of Pb and Th in interplinian volcanics from Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy

    Cortini, M.; De Vivo, B.; Somma, R.; Ayuso, R.A.; Holden, P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed isotopic study of volcanic rocks emitted from Somma-Vesuvius volcano during three periods of interplinian activity: 'Protohistoric' (3550 y B.P. to 79 A.D.), 'Ancient Historic' (79 to 472 A.D.) and 'Medieval' (472 to 1631 A.D.). Pb isotopic compositions of two acid leached fractions and whole rock residues of 37 whole rock samples (determined by Somma et al., 2001) show that each of the three interplinian periods is distinguished by small, systematic, and unique uranogenic and thorogenic Pb isotopic trends. This key and novel feature is compatible with the notion that the Pb isotopic data reflect small-scale source heterogeneity operating over relatively short periods of time. From this representative group of samples, a selected set of nine whole rocks were analyzed for Th isotopes. 232 Th/ 238 U ratios in the source can be obtained independently from Pb and from Th isotopes. Those obtained from Pb isotopes represent source ratios, time-integrated over the whole age of the earth; they range from 3.9 to 4.1. 232 Th/ 238 U obtained from Th isotopes are those of the present source. They are lower, and cluster around 3.5; this difference probably indicates recent U enrichment of the present source. The behavior of Pb, as inferred by its isotopic ratios, is quite distinct from that of Sr and Nd isotopes: Pb isotope variations are not correlated to Sr or Nd isotope variations. The isotopic contrast is compatible with the idea that the isotopes were decoupled during magmatic production, evolution, and ascent through the crust. Thus, the Pb isotopes do not reflect the effects of the same processes as in the case of the Sr and Nd isotopes, or, as we also favor, they do not necessarily reflect the same source contributions into the magmas. Moreover, the Pb isotopic evolution of the interplinian rocks chiefly reflects mixing, driven by processes that are superimposed on, and independent of, other source contributions that determine the isotopic

  9. Growth Rates, Stable Oxygen Isotopes (18O), and Strontium (Sr/Ca) Composition in Two Species of Pacific Sclerosponges (Acanthocheatetes wellsi and Astrosclera willeyana) with 18O Calibration and Application to Paleoceanography

    Grottoli, A.; Adkins, J; Panero, W; Reaman, D; Moots, K

    2010-01-01

    The isotopic and elemental composition of sclerosponge skeletons is used to reconstruct paleoceanographic records. Yet few studies have systematically examined the natural variability in sclerosponge skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O, growth, and Sr/Ca, and how that may influence the interpretation of sclerosponge proxy records. Here, we analyzed short records in seven specimens of Acanthocheatetes wellsi (high-Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Palau, four A. wellsi (high-Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Saipan, and three Astrosclera willeyana (aragonite) sclerosponges from Saipan, as well as one long record in an A. wellsi specimen from Palau spanning 1945-2001.5. In Saipan, species-specific and mineralogical effects appear to have a negligible effect on sclerosponge {delta}{sup 18}O, facilitating the direct comparison of {delta}{sup 18}O records between species at a given location. At both sites, A. wellsi {delta}{sup 18}O and growth rates were sensitive to environmental conditions, but Sr/Ca was not sensitive to the same conditions. High-resolution {delta}{sup 18}O analyses confirmed this finding as both A. wellsi and A. willeyana deposited their skeleton in accordance with the trends in isotopic equilibrium with seawater, though with a 0.27{per_thousand} offset in the case of A. willeyana. In the high-Mg-calcite species A. wellsi, Mg may be interfering with Sr incorporation into the skeleton. On multidecadal timescales, A. wellsi sclerosponge {delta}{sup 18}O in Palau tracked the Southern Oscillation Index variability post-1977, but not pre-1977, coincident with the switch in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) at {approx}1976. This suggests that water mass circulation in the region is influenced by El Nino-Southern Oscillation variability during positive PDO phases, but not during negative ones.

  10. Systematic review

    Enggaard, Helle

    Title: Systematic review a method to promote nursing students skills in Evidence Based Practice Background: Department of nursing educate students to practice Evidence Based Practice (EBP), where clinical decisions is based on the best available evidence, patient preference, clinical experience...... and resources available. In order to incorporate evidence in clinical decisions, nursing students need to learn how to transfer knowledge in order to utilize evidence in clinical decisions. The method of systematic review can be one approach to achieve this in nursing education. Method: As an associate lecturer...... I have taken a Comprehensive Systematic Review Training course provide by Center of Clinical Guidelines in Denmark and Jonna Briggs Institute (JBI) and practice in developing a systematic review on how patients with ischemic heart disease experiences peer support. This insight and experience...

  11. Systematic measurements of the Bohr-Weisskopf effect at ISOLDE

    Nojiri, Y; Matsuki, S; Ragnarsson, I; Neugart, R; Redi, O; Stroke, H H; Duong, H T; Marescaux, D; Pinard, J; Juncar, P; Ekstrom, C; Pellarin, M; Vialle, J-L; Inamura, T

    2002-01-01

    The " Bohr-Weisskopf " effect, or " hyperfine structure (hfs) anomaly ", which results from the effect of the distribution of nuclear magnetization on the electro-nuclear interaction, will be measured systematically at the PS Booster ISOLDE, first for a long chain of radioactive cesium isotopes, analogously to previous isotope shift and hfs studies. In addition to the direct measurement of magnetic moment values, the results are expected to provide independent data for testing nuclear wavefunctions, these will be of importance for interpreting systematic parity non-conservation experiments, complementary to the single isotope study which requires a high precision knowledge of the electron wavefunction. Substantial progress in these calculations has been achieved recently. Precision measurements of the hfs splittings and nuclear magnetic moments are required, with sensitivity adequate for the radioactive isotopes produced. A triple resonance atomic beam magnetic resonance apparatus with optical pumping state s...

  12. Diversity of sulfur isotope fractionations by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes

    Detmers, Jan; Brüchert, Volker; Habicht, K S

    2001-01-01

    Batch culture experiments were performed with 32 different sulfate-reducing prokaryotes to explore the diversity in sulfur isotope fractionation during dissimilatory sulfate reduction by pure cultures. The selected strains reflect the phylogenetic and physiologic diversity of presently known...... sulfate reducers and cover a broad range of natural marine and freshwater habitats. Experimental conditions were designed to achieve optimum growth conditions with respect to electron donors, salinity, temperature, and pH. Under these optimized conditions, experimental fractionation factors ranged from 2.......0 to 42.0 per thousand. Salinity, incubation temperature, pH, and phylogeny had no systematic effect on the sulfur isotope fractionation. There was no correlation between isotope fractionation and sulfate reduction rate. The type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase also had no effect on fractionation...

  13. Expanding the isotopic toolbox: Applications of hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to food web studies

    Hannah B Vander Zanden

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of stable carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N isotopes in tissues of organisms has formed the foundation of isotopic food web reconstructions, as these values directly reflect assimilated diet. In contrast, stable hydrogen (δ2H and oxygen (δ18O isotope measurements have typically been reserved for studies of migratory origin and paleoclimate reconstruction based on systematic relationships between organismal tissue and local environmental water. Recently, innovative applications using δ2H and, to a lesser extent, δ18O values have demonstrated potential for these elements to provide novel insights in modern food web studies. We explore the advantages and challenges associated with three applications of δ2H and δ18O values in food web studies. First, large δ2H differences between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem end members can permit the quantification of energy inputs and nutrient fluxes between these two sources, with potential applications for determining allochthonous vs. autochthonous nutrient sources in freshwater systems and relative aquatic habitat utilization by terrestrial organisms. Next, some studies have identified a relationship between δ2H values and trophic position, which suggests that this marker may serve as a trophic indicator, in addition to the more commonly used δ15N values. Finally, coupled measurements of δ2H and δ18O values are increasing as a result of reduced analytical challenges to measure both simultaneously and may provide additional ecological information over single element measurements. In some organisms, the isotopic ratios of these two elements are tightly coupled, whereas the isotopic disequilibrium in other organisms may offer insight into the diet and physiology of individuals. Although a coherent framework for interpreting δ2H and δ18O data in the context of food web studies is emerging, many fundamental uncertainties remain. We highlight directions for targeted research that

  14. Mg and Mg alloys: how comparable are in vitro and in vivo corrosion rates? A review.

    Martinez Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Bérengère J C; Feyerabend, Frank; Willumeit, Regine

    2015-02-01

    Due to their biodegradability, magnesium and magnesium-based alloys could represent the third generation of biomaterials. However, their mechanical properties and time of degradation have to match the needs of applications. Several approaches, such as choice of alloying elements or tailored microstructure, are employed to tailor corrosion behaviour. Due to the high electrochemical activity of Mg, numerous environmental factors (e.g. temperature and surrounding ion composition) influence its corrosion behaviour, making it unpredictable. Nevertheless, the need of reliable in vitro model(s) to predict in vivo implant degradation is increasing. In an attempt to find a correlation between in vitro and vivo corrosion rates, this review presents a systematic literature survey, as well as an attempt to correlate the different results. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Isotope separation process

    Kaldor, A.; Rabinowitz, P.

    1979-01-01

    A method of separating the isotopes of an element is described, which comprises the steps of (i) subjecting molecules of a gaseous compound of the element simultaneously to two infrared radiations of different wavelengths, the first radiation having a wavelength which corresponds to an absorption band of the compound, which in turn corresponds to a mode of molecular motion in which there is participation by atoms of the element, and the second radiation having a power density greater than 10 6 watts per cm 2 , thereby exciting molecules of the compound in an isotopically selective manner, this step being conducted in such manner that the excited molecules either receive a level of energy sufficient to cause them to undergo conversion by unimolecular decomposition or receive a level of energy sufficient to cause them to undergo conversion by reaction with molecules of another gas present for that purpose; and (ii) separating and recovering converted molecules from unconverted molecules. (author)

  16. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  17. Cyclotrons for isotope production

    Milton, B.F.; Stevenson, N.R.

    1995-06-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radioisotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicates a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper we will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, and isotope production, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. We will also discuss the possibility of systems capable of extracted energies up to 100 MeV and extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  18. Rechargeable radioactive isotope generator

    Thornton, A.K.; Cerone, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    The description is given of a rechargeable radioactive isotope generator having the following features: a box containing a transport shield, a shielded generator including elements for the absorption and holding of the parent isotope, an eluant tank, a first pipe causing this tank to communicate with the transport shield, a second pipe causing this transport shield to communicate with the shielded generator and a third pipe placing the shielded generator in communication with the outside of the unit. It also includes a shelf across the external front part of the unit a part of which is shielded by external components, a shielded elution flask in which the eluate is poured and a filter set at a point between the flask and the third pipe [fr

  19. Isotopic Exchange in Porous and Dense Magnesium Borohydride.

    Zavorotynska, Olena; Deledda, Stefano; Li, Guanqiao; Matsuo, Motoaki; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Hauback, Bjørn C

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium borohydride (Mg(BH4)2) is one of the most promising complex hydrides presently studied for energy-related applications. Many of its properties depend on the stability of the BH4(-) anion. The BH4(-) stability was investigated with respect to H→D exchange. In situ Raman measurements on high-surface-area porous Mg(BH4 )2 in 0.3 MPa D2 have shown that the isotopic exchange at appreciable rates occurs already at 373 K. This is the lowest exchange temperature observed in stable borohydrides. Gas-solid isotopic exchange follows the BH4(-) +D˙ →BH3D(-) +H˙ mechanism at least at the initial reaction steps. Ex situ deuteration of porous Mg(BH4)2 and its dense-phase polymorph indicates that the intrinsic porosity of the hydride is the key behind the high isotopic exchange rates. It implies that the solid-state H(D) diffusion is considerably slower than the gas-solid H→D exchange reaction at the surface and it is a rate-limiting steps for hydrogen desorption and absorption in Mg(BH4)2. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Equipment for isotope diagnostics

    Platz, W.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns an improvement of equipment for isotope diagnostics allowing to mark special intensity ranges of the recorded measurements by means of different colors. For undisturbed operation it is of advantage to avoid electric circuits between movable and unmovable parts of the color recorder. According to the invention, long gear wheels of glass fiber-reinforced polyamide are used for these connections. (ORU) [de

  1. Stable isotope analysis

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  2. Stable-isotope studies

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Structures of bacteriochlorophyll b and the Krasnovskii photoreduction products of chlorophyll a are given. All 55 13 C and 4 15 N NMR transitions in chlorophyl a and its magnesium-free derivative pheophytin a were assigned. ESR of triplet states of chlorophylls a, b, c/sub z/, and c 2 and bacteriochlorophyll a are reported. Experiments in the cultivation of 13 C-enriched morning glory plants indicated that the isotope enrichment can produce observable morphological changes. (U.S.)

  3. Protected isotope heat source

    Burns, R.K.; Shure, L.I.; Katzen, E.D.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive isotope capsule is disposed in a container (heat shield) which will have a single stable trim attitude when reentering the earth's atmosphere and while falling to earth. The center of gravity of the heat source is located forward of the midpoint between the front face and the rear face of the container. The capsule is insulated from the front face of the container but not from the rear surface of the container. (auth)

  4. Isotopes and agriculture

    Malavolta, E.

    1988-01-01

    The agriculture is defined as the art of desturbing the ecosystems in economical terms with the minimum of irreversible damage. Man survival in the biosphere will depend on its ability of using four technologies - mechanization, fertilizers, irrigation and pest disease control. The isotopes are usefull to establish means of producing more food and to preserve it; and clains of unbearable damages to the ecosystems caused by fertilizers and pesticides are not true, are presented. (author) [pt

  5. Isotopic safeguards statistics

    Timmerman, C.L.; Stewart, K.B.

    1978-06-01

    The methods and results of our statistical analysis of isotopic data using isotopic safeguards techniques are illustrated using example data from the Yankee Rowe reactor. The statistical methods used in this analysis are the paired comparison and the regression analyses. A paired comparison results when a sample from a batch is analyzed by two different laboratories. Paired comparison techniques can be used with regression analysis to detect and identify outlier batches. The second analysis tool, linear regression, involves comparing various regression approaches. These approaches use two basic types of models: the intercept model (y = α + βx) and the initial point model [y - y 0 = β(x - x 0 )]. The intercept model fits strictly the exposure or burnup values of isotopic functions, while the initial point model utilizes the exposure values plus the initial or fabricator's data values in the regression analysis. Two fitting methods are applied to each of these models. These methods are: (1) the usual least squares fitting approach where x is measured without error, and (2) Deming's approach which uses the variance estimates obtained from the paired comparison results and considers x and y are both measured with error. The Yankee Rowe data were first measured by Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) and remeasured by Nuclear Audit and Testing Company (NATCO). The ratio of Pu/U versus 235 D (in which 235 D is the amount of depleted 235 U expressed in weight percent) using actual numbers is the isotopic function illustrated. Statistical results using the Yankee Rowe data indicates the attractiveness of Deming's regression model over the usual approach by simple comparison of the given regression variances with the random variance from the paired comparison results

  6. Dual isotope assays

    Smith, G.F.W.; Stevens, R.A.J.; Jacoby, B.

    1980-01-01

    Dual isotope assays for thyroid function are performed by carrying out a radio-immunoassay for two of thyroxine (T4), tri-iodothyronine (T3), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), by a method wherein a version of one of the thyroid components, preferably T4 or T3 is labelled with Selenium-75 and the version of the other thyroid component is labelled with a different radionuclide, preferably Iodine-125. (author)

  7. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  8. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  9. Systematic of delayed neutron parameters

    Isaev, S.G.; Piksaikin, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental studies of the energy dependence of the delayed neutron (DN) parameters for various fission systems has shown that the behaviour of a some combination of delayed neutron parameters has a similar features. On the basis of this findings the systematics of delayed neutron experimental data for thorium, uranium, plutonium and americium isotopes have been investigated with the purpose to find a correlation of DN parameters with characteristics of fissioning system as well as a correlation between the delayed neutron parameters themselves. It was presented the preliminary results which were obtained during study the physics interpretation of the results [ru

  10. Studies of geothermal background and isotopic geochemistry of thermal waters in Jiangxi Province

    Zhou Wenbin; Sun Zhanxue; Li Xueli; Shi Weijun

    1996-10-01

    The terrestrial heat flow measurement, isotope and geochemical techniques have been systematically applied to the geothermal systems in Jiangxi Province. Results show that the thermal waters in the study area all belong to the low-medium temperature convective geothermal system, which essentially differs from high temperature geothermal systems with deep magmatic heat sources. It has been proven that the isotope and geochemical techniques are very useful and effective in geothermal exploration. (13 refs., 14 tabs., 8 figs.)

  11. Decay of new mass-separated neutron-deficient La and Ce isotopes

    Genevey, J.; Gizon, A.; Idrissi, N.; Weiss, B.; Beraud, R.; Charvet, A.; Duffait, R.; Emsallem, A.; Meyer, M.; Ollivier, T.; Redon, N.

    1987-01-01

    By use of a He jet system coupled to a Bernas-Nier ion-source, several new mass-separated A = 122 - 127 isotopes reached in heavy ion fusion reactions at SARA have been identified and studied. From experimental decay properties of La isotopes, systematics of low-lying energy levels have been extended for even-even and odd-A barium. New informations on Ce decay schemes are briefly reported

  12. On krypton isotopic abundances in the sun and in the solar wind

    Marti, K.

    1980-01-01

    The Kr isotopic systematics in the meteorite Pesyanoe which is known to contain solar-type gases, are reported. Discrepancies in the isotopic data of fractions released at stepwise increasing temperatures cannot be reconciled with spallation Kr components, although spallation effects are significant. Fractionation mechanisms on the parent body and in the solar wind source region are considered and the implications for solar abundances discussed.

  13. Magnesium isotopes in giants in the Milky Way inner disk and bulge: First results with 3D stellar atmospheres.

    Thygesen, Anders; Sbordone, Luca; Christlieb, Norbert; Asplund, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The Milky Way bulge is one of the most poorly understood components of our galaxy and its formation history is still a matter of debate (early collapse vs. disk instability). All knowledge of its chemical evolution history has been so far derived by measuring elemental abundances: no isotopic mixtures have been measured so far in the Bulge. While quite challenging, isotopic measurements can be accomplished with present instruments in bulge stars for a few elements, Magnesium being one of them.Of the three stable Mg isotopes, the most common one, 24Mg, is mainly produced by α capture in SN II, while the other two, 25Mg and 26Mg, can be produced efficiently in massive AGB stars, through the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg(n, γ)26Mg reactions as well as the Mg-Al chain. Moreover, SN II production of 25Mg and 26Mg increases with increasing progenitor metallicity, so in older stellar populations, where only the signature of metal-poor SNe is to be expected, one should not see a significant 25Mg or 26Mg fraction. However, if larger 25Mg/24Mg and 26Mg/24Mg ratios are observed, relative to what is produced in SNe, this is a clear sign of an AGB contribution. As such, Mg isotopic ratios are a very useful probe of AGB pollution onset and chemical enrichment timescale in a stellar population.Here, we present the first ever measurements of Mg isotopes in 7 red giant stars in the Milky Way bulge and inner disk, including two stars in the bulge globular cluster NGC6522. The isotopic abundances have been derived from high resolution, high signal-to-noise VLT-UVES spectra using both standard 1D atmospheric models as well as state-of-the-art 3D hydrodynamical models and spectrosynthesis. The use of 3D atmospheric models impacts the derived ratios and this work represents the first derivation of Mg isotopes using full 3D spectrosynthesis. These results yield new constraints on the proposed formation scenarios of the Milky Way bulge.

  14. Use of Sr isotopes as a tool to decipher the soil weathering processes in a tropical river catchment, southwestern India

    Gurumurthy, G.P.; Balakrishna, K.; Tripti, M.; Riotte, Jean; Audry, Stéphane; Braun, Jean-Jacques; Udaya Shankar, H.N.

    2015-01-01

    River water composition (major ion and "8"7Sr/"8"6Sr ratio) was monitored on a monthly basis over a period of three years from a mountainous river (Nethravati River) of southwestern India. The total dissolved solid (TDS) concentration is relatively low (46 mg L"−"1) with silica being the dominant contributor. The basin is characterised by lower dissolved Sr concentration (avg. 150 nmol L"−"1), with radiogenic "8"7Sr/"8"6Sr isotopic ratios (avg. 0.72041 at outlet). The composition of Sr and "8"7Sr/"8"6Sr and their correlation with silicate derived cations in the river basin reveal that their dominant source is from the radiogenic silicate rock minerals. Their composition in the stream is controlled by a combination of physical and chemical weathering occurring in the basin. The molar ratio of SiO_2/Ca and "8"7Sr/"8"6Sr isotopic ratio show strong seasonal variation in the river water, i.e., low SiO_2/Ca ratio with radiogenic isotopes during non-monsoon and higher SiO_2/Ca with less radiogenic isotopes during monsoon season. Whereas, the seasonal variation of Rb/Sr ratio in the stream water is not significant suggesting that change in the mineral phase being involved in the weathering reaction could be unlikely for the observed molar SiO_2/Ca and "8"7Sr/"8"6Sr isotope variation in river water. Therefore, the shift in the stream water chemical composition could be attributed to contribution of ground water which is in contact with the bedrock (weathering front) during non-monsoon and weathering of secondary soil minerals in the regolith layer during monsoon. The secondary soil mineral weathering leads to limited silicate cation and enhanced silica fluxes in the Nethravati river basin. - Highlights: • Systematic monthly geochemical monitoring of a mountainous tropical river. • Soil weathering has dominant control on the surface water chemistry in the basin. • Soil redox process plays a dominant role in leaching of soil minerals. • Soil mineral weathering in

  15. Vibrational spectra of mixed oxides of Ln2MgTiO6 composition

    Porotnikov, N.V.; German, M.; Kovba, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    In the range 33-4000 cm -1 IR and Raman spectra of complex oxides of the composition Ln 2 MgTiO 6 (Ln=La-Yb and Y) have been studied. Using the Magnesium isotope-substituted compositions Lasub(2)sup(24,26)MgTiOsub(6), Smsub(2)sup(24,26)MgTiOsub(6) and Ybsub(2)sup(24,26)MgTiOsub(6), it has been shoWn that in Ln 2 MgTiO 6 titanium and magnesium ions are located in sites With octahedral coordination, of rare earth ions highly-coordinated polyhedrons with coordination number 10-12 are characteristic

  16. Spectral isotopic methods of determining nitrogen and carbon in plant specimens with laser volatization

    Lazeeva, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    Methods have been devised for the local determination of nitrogen and carbon isotope compositions in plant specimens, which provide separate and joint determination. Local laser evaporation has been combined with spectroscopic determination of the isotope compositions in the gas phase. A continuous-wave CO 2 laser is preferable for the local evaporation; the carbon isotope composition may be determined directly on the sum of the evaporation products, whereas nitrogen must first be separated as N 2 . Methods have also been developed for the local determination of total nitrogen and carbon in a sample with isotope dilution on the basis of laser evaporation. In order to eliminate systematic errors in determining total carbon in plant material, an evaporation method free from a rim has been devised. These methods have been used in determining isotope concentration profiles in plant specimens grown in experiments employing labeled nitrogen and carbon

  17. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    Bullen, Tomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  18. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  19. Isotope effects on chemical equilibria

    Golding, P.D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium constants of three deuterated substituted acetic acids are reported. The calculation of secondary isotope effects of the second kind for the three isotopic acid pairs has been accomplished by the appropriate comparison of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, and by the comparison of isotopic slopes. The effect of substituent variation on the isotope effects reported here disqualifies the simple inductive model as a legitimate description of secondary isotope effects of the second kind. The correlation of diminishing isotope effect per deuterium atom with increasing acidity is also invalidated by the present results. The syntheses of 9-thia-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-9-oxide and thioxanthene-10-oxide are described. These compounds have been partially deuterated at their respective methylene positions. Spectral evidence indicates stereoselectivity of the methylene protons in the exchange reactions of both compounds. (author)

  20. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  1. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  2. French days on stable isotopes

    2000-01-01

    These first French days on stable isotopes took place in parallel with the 1. French days of environmental chemistry. Both conferences had common plenary sessions. The conference covers all aspects of the use of stable isotopes in the following domains: medicine, biology, environment, tracer techniques, agronomy, food industry, geology, petroleum geochemistry, cosmo-geochemistry, archaeology, bio-geochemistry, hydrology, climatology, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, isotope separations etc.. Abstracts available on CD-Rom only. (J.S.)

  3. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    1982-01-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available for distribution within the United States for nondestructive research use from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Material Research Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  4. Isotopes of carbon and oxygen in the carbonate impurities of coal have potential as palaeoenvironmental indicators

    Verhagen, B.T.; Falcon, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and systematics of impurities such as carbonates need to be established in order to understand their provenance in coal seams with reference to mining, beneficiation and ultimately their elimination or reduction. To this end, mineralogical and carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotopic studies were undertaken on carbonate occurrences in coal from the eastern Transvaal highveld. Isotopic variations of considerable amplitude and individual values of extreme ''lightness'' are to be found in the carbonates in coal of the Witbank and adjacent basins. The observed isotopic ratios have a clear bearing on the nature and origins of the carbonates. 1 tab., 1 fig

  5. Stable isotope separation in calutrons: Forty years of production and distribution

    Bell, W.A.; Tracy, J.G.

    1987-11-01

    The stable isotope separation program, established in 1945, has operated continually to provide enriched stable isotopes and selected radioactive isotopes, including the actinides, for use in research, medicine, and industrial applications. This report summarizes the first forty years of effort in the production and distribution of stable isotopes. Evolution of the program along with the research and development, chemical processing, and production efforts are highlighted. A total of 3.86 million separator hours has been utilized to separate 235 isotopes of 56 elements. Relative effort expended toward processing each of these elements is shown. Collection rates (mg/separator h), which vary by a factor of 20,000 from the highest to the lowest ( 205 Tl to 46 Ca), and the attainable isotopic purity for each isotope are presented. Policies related to isotope pricing, isotope distribution, and support for the enrichment program are discussed. Changes in government funding, coupled with large variations in sales revenue, have resulted in 7-fold perturbations in production levels

  6. Variations in lead isotopic abundances in Sprague-Dawley rat tissues: possible reason of formation.

    Duojian Liu

    Full Text Available It has been reported in previous research that the lead isotopic composition of blood, urine and feces samples statistically differed from the given lead sources in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. However, the reason for this phenomenon is still unclear. An animal experiment was performed to investigate the lead isotope fractionation in diverse biological samples (i.e., lungs, liver, kidneys, bone and to explore the possible reasons. SD rats were intratracheally instilled with lead acetate at the concentrations of 0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2 mg/kg body weight. Biological samples were collected for lead isotope analysis using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Significant differences are observed in lead isotope abundances among the diverse biological samples. The lead isotope abundances ((206Pb, (207Pb and (208Pb in diverse biological samples show different degrees and directions of departure from the given lead source. The results suggest that differences in enrichment or depletion capacity for each lead isotope in the various tissues might lead to the variation in lead isotopic abundances in tissues. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead level and the lead isotope abundances in liver and bone is observed. When the whole-blood level is higher than 50 ng/mL, the lead isotopic compositions of biological samples tend to be the same. Thus, the data support the speculation of a fractionation functional threshold.

  7. Assessment of international reference materials for isotope-ratio analysis (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the number of international measurement standards for anchoring stable isotope delta scales has mushroomed from 3 to more than 30, expanding to more than 25 chemical elements. With the development of new instrumentation, along with new and improved measurement procedures for studying naturally occurring isotopic abundance variations in natural and technical samples, the number of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials with a specified delta value has blossomed in the last six decades to more than 150 materials. More than half of these isotopic reference materials were produced for isotope-delta measurements of seven elements: H, Li, B, C, N, O, and S. The number of isotopic reference materials for other, heavier elements has grown considerably over the last decade. Nevertheless, even primary international measurement standards for isotope-delta measurements are still needed for some elements, including Mg, Fe, Te, Sb, Mo, and Ge. It is recommended that authors publish the delta values of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials that were used for anchoring their measurement results to the respective primary stable isotope scale.

  8. IUPAC Periodic Table of Isotopes for the Educational Community

    Holden N. E.; Holden,N.E.; Coplen,T.B.

    2012-07-15

    John Dalton first proposed the concept of atomic weights of the elements in the first decade of the nineteenth century. These atomic weights of the chemical elements were thought of as constants of nature, similar to the speed of light. Dmitri Mendeleev arranged the atomic weights of the elements in ascending order of value and used the systematic variation of their chemical properties to produce his Periodic Table of the Elements in 1869. Measurement of atomic weight values became an important chemical activity for a century and a half. Theodore Richards received a Noble Prize for his work in this area. In 1913, Fredrick Soddy found a species of radium, which had an atomic weight value of 228, compared to the familiar radium gas value of 226. Soddy coined the term 'isotope' (Greek for 'in the same place') to account for this second atomic weight value in the radium position of the Periodic Table. Both of these isotopes of radium are radioactive. Radioactive isotopes are energetically unstable and will decay (disintegrate) over time. The time it takes for one half of a sample of a given radioactive isotope to decay is the half-life of that isotope. In addition to having different atomic weight values, radium-226 and radium-228 also have different half-life values. Around the same time as Soddy's work, J.J. Thomson (discoverer of the electron) identified two stable (non-radioactive) isotopes of the same element, neon. Over the next 40 years, the majority of the known chemical elements were found to have two or more stable (or long-lived radioactive isotopes that contribute significantly to the determination of the atomic weights of the elements).

  9. IUPAC Periodic Table of Isotopes for the Educational Community

    Holden, N.E.; Coplen, T.B.

    2012-01-01

    John Dalton first proposed the concept of atomic weights of the elements in the first decade of the nineteenth century. These atomic weights of the chemical elements were thought of as constants of nature, similar to the speed of light. Dmitri Mendeleev arranged the atomic weights of the elements in ascending order of value and used the systematic variation of their chemical properties to produce his Periodic Table of the Elements in 1869. Measurement of atomic weight values became an important chemical activity for a century and a half. Theodore Richards received a Noble Prize for his work in this area. In 1913, Fredrick Soddy found a species of radium, which had an atomic weight value of 228, compared to the familiar radium gas value of 226. Soddy coined the term 'isotope' (Greek for 'in the same place') to account for this second atomic weight value in the radium position of the Periodic Table. Both of these isotopes of radium are radioactive. Radioactive isotopes are energetically unstable and will decay (disintegrate) over time. The time it takes for one half of a sample of a given radioactive isotope to decay is the half-life of that isotope. In addition to having different atomic weight values, radium-226 and radium-228 also have different half-life values. Around the same time as Soddy's work, J.J. Thomson (discoverer of the electron) identified two stable (non-radioactive) isotopes of the same element, neon. Over the next 40 years, the majority of the known chemical elements were found to have two or more stable (or long-lived radioactive isotopes that contribute significantly to the determination of the atomic weights of the elements).

  10. Impact of diagenesis and low grade metamorphosis on Triassic sabkha dolomite δ26Mg

    Immenhauser, A.; Geske, A.; Richter, D.; Buhl, D.; Niedermayr, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dolomite is a common rock forming mineral in the geological record but its value as archive of ancient seawater δ26Mg signatures and their variations in time are at present underexplored. Unknown factors include the sensitivity of δ26Mg ratio to processes in the diagenetic and low grade metamorphic domain. Here, we document and discusses the first detailed δ26Mg data set from early diagenetic and burial dolomites. Samples come from the Upper Triassic Hauptdolomit (Dolomia Principale; The Dolomites, Italy) and include coeval dolmicrites that underwent differential burial diagenesis in a temperature range between about 100 and more than 350°C. As indicated by dolmicrite 87/86Sr ratios, sabkha calcian D1 dolomites precipitated from evaporated seawater and stabilized at an early diagenetic stage to D2 dolomites analysed here. With increasing burial temperature, dolomite δ26Mg ratio scatter in the data set decreases with increasing Mg/Ca ratio and degree of order. Specifically, δ26Mg ratio variability is reduced from ~0.7‰ at burial temperatures beneath 100°C to about ~0.2‰ at temperatures in excess of 350°C, respectively, with mean δ26Mg values ranging constantly near -1.9‰. This suggests that, at least for the rock buffered system investigated here, dolmicrite δ26Mg proxy data are conservative and preserve near pristine values even at elevated burial temperatures. At present, the main element of uncertainty is the Mg-isotope fractionation factor between (evaporated) seawater and dolomite. A possible solution to this problem includes the compilation of a data from modern sabkha environments including pore water and calcian dolomite δ26Mg isotope signatures.

  11. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF/sub 3/ gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF/sub 3/. Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF/sub 3/ solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references.

  12. Melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A study has been made of isotope exchange between melatonin and deuterium (D 2 O) or tritium (HTO) oxide under different conditions. The ease of isotope exchange for the indole ring hydrogens of melatonin in an acidic medium decreases over the series H 4 > H 2 H 6 >> H 7 , enabling the authors to process a route for production of melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at positions 4,6, and 2 of the indole ring. A method has been suggested for producing melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at position 2 by desulfurization of 2-(2,4-dinitro-phenylsulfenyl)melatonin at Ni(Re) (D)

  13. Melatonin labelled by hydrogen isotopes

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    Isotope exchange of melatonin with deuterium (D 2 O) and tritium (HTO) oxides under different conditions is studied. Simplicity of isotope exchange of hydrogens of the indole ring of melatonin in the acidic medium decreases in series H 4 >H 2 >H 6 >>H 7 , that permits to suggest the way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in positions 4,6 and 2 of the indole ring. The way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in position 2 according to the reaction of desulfation 2-(2,4-dinitrophenylsulphenyl) melatonin at catalyst Ni(Re)(D) is suggested

  14. Development of Stable Isotope Technology

    Jeong, Do Young; Kim, Cheol Jung; Han, Jae Min

    2009-03-01

    KAERI has obtained an advanced technology with singular originality for laser stable isotope separation. Objectives for this project are to get production technology of Tl-203 stable isotope used for medical application and are to establish the foundation of the pilot system, while we are taking aim at 'Laser Isotope Separation Technology to make resistance to the nuclear proliferation'. And we will contribute to ensuring a nuclear transparency in the world society by taking part in a practical group of NSG and being collaboration with various international groups related to stable isotope separation technology

  15. Isotope separation by ion waves

    Dawson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    One of the isotopes of an element having several isotopes can be separated from the others in a dense, neutral plasma. Thus initially a neutral plasma is prepared including the element in question. This may consist of positive ions and negative electrons or alternatively of positive and negative ions, or else of a mixture of positive ions, negative ions and electrons. The plasma may then be injected into a magnetic field or may be generated in the field where more energy is imparted to a selected isotope than to the others. Finally, the isotopes are separated from each other on the basis of their differential energies. For example, the selected isotope may be given more energy than the others by stimulating it within the plasma at its resonant frequency which may be close to the cyclotron frequency, either by an electric field or by a magnetic field. In order to excite the other isotope, a different resonant frequency is required which depends on the plasma density, the relative concentration of electrons if the plasma contains electrons, the strength of the magnetic field, the ratio of charge to mass of the isotope, and possibly on the physical parameters of the plasma apparatus itself, such as the ratio of the length of the plasma column to its radius. The more energetic isotope may be separated by energy dependent chemical reactions, it may be collected by a positively biased probe or else the isotopes may be separated from each other by magnetic fields or in various other ways

  16. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF 3 gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF 3 . Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF 3 solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references

  17. Isotope separation by magnetic fields

    Dawson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    One of the isotopes of an element having several isotopes can be separated from the others in a dense, neutral plasma. Thus initially a neutral plasma is prepared including the element in question. This may consist of positive ions and negative electrons or alternatively of positive and negative ions, or else of a mixture of positive ions, negative ions and electrons. The plasma may then be injected into a magnetic field or may be generated in the field where more energy is imparted to a selected isotope than to the others. Finally, the isotopes are separated from each other on the basis of their differential energies. For example, the selected isotope may be given more energy than the others by stimulating it within the plasma at its resonant frequency which may be close to the cyclotron frequency, either by an electric field or by a magnetic field. In order to excite the other isotope, a different resonant frequency is required which depends on the plasma density, the relative concentration of electrons if the plasma contains electrons, the strength of the magnetic field, the ratio of charge to mass of the isotope, and possibly on the physical parameters of the plasma apparatus itself, such as the ratio of the length of the plasma column to its radius. The more energetic isotope may be separated by energy dependent chemical reactions, it may be collected by a positively biased probe or else the isotopes may be separated from each other by magnetic fields or in various other ways

  18. Luna 24 ferrobasalt as a low-Mg primary melt

    Norman, M.; Ryder, G.

    1980-01-01

    Luna 24 very-low titanium (VLT) ferrobasalts, metabasalts, brown glasses and impact melts form a tight compositional cluster with no gradation to other groupings postulated for the Luna 24 core components. This suggests that the Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt was extruded as a liquid of its own composition and was not derived by fractional crystallization from a more magnesian parent in a surface flow. Furthermore, the characteristics of the core lithologies are not easily visualized as components of such a differential flow, e.g. brown glasses. Gravitative settling models purporting to demonstrate the validity of the flow differentiation model are merely permissive. Subsurface fractionation requires that plagioclase, not olivine, be the liquidus phase. The high-Mg component in the Luna 24 core can be constrained, though not identified, chemically, and it has neither the major element, trace element, isotopic, nor mineralogical characteristics required of a possible parent to the Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt. Thus models of fractionation lack a physical expression of the less differentiated compositions, contrary to the belief that the high-Mg component in the core is the parent material. The Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt is probably a primary low-Mg melt from a plagioclase-bearing source region, and may have undergone little or no fractionation prior to eruption. Such a model is compatible with, and suggested by, chemical and experimental data. Caution against posulating that all Mg-poor melts are fractionated products, based on terrestrial models, is advised. The terrestrial oceanic situation of 'primary melts' with similar Mg/Fe is probably not valid for the Moon. (Auth.)

  19. Distinct 238U/235U ratios and REE patterns in plutonic and volcanic angrites: Geochronologic implications and evidence for U isotope fractionation during magmatic processes

    Tissot, François L. H.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Grove, Timothy L.

    2017-09-01

    Angrites are differentiated meteorites that formed between 4 and 11 Myr after Solar System formation, when several short-lived nuclides (e.g., 26Al-26Mg, 53Mn-53Cr, 182Hf-182W) were still alive. As such, angrites are prime anchors to tie the relative chronology inferred from these short-lived radionuclides to the absolute Pb-Pb clock. The discovery of variable U isotopic composition (at the sub-permil level) calls for a revision of Pb-Pb ages calculated using an ;assumed; constant 238U/235U ratio (i.e., Pb-Pb ages published before 2009-2010). In this paper, we report high-precision U isotope measurement for six angrite samples (NWA 4590, NWA 4801, NWA 6291, Angra dos Reis, D'Orbigny, and Sahara 99555) using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry and the IRMM-3636 U double-spike. The age corrections range from -0.17 to -1.20 Myr depending on the samples. After correction, concordance between the revised Pb-Pb and Hf-W and Mn-Cr ages of plutonic and quenched angrites is good, and the initial (53Mn/55Mn)0 ratio in the Early Solar System (ESS) is recalculated as being (7 ± 1) × 10-6 at the formation of the Solar System (the error bar incorporates uncertainty in the absolute age of Calcium, Aluminum-rich inclusions - CAIs). An uncertainty remains as to whether the Al-Mg and Pb-Pb systems agree in large part due to uncertainties in the Pb-Pb age of CAIs. A systematic difference is found in the U isotopic compositions of quenched and plutonic angrites of +0.17‰. A difference is also found between the rare earth element (REE) patterns of these two angrite subgroups. The δ238U values are consistent with fractionation during magmatic evolution of the angrite parent melt. Stable U isotope fractionation due to a change in the coordination environment of U during incorporation into pyroxene could be responsible for such a fractionation. In this context, Pb-Pb ages derived from pyroxenes fraction should be corrected using the U isotope composition

  20. High-precision isotopic characterization of USGS reference materials by TIMS and MC-ICP-MS

    Weis, Dominique; Kieffer, Bruno; Maerschalk, Claude; Barling, Jane; de Jong, Jeroen; Williams, Gwen A.; Hanano, Diane; Pretorius, Wilma; Mattielli, Nadine; Scoates, James S.; Goolaerts, Arnaud; Friedman, Richard M.; Mahoney, J. Brian

    2006-08-01

    The Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research (PCIGR) at the University of British Columbia has undertaken a systematic analysis of the isotopic (Sr, Nd, and Pb) compositions and concentrations of a broad compositional range of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reference materials, including basalt (BCR-1, 2; BHVO-1, 2), andesite (AGV-1, 2), rhyolite (RGM-1, 2), syenite (STM-1, 2), granodiorite (GSP-2), and granite (G-2, 3). USGS rock reference materials are geochemically well characterized, but there is neither a systematic methodology nor a database for radiogenic isotopic compositions, even for the widely used BCR-1. This investigation represents the first comprehensive, systematic analysis of the isotopic composition and concentration of USGS reference materials and provides an important database for the isotopic community. In addition, the range of equipment at the PCIGR, including a Nu Instruments Plasma MC-ICP-MS, a Thermo Finnigan Triton TIMS, and a Thermo Finnigan Element2 HR-ICP-MS, permits an assessment and comparison of the precision and accuracy of isotopic analyses determined by both the TIMS and MC-ICP-MS methods (e.g., Nd isotopic compositions). For each of the reference materials, 5 to 10 complete replicate analyses provide coherent isotopic results, all with external precision below 30 ppm (2 SD) for Sr and Nd isotopic compositions (27 and 24 ppm for TIMS and MC-ICP-MS, respectively). Our results also show that the first- and second-generation USGS reference materials have homogeneous Sr and Nd isotopic compositions. Nd isotopic compositions by MC-ICP-MS and TIMS agree to within 15 ppm for all reference materials. Interlaboratory MC-ICP-MS comparisons show excellent agreement for Pb isotopic compositions; however, the reproducibility is not as good as for Sr and Nd. A careful, sequential leaching experiment of three first- and second-generation reference materials (BCR, BHVO, AGV) indicates that the heterogeneity in Pb isotopic compositions

  1. Al-doped MgB{sub 2} materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Koç University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, Istanbul (Turkey); Erdem, Emre, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, Freiburg (Germany); Weber, Stefan [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, Freiburg (Germany); Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies (FRIAS), Universität Freiburg, Albertstr. 19, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-16

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB{sub 2}. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB{sub 2} disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  2. Advanced isotope separation

    1982-01-01

    The Study Group briefly reviewed the technical status of the three Advanced Isotope Separation (AIS) processes. It also reviewed the evaluation work that has been carried out by DOE's Process Evaluation Board (PEB) and the Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCCND). The Study Group briefly reviewed a recent draft assessment made for DOE staff of the nonproliferation implications of the AIS technologies. The staff also very briefly summarized the status of GCEP and Advanced Centrifuge development. The Study Group concluded that: (1) there has not been sufficient progress to provide a firm scientific, technical or economic basis on which to select one of the three competing AIS processes for full-scale engineering development at this time; and (2) however, should budgetary restraints or other factors force such a selection, we believe that the evaluation process that is being carried out by the PEB provides the best basis available for making a decision. The Study Group recommended that: (1) any decisions on AIS processes should include a comparison with gas centrifuge processes, and should not be made independently from the plutonium isotope program; (2) in evaluating the various enrichment processes, all applicable costs (including R and D and sales overhead) and an appropriate discounting approach should be included in order to make comparisons on a private industry basis; (3) if the three AIS programs continue with limited resources, the work should be reoriented to focus only on the most pressing technical problems; and (4) if a decision is made to develop the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation process, the solid collector option should be pursued in parallel to alleviate the potential program impact of liquid collector thermal control problems

  3. Isotope effect and isotope separation. A chemist's view

    Ishida, Takanobu

    2002-01-01

    What causes the isotope effects (IE)? This presentation will be centered around the equilibrium isotope effects due to the differences in the nuclear masses. The occurrence of the equilibrium constant, K, of isotope exchange reactions which differ from the values predicted by the classical theory of statistical mechanics, K cl , is explored. The non-classical K corresponds to the unit-stage separation factor, α, that is different from unity and forms a basis of an isotope separation process involving the chemical exchange reaction. Here, the word 'chemical exchange' includes not only the isotope exchange chemical reactions between two or more chemical species but also the isotope exchanges involving the equilibria between liquid and vapor phases and liquid-gas, liquid solution-gas, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid phases. In Section I, origins of the isotope effect phenomena will be explored and, in the process, various quantities used in discussions of isotope effect that have often caused confusions will be unambiguously defined. This Section will also correlate equilibrium constant with separation factor. In Section II, various forms of temperature-dependence of IE and separation factor will be discussed. (author)

  4. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis

    Xu, Zemin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Shen, Xiaoli [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Environmental Engineering, Quzhou University, Quzhou 324000 (China); Zhang, Xi-Chang [Laboratory for Teaching in Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liu, Weiping [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Department of Effect-Directed Analysis, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig 04318 (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Alpha-cypermethrin (α-CP) can be degraded by microorganisms in soil. • Biodegradation of α-CP resulted in carbon isotope fractionation. • A relationship was found between carbon isotope ratios and concentrations of α-CP. • An enrichment factor ϵ of α-CP was determined as −1.87‰. • CSIA is applicable to assess biodegradation of α-CP. - Abstract: To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days’ incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to −29.14 ± 0.22‰ and −29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = −1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field.

  5. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    1976-01-12

    A container is described for storage, shipping and and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same. The container is compact, safe against fracture or accident, and is reusable. It consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and is retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  6. Cold regions isotope applications

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids

  7. Applied isotope hydrogeology

    Pearson, F.J. jr; Balderer, W.; Gautschi, A.

    1991-01-01

    This volume is a report on the isotopic investigations of ground-water in northern Switzerland and adjacent regions carried out since 1981 by Nagra, the Swiss National Cooperation for the Storage of Radio-active Waste. This study was undertaken to support a programme assessing potential sites for nuclear waste repositories. It includes measurements on a large number of stable- and radioisotopes and noble gases, supported by complete water chemical analyses and many rock and mineral analyses. A synthesis and interpretation of the data, along with the data themselves, are given here. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  8. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  9. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure , particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  10. Isotope diagnostics apparatus

    Herrschaft, H.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a measuring probe for an isotope diagnostics apparatus to determine the distribution of radioactive substances in a body by measuring the radiation emanating from this body by means of a multiplicity of measuring probes directed simultaneously towards areas of measuring surfae and carried in guidances of a holding block. The measuring results of the individual probes are recorded separately, thus allowing the possibility of being evaluated separately, too. Measuring probes of this kind are used in multi-channel measuring objects and are useful particularly for determining the regional cerebral blood flow. (orig./ORU) [de

  11. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    1976-01-01

    A container is described for storage, shipping and and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same. The container is compact, safe against fracture or accident, and is reusable. It consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and is retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates

  12. Isotopic Thermionic Generator

    Clemot, M.; Devin, B.; Durand, J.P.

    1967-01-01

    This report describes the general design of a thermionic direct conversion space generator. The power source used is a radioisotope. Two radioisotopes are considered: Pu 238 and Cm 244. The system is made up of a heat pipe concentrating the thermal flux from the isotope to the emitter, and of a second heat pipe evacuating the waste heat from the collector to the outer wall used as radiating panel. Calculations are given in the particular case of a 100 electrical watts output power. (authors) [fr

  13. Isotope separation process

    Lyon, R.K.; Kaldor, A.

    1977-01-01

    In a method for the separation of isotopes of uranium in UF 6 , the UF 6 is subjected to ir radiation at a predetermined wavelength or set of wavelengths for less than 10 -3 sec in such a manner that at least 0.1% of the 235 UF 6 molecules absorb an energy of more than 2000 cm -1 . The excited UF 6 is then reacted with a gaseous reagent, F 2 , Cl 2 , or Br 2 , to produce a product which is then recovered by means known in the art

  14. Dual Si and O Isotope Measurement of Lunar Samples Using IRMS

    Banerjee, N.; Hill, P. J. A.; Osinski, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    The use of isotopic systems and their associated theoretical models have become an increasingly sophisticated tool for investigating the origin of planetary bodies in the solar system. It was originally hypothesized that evidence for the impact origin of Moon would manifest itself as an isotopic heterogeneity between lunar and terrestrial samples; however, most isotope systems show no difference between the bulk Earth and Moon. The stable isotopes of both silicon (Si) and oxygen (O) have been essential in further understanding planetary processes including core formation. Historically the analysis of the Si and O isotope ratios in terrestrial and extraterrestrial material has primarily been measured independent of each other through three main techniques: isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). Each technique has its own strength and weakness in regards to resolution and precision; however, one of the main limiting factors in all three of these techniques rests on the requirement of multiple aliquots. As most literature focuses on the measurement of oxygen or silicon isotopes, this unique line allows for the precise analysis of Si and O isotopes from the same aliquot of bulk sample, which cannot be done with SIMS or ICP-MS analysis. To deal with this problem a unique laser line system has been developed in the Laboratory for Stable Isotope Science at Western University, Canada, that simultaneously extracts SiF4 and O2 from the same 1-2 mg aliquot. We present the application of analyzing both isotopic systems from the sample aliquot to Apollo, meteoritic, and terrestrial samples and its implication for the formation of the Moon. Preliminary results from this line suggest that although the O isotopes ratios are consistent with a homogenous Moon-Earth system, a difference is observed in Si isotopes between Apollo and terrestrial samples compared to

  15. Data mining for isotope discrimination in atom probe tomography

    Broderick, Scott R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States); Bryden, Aaron [Ames National Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States); Suram, Santosh K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States); Rajan, Krishna, E-mail: krajan@iastate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Ions with similar time-of-flights (TOF) can be discriminated by mapping their kinetic energy. While current generation position-sensitive detectors have been considered insufficient for capturing the isotope kinetic energy, we demonstrate in this paper that statistical learning methodologies can be used to capture the kinetic energy from all of the parameters currently measured by mathematically transforming the signal. This approach works because the kinetic energy is sufficiently described by the descriptors on the potential, the material, and the evaporation process within atom probe tomography (APT). We discriminate the isotopes for Mg and Al by capturing the kinetic energy, and then decompose the TOF spectrum into its isotope components and identify the isotope for each individual atom measured. This work demonstrates the value of advanced data mining methods to help enhance the information resolution of the atom probe. - Highlights: ► Atom probe tomography and statistical learning were combined for data enhancement. ► Multiple eigenvalue decompositions decomposed a spectrum with overlapping peaks. ► The isotope of each atom was determined by kinetic energy discrimination. ► Eigenspectra were identified and new chemical information was identified.

  16. Systematic review

    Lødrup, Anders Bergh; Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in getting off acid-suppressive medication and partly explain the increase in long-term use of PPI. A number of studies addressing this issue have been published recently. The authors aimed to systematically review the existing evidence of clinically relevant symptoms caused by acid rebound following PPI...

  17. Systematic review

    Christensen, Troels Dreier; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Palshof, Jesper Andreas

    2016-01-01

    to earlier diagnosis and improved survival. Method: In this paper, we describe the incidence as well as characteristics associated with BM based on a systematic review of the current literature, following the PRISMA guidelines. Results: We show that the incidence of BM in CRC patients ranges from 0.6 to 3...

  18. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  19. Electromagnetic separator for light and middle isotope elements; Separateur electromagnetique pour les isotopes d'elements legers et moyens

    Bernas, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    We describe a separator of isotope with a 60 deg magnetic sector that permits, thanks to a process of neutralization of the space charge, to use efficiently intense ion beams. The ion source for solid is essentially constituted by a discharge of hot cathode in a magnetic field and provides an ion beam focused of more than 10 mA. The result of the first separations (Zn, Sb, Hg) indicates that the isotopes of various elements can be obtained in quantities varying from 10 to 100 mg/24 hours. (author) [French] 0n decrit un separateur d'isotope a secteur magnetique de 60 deg qui permet, grace a un procede de neutralisation de la charge d'espace, d'utiliser efficacement des faisceaux d'ions intenses. La source d'ions pour solide est essentiellement constituee par une decharge a cathode chaude dans un champ magnetique et fournit un faisceau d'ion focalises de plus de 10 mA. Le resultat des premieres separations (Zn, Sb, Hg) indique que les isotopes de divers elements peuvent etre obtenus en quantites variant de 10 a 100 mg/24 heures. (auteur)

  20. Extreme heterogeneity in Sr isotope systematic in the Himalayan ...

    R. Narasimhan, Krishtel eMaging Solutions

    due to post-collision partial melting within the Himalayan crust. ... plutons occur in two linear belts either close to ... can explain, even in outcrop scale, the observed ... between the northern Eurasian plate and the southern Indian plate. ... (b) Thrusting model and boundary conditions used for calculating transient geotherms.

  1. Constraints on Weathering from Riverine Magnesium Isotope Ratios

    Wiechert, Uwe; Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Meixner, Anette

    and industrialized regions, the d26Mg values mirror the lithologies of the catchment areas: the Danubian catchment is dominated by carbonatic lithologies and in the Danube dissolved magnesium exhibits the most negative d26Mg values between -1.85 and -1.70 ‰. The mainly siliceous catchment of the river Elbe causes....... Simple mass balance calculations on the basis of the magnesium isotopes obtained for the investigated rivers imply 26 to 59 % magnesium derived from carbonatic lithologies and 41 to 74 % magnesium from siliceous lithologies. This is in contrast to estimates using conventional methods for the tribute...

  2. Controls on the stable isotope compositions of travertine from hyperalkaline springs in Oman: Insights from clumped isotope measurements

    Falk, E. S.; Guo, W.; Paukert, A. N.; Matter, J. M.; Mervine, E. M.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2016-11-01

    Carbonate formation at hyperalkaline springs is typical of serpentinization in peridotite massifs worldwide. These travertines have long been known to exhibit large variations in their carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, extending from apparent equilibrium values to highly depleted values. However, the exact causes of these variations are not well constrained. We analyzed a suite of well-characterized fresh carbonate precipitates and travertines associated with hyperalkaline springs in the peridotite section of the Samail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman, and found their clumped isotope compositions vary systematically with formation environments. Based on these findings, we identified four main processes controlling the stable isotope compositions of these carbonates. These include hydroxylation of CO2, partial isotope equilibration of dissolved inorganic carbon, mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end-members, and post-depositional recrystallization. Most notably, in fresh crystalline films on the surface of hyperalkaline springs and in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools, we observed large enrichments in Δ47 (up to ∼0.2‰ above expected equilibrium values) which accompany depletions in δ18O and δ13C, yielding about 0.01‰ increase in Δ47 and 1.1‰ decrease in δ13C for every 1‰ decrease in δ18O, relative to expected equilibrium values. This disequilibrium trend, also reflected in preserved travertines ranging in age from modern to ∼40,000 years old, is interpreted to arise mainly from the isotope effects associated with the hydroxylation of CO2 in high-pH fluids and agrees with our first-order theoretical estimation. In addition, in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools and in subsamples of one preserved travertine terrace, we observed additional enrichments in Δ47 at intermediate δ13C and δ18O, consistent with mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end

  3. Development and studies of Cd_1_−_xMg_xTe thin films with varying band gaps to understand the Mg incorporation and the related material properties

    Palomera, Roger C.; Martínez, Omar S.; Pantoja-Enriquez, J.; Mathews, N.R.; Reyes-Banda, Martín G.; Krishnan, B.; Mathew, X.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Cd_1_−_xMg_xTe films with band gap in the range 1.47–2.41 eV is obtained. • Cd substitution by Mg was confirmed with SIMS and XPS analysis. • Cd_1_−_xMg_xTe films maintained CdTe structural features but with higher band gap. • Mg incorporation in CdTe inhibited grain growth. - Abstract: In this paper we report a systematic work involving the development of Cd_1_−_xMg_xTe thin films by co-evaporation of CdTe and Mg. The evaporation rate of both materials were adjusted to obtain ternary films of varying stoichiometry and hence the band gap. We have deposited films with band gap ranging from 1.47 to 2.41 eV. The films were characterized for structural, morphological, optical, opto-electronic, and spectroscopic properties. The film stoichiometry was studied across the thickness using SIMS data. SEM images showed that the grain size has a dependence on Mg content in the film, which inhibits the grain growth. The structural parameters showed a systematic dependence on Mg content in the film, however, there was no noticeable change in the XRD reflections with respect that of pure CdTe for lower concentrations of Mg. XPS analysis shed light on the incorporation of Mg further supporting the band gap variations observed with the UV–Vis spectroscopic studies. The photoresponse of the film was affected by Mg incorporation. Prototype devices of the type Cd_1_−_XMg_xTe/CdS were fabricated and the results are discussed.

  4. Stable isotope evolution and paleolimnology of ancient Lake Creede

    Rye, Robert O.; Bethke, Philip M.; Finkelstein, David B.

    2000-01-01

    The lacustrine carbonate and travertine (tufa) deposits of ancient Lake Creede preserve a remarkable record of the isotopic evolution of the lake. That record indicates that the δ18O of the lake water, and by analogy its salinity, evolved through evaporation. Limited and less reliable data on hydrous minerals and fluid inclusions in early diagenetic carbonates indicate that the δD of the lake waters also evolved through evaporation. The isotope data place restrictions on models of the physical limnology of the lake and its evolution.The closed-basin Lake Creede formed shortly after collapse of the 26.9 Ma Creede caldera. Throughout most of its history it occupied the northern three quarters of the moat between the resurgent dome and wall of the caldera. The Creede Formation was deposited in the basin, dominantly as lacustrine sediments. Travertine mounds interfinger with Creede Formation sediments along the inner and outer margins of the lake basin. An estimated one-half of the original thickness of the Creede Formation has been lost mainly to erosion although scattered remnants of the upper portion remain on the caldera walls. Two diamond core holes (CCM-1 and CCM-2) sampled the uneroded portion of the Creede Formation as part of the U.S. Continental Drilling Program. Volcaniclastic material, including tuff units deposited directly into the lake and ash washed in from the watershed, compose the main lithologies of the Creede Formation. These volcaniclastic strata were produced by episodic ring-fracture volcanism.Lacustrine carbonates make up about 15% of the section sampled by drill core. They occur as 1 mm to 2 cm low-Mg calcite laminae alternating with siliciclastic laminae in scattered intervals throughout the preserved section. The carbonate laminae are accumulations of 5–20 µm crystallites (microsparites) and brine shrimp fecal pellets (peloids) composed mainly of microsparite particles. Low-Mg calcite also occurs as an early diagenetic replacement of

  5. Radium isotopes, alkaline earth diagenesis, and age determination of travertine from Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyoming, U.S.A

    Sturchio, N.C.

    1990-01-01

    Travertine from active springs, former vents, and drill core was analyzed for Ra isotopes, other alkaline earth elements, and mineralogical composition. Thermal water also was analyzed. Travertine, presently being deposited, contains 3.0-15.3 pCi/g 226 Ra, and has a 228 Ra/ 226 Ra ratio identical to that in thermal water. Travertine precipitates mostly as aragonite and experiences a complete diagenetic transformation to calcite within 9 a. Systematic compositional changes associated with this diagenetic transformation are enrichment of Mg and depletion of Sr, Ba and Ra. Apparent mineral-water distribution coefficients for Mg, Sr and Ba in aragonite and calcite are within the range of those determined experimentally, implying near-equilibrium conditions and high water-rock ratios during diagenesis. Impure travertine from near the base of a section in the Y-10 drill hole (at 72.9 m depth) has a 230 Th/ 234 U isochron age of 7700±440 a. The content of 226 Ra in the normal, subhorizontally layered, porous travertine decreases with depth. The observed 226 Ra vs depth relation is consistent with continuous deposition of travertine at the site from 7700 a BP to near present at a mean rate of ∼1.0 cm/a, and indicates minimal exchange of Ra between travertine and pore water after the early diagenetic transformation of aragonite to calcite. (author)

  6. Preparation and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Mg-Rich Mg-Ni Ultrafine Particles

    Jianxin Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Mg-rich Mg-Ni ultrafine powders were prepared through an arc plasma method. The phase components, microstructure, and hydrogen storage properties of the powders were carefully investigated. It is found that Mg2Ni and MgNi2 could be obtained directly from the vapor state reactions between Mg and Ni, depending on the local vapor content in the reaction chamber. A nanostructured MgH2 + Mg2NiH4 hydrogen storage composite could be generated after hydrogenation of the Mg-Ni ultrafine powders. After dehydrogenation, MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 decomposed into nanograined Mg and Mg2Ni, respectively. Thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC analyses showed that Mg2NiH4 phase may play a catalytic role in the dehydriding process of the hydrogenated Mg ultrafine particles.

  7. Zirconium isotope separation process

    Peterson, S.H.; Lahoda, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for reducing the amount of zirconium 91 isotope in zirconium comprising: forming a first solution of (a) a first solvent, (b) a scavenger, and (c) a zirconium compound which is soluble in the first solvent and reacts with the scavenger when exposed to light of a wavelength of 220 to 600 nm; irradiating the first solution with light at the wavelength for a time sufficient to photoreact a disproportionate amount of the zirconium compound containing the zirconium 91 isotope with the scavenger to form a reaction product in the first solution; contacting the first solution, while effecting the irradiation, with a second solvent which is immiscible with the first solvent, which the second solvent is a preferential solvent for the reaction product relative to the first solvent, such that at least a portion of the reaction product is transferred to the second solvent to form a second solution; and separating the second solution from the first solution after the contacting

  8. Isotope techniques for hydrology

    1964-01-01

    In the body of the Panel's report specific conclusions and recommendations are presented in the context of each subject. The general consensus of the Panel is as follows: by the study of this report, the 1961 Panel report, the Proceedings of the March 1963 Tokyo Symposium and other reports of research and technological advances, isotope-technique applications to hydrologic problems have provided some useful avenues for understanding the nature of the hydrologic cycle and in the solution of specific engineering problems. Some techniques are developed thoroughly enough for fairly routine application as tools for use in the solution of practical problems, but further research and development is needed on other concepts to determined whether or not they can be beneficially applied to either research or engineering problems. A concerted effort is required on the part of both hydrologists and isotope specialists working as teams to assure that proper synthesis of scientific advances in the respective fields and translation of these advances into practical technology is achieved

  9. Isotopes in agriculture

    1983-01-01

    Part 1: The stable isotope of nitrogen 15N has become widely used as tracer in agriculture, medicine and biology research. The film gives an overview of the sample preparation and analytical procedures followed in the analysis of the nitrogen isotopic composition (14N/15N ratio) by optical emission spectrometry at the Seibersdorf Laboratory. The subsampling of plant material and the several steps of chemical pretreatment such as Kjeldahl digestion, distillation, titration and adjustment of the proper N concentration in the extract are demonstrated. The preparation of the discharge tubes is shown in detail. Final measurement of the 14N/15N ratio is carried out with the NOI-5 and JASCO emission spectrometers. Part 2: This training film deals with the use of 32P-labelled materials in field and greenhouse experimentation in soil-plant relationships studies. All technical aspects, including safe handling and radiation protection procedures to be considered in the layout and harvesting of field experiments are documented in detail. Procedures followed up in the evaluation of P fertilizers such as rock phosphates under greenhouse conditions are described. Several soil injection techniques available for determination of the root activity pattern of trees are shown

  10. Isotope techniques for hydrology

    1964-01-01

    In the body of the Panel's report specific conclusions and recommendations are presented in the context of each subject. The general consensus of the Panel is as follows: by the study of this report, the 1961 Panel report, the Proceedings of the March 1963 Tokyo Symposium and other reports of research and technological advances, isotope-technique applications to hydrologic problems have provided some useful avenues for understanding the nature of the hydrologic cycle and in the solution of specific engineering problems. Some techniques are developed thoroughly enough for fairly routine application as tools for use in the solution of practical problems, but further research and development is needed on other concepts to determined whether or not they can be beneficially applied to either research or engineering problems. A concerted effort is required on the part of both hydrologists and isotope specialists working as teams to assure that proper synthesis of scientific advances in the respective fields and translation of these advances into practical technology is achieved.

  11. Method of isotope separation

    Lyon, R K

    1975-05-22

    Isotopes of a gaseous compound can be separated by multi-infrared photoabsorption which follows a selective dissociation of the excited molecules by single photon absorption of photons of visible or UV radiation. The process involves three steps. Firstly, the molecules to be separated are irradiated with a high-energy IR laser, whereby the molecules of the compound containing the lighter isotopes are preferably excited. They are then irradiated by a second laser with UV or visible light whose frequency of radiation brings the excited molecules into a form in which they can be separated from the non-excited molecules. The third step is the reformation of the substances according to known methods. A power density of at least 10/sup 4/ watt/cm/sup 2/ per torr gas pressure with an irradiation time of 10/sup -10/ to 5 x 10/sup -5/ seconds in the presence of a second gas with at least 5 times higher partial pressure is necessary for the IR radiation. The method may be used for UF/sub 6/ for which an example is given here.

  12. Isotopic geochemistry at Wairakei

    Stewart, M.K.

    1985-12-01

    Deuterium measurements on geothermal water at Wairakei are consistent with the water being derived from rainfall which has percolated down from the surface. The oxygen-18 content, however, is enriched compared to average rainfall. This 18 O shift is due to isotopic exchange between water and rock at greater-than-explored depths. The magnitude of the shift implied that the mass ration (W/R) of water that has passed through the system (W) to the rock it has exchanged with (R) is about 1 assuming open (i.e. single-pass) conditions. (The ratio is about 2 if it has been a closed system, but this is thought to be less likely). The residence time of water underground cannot be determined from tritium and carbon-14 measurements at present, but arguments based on the argon isotope and deuterium contents suggest mean residence times of a few tens of thousand years. The water-rock ratio and large natural outflow of thermal water prior to exploitation are consistent with this. The 18 O content of the water has changed only slightly, and the D content not at all, during exploitation at Wairakei (measurements from 1963, 1974 and 1981). An initial tendency for the 18 O to increase because of steam loss (also shown more clearly by chloride), has been followed by decrease of 18 O (and chloride) because of dilution with infiltrating near-surface water in parts of the field

  13. Petrological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of lignite and calcified lignite from mining area Pesje, Velenje Basin, Slovenia

    Vrabec, Mirijam; Markič, Miloš; Vrabec, Marko; Jaćimović, Radojko; Kanduč, Tjaša

    2014-05-01

    Lignite (organic rich) and calcified lignite (inorganic rich) samples from excavation field -50c mining area Pesje, Velenje Basin, Slovenia were investigated. During geological and structural mapping lignite and calcified lignite samples were systematically taken for determination of their petrological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics. Lignite is composed of fine detritical gelified matrix. At least five different types of calcified lignite were recognized forming laminations, calcifications after wood, petrified wood and complete replacements of lignite with carbonate. All measured parameters so far indicate geochemical processes during sedimentation of the Velenej Basin. After macroscopic description samples were split to organic and inorganic component (Ward, 1984) and powdered in an agate mortar for geochemical and isotopic analyses. Major and trace elements (As, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Sb, Se, Th, U, Zn) in these samples were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using k-0 standardization method (Jaćimović et al, 2002). The isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen was determined using a Europa 20-20 continuous flow IRMS ANCA-SL preparation module. A 1 mg amount of a sample was weighed in a tin capsule for carbon and 10 mg for nitrogen analysis. Samples for carbon analyses were pretreated with 1 M HCl to remove carbonates. Carbonate samples from carbonate-rich strata and calcified xylite were first roasted at 450 deg C (Krantz et al., 1987). Three miligrams of carbonate sample was transformed into CO2 by reaction with anhydrous H3PO4 at 55 deg C under vacuum (McCrea, 1950) and measured with GV 2003 isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Measured isotopic composition of oxygen as VPDB values was recalculated to the VSMOW reference standard to enable the comparison with data from other coal basins. SEM/EDXS of carbonate rich sediments was performed with JEOL JSM 5800 electron microanalyzer scanning electron microscope

  14. Reaction cross section for Ne isotopes

    Panda, R.N.; Sahu, B.K.; Patra, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present contribution, first the bulk properties are calculated, such as binding energy (BE), root mean square charge radius r ch , matter radius r m and quadrupole deformation parameter β 2 for 18-32 Ne isotopes in the Relativistic mean field (RMF) and effective field theory motivated RMF (E-RMF) formalisms . Then the total nuclear reaction cross section σR is analyzes for the scattering of 20 Ne and 28-32 Ne from a 12 C target at 240 MeV/nucleon by using the RMF model. Thus the objective of the present study is to calculate the bulk properties as well as a systematic analysis of σR over a range of neutron rich nuclei in the frame work of Glauber model

  15. Dielectrophoretic separation of gaseous isotopes

    McConnell, D.B.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous isotopes are separated from a mixture in a vertically elongated chamber by subjecting the mixture to a nonuniform transverse electric field. Dielectrophoretic separation of the isotopes is effected, producing a transverse temperature gradient in the chamber, thereby enhancing the separation by convective countercurrent flow. In the example given, the process and apparatus are applied to the production of heavy water from steam

  16. Boron isotopes in geothermal systems

    Aggarwal, J.

    1997-01-01

    Boron is a highly mobile element and during water-rock reactions, boron is leached out of rocks with no apparent fractionation. In geothermal systems where the water recharging the systems are meteoric in origin, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal fluid reflects the B isotope ratio of the rocks. Seawater has a distinctive B isotope ratio and where seawater recharges the geothermal system, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal system reflects the mixing of rock derived B and seawater derived B. Any deviations of the actual B isotope ratio of a mixture reflects subtle differences in the water-rock ratios in the cold downwelling limb of the hydrothermal system. This paper will present data from a variety of different geothermal systems, including New Zealand; Iceland; Yellowston, USA; Ibusuki, Japan to show the range in B isotope ratios in active geothermal systems. Some of these systems show well defined mixing trends between seawater and the host rocks, whilst others show the boron isotope ratios of the host rock only. In geothermal systems containing high amounts of CO 2 boron isotope ratios from a volatile B source can also be inferred. (auth)

  17. Basic methods of isotope analysis

    Ochkin, A.V.; Rozenkevich, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    The bases of the most applied methods of the isotope analysis are briefly presented. The possibilities and analytical characteristics of the mass-spectrometric, spectral, radiochemical and special methods of the isotope analysis, including application of the magnetic resonance, chromatography and refractometry, are considered [ru

  18. Lead isotope in mineral exploration

    Gulson, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date state-of-the-art review of lead isotopes in mineral exploration. Beginning with an historical review on suggested uses of lead isotopes in mineral exploration, the author then outlines the theoretical aspects of lead isotopes and illustrates that the method is based on well-known principles of radioactive decay, from which isotopic signatures for different styles of mineralization are derived. The varying isotopic signatures are then introduced. The major part of the book details over 40 case histories for base and precious metals, uranium and tin using sampling media such as sulfides, gossans, soils, weathered bedrock, vegetation and groundwaters. Advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Examples are given of the use of lead isotopes in testing conceptual models for exploration. The success rate and cost-effectiveness of the method are illustrated by actual exploration examples. Analytical advances which should lower the cost of the method and future uses are outlined. Many of the case histories use recently published or unpublished data, 27 tables of which are given in an appendix. Details of sampling, the methods for obtaining the isotope ratios, and a commercially-available integrated lead isotope service are also provided. (Auth.)

  19. Method for separating krypton isotopes

    Porter, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for separating krypton isotopes utilizing low temperature selective infrared excitation of 85krypton difluoride in an isotopic compound mixture. Multiphoton ir excitation and uv excitation techniques are used, as well as cryogenic matrix isolation and inert buffer gas isolation techniques

  20. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    1980-12-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available for distribution within the United States for non-destructive research use from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Materials Research Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or in reprocessing