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Sample records for mft doctoral education

  1. The Core Competencies and MFT Education: Practical Aspects of Transitioning to a Learning-Centered, Outcome-Based Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehart, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The MFT core competencies and latest COAMFTE accreditation standards usher in a new paradigm for MFT education. This transition necessitates not only measuring student mastery of competencies but also, more importantly, adopting a contemporary pedagogical model. This article provides an overview of the changes, a review of parallel trends in other…

  2. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  3. Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin (NKLM für Deutschland: Zusammenarbeit der Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung (GMA und des Medizinischen Fakultätentages (MFT [National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM in Germany: Cooperation of the Association for Medical Education (GMA and the Association of Medical Faculties in Germany (MFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn, Eckhart G.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] The Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area (FQ-EHEA; Bologna Process and the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning (EQF-LLL; Lisbon Process are competence-driven frameworks for vocational and higher education programmes in need for defined learning objectives. In the field of medical education, The Netherlands and Switzerland have developed national catalogues for undergraduate medical training, which are competence-based and compatible with a two-cycle curriculum comprised of a Bachelor in Medicine and a Master in Medicine. In Germany, virtually all medical organizations, last not least the Association of Medical Faculties (MFT, have voted against the application of the two-cycle (and the three-cycle curriculum to medical undergraduate education. A standstill of the European processes will not be accepted in the political arena, and a proposition was made by the Conference of German Ministers of Higher Education to develop a medical qualification framework for Germany, asking the Association for Medical Education (GMA and the MFT to join forces. This is not possible without consented national learning objectives derived from the professional context of physicians. The GMA has teamed up with the MFT to develop National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM in Germany (see Figure 1 to fulfill these needs.

  4. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education.

  5. Feasible utopias in doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Dely; Guccione, Kay; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    -Martek, Chen & McAlpine, 2011). PGRs’ motivation, creativity, resilience and momentum during their long and intense doctoral journey are often strongly sustained by unseen informal structures, social support systems and extra-curricular activities tacitly providing emotional, social, pastoral and academic......Part 1 Abstract Ongoing educational and psycho-social challenges in doctoral education (e.g. psychological distress, attrition and delay in completion) warrant a more comprehensive understanding of the expanded doctoral education context and how the different facets of doctoral support mechanisms......, 2016b; Bengtsen & Barnett, 2017; Bryan & Guccione, 2018; Elliot et al., 2016b, 2016c; Wisker et al., 2017). Yet, there remains a somewhat limited understanding not only of these multifaceted components but how they interact with already existing formal and informal support mechanisms offered...

  6. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  7. Doctoral education in a successful ecological niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly communities are dependent on and often measured by their ability to attract and develop doctoral students. Recent literature suggests that most scholarly communities entail ecological niches in which the doctoral students learn the codes and practices of research. In this article, we...... successful doctoral education because it: 1) fleshes out the professional attitude that is necessary for becoming a successful researcher in the department, 2) shapes and adapts the doctoral students’ desires to grasp and identify with the department’s practices, and 3) provides the doctoral students...... explore the microclimate in an ecological niche of doctoral education. Based on a theoretical definition of microclimate as the emotional atmosphere that ties group members together and affects their actions, we conducted a case study that aimed to describe the key features of the microclimate...

  8. Doctoral Education in Nursing: Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Florence S.

    1978-01-01

    Problems that confront nursing education and the quality of doctoral preparation are discussed in this article and include the steep rise in requests from nurses for admission into doctoral programs and tight university budgets; other concerns are the development of scholars and sharing research findings. (TA)

  9. The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jill Alexa

    2015-01-01

    Beginning with 21 US schools of education, the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate (CPED) has created a network of education faculty who are differentiating the EdD from the PhD in order to better meet the needs of their practitioner-scholar students. Their discussions center on two questions: "What are the knowledge, skills, and…

  10. Optimizing MFT dewatering by controlling polymer mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demoz, A.; Munoz, V.; Mikula, R. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Western Research Centre

    2010-07-01

    A method of controlling polymer mixing for the dewatering of mature fine tailings (MFT) was presented. The method was developed to accelerate water release from MFT and to recover more water for re-use. Dewatering rates are dependent upon hydrodynamic conditions as well as various physical mixing variables. The effect of mixing energy on the rate and amount of released water flocculated MFT was investigated using different impellers in order to determine the release water amount and capillary suction time. The mixing energy effect on the structure of the flocculated MFT was analyzed using rheology and stereo microscopy techniques. Batch mixing tests were conducted to determine dewatering characteristics. Flow was described using the Herschel-Bulkley model. Results of the study demonstrated a clear peak in the amount of water released with the mixing time. The effect was applicable to rim-ditch thin-lift, and dewatering by centrifugation. tabs., figs.

  11. Student Socialization in Interdisciplinary Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Daniel; Borrego, Maura; Newswander, Lynita K.

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary approaches are often seen as necessary for attacking the most critical challenges facing the world today, and doctoral students and their training programs are recognized as central to increasing interdisciplinary research capacity. However, the traditional culture and organization of higher education are ill-equipped to…

  12. Leadership Preparation in an Education Doctorate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, Dean

    2011-01-01

    This was a study of an education doctorate program at a small, private college. It examined the following nine components: theory of leadership for school improvement; candidate recruitment and selection based on leadership; coherent curriculum; use of active learning strategies; knowledgeable faculty; high quality internships; social and…

  13. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  14. Re-Imagining Doctoral Education: Professional Doctorates and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alison; Brennan, Marie; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Portents of the demise of the Professional Doctorate have emerged in some recent policy and institutional circles in Australia, raising questions about the meaning and relevance of the Professional Doctorate in an era of "league tables" and research assessment in Australia. This article argues that such portents, based largely on narrow…

  15. Looking Back at Doctoral Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a quantitative picture of doctoral education in South Africa up to 2010, from the time the first doctorate was awarded in 1899. It identifies the different institutional profiles and emphases of doctoral graduation in South African universities at various periods of time in the context of economic, political and social…

  16. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector; La formacion de doctores en el sector nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-03-01

    Doctoral aducation is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  17. Identification, Functional Study, and Promoter Analysis of HbMFT1, a Homolog of MFT from Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghong Bi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A homolog of MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT was isolated from Hevea brasiliensis and its biological function was investigated. Protein multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that HbMFT1 conserved critical amino acid residues to distinguish MFT, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT and TERMINAL FLOWER1 (TFL1-like proteins and showed a closer genetic relationship to the MFT-like group. The accumulation of HbMFT1 was generally detected in various tissues except pericarps, with the highest expression in embryos and relatively higher expression in roots and stems of seedlings, flowering inflorescences, and male and female flowers. HbMFT1 putative promoter analysis showed that tissue-specific, environmental change responsive and hormone-signaling responsive elements were generally present. HbMFT1 was strongly induced under a short-day condition at 28 °C, with the highest expression after the onset of a day. Overexpression of HbMFT1 inhibited seed germination, seedling growth, and flowering in transgenic Arabidopsis. The qRT-PCR further confirmed that APETALA1 (AP1 and FRUITFULL (FUL were drastically down-regulated in 35S::HbMFT1 plants. A histochemical β-glucuronidase (GUS assay showed that HbMFT1::GUS activity was mainly detected in stamens and mature seeds coinciding with its original expression and notably induced in rosette leaves and seedlings of transgenic Arabidopsis by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA due to the presence of ABA cis-elements in HbMFT1 promoter. These results suggested that HbMFT1 was mainly involved in maintenance of seed maturation and stamen development, but negatively controlled germination, growth and development of seedlings and flowering. In addition, the HbMFT1 promoter can be utilized in controlling transgene expression in stamens and seeds of rubber tree or other plant species.

  18. The Rise of Professional Doctorates: Case Studies of the Doctorate in Education in China, Iceland and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Peden, Sanna; Chan, Karyn

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education is going through a period of transition. This transition is evident in the many varieties of doctoral degrees currently offered in higher education institutions worldwide, from the traditional research-based Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) to the Professional Doctorate and the New Route PhD. This article reports on a study which…

  19. Drivers and Interpretations of Doctoral Education Today: National Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, Lesley; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Castano, Liliana Del Pilar Gallego

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, doctoral education has undergone a sea change with several global trends increasingly apparent. Drivers of change include massification and professionalization of doctoral education and the introduction of quality assurance systems. The impact of these drivers, and the forms...... that they take, however, are dependent on doctoral education within a given national context. This paper is frontline in that it contributes to the literature on doctoral education by examining the ways in which these global trends and drivers are being taken up in policies and practices by various countries. We...... do so by comparing recent changes in each of the following countries: Canada, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, the UK, and the USA. Each country case is based on national education policies, policy reports on doctoral education (e.g., OECD and EU policy texts), and related materials. We use the same...

  20. Development of modified FT (MFT) process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinglai Zhou; Zhixin Zhang; Wenjie Shen [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Taiyuan (China)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Two-Stage Modified FT (MFT) process has been developed for producing high-octane gasoline from coal-based syngas. The main R&D are focused on the development of catalysts and technologies process. Duration tests were finished in the single-tube reactor, pilot plant (100T/Y), and industrial demonstration plant (2000T/Y). A series of satisfactory results has been obtained in terms of operating reliability of equipments, performance of catalysts, purification of coal - based syngas, optimum operating conditions, properties of gasoline and economics etc. Further scaling - up commercial plant is being considered.

  1. Student mobility and doctoral education in South Africa | Sehoole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analyses doctoral education programmes in South Africa with a particular focus on student mobility. It investigates pull and push factors as a conceptual framework, arguing that the patterns of student mobility in doctoral education programmes in South Africa follow the patterns of international student mobility ...

  2. Index to Doctoral Dissertations in Business Education 1900-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahe, Harves

    The cross-referenced index to doctoral dissertations in business education is based on listings and summaries of doctoral studies as they appeared in the major publications in the field of business education for the last 75 years. The index is divided into four parts: (1) a researcher/author index (76 pages) supplying typical bibliographic data…

  3. Signature Pedagogy in California State University Educational Doctorates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Charles; Brown-Welty, Sharon; Cohn, Kathleen; Rodriguez, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine signature pedagogies for the education doctorate. Three California State University campuses that have started new Ed.D. programs examine practices that distinguish the education doctoral experience from other professions. Embedded field work, the professional seminar, and the research and writing support…

  4. Knowledge Management in Doctoral Education toward Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamou, Adamantia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role and the scope of knowledge management (KM) in doctoral education, in the emerging knowledge economy (KE) context, and the recommendation of a framework for KM in doctoral education. Design/Methodology/Approach: An extended literature analysis was contacted to elaborate the role and the…

  5. Migration of doctors for undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, James A; McKinley, Danette W; Boulet, John R

    2007-03-01

    Global shortages of healthcare workers in both developed and developing countries are of great concern. Research on physician migration typically focuses on medical school graduates, most often those seeking postgraduate training opportunities elsewhere. An overview of medical school migration patterns is presented in this paper. To put this phenomenon into the broader context of global physician migration, data is also presented on the distribution of medical schools, physician density, the flow of international medical graduates to the US, and the present composition of the US physician workforce. Results of the study indicate that many individuals leave their home country for undergraduate medical education. Given the movement of students and physicians, both for medical school and for advanced training opportunities, it is evident that some medical schools in the world are training doctors for their home country as well as for the international labor market. Overall, given the internationalization of medical education, collaborative efforts will be needed to develop an adequate, balanced, and well-trained global physician workforce.

  6. The quality of doctoral nursing education in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siedine K. Coetzee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of doctoral programmes in nursing has multiplied rapidly throughout the world. This has led to widespread concern about nursing doctoral education, specifically with regard to the quality of curricula and faculty, as well as to the availability of appropriate institutional resources. In South Africa, no study of these issues has been conducted at a national level. Objective: To explore and describe the quality of nursing doctoral education in South Africa from the perspectives of deans, faculty, doctoral graduates and students. Method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. All deans (N = 15; n = 12, faculty (N = 50; n = 26, doctoral graduates (N = 43; n = 26 and students (N = 106; n = 63 at South African nursing schools that offer a nursing doctoral programme (N = 16; n = 15 were invited to participate. Data were collected by means of structured email-mediated Quality of Nursing Doctoral Education surveys. Results: Overall, the graduate participants scored their programme quality most positively of all the groups and faculty scored it most negatively. All of the groups rated the quality of their doctoral programmes as good, but certain problems related to the quality of resources, students and faculty were identified. Conclusion: These evaluations, by the people directly involved in the programmes, demonstrated significant differences amongst the groups and thus provide valuable baseline data for building strategies to improve the quality of doctoral nursing education in South Africa.

  7. Professional and Personal Development in Contemporary Gerontology Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Heidi H.; Rowles, Graham D.; Watkins, John F.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the Gerontology Doctoral Student Assessment Model (GDSAM), a comprehensive web-based system premised on developing an evaluation mechanism attuned to the special requirements of advanced graduate education at the doctoral level. The system focuses on longitudinal tracking of selected dimensions of intellectual,…

  8. Financing and Restructuring Doctoral Education in the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the author argues that a combination of short- and longer-run economic and political forces pose a threat to the well-being of the nation's doctoral programs. After briefly touching on the impact of current economic problems on doctoral education at private universities, he then discusses the growing pressure on academia to expand…

  9. Political Transformation and Research Methodology in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between political change and epistemologies and methodologies employed at doctorate level. It does so by analysing the range of topics, questions and methodologies used by doctoral students at the University of Pretoria's Faculty of Education between 1985 and 2005--a time-frame that covers the decade before and…

  10. Enhancing Doctoral Research Education through the Institution of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : academy, doctoral research education, Ghana, graduate writing course, support .... courses draw international students from various departments throughout the .... know how to apply critical thinking to transform and create knowledge as well.

  11. The master degree: A critical transition in STEM doctoral education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sheila Edwards

    The need to broaden participation in the nation's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate and graduate programs is currently a matter of national urgency. The small number of women and underrepresented minorities (URM) earning doctoral degrees in STEM is particularly troubling given significant increases in the number of students earning master's degrees since 1990. In the decade between 1990 and 2000, the total number of master's recipients increased by 42%. During this same time period, the number of women earning master's degrees increased by 56%, African Americans increased by 132%, American Indians by 101%, Hispanics by 146%, and Asian Americans by 117% (Syverson, 2003). Growth in underrepresented group education at the master's level raises questions about the relationship between master's and doctoral education. Secondary data analysis of the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) was used to examine institutional pathways to the doctorate in STEM disciplines and transitions from master's to doctoral programs by race and gender. While the study revealed no significant gender differences in pathways, compared to White and Asian American students, URM students take significantly different pathways to the doctorate. URM students are significantly more likely to earn the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees at three different institutions. Their path is significantly more likely to include earning a master's degree en route to the doctorate. Further, URM students are more likely to experience transition between the master's and doctoral degrees, and the transitions are not limited to those who earn master's degrees at master's-only institutions. These findings suggest that earning a master's degree is more often a stepping stone to the doctorate for URM students. Master's degree programs, therefore, have the potential to be a valuable resource for policymakers and graduate programs seeking to increase the diversity of URM students

  12. The ‘torn curriculum’ in globalised doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    of future researchers, mainly through doctoral education, has become of heightened interest. In this process several global trends and related drivers of such changes can be identified, e.g. professionalization and quality assurance of doctoral education, and researcher mobility. With the European...... for students during the PhD – when at the same time political fractions state that “[o]verregulation of doctoral programs should be avoided” as doctoral education is seen as “a source for human capital for research but is also an extremely important part of the research itself” (Gudmundsson, 2008, p. 77). Also...... the PhD to not only international disciplinary arenas, but also to a world beyond the campus made manifest through a culturally diverse and existentially enhanced PhD process and learning environment. I argue that we should acknowledge that globalisation does not only make possible ‘standardisation...

  13. Reflections on Doctoral Education in Chemistry. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiram, Alvin L.

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  14. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  15. Coteaching in Counselor Education: Preparing Doctoral Students for Future Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrinic, Eric R.; Jencius, Marty; McGlothlin, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored 10 counselor education doctoral students' coteaching experiences with faculty members. Three coteaching structures identified from the data were relational, operational, and developmental. A definition of coteaching supported by the findings is presented. Implications for counselor education programs,…

  16. The Case for a Modern Doctor of Education Degree (Ed.D.): Multipurpose Education Doctorates No Longer Appropriate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Educational research and professional practice, though assuredly capable of providing reciprocal benefits one to the other, have, nevertheless, evolved into decidedly different activities. Increasingly, each has a separate and defensible technical basis. Doctoral programs in education should honor and reflect, not conflate, the differences. The…

  17. Health-related doctoral distance education programmes: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health-related doctoral distance education programmes: A review of ethical scholarship considerations. ... Universities should encourage and support supervisors and students to publish research findings in academic journals and to present these at conferences. However, communities that participated in a research project ...

  18. Leadership in Doctoral Dissertations of Educational Sciences in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardibi, Nursel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine tendencies in educational sciences doctoral dissertations according to divisions, research methods and desings, data collection tools, data analysis techniques, and leadership levels in Turkey. This content analysis study has been desinged with qualitative research methods. This research has been limited by…

  19. Prevalence of Evaluation Method Courses in Education Leader Doctoral Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperson, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the prevalence of single evaluation methods courses in doctoral education leadership programs. Analysis of websites of 132 leading U.S. university programs found 62 evaluation methods courses in 54 programs. Content analysis of 49 course catalog descriptions resulted in five categories: survey, planning and…

  20. Economics of Corruption in Doctoral Education: The Dissertations Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of "dissertations for sale" in Russia. The tasks of this anthropological study include establishing the problem of corruption in doctoral education, identification of the dissertations suppliers, study of the specific services they offer, analysis of their prices on different services, and generalizations…

  1. Mexican American Women Pursuing Counselor Education Doctorates: A Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Tamara J.; Carney, JoLynn V.

    2016-01-01

    The authors used narrative inquiry and Anzaldúa's (1999) bordlerlands theory to understand the cultural experiences of 5 Mexican American women in doctoral programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. Results indicated that participants navigated multiple cultural spheres and that the…

  2. Expanding Doctoral Education in South Africa: Pipeline or Pipedream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss both the status of the PhD in South Africa and the feasibility of the country's aspiration to increase by fivefold the production of PhDs by 2025. Based on the first empirical studies on doctoral education in South Africa, it argues that in order to move towards this target, an expanded and coordinated…

  3. Elusive Equity in Doctoral Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the drive to expand the quantity and quality of PhD's in South Africa and the impact this has had on under-represented groups, in particular black graduates. Based on both qualitative and quantitative data, the paper argues that while there has been a significant increase in the number of black students in doctoral education,…

  4. Laboratory and field experience with rim ditch dewatering of MFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demoz, A.; Mikula, R. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Western Research Centre; Lahaie, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described a rim ditch method of dewatering mature fine tailings (MFT). Polymer additions were used to strengthen the MFT and to decrease the capillary suction time (CST). Laboratory and field-scale studies were conducted to demonstrate the dewatering method. The flocculants were added in a Komax inline mixer. Polymers were then injected into the tailings. The mixing processes were optimized in a series of laboratory studies and then demonstrated in the field tests. The tests showed that CST and high dewatering rates were consistently maintained using the method. MFT feeds were also consistent. Release water quality was improved using the method. The large-scale test site is now being monitored for compliance with Directive 74. tabs., figs.

  5. Uniformity of material in the SME and MFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    The DWPF will satisfy the product consistency specification in the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications through control of the chemical composition of the glass product. This control will be achieved by ensuring that each batch of feed in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) will produce glass which satisfies the specification. The purpose of this report is to determine what degree of uniformity can be expected of material in the SME and Metter Feed Tank (MFT). These vessels were designed based on a design development process which had proven successful for similar hard-to-mix feeds in the past. This process resulted in a design of the SME and MFT agitation systems which was intended to provide highly uniform melter feed material. Based on the results of extensive tests in protoypic equipment, the SME and MFT designs have met this design goal

  6. Towards a Marketing Communication Recruitment Plan for the Rowan University Educational Leadership Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyi, Titus Kamau

    2009-01-01

    Doctoral studies are at the apex of the education system. Attracting, recruiting, enrolling, and graduating the best suited students in doctoral education is, therefore, critical in ensuring the highest academic standards and service to society. Focusing on Rowan University's Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership program, this…

  7. Is there a Core Curriculum across Higher Education Doctoral Programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney Freeman Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently the study of higher education has been referred to as a multidisciplinary field. Consensus is continuing to evolve regarding both what is considered the appropriate coursework and the foundational knowledgebase of this field. The study of higher education is maturing and has the potential to transition from being seen as a field to being respected as an academic discipline. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the status of the core curriculum in higher education doctoral programs from the perspective of program directors with programs that required the completion of standardized coursework prior to beginning a dissertation. We used online survey analytic techniques to query program directors about their EdD and PhD programs in higher education, credit hours, and curricular content. Our study confirms previous work finding that there is common agreement in the subject matter areas of organization, leadership, administration, and history. What our work adds is that there is a growing consensus among higher education doctoral programs about the position of higher education law and finance in the curricular core. In addition, we find there is a growing interest in public policy and community colleges over time, with a majority of EdD programs including instruction in these areas. Nevertheless, majoritarian agreement does not meet at a level wherein consensus can be inferred, especially within PhD programs where requirements are more varied across programs. In addition, while there is an increasing trend in the inclusion of multiculturalism in higher education doctoral programming, multiculturalism is not currently part of higher education’s core. We conclude with research and practice implications for doctoral programs in higher education as a field of study.

  8. North/south Station Keeping of Geostationary Satellite Using Mft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong-Young Ahn

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A precise determination of the fuel efficiency is important because North/South station keeping ,which controls the inclination of the geostationary orbit, consumes most of the satellite fuel. We estimate the amount of fuel required during the lifetime of the KOREASAT when MFT(Minimum Fuel Target technique is adopted, and the result is compared to those when MCT(Maximum Compensation Target and TBCT(Track-Back Chord Target technique are applied. From this computation, we find that if MFT technique is adopted, the lifetime of the satellite can be extended at least 45 and 15 days, respectively, compared to those consumed with MCT and TBCT technique.

  9. Exporting doctoral education: experience of a state-supported university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoskopf, Carleen H; Xirasagar, Sudha; Han, Whiejong M; Snowdon, Sonja

    2007-01-01

    There is a demand for non-traditional doctoral education in healthcare management and policy among many countries in support of their health system reform efforts. Healthcare professionals need retooling to provide stewardship to complex new health financing systems. Most health service leaders are mid career professionals and cannot transplant themselves to study on American university campuses. They demand high quality programs, designed to enable most coursework to be completed overseas. Aided by recent distance education technology, the University of South Carolina's Department of Health Services Policy and Management developed and provides doctoral programs for working professionals in Taiwan and South Korea with a minimal and convenient campus attendance requirement. This paper presents the experience of setting up the programs, management, quality control, and benefits for both students overseas and for our Department's mission and on-campus programs. Our experience is that there are many challenges, but it is also rewarding from academic, scholarly, and financial perspectives.

  10. [Significance of the doctorate in scientific medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    According to European and German law, the medical education of physicians must take place in a scientific degree program at a university or under the supervision of a university. To keep up the ideal of a scientific degree program, various organizations and associations, such as the German Research Foundation, the German Council of Science and Humanities and the German Medical Faculty Association, see the need for an even stronger anchoring of academic learning content in the course of study. Traditionally, a scientific project, which is carried out during the studies, provides the basis for the Doctor of Medicine (Dr. med.) after graduation, although the research projects as a basis for medical degrees are currently not obligatory parts of the curricula. The number of medical students performing such research projects is significantly decreasing, thus they are missing major skills for working in science. To counteract these developments, faculties of medicine are currently developing model curricula including deepened scientific education. Despite these efforts, the German Association of Faculties of Medicine argues that the performance of research projects leading to the doctoral degree is most suitable for obtaining expertise in scientific work. According to recommendations by the German Council of Science on the requirements for quality assurance of graduation doctoral degree programs have been introduced. This and further measures, like MD/PhD programs or research-based additional study programs serving the scientific qualification of medical students, are the subject of this article.

  11. [Assessing bioethics education: Teaching to be virtuous doctors or just doctors with practical ethical skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerda, Montse; Pifarré, Josep; Roig, Helena; Busquets, Ester; Yuguero, Oriol; Viñas, Joan

    2018-04-04

    In the last decades, bioethics has been incorporated into the academic training of the Medical Schools. Some studies analyze the ethical-moral development of medical students and the effect of ethical education in other countries. This evaluation is done by measuring Kohlberg's moral reasoning (virtuous doctors), or ethical sensitivity to resolve clinical cases (physicians with ethical skills). The following study is proposed to assess the impact of bioethics training on these two variables, in Spanish medical students. Observational cross-sectional study. SITE: Faculty of Medicine, University of Lleida. 175 students from third year of medicine (78 before bioethics and 97 after bioethics, in different courses) were conducted. Bioethics course. A socio-demographic questionnaire, the Rest Defining Issue test scale, and Problem Identification Test with clinical vignettes were administered. A consistent and significant correlation has been found between moral reasoning and ethical sensitivity. Women presented greater post-conventional reasoning. There were no changes in Kohlberg's stage of global moral reasoning with ethical training. There were changes in ethical sensitivity with bioethical training, with a significantly and globally improvement. In our study, training in bioethics does not improve moral development but rather the ethical problem solving skills. It is asked if this improvement is enough to train doctors prepared for the new challenges. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Special Education Doctoral Programs: A 10-Year Comparison of the Suppliers of Leadership Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah Deutsch; Montrosse, Bianca Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The first article in this special issue is about the doctoral programs, the suppliers of new doctoral graduates in special education. It focuses on one component of a larger effort, the Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment (SEFNA) project, which investigated many aspects of the supply of new doctoral graduates as well as the demand for new…

  13. Quantitative Preparation in Doctoral Education Programs: A Mixed-Methods Study of Doctoral Student Perspectives on their Quantitative Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Ferguson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The purpose of the current study is to explore student perceptions of their own doctoral-level education and quantitative proficiency. Background: The challenges of preparing doctoral students in education have been discussed in the literature, but largely from the perspective of university faculty and program administrators. The current study directly explores the student voice on this issue. Methodology: Utilizing a sequential explanatory mixed-methods research design, the present study seeks to better understand doctoral-level education students’ perceptions of their quantitative methods training at a large public university in the southwestern United States. Findings: Results from both phases present the need for more application and consistency in doctoral-level quantitative courses. Additionally, there was a consistent theme of internal motivation in the responses, suggesting students perceive their quantitative training to be valuable beyond their personal interest in the topic. Recommendations for Practitioners: Quantitative methods instructors should emphasize practice in their quantitative courses and consider providing additional support for students through the inclusion of lab sections, tutoring, and/or differentiation. Pre-testing statistical ability at the start of a course is also suggested to better meet student needs. Impact on Society: The ultimate goal of quantitative methods in doctoral education is to produce high-quality educational researchers who are prepared to apply their knowledge to problems and research in education. Results of the present study can inform faculty and administrator decisions in doctoral education to best support this goal. Future Research: Using the student perspectives presented in the present study, future researchers should continue to explore effective instructional strategies and curriculum design within education doctoral programs. The inclusion of student voice can strengthen

  14. Is ‘friendship’ educationally relevant in doctoral pedagogy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    pedagogies: To what extent does the personal and social relation between doctoral supervisors and students influence the learning outcome of the PhD, and how do doctoral supervisors reflect this pedagogical element? During my research stay at the Oxford Learning Institute, University of Oxford, in the spring...... the personal (private) and professional sides of the supervisor-student relationship. This group of supervisors find an emotional bond between supervisors and students to be potentially dangerous and threatening the sober and Socratic academic relation in the supervision process. The second category contains...... of trust and honesty in the supervision process, which hightens the quality of the research and the probability for timely completion. The variety of supervisor perspectives show that even within a small sample of a relatively homogenous educational context the pedagogical implications for the research...

  15. Didactic Migraine Education in US Doctor of Pharmacy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padiyara, Rosalyn S.; Schommer, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare didactic migraine education in doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs in the United States with the Headache Consortium's evidence-based migraine treatment recommendations. Methods A self-administered survey instrument was mailed to all 90 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) approved PharmD programs in the United States. Results Seventy-seven programs responded (86%) and 69 useable survey instruments were analyzed. Fifty-five percent of programs discussed the Consortium's guidelines, 49% discussed the selection of nonprescription versus prescription agents, 45% recommended a butalbital-containing product as migraine treatment, and 20% educated students about tools for assessing migraine-related debilitation. At least 50% of programs taught information consistent with the remaining Consortium recommendations. Conclusion Approximately half of the PharmD programs teach concepts about migraine headache treatment consistent with the US Headache Consortium's recommendations. PMID:20221355

  16. Teaching Teachers: Methods and Experiences Used in Educating Doctoral Students to Prepare Preservice Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven N.; VanWeelden, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    This investigation addressed methods and experiences used to educate doctoral music education students to work as university college professors. Selected faculty representing every institution offering a Ph.D. in music education in the United States and Canada (N = 46) were sent an online questionnaire concerning (1) the extent respondents…

  17. Unequal Socialization: Interrogating the Chicano/Latino(a) Doctoral Education Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Elvia

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of Chicano/Latino(a) doctoral students at a research-intensive doctorate-granting institution. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 24 Chicano/Latino(a) doctoral students across social science, humanities, education, and science disciplines, this qualitative investigation analyzed how disciplinary…

  18. Not Surprised, But Concerned: The Professoriate's Reaction to PETE Doctoral Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Melissa; Sutherland, Sue; Sinclair, Christina; Ward, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to initiate a discussion and explore reactions to PETE doctoral education in the United States. A purposeful sample of 27 representatives from doctoral and non doctoral granting programs in the U.S. was interviewed. Analysis resulted in four themes: (a) Is the dog wagging its tail or the tail wagging the…

  19. Sharing the Stories of Racism in Doctoral Education: The Anti-Racism Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ashley; Livingstone, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    Across-racial group of social work doctoral students engaged in an Anti-Racism Project. Through shared journaling and group discussions, participants explored and interrogated experiences of racism related to doctoral education. A thematic analysis of qualitative data surfaced several themes: experiences with racism as a doctoral student, noticing…

  20. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  1. Doctoral Students in Music Education: Occupational Identity, Career Intent and Commitment, and Confidence for Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine music education doctoral students' shifting occupational identity beliefs, career intent and commitment, and overall confidence for teaching in higher education. A total of 124 music education doctoral students, enrolled at 29 institutions of higher education in the United States, completed a onetime,…

  2. An Informed Look at Doctoral Vivas (Oral Examinations) in the Preparation of Counselor Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Charles R., III; Robertson, Derek L.

    2012-01-01

    Viva voce is the Latin expression traditionally used to refer to doctoral oral examinations. Viva voce, or simply viva, examinations are a standard requirement for doctoral candidacy and degree completion in many counselor education programs. Despite the prevalent use of vivas as an assessment and learning tool, the counselor education literature…

  3. Making Social Scientists, or Not?: Glimpses of the Unmentionable in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, David; Paulson, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on doctoral education in the U.K. has revealed the increasing number and diversity of academic relationships that shape the lives of research students, and students' own role in activating, mobilising and maintaining these relationships. Higher education policy reforms promoting doctoral "skills training",…

  4. From Product to Process. The Reform of Doctoral Education in Europe and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanhua; Kehm, Barbara M.; Ma, Yonghong

    2018-01-01

    This contribution is based on an analysis of recent changes in doctoral education that can be observed in Europe and China. It traces the policies having led to these changes and discusses related policy transfer. The contribution is divided into five parts. It begins by sketching recent changes in doctoral education in the framework of the…

  5. The Impact of Doctoral Study on Educational Leaders' Work for Students' Participation in Education Systems and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taysum, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines ways educational leaders engaging with doctoral research have worked for students' participation in education systems. Twenty-four interviews were conducted with educational leaders of schools, colleges, and districts in England and the US doing doctoral research. The findings reveal that the leaders identify US and English…

  6. The Impact of Supply and Demand on Doctorates in Physical Education Teacher Education: The Future of the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Barbara Ann; Lund, Jackie; O'Neil, Kason

    2016-01-01

    Quality preparation of doctoral students is a key to the survival of physical education teacher education. Past research has revealed a shortage of students graduating with a doctoral degree in physical education and a general reluctance of teachers to leave their jobs to pursue an advanced degree. As the number of universities preparing new…

  7. Attitudes of Korean and Chinese traditional medical doctors on education of East Asian traditional medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ji Lee

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: This study revealed the attitude of Korean and Chinese TRM doctors on their educational system, and discussed the implication of similarities and differences between them. It would provide foundations for the improvement of the TRM educational curriculums.

  8. Status of physiology education in US Doctor of Pharmacy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Khan, Seher A; Talukder, Rahmat M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the current status of physiology education in US Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) programs. A survey instrument was developed and distributed through SurveyMonkey to American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Biological Sciences section members of 132 PharmD programs. Survey items focused on soliciting qualitative and quantitative information on the delivery of physiology curricular contents and faculty perceptions of physiology education. A total of 114 programs responded to the survey, resulting in a response rate of 86%. Out of 114 schools/colleges, 61 programs (54%) offered standalone physiology courses, and 53 programs (46%) offered physiology integrated with other courses. When integrated, the average contact hours for physiology contents were significantly reduced compared with standalone courses (30 vs. 84 h, P US PharmD programs remains. The reduction of physiology contents is evident when physiology is taught as a component of integrated courses. Given current trends that favor integrated curricula, these data suggest that additional collaboration among basic and clinical science faculty is required to ensure that physiology contents are balanced and not underemphasized in a PharmD curriculum. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Leadership Competence Educational Model for a Twenty-First Century Nursing Doctoral Education in Contemporary Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fusun

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes a nursing education model about leadership that can be used to improve the leadership skills of nursing doctoral students. This model is developed at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. In developing this model, the author had the opportunity to observe the University of Michigan, School of Nursing…

  10. The Ph.D. in Education. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Virginia

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  11. Doctors in ancient Greek and Roman rhetorical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Craig A

    2013-10-01

    This article collects and examines all references to doctors in rhetorical exercises used in ancient Greek and Roman schools in the Roman Empire. While doctors are sometimes portrayed positively as philanthropic, expert practitioners of their divinely sanctioned art, they are more often depicted as facing charges for poisoning their patients.

  12. Personal Study Planning in Doctoral Education in Industrial Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahenius, K.; Martinsuo, M.

    2010-01-01

    The duration of doctoral studies has increased in Europe. Personal study planning has been considered as one possible solution to help students in achieving shorter study times. This study investigates how doctoral students experience and use personal study plans in one university department of industrial engineering. The research material…

  13. Assessment of Examinations in Computer Science Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys the examination requirements for attaining degree candidate (candidacy) status in computer science doctoral programs at all of the computer science doctoral granting institutions in the United States. It presents a framework for program examination requirement categorization, and categorizes these programs by the type or types…

  14. Junior doctors and undergraduate teaching: the influence of gender on the provision of medical education.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prichard, David

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: International experience has demonstrated that the medical profession is becoming less dominated by men. This "feminization of medicine" has been a topic of much debate in the medical literature. As the gender ratio in the profession changes, it is likely that a greater proportion of undergraduate education will be provided by women. Whether this shift away from the male-dominated provision of medical education will have an effect on undergraduate education is unknown. PURPOSE: The aim of this research was to clarify whether there are differences between the attitudes and practices of male and female junior doctors regarding the practice of undergraduate teaching. METHOD: A survey methodology among a cohort of nonconsultant hospital doctors in a major Irish teaching hospital was utilized. The overall response rate was 93%. The cohort held a positive attitude toward teaching undergraduates, and the majority were actively engaged in this activity. Doctors of both genders expressed a willingness to undertake teacher training. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the genders regarding the self-reported quantity of teaching provided to undergraduates. Male doctors perceived themselves as more confident educators when compared to female doctors, but this is likely to reflect cohort demographics in which a greater proportion of male doctors were more senior. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that male and female doctors have similar attitudes toward, and practices in, voluntary undergraduate teaching. As a result, any gender shift in medicine is unlikely to result in a significant change in junior doctors\\' attitudes toward undergraduate medical education.

  15. Junior doctors and undergraduate teaching: the influence of gender on the provision of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, David; Collins, Niamh; Boohan, Mairead; Wall, Catherine

    2011-04-01

    International experience has demonstrated that the medical profession is becoming less dominated by men. This "feminization of medicine" has been a topic of much debate in the medical literature. As the gender ratio in the profession changes, it is likely that a greater proportion of undergraduate education will be provided by women. Whether this shift away from the male-dominated provision of medical education will have an effect on undergraduate education is unknown. The aim of this research was to clarify whether there are differences between the attitudes and practices of male and female junior doctors regarding the practice of undergraduate teaching. A survey methodology among a cohort of nonconsultant hospital doctors in a major Irish teaching hospital was utilized. The overall response rate was 93%. The cohort held a positive attitude toward teaching undergraduates, and the majority were actively engaged in this activity. Doctors of both genders expressed a willingness to undertake teacher training. There were no significant differences between the genders regarding the self-reported quantity of teaching provided to undergraduates. Male doctors perceived themselves as more confident educators when compared to female doctors, but this is likely to reflect cohort demographics in which a greater proportion of male doctors were more senior. This study demonstrates that male and female doctors have similar attitudes toward, and practices in, voluntary undergraduate teaching. As a result, any gender shift in medicine is unlikely to result in a significant change in junior doctors' attitudes toward undergraduate medical education.

  16. Quality of doctoral nursing education in the United Kingdom: exploring the views of doctoral students and staff based on a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Hugh; Keeney, Sinead; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the quality of doctoral education in nursing in the United Kingdom. In recent decades, doctoral education programmes in nursing are increasing worldwide. There are many reasons for this and concerns have been raised regarding the quality of provision in and across countries. To date, the quality of doctoral education on a global level has not been reported in the literature. This United Kingdom study is part of a seven country investigation into the quality of doctoral education in nursing (Australia, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States of America). A quantitative study using a cross-sectional comparative survey design. An online survey was administered to collect the views of doctoral students and staff members on four domains: programme, faculty/staff, resource and evaluation. The study was carried out between 2010-2012. In most cases, staff perceived these more positively than students and the differences in perception were often statistically significant. Interestingly, many students rated the quality of supervision as excellent, whereas no staff member rated supervision this highly. The crucial importance of resources was confirmed in the path analysis of the four Quality of Doctoral Nursing Education domains. This demonstrates that investment in resources is much more cost-effective than investment in the other domains in relation to improving the overall quality of doctoral education in nursing. This study has wide-ranging implications for how the quality of doctoral education is monitored and enhanced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Peer-Learning Networks in Social Work Doctoral Education: An Interdisciplinary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. Jay; Duron, Jacquelynn F.; Bosk, Emily Adlin; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Abner, Kristin S.

    2016-01-01

    Peer-learning networks (PLN) can be valuable tools for doctoral students. Participation in these networks can aid in the completion of the dissertation, lead to increased scholarship productivity, and assist in student retention. Yet, despite the promise of PLNs, few studies have documented their effect on social work doctoral education. This…

  18. A Critical Race Feminist Analysis of Men of Color Matriculating into a Higher Education Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dian D.; Kelly, Bridget Turner; Jourian, T. J.; Byrd, Ajani M.; Manzano, Lester J.; Bumbry, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In Fall, 2012, the Loyola University Chicago Higher Education program faculty admitted a doctoral cohort of 5 men of color. This article is a reflexive and reflective autoethnography that explores the college choice processes of 5 doctoral men of color through a Critical Race Feminist perspective. The faculty program chair's narrative supplements…

  19. Peer Support in Negotiating Multiple Relationships within Supervision among Counselor Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Amanda J.; Pimpleton, Asher; Stinchfield, Tracy; Stevens, Heath; Othman, Nor Asma

    2013-01-01

    Counselor education doctoral students (CEDSs), like other doctoral students, need assistance and support to ensure their self-care. One area markedly affecting self-care is one's relationships with others. The purpose of this article is to examine the multiple relationships involved within CEDSs supervision, the potential areas to utilize peer…

  20. "Con todo mi corazón": Mentoring Latinas in Educational Leadership Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Mariela A.

    2016-01-01

    Personal narrative essays were used to analyze the experiences of four Latina doctoral students who completed their first year in an educational leadership doctoral program in a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) in the southwestern U.S. Four themes emerged from their "testimonios" 1) "Con todo el corazón"; 2) "Somos como…

  1. What's in It for Industry? A Case Study on Collaborative Doctoral Education in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assbring, Linda; Nuur, Cali

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge economy and the changing nature of knowledge production, the increased interaction between public agencies, industry and universities, and the changing labour market for doctoral degree holders are forces that together have led to an increased interest in the organization of doctoral education--particularly the role of collaborative…

  2. Mentoring Matters: An Exploratory Survey of Educational Leadership Doctoral Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Anjalé D.; Mansfield, Katherine Cumings; Lee, Pei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    There is limited research on quantitative differences between men and women's experiences in doctoral programs. We aim to fill that gap by sharing findings from a web-based exploratory survey of perceived gender differences on quality mentoring in educational leadership doctoral programs. According to survey results, there is limited…

  3. Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterman, Ann Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to compare the lived experiences of doctoral women studying Education, a prototypically female field, with women studying Engineering, a prototypically male field to illustrate the phenomenon of doctoral degree progress in the two fields. Using critical feminist theory and Valian's (1999) concept of gender schemas, this…

  4. Higher Degree Committee Members’ Perceptions of Quality Assurance of Doctoral Education: A South African Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Simmonds

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa four key policy discourses underpin doctoral education: growth, capacity, efficiency, and quality discourses. This article contributes to the discourse on quality by engaging with quality assurance from the perspective of the decision makers and implementers of macro policy (national, meso (institutional, and micro (faculty/departmental levels. We explore the perceptions that members of higher degree committees in the field of Education have of the quality assurance of doctoral education. Our data are drawn from a national survey questionnaire completed by these respondents at all public South African institutions that offer a doctorate in Education. The insights gained reside within four categories: positionality, policy, programmes, and people (stakeholders. Thereafter, we problematised the main results using academic freedom in a mode 3 knowledge production environment as a lens, which revealed thought provoking directions for future research about doctoral education.

  5. [Effect of doctor-patient communication education on oral clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Tang, Yu; He, Yan; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of doctor-patient communication education on dental clinical practice. The process of 61 dental interns' clinical practice was divided into two stages. The dental interns were taught with traditional teaching method in the first stage. Doctor-patient communication and communication skill training were added to the second stage. Scale of medical student's doctor-patient communication behavior was used to evaluate the dental interns' behavior by themselves after two stages. The SEGUE frame work was used to evaluate the dental interns' behavior by teachers after two stages. All statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package. The result of scale of medical student's doctor-patient communication behavior was analyzed using Fisher exact test or Chi-square test. The score of the SEGUE frame work was analyzed using Student's t test. The result of Scale of medical student's doctor-patient communication behavior showed only 37.71% of dental interns could establish good doctor-patient relationship in the first stage. After doctor-patient communication and communication skill training, the percentage became 75.4%. The result of the SEGUE frame work showed the score was raised from 16.066±3.308 to 21.867±2.456, and a significant difference was found between the two stages. Doctor-Patient communication education can improve dental interns' communication skills and help to establish a good doctor-patient relationship.

  6. Doctoring Undercover: updating the educational tradition of shadowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Claire D

    2017-01-01

    Premedical students are educated in basic biological and health sciences. As a complement to traditional premedical coursework, medical school applicants are encouraged to shadow practitioners, with the hope that observation will introduce students to the culture and practice of healthcare. Yet the shadowing experience varies widely across practitioners and institutions; resources that guide students' critical reflection and structure the experience are scarce. A pilot experiential learning course, Doctoring Undercover: Shadowing and the Culture of Medicine, was developed to fill this gap. The course consisted of three parts: an introduction to medical culture through the disciplines of medical sociology, history, anthropology, and bioethics; a site placement in which students applied these fields' analytical techniques to the study of medical culture and practice; and the development of an online activity guide that other premedical students may adapt to their shadowing circumstances. Students reported that they were exposed to new disciplinary perspectives and interprofessional environments that they would not traditionally encounter. Students' contributions to the shadowing guide encouraged active learning and reflection on the dynamics of effective patient-provider relationships and shadowing experiences. Locally, the class may be scaled for a larger group of premedical students and incorporated into a formal pathway program for premedical students; the content will also be integrated into the clinical medicine course for first-year medical students. Online, the guide will be promoted for use by other institutions and by individuals planning extracurricular shadowing experiences; feedback will be solicited. Tools for evaluating the short- and long-term impact of the course and guide will be developed and validated. Observational and experimental studies of the course's impact should be conducted. ICM: Introduction to Clinical Medicine; SCE: Selective Clinical

  7. Examining the Predictive Validity of GRE Scores on Doctoral Education: Students' Success and Methodology Choices in the Dissertation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda J.; Bray, Oliver R., Jr.; Spaulding, Lucinda S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how GRE scores can be used to better understand Education doctoral candidates' methodology choices for the dissertation as well as their persistence behaviors. Candidates' of one online doctoral education program were examined. Results of a MANOVA suggested that there is no difference in GRE scores based on doctoral candidates'…

  8. An educational model for improving diet counselling in primary care. A case study of the creative use of doctors' own diet, their attitudes to it and to nutritional counselling of their patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Palmvig, Birthe; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire......Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire...

  9. Teaching Future Teachers: A Model Workshop for Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Julia M.; Ainbinder, Alisa; Werner-Lin, Allison V.; Browne, Teri A.; Smithgall, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Doctoral student training has become focused in recent years on acquiring subject-area knowledge and research skills, rather than on teaching. This shift often leaves aspiring junior faculty feeling unprepared to address the demanding pedagogical requirements of the professoriate. In the area of social work, few programs contain a structured,…

  10. TRAINING COURSES AND PROFESSIONAL INTEGRATION OF DOCTORS IN EDUCATION: PATHS AND DESTINATION OF GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altair Alberto Fávero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the trajectories and institutional destinations of graduates of doctoral programs in Education from Brazilian public universities in the last twelve years (2000-2012. The research is characterized as Mixed Methods (CRESWELL and CLARK, 2013 and was developed from data available in the electronic site of the CAPES, referring to graduate programs and Lattes Platform. Of the 3,598 graduates surveyed, a small number represents researchers who went straight to masters and doctorate degrees shortly after undergraduate studies. Almost one-third of respondents obtained doctorate degrees in between 10 and 15 years after graduation. About 15% held a doctorate between 20 and 25 years after graduation. We found that less than 25% of respondents were master's degree students in 2013 and less than 10% have contributed to the training of young doctors. We believe that the development of this research, unprecedented on this scale in the area of education, can contribute to the evaluation of expansion conditions and qualification programs and courses. In addition to taking a look at the activities and the working arrangements of the young doctors in Education in Brazil and prepare analytical frameworks that can contribute to the proposition of strategic funding policies and the setting of teachers in disadvantaged regions. Keywords: Postgraduate studies. Education. Graduate student training. Employability.

  11. Pediatric dentistry clinical education venues evaluation by pre and post-doctoral students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimstein, E; Mayes, A; Mittal, Hc

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate dental students' perspectives about pre- and post-doctoral pediatric dentistry education venues. Surveys with visual analog scales (from 0 to 100) measuring the educational contribution of pediatric dentistry venues were conducted. The pre-doctoral venues included a 3rd year university twilight clinic (UTC), a 3rd year urban community based clinic (CBC) and 4th year mobile clinics (MCs). The post-doctoral venues included treatment of children under general anesthesia, oral sedations, a regular clinic (no sedations), seminars, journal club, case conferences and studding for the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. Analyses of variance between the scores indicated that the 3rd year CBC score (68.2 ± 4.5) was statistically significant higher (p= .007) than the one for the 3rd year UTC score (44.9 ± 6.1). The 4th year students' MCs score (61.4 ± 4.0) was statistically significant higher than their retrospective scores for the 3rd year CBC (56.4 ± 4.4) or UTC (42.2 ± 4.9) scores (p= .03 and .004 respectively). Among the didactic or clinical post-doctoral venues, the regular clinic and the seminars received the highest scores (84.3 ± 1.7 and 71.6 ± 2.8 respectively). pre-doctoral community-based clinical education and post-doctoral regular university based clinic are considered by students to provide the main contribution to pediatric dental education.

  12. Training doctors for primary care in China: Transformation of general practice education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donald

    2016-01-01

    China is known for developing a cadre of "Barefoot Doctors" to address her rural healthcare needs in past. The tradition of barefoot doctors has inspired similar developments in several other countries across world. Recently China has embarked upon an ambitious new mission to create a primary care workforce consisting of trained general practitioners having international standard skillsets. This editorial provides an insight into the current status of policy deliberations with regards to training of primary care doctors and a new surge in general practice education in China.

  13. Experiential Workshop with Educational Leadership Doctoral Students: Managing Affective Reactions to Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Leigh; Jara, Teresa; Sever, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Managing change processes, resistance to change, and organizational members' emotional reactions to change are crucial skills for future educational leaders to learn. Our case study is based on a workshop conducted using two experiential exercises to facilitate current educational leadership doctoral students' reflections on their own reactions to…

  14. Educational Leaders' Doctoral Research That Informed Strategies to Steer Their Organizations towards Cultural Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taysum, Alison

    2016-01-01

    This research generates new knowledge about how 24 educational leaders in the USA and England used their doctoral research to build narrative capital to inform strategies to steer their organizations towards cultural alignment. Cultural alignment prevents forms of segregation rooted in nation-states' wider historiography of education segregation…

  15. Industry Perceptions of Industry-University Partnerships Related to Doctoral Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of the extent to which industry-university partnerships in doctoral education, which have become increasingly prevalent in the knowledge economy, have begun to penetrate the South African higher education milieu, is reported. The factors that motivate large industries in developing countries such as South Africa to invest in doctoral…

  16. The Perspectives of Two First-Generation College Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil, Martina; McCall, Joyce M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this autoethnographic multiple case study was to compare experiences of two first-generation college students pursuing doctoral degrees in music education. Motivations for pursuing an advanced degree were to enact change in the field of music education and fulfill personal ambitions. Participants encountered two challenges,…

  17. Professional approaches in clinical judgements among senior and junior doctors: implications for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilhammar Ewa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical experience has traditionally been highly valued in medical education and clinical healthcare. On account of its multi-faceted nature, clinical experience is mostly difficult to articulate, and is mainly expressed in clinical situations as professional approaches. Due to retirement, hospitals in Scandinavia will soon face a substantial decrease in the number of senior specialist doctors, and it has been discussed whether healthcare will suffer an immense loss of experienced-based knowledge when this senior group leaves the organization. Both senior specialists and junior colleagues are often involved in clinical education, but the way in which these two groups vary in professional approaches and contributions to clinical education has not been so well described. Cognitive psychology has contributed to the understanding of how experience may influence professional approaches, but such studies have not included the effect of differences in position and responsibilities that junior and senior doctors hold in clinical healthcare. In the light of the discussion above, it is essential to describe the professional approaches of senior doctors in relation to those of their junior colleagues. This study therefore aims to describe and compare the professional approaches of junior and senior doctors when making clinical judgements. Methods Critical incident technique was used in interviews with nine senior doctors and nine junior doctors in internal medicine. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Result Senior and junior doctors expressed a variety of professional approaches in clinical judgement as follows: use of theoretical knowledge, use of prior experience of cases and courses of events, use of ethical and moral values, meeting and communicating with the patient, focusing on available information, relying on their own ability, getting support and guidance from others and being directed by the

  18. Exploring talent development environments –inspirations to medical education at doctoral level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    Introduction: Doctoral students may be considered some of our most talented students. In order to maintain high quality in doctoral education we should be aware of optimizing the talent development environment in which the students develop their competencies. In this paper we explore the features...... has been on cognitive skills of individual talents and to a minor degree on institutional conditions and constraints within talent development environments. However, recent studies on talent development in sport recognize ‘talent’ as a social construction (1) and institutional and environmental...... features playing a decisive role in talent development (2). Our research question is: do concepts and models for talent development environments in sport apply to medical education at doctoral level? Considering the uniqueness of the two domains (they refer to different overall social fields: education...

  19. Exploring provision of Innovative Community Education Placements (ICEPs) for junior doctors in training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Ann; Jones, Melvyn M; Khan, Nada; Park, Sophie; Rosenthal, Joe; Chrysikou, Vasiliki

    2016-02-09

    Medical education in community settings is an essential ingredient of doctors' training and a key factor in recruiting general practitioners (GP). Health Education England's report 'Broadening the Foundation' recommends foundation doctors complete 4-month community placements. While Foundation GP schemes exist; other community settings, are not yet used for postgraduate training. The objective of this study was to explore how community-based training of junior doctors might be expanded into possible 'innovative community education placements' (ICEPs), examining opportunities and barriers to these developments. A qualitative study where semistructured interviews were undertaken and themes were generated deductively from the research questions, and iteratively from transcripts. UK community healthcare. Stakeholders from UK Community healthcare providers and undergraduate GP and community educators. Nine participants were interviewed; those experienced in delivering community-based undergraduate education, and others working in community settings that had not previously trained doctors. Themes identified were practicalities such as 'finance and governance', 'communication and interaction', 'delivery of training' and 'perceptions of community'. ICEPs were willing to train Foundation doctors. However, concerns were raised that large numbers and inadequate resources could undermine the quality of educational opportunities, and even cause reputational damage. Organisation was seen as a challenge, which might be best met by placing some responsibility with trainees to manage their placements. ICEP providers agreed that defined service contribution by trainees was required to make placements sustainable, and enhance learning. ICEPs stated the need for positive articulation of the learning value of placements to learners and stakeholders. This study highlighted the opportunities for foundation doctors to gain specialist and generalist knowledge in ICEPs from diverse clinical

  20. Doctoral Programs in Developmental Education: Interview with Three Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Marla

    2013-01-01

    Marla Kincaid (Adjunct Instructor, Austin Community College M.A., Developmental Education Department of Curriculum and Instruction Texas State University-San Marcos) interviewed the following leaders in the field of Developmental Education: (1) Dr. Olatunde Ogunyemi, Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership at Grambling State…

  1. Preliminary study of sand jets in water-capped artificial and real MFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J.; Zhu, D.; Rajaratnam, N. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2008-07-01

    A preliminary study of sand jets in water-capped artificial and real MFT was presented. Background information on oil sands tailing reclamation including water capping and sand capping were first discussed, followed by background information to the study, including non-Newtonian fluids and laponite clay, the artificial clay used mainly in small amounts as a rheology modifier in industrial fluids and materials. Although laponite clay is insoluble in water, it hydrates to make a clear and colourless colloidal, which is thixotropic and also behaves as a Bingham plastic fluid. The benefit of using gels made from laponite is the ability to see through to observe the physical processes in it. The objectives of the study were to examine the dynamics of sand jets in water-capped laponite gel and real MFT; improve the understanding of physical processes related to MFT and sand/slurry operations in tailings ponds; and find potential applications in recycling processed water and decommissioning of tailings ponds. It was concluded that it is much more difficult for jets to penetrate water-capped MFT due to larger yield stress in MFT. Future studies will focus on density correction, viscosity adjustment, and sensitivity analysis. tabs., figs.

  2. Strategic Planning and Doctor Of Nursing Practice Education: Developing Today's and Tomorrow's Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Nancy L; Garrison, Kenneth F; Brown, Mary-Michael; Pintz, Christine; Bocchino, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Strategic planning and thinking skills are essential for today's nurse leaders. Doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs provide an opportunity for developing effective nurse strategists. A well-designed strategy course can stimulate intellectual growth at all levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Discussion forums in online education provide new opportunities for rich interaction among peers en route to development of well-informed strategic plans. An interprofessional perspective adds a rich and vital aspect to doctoral nursing education and it serves to inform strategic plan development. A roadmap for teaching strategic planning to current and future nursing leaders will guide the integration of essential content into DNP programs.

  3. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Doctors or technicians: assessing quality of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Tayyab

    2010-01-01

    Medical education institutions usually adapt industrial quality management models that measure the quality of the process of a program but not the quality of the product. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of industrial quality management models on medical education and students, and to highlight the importance of introducing a proper educational quality management model. Industrial quality management models can measure the training component in terms of competencies, but they lack the educational component measurement. These models use performance indicators to assess their process improvement efforts. Researchers suggest that the performance indicators used in educational institutions may only measure their fiscal efficiency without measuring the quality of the educational experience of the students. In most of the institutions, where industrial models are used for quality assurance, students are considered as customers and are provided with the maximum services and facilities possible. Institutions are required to fulfill a list of recommendations from the quality control agencies in order to enhance student satisfaction and to guarantee standard services. Quality of medical education should be assessed by measuring the impact of the educational program and quality improvement procedures in terms of knowledge base development, behavioral change, and patient care. Industrial quality models may focus on academic support services and processes, but educational quality models should be introduced in parallel to focus on educational standards and products.

  5. Doctors or technicians: assessing quality of medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyab Hasan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tayyab HasanPAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, University Brunei Darussalam, Bandar Seri Begawan, BruneiAbstract: Medical education institutions usually adapt industrial quality management models that measure the quality of the process of a program but not the quality of the product. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of industrial quality management models on medical education and students, and to highlight the importance of introducing a proper educational quality management model. Industrial quality management models can measure the training component in terms of competencies, but they lack the educational component measurement. These models use performance indicators to assess their process improvement efforts. Researchers suggest that the performance indicators used in educational institutions may only measure their fiscal efficiency without measuring the quality of the educational experience of the students. In most of the institutions, where industrial models are used for quality assurance, students are considered as customers and are provided with the maximum services and facilities possible. Institutions are required to fulfill a list of recommendations from the quality control agencies in order to enhance student satisfaction and to guarantee standard services. Quality of medical education should be assessed by measuring the impact of the educational program and quality improvement procedures in terms of knowledge base development, behavioral change, and patient care. Industrial quality models may focus on academic support services and processes, but educational quality models should be introduced in parallel to focus on educational standards and products.Keywords: educational quality, medical education, quality control, quality assessment, quality management models

  6. The delivery of distance education--is it time for doctoral programs in gerontology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Melinda; Martin, Peter; Doll, Gayle; Pearson-Scott, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of higher education in gerontology is changing; students are now able to receive an education solely online. Perhaps it is time to consider offering this option at the doctoral level. A needs assessment was conducted to assess whether a doctoral program in gerontology should be created in the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (GPIDEA) program. An online survey was sent to 247 students enrolled in the GPIDEA program and to students who had taken a GPIDEA course in gerontology but were not currently enrolled in the program. One hundred and twenty-three students began the survey, although only 120 students completed the survey. Findings indicated students are interested in a doctoral program in gerontology. Approximately 65% of students were interested in obtaining a PhD from a distance education program. However, an applied program focusing on community outreach and leadership was of most interest to students. Students were less interested in research-based programs or in research residency. Therefore, the development of distance education doctoral degree programs in gerontology may need to be created differently than "traditional" formats.

  7. Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 069

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Darren; Eisl-Culkin, Judy; Desjardins, Louise

    2008-01-01

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral…

  8. Flow behaviour and robustness of non-segregating tailings made from filtered/centrifuged MFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nik, R.M.; Sego, D.C.; Morgenstern, N.R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Geotechnical Center

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described an experimental study of a centrifugal dewatering filtration process for mature fine tailings (MFT). Various MFT samples from different oil sands operations were pumped into a filtering centrifuge that produced cake, thin tailings, and filtrate. The MFT was then transformed into non-segregated tailings (NST) and composite tailings (CT). The depositional characteristics of the CT-NST samples were evaluated in a series of flume tests. Flow profiles were presented for various samples. Vane shear tests were also conducted. The yield stress of each sample was compared with its flow duration and solids content. The results of the experimental tests demonstrated that the centrifugal filtration process can be considered as the initial stage of a multi-stage tailings management plan. The filtering centrifuge method can be used to produce robust CTs with higher solids content. Use of the method can decrease the amount of coagulants or flocculants required for further treatment. tabs., figs.

  9. MFT homogeneity study at TNX: Final report on the low weight percent solids concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical design and analysis of both elemental analyses and weight percent solids analyses data was utilized to evaluate the MFT homogeneity at low heel levels and low agitator speed at both high and low solids feed concentrations. The homogeneity was also evaluated at both low and high agitator speed at the 6000+ gallons static level. The dynamic level portion of the test simulated feeding the Melter from the MFT to evaluate the uniformity of the solids slurry composition (Frit-PHA-Sludge) entering the melter from the MFT. This final report provides the results and conclusions from the second half of the study, the low weight percent solids concentration portion, as well as a comparison with the results from the first half of the study, the high weight percent solids portion

  10. The Lived Experiences of Female Educational Leadership Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Katherine Cumings; Welton, Anjale; Lee, Pei-Ling; Young, Michelle D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is a meager body of research addressing the role educational leadership preparation programs in colleges and universities play in preparing women leaders. Also educational leadership preparation research has yet to explore ways in which mentorship provides additional capital for female graduate students. This study seeks to…

  11. Guidelines for cognitive behavioral training within doctoral psychology programs in the United States: report of the Inter-organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K; Ronan, George F; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D; Belar, Cynthia D; Berry, Sharon L; Christofff, Karen A; Craighead, Linda W; Dougher, Michael J; Dowd, E Thomas; Herbert, James D; McFarr, Lynn M; Rizvi, Shireen L; Sauer, Eric M; Strauman, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a year-long series of conferences, and developed a consensus on optimal doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology. The recommendations assume solid foundational training that is typical within applied psychology areas such as clinical and counseling psychology programs located in the United States. This article details the background, assumptions, and resulting recommendations specific to doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology, including competencies expected in the areas of ethics, research, and practice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Three Women’s Educational Doctoral Program Experiences: A Case Study of Performances and Journeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Goodykoontz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Three academic women joined to write this piece to explore individual doctoral program experiences and to establish common understandings. They collectively analyzed their experiences using the conceptual approach of doctoral program performances and journeys. This case study shares their experiences within the conceptual approach through emerging themes. The common understandings developed herein about doctoral education based on these themes are also shared. The broader contributions of the three women’s work are two-fold. First, the entire case study provides a way to view, discuss, and consider women’s doctoral education pluralistically. Secondly, perhaps readers of this piece will recognize that individual and common understandings with others are a way to develop professional knowledge as academics. Further, readers of this piece might be able to relate more deeply to their own and others’ unique doctoral program experiences through the lens of performances or journeys. Some of these connections might be based on the overarching framework, while others might be specific to the shared women’s experiences.

  13. Effective Doctoral Education: Interpreting Factors and Outcomes of Success through a New Framework, Autoethnography, and Quantitative Study of Passion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nathan Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this disquisition is to increase knowledge about the factors and outcomes of success in doctoral education. Enhanced understanding about the factors and outcomes of success could help optimize effectiveness of the complex systems that educate doctoral students. To achieve the purpose of this disquisition, three manuscripts were…

  14. International Doctoral Students in Counselor Education: Coping Strategies in Supervision Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hongryun; Jang, Yoo Jin; Henfield, Malik S.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores 8 international doctoral students' perceptions of coping strategies used in supervision training in counselor education programs. Using human agency as a conceptual framework, the authors found 3 categories: (a) personal and professional self-directed strategies as personal agency, (b) support and care from mentors as proxy…

  15. Post-Monolingual Research Methodology: Multilingual Researchers Democratizing Theorizing and Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the ground-breaking research in the study of languages in doctoral education. It argues for democratizing the production and dissemination of original contributions to knowledge through activating and mobilizing multilingual Higher Degree Researchers' (HDRs) capabilities for theorizing through them using their full linguistic…

  16. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivational Factors Related to Educators' Pursuit of Doctoral Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    George-Reid, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify intrinsic and extrinsic motivational factors for professional doctoral degree attainment among educators. The researcher examined the following intrinsic motivating factors: personal attainment, skill and ability enhancement, and goals. The researcher also included the following extrinsic factors:…

  17. Characteristics of Education Doctoral Dissertation References: An Inter-Institutional Analysis of Review of Literature Citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beile, Penny M.; Boote, David N.; Killingsworth, Elizabeth K.

    This study had two purposes: to examine the expertise of doctoral students in their use of the scholarly literature and to investigate the use of citation analysis as a tool for collection development. Analysis of 1,842 coded citations gleaned from 30 education dissertations awarded in 2000 from 3 institutions in the United States revealed that…

  18. Doctoral Studies: What Has Radical Adult Education Got to Do with It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudry, Aziz; Rochat, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    Working and writing together as supervisor and graduate student in a Canadian university, the authors bring their community/activist/adult education learning backgrounds into dialogue--and tension--with doctoral studies by reflecting on their personal learning paths and thinking about what this means for teaching and learning in academic contexts.…

  19. Structure, Impact, and Deficiencies of Beginning Counselor Educators' Doctoral Teaching Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalkes, Phillip L.; Benshoff, James M.; Stickl, Jaimie; Swindle, Paula J.; Umstead, Lindsey K.

    2018-01-01

    The authors utilized the consensual qualitative research method (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, [Hill, C. E., 1997]) to explore beginning counselor educators' (N = 9) experiences of doctoral teaching preparation, including helpful and missing components. Emerging themes included a lack of intentionality in teaching-related program design and a…

  20. Words and Responsibilities: Graduate Education and the Humanities. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Catharine R.

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  1. Doctoral Social Work Education: Responding to Trends in Society and the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaan, Ram A.; Ghose, Toorjo

    2018-01-01

    This article is intended to forecast major environmental changes that may impact social work doctoral education and assess what should be done in anticipation of these changes. We apply an open system and future studies perspective to guide our work. We present a set of predicted societal changes that will impact social work as a profession and…

  2. Perceptions Regarding the Professional Identity of Counselor Education Doctoral Graduates in Private Practice: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swickert, Mary Lee

    1997-01-01

    Reports on interviews of 10 doctoral graduates of counselor education programs to determine how they viewed professional identity. Results focus on uniqueness of counselors, career development issues, dislike of research, grouping for support, dislike of managed care, anger over turf wars, and affinity with holistic and preventive medicine. (RJM)

  3. Doctors in a Southeast Asian country communicate sub-optimally regardless of patients' educational background.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claramita, M.; Dalen, J.V.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between the style of doctor-patient communication and patients' educational background in a Southeast Asian teaching hospital setting using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). METHODS: We analyzed a total of 245 audio-taped consultations involving 30

  4. Continuing Medical Education for European General Practitioners in Doctor-Patient Relationship Skills and Psychosocial Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. Randol

    1998-01-01

    Most of the 23 European providers of continuing medical education (CME) surveyed reported programming on the doctor-patient relationship and psychosocial issues. Visits to programs in France, the Netherlands, and Spain identified the formats used most often in small group instruction, intensive individual learning, and national-level CME. (SK)

  5. Becoming an Academic: The Role of Doctoral Capital in the Field of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jude; Yoon, EeSeul

    2017-01-01

    This paper draws on Bourdieu's concepts of "field," "capital" and "habitus" to examine the learning and enculturation of alumni of a Canadian PhD programme in the discipline of Education. We introduce the concept of "doctoral capital" to help explain how and why some PhD graduates go on to secure faculty…

  6. Gender Differences in Educational Attainment: The Case of Doctoral Degrees in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastekaasa, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Despite strong trends in most Western countries towards gender equality in educational attainments, men are still considerably more likely to obtain doctoral degrees. Using data comprising nearly all students graduating from Norwegian universities during 1981-1996, separate event history analyses are carried out of recruitment to and completion of…

  7. International educational partnerships for doctors in training: a collaborative framework with the RCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, George A; Foster, Matthew; Sheriff, Rezvi; Mendis, Lalitha; Fernando, Devaka J S; Blundell, Caroline; Worrall, Jeffrey; Black, Carol

    2005-01-01

    The UK offers excellent postgraduate medical education, and overseas doctors in training often covet a period of training in the UK. Some overseas training authorities make UK training mandatory prior to appointment as a consultant. Unfortunately, the organisation of such training often proves to be ad hoc, and may lack educational value. UK training faces challenges as a result of reduced hours of work, more structured and intensive educational needs, and pressures of increasing clinical demand. A plethora of new 'trust' posts have developed, often with limited educational value, creating a risk that training quality for overseas doctors is reduced. Against this background, such posts can be used to create international training partnerships such as that at Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Trust (SFHT), providing high-quality general and specialty training. Given the success of this strategy, it would be desirable for other UK trusts to provide similar schemes offering specialties not covered at SFHT.

  8. Toward a Consensus in Ethics Education for the Doctor of Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabs, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to begin to develop a consensus as to the essential content and methods of ethics education for advanced practice nurses. An online Delphi technique was used to survey ethics experts to determine whether items were essential, desirable, or unnecessary to ethics education for students in doctor of nursing practice programs. Only the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and ethics terminology were deemed essential foundational knowledge.

  9. DOCTORAL STUDIES IN THE HOMELAND HIGHER EDUCATION: EXPERIENCE AND PROSPECTS OF THE EUROPEAN DIMENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Holovko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ensuring compliance of doctoral training in Ukraine with the European standards is an objective condition for the complete integration of our state into the united educational and scientific environment. In order to ensure the effectiveness of this process, the necessity of research conducted on the European experience as well as the first achievements and difficulties in the national high school, the determining factors, in particular, the state and prospects of the legal area development for the implementation of the new model appears to be urgent. Methods: general and specific scientific (special methods were used to achieve the research target. Applying the methods of the first group made it possible to outline the tendencies of the doctoral training transformation in European countries and in Ukraine. By means of the comparative legal method, the peculiarities of the development of the normative-legal field of doctoral training in the national high school were analyzed, and the areas of its improvement were determined. Results: The features of development of doctoral training in the European educational space and the prospects of its introduction in the national higher education were considered. The formation of the legal area of doctoral training in Ukraine was argued, and the ways of its improvement were outlined. Exemplified on the National Aviation University, as one of the leading research institutions, the first experience of introducing a European model for training scientific staff is summarized. Discussion: In doctoral training, one of the leading trends is the issue of ensuring the quality of the implementation of curricula of the Doctor of Philosophy, enhancing the autonomy and responsibility of postgraduate students and academic leaders, improving the academic and geographical mobility of scholars, increasing funding for research and enhancing its innovation. In the projection of this issue on the national university

  10. Community-Based Research (CBR in the Education Doctorate: Lessons Learned and Promising Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Stevahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Community-based research (CBR is an advanced form of academic service-learning through which university students, faculty, and community organizations collaborate to conduct inquiry projects aimed at producing social change. Despite its potential for advancing learning in graduate studies, little research exists on CBR implementations or outcomes in doctoral programs. This study examined the effectiveness of integrating CBR into an educational leadership doctorate across three consecutive cohorts in which students worked in teams to conduct CBR projects, each in partnership with a community organization pursuing a social justice initiative. A mixed-methods developmental case study design produced quantitative and qualitative data on students’ perceived effectiveness of cooperative/collaborative interaction and team decision making in CBR, experience with and learning from CBR in the education doctorate, and development of CBR competencies. Triangulated results overall revealed students’ (a positive attitudes toward CBR, (b enhanced understanding of and commitment to CBR and how to conduct it, (c expanded understanding and application of technical research skills, (d growth in coopera-tive/collaborative and conflict resolution skills, and (e development of leadership project management skills. These findings may assist faculty in planning innovative, authentic, applied, professional training in the education doctorate capable of advancing students’ graduate inquiry skills while also enhancing competencies for successful leadership in the field.

  11. Enhancing Doctoral Research Education through the Institution of Graduate Writing Courses in Ghanaian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph B. A. Afful

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A key support service in doctoral research that has increasingly gained attention is academic writing courses. This position paper argues for the institutionalization of graduate writing courses in universities in Ghana in order to acquaint doctoral students with the theoretical, procedural, and practical aspects of the writing of high stakes academic genres. An overview (including evaluation of existing courses on research- related writing in some universities is proffered. The study consequently presents arguments to support a proposal for institutional graduate writing courses in Ghanaian universities, followed by a discussion of other pertinent issues such as the curriculum, staffing, and funding. It is hoped that the institutionalization of such a writing support service will ultimately improve the quality of doctoral research education in Ghana

  12. Improving the working relationship between doctors and pharmacists: is inter-professional education the answer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Ruth M

    2012-05-01

    Despite their common history, there are many cultural, attitudinal and practical differences between the professions of medicine and pharmacy that ultimately influence patient care and health outcomes. While poor communication between doctors and pharmacists is a major cause of medical errors, it is clear that effective, deliberate doctor-pharmacist collaboration within certain clinical settings significantly improves patient care. This may be particularly true for those patients with chronic illnesses and\\/or requiring regular medication reviews. Moreover, in hospitals, clinical and antibiotic pharmacists are successfully influencing prescribing and infection control policy. Under the new Irish Pharmacy Act (2007), pharmacists are legally obliged to provide pharmaceutical care to their patients, thus fulfilling a more patient-centred role than their traditional \\'dispensing\\' one. However, meeting this obligation relies on the existence of good doctor-pharmacist working relationships, such that inter-disciplinary teamwork in monitoring patients becomes the norm in all healthcare settings. As discussed here, efforts to improve these relationships must focus on the strategic introduction of agreed changes in working practices between the two professions and on educational aspects of pharmaceutical care. For example, standardized education of doctors\\/medical students such that they learn to prescribe in an optimal manner and ongoing inter-professional education of doctors and pharmacists in therapeutics, are likely to be of paramount importance. Here, insights into the types of factors that help or hinder the improvement of these working relationships and the importance of education and agreed working practices in defining the separate but inter-dependent professions of pharmacy and medicine are reviewed and discussed.

  13. Improving the working relationship between doctors and pharmacists: is inter-professional education the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ruth M; Gallagher, Helen C

    2012-05-01

    Despite their common history, there are many cultural, attitudinal and practical differences between the professions of medicine and pharmacy that ultimately influence patient care and health outcomes. While poor communication between doctors and pharmacists is a major cause of medical errors, it is clear that effective, deliberate doctor-pharmacist collaboration within certain clinical settings significantly improves patient care. This may be particularly true for those patients with chronic illnesses and/or requiring regular medication reviews. Moreover, in hospitals, clinical and antibiotic pharmacists are successfully influencing prescribing and infection control policy. Under the new Irish Pharmacy Act (2007), pharmacists are legally obliged to provide pharmaceutical care to their patients, thus fulfilling a more patient-centred role than their traditional 'dispensing' one. However, meeting this obligation relies on the existence of good doctor-pharmacist working relationships, such that inter-disciplinary teamwork in monitoring patients becomes the norm in all healthcare settings. As discussed here, efforts to improve these relationships must focus on the strategic introduction of agreed changes in working practices between the two professions and on educational aspects of pharmaceutical care. For example, standardized education of doctors/medical students such that they learn to prescribe in an optimal manner and ongoing inter-professional education of doctors and pharmacists in therapeutics, are likely to be of paramount importance. Here, insights into the types of factors that help or hinder the improvement of these working relationships and the importance of education and agreed working practices in defining the separate but inter-dependent professions of pharmacy and medicine are reviewed and discussed.

  14. Response to science education reforms: The case of three science education doctoral programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwekwerere, Yovita Netsai

    Doctoral programs play a significant role in preparing future leaders. Science Education doctoral programs play an even more significant role preparing leaders in a field that is critical to maintaining national viability in the face of global competition. The current science education reforms have the goal of achieving science literacy for all students and for this national goal to be achieved; we need strong leadership in the field of science education. This qualitative study investigated how doctoral programs are preparing their graduates for leadership in supporting teachers to achieve the national goal of science literacy for all. A case study design was used to investigate how science education faculty interpreted the national reform goal of science literacy for all and how they reformed their doctoral courses and research programs to address this goal. Faculty, graduate students and recent graduates of three science education doctoral programs participated in the study. Data collection took place through surveys, interviews and analysis of course documents. Two faculty members, three doctoral candidates and three recent graduates were interviewed from each of the programs. Data analysis involved an interpretive approach. The National Research Council Framework for Investigating Influence of the National Standards on student learning (2002) was used to analyze interview data. Findings show that the current reforms occupy a significant part of the doctoral coursework and research in these three science education doctoral programs. The extent to which the reforms are incorporated in the courses and the way they are addressed depends on how the faculty members interpret the reforms and what they consider to be important in achieving the goal of science literacy for all. Whereas some faculty members take a simplistic critical view of the reform goals as a call to achieve excellence in science teaching; others take a more complex critical view where they question

  15. Doctors in a Southeast Asian country communicate sub-optimally regardless of patients' educational background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Dalen, Jan Van; Van Der Vleuten, Cees Pm

    2011-12-01

    To explore the relationship between the style of doctor-patient communication and patients' educational background in a Southeast Asian teaching hospital setting using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). We analyzed a total of 245 audio-taped consultations involving 30 internal medicine residents with 7-10 patients each in the internal medicine outpatient clinics. The patients were categorized into a group with a high and a group with a low educational level. We ranked the data into 41 RIAS utterances and RIAS-based composite categories in order of observed frequency during consultations. The residents invariantly used a paternalistic style irrespective of patients' educational background. The RIAS utterances and the composite categories show no significant relationship between communication style and patients' educational level. Doctors in a Southeast Asian country use a paternalistic communication style during consultations, regardless of patients' educational background. To approach a more partnership doctor-patient communication, culture and clinical environment concern of Southeast Asian should be further investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Are MFT-B Results Biased Because of Students Who Do Not Take the Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Magali; Kocher, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The authors study the characteristics of students who take the Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B) versus those who do not. The authors find that students with higher cumulative grade point averages (GPAs) are more likely to take the test. Additionally, students are more likely to take the test if it is offered late in the semester. Further…

  17. Assurance of Learning and the MFT: Closing the Loops with an Online Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Karen L.; Loveland, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the four stages of the closing the loop process undertaken by a college of business (COB) over a 6-year period. The COB developed and offered an online, noncredit review course to help students prepare for the Major Field Test in Business (MFT). Early results demonstrated the efficacy of the course as student scores rose from…

  18. [Development of postgraduate education for doctors-internists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozulia, I S; Verner, O M; Murashko, N K

    2012-01-01

    Medical progress and to optimize the management of health is largely dependent upon the effectiveness of the modernization of education and science. The primary objective in this regard is the creation of a new management model clinics. International experience has confirmed the effectiveness of the cluster approach. Another important development is the transition to single-channel financing, improving the monitoring of the quality of medical care. To solve these problems it is necessary to develop a model management model clinic based on modern technologies of strategic management and information technology, optimizations of economic activity, social monitoring system of public satisfaction with the quality of medical care.

  19. Doctoral Dissertation Topics in Education: Do They Align with Critical Issues?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan J Allen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available American society faces complex educational issues which impact many facets of its national interests. Institutions of higher education are granting doctoral degrees to educational leaders, but it is not known to what extent their dissertation topics are aligned with both longstanding and critical issues in education. Using a theoretical framework synthesizing Paul and Elder’s critical thinking model and Kuhlthau’s information seeking process, this study examines a set of education doctoral dissertation topical selections and categorizes them by general themes in relationship to many of the recognized educational issues in the United States. Investigators categorized dissertations from four departments within the College of Education of their home institution. The dataset, retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global, consisted of 231 documents published between 2005 and 2014. Through an inter-rater process examining dissertation titles, abstracts, and keywords, the dissertations were assigned critical issue themes culled from nine editions of a college text, and then categorized under a broader topical scheme situated within a well-used educational research website. Findings indicated that most dissertations concentrated in studies that researched problems and issues within schools. Further, some of the issues considered longstanding were not studied by dissertation authors within the sample. For example, privatization of schools and classroom discipline and justice were not selected for study. Findings also suggest new directions for those responsible for dissertation supervision and topic selection. The study adds to the literature on dissertation topic selection that addresses existing educational issues.

  20. Guidelines for Cognitive Behavioral Training within Doctoral Psychology Programs in the United States: Report of the Inter-Organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K.; Ronan, George F.; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D.; Belar, Cynthia D.; Berry, Sharon L.; Christofff, Karen A.; Craighead, Linda W.; Dougher, Michael J.; Dowd, E. Thomas; Herbert, James D.; McFarr, Lynn M.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Sauer, Eric M.; Strauman, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a yearlong series of…

  1. Developing the professional competence of future doctors in the instructional setting of higher medical educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokhovets, Halyna Yu; Lysanets, Yuliia V

    The main objectives of higher medical education is the continuous professional improvement of physicians to meet the needs dictated by the modern world both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. In this respect, the system of higher medical education has undergone certain changes - from determining the range of professional competences to the adoption of new standards of education in medicine. The article aims to analyze the parameters of doctor's professionalism in the context of competence-based approach and to develop practical recommendations for the improvement of instruction techniques. The authors reviewed the psycho-pedagogical materials and summarized the acquired experience of teachers at higher medical institutions as to the development of instruction techniques in the modern educational process. The study is based on the results of testing via the technique developed by T.I. Ilyina. Analytical and biblio-semantic methods were used in the paper. It has been found that the training process at medical educational institution should be focused on the learning outcomes. The authors defined the quality parameters of doctors' training and suggested the model for developing the professional competence of medical students. This model explains the cause-and-effect relationships between the forms of instruction, teaching techniques and specific components of professional competence in future doctors. The paper provides practical recommendations on developing the core competencies which a qualified doctor should master. The analysis of existing interactive media in Ukraine and abroad has been performed. It has been found that teaching the core disciplines with the use of latest technologies and interactive means keeps abreast of the times, while teaching social studies and humanities to medical students still involves certain difficulties.

  2. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  3. Business Professional Doctoral Programs: Student Motivations, Educational Process, and Graduate Career Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis J. Grabowski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging body of research on business professional doctoral programs has focused primarily on the programs’ composition and management, offering limited insight into students’ motivations and the impact the degree has on graduates and their careers. However, understanding these student motivations and career impacts is valuable for several reasons. In addition to helping future candidates assess various programs and the business professional doctoral degree itself, it can help enrolled students maximize their academic experience and help administrators improve these programs so that they better meet students’ personal and professional expectations. To bridge this research gap, this study pursued a mixed-methods approach to glean insights into why people pursue professional doctorates in business, the ultimate personal and professional outcomes of students, and the educational process producing those outcomes. The study revealed that most students entered these programs with a desire for personal or professional transformation, including the possibility of entering academia or a new industry. Moreover, the vast majority of program graduates believed they had experienced such a transformation, often in both professional and personal ways. Further, while important to personal growth, alumni perceived that certain program elements—such as the student networks they created and non-research related coursework—had little to no effect upon their career and viewed their research and the research process as far more important to their professional development. Based upon these findings, the researchers propose a comprehensive process model to explain the personal and professional factors and outcomes for graduates of business professional doctoral programs. They also suggest practical steps that students and administrators can take to improve the business professional doctoral educational experience.

  4. Designing a Peer-Mentoring Program for Education Doctorate (EdD) Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kendra Lowery; Rachel Geesa; Kat McConnell

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: In preparation for creating a peer-mentoring program for education doctorate (EdD) students, we conducted a literature review to learn about the characteristics of peer-mentoring programs for graduate students and EdD students specifically. Method: Our search criteria included articles about peer mentoring for graduate students only; published in peer-reviewed journals since the year 2000; and about programs that involved more experienced students, students farther along in t...

  5. Characteristics of Education Doctoral Dissertation References: An Inter-Institutional Analysis of Review of Literature Citations

    OpenAIRE

    Beile, Penny; Boote, David; Killingsworth, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    This study had two purposes: to examine the expertise of doctoral students in their use of the scholarly literature and to investigate the use of citation analysis as a tool for collection development. Analysis of 1,842 coded citations gleaned from 30 education dissertations awarded in 2000 from 3 institutions in the United States revealed that journal articles, at 45%, were cited most frequently, followed by monographs (33.9%) and "other" (18.3%), with magazines and Web sites contributing le...

  6. Promoting Interdisciplinary Education: The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, Günter; Bucher, Christian; Carr, Gemma; Farnleitner, Andreas; Rechberger, Helmut; Wagner, Wolfgang; Zessner, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    An interdisciplinary approach is often described as a valuable strategy to assist in overcoming the existing and emerging challenges to water resource management. The development of educational approaches to instil a culture of interdisciplinarity in the future generation of water resource professionals will help to meet this strategic need. The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems demonstrates how the adoption of an interdisciplinary education framework has been applied to a graduate programme in the water sciences. The interdisciplinary approach aims to provide doctoral research students with an understanding of the wide spectrum of processes relevant to water resource systems. This will enable them to bring together a range of ideas, strategies and methods to their current research and future careers. The education programme also aims to teach the softer skills required for successful interdisciplinary work such as the ability to communicate clearly with non-specialist professionals and the capacity to listen to and accommodate suggestions from experts in different disciplines, which have often not traditionally been grouped together. The Vienna Doctoral Programme achieves these aims through teaching an appreciation for a wide variety of approaches including laboratory analysis, field studies and numerical methods across the fields of hydrology, remote sensing, hydrogeology, structural mechanics, microbiology, water quality and resource management. Teaching takes the form of a detailed study programme on topics such as socio-economic concepts, resource and river basin management, modelling and simulation methods, health related water quality targets, urban water management, spatial data from remote sensing and basics for stochastic mechanics. Courses are also held by internationally recognised top scientists, and a guest scientist seminar series allows doctoral researchers to profit from the expertise of senior researchers from around the world

  7. The continuing medical education activities and attitudes of Australian doctors working in different clinical specialties and practice locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Grant D; Khadra, Mohamed H

    2009-02-01

    Currently, it is not clear which continuing medical education (CME) methods are being used by senior doctors and what their attitudes towards them are. The aims of this study were to investigate which modes of CME delivery senior Australian doctors utilise, to assess doctors' attitudes towards CME and to determine any differences in modes used and attitudes between clinical specialties and practice locations. A 52-statement questionnaire enquiring about doctors' current CME activities and their attitudes towards CME was distributed to 1336 senior Australian doctors. 494 doctors responded to the questionnaire. Traditional forms of CME (eg, meetings, conferences, journals and lectures) were most commonly used. Doctors thought CME involving face-to-face interaction was superior to electronic forms of CME. All doctors, especially those in hospital practice, had a positive attitude towards CME but found lack of time a barrier to learning. Rural doctors found CME sessions more difficult to attend than did their metropolitan colleagues. Traditional forms of CME were more popular than modern CME approaches, such as e-learning. Australian doctors had a positive attitude towards undertaking CME despite struggling to find time to perform CME. The differences in attitudes towards CME demonstrated between specialties and different practice location will aid future CME planning.

  8. First year doctors experience of work related wellbeing and implications for educational provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M

    2014-06-01

    To explore factors which affect newly qualified doctors' wellbeing and look at the implications for educational provision. Data were collected by free association narrative interviews of nine Foundation doctors and analysed using a grounded theory approach. Two Foundation programme directors were interviewed to verify data validity. Two main themes emerged: newly qualified doctors' wellbeing is affected by 1) personal experience and 2) work related factors. They start work feeling unprepared by medical school, work experience ("shadowing") or induction programmes at the beginning of the post. Senior colleague support and feedback are much valued but often lacking with little discussion of critical incidents and difficult issues. Challenges include sick patients, prescribing, patient/relative communication and no consistent team structure. Working shift patterns affects personal and social life. Enjoyment and reward come from helping patients, feelings of making a difference or teaching medical students. Whilst becoming familiar with their roles, newly qualified doctors search for identity and build up resilience. The support given during this process affects their wellbeing including coping with day to day challenges, whether posts are experienced as rewarding and how work influences their personal and social lives.

  9. Impact of workplace based assessment on doctors' education and performance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alice; Archer, Julian

    2010-09-24

    To investigate the literature for evidence that workplace based assessment affects doctors' education and performance. Systematic review. The primary data sources were the databases Journals@Ovid, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and ERIC. Evidence based reviews (Bandolier, Cochrane Library, DARE, HTA Database, and NHS EED) were accessed and searched via the Health Information Resources website. Reference lists of relevant studies and bibliographies of review articles were also searched. Review methods Studies of any design that attempted to evaluate either the educational impact of workplace based assessment, or the effect of workplace based assessment on doctors' performance, were included. Studies were excluded if the sampled population was non-medical or the study was performed with medical students. Review articles, commentaries, and letters were also excluded. The final exclusion criterion was the use of simulated patients or models rather than real life clinical encounters. Sixteen studies were included. Fifteen of these were non-comparative descriptive or observational studies; the other was a randomised controlled trial. Study quality was mixed. Eight studies examined multisource feedback with mixed results; most doctors felt that multisource feedback had educational value, although the evidence for practice change was conflicting. Some junior doctors and surgeons displayed little willingness to change in response to multisource feedback, whereas family physicians might be more prepared to initiate change. Performance changes were more likely to occur when feedback was credible and accurate or when coaching was provided to help subjects identify their strengths and weaknesses. Four studies examined the mini-clinical evaluation exercise, one looked at direct observation of procedural skills, and three were concerned with multiple assessment methods: all these studies reported positive results for the educational impact of workplace based assessment tools

  10. Hospital doctors' Opinions regarding educational Utility, public Sentiment and career Effects of Medical television Dramas: the HOUSE MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haboubi, Hasan N; Morgan, Holly; Aldalati, Omar

    2015-12-14

    To evaluate the opinions of practicing clinicians on medical television dramas and the effects these series have on society as well as their own practice. Observational study using a structured questionnaire disseminated among doctors of all grades and specialties at one tertiary centre and two large secondary care district general hospitals in Wales, United Kingdom. Three hundred and seventy-two questionnaires were distributed over a 3-month period, with 200 completed questionnaires received (response rate, 54%). Frequency and reasons for watching these programs, and opinions regarding realism, educational value and public perception, evaluated by doctors' grades and specialties. Identification of work practice with any observed traits in fictional doctors was also analysed. 65% of doctors surveyed admitted to watching these programs on more than one occasion. Junior doctors (interns and resident medical officers) were more regular viewers. Most doctors who admitted to watching medical dramas did so for entertainment purposes (69%); 8% watched for educational purposes and, of these, 100% watched House MD, 82% felt that these dramas were unrepresentative of daily practice, and 10% thought that they accurately portrayed reality. Most of the positive responses were from junior doctors. 61% of doctors identified some aspect of their clinical practice with another doctor (fictional or non-fictional; most junior doctors identified with a fictional doctor, compared with non-fictional role models for more senior practicing clinicians. This survey shows that a large body of the medical workforce watches medical television dramas and that such programs exercise a growing influence on the practice of junior doctors, particularly those in physicianly specialties. The reasons for certain role model selections remain unknown and may require further evaluation.

  11. Spin doctoring

    OpenAIRE

    Vozková, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    1 ABSTRACT The aim of this text is to provide an analysis of the phenomenon of spin doctoring in the Euro-Atlantic area. Spin doctors are educated people in the fields of semiotics, cultural studies, public relations, political communication and especially familiar with the infrastructure and the functioning of the media industry. Critical reflection of manipulative communication techniques puts spin phenomenon in historical perspective and traces its practical use in today's social communica...

  12. A critical examination of developments in nursing doctoral education in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaké Ketefian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Graduate nursing education in the United States is undergoing major transformations, as a result of factors both within nursing and in the larger society.OBJECTIVE: In this paper the authors examine the trends and factors that are influencing the changes, especially in doctoral education, for both nurse scientist and advanced practice preparation.CONCLUSION: The paper provides a background that serves as context, it gives an overview of the PhD and the DNP degrees, focusing on the recent changes and identifying the most compelling issues and concerns, ending with a series of recommendations.

  13. 'Let me through, I'm a Doctor!' : Professional Socialization in the Transition from Education to Work

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Based on four articles, this compilation thesis analyses the demonstrated com-petence defining a medical doctor, to the extent to which he or she acquires a high status and high level of employability in professional practice. Overall, the thesis aimed to describe and analyse professional socialization during doctors' transition from education to work. Questions addressed included how higher education should be understood as preparation for professional practice, how ideals of the future prof...

  14. Doctor Down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nagornaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biographical data of John Langdon Down, his invaluable contribution to the development of rehabilitation programs for children with Down syndrome. The basis of these programs was the socialization of people with intellectual disabilities. In doctor Down’s rehabilitation center there were used methods, including health care, education, physical education, the formation of correct behavior.

  15. Quality of doctor-patient communication through the eyes of the patient: variation according to the patient's educational level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-10-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In this study we describe patients' perspective in doctor-patient communication according to their educational level, and to what extent these perspectives lean towards the expert opinion on doctor-patient communication. In a multi-center study (Belgium, The Netherlands, UK and Italy), focus group discussions were organised using videotaped medical consultations. A mixed methods approach was used to analyse the data. Firstly, a difference in perspective in communication style was found between the lower educated participants versus the middle and higher educated participants. Secondly, lower educated participants referred positively most to aspects related to the affective/emotional area of the medical consultation, followed by the task-oriented/problem-focused area. Middle and higher educated participants positively referred most to the task-oriented/problem-focused area. The competency of the physician was an important category of communication for all participants, independent of social background. The results indicate that the preferences of lower educated participants lean more towards the expert opinion in doctor-patient communication than the middle and higher educated participants. Patients' educational level seems to influence their perspective on communication style and should be taken into account by physicians. Further quantitative research is needed to confirm these results.

  16. Building doctoral ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    heavily from the support from informal and extra-curricular researcher communities and non-formal support systems even beyond the institution in the private and societal lifeworlds. The chapter describes and analyses such forms of organizational and existential darkness within doctoral education...... and professionalization of doctoral education, with Graduate schools increasing in size and organizational complexity. Paradoxically, we see in contemporary research into doctoral students’ learning experiences that the students do not favour the formalized support systems and supervision, but on the contrary draw most......, and discusses how institutions and doctoral programmes could use such sprawling spaces for learning to build doctoral ecologies and to strengthening existentially based pedagogies within doctoral education....

  17. Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yang-Heui; Kim, Euisook; Yun, Soon-Nyoung; Lee, Kwang-Ja

    2010-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Focus group. Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. The quality characteristics of faculty

  18. [Continuous medical education of general practitioners/family doctors in chronic wound care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinozić, Tamara; Kovacević, Jadranka

    2014-10-01

    A number of healthcare professionals, specialists in different fields and with different levels of education, as well as non-healthcare professionals, are involved in the care of chronic wound patients, thus forming a multidisciplinary team that is not only responsible for the course and outcome of treatment, but also for the patient quality of life. Family doctor is also member of the team the task of which is to prevent, diagnose, monitor and anticipate complications and relapses, as well as complete recovery of chronic wound patients, with the overall care continuing even after the wound has healed, or is involved in palliative care. A family medicine practitioner with specialized education and their team of associates in the primary health care, along with material conditions and equipment improvement, can provide quality care for patients with peripheral cardiovascular diseases and chronic wounds, organized according to the holistic approach. It is essential that all professional associations of family medicine as well as professional associations of other specialties - fields that are involved in wound prevention and treatment - be included in developing the continuous medical education program. The benefits of modern information technology should be used to good advantage. The education should be adapted to the needs of family practitioners in terms of the form, place, time, volume, financial affordability and choice of topic. The interest shown in team education should be transformed into specialized programs in the creation of which it is essential to include both physicians and nurses and their respective professional associations. Special attention should be paid to education and training of young doctors/nurses, those with less work experience, those that have not yet been part of such education, those that lack experience in working with wound patients, those whose teams deal mostly with elderly patients, and also residents in family medicine and

  19. The Process in Completing a Nontraditional Group Dissertation in Practice for the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate, the Ed.D. Educational Leadership Program at Lynn University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on how a cohort of scholarly practitioners extended the traditional Doctorate in Education (Ed.D.) model at Lynn University by undertaking a nontraditional group Dissertation in Practice (DiP). The participants were a cohort of 11 scholarly practitioners known as Cohort 5 who became the first Lynn University doctoral students to…

  20. Modeling returns to education and labour market outcomes of doctoral degree holders in Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Simeonova-Ganeva, Ralitsa; Panayotova, Nataliya; Ganev, Kaloyan

    2013-01-01

    In this study we present the theoretical framework of the so called Mincerian equations used for modelling returns to education. Then, we construct a conceptual framework which allows us to answer the question “What happens to doctoral degree holders in the labour market?”. We analyse data for about 45,000 PhD graduates in Bulgaria from the NSI survey Career development of PhD degree holders run in 2007, 2009, and 2010. An attempt is made to measure pay gaps in terms of gender and major of st...

  1. Doctors' views about their work, education and training three years after graduation in the UK: questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Trevor; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Doctors who graduated in the UK after 2005 have followed a restructured postgraduate training programme (Modernising Medical Careers) and have experienced the introduction of the European Working Time Regulation and e-portfolios. In this paper, we report the views of doctors who graduated in 2008 three years after graduation and compare these views with those expressed in year 1. Questionnaires about career intentions, destinations and views sent in 2011 to all medical graduates of 2008. 3228 UK medical graduates. Comments on work, education and training. Response was 49% (3228/6538); 885 doctors wrote comments. Of these, 21.8% were unhappy with the standard of their training; 8.4% were positive. Doctors made positive comments about levels of supervision, support, morale and job satisfaction. Many doctors commented on poor arrangements for rotas, cover and leave, which had an adverse effect on work-life balance, relationships, morale and health. Some doctors felt pressured into choosing their future specialty too early, with inadequate career advice. Themes raised in year 3 that were seldom raised in year 1 included arrangements for flexible working and maternity leave, obtaining posts in desired locations and having to pay for courses, exams and conferences. Many doctors felt training was available, but that European Working Time Regulation, rotas and cover arrangements made it difficult to attend. Three years after graduation, doctors raised similar concerns to those they had raised two years earlier, but the pressures of career decision making, family life and job seeking were new issues.

  2. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » ... can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ...

  3. How To Talk to Your Doctor (and Get Your Doctor To Talk to You!). An Educational Workshop on Doctor Patient Communication = Como Hablarle a su Doctor (iY que su doctor le hable a usted!). Un seminario educativo sobre la comunicacion entre el doctor y el paciente.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX.

    This workshop, written in both English and Spanish, focuses on improving communication between physician and patient. In the workshop, the trainers will talk about "building bridges" between patient and doctor by understanding the doctor's role and his/her duty to the patient. According to the workshop, a person's doctor should…

  4. A DOCTORAL PROGRAM FOR THE WORLD: GLOBAL TERTIARY EDUCATION AND LEADERSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jace Hargis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to share the findings of a highly generalizable investigative feasibility project, whose goal is to enhance the teaching ability of current higher education faculty members. The mission of the project was to introduce a new doctoral degree on Global Education and Leadership (GEL geared toward a ubiquitous, broad approach to assist faculty members in their pursuit of improved teaching and learning. The methods used were to perform an online search identifying 18 different institutions, whose mission focused on both student-centered learning, as well as pursued an active scholarship of teaching and learning agenda; contact 52 key personnel for a visit to share our program; travel to each of eight countries to share the vision of the program in five weeks; and finally to collate results and examine trends and identify host institutions, accreditation steps and start dates. The major result of this experience was the unanimous agreement on the universal unsystematic process of providing tertiary faculty members with the essential andragogical methods to efficiently and effectively become exemplar teachers. Due to the overwhelming uniformity in affirmative response to the program, the key conclusion is to move forward with the doctoral program aggressively.

  5. Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Levels in Consulting Psychology/Organizational Consulting Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of these "Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Levels in Consulting Psychology/Organizational Consulting Psychology" is to provide a common framework for use in the development, evaluation, and review of education and training in consulting psychology/organizational consulting psychology (CP/OCP). The…

  6. From scientific discovery to health outcomes: A synergistic model of doctoral nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Melanie J; Clochesy, John M

    2016-05-01

    Across the globe, health system leaders and stakeholder are calling for system-level reforms in education, research, and practice to accelerate the uptake and application of new knowledge in practice and to improve health care delivery and health outcomes. An evolving bi-dimensional research-practice focused model of doctoral nursing education in the U.S. is creating unprecedented opportunities for collaborative translational and investigative efforts for nurse researchers and practitioners. The nursing academy must commit to a shared goal of preparing future generations of nurse scientists and practitioners with the capacity and motivation to work together to accelerate the translation of evidence into practice in order to place nursing at the forefront of health system improvement efforts and advance the profession. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Post-Monolingual Research Methodology: Multilingual Researchers Democratizing Theorizing and Doctoral Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the ground-breaking research in the study of languages in doctoral education. It argues for democratizing the production and dissemination of original contributions to knowledge through activating and mobilizing multilingual Higher Degree Researchers’ (HDRs capabilities for theorizing through them using their full linguistic repertoire. This paper contributes to this study’s development of post-monolingual research methodology which provides a theoretic-pedagogical framework for multilingual HDRs (a to use their full linguistic repertoire in their research; (b to develop their capabilities for theorizing and (c to construct potentially valuable theoretical tools using metaphors, images, concepts and modes of critique. This paper is based on a longitudinal program of collaborative research whereby monolingual Anglophone and multilingual HDRs jointly developed their capabilities for theorizing through producing Anglo-Chinese analytical tools, and the associated pedagogies for using their languages in doctoral research. This longitudinal research program has been undertaken in the field of doctoral education to further a defining feature of democracy, namely linguistic diversity. This research has been conducted with the aims of promoting the multilingualism of Australian universities and activating linguistic communities of scholars to use their full linguistic repertoire in their research. The main finding arising from this program of research has been the development of post-monolingual research methodology which (a uses the divergences within and between languages to undertake theorizing and (b in co-existence with the tensions posed by monolingualism, especially the insistence on using extant theories available in only one language. Doctoral pedagogies of intellectual/racial equality provide multilingual HDRs with insights into the debates about the geopolitics governing the use of languages in the production and

  8. Advancing Transdisciplinary and Translational Research Practice: Issues and Models of Doctoral Education in Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Neuhauser

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Finding solutions to complex health problems, such as obesity, violence, and climate change, will require radical changes in cross-disciplinary education, research, and practice. The fundamental determinants of health include many interrelated factors such as poverty, culture, education, environment, and government policies. However, traditional public health training has tended to focus more narrowly on diseases and risk factors, and has not adequately leveraged the rich contributions of sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, communication, political science, and other disciplines. Further, students are often not sufficiently trained to work across sectors to translate research findings into effective, large-scale sustainable actions.During the past 2 decades, national and international organizations have called for more effective interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, and translational approaches to graduate education. Although it has been difficult to work across traditional academic boundaries, some promising models draw on pedagogical theory and feature cross-disciplinary training focused on real-world problems, linkage between research, professional practice, community action, and cultivation of leadership skills.We describe the development the Doctor of Public Health program at the University of California, Berkeley, USA and its efforts to improve transdisciplinary and translational research education. We stress the need for international collaboration to improve educational approaches and better evaluate their impact.

  9. What does it means to be a critical scholar? A metalogue between science education doctoral students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cian, Heidi; Dsouza, Nikeetha; Lyons, Renee; Alston, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This manuscript is written in response to Lydia Burke and Jesse Bazzul's article Locating a space of criticality as new scholars in science education. As doctoral students finding our place in the culture of science education, we respond by discussing our journeys towards the development of a scholarly identity, with particular focus on whether or how we see ourselves as critical scholars. Since each of us authoring this paper has a different perspective, a metalogue format is utilized to ensure all of our voices and journeys are represented. We use the Burke and Bazzul article as a platform for conversations about challenges faced for emerging scholars in the field of science education and explore how we see our role in responding to these challenges. Specifically, we discuss the barriers to publication, dissemination of research to practitioners, and how to approach these problems from a grounding in critical theory. As a result of our conversations, we conclude that there is a need to reshape the field of science education to invite more unorthodox research perspectives, methodologies, and publication formats. To do so, the issues we explore require a continued conversation between emerging scholars, practicing researchers, and practicing educators.

  10. Promoting interdisciplinary education − the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wagner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems (DK-WRS is a programme that aims to educate students in interdisciplinary water science through cutting edge research at an international level. It is funded by the Austrian Science Fund and designed to run over a period of 12 yr during which 80 doctoral students are anticipated to graduate. This paper reports on our experiences of setting up and implementing the Programme. We identify three challenges: integrating the disciplines, maintaining depth in an interdisciplinary programme, and teaching subjects remote to each student's core expertise. To address these challenges we adopt a number of approaches. We use three levels of instruments to foster integration across the disciplines: joint groups (e.g. a joint study programme, joint science questions (e.g. developed in annual symposia, and joint study sites. To maintain depth we apply a system of quality control including regular feedback sessions, theses by journal publications and international study exchange. For simultaneously teaching students from civil and environmental engineering, biology, geology, chemistry, mathematics we use visually explicit teaching, learning by doing, extra mentoring and by cross relating associated subjects. Our initial assessment of the Programme shows some very positive outcomes. Joint science questions formed between students from various disciplines indicate integration is being achieved. The number of successful publications in top journals suggests that depth is maintained. Positive feedback from the students on the variety and clarity of the courses indicates the teaching strategy is working well. Our experiences have shown that implementing and running an interdisciplinary doctoral programme has its challenges and is demanding in terms of time and human resources but seeing interactions progress and watching people grow and develop their way of thinking in an interdisciplinary environment is a

  11. Promoting interdisciplinary education - the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, G.; Carr, G.; Bucher, C.; Farnleitner, A. H.; Rechberger, H.; Wagner, W.; Zessner, M.

    2012-02-01

    The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems (DK-WRS) is a programme that aims to educate students in interdisciplinary water science through cutting edge research at an international level. It is funded by the Austrian Science Fund and designed to run over a period of 12 yr during which 80 doctoral students are anticipated to graduate. This paper reports on our experiences of setting up and implementing the Programme. We identify three challenges: integrating the disciplines, maintaining depth in an interdisciplinary programme, and teaching subjects remote to each student's core expertise. To address these challenges we adopt a number of approaches. We use three levels of instruments to foster integration across the disciplines: joint groups (e.g. a joint study programme), joint science questions (e.g. developed in annual symposia), and joint study sites. To maintain depth we apply a system of quality control including regular feedback sessions, theses by journal publications and international study exchange. For simultaneously teaching students from civil and environmental engineering, biology, geology, chemistry, mathematics we use visually explicit teaching, learning by doing, extra mentoring and by cross relating associated subjects. Our initial assessment of the Programme shows some very positive outcomes. Joint science questions formed between students from various disciplines indicate integration is being achieved. The number of successful publications in top journals suggests that depth is maintained. Positive feedback from the students on the variety and clarity of the courses indicates the teaching strategy is working well. Our experiences have shown that implementing and running an interdisciplinary doctoral programme has its challenges and is demanding in terms of time and human resources but seeing interactions progress and watching people grow and develop their way of thinking in an interdisciplinary environment is a valuable reward.

  12. The Dialogue Between Medical Doctors and Bioethicists: Rethinking Experience to Improve Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Luca; Russo, María Teresa; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    More and more seems to be necessary to find new ways of communication between medical doctors and bioethicists in order to build a shared vocabulary and to prevent conflicts: many bioethical problems seem to be caused by the lack of dialogue between them, which both seem to speak two different languages. Improving this dialogue means searching new languages and innovative forms of communication: the narration could be a really effective tool to enhance the physicians' and bioethicist's moral conscience, since it facilitates reasoning on someone's particular experience, and, ultimately, on our experience. Starting from the results of a questionnaire administered to a group of students of the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery of the University Campus Bio-Medico we present a theoretical discussion about the need for more dialogue and for a shared vocabulary in medical experiences. In this regard, we suggest as a possible solution to the conflicts among medical doctors and bioethicists, an educational strategy, i.e., humanities courses for medical students, which may help them to deeply describe their practical present (and future) experience.

  13. Doctor-patient communications in the Aboriginal community: towards the development of educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Angela; Godolphin, William; Alexander, Ted

    2006-09-01

    Aboriginal people in Canada have poorer health than the rest of the population. Reasons for health disparities are many and include problems in communication between doctor and patient. The objective of this study was to understand doctor-patient communication in Aboriginal communities in order to design educational interventions for medical students based on the needs and experiences of patients. Experiences of good and poor communication were studied by semi-structured interviews or focus groups with 22 Aboriginal community members, 2 community health representatives and 2 Aboriginal trainee physicians. Transcribed data were coded and subjected to thematic analysis. Positive and negative experiences of communicating with physicians fell into three broad and interrelated themes: their histories as First Nations citizens; the extent to which the physician was trusted; time in the medical interview. Aboriginal peoples' history affects their communication with physicians; barriers may be overcome when patients feel they have a voice and the time for it to be heard. Physicians can improve communication with Aboriginal patients by learning about their history, building trust and giving time.

  14. Integrated School of Ocean Sciences: Doctoral Education in Marine Sciences in Kiel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Nina; Basse, Wiebke; Prigge, Enno; Schelten, Christiane; Antia, Avan

    2016-04-01

    Marine research is a dynamic thematic focus in Kiel, Germany, uniting natural scientists, economists, lawyers, philosophers, artists and computing and medical scientists in frontier research on the scientific, economic and legal aspects of the seas. The contributing institutions are Kiel University, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel Institute for the World Economy and Muthesius University in Kiel. Marine science education in Kiel trains young scientists to investigate the role of the oceans in global change, risks arising from ocean usage and sustainable management of living and non-living marine resources. Basic fundamental research is supplemented with applied science in an international framework including partners from industry and public life. The Integrated School of Ocean Sciences (ISOS) established through the Cluster of Excellence "The Future Ocean", funded within the German Excellence Initiative, provides PhD candidates in marine sciences with interdisciplinary education outside of curricular courses. It supports the doctoral candidates through supplementary training, a framework of supervision, mentoring and mobility, the advisors through transparency and support of doctoral training in their research proposals and the contributing institutions by ensuring quality, innovation and excellence in marine doctoral education. All PhD candidates financed by the Helmholtz Research School for Ocean System Science and Technology (HOSST) and the Collaborative Research Centre 754 "Climate-biogeochemical interactions in the tropical ocean" (SFB 754) are enrolled at the ISOS and are integrated into the larger peer community. Over 150 PhD candidate members from 6 faculties form a large interdisciplinary network. At the ISOS, they sharpen their scientific profile, are challenged to think beyond their discipline and equip themselves for life after a PhD through early exposure to topics beyond research (e.g. social responsibility, public communication

  15. Paste pumping and deposition field trials and concepts on Syncrude's dewatered mature fine tailings MFT centrifuge cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahaie, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ahmed, I.; Labelle, M.; Brown, R. [Golder Paste Technology, Sudbury, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed a paste pumping and deposition field study conducted on dewatered mature fine tailings (MFT) located at Syncrude's Mildred Lake operation. Bench scale rheological examinations of centrifuge cakes and design field testing are used to determine the pumpability of MFT centrifuge cakes. The study included a transportation assessment for the conveyor and positive displacement pumps and pipelines, as well as geotechnical and environmental analyses of bulk materials. Flocculant optimization and centrifuge operational parameter assessments were conducted. Pressure differential and flow rate data were captured in the field studies in order to determine pipeline friction loss. The study showed that pipe friction factors can be obtained using the Bingham plastic model. A natural deposition angle was determined for the MFT centrifuged cake. The study showed that the cake must be sheared in order to reduce yield stress before pumping. It was concluded that displacement pumps can be used to reduced pipeline friction factors. tabs., figs.

  16. Analysis of inpatient dermatologic referrals: insight into the educational needs of trainee doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, K

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To analyse inpatient consultation referrals to the Dermatology Department and to identify the educational needs of junior\\/trainee doctors. METHODS: Consultation data of inpatients referred to the Dermatology Department between 2001 and 2006 was reviewed. RESULTS: There were 703 referrals identified. Patients were referred from all wards in the hospital. There were a total of 113 different dermatological diagnoses in the group. One-fifth (22%) consultations were for skin infections, 12% had atopic dermatitis, 8% had psoriasis and 8% had clear or suspected drug cause for their rash. In 391 cases, the Consultant Dermatologist\\'s diagnosis was different to the inpatient referral diagnosis on the consultation referral form. CONCLUSIONS: Our results emphasise the need for junior dermatology trainees to undertake extra training in both the dermatologic conditions. This data supports the need for expansion of service provision of dermatology in the region.

  17. Review of Doctoral Research in English Language Education in the Philippines, Singapore and Malaysia (2007-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubdy, Rani; Tupas, T. Ruanni F.; Villareal, Corazon D.; David, Maya Khemlani; Dumanig, Francisco Perlas

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights recent doctoral research in English language education and related areas completed between 2007 and 2010 in three countries in Southeast Asia: Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines. Out of sixty dissertations initially chosen from major universities in these countries, five from the Philippines, four from Malaysia and…

  18. Advisory Relationship as a Moderator between Research Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Productivity among Counselor Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Patty Beyrong; Woo, Hongryun; Bang, Na Mi

    2017-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between research self-efficacy, motivation, and productivity, as well as advisory relationship as a moderator, among 190 counselor education doctoral students. Research self-efficacy and motivation predicted productivity. Advisory relationship moderated the relationship between intrinsic and failure avoidance…

  19. Writing for Scholarly Publication as "Tacit Knowledge": A Qualitative Focus Group Study of Doctoral Students in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck; Boyer, Wanda; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2014-01-01

    Expectations for academic writing and publication have intensified in Academia. Doctoral students in colleges of education are advised to publish even before they graduate and evidence of successful publication is influential in hiring, tenure, and promotion decisions. The purpose of this research was to study the process of writing for…

  20. An Analysis of Research Methods and Statistical Techniques Used by Doctoral Dissertation at the Education Sciences in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Engin

    2010-01-01

    To assess research methods and analysis of statistical techniques employed by educational researchers, this study surveyed unpublished doctoral dissertation from 2003 to 2007. Frequently used research methods consisted of experimental research; a survey; a correlational study; and a case study. Descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, factor…

  1. An Approach for Doctoral Students Conducting Context-Specific Review of Literature in IT, ICT, and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretto, Gabriella; Curró, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Since 1980s the rate of technological change has been phenomenal, creating an impact on the information-seeking behaviors of doctoral students and other researchers. When searching the three fields of Information Technology (IT), Information and Communication Technology (ICT), and Educational Technology (EdTech), it is like opening a Pandora's…

  2. An analysis of the current educational status and future training needs of China's rural doctors in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingming; Liu, Juyuan; Huang, Jianshi; Qian, Yunliang; Che, Lu

    2013-04-01

    To analyse the educational status and future training needs of China's rural doctors and provide a basis to improve their future training. A cross-sectional epidemiological survey was used for the analysis, and 17 954 rural doctors chosen randomly from the eastern, central and western regions of China in 2009-2010 were surveyed to ascertain their average training time and the methods used for and content of their training. In general, 8671/17 778 (48.77%) of respondents received less than 12 days of training in a year. Conference sessions seemed to be the major route of training, with 10 150/17 925 respondents (56.62%). Clinical skills, with a response rate of 14 441/17 926 (80.56%), seemed to be the most popular training content. With regard to the general needs for training time received, 6547/18 255 (35.86%) of respondents hoped the average training time received a year would be less than 12 days; on-site guidance from a senior doctor was the most popular training method with response rate of 10 109/17 976 (56.24%), and clinical skills was what rural doctors wished to study the most, with a positive response of 16 744/17 962 (93.22%). Statistically significant differences existed in the current status and training time, training method and training content needs of China's rural doctors. Our results suggest that the training status and needs of China's rural doctors are still disjointed; measures including the introduction of remote education and clinical further education, extended training time and more clinical skills training should be adopted.

  3. Educational and labor wastage of doctors in Mexico: towards the construction of a common methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz José

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper addresses the problem of wastage of the qualified labor force, which takes place both during the education process and when trained personnel try to find jobs in the local market. Methods Secondary sources were used, mainly the Statistical yearbooks of the National Association of Universities and Higher Education Institutions (ANUIES in Spanish. Also, the 2000 Population Census was used to estimate the different sources of labor market wastage. The formulas were modified to estimate educational and labor wastage rates. Results Out of every 1000 students who started a medical training in 1996, over 20% were not able to finish the training by 2000. Furthermore, out of every 1000 graduates, 31% were not able to find a remunerated position in the labor market that would enable them to put into practice the abilities and capacities obtained at school. Important differences can be observed between generalists and specialists, as well as between men and women. In the case of specialists and men, lower wastage rates can be observed as compared to the wastage rates of generalists and women. A large percentage of women dedicate themselves exclusively to household duties, which in labor terms represents a wastage of their capacity to participate in the production of formal health services. Conclusion Women are becoming a majority in most medical schools, yet their participation in the labor market does not reflect the same trend. Among men, policies should be formulated to incorporate doctors in the specific health field for which they were trained. Regarding women, specific policies should target those who are dedicated full-time to household activities in order to create the possibility of having them occupy a remunerated job if they are willing to do so. Reducing wastage at both the educational and labor levels should improve the capacity of social investment, thereby increasing the capacity of the health system as a whole

  4. Educational and labor wastage of doctors in Mexico: towards the construction of a common methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigenda, Gustavo; Ruiz, José Arturo; Bejarano, Rosa

    2005-04-15

    BACKGROUND: This paper addresses the problem of wastage of the qualified labor force, which takes place both during the education process and when trained personnel try to find jobs in the local market. METHODS: Secondary sources were used, mainly the Statistical yearbooks of the National Association of Universities and Higher Education Institutions (ANUIES in Spanish). Also, the 2000 Population Census was used to estimate the different sources of labor market wastage. The formulas were modified to estimate educational and labor wastage rates. RESULTS: Out of every 1000 students who started a medical training in 1996, over 20% were not able to finish the training by 2000. Furthermore, out of every 1000 graduates, 31% were not able to find a remunerated position in the labor market that would enable them to put into practice the abilities and capacities obtained at school. Important differences can be observed between generalists and specialists, as well as between men and women. In the case of specialists and men, lower wastage rates can be observed as compared to the wastage rates of generalists and women. A large percentage of women dedicate themselves exclusively to household duties, which in labor terms represents a wastage of their capacity to participate in the production of formal health services. CONCLUSION: Women are becoming a majority in most medical schools, yet their participation in the labor market does not reflect the same trend. Among men, policies should be formulated to incorporate doctors in the specific health field for which they were trained. Regarding women, specific policies should target those who are dedicated full-time to household activities in order to create the possibility of having them occupy a remunerated job if they are willing to do so. Reducing wastage at both the educational and labor levels should improve the capacity of social investment, thereby increasing the capacity of the health system as a whole to provide services

  5. Power, Jobs and Bodies: The Experiences of Becoming a Gender Scholar in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danowitz, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that doctoral students' learning and experiences are influenced by their relationships and predominant organizational norms and structures, create gender inequality and discourage or prevent alternative behaviors. However, there is very little empirical information on the nature of doctoral experiences and organizational…

  6. Learning through Experience: The Transition from Doctoral Student to Social Work Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Julianne S.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The researchers conducted an exploratory study using grounded theory qualitative research methods to examine experiences of social work doctoral students as they learned to teach ("N"?=?14). A core category, "learning through experience," representing a basic social process, was identified. The doctoral students experienced…

  7. The Role of Research Education Coordinators in Building Research Cultures in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Angela; Boud, David; Malfroy, Janne

    2017-01-01

    The development of cultures of support has become important in programmes for the preparation of research students. The paper draws on in-depth interviews with 21 research education coordinators from Australian and United Kingdom institutions to identify the strategies that they use to build research cultures and integrate research students into…

  8. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  9. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ... Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  10. Changing organisational routines in doctoral education: an intervention to infuse social justice into a social welfare curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro, Valerie B.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes one effort to infuse a social justice framework into a social work doctoral education programme in a prominent research university of the United States. The “Social Justice in Doctoral Education” (SJDE Project identified Social Justice Learning Objectives (SJLOs in the categories of scholarship, teaching, and service. Doctoral students were surveyed in 2010 to determine the extent to which the SJLOs were being systematically facilitated by their doctoral programme. The forms that guide and shape the milestones of doctoral education at that institution were revised in 2011 in an attempt to create new opportunities for social justice learning. A second survey of doctoral students in 2013 resulted in two findings. First, doctoral students reported using the SJLOs to guide their education. Second, a pre/post comparison of student perceptions indicated an increase in opportunities for social justice learning through doctoral education. This case study provides preliminary support for the modification of organisational routines to expand social justice education in social work.En este artículo se describe el esfuerzo para infundir un marco de justicia social en un programa doctoral de trabajo social dentro de una universidad prominente de investigación de los Estados Unidos. El proyecto de investigación “Justicia Social en la Educación Doctoral” (SJDE identificó los Objetivos de Aprendizaje de la Justicia Social (SJLOs en una serie de categorías de la investigación científica, como la enseñanza y el servicio. Los estudiantes de doctorado respondieron a una encuesta en 2010 para determinar el grado en el que los SJLOs se facilitaban sistemáticamente en el programa de doctorado. En 2011 se revisaron los formularios que guían y dan forma a los hitos de la educación doctoral en esa institución, en un intento de crear nuevas oportunidades para la justicia social de aprendizaje. En 2013, una encuesta seguimiento a

  11. But I Don't Want to Be a Professor! The Innovations of an Online Practitioner Doctorate Focused on Educational Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher T.; Curry, John H.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing potential for the development of practitioner-based doctor of education (EdD) programs as potential students in the field recognize that they do not need to leave their current work positions to obtain a doctorate particularly if it enhances their work. This article chronicles 1 university's process in developing an innovative…

  12. Women Doctors and Lady Nurses: Class, Education, and the Professional Victorian Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The lives of the first women doctors in Britain have been well studied by historians, as have the many debates about the right of women to train and practice as doctors. Yet the relationship between these women and their most obvious comparators and competitors-the newly professionalized hospital nurses-has not been explored. This article makes use of a wide range of sources to explore the ways in which the first lady doctors created "clear water" between themselves and the nurses with whom they worked and trained. In doing so, it reveals an identity that may seem at odds with some of the clichés of Victorian femininity, namely that of the intelligent and ambitious lady doctor.

  13. Preservation of Educational Inequality in Doctoral Education: Tacit Knowledge, Implicit Bias and University Faculty. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.1.17

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLachlan, Anne J.

    2017-01-01

    Making doctoral education accessible and successful for students from low income, first generation families as well as members of immigrant or specific ethnic groups is a world- wide problem. In the US the traditional explanation for the low numbers of Ph.D. recipients from these groups are lack of preparation, lack of interest and a "leaky…

  14. Educating Tourists for Global Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phi, Giang; Whitford, Michelle; Dredge, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Ethical tourism initiatives have increasingly been framed as tools to educate tourists about global citizenship (GC), yet it is unclear how these initiatives are conceptualised, planned and implemented by tourism providers. This paper focuses on a form of ethical tourism known as microfinance...... tourism (MFT). It critically explores MFT providers’ perspectives on what constitutes the goals of educating tourists about GC and how MFT can be designed and implemented to achieve these goals. The study adopted a qualitative approach utilising in-depth interviews with twelve key informants from six MFT......’ perspectives pertaining to GC, the effect diversity has on the design of tourism initiatives, and the resultant outcomes of GC education utilising ethical tourism....

  15. Educating doctors in the clinical workplace: unraveling the process of teaching and learning in the medical resident as teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busari, J O; Arnold, Aer

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, higher medical education has witnessed major changes in the structure and content of postgraduate medical training. Seven professional competencies have been described that address the medical doctors' ability to effectively communicate and transfer medical information, interact effectively and professionally, and demonstrate a good grasp of clinical knowledge and skills. Proficiency in didactic skills, however, is an important competency that has not received prominent attention. In the clinical setting, attending-physicians and medical residents are responsible for teaching. Consequently, several medical institutions have proposed the need for teacher training programs to improve the teaching skills of attending doctors and medical residents. The supporters of these programs believe that through teaching, medical doctors improve their individual professional and clinical problem-solving abilities. Hence, it is logical to assume that didactic skills' training would contribute to the professional development of doctors. In this paper, we re-examine the underlying theory of the didactic proficiency, how it relates to the clinical setting, and why it may be beneficial for the professional training of medical residents.

  16. Doctors and pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Roy G

    2009-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is seen as seducing doctors by providing expensive gifts, subsidising travel and underwriting practice expenses in return for those doctors prescribing products that otherwise they would not use. This paints doctors in a very negative light; suggests doctors are available to the highest bidder; implies doctors do not adequately act as independent agents; and that doctors are driven more by self-interest than by patient needs. Similar practices, in other industries, are accepted as normal business behaviour but it is automatically assumed to be improper if the pharmaceutical industry supports doctors. Should the pharmaceutical industry withdraw educational grants then there would be: fewer scientific meetings; reduced attendance at conferences; limited post graduate education; and a depreciated level of maintenance of professional standards. To suggest that doctors prescribe inappropriately in return for largesse maligns their integrity but where there is no scientific reason to choose between different treatments then there can be little argument against selecting the product manufactured by a company that has invested in the doctor and the question arises as to whether this represents bad medicine? This paper will examine what constitutes non-professional conduct in response to inducements by the pharmaceutical industry. It will review: conflict of interest; relationships between doctors and pharma and the consequences for patients; and the need for critical appraisal before automatically decrying this relationship while accepting that there remain those who do not practice ethical medicine.

  17. Improving Symptom Control, QOL, and Quality of Care for Women with Breast Cancer: Developing a Research Program on Neurological Effects via Doctoral Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bakitas, Marie; Ahles, Tim A

    2006-01-01

    ... on the Cognitive Effects of Chemotherapy. The scope of the program was to support the trainee's doctoral education with an ultimate career goal of becoming a Clinical Breast Cancer Research Scientist through a mentored research experience. Ms...

  18. Completion of Limitation of Medical Treatment forms by junior doctors for patients with dementia: clinical, medicolegal and education perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Jaclyn; MacPhail, Aleece; Trytel, Gael; Rajendram, Prashanti Yalini; Winbolt, Margaret; Ibrahim, Joseph E

    2017-10-01

    Objective Limitation of Medical Treatment (LMT) forms are an essential element of end-of-life care. Decision making around LMT is complex and often involves patients with dementia. Despite the complexity, junior doctors frequently play a central role in completing LMT forms. The present study sought perspectives from a range of stakeholders (hospital clinicians, medical education personnel, legal and advocacy staff) about junior doctors' roles in completing LMT forms in general and for patients with dementia. Methods Qualitative data were gathered in semi-structured interviews (SSI) and theoretical concepts were explored in roundtable discussion (RD). Participants were recruited through purposive and convenience sampling drawing on healthcare and legal personnel employed in the public hospital and aged care systems, selected from major metropolitan hospitals, healthcare and legal professional bodies and advocacy organisations in Victoria, Australia. The contents of the SSIs and RD were subject to thematic analysis using a framework approach. Data were indexed according to the topics established in the study aim; categories were systematically scrutinised, from which key themes were distilled. Results Stakeholders reported that completing LMT forms was difficult for junior doctors because of a lack of medical and legal knowledge, as well as clinical inexperience and inadequate training. Healthcare organisations (HCOs) either lacked policies about the role of junior doctors or had practices that were discordant with policy. In this process, there were substantial gaps pertaining to patients with dementia. Recommendations made by the study participants included the provision of supervised clinical exposure and additional training for junior doctors, strengthening HCO policies and explicit consideration of the needs of patients with dementia. Conclusions LMT forms should be designed for clarity and consistency across HCOs. Enhancing patient care requires appropriate

  19. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation...... impact the supervisor – student relationship in a positive way....

  20. Standardization of doctoral study in agricultural and extension education: is the field of study mature enough for achievement of the optimum degree of order?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briers, G E; Lindner, J R; Shinn, G C; Wingenbach, G W; Baker, M T

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural and extension education--or some derivative name--is a field of study leading to the doctoral degree in universities around the world. Is there are body of knowledge or a taxonomy of the knowledge--e.g., a knowledge domain--that one should possess with a doctorate in agricultural and extension education? The purpose of this paper was to synthesize the work of researchers who attempted to define the field of study, with a taxonomy comprising the knowledge domains (standards) and knowledge objects--structured interrelated sets of data, knowledge, and wisdom--of the field of study. Doctoral study in agricultural and extension education needs a document that provides for rules and guidelines--rules and guidelines that in turn provide for common and repeated use--all leading to achievement of an optimum degree of order in the context of academic, scholarly, and professional practice in agricultural and extension education. Thus, one would know in broad categories the knowledge, skills, and abilities possessed by one who holds a doctoral degree in agricultural and extension education. That is, there would exist a standard for doctoral degrees in agricultural and extension education. A content analysis of three previous attempts to categorize knowledge in agricultural and extension education served as the primary technique to create a new taxonomy--or to confirm an existing taxonomy--for doctoral study in agricultural and extension education. The following coalesced as nine essential knowledge domains for a doctorate in agricultural and extension education: (1) history, philosophy, ethics, and policy; (2) agricultural/rural development; (3) organizational development and change management; (4) planning, needs assessment, and evaluation; (5) learning theory; (6) curriculum development and instructional design; (7) teaching methods and delivery strategies; (8) research methods and tools; and, (9) scholarship and communications.

  1. Factors of Attrition in Cohort Doctoral Education: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Linda Ann

    2013-01-01

    Attrition rates, completion rates, and time to degree are the key areas researchers have sought to examine influencing factors and patterns of behavior that describe the departure process of students in doctoral study. Through the lens of self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985), the purpose of this phenomenological qualitative study was…

  2. Exploring the Relationship between Cultural Intelligence, Transformational Leadership, and Burnout in Doctorate of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, D. Michelle.

    2013-01-01

    This correlational study used standard multiple regression to determine if there was a relationship between the factors of cultural intelligence (metacognitive CQ, cognitive CQ, motivational CQ, and behavioral CQ) and transformational leadership in doctoral students. This study also sought to determine the best predictor of burnout by using a…

  3. Mentoring in Gerontology Doctoral Education: The Role of Elders in Mentoring Gerontologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangmo, Tenzin; Ewen, Heidi H.; Webb, Alicia K.; Teaster, Pamela B.; Russell Hatch, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    This study examined elder mentors' and students' roles, functions, and satisfaction with the Elder Mentorship program at the Graduate Center for Gerontology, University of Kentucky. The Elder Mentorship program matches gerontology doctoral students with older adults in the community. Parallel surveys were constructed to evaluate the program from…

  4. A Scientific Framework for Social Work Doctoral Education in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G.; Moore, Hadass; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie

    2018-01-01

    The emerging discourse about the science of social work has urged doctoral social work programs to reexamine assumptions about conducting research and responding to new expectations for scholarship. This article examines three promising models to guide scientific research in social work (evidence-based practice, team science, and multi- and…

  5. The Quality of Doctoral Education in South Africa: A Question of Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    One of the underlying concerns in the Study Panel on the South African PhD, a large-scale, overview investigation of the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf), was the negative consequences of signalling the need for more doctoral graduates to boost the presumed link to national competitiveness within a global knowledge economy. There was…

  6. Constructing Anthropologists: Culture Learning and Culture Making in U.S. Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathurst, Laura

    2012-01-01

    In the tradition of anthropological reflexivity, this article examines how the structure of early doctoral training contributes to the construction of particular kinds of anthropologists. Based on research conducted in an anthropology department in the U.S.A. during the late 1990s, the experience of the transition from undergraduate to doctoral…

  7. Improving the Working Relationship between Doctors and Pharmacists: Is Inter-Professional Education the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ruth M.; Gallagher, Helen C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite their common history, there are many cultural, attitudinal and practical differences between the professions of medicine and pharmacy that ultimately influence patient care and health outcomes. While poor communication between doctors and pharmacists is a major cause of medical errors, it is clear that effective, deliberate…

  8. 75 FR 57000 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ..., international development, and the professions. Therefore, students planning to apply their language skills in... colleges and universities to fund individual doctoral students to conduct research in other countries in... (Cambodian), Kirghiz, Korean, Kurdish (Kurmanji), Kurdish (Sorani), Lao, Malay (Bahasa Melayu or Malaysian...

  9. The state of doctoral education in public administration: developments in the field's research preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Toole, Laurence J.; Brewer, Gene A.; Facer II, Rex L.; Douglas, James W.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports the results of a 1995 survey of the fifty-six NASPAA-affiliated doctoral programs of public administration and public affairs. Following on two related streams of research, we assess the degree of intellectual coherence in the field of public administration, and document what

  10. Trans-Cultural, Trans-Language Practices: Potentialities for Rethinking Doctoral Education Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Sarojni; Singh, Parlo; Li, Minglin

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in doctoral enrolments of Asian international students in Australian universities. While policies have been developed to meet the needs of these students, there seems to be some confusion around the terms internationalisation, globalisation, bi-cultural, inter-cultural, multi-cultural, and…

  11. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH ...

  12. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus ...

  13. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More ... & Compliance Grants News/Blog Contracts Loan Repayment More » ...

  14. Educating doctors in the clinical workplace: Unraveling the process of teaching and learning in the medical resident as teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busari J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, higher medical education has witnessed major changes in the structure and content of postgraduate medical training. Seven professional competencies have been described that address the medical doctors′ ability to effectively communicate and transfer medical information, interact effectively and professionally, and demonstrate a good grasp of clinical knowledge and skills. Proficiency in didactic skills, however, is an important competency that has not received prominent attention. In the clinical setting, attending-physicians and medical residents are responsible for teaching. Consequently, several medical institutions have proposed the need for teacher training programs to improve the teaching skills of attending doctors and medical residents. The supporters of these programs believe that through teaching, medical doctors improve their individual professional and clinical problem-solving abilities. Hence, it is logical to assume that didactic skills′ training would contribute to the professional development of doctors. In this paper, we re-examine the underlying theory of the didactic proficiency, how it relates to the clinical setting, and why it may be beneficial for the professional training of medical residents.

  15. Improving the education in the field of patient autonomy in rehabilitation doctors working with engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bliuc Roxana Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes the use of bioethical expertise of Romanian rehabilitation doctors working in a hospital for engineering professionals, the Romanian Railways Clinical Hospital Iasi. The knowledge of the specific legislation by the medical personnel, proper communication, shared decision making and the use of informed consent are essential for effective healthcare provided to engineers, a group of professionals with a great contribution to the development of rehabilitation robotics and medical technology.

  16. Barriers to education of overseas doctors in paediatrics: a qualitative study in South Yorkshire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, J; Stark, P

    2007-03-01

    To explore the factors that may influence the progress of doctors who come from the Indian subcontinent to train in paediatrics in the UK. Overseas doctors training in paediatrics in Rotherham, Sheffield and Doncaster participated in the study. Focus groups were used to collect data; two focus groups, each with 4-5 participants, were conducted at 6-week intervals. Semistructured, one-to-one interviews were conducted to add more understanding and depth to issues highlighted in the focus groups. The focus groups and interviews were audiotaped; the tapes were transcribed and data were analysed using the Grounded Theory; open codes were formed and concepts identified using microanalysis, and initial theories were built. Lack of information about the National Health Service (NHS)/Royal Colleges, inappropriate communication skills, difficulties in team working, difficulties in preparing for Royal College examinations, visa and job hunting, and social and cultural isolation were identified as major barriers. Problems arose not only from difficulties with language but also from use of local and colloquial words, different accents and difficulty in communicating sensitive issues. Lack of understanding of role in teams and difficulties in working in multiprofessional setting all contributed to the problems. Cultural differences inside and outside the workplace, and social isolation were also highlighted. Induction programmes, mentoring, awareness of the issues within the teams, and courses in communication specifically directed at overseas doctors were identified as means to overcome these barriers. Several intercultural factors were identified that could act as barriers to the progress of overseas doctors training in paediatrics in the UK. Increased awareness of these factors within the teams would be the first step in resolving some of the issues.

  17. Trans-Cultural, Trans-Language Practices: Potentialities for Rethinking Doctoral Education Pedagogies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarojni Choy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in doctoral enrolments of Asian international students in Australian universities. While policies have been developed to meet the needs of these students, there seems to be some confusion around the terms internationalisation, globalisation, bi-cultural, inter-cultural, multi-cultural, and trans-cultural within these policies. In this paper, we define these terms and advocate for a policy position which orients to a futurist definition of culture. We then review the work of Michael Singh and his research team at Western Sydney University who have responded to this rapid increase in Asian international student doctoral enrolments in Australian universities by developing pedagogic principles around notions of trans-language and trans-cultural practices. In the final section of the paper, we then draw on our own experiences of doctoral supervision in Australian universities to reflect on our positioning within the pedagogic principles around trans-language and trans-cultural practices.

  18. Choose your doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Jeremy

    2007-02-01

    The development of education options for nurses has been inexorable and it is increasingly the case that senior nurses are considering a doctorate as the logical next step in their educational career. Such individuals need to make important decisions as to whether they should embark on a taught doctorate, professional doctorate or a traditional PhD. Each of these options will necessitate a considerable investment in time and money as well as the sacrifice of quality time and spare time over a significant number of years. A doctorate is not for everyone. Those still reading this text may be asking 'could this possibly be for me'? This paper will try to help the reader decide which if any option to take. It is suggested that nurses will now turn to the doctoral degree as their next adventure in academic study. It is argued that this development is not being controlled by management forces and indeed cannot be controlled by them. This last is chiefly because the move towards doctoral education is led by individuals who choose to study for a doctorate simply because they can. The paper considers what choices are available to nurses who wish to pursue a doctoral programme of study. In particular, this paper considers what new developments in doctoral courses are becoming available and what advantage there may be in studying for one of the newer professional doctorates rather than a traditional PhD. The material here is the result of a review of the literature on recent developments in doctoral education for nurses. The existing provision by UK and other universities was also reviewed, the data being collected by an informal review of universities' advertising material. It is inevitable that some nurses who are already qualified to degree and masters degree will take advantage of the doctoral degree opportunities which now newly present themselves. For nurses in practice, the advantages of the professional doctorate is that it is more structured, enables more peer and

  19. Perceived Demand for Online and Hybrid Doctoral Programs in Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jim; Baltzer, Holly

    2006-01-01

    Data from Sloan-C snapshot of the status of online education in the US indicate that online education is becomingly increasingly a part of the long-term goals and strategies of many institutions. Technical education has begun taking advantage of the online market by offering online education at the bachelor's and master's level. However, the…

  20. Institutional change and professional practices: The case of French doctoral education

    OpenAIRE

    Dahan, Aubépine; Mangematin, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Based on empirical research on the effect of doctoral schools in French university, this paper analyses under which conditions the implementation of a new institution impacts work practices i.e. the ways by which individuals and collective actors perform their activity. It focuses on the micro-practices of actors, in order to shed new light on the micro-level works which put the new institution into action. The paper contributes to existing theory in three different ways. First, it shows that...

  1. [Psychological features of the motivation component in the training of doctors in the system of postgraduate education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshova, Svitlana; Horachuk, Viktoriia; Pishchykov, Valerii

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Тhe problem of motivating adult learning in postgraduate education has so far been the subject of study primarily in methodological and pedagogical studies. They focus on the analysis of the content side of the motivation of adult learning activities. As for the problem of the dynamics of motivation for adult learning activities, including for doctors in the system of postgraduate medical education with continuous professional development, it has not been sufficiently studied so far. The aim: This work is to analyze information and psychological features of the motivational sphere of doctors, which contribute to their successful training during continuous professional development in the system of postgraduate medical education. Materials and methods: In the work is used a range of methods: content analysis, bibliosemantic, systematic approach, analysis of products of activity. Review: At the present stage of social and economic transformations in Ukraine, the development of the general abilities of a person, his professional self-awareness, motivation for postgraduate education and obtaining a new specialization (E.О. Klimov, N.S. Glukhanyuk, I.V. Dubrovin, D.N. Zabrodin, T.V. Kudryavtsev, V.D. Shadrikov, etc.) The existing system of professional retraining does not pay enough attention to the study of conscious motives in adult learning activity. The practical relevance of this problem is determined, on the one hand, by the dynamic processes in the system of vocational training and retraining, the requirements for high efficiency of the results of the work of trained specialists. On the other hand, there is need to create conditions in the system of continuing education, the result of which is the effectiveness of adult learning activities. Conclusions: The study of the dynamics of motivation of adult learning activities is, in our opinion, relevant and has great theoretical as well as practical interest. It will allow to expand the idea of

  2. Panorama de la formación doctoral en enfermería Panorama da formação doutoral em enfermagem Overview of the doctoral education in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUZ STELLA BUENO ROBLES

    2010-12-01

    education in nursing has evolved as a response to the need of educating human capital capable of developing personal knowledge and promoting innovative change strategies in the domains of science and technology. Objectives: describe the overview of the doctoral education in nursing in Latin America, Colombia and the world, and ponder over its contributions to the discipline and the Colombian society. Methodology: the methodology is divided into three segments: worldwide overview of the doctoral education in nursing, current situation of doctoral programs in Colombia and pertinence of nursing doctors in Colombia. Results and discussion: findings show differences among the progress made regarding the doctoral education in nursing in the World, Latin America and Colombia. It is worth highlighting the growth of programs in Europe, Asia and Latin America, which is positive to achieve further development of the discipline.

  3. Overview of the doctoral education in nursing Panorama de la formación doctoral en enfermería Panorama da formação doutoral em enfermagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEJÍA ROJAS MARÍA ELENA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The level of education in nursing has evolved as a response to the need of educating human capital capable of developing personal knowledge and promoting innovative change strategies in the domains of science and technology.

    Objectives: describe the overview of the doctoral education in nursing in Latin America, Colombia and the world, and ponder over its contributions to the discipline and the Colombian society.

    Methodology: the methodology is divided into three segments: worldwide overview of the doctoral education in nursing, current situation of doctoral programs in Colombia and pertinence of nursing doctors in Colombia.

    Results and discussion: findings show differences among the progress made regarding the doctoral education in nursing in the World, Latin America and Colombia. It is worth highlighting the growth of programs in Europe, Asia and Latin America, which is positive to achieve further development of the discipline.

    El nivel de la educación en enfermería ha evolucionado a través del tiempo, como respuesta a la necesidad de formar capital humano capaz de desarrollar conocimiento propio y de promover estrategias innovadoras de cambio en las áreas de ciencia y tecnología.

    Objetivos: describir el panorama de la formación doctoral en enfermería a escala mundial, latinoamericana y nacional, y reflexionar sobre sus aportes para la disciplina y la sociedad colombiana.

    Metodología: se desarrolla en tres partes: panorama mundial de la formación doctoral en enfermería, situación actual de los doctorados en Colombia y pertinencia de los doctores de enfermería en Colombia.

    Resultados y discusión: los hallazgos muestran diferencias entre los desarrollos de la formaci

  4. Quality of nursing doctoral education and scholarly performance in U.S. schools of nursing: strategic areas for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi; Park, So Hyun; Khan, Shaheen; Ketefian, Shaké

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of quality of nursing doctoral education (QNDE) in research-intensive universities has not been reported since 1980s. This study aimed to examine the QNDE from the perspectives of faculty and students/graduates and their relations to school characteristics, identify factors of the four domains of the QNDE that influence the QNDE, and analyze the relationship of QNDE to scholarly performance of nursing schools in the Unites States. Seventy-two nursing schools offering research-focused nursing doctoral programs with National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding during 2004-2007 participated, and they responded to the questionnaire (see http://gknf.or.kr/research/). Twenty-nine deans/schools, 179 faculties, and 461 students/graduates responded. Both faculty and students/graduates groups rated quality positively. Schools in the top quartile group per NIH funding amounts showed significant differences in QNDE from the bottom quartile group. Program and faculty domains were identified as most important by the top quartile group, and items that were significantly associated with the quality were supportive environment for students' learning, faculty mentorship, and assistance to students in understanding the value of programs of research and scholarship. Percentage of faculty member with research grants was significant predictors for all domains of QNDE, and time to degree was significant in explaining overall quality. © 2014.

  5. Surviving the Doctoral Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This article probes the implications of neo-conservative public education policies for the future of the academic profession through a detailed examination of critical issues shaping contemporary doctoral education in U.S. and Canadian universities. Institutional and social factors such as financial retrenchment, declining support for affirmative action, downward economic mobility, a weak academic labor market for tenure-track faculty, professional ethics in graduate education, and backlash against women's progress form the backdrop for analysis of the author's survey of current doctoral students' opinions about funding, support, the job market, and quality of learning experiences.

  6. Training tomorrow's doctors to explain 'medically unexplained' physical symptoms: An examination of UK medical educators' views of barriers and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emmeline; Cowing, Jennifer; Lazarus, Candice; Smith, Charlotte; Zenzuck, Victoria; Peters, Sarah

    2018-05-01

    Co-occuring physical symptoms, unexplained by organic pathology (known as Functional Syndromes, FS), are common and disabling presentations. However, FS is absent or inconsistently taught within undergraduate medical training. This study investigates the reasons for this and identifies potential solutions to improved implementation. Twenty-eight medical educators from thirteen different UK medical schools participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis proceeded iteratively, and in parallel with data production. Barriers to implementing FS training are beliefs about the complexity of FS, tutors' negative attitudes towards FS, and FS being perceived as a low priority for the curriculum. In parallel participants recognised FS as ubiquitous within medical practice and erroneously assumed it must be taught by someone. They recommended that students should learn about FS through managed exposure, but only if tutors' negative attitudes and behaviour are also addressed. Negative attitudes towards FS by educators prevents designing and delivering effective education on this common medical presentation. Whilst there is recognition of the need to implement FS training, recommendations are multifaceted. Increased liaison between students, patients and educators is necessary to develop more informed and effective teaching methods for trainee doctors about FS and in order to minimise the impact of the hidden curriculum. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Financing physical therapy doctoral education: methods used by entry-level students and the financial impact after graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kris; Coon, Jill; Handford, Leandrea

    2011-01-01

    With the move to the doctor of physical therapy (DPT) degree and increasing tuition costs, there is concern about financing entry-level education. The purposes of this study were to identify how students finance their DPT education and to describe the financial impact after graduation. A written survey was used to collect data on financing DPT education, student debt, and the financial impact on graduates. There were 92 subjects who had graduated from one program. Frequencies as well as nonparametric statistics using cross-tabulations and chi-squared statistics were calculated. The response rate was 55%. Of the respondents, 86% had student loans, 66% worked during school, 57% received some family assistance, and 21% had some scholarship support. The amount of monthly loan repayment was not statistically related to the ability to save for a house, the ability to obtain a loan for a house or car, or the decision to have children. Saving for the future (p = 0.016) and lifestyle choices (p = 0.035) were related to the amount of monthly loan repayment. Major sources of funding were student loans, employment income, and/or family assistance. Respondent's ability to save for the future and lifestyle choices were negatively impacted when loan debt increased. Physical therapist education programs should consider offering debt planning and counseling.

  8. Educational Research and Doctoral Dissertations: A Review within a Research Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mariana Gaio; Azevedo, Nair Rios; Goncalves, Teresa N. R.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents some results arising from the meta-analysis of the educational research that has been developed at Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal). The intention was to understand the status of the educational research produced, the main thematic trends studied, affiliated scientific domains, conceptual frames mobilized, and…

  9. Selected aspects of a professional doctor-patient communication--education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włoszczak-Szubzda, Anna; Jarosz, Mirosław J

    2013-01-01

    In the work of a physician, not only knowledge, and professional skills (technical/hard) are important, but also psychosocial skills (relational/soft). The primary goal of the presented research was evaluation of the level (study of the state) of communication competences of physicians and determination of the factors on which this level depends. An additional goal was analysis of the needs and educational possibilities within the existing models of education in the area of interpersonal communication provided in Medical Universities in Poland. Information about educational curricula available on the websites of 12 Medical Universities in Poland were compared. The self-designed questionnaire and adjective check list were subject to standardization from the aspect of reliability and validity. The study groups included 1) occupationally-active physicians (185 respondents) employed in outpatient departments and hospitals, who were covered by a pre-graduate standard educational programme and not trained in interpersonal communication skills as part of their continuing education; 2) medical students covered by a standard educational programme (246 respondents). The conducted analysis of the educational curricula showed a very narrow scope of problems concerning professional medical communication. The results indicating the general state of respondents' communication competences within all aspects (motivation, skills, knowledge) were relatively low. That clearly indicated an inadequate educational model (students), and lack of post-graduate training in the area of professional medical communication (physicians). The education of students of medicine should cover selected classes within the scope of professional communication competences. These classes should be based on the systemically designed training of skills. The patterning by students of the relations attitudes observed in practising physicians is insufficient. It is necessary to apply a methodical evaluation of

  10. Doctoral Education in Planning and Urban Studies in Italy: what is it really for? Introduction and Editorial note.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Falco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Data show the reduction of academic positions in Italy and invite to reconsider the role of PhD education and training as the highest level of university education. In fact, although PhDs seem to have a little advantage over Master’s level graduates in the job market, only about 10% find a job at universities. This suggests that changes in PhD programmes might be needed to match students’ needs and job market requirements. However, the opposite is also true with employers, either in the public or private sector, who should try to absorb more PhDs and use their skills and expertise.The aim of this special issue is to analyse PhD education in Italy with a focus on planning and urban studies programmes by emphasising the perspectives of PhD candidates and freshly awarded Doctors since they are generally neglected in reform processes.All authors who contributed to this special issue reflected on the same aim of the paper stressing different implications and perspectives. The topics investigated are: matching between students’ expectations and institutional goals, the international mobility of PhD candidates, experiences of international PhD students in Italy, and the evolution of two of the oldest PhD programmes in planning in Italy at Sapienza, Rome and Iuav, Venice.

  11. Toward an Evaluation Framework for Doctoral Education in Social Work: A 10-Year Retrospective of One PhD Program's Assessment Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Kia J.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a framework for evaluation in social work doctoral education and details 10 years of successes and challenges in one PhD program's use of the framework, including planning and implementing specific assessment activities around student learning outcomes and larger program goals. The article argues that a range of…

  12. Impact of Post-Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy Education on the Role of a School Based Physical Therapist: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Susan; Brown, Suzanne Robben

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the impact of the post-professional doctor of physical therapy curriculum on the role of one physical therapist employed as a special education related service provider. Physical therapists working in the public school setting play an important role in promoting success for students with physical disabilities as…

  13. Higher Education Facilities: The SmartGrid Earns a Doctorate in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tysseling, John C.; Zibelman, Audrey; Freifeld, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Most higher education facilities have already accomplished some measure of a "microgrid" investment with building control systems (BCS), energy management systems (EMS), and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) installations. Available energy production facilities may include boilers, chillers, cogeneration, thermal storage, electrical…

  14. Doctors Today

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-03-01

    Doctors’ relationship with patients and their role in society is changing. Until the 1960s doctors concentrated on the welfare of patients with less emphasis placed on patients’ rights1. Over recent decades there has been increasing empowerment of the individual across all facets of society including health care. Doctors continue to be perceived as having expertise and authority over medical science. Patients, however, now hold sway over questions of values or preferences. We all must be aware of this change in the doctor- patient interaction. We need to be more aware of the outcomes that patients view as important. The concept of shared decision-making with the patient is now widely appreciated. The process involves a change in mind set particularly for doctors who trained in an earlier era.

  15. Interdisciplinary research and education in the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems: a framework for evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloeschl, G.; Carr, G.; Loucks, D. P.

    2017-12-01

    Greater understanding of how interdisciplinary research and education evolves is critical for identifying and implementing appropriate programme management strategies. We propose a program evaluation framework that is based on social learning processes (individual learning, interdisciplinary research practices, and interaction between researchers with different backgrounds); social capital outcomes (ability to interact, interpersonal connectivity, and shared understanding); and knowledge and human capital outcomes (new knowledge that integrates multiple research fields). The framework is tested on established case study doctoral program: the Vienna Doctoral Program on Water Resource Systems. Data are collected via mixed qualitative/quantitative methods that include semi-structured interviews, publication co-author analysis, analysis of research proposals, categorisation of the interdisciplinarity of publications and graduate analysis. Through the evaluation and analysis, several interesting findings about how interdisciplinary research evolves and can be supported are identified. Firstly, different aspects of individual learning seem to contribute to a researcher's ability to interact with researchers from other research fields and work collaboratively. These include learning new material from different research fields, learning how to learn new material and learning how to integrate different material. Secondly, shared interdisciplinary research practices can be identified that may be common to other programs and support interaction and shared understanding between different researchers. They include clarification and questioning, harnessing differences and setting defensible research boundaries. Thirdly, intensive interaction between researchers from different backgrounds support connectivity between the researchers, further enabling cross-disciplinary collaborative work. The case study data suggest that social learning processes and social capital outcomes

  16. TOURISM HIGHER EDUCATION IN BRAZIL: AN OVERVIEW OF MASTER AND DOCTORAL THESES (2000-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ribeiro de Lima

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This is an exploratory-descriptive research aiming to analyze Master and PHD Theses presented in Brazil. The research was held at data bases and websites of Higher Education institutions. A sample of 45 theses presented from 2000 to 2009, whose titles, abstracts and keywords were recorded in Access form was analyzed on general, thematic and geographical basis. Most are Master Theses authored by Bachelors in Tourism teaching in Higher Education institutions. As for subjects, the result is that most researches are about undergraduate tourism programs , with emphasis in vocational training. The few researches found about Pos Graduate programs present in-depth analysis based on theoretical and methodological framework borrowed from Education and Information Science. Lack of standardization and fragility of keywords indicates the urgency of use of controlled glossaries in Tourism.

  17. Impact of reduction in working hours for doctors in training on postgraduate medical education and patients' outcomes: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonesinghe, S R; Lowery, J; Shahi, N; Millen, A; Beard, J D

    2011-03-22

    To determine whether a reduction in working hours of doctors in postgraduate medical training has had an effect on objective measures of medical education and clinical outcome. Systematic review. Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, ERIC, and SIGLE were searched without language restriction for articles published between 1990 and December 2010. Reference lists and citations of selected articles. Studies that assessed the impact of a change in duty hours using any objective measure of outcome related to postgraduate medical training, patient safety, or clinical outcome. Any study design was eligible for inclusion. 72 studies were eligible for inclusion: 38 reporting training outcomes, 31 reporting outcomes in patients, and three reporting both. A reduction in working hours from greater than 80 hours a week (in accordance with US recommendations) does not seem to have adversely affected patient safety and has had limited effect on postgraduate training. Reports on the impact of European legislation limiting working hours to less than 56 or 48 a week are of poor quality and have conflicting results, meaning that firm conclusions cannot be made. Reducing working hours to less than 80 a week has not adversely affected outcomes in patient or postgraduate training in the US. The impact of reducing hours to less than 56 or 48 a week in the UK has not yet been sufficiently evaluated in high quality studies. Further work is required, particularly in the European Union, using large multicentre evaluations of the impact of duty hours' legislation on objective educational and clinical outcomes.

  18. Foregrounding Women in the Doctoral Classroom: Mainstreaming and Single-Sex Approaches to Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzubinski, Leanne

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of published studies have drawn attention to gender disparities in various dimensions of Christian higher education. Although the majority of students on the campuses of member institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU) are women, and the percentage of women holding faculty and administrative…

  19. Framing Education for a Science of Social Work: Missions, Curriculum, and Doctoral Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Rowena

    2012-01-01

    Social work education has historically been grounded in professional practice but recent discussions have urged a reconsideration of social work as a science. Social work is progressively doing more intervention work, service systems research, implementation research, and translational research which are elevating research standards to new levels…

  20. Preparing Community College Leaders: The AACC Core Competencies for Effective Leadership & Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Delores E.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States face shortages of leaders prepared to assume administrative positions in the 21st century. To respond to this shortage, graduate programs are emerging with a specific emphasis on community college leadership; other graduate programs offer broader curricula focused on educational leadership, policy, or higher…

  1. Biomedical Informatics Education at Charles University in Prague for Undergraduate and Doctoral Degree Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana; Svačina, Š.; Dostálová, T.; Seydlová, M.; Zvára Jr., Karel; Papíková, Vendula; Zvolský, Miroslav; Štuka, Č.; Vejražka, M.; Feberová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2011), s. 72-78 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : education * biomedicine * informatics * e-learning * healthcare Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/img/ejbi/2011/2/Zvarova_en.pdf

  2. Recommendations for Improving The Quality of Masters and Doctorate Education in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Zekai ŞEN

    2013-01-01

    In Turkey, while academic staff is assessed quantitively, assessment on quality takes place only about students.evaluations are always applied mechanically through western standards without considering our cultural qualities. In this process, the staff member quality standards of Western countries stay outside theTurkish boundarie. Therefore, with every attempt to increase the quality of higher education, students' and research asisstants' quality is improved but the aimed quality is never re...

  3. Future doctors : Mental distress during medical education: cross-sectional and longitudinal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlin, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Medical education is long and stressful and medical students may suffer from mental distress. The aims of this dissertation are threefold; to investigate levels of distress in medical students at one Swedish medical school, to examine gender differences in such distress and to study individual and environmental determinants of distress. Major outcome measures were self-rated depression, burnout and interviewer-rated psychiatric morbidity. The thesis consists of two cross-sec...

  4. Analysis of radiology education in undergraduate medical doctors training in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Valcke, Martin; Derese, Anselme; Verstraete, Koenraad L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to describe how undergraduate radiology teaching is organized in Europe and to identify important characteristics of undergraduate radiology curriculum. Methods: An electronic survey on undergraduate teaching was distributed by the European Society of Radiology (ESR) to 38 national delegates of the ESR Education Committee. Results: The 'classic type' of radiology teaching method is more frequent than the 'modular type'. In 38% of medical training centres the first experience with radiology is in pre-clinical years. The students enrolled in the fourth medical year experience the largest involvement in radiology education. The total number of teaching hours (mean 89 h, median 76 h) varies across the countries and differs depending on the radiological topic (mean across all topics 14.8 h, median 13). Written tests and oral exams were the most frequently used examination modes. Clerkships are reported as a key part of training. Conclusion: This first international comparative study of undergraduate radiological curriculum in Europe identifies a large number of differences in curriculum content and teaching methods throughout Europe. More research is needed to establish the radiological educational competences resulting from these differing curricula's to improve and to standardize the teaching according to (inter)national and institutional needs.

  5. Realist synthesis of educational interventions to improve nutrition care competencies and delivery by doctors and other healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogre, Victor; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Stevens, Fred; Aryee, Paul; Cherry, Mary Gemma; Dornan, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine what, how, for whom, why, and in what circumstances educational interventions improve the delivery of nutrition care by doctors and other healthcare professionals work. Design Realist synthesis following a published protocol and reported following Realist and Meta-narrative Evidence Synthesis: Evolving Standards (RAMESES) guidelines. A multidisciplinary team searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, EMBASE, PsyINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Science Direct for published and unpublished (grey) literature. The team identified studies with varied designs; appraised their ability to answer the review question; identified relationships between contexts, mechanisms and outcomes (CMOs); and entered them into a spreadsheet configured for the purpose. The final synthesis identified commonalities across CMO configurations. Results Over half of the 46 studies from which we extracted data originated from the USA. Interventions that improved the delivery of nutrition care improved skills and attitudes rather than just knowledge; provided opportunities for superiors to model nutrition care; removed barriers to nutrition care in health systems; provided participants with local, practically relevant tools and messages; and incorporated non-traditional, innovative teaching strategies. Operating in contexts where student and qualified healthcare professionals provided nutrition care in developed and developing countries, these interventions yielded health outcomes by triggering a range of mechanisms, which included feeling competent, feeling confident and comfortable, having greater self-efficacy, being less inhibited by barriers in healthcare systems and feeling that nutrition care was accepted and recognised. Conclusions These findings show how important it is to move education for nutrition care beyond the simple acquisition of knowledge. They show how educational interventions embedded within systems of healthcare can improve

  6. Recommendations for Improving The Quality of Masters and Doctorate Education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekai ŞEN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, while academic staff is assessed quantitively, assessment on quality takes place only about students.evaluations are always applied mechanically through western standards without considering our cultural qualities. In this process, the staff member quality standards of Western countries stay outside theTurkish boundarie. Therefore, with every attempt to increase the quality of higher education, students' and research asisstants' quality is improved but the aimed quality is never realised. In fact, the quality improvement in an institution should start from the top so that the reflections of this improvement should be seen in those under their and total quality augmentation Dynamics should arise. InTurkey, instead of total quality, the quality of the lower level workers is thought to be improved and not much is realised as a result of performing all the plans, projects and educational settings without considering the quality of higher ranking academicians. As a consequence of this mentioned situation masters and Ph. D.thesis done in Turkish universities can not provide reflections in international domain. Turkey thinks to compensate the gap by sending its youngsters in an unplanned manner to especially the USA. Even the M.Sc. and PH.D. thesis supervised by those who were educated in the USA and got academic titles there can not gain international quality. By the authorities, the sole reason for this is always clamied to be the inquality of the students. In this study it will be focused that the reson for this problem does not take it's source from the quality of the students but the academic staff eventhough they were educated abroad. It will also be mentioned that the main reasons why the masters and Ph.D. thesis can not gain an international quality are the quality of the academicians is only linked to the academic promotion and eventhough in theory the promotions appear to be scientific , in practice they are usually out of

  7. The first Italian doctorate (PhD Course) in Physics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    The first PhD Italian course in Physics Education Research in Udine aims to qualify young researchers and teachers coming from all the Italian groups of research in the field. It becomes a context for developing research projects carried out following parallel research lines on: Teaching/Learning paths for didactic innovation, cognitive research, ICT for strategies to overcome conceptual knots in physics; E-learning for personalization; d) Computer on-line experiments and modelling; e) Teacher formation and training; f) Informal learning in science.

  8. Personal Development Planning as a means to strengthen supervisory relationships in doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Grout, Brian William Wilson; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    of ‘closeness’ building a robust and trustful relationship has been the topic of research in only a few studies. While personal development planning is used extensively in higher education in the UK to strengthen the learning process of students, this study documents another potent use of the tool....... In an introduction course for new PhD students at the University of Copenhagen participants are required to share their personal development plan with their supervisor, and our analysis of reflective notes reveal how this can contribute to a better working relationship....

  9. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ...

  10. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in ...

  11. Women, Men and the Doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centra, John A; Kuykendall, Nancy M.

    This study describes the current status and professional development of a sample of women doctorates and compares them to a sample of men who have attained the same educational status. Chapters cover the sample and procedures used; employment patterns; doctorates in academe; publications, income, and job satisfaction; marriage and family life;…

  12. Publication Productivity among Doctoral Graduates of Educational Psychology Programs at Research Universities before and after the Year 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Saxon, Terrill F.; Johnson, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that new doctoral graduates face increased publication pressure to achieve tenure: doctoral programs may have also increased this expectation. We examined whether faculty graduating before and after the year 2000 differed significantly in total publications, peer-reviewed publications, and first-authored publications as of the…

  13. Role of Leading Programs in Doctoral Education: A New Type of Leadership Education in the Sciences at University of Hyogo, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Okamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fostering global leaders for the next generation is an important mission of universities. In Japan, Leading Programs in Doctoral Education (LP has been implemented in many graduate schools. The main goal of this program is to foster PhDs with deep specialization and peer leadership who will be able to compete well internationally. The Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo is implementing a LP to foster global leaders using cutting-edge technology. They are also trying to create new evaluation criteria of human resource development with their corporate sponsors. The success of LP depends not only on how many graduates can play leading roles globally, but also how university staff can create a superior new evaluation criteria of human resource development and how much it can be shared with universities and industry. Development of students and graduates with a high level of ability takes time, thus it is important to consider the continuous development of LP.

  14. Doctor's Orders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VALERIE SARTOR

    2010-01-01

    @@ "To become a doctor is like becoming a bomb expert:It takes a long time to learn this skill; you must use care and intuition; and you must understand that your work has grave consequences for those around you,"said Amgalan Gamazhapov,an advanced medical student who studies traditional Chinese and Mongolian medicine at the Inner Mongolia Medical University.

  15. Hybrid Doctoral Program: Innovative Practices and Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvich, Dori; Manning, JoAnn; McCormick, Kathy; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects on how one mid-Atlantic University innovatively incorporated technology into the development of a hybrid doctoral program in educational leadership. The paper describes a hybrid doctoral degree program using a rigorous design; challenges of reworking a traditional syllabus of record to a hybrid doctoral program; the perceptions…

  16. Agency doctorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Staff members of the Agency working at the Seibersdorf laboratory are continuing to achieve high academic distinction. Two more - both Austrian - have now been awarded the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. Joachim Kramer, who is 26, graduated from the Hochschule fur Bodenkultur in 1967 with the degree of Diplom-Ingenieur and then started work in the plant breeding and genetics section of the laboratory under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen. The results of the research work he carried out were accepted as the subject of a thesis for which he has now been granted his doctorate. The doctoral promotion took place on 30 June, at a ceremony attended by Dr. Andre Finkelstein, Deputy Director General for Research and Isotopes. The subject of Dr. Kramer's thesis was a comprehensive study of the mutagenic effects of fast neutrons and gamma rays, and the influence of various modifying factors such as water content, oxygen and metabolic state of seeds at the time of irradiation. This work has contributed significantly to the understanding of the mechanisms by which these two types of ionizing radiation produce mutations in seeds. The knowledge gained will be of great importance in the efficient use of ionizing radiation in practical plant breeding. Paul Wassermann, who is 33 years old, joined the Agency in 1965. He, too, graduated from the Hochschule fur Bodenkultur as Diplom-Ingenieur in agriculture, having graduated with honours previously from the agricultural secondary school at Raumberg, Austria, in 1958. Dr. Wassermann's own words may be used to explain how he came to gain his doctorate. 'In October, 1966, I completed my studies at the Hochschule,' he writes. 'I was employed at the Agency laboratories in Seibersdorf, working in the plant and soils group. Encouraged by the interesting research which was performed there, a thesis entitled 'the Fate of Nitrogen in Submerged Rice Soils' was started, which finally led to the doctor's degree in Agriculture in June this year

  17. The Impact of Leadership Roles and Internships on Undergraduate Business Major Field Test (MFT) Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Chris; Yates, Dan; Song, Joon Young

    2014-01-01

    It is often the goal or mission of higher education to prepare graduates for leadership roles in organizations and the community. Even if we are to assume that leadership skills can be developed, determining the appropriate ways to teach and measure leadership is often debated. Our study used quantitative data from the ETS Business Major Field…

  18. Agency doctorates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1970-07-01

    Mr. Wen-chuan Li of China has become the first student to obtain a doctor's degree as a result of research work carried out in the Agency. Mr. Li, who is 33, graduated as a Bachelor of Agriculture at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University in 1960 and in 1966 was granted a fellowship to study mutations in plant breeding at the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory near Vienna, under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen, a professor of the University of Bergen. The Hochschule fur Bodenkultur of Vienna accepted the research as being suitable for a thesis and have now granted the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. The subject of the thesis was modifying factors influencing the mutagenic effects of alkylating agents as compared with ionizing radiations in barley. Alkylating agents are involved in the use of chemicals as a means of changing the characteristics of seeds to bring about changes aimed at improving the quality of crops. Mr. Li's work is regarded as a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanics by which mutations are induced, to the efficient use of chemicals and ionizing radiations in practical applications, and to the efforts of the Agency in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization to benefit food supplies. Mr. Li has now completed his fellowship with the Agency and has been appointed an Assistant Professor in Plant Breeding at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University. The photograph, taken in the plastic hot house at Seibersdorf, shows him studying rice plants grown from seeds subjected to irradiation. Another noteworthy achievement is that of Mr. Karl-Franz Lacina, a security guard at the Agency's headquarters. At the age of 50 he has been accorded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Vienna University, the result of six years' work in his leisure time. The major subject was Arabic, with French and philosophy as supporting subject. (author)

  19. Agency doctorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Mr. Wen-chuan Li of China has become the first student to obtain a doctor's degree as a result of research work carried out in the Agency. Mr. Li, who is 33, graduated as a Bachelor of Agriculture at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University in 1960 and in 1966 was granted a fellowship to study mutations in plant breeding at the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory near Vienna, under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen, a professor of the University of Bergen. The Hochschule fur Bodenkultur of Vienna accepted the research as being suitable for a thesis and have now granted the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. The subject of the thesis was modifying factors influencing the mutagenic effects of alkylating agents as compared with ionizing radiations in barley. Alkylating agents are involved in the use of chemicals as a means of changing the characteristics of seeds to bring about changes aimed at improving the quality of crops. Mr. Li's work is regarded as a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanics by which mutations are induced, to the efficient use of chemicals and ionizing radiations in practical applications, and to the efforts of the Agency in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization to benefit food supplies. Mr. Li has now completed his fellowship with the Agency and has been appointed an Assistant Professor in Plant Breeding at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University. The photograph, taken in the plastic hot house at Seibersdorf, shows him studying rice plants grown from seeds subjected to irradiation. Another noteworthy achievement is that of Mr. Karl-Franz Lacina, a security guard at the Agency's headquarters. At the age of 50 he has been accorded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Vienna University, the result of six years' work in his leisure time. The major subject was Arabic, with French and philosophy as supporting subject. (author)

  20. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  1. A marketing clinical doctorate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Isaac D; Kimball, Olive M

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, clinical doctorate programs in health disciplines have proliferated amid both support and controversy among educators, professional organizations, practitioners, administrators, and third-party payers. Supporters argue that the explosion of new knowledge and increasing sophistication of technology have created a need for advanced practice models to enhance patient care and safety and to reduce costs. Critics argue that necessary technological advances can be incorporated into existing programs and believe that clinical doctorates will increase health care costs, not reduce them. Despite the controversy, many health disciplines have advanced the clinical doctorate (the most recent is the doctor of nursing practice in 2004), with some professions mandating the doctorate as the entry-level degree (i.e., psychology, pharmacy, audiology, and so on). One aspect of the introduction of clinical doctoral degrees has been largely overlooked, and that is the marketing aspect. Because of marketing considerations, some clinical doctorates have been more successfully implemented and accepted than others. Marketing is composed of variables commonly known as "the four P's of marketing": product, price, promotion, and place. This report explores these four P's within the context of clinical doctorates in the health disciplines.

  2. The Wanderer, the Chameleon, and the Warrior: Experiences of Doctoral Students of Color Developing a Research Identity in Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Piert, Joyce; Militello, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors use their personal narratives and collaborative portraits as methods to shed light on the complexities of developing a research identity while journeying through a doctoral program. Using the metaphors of a wanderer, a chameleon, and a warrior, their narratives represent portraits of experiences faced by doctoral…

  3. 'And you'll suddenly realise 'I've not washed my hands': medical students', junior doctors' and medical educators' narratives of hygiene behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Penelope; Monrouxe, Lynn V

    2018-03-22

    Compliance to hygiene behaviours has long been recognised as important in the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections, but medical doctors still display some of the lowest rates of compliance of all healthcare workers. We aim to understand compliance to hygiene behaviours by analysing medical students', junior doctors' and medical educators' narratives of these behaviours to identify their respective attitudes and beliefs around compliance and how these are learnt during training. Such an understanding can inform future interventions to improve compliance targeted to areas of greatest need. A qualitative study, using narrative interviews (nine focus groups and one individual interview). Data were analysed thematically using inductive framework analysis. Teaching hospitals in the UK. Convenience sample of 25 participants: third-year medical students in their first clinical year (n=13), junior doctors (n=6) and medical educators (n=6). We identified four main themes: (1) knowledge, (2) constraints, (3) role models/culture and (4) hygiene as an added extra. Knowledge varied across participant groups and appeared to influence behaviours; medical students relied on what they have been told by seniors, while medical educators relied on their own knowledge and experience. There was a strong belief that evidence for the effectiveness of good hygiene behaviours is lacking. Furthermore, medical educators' behaviour appears to strongly influence others. Finally, hygiene was predominately viewed as an added extra rather than an integral part of the process. Awareness of the evidence around good hygiene needs to be improved at all levels. Medical students and junior doctors should be encouraged to consider why they are asked to perform certain hygiene behaviours in order to improve ownership of those behaviours. Medical educators need to recognise their responsibilities as role models for their junior counterparts, thereby understanding their role in

  4. Quality and safety in graduate nursing education: Cross-mapping QSEN graduate competencies with NONPF's NP core and practice doctorate competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Joanne M; Savrin, Carol; Fiandt, Kathryn; Beauchesne, Michelle; Drayton-Brooks, Shirlee; Scheibmeir, Monica; Brackley, Margaret; Werner, Kathryn E

    2009-01-01

    To ensure that nurse practitioners are prepared to deliver safe, high-quality health care, the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) publishes documents that outline the expected competencies for nurse practitioner (NP) practice (Domains and Core Competencies of Nurse Practitioner Practice and Practice Doctorate Nurse Practitioner Entry-Level Competencies). Having participated in the development of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies for graduate education, NONPF convened a task force to compare NONPF competencies with QSEN competencies for graduate education. This paper reports the first step of that cross-mapping process, comparing NONPF competencies with the QSEN knowledge objectives. Overall findings indicate close congruence across the 2 sets of competencies; however there are areas in which gaps are noted or for which clarification is required.

  5. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  6. Some doctors of medicine who published optometry books and played significant roles in early twentieth century optometric education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, David A

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides brief profiles of four doctors of medicine who wrote books for optometrists and who were faculty members in, and/or directors of, optometry schools in the early twentieth century. Those studied were Thomas G. Atkinson (1870-1946), Marshall B. Ketchum (1856-1937), Joseph I. Pascal (1890-1955), and Clarence W. Talbot (1883-1958). The content of the books they wrote is also discussed.

  7. Physical activity education in the undergraduate curricula of all UK medical schools. Are tomorrow's doctors equipped to follow clinical guidelines?

    OpenAIRE

    Weiler, Richard; Chew, Stephen; Coombs, Ngaire; Hamer, Mark; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a cornerstone of disease prevention and treatment. There is, however, a considerable disparity between public health policy, clinical guidelines and the delivery of physical activity promotion within the National Health Service in the UK. If this is to be addressed in the battle against non-communicable diseases, it is vital that tomorrow's doctors understand the basic science and health benefits of physical activity. The aim of this study was to assess the provision...

  8. Radiographers as doctors: A profile of UK doctoral achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snaith, B.; Harris, M.A.; Harris, R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiography aspires to be a research active profession, but there is limited information regarding the number of individuals with, or studying for, a doctoral award. This study aims to profile UK doctoral radiographers; including their chosen award, approach and employment status. Method: This was a prospective cohort study utilising an electronic survey. No formal database of doctoral radiographers existed therefore a snowball sampling method was adopted. The study sample was radiographers (diagnostic and therapeutic) based in the UK who were registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and who held, or were studying for, a doctoral award. Results: A total of 90 unique responses were received within the timescale. The respondents comprised 58 females (64.4%) and the majority were diagnostic radiographers (n = 71/90; 78.9%). The traditional PhD was the most common award, although increasing numbers were pursuing Education or Professional Doctorates. An overall increase in doctoral studies is observed over time, but was greatest amongst those working in academic institutions, with 63.3% of respondents (n = 57/90) working solely within a university, and a further 10% employed in a clinical–academic role (n = 9/90). Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that radiography is emerging as a research active profession, with increasing numbers of radiographers engaged in study at a doctoral level. This should provide a platform for the future development of academic and clinical research. - Highlights: • 90 radiographers were identified as holding, or studying for, a doctoral award. • The PhD is the most common award. • EdD and professional doctorates are increasing in popularity. • Academic staff were more likely to pursue such research training.

  9. Teaching evidence-based practice in a distance education occupational therapy doctoral program: strategies for professional growth and advancing the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Centennial Vision of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) projects that by 2017 all occupational therapy (OT) practice areas will be supported by evidence. Achieving this goal requires preparing clinicians with the skills to assimilate, analyze, and apply research to their areas of practice and communicate the value of OT services to consumers and payers. These skills are at the heart of evidence-based practice (EBP). Educators must be prepared to teach EBP skills in both entry-level and postprofessional programs. This article outlines how EBP can be taught to postprofessional occupational therapy clinical doctoral students using a distance education format. Key features of a successful EBP course include having access to full-text electronic articles, opportunities for students to explore the literature in their own areas of interest, consistent and timely feedback on written work and discussion topics, and opportunities to collaborate with peers.

  10. Physical activity education in the undergraduate curricula of all UK medical schools: are tomorrow's doctors equipped to follow clinical guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Richard; Chew, Stephen; Coombs, Ngaire; Hamer, Mark; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a cornerstone of disease prevention and treatment. There is, however, a considerable disparity between public health policy, clinical guidelines and the delivery of physical activity promotion within the National Health Service in the UK. If this is to be addressed in the battle against non-communicable diseases, it is vital that tomorrow's doctors understand the basic science and health benefits of physical activity. The aim of this study was to assess the provision of physical activity teaching content in the curricula of all medical schools in the UK. Our results, with responses from all UK medical schools, uncovered some alarming findings, showing that there is widespread omission of basic teaching elements, such as the Chief Medical Officer recommendations and guidance on physical activity. There is an urgent need for physical activity teaching to have dedicated time at medical schools, to equip tomorrow's doctors with the basic knowledge, confidence and skills to promote physical activity and follow numerous clinical guidelines that support physical activity promotion.

  11. The Doctorate in Chemistry. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, Ronald

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  12. The Nuclear Engineering Doctorate and NTEC CPD and Masters programmes: education, training and research for the decommissioning skills-base - 16395

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Since its establishment in 2005 the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has a remit to maintain the skills-base for safe, secure and cost effective decommissioning of the existing UK civil nuclear power plants and associated facilities. With an aging workforce and a competitive tender process for each project a number of new companies are realising the potential of the UK decommissioning market. The Nuclear Engineering Doctorate and NTEC Masters Programmes have been designed to provide the nuclear workforce of the future. The doctorate is a partnership between industry, a university partner and the research engineer with the benefit to industry that the research engineer is based with the industrial partner. Technical and management modules are studied at the university whilst the research project is carried out in the industrial environment. The Masters programme draws on the expertise of 11 Higher Education Institutes and offers over 20 modules that are delivered in a short-fat format either as standalone CPD courses or, by taking further modules, a certificate, diploma or on completion of a research project an M.Sc. Modules are available that cover the technical aspects of decommissioning as well as management of the decommissioning process. The availability of modules in a Distance Learning format now enables students based around the world to benefit from this programme. This paper will describe the two programmes in detail and provide examples of current projects that are delivering the research and workforce required for a successful decommissioning programme. (author)

  13. When Work Was Its Own Reward: A Swedish Study from the Perspective of Women's History, of the Kindergarten Teacher as Public Educator. Reprints and Miniprints from Department of Educational and Psychological Research. No. 792. Summary of a Doctoral Thesis, Malmo School of Education, University of Lund, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broman, Ingegerd Tallberg

    This report summarizes a doctoral thesis defended and published in Swedish in 1991 at the Malmo School of Education, University of Lund. The thesis examined the preconditions necessary for the development of a new profession in Sweden for the education and care of young children in the 19th century. These preconditions led to the creation, in the…

  14. Cost incentives for doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schottmüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    If doctors take the costs of treatment into account when prescribing medication, their objectives differ from their patients' objectives because the patients are insured. This misalignment of interests hampers communication between patient and doctor. Giving cost incentives to doctors increases...... welfare if (i) the doctor's examination technology is sufficiently good or (ii) (marginal) costs of treatment are high enough. If the planner can costlessly choose the extent to which doctors take costs into account, he will opt for less than 100%. Optimal health care systems should implement different...... degrees of cost incentives depending on type of disease and/or doctor....

  15. Doctoral Women: Managing Emotions, Managing Doctoral Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Claire; Mowbray, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of women doctoral students and the role of emotion during doctoral candidature. The paper draws on the concept of emotional labour to examine the two sites of emotional investment students experienced and managed during their studies: writing and family relationships. Emotion is perceived by many dominant…

  16. Suicide in doctors and wives of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakinofsky, I

    1980-06-01

    This paper re-examines the widespread belief that doctors have a proneness for suicide greater than the general population. The Standardized Mortality Ratio for male physicians is 335 and for single women doctors 257. Doctors' wives have an even greater risk: their SMR is 458. These rates for doctors are higher than for most other professional groups (except pharmacists) and the rate for doctors' wives far exceeds that for wives of other professionals. The intrinsic causes of the physician's high occupational mortality include his knowledge of toxicology and ready access to lethal drugs, so that impulsive suicide is more often successful. Professional stress and overwork, particularly the unrelenting responsibility for decisions upon which the lives of others may depend, have been inculpated. These stresses interact with the decline in the doctors' self-respect and with a personality that is prestige-oriented and independent. Some physicians turn in their frustration to alcohol/and or drugs, accelerating the process of deterioration. The high suicide rate in doctors' wives appears to be the result of unrequited needs for caring and dependency which the doctors' career demands and personality deny them.

  17. Finding the Right Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certified hospital Communicating with Healthcare Professionals for Caregivers Consumer Health Care • Home • Health Insurance Information • Your Healthcare Team Introduction Finding the Right Doctor Talking to Your Doctor Getting a Second ...

  18. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Impact of NIH Research Science, Health, and Public Trust You are here Home » Institutes at NIH » NIH ... Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, and Public Trust Talking to Your Doctor Part I: Preparing for ...

  19. Talking to Your Doctor

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  20. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... for the doctor’s contact information and their preferred method of communication. Remember that nurses and pharmacists are also good sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , NIH ...

  1. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) Español Aging Planning Your Doctor Visit , NIHSeniorHealth.gov Videos: Talking ... A Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your Doctor Presentation Toolkit , National ...

  2. "Tough Love and Tears": Learning Doctoral Writing in the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Claire; Catterall, Janice; Ross, Pauline; Burgin, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary changes to the doctorate mean student researchers are likely to be expected to write differently, write more and more often, and yet, despite a growing interest in doctoral education, we still know relatively little about the teaching and learning practices of students and supervisors vis-a-vis doctoral writing. This paper draws from…

  3. Who are the job seekers? : Explaining unemployment among doctoral recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yerkes, M.; Van de Schoot, R.; Sonneveld, H.

    2012-01-01

    Despite increased attention for doctoral education in recent years, one particular phenomenon has received little attention—the unemployment of doctoral candidates following graduation. While the unemployment of doctoral recipients is relatively low in comparison to the general popula-tion, the

  4. Doctoral Dissertation Defences: Performing Ambiguity between Ceremony and Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Arjen; Rufas, Alix; Supper, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Dissertation defenses are ambiguous affairs, which mark both the end of a long process of doctoral education and the inauguration of a doctoral candidate into a body of experts. At Maastricht University (and other Dutch universities), the decision to award a doctoral degree is made on the basis of

  5. State Level Review of Doctoral Programs in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Nil

    Review of doctoral degree programs in Texas public colleges and universities is discussed. Attention is directed to review procedures and strengths and weaknesses in the state's doctoral programs in educational psychology, counseling and guidance, and student personnel services. Doctoral programs were reviewed because of their high cost and a…

  6. Obstacles to Success--Doctoral Student Attrition in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2011-01-01

    The article explores doctoral attrition in South Africa, investigating and comparing the attributions of attrition of doctoral students and PhD programme leaders. The article is based on secondary data analysis of two large studies on doctoral education in South Africa. The main point of the article is that the different understandings of the…

  7. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Collaboration on Effective Professional Practice. This register is kept up to date by searching the following databases for reports of relevant research: DHSS-DATA; EMBASE; MEDLINE; SIGLE; Resource Database in Continuing Medical Education (1975-1994), along with bibliographies of related topics, hand searching......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... of key journals and personal contact with content area experts. Randomised controlled trials and non-equivalent group designs with pre- and post-intervention measures were included. Outcome measures were those used by the study authors. For each study we determined whether these were positive, negative...

  8. The Doctor Is In, but Is Academia? Re-Tooling II Education for a New Era in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andre; Moy, Lawrence; Kruck, S. E.; Rabang, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare information technology is at a crossroads today. As legacy data systems converge with bleeding edge technologies, the technology environments of today's hospitals and clinics are evolving rapidly, producing new care delivery models. As a result, we need to reassess how information technology education is meeting the needs of healthcare…

  9. Doctoral Research Education in Canada: Full-Time and Part-Time Students' Access to Research Assistantships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczyk, Ewalina Kinga

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students' development as researchers is a key objective in higher education internationally. Research assistantships (RAships) nurture graduate students as novice researchers as they develop theoretical and methodological knowledge. However, few studies have investigated the ways institutional regulations, informal practices, and…

  10. Analyzing the Curricula of Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Technology-Related Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaden, Abdullah; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze on-campus and online PhD programs in educational technology-related fields in the United States. In particular, it sought to evaluate the most common program titles; core, elective, and research courses based on program curricula. The research design was quantitative content analysis and data were collected…

  11. Rethinking the Structure of Student Recruitment and Efforts to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Doctoral Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Griffin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While researchers, institutional leaders, and policymakers have made significant progress towards increasing undergraduate student diversity in the United States, diversity in graduate education has been less often studied and a more challenging goal on which to make progress. This qualitative study explores the roles and work of graduate diversity officers (GDOs in student recruitment activities with a focus on how race and issues of diversity manifest and influence this process. Interviews with fourteen GDOs at 11 different research universities in the United States highlight the phases in the graduate recruitment process, the manner in which diversity is considered at each stage, and GDOs’ perceptions of their ability to shape this process. Findings suggest that GDOs are important institutional agents in diversification efforts; however, faculty engagement and broad institutional commitment are required to increase diversity in graduate education due to GDOs’ often limited involvement in the admissions stage of the recruitment process, where race becomes the most salient in decision making.

  12. Education Program for Doctoral Researchers by Industrial-Government-Academic Cooperation and Interaction between Different Research Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kazuya; Sawaragi, Tetsuo; Hasebe, Shinji; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    New education program to train graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who can be good leaders in a variety of social fields by cooperation of graduate school of engineering and pharmaceutical sciences is conducted as an advanced activity in Kyoto University. This program consists of four sub-programs and the educational effect by the collaboration of industry-government-academic and the interaction between dissimilar research fields is described in this paper. Trainees in this program acquire the ability to understand objectively one’ s research from comprehensive point of view and to debate with researchers in different fields. This program supports them to become ‘Global Leaders’ who play an important role internationally in advanced technology.

  13. [Life conditions of Togolese doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi-Tessio, Annick Viwalé; Oniankitan, Owonayo; Mijiyawa, Moustafa

    2010-09-01

    A study has been carried out by Togolese medical doctors in order to determine the perceived and the real life of their profession. The study, which was transversal, has taken in account a sample of 52 medical doctors made on the basis of a cautious choice. Most of these medical doctors (15 general practitioners, 23 specialists and 14 hospitalo-universitaires) work in the medical cares centres of Lomé. A sheet of survey has permitted the collection of demographic data and data relating to the medical studies and career. The 52 medical doctors included in the study (7 women, 45 men) were between 25 and 59 years old; their age of getting their A-level was between 16 and 23 years old, and that of getting the doctorate diploma between 24 and 37. The length of professional experience stands between 8 months and 27 years. The marital status was specified by 47 of the 52 medical doctors: 13 single, one divorced, and 33 married; 5 of the 7 women who took part in the survey were single and without any child. The love of the profession (65%), the social status it confers (37%) and the honour tied to the profession (27%) were the main motives of choosing the profession. The decision of doing medical studies was taken during secondary studies by 45 of the 52 persons. The faculty of medicine of Lomé has been the study frame to general medicine studies of 35 persons (67%). The low payment (83%), the poverty of the patients (83%), the narrowness of the technical platform (79%), the insufficiency of cares structures in paramedical personnel (67%), the insufficiency of continuing education (60%), and the lack or insufficiency of drugs (58%) were the main problems encountered during their professional experience by the people questioned. 22 medical doctors (43%) have estimated that their profession has given them a particular social status. Only 8 medical doctors have found that the real things they have gone trough in the profession matches with the idea they had, while 32 (62

  14. Bedside Teaching in Undergraduate Medical Education: Issues, Strategies, and New Models for Better Preparation of New Generation Doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdus Salam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBedside teaching is a vital component of medical education. It isapplicable to any situation where teaching is imparted in thepresence of patients. In teaching in the patients’ presence, learnershave the opportunities to use all of their senses and learn thehumanistic aspect of medicine such as role modeling, which isvital but difficult to communicate in words. Unfortunately, bedsideteaching has been on the decline. To investigate the reasonsfor the decline in bedside teaching, its importance and its revival,a review of literature was carried out using PubMed and otherdata bases. The review revealed that the major concerns of bedsideteaching were time constraint, false preceptors’ concernabout patients’ comfort, short stay of patients in hospitals, learnerdistraction by technology, lack of experience and unrealistic facultyexpectation. Whatsoever the reasons, bedside teaching cannotbe replaced with anything else. There are newer approachesof effective bedside teaching, and the core focus of all such approachesis educational process. A bedside teacher must learnhow to involve patients and learners in the educational processes.Moreover, bedside teaching is the process through which learnersacquire the skills of communication by asking patients’ permission,establishing ground rules, setting time limit, introducing theteam, diagnosing learner, diagnosing patient, conducting focusedteaching, using simple language, asking patient if there is anyquestion, closing with encouraging thanks, and giving feedbackprivately. It is most important to ensure a comfortable environmentfor all participants, the learner, the patient and the bedsideteacher. Ongoing faculty development programs on educationalprocesses and realistic faculty expectations may overcome theproblems.

  15. Doctors in Balzac's work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Balzac wrote his novels during a time of great literary and scientific change. Romanticism gave way to the school of realism, of which Balzac could be considered the founder. It was via realism, where both the positive and negative aspects of life were depicted, that doctors naturally gained a much more active role in novels. In conjunction with this was the development of science and medicine, which fascinated Balzac, also leading to the significant and prevalent role of doctors in his works. His fascination with the sciences led to him to gain many acquaintances and much knowledge in the medical domain, especially in neuropsychiatry and physiology. His fictional doctors, such as Desplein and Bianchon, thus demonstrate considerable knowledge of pathology, physiology, and neuropsychiatry. The doctors in Balzac's novels can be grouped into four categories: provincial doctors, Parisian doctors, country doctors, and military doctors. They were most often fictitious representations of real individuals (e.g. Guillaume Dupuytren), and often symbolize schools of thought which were in vogue at the time. In addition to the accurate scientific depiction of doctors, it must be noted that his doctors not only played an active role in clinically assessing their patients, but also had a sociological role in assessing society; it is through his doctors that Balzac gave his opinion of the world in which he lived. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Child Development and the Coworking of Doctor and Teacher: A Waldorf School Doctor's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnow, Gerald F.

    This paper draws on the nearly 20 years' experiences of a school doctor working with teachers at the Rudolf Steiner School in New York City to describe general principles of assessing child development in relation to educational progress. The paper contrasts the customary role of school doctors (related to conducting physical examinations for…

  17. The complex thinking and prospect of actions of future doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Segtowich

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing prospects of actions manifested by future doctors in the beginning of their doctoral training. The research started through my involvement in the ambit of doctoral education in the curriculum component Epistemological Basis of Research on Education in Science and Mathematics, offered in the Postgraduate Course in Science and Mathematics Education, at Federal University of Pori (UFPA in 2010 academic year. At these meetings, the teachers trainers requested the doctoral students, in pairs, to elaborate three questions about the following positioning: "HOW DO I SEE MYSELF AS A DOCTOR?" These questions were discussed by all the doctoral students and subsequently reduced to five to be answered by all individually. The responses to this questionnaire provided the data for this research. The answers revealed that doctoral students are not tied to methodologies or unique processes, this positioning being demonstrated through prospects of performance in ways that were diverse and interactive

  18. Doctors with dyslexia: strategies and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Alexander, Gail; Mann, Richard; Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha

    2017-10-01

    Looking beyond dyslexia as an individual doctor's issue requires adjusting a working environment to better serve the needs of doctors with dyslexia. With an increasing number of doctors disclosing dyslexia at medical school, how can educators best provide this support? Our research looks at the impact of dyslexia on clinical practice and the coping strategies used by doctors to minimise the effect. Qualitative data were collected from 14 doctors with dyslexia using semi-structured interviews and by survey. 'In situ' demonstration interviews were conducted in order to understand how dyslexia is managed in the workplace from first-hand experience. Employers and educators who have responsibility for meeting the needs of this group were also consulted. Even in cases of doctors who had a diagnosis, they often did not disclose their dyslexia to their employer. Study participants reported having developed individual ways of coping and devised useful 'workarounds'. Support from employers comes in the form of 'reasonable adjustments', although from our data we cannot be sure that such adjustments contribute to an 'enabling' work environment. Supportive characteristics included the opportunity to shadow others and the time and space to complete paperwork on a busy ward. How can educators best provide support [for doctors with dyslexia]? Doctors with dyslexia need to be helped to feel comfortable enough to disclose. Educators need to challenge any negative assumptions that exist as well as promote understanding about the elements that contribute to a positive working environment. As a result of the research there is now practice available for educators to identify evidence-based strategies and resources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  19. Daddy, Can We Play Beatles Rock Band? The Lived Experiences of a Married Student with Children in a Cohort-Based Education Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand more clearly the lived experiences of married doctoral students with children who are enrolled in a cohort-based program. Attempting to maintain a strong family relationship, balance a career, enroll in a doctoral program, and provide for a family is an avalanche of emotion and pressure on all members…

  20. Effects of an integrated geriatric group balance class within an entry-level Doctorate of Physical Therapy program on students’ perceptions of geriatrics and geriatric education in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer C. Reneker; Kyra Weems; Vincent Scaia

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining the effect of an integrated group balance class for community-dwelling older adults within entry-level physical therapist coursework on student perceptions of geriatric physical therapy and geriatric physical therapy education. Twenty-nine Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students, 21–33 years old, in their second year of coursework in 2012, participated in an integrated clinical experience with exposure to geriatric patients at an outpatient facility at th...

  1. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Website NIH Employee Intranet Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines ... Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health Español Talking to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) ...

  2. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Discovery Into Health ® Impact of NIH Research Science, Health, and Public Trust You are here Home » Institutes at NIH » ... Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, and Public Trust Talking to Your Doctor Part I: Preparing ...

  3. The doctoral learning penumbra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Robinson, Gill; Wisker, Gina

    This paper presents our cross-national research into what we term the ‘doctoral learning penumbra’, which covers the diverse, unnoticed, and often unrecognised forms of help and support that doctoral students draw from during their PhD, and which are vital for completion. Our aim is to better...

  4. The Career Paths of Doctoral Graduates in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Economists and policy makers often emphasise the importance of human capital as a key determinant in the pursuit of economic growth. The highest formal qualification in the educational system is the doctorate, which is attained after the first stage of tertiary education at ISCED 6 level. Doctorate holders play a central role in research and…

  5. The Professional Doctorate: From Anglo-Saxon to European Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Jeroen; Naidoo, Rajani

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the debate on the third cycle of European higher education. Currently, much attention is paid to improving the structure and quality of doctorate education in the European context of the Bologna process and the Lisbon objectives. However, alternatives to the traditional doctorate are hardly addressed in the policy documents of…

  6. Turning Doctors Into Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Much of the contentious debate surrounding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare” concerned its financing and its attempt to guarantee (near universal access to healthcare through the private insurance market.  Aside from sensationalist stories of “death panels,” much less attention went to implications of the bill for the actual provision of healthcare. Methodology: This paper examines the "patient-centered medical home" (PCMH model which has been widely promoted as a means of reviving and improving primary care (i.e. general internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics. Argument: The PCMH and many of its components (e.g pay-for-performance, electronic medical records were interventions that were implemented on a massive basis without any evidence of benefit. Recent research has not generally supported clinical benefits with the PCMH model. Instead it seems to designed to de-professionalize (make proletarians of health care workers and enforce corporate models of health. The core values of professional work are undermined while the PCMH does nothing to address the structural marginalization of primary care within US health care. Conclusions: The development of alternative models will require political changes. Both doctors and teachers are in a position of advocate for more progressive systems of care and education.

  7. Doctoral level research and training capacity in the social determinants of health at universities and higher education institutions in India, China, Oman and Vietnam: a survey of needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farhad; Shet, Arun; Yan, Weirong; Al-Maniri, Abdullah; Atkins, Salla; Lucas, Henry

    2017-09-02

    Research capacity is scarce in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings. Social determinants of health research (SDH) is an area in which research capacity is lacking, particularly in Asian countries. SDH research can support health decision-makers, inform policy and thereby improve the overall health and wellbeing of the population. In order to continue building this capacity, we need to know to what extent training exists and how challenges could be addressed from the perspective of students and staff. This paper aims to describe the challenges involved in training scholars to undertake research on the SDH in four Asian countries - China, India, Oman and Vietnam. In-depth interviews were conducted with research scholars, research supervisors and principal investigators (n = 13) at ARCADE partner institutions, which included eight universities and research institutes. In addition, structured questionnaires (n = 70) were used to collect quantitative data relating to the courses available, teaching and supervisory capacity, and related issues for students being trained in research on SDH. Simple descriptive statistics were calculated from the quantitative data and thematic analysis applied to the qualitative data. We identified a general lack of training courses focusing on SDH. Added to this, PhD students studying related areas reported inadequate supervision, with limited time allocated to meetings and poor interpersonal communication. Supervisors cited interpersonal communication problems and student lack of skills to perform high quality research as challenges to research training. Further challenges reported included a lack of research funding to include SDH-related topics. Finally, it was suggested that there was a need for institutions to define clear and appropriate standards regarding admission and supervision of students to higher education programs awarding doctoral degrees. There are gaps in training for research on the SDH at the surveyed

  8. Working with doctors and nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with doctors and nurses Working with doctors and nurses Answering questions, filling out papers, getting poked and ... to pay? What questions will the doctor or nurse ask? top It’s a good idea to know ...

  9. Challenges to the Doctoral Journey: a Case of Female Doctoral Students from Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asamenew Demessie Bireda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate some challenges female doctoral students experience in their doctoral journey. The study used a qualitative design and structured interviews. The theoretical framework that guided the study was that of Urie Bronfenbrenner’s ecosystemic theory. A purposely selected sample of five female doctoral students from the University of South Africa Ethiopia campus participated in the study. The results identified three major areas of concern such as: academic, psychosocial and home/work related. Specifically, female doctoral students reported concerns surrounding quality of supervision support, inadequate academic skill, nature or system of education, stress, motivation, isolation, balancing personal and professional life, relationship problems, home and work related concerns. Hence, universities must provide opportunities and resourceful strategies to meet the challenges posed by women scholars in the doctoral journey.

  10. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... honest communication between you and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your health. ... recovery. Here are a few tips that can help you talk to your doctor and make the ...

  11. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science ... More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives ...

  12. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. Learn how ...

  13. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Health Literacy Clear & Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain ... Health Care Providers About Complementary Health Approaches , National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) Diabetes Questions ...

  14. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... concerns before your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. ...

  15. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, ... to take notes for you. Learn how to access your medical records, so you can keep track ...

  16. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ... Institute on Aging (NIA) Cancer Communication in Cancer Care , National Cancer Institute (NCI) Español Complementary and Integrative ...

  17. The Doctor and Society*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the pressure of his own discipline he should be an edu- cated person in the ... found and multiform influence on social norms and human .destiny. The paths of ... This broad approach is fundamental to a sound doctor- patient relationship.

  18. Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manager Book Appointments Getting Care When on Active Duty Getting Care When Traveling What's Covered Health Care Dental Care ... Manager Book Appointments Getting Care When on Active Duty Getting Care When Traveling Bread Crumbs Home Find a Doctor ...

  19. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine P. Dabney; Robert H. Tai

    2013-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female...

  20. Dos experiencias de formación doctoral: Objetivos, disciplinariedad, enfoques y estrategias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesa, V.; Valero, Paola

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the doctoral programs in which we have been enrolled as students during the last four years. We describe the doctoral programs at the University of Georgia (Athens, Georgia, USA) and at the Royal Danish School of Educational Studies (Denmark). Then we discuss these doctoral...... for the Colombian mathematics education research community....

  1. Content and Process in a Teaching Workshop for Faculty and Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinfrette, Elaine S.; Maccio, Elaine M.; Coyle, James P.; Jackson, Kelly F.; Hartinger-Saunders, Robin M.; Rine, Christine M.; Shulman, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Teaching in higher education is often not addressed in doctoral education, even though many doctoral graduates will eventually teach. This article describes a biweekly teaching workshop, presents pitfalls and challenges that beginning instructors face, and advocates pedagogical training for doctoral students. Led by a well-known social work…

  2. Doctors do cry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Sonal; Goel, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Physicians have tried to understand whether crying for a patient is a raw emotion that demonstrates their lack of control over themselves and the situation, or whether it is a sign of humanity and concern for one's fellow beings. Studies on medical students and doctors'narrations of times when they have shed tears over a patient's suffering or death have established beyond doubt that medical students and physicians are not immune to their patients'suffering and may cry when overwhelmed by stress and emotions. Even though humanity is the cornerstone of medicine, depersonalisation has somehow crept into the physician-patient relationship and crying is considered incompatible with the image of a good physician, who is supposed to be strong, confident and fully in charge. Thus, crying has been equated to weakness and at times, incompetence. This could be attributed to the fact that our medical curriculum has ingrained in us the belief that emotion clouds rationality and prevents us from being objective while making decisions regarding a patient's clinical progress. Our curriculum fails to teach us how to handle emotional situations, witness the dying process, communicate bad news, interact with the bereaved during the period of grief immediately following death, and reduce the professional stress involved in working with newly bereaved persons. Our training focuses on cure, amelioration of disease and the restoration of good health, with little emphasis on death, which is an absolute reality. It is crucial that medical educators take note of these lacunae in the curriculum. Physicians and teachers must recognise and accept the emotions that medical students experience in these situations, and teach them to offer their patients a sound blend of rationality and compassion with an attitude of humility.

  3. University strategy for doctoral training: the Ghent University Doctoral Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, N; Moens, L

    2010-01-01

    The Doctoral Schools at Ghent University have a three-fold mission: (1) to provide support to doctoral students during their doctoral research, (2) to foster a quality culture in (doctoral) research, (3) to promote the international and social stature and prestige of the doctorate vis-a-vis potential researchers and the potential labour market. The Doctoral Schools offer top-level specialized courses and transferable skills training to doctoral students as part of their doctoral training programme. They establish mechanisms of quality assurance in doctoral research. The Doctoral Schools initialize and support initiatives of internationalization. They also organize information sessions, promotional events and interaction with the labour market, and as such keep a finger on the pulse of external stakeholders.

  4. Journalism and Journalism Education: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1982 (Vol. 42 Nos. 7 through 12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 10 titles deal with the following topics: (1) press bias in Northern Ireland; (2) the nature of news media selection; (3) the agenda-setting function of the press; (4) a training program for newsroom supervisors using video taped…

  5. The European Donor Hospital Education Programme (EDHEP): addressing the training needs of doctors and nurses who break bad news, care for the bereaved, and request donation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, G. A.; van Dalen, J.; Jager, K. J.; Ryan, M.; Wijnen, R. M.; Wight, C.; Morton, J. M.; Morley, M.; Cohen, B.

    1999-01-01

    The competence of critical care staff when it comes to death and organ donation can make the difference between a family's agreeing to or refusing the latter. Doctors and nurses often feel uncomfortable approaching relatives about donation and attribute this to a lack of training. Bereaved relatives

  6. Speech Communication Education and Classroom Instruction: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1982 (Vol. 43 Nos. 1 through 6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The eight titles deal with the following topics: (1) the effects of self-instructional and discrimination communication training on the development of confrontation skills in prepracticum counseling trainees, (2) cross-cultural…

  7. "Disqus" Website-Based Commenting as an e-Research Method: Engaging Doctoral and Early-Career Academic Learners in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Daniel; Earley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of established qualitative research methods for online focus groups by using the "Disqus" website-based commenting platform as a medium for discussion among doctoral and early-career academic learners. Facilities allowing Internet users to comment on the content of web pages are increasingly popular on…

  8. Chiropractic Health Care: A National Study of Cost of Education, Service Utilization, Number of Practicing Doctors of Chiropractic, and Other Key Policy Issues. Volumes I-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kuster, Thomas, Jr.

    Results from the first federally sponsored study of the chiropractic health care profession are presented, and a broad range of facts and issues of concern to policy-makers, the profession, and the public are described. The two-year project included three national surveys of: service providers (doctors of chiropractic in practice more than two…

  9. Formação de especialistas, mestres e doutores em enfermagem: avanços e perspectivas Formación de especialistas, maestros y doctores en enfermería: avances y perspectivas Education of specialists, masters, and doctorates in nursing: progress and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alacoque Lorenzini Erdmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente texto tece algumas considerações sobre a área da enfermagem e os avanços e perspectivas para a formação de especialistas, mestres e doutores em enfermagem. A construção de conhecimentos resulta de recursos humanos competentes no processo investigativo para um cuidado mais qualificado. Sua produção é uma importante estratégia para o fortalecimento da Enfermagem como ciência e profissão comprometida em promover melhor saúde à sociedade. A pós-graduação lato e stricto sensu em enfermagem empenha-se em formar especialistas, mestres e doutores com competência e qualificação que contribuem para o avanço da ciência e tecnologia da enfermagem brasileira.El presente artículo teje algunas consideraciones sobre el área de la enfermería y los avances y perspectivas para la formación de especialistas, maestros y doctores en enfermería. La construcción de conocimientos resulta de recursos humanos competentes en el proceso investigativo para un cuidado más calificado. Su producción es una estrategia importante para el fortalecimiento de la Enfermería como ciencia y profesión comprometida en promover una mejor salud para la sociedad. El postgrado lato y stricto sensu en enfermería se empeña en formar especialistas, maestros y doctores con competencia y calificación que contribuyen al avance de la ciencia y tecnología de la enfermería brasileña.This paper discusses the progress and prospects of the education of specialists, masters, and doctorates in nursing. The development of knowledge results from competent human resources in the research process to promote quality nursing care. Their scientific production is an important strategy for strengthening nursing as a science and a profession committed to promoting quality health care services to society. The "strict sensu" and "lato sensu" graduate programs in nursing are committed to educate nurse specialists, masters, and doctorates with the expertise and

  10. Wanted--doctors who care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovdal, L T; Pearson, R

    1989-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine what consumers value in doctors' behavior. Results indicate that consumers in the sample population studied prefer doctors who are friendly and caring as well as those who are technically competent. However, these respondents reported less favorable opinions about doctors' friendliness (i.e., affective behavior) than they did about doctors' competence (i.e., instrumental behavior).

  11. Barriers facing junior doctors in rural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah M

    2005-01-01

    Early postgraduate, or junior doctors, are still required to practise in rural and remote communities, and they continue to face numerous issues and difficulties. Within the hospital setting, exposure to rural practice appears to be very limited during internship, and also to some extent, during the second postgraduate year and beyond. This is a major issue for those required to undertake country relieving, rural terms or who will be bonded to rural and remote practice for several years after internship. This research investigated the current issues and difficulties faced by junior doctors, required to undertake rural and remote practice in Queensland, Australia. An exploratory study was undertaken. Primary data were collected through semi-structured interviews held with key stakeholders. Stakeholders included: directors of clinical training; medical educators; junior doctors; rural practitioners; academic rural practitioners; and medical administrators. Of the 23 people approached, a total of 19 agreed to be interviewed. The response rate was 82.6%. Similar to the issues identified in the literature, there are currently a number of barriers influencing the ability of junior doctors to practise competently and confidently when undertaking practice in rural and remote communities. Minimal clinical experience, lack of supervision and on-site support, inadequate orientation and uninformed expectations, limited access to relevant education, and the influence of isolation, results in an overall lack of preparation both professionally and personally. When asked, respondents supported the identification of core skills and knowledge, and integration of these and other issues affecting rural practice, into their hospital-based programs. Current hospital-based education and training programs were not adequately preparing junior doctors for rural and remote practice. It was commented that orientation and education, with a rural emphasis, could assist junior doctors in their

  12. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  13. Attracting and retaining doctors in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P R

    2010-01-01

    In Nepal, a number of private sector medical schools have opened recently; although sufficient numbers of doctors are graduating there continues to be a doctor shortage in rural areas. This article analysed the rural doctor shortage in Nepal and reviewed the international literature for strategies that may be suitable for use in Nepal. Original research articles, reviews, magazine articles and project reports dealing with Nepal and other developing countries during the period 1995 to 2010 were sourced via Google, Google Scholar and Pubmed. Full text access was obtained via WHO's HINARI database. The health workforce in Nepal is unevenly distributed resulting in doctor shortages in rural areas. The recent introduction of mandatory rural service for scholarship students was aimed to reduce the loss of medical graduates to developed nations. High tuition fees in private medical schools and low Government wages prevent recent graduates from taking up rural positions, and those who do face many challenges. Potential corrective strategies include community-based medical education, selecting rural-background medical students, and providing a partial or complete tuition fee waiver for medical students who commit to rural service. Traditional healers and paramedical staff can also be trained for and authorized to provide rural health care. A range of strategies developed elsewhere could be used in Nepal, especially community-oriented medical education that involves rural doctors in training medical students. The reimbursement of tuition fees, assistance with relocation, and provision of opportunities for academic and professional advancement for rural doctors should also be considered. Government investment in improving working conditions in rural Nepal would assist rural communities to attract and retain doctors.

  14. [Murder of the doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorettu, Liliana; Falchi, Lorenzo; Nivoli, Fabrizia L; Milia, Paolo; Nivoli, Giancarlo; Nivoli, Alessandra M

    2015-01-01

    To examine possible risk factors for the doctor to be killed by the patient in the clinical practice by examining a series of murders that involved physicians. This aim has been achieved through a retrospective review on clinical cases of doctors killed by patients within the period between 1988 and 2013, in Italy. In this period 18 Italian doctors have been killed in the workplace, with a rate of 0.3/100,000. In 7 cases, the murder resulted in the context of doctor-dissatisfaction; in 7 cases the murder was committed by a psychiatric patient; 1 case in the context of a stalking; 3 cases occurred in a workplace which was not safe enough. Four categories of at-risk contexts have been identified. One category includes a murder in the context of a doctor-dissatisfaction, perceived by patient. The second category concerns murders committed by patients suffering from mental illness. A third category includes homicides in a workplace which is not safe. The last category comprises the murder in the context of stalking. These categories identify specific dangerous situations for physicians, in which are highlighted elements that have played a crucial role in the murder and for which special precautions are suggested preventive.

  15. The Doctorate in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein; Tvede, Olaf

    1998-01-01

    Overview of research training systems leading to doctoral degrees in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden emphasizes the structure of postgraduate education, administration and funding, number of students, time to degree, completion rates, labor market, and study abroad. Comparisons to U.S., British, German, and French systems suggests a trend…

  16. How Six Sigma Methodology Improved Doctors' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Six Sigma methodology was used in a District General Hospital to assess the effect of the introduction of an educational programme to limit unnecessary admissions. The performance of the doctors involved in the programme was assessed. Ishikawa Fishbone and 5 S's were initially used and Pareto analysis of their findings was performed. The results…

  17. Understanding Critical Thinking to Create Better Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Zayabalaradjane; Menon, Vikas; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar; Batmanabane, Gitanjali

    2016-01-01

    Medical students master an enormous body of knowledge, but lack systematic problem solving ability and effective clinical decision making. High profile reports have called for reforms in medical education to create a better generation of doctors who can cope with the system based problems they would encounter in an interdisciplinary and…

  18. A Review of the Literature on Professional Doctorate Supervisory Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Carol; Yerrabati, Sridevi

    2017-01-01

    At the core of doctoral education is the importance of the quality of the supervisor and student relationship. Research has shown that this relationship is directly linked to completion rates, and impacts the quality of the doctorate and its ultimate success or failure (Gill and Burnard, 2008). One influence on the supervisory relationship is the…

  19. Undergraduate Origins of Recent Science and Engineering Doctorate Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Susan T.; And Others

    Because undergraduate education is the foundation for graduate studies, it is important to know where our Nation's science and engineering (S&E) doctorate recipients are receiving their undergraduate training. Specifically, this report addresses the following broad questions: (1) What are the undergraduate origins of S&E doctorate holders? (2)…

  20. Fact File: A Profile of 1987 Recipients of Doctorates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A table showing the results of the Survey of Earned Doctorates is presented. Degrees conferred, age, sex, citizenship, planned postdoctoral study, planned postdoctoral employment, and primary postdoctoral activity are included. Doctoral degrees included arts and humanities, business and management, computer science, education, engineering, life…

  1. Winter is Coming: Doctoral Supervision in the Neoliberal University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Brabazon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available : Doctoral Education Studies, particularly in its North American manifestations, emphasizes quantitative methods. The resulting research is empirical and occasionally empiricist. The challenges revealed through this mode of research is that the highly ideological, volatile environment of higher education is flattened, framed and justified. My research offers an alternative view and perspective of doctoral education through a post-empirical, theoretical article. Within my piece, the PhD and doctoral supervision are framed by the post-Global Financial Crisis to understand the very specific – and volatile – context for research and research training.

  2. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find A Doctor Education & Training Continuing Education Graduate Medical Education Simulator Training Program Resources For Your Practice ... Find A Doctor Education & Training Continuing Education Graduate Medical Education Simulator Training Program Resources For Your Practice ...

  3. Evaluation of an international doctoral educational program in space life sciences: The Helmholtz Space Life Sciences Research School (SpaceLife) in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Spitta, L. F.; Kopp, K.; Schmitz, C.; Reitz, G.; Gerzer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Training young researchers in the field of space life sciences is essential to vitalize the future of spaceflight. In 2009, the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine established the Helmholtz Space Life Sciences Research School (SpaceLife) in cooperation with several universities, starting with 22 doctoral candidates. SpaceLife offered an intensive three-year training program for early-stage researchers from different fields (biology, biomedicine, biomedical engineering, physics, sports, nutrition, plant and space sciences). The candidates passed a multistep selection procedure with a written application, a self-presentation to a selection committee, and an interview with the prospective supervisors. The selected candidates from Germany as well as from abroad attended a curriculum taught in English. An overview of space life sciences was given in a workshop with introductory lectures on space radiation biology and dosimetry, space physiology, gravitational biology and astrobiology. The yearly Doctoral Students' Workshops were also interdisciplinary. During the first Doctoral Students' Workshop, every candidate presented his/her research topic including hypothesis and methods to be applied. The progress report was due after ∼1.5 years and a final report after ∼3 years. The candidates specialized in their subfield in advanced lectures, Journal Clubs, practical trainings, lab exchanges and elective courses. The students attended at least one transferable skills course per year, starting with a Research Skills Development course in the first year, a presentation and writing skills course in the second year, and a career and leadership course in the third year. The whole program encompassed 303 h and was complemented by active conference participation. In this paper, the six years' experience with this program is summarized in order to guide other institutions in establishment of structured Ph.D. programs in this field. The curriculum including elective courses is

  4. Online Programs and Geographic Proximity are Key Determinants of Information Professionals’ Interest in Pursuing Post-Master’s Education at the Doctoral Level. A Review of: Powell, Ronald R. and Susan E. Boling. “Post-Master’s Educational Needs of Information Professionals.” Journal of Access Services 3.4 (2005: 29-43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Ingrid Preddie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate post-master’s educational needs and interests of information professionals.Design – Survey research using print and electronic questionnaires.Setting – The geographic area surrounding Wayne State University in Michigan, United States of America.Subjects – Members of the library associations of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Southwestern Ontario, Canada.Methods – Systematic random samples were derived from the membership lists of the library associations in Ohio, Indiana, and Southwestern Ontario. Paper questionnaires were mailed to those selected. Michigan Library Association’s official policy barred the release of its membership list to researchers. Consequently, announcements of the survey were placed in three successive issues of the Association’s electronic newsletter. Interested members were directed to a website to complete an electronic version of the questionnaire. This option was also extended to members of the other three library associations. The overall research question was investigated through specific questions that sought to ascertain the overall level of interest in professional library and information studies (LIS education, levels of interest in specific types of programs, factors that favoured or deterred enrolment in doctoral programs, as well as the fields of study that were preferred for combination with LIS in doctoral programs. With the exception of demographic type questions (e.g., place of residence and educational qualifications and two questions that required open ended responses, the questionnaire design encompassed questions with Likert scale type responses. Analysis of the responses included descriptive statistics, the use of Pearson chi square to determine statistically significant relationships, and, to a lesser extent, content analysis.Main Results – A total of 270 questionnaires(33% were returned from three populations: Ohio, Indiana, and Ontario. A self

  5. Talking to Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or risks? Will I need more tests later? Understanding your doctor's responses is essential to good communication. Here are a few more tips: If you ... is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and ... and Human Services | The National Institutes of Health | USA.gov ...

  6. Choosing a Family Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age or sex. This includes care for your physical, mental, and emotional health. Family doctors get to know their patients. They ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food ...

  7. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Repayment More » Search the NIH Guide Quick Links RePORT eRA Commons NIH Common Fund NIH and the ... if you feel embarrassed or shy. Have an open dialogue with your doctor — ask questions to make ...

  8. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science ... Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation and Guidance More » Quick Links ...

  9. Patient perception of smartphone usage by doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry G

    2017-03-01

    consider the doctor ignorant. It is suggested that moves are made to educate patients of the importance of the use of technology by doctors and to ensure that patients are aware of the reasons for which doctors use smartphones at work. Keywords: telehealth, smartphone, doctor–patient relationship, patient self-determination act

  10. Conceptualising Doctoral Writing as an Affective-political Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Burford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This article offers a conceptual summary and critique of existing literature on doctoral writing and emotion. The article seeks to intervene in current debates about doctoral writing by re-positioning it as an affective-political practice Background: Over recent decades public interest in the doctorate has expanded as it has become re-framed as a key component of national success in the global knowledge economy. It is within this context that the practice of doctoral writing has crystallised as an object of interest. While researchers have examined the increased regulation, surveillance, and intensification of doctoral writing, often this work is motivated to develop pedagogies that support students to meet these new expectations. At this point, there has been limited attention to what broad changes to the meanings and practices of doctoral writing feel like for students. Methodology: The paper offers a conceptual review that examines the ways in which doctoral writing tends to be understood. A review of literature in the areas of doctoral writing, doctoral emotion, and critical studies of academic labour was undertaken in order to produce a more comprehensive understanding of the political and emotional dynamics of doctoral writing. Contribution: It is intended that this conceptual research paper help researchers attend to the emotional context of doctoral writing in the current university context. Critical studies of academic work and life are identified as a possible platform for the development of future doctoral education research, and the conceptual tool of “affective-politics” is advanced as a novel frame for approaching doctoral writing research.

  11. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Uk Chae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE. Methods The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. Results The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%. NK doctors’ lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. Conclusion The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also.

  12. Self-assessed dental health knowledge of Nigerian Doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess medical doctors' knowledge of common dental diseases ... need to include dental education in the Nigerian undergraduate medical curriculum. ... The definition, etiology, treatment and age-related risk were assessed.

  13. Stress in doctors and dentists who teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Harry; Herzberg, Joe; Paice, Elisabeth

    2002-06-01

    To explore the relationship between a teaching role and stress in doctors and dentists who teach. Medline, PubMed, BIDS database for social sciences literature, and the ERIC database for educational literature were searched using the key words 'stress' or 'burnout' with the terms doctor, physician, dentist, teacher, lecturer, academic staff, and university staff. Other books and journals known to the authors were also used. Many studies have shown high levels of stress in doctors, dentists, teachers, and lecturers. A large number of factors are implicated, including low autonomy, work overload, and lack of congruence between power and responsibility. Doctors and dentists who take on a teaching role in addition to their clinical role may increase their levels of stress, but there is also evidence that this dual role may reduce job-related stress. Working as a doctor or dentist may entail higher levels of stress than are experienced by the general population. In some situations adding in the role of teacher reduces this stress, but more research is needed to explain this finding.

  14. A therapist’s perspective of a financial planning course: Implications for financial therapy education and trainings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Ann McCoy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the autoethnography of a doctoral Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT student studying finances in a graduate course. A dataset in the form of field notes was created through recording observations and reflective journaling during the 15 week financial planning course. This data set included observations and insights on various skills and knowledge that would be helpful for conducting financial therapy, the professional and personal growth of a therapist integrating finances into her clinical work, and evaluations regarding how financial courses can be beneficial for therapists and planners who are interested in the interaction between relational and financial issues. Based on the first author’s experiences, reflections and conversations with the second author, four themes were developed. The themes were: (a Seeing the Unnoticed: Challenging Implicit Assumptions, (b Critically Examining My Own Money Scripts, (c What can Therapists Learn From the Financial Discipline, and (d What Financial Planners can Learn from the Clinical Disciplines. Implications for the burgeoning field of financial therapy are discussed, with special attention given to cross-discipline education and training.

  15. Reinventing The Doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a seismic shift in the lives of people because of technology. People are far better informed than they were in the 1980s and 1990s. Much of this information is available through the media but even more is available and archived on the internet. The forces pushing the internet into health and health care are strong and unstoppable, ensuring that the internet and the choices it offers must be part of the design of our future health care system. We are no longer content to wait in queues as we live at a faster pace than earlier generations — we don’t not have time to wait for appointments months, weeks or even days in advance. The internet offers the prospect of online consultations in the comfort of your own home. The physical examination will change as new devices are developed to allow the necessary sounds and signals emitted by our malfunctioning bodies to be recorded, interpreted and captured at a remote location. Meanwhile, for those who prefer to see a health care practitioner in person the options to consult practitioners other than doctors who can advise on our health is expanding. The reality is we can’t afford to train or pay for all the doctors we need under the current “doctor-knows-best” system of health care. Patients no longer believe the rhetoric and are already voting with their feet. Pharmacists, nurses and other allied health professionals are beginning to play a much greater role in offering relief from symptoms and monitoring of chronic diseases. Of course, the doctor of the future will still need to offer face-to-face consultations to some people most of the time or most people some of the time. The social role doctors play will continue to be important as humans will always need other humans to personally respond to their distress. As doctors reinvent themselves, the internet and the value of time with patients will be the driving forces that move us into a more sustainable future in health care.

  16. Doctoral learning: a case for a cohort model of supervision and support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naydene de Lange

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We document the efforts of the faculty of education of a large research-oriented university in supporting doctoral learning. The development of a space for doctoral learning is in line with the need to develop a community of researchers in South Africa. We describe the historical origins of this cohort model of doctoral supervision and support, draw on literature around doctoral learning, and analyse a cohort of doctoral students' evaluation of the seminarsoverthree years. The findings indicate that the model has great value in developing scholarship and reflective practice in candidates, in providing support and supervision, and in sustaining students towards the completion of their doctorates.

  17. A laboratory simulation of Arabidopsis seed dormancy cycling provides new insight into its regulation by clock genes and the dormancy-related genes DOG1, MFT, CIPK23 and PHYA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footitt, Steven; Ölçer-Footitt, Hülya; Hambidge, Angela J; Finch-Savage, William E

    2017-08-01

    Environmental signals drive seed dormancy cycling in the soil to synchronize germination with the optimal time of year, a process essential for species' fitness and survival. Previous correlation of transcription profiles in exhumed seeds with annual environmental signals revealed the coordination of dormancy-regulating mechanisms with the soil environment. Here, we developed a rapid and robust laboratory dormancy cycling simulation. The utility of this simulation was tested in two ways: firstly, using mutants in known dormancy-related genes [DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1), MOTHER OF FLOWERING TIME (MFT), CBL-INTERACTING PROTEIN KINASE 23 (CIPK23) and PHYTOCHROME A (PHYA)] and secondly, using further mutants, we test the hypothesis that components of the circadian clock are involved in coordination of the annual seed dormancy cycle. The rate of dormancy induction and relief differed in all lines tested. In the mutants, dog1-2 and mft2, dormancy induction was reduced but not absent. DOG1 is not absolutely required for dormancy. In cipk23 and phyA dormancy, induction was accelerated. Involvement of the clock in dormancy cycling was clear when mutants in the morning and evening loops of the clock were compared. Dormancy induction was faster when the morning loop was compromised and delayed when the evening loop was compromised. © 2017 The Authors Plant, Cell & Environment Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Purist or Pragmatist? UK Doctoral Scientists' Moral Positions on the Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Sally; Hughes, Gwyneth; Walsh, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    Doctoral scientists increasingly forge non-academic careers after completing the doctorate. Governments and industry in advanced economies welcome this trend, since it complements the "knowledge economy" vision that has come to dominate higher education globally. Knowledge economy stakeholders consider doctoral scientists to constitute…

  19. The Moderating Effect of Personality Traits on Advisor Relationships in Predicting Doctoral Student Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosh, Emily P.

    2014-01-01

    Personality affects relationships. During the doctoral education, the second most important factor in degree completion, after financial support, is the student-advisor relationship. Approximately half of doctoral students do not finish their degrees. While it is known mentors have a profound impact on the success of doctoral students, the effect…

  20. Radon house doctor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, I.A.; Brennan, T.; Wadach, J.B.; O'Neil, R.

    1986-01-01

    The term house doctor may be generalized to include persons skilled in the use of instruments and procedures necessary to identify, diagnose, and correct indoor air quality problems as well as energy, infiltration, and structural problems in houses. A radon house doctor would then be a specialist in radon house problems. Valuable experience in the skills necessary to be developed by radon house doctors has recently been gained in an extensive radon monitoring and mitigation program in upstate New York sponsored by Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. These skills, to be described in detail in this paper, include: (i) the use of appropriate instruments, (ii) the evaluation of the symptoms of a radon-sick house, (iii) the diagnostic procedures required to characterize radon sources in houses, (iv) the prescription procedures needed to specify treatment of the problem, (v) the supervision of the implementation of the treatment program, (vi) the check-up procedures required to insure the house cured of radon problems. 31 references, 3 tables

  1. A peer-led teaching initiative for foundation doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Sophie; Abidogun, Abiola; Stringer, Emma; Mahgoub, Sara; Kastrissianakis, Artemis; Baker, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Peer teaching has been used informally throughout the history of medical education. Formal studies within the medical student and allied health care professional communities have found it to be a popular, and highly effective, method of teaching. Newly qualified doctors are currently an underused resource in terms of teaching one another. A committee, made up of newly qualified doctors and postgraduate education staff, was established. Using only a few resources, this committee organised regular, peer-led tutorials and used educational needs assessment tools, such as questionnaires, to make improvements to early postgraduate training. A realistic and well-received intervention to improve the teaching of newly qualified doctors, which is feasible in the modern, busy health care setting. Other institutions may find this method and its resources valuable. Newly qualified doctors are currently an underused resource in terms of teaching one another. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Mathematics Doctorate: A Time for Change? Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  3. The Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate: The Case of Mathematics. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Hyman

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  4. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, K.; Faber, M.J.; Arah, O.A.; Elwyn, G.; Lombarts, K.M.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy-makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  5. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, Karlijn; Faber, Marjan J.; Arah, Onvebuchi A.; Elwyn, Glyn; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Wollersheim, Hub C.; Grol, Richard P. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  6. Medical humanities: a resident doctor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauranik, Anvita

    2012-01-01

    The barrage of competitive examinations, overwork, sleep deprivation, and the pressure of expectations all combine to destroy the dreams that resident doctors have when they start medical school. The empathy they had before entering this field fades away, and they eventually become insensitive to their patients. Medical humanities may be the means to halt this trend. Sensitising young minds, using the arts, literature, history and lessons on social issues, may bring about a paradigm shift in these doctors' outlook towards their patients. However, for the humanities to be integrated into medical education, the current curriculum must be modified and made more clinically and socially relevant. Further, the humanities cannot be taught in lecture halls; they need to be integrated into all aspects of medical school. For this, the medical school faculty should be sensitised to, and trained in, humanities education.

  7. Skills and Competences of a Doctor of Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. W. Hoffmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Not only in Europe but also on other continents, it is felt that a reform of the doctoral phase in tertiary education is necessary. To make this reform a success, it is necessary to first define the skills and competences of a doctor in general and of a doctor of engineering in particular to dispose of measurable criteria for the outcomes of the reform. These criteria are intended to foster not only an academic career but also careers in industry and administration, i.e. to support the careers of future chief executives. It is also presented how these skills and competences are seen by industrial companies as well as by the young Doctors of Engineering. Finally, it is discussed how existing methods might be reformed to further improve the doctoral phase at and in cooperation with universities.

  8. Professionalism for future humanistic doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear editor Clinical environments encounter is an important part of studying medicine (1. Patient contact as an integral part of medical education occurs in various formats in the clinical settings (2, 3. During clinical training, medical students may experience high levels of stress, and some may not deal with it well. The abruptness of students’ transition to the clinical setting generated positive and negative emotions. Due to being a novice, they did not receive adequate training on how to get emotionally prepared for meeting seriously ill people. In such circumstances, the shortage of training will have predictably crucial consequences. Early clinical contact has been suggested to reduce these stresses and help the students adapt effectively to changes in the hospital climate (2. Patient contact creates an environment where each student appreciates cultural diversity and reinforces the development of clinical professional interpersonal skills through social, emotional and cognitive experiences (4, 5. It encourages validating of the relationship between patients and doctors and allows students to experience a more personal relationship with patients and nurture the ability to empathize with them, providing considerable benefits for trainees and patients. In this way, the social emotions that students experience when empathizing with a patient represent a uniquely human achievement. By internalizing their subjective interpretations of patient’s beliefs and feelings, the student’s body, brain and mind come together to produce cognition and emotion . They construct culturally relevant knowledge and make decisions about how to act and think about the patient’s problems as if they were their own. On the other hand, patient interaction in undergraduate education offers students a valuable early insight into the day-to-day role of a doctor and the patients’ perspective on specific conditions. Early experience provides a greater knowledge

  9. Doctors on display: the evolution of television's doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Tapper, Elliot B.

    2010-01-01

    Doctors have been portrayed on television for over 50 years. In that time, their character has undergone significant changes, evolving from caring but infallible supermen with smoldering good looks and impeccable bedside manners to drug-addicted, sex-obsessed antiheroes. This article summarizes the major programs of the genre and explains the pattern of the TV doctors' character changes. Articulated over time in the many permutations of the doctor character is a complex, constant conversation...

  10. Doctors on display: the evolution of television's doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Elliot B

    2010-10-01

    Doctors have been portrayed on television for over 50 years. In that time, their character has undergone significant changes, evolving from caring but infallible supermen with smoldering good looks and impeccable bedside manners to drug-addicted, sex-obsessed antiheroes. This article summarizes the major programs of the genre and explains the pattern of the TV doctors' character changes. Articulated over time in the many permutations of the doctor character is a complex, constant conversation between viewer and viewed representing public attitudes towards doctors, medicine, and science.

  11. Encouraging formative assessments of leadership for foundation doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Lindsay; Black, David; Welch, Jan; Reynolds, Peter; Penlington, Clare

    2015-08-01

    Clinical leadership is considered essential for maintaining and improving patient care and safety in the UK, and is incorporated in the curriculum for all trainee doctors. Despite the growing focus on the importance of leadership, and the introduction of the Medical Leadership Competency Framework (MLCF) in the UK, leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. Assessment is focused on clinical skills, and trainee doctors receive very little formal feedback on their leadership competencies. In this article we describe the approach taken by Health Education Kent, Sussex and Surrey (HEKSS) to raise the profile of leadership amongst doctors in training in the South Thames Foundation School (STFS). An annual structured formative assessment in leadership for each trainee has been introduced, supported by leadership education for both trainees and their supervisors in HEKSS trusts. We analysed over 500 of these assessments from the academic year 2012/13 for foundation doctors in HEKSS trusts, in order to assess the quality of the feedback. From the analysis, potential indicators of more effective formative assessments were identified. These may be helpful in improving the leadership education programme for future years. There is a wealth of evidence to highlight the importance and value of formative assessments; however, particularly for foundation doctors, these have typically been focused on assessing clinical capabilities. This HEKSS initiative encourages doctors to recognise leadership opportunities at the beginning of their careers, seeks to help them understand the importance of acquiring leadership skills and provides structured feedback to help them improve. Leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effects of an integrated geriatric group balance class within an entry-level Doctorate of Physical Therapy program on students' perceptions of geriatrics and geriatric education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneker, Jennifer C; Weems, Kyra; Scaia, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining the effect of an integrated group balance class for community-dwelling older adults within entry-level physical therapist coursework on student perceptions of geriatric physical therapy and geriatric physical therapy education. Twenty-nine Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students, 21-33 years old, in their second year of coursework in 2012, participated in an integrated clinical experience with exposure to geriatric patients at an outpatient facility at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Akron, Ohio, USA. Student perceptions were collected before and after participation in the 8-week balance class. The Wilcoxon sign-ranked test was used to identify differences in perceptions after participation in the group balance class. Cohen's d values were calculated to measure the size of the pre-participation to post-participation effect for each measure. At the conclusion of the group class, the DPT students demonstrated an increase in positive perceptions of geriatric physical therapy in 8 measures, with small effect sizes (d=0.15-0.30). Two perceptions of geriatric physical therapy demonstrated a significant positive increase (Pgeriatric education in the curriculum demonstrated a large positive effect for quality (d=1.68) and enjoyment (d=1.96). Positive changes were found in most of the perceptions of geriatrics and geriatric education after participation, suggesting that integrated clinical experiences with geriatric patients are an effective way to positively influence perceptions of physical therapist practice with older adults.

  13. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine P. Dabney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  14. The Business of Doctoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The core business of medicine is the consultation. During the consultation one human being responds to another in distress. Most doctors spend more time talking with people than performing surgery, prescribing pills or ordering tests. The extent to which the doctor succeeds as a communicator may even govern the ‘success’ of any procedure performed, if we define success as relief from the condition causing distress. As human beings our ability to benefit from what is offered to alleviate our symptoms is limited by the extent to which we feel that we have been heard and supported with empathy. It has been demonstrated that the human body has the capacity to heal and that healers are limited by their capacity to facilitate that process. That is not to say that ‘talking’ can spare us the need for other interventions. In this review the author examines the factors that impact on the medical consultation with particular emphasis on the scope for harm when the consultation is interrupted.

  15. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-06-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  16. [Health behaviour of doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Anikó

    2016-07-01

    Health behaviour involves maintaining, improving and restoration of health. The aim of the author was to assess correlations of health behaviour with age, gender, job type and overtime. A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted using an online questionnaire (N = 186). Data were analyzed with chi-square, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Doctors working in in-patient care drink more coffee (p = 0.034) and energy drinks (p = 0.018); they eat undisturbed only on weekends at home (p = 0.032). Men consume more alcohol (p = 0.003), red meats (pmeals (p = 0.018) and their daily fluid consumption exceeds 2 litres (p = 0.005); their body mass index values are higher compared to women (peat more hot meals (p = 0.005), and those under the age of 30 consume more crisps, fast food (p = 0.001) and energy drinks (p = 0.005), while they are more active (p = 0.010). Dietary habits of doctors are not ideal and their physical activity is diminished compared to international trends. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(30), 1198-1206.

  17. [Doctors in love].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how often doctors fall in love or are in a relationship with a colleague. Descriptive questionnaire. Doctors and medical students completed an online questionnaire during the summer of 2012. The questions concerned baseline characteristics as well as their feelings of happiness. In addition, we asked them whether they were in love or had ever been with a colleague and whether this had resulted in a steady relationship. A total of 401 individuals participated, of which 41% were male and 59% female. Their mean age was 40 years. Altogether, 40% of the participants indicated to be or have been in love with a colleague. This occurred more often in women than men. In 82% the relationship was of an equivalent nature; it was hierarchical in the remainder. In only 23% of cases, the relationship was steady; this was independent of age. Dermatologists appeared to be the least apt to fall in love with a colleague, while obstetricians had the highest rate. Although love between colleagues is a frequently occurring phenomenon, this is associated with a steady relationship in only about 25% of cases. There is wide variation among specialists in their proneness to intercollegial love.

  18. Doctors and romance: not only of interest to Mills and Boon readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Paul; Badkar, Juthika; Didham, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Internationally there is a growing demand for health services. Skilled health workers, including doctors, have a high degree of international mobility and New Zealand (NZ) stands out internationally in terms of the significant flows of doctors in and out of the country. Through changes in training of doctors in NZ and migration flows, there have been major shifts in the composition of the medical workforce in NZ since the mid-1980s. Studies of the changing nature of the medical workforce often focus on gender and migration separately as well as only considering doctors as individuals. The aim of this exploratory study is to examine the living arrangements of doctors, the composition of migrant doctors who are coming to NZ, and to understand the educational and employment status of the partners of doctors. This study is a descriptive analysis primarily using census data from 1986 through to 2006 and immigration data collected by the Department of Labour. Half of the female medical doctors approved for residence through the Skilled/Business stream migrated independently, while for male doctors less than athird came to NZ independently. Male migrant doctors were more likely to be partnered. Census data showed that people with medical backgrounds tend to partner with each other. However, these relationships are changing, as more women become doctors. In 1986 about 14% of male doctors had a nurse or midwife as a partner and nearly 9% had a doctor partner. By 2006 the proportion of partners of male doctors who were also doctors had risen to 16%, higher than the 9% who were nurses. For female doctors the changes are more dramatic. In 1986, 42% of female doctors in relationships had a doctor as a partner. By 2006, female doctors had increased substantially, but the percentage with a doctor partner had dropped to under athird. Well-qualified couples where one or both are doctors, have a greater propensityto live in main urban areas. Through official reports and extensive

  19. [Patients, doctors and the internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannot, Jean Gabriel; Bischoff, Thomas

    2015-05-13

    The majority of the Swiss population uses the internet to seek information about health. The objective is to be better informed, before or after the consultation. Doctors can advise their information-seeking patients about high quality websites, be it medical portals or websites dedicated to a specific pathology. Doctors should not see the internet as a threat but rather as an opportunity to strengthen the doctor-patient relationship.

  20. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  1. Doctor?patient communication in Southeast Asia: a different culture?

    OpenAIRE

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D. F.; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2012-01-01

    Studies of doctor?patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative study based on principles of grounded theory. Twenty residents and specialists and 20 patients of a low or high educational level were interviewed in in...

  2. Celiac Family Health Education Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A Referral Refer A Patient Transfer A Patient Find A Doctor Education & Training Continuing Education Graduate Medical ... A Referral Refer A Patient Transfer A Patient Find A Doctor Education & Training Continuing Education Graduate Medical ...

  3. When doctors share visit notes with patients: a study of patient and doctor perceptions of documentation errors, safety opportunities and the patient-doctor relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sigall K; Mejilla, Roanne; Anselmo, Melissa; Darer, Jonathan D; Elmore, Joann G; Leveille, Suzanne; Ngo, Long; Ralston, James D; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Patient advocates and safety experts encourage adoption of transparent health records, but sceptics worry that shared notes may offend patients, erode trust or promote defensive medicine. As electronic health records disseminate, such disparate views fuel policy debates about risks and benefits of sharing visit notes with patients through portals. Presurveys and postsurveys from 99 volunteer doctors at three US sites who participated in OpenNotes and postsurveys from 4592 patients who read at least one note and submitted a survey. Patients read notes to be better informed and because they were curious; about a third read them to check accuracy. In total, 7% (331) of patients reported contacting their doctor's office about their note. Of these, 29% perceived an error, and 85% were satisfied with its resolution. Nearly all patients reported feeling better (37%) or the same (62%) about their doctor. Patients who were older (>63), male, non-white, had fair/poor self-reported health or had less formal education were more likely to report feeling better about their doctor. Among doctors, 26% anticipated documentation errors, and 44% thought patients would disagree with notes. After a year, 53% believed patient satisfaction increased, and 51% thought patients trusted them more. None reported ordering more tests or referrals. Despite concerns about errors, offending language or defensive practice, transparent notes overall did not harm the patient-doctor relationship. Rather, doctors and patients perceived relational benefits. Traditionally more vulnerable populations-non-white, those with poorer self-reported health and those with fewer years of formal education-may be particularly likely to feel better about their doctor after reading their notes. Further informing debate about OpenNotes, the findings suggest transparent records may improve patient satisfaction, trust and safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  4. Skill set development of doctoral and post-doctoral graduates in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, R S

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral and post-doctoral training programs at leading research universities in the USA are highly important in generating the much needed knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics for keeping rural and urban economies strong and societies healthy and prosperous. In addition, innovative graduate and post doctoral research programs are the driving engines of the success of U.S. economy and have made the U.S. the most successful model of generating new knowledge in the broader areas of life sciences (and agricultural education, research, and extension). We need to do everything in our power to make these training programs innovative, collaborative, independent, and resourceful so that students are trained in different disciplines making them more flexible within a range of challenges and opportunities. The training programs must empower students to solve complex and interdisciplinary problems of the society in 21st century and make our students competitive within a global economic system, to improve the health of the nation's economy. If our land grant schools and institutions of higher learning are not preparing doctoral students to be globally competitive scientists to create new knowledge and technologies to solve complex and interdisciplinary problems of the 21st century, then either we need to redefine the mission of our land grant system or we risk losing our role to serve the public and industry effectively. Doctoral and post doctoral students should be given the needed skills and experiences to prepare them for tenure track faculty jobs at leading US Universities in the 21st century as well as prepare them for the world outside of academia. I would say minimum competency skills are needed as "bare survival skills" for all doctoral students to become successful after obtaining PhD degrees. Today's PhD students will be working in a global but highly competitive, rapidly changing, and complex world. It is no longer enough to be a good

  5. On the Way to Scholarship: From Master's to Doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleis, Afaf Ibrahim

    1992-01-01

    Progress in the discipline of nursing is predicated on the development of a community of scholars who have a passion for substance. Nurse educators are challenged to develop programs and environments that stimulate and nurture scholarship. Includes a discussion of strategies for development of scholarly doctoral education. (Author)

  6. Learning the Scholarship of Teaching in Doctorate-Granting Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy

    1997-01-01

    Asks faculty members whether doctoral candidates in journalism/mass communication received a fundamental education in the scholarship and practices of teaching and whether their institutions model a culture in which teaching is important. Finds little evidence that teachers in higher education will have mentored teaching experiences before facing…

  7. Doctoral Conceptual Thresholds in Cellular and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldon, David F.; Rates, Christopher; Sun, Chongning

    2017-01-01

    In the biological sciences, very little is known about the mechanisms by which doctoral students acquire the skills they need to become independent scientists. In the postsecondary biology education literature, identification of specific skills and effective methods for helping students to acquire them are limited to undergraduate education. To…

  8. Perceived Caring of Instructors among Online Doctoral Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Gwendolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of caring has been integral to the practice of nursing and nursing education since the early teachings of Florence Nightingale. Significant changes in both the practice and the need for educating increasing numbers of advanced-degree nurses have resulted in an increase in online doctoral-level nursing programs. This internet-based…

  9. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  10. Doctorate Program Trains Industrial Chemists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The University of Texas (Dallas) has initiated a new Ph.D. program specifically to train chemists for doctoral level work in industry (Doctor of Chemistry). Participants will complete three research practica (at an industrial site and in two laboratory settings) instead of the traditional dissertation, emphasizing breadth and flexibility in…

  11. From Skepticism to Scholarship: Learning and Living Self-Study Research in a Doctoral Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kristen H.; Diacopoulos, Mark M.; Branyon, Angela; Butler, Brandon M.

    2017-01-01

    Teacher education doctoral seminars can provide a space for students to collaborate, reflect and support each other as they transition from teacher to teacher educator. These spaces also provide a forum for the learning of new research methodologies. This collaborative self-study chronicles how one group of doctoral students learned self-study…

  12. Interventions for improving patients' trust in doctors and groups of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Alix; Cash-Gibson, Lucinda; Car, Josip; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2014-03-04

    Trust is a fundamental component of the patient-doctor relationship and is associated with increased satisfaction, adherence to treatment, and continuity of care. Our 2006 review found little evidence that interventions improve patients' trust in their doctor; therefore an updated search was required to find out if there is further evidence of the effects of interventions that may improve trust in doctors or groups of doctors. To update our earlier review assessing the effects of interventions intended to improve patients' trust in doctors or a group of doctors. In 2003 we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Health Star, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS, African Trials Register, African Health Anthology, Dissertation Abstracts International and the bibliographies of studies selected for inclusion. We also contacted researchers active in the field. We updated and re-ran the searches on available original databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library issue 2, 2013), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), CINAHL (Ebsco)) as well as Proquest Dissertations and Current Contents for the period 2003 to 18 March 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series of interventions (informative, educational, behavioural, organisational) directed at doctors or patients (or carers) where trust was assessed as a primary or secondary outcome. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. Where mentioned, we extracted data on adverse effects. We synthesised data narratively. We included 10 randomised controlled trials (including 7 new trials) involving 11,063 patients. These studies were all undertaken in North America, and all but two involved primary care.  As expected, there was considerable heterogeneity between

  13. Intolerance and Violence Against Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meharban

    2017-10-01

    Intolerance and grouse against doctors is a global phenomenon but India seems to lead the world in violence against doctors. According to World Health Organization, about 8-38% healthcare workers suffer physical violence at some point in their careers. Many more are verbally abused or threatened. Public is almost behaving like health sector terrorists. The spate of increasing attacks on doctors by damaging their property and causing physical injury is not acceptable by any civilized society. The public is becoming increasingly intolerant to a large number of social issues because of poor governance and vote bank politics. There is a need to arrest the development of further distrust between doctors and their patients/relatives, otherwise it will compromise all achievements of medical science and adversely affect healing capabilities of doctors. Rude and aggressive behavior of the patients or their family members, and arrogant and lackadaisical approach of the doctor, adversely affects the doctor-patient relationship and the outcome of the patient. The doctors, hospital administration and government must exercise "zero tolerance" with respect to acts of violence against healthcare professionals. It is possible to reduce the incidence of intolerance against doctors but difficult to eliminate it completely. The healthcare providers should demonstrate greater compassion and empathy with improved communication skills. The hospitals must have adequate infrastructure, facilities and staff to handle emergencies without delay and with due confidence and skills. The security of healthcare providers, especially in sensitive areas, should be improved by having adequate number of security guards, frisking facilities, extensive CCTV network and availability of "Quick response team" to handle unruly mob. In case of any grievances for alleged mismanagement, the public should handle the situation in a civilized manner and seek redressal through Medical Protection Act and legal

  14. Influences to post-graduation career aspirations and attainment in STEM doctoral candidates and recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Deborah S.

    As the realities of the academic job market have forced some PhD recipients to accept less-preferable position types, there has been increasing concerns that these students are not prepared for their careers, especially in STEM fields. However, aside from the labor market, few studies have explored the influences on career aspiration and attainment among doctoral degree holders. This study utilized the socialization theory framework to identify aspects of the doctoral education process that are predictive of the likelihood of certain career aspirations among science and engineering doctoral candidates and career attainment among STEM doctoral recipients by utilizing nationally representative datasets: The National Research Council's Assessment of Research Doctorate Programs student questionnaire and the National Science Foundation's Survey of Earned Doctorates. This study identified field of study, research productivity rank of doctoral programs, primary type of finding doctoral students received, level of satisfaction with research experiences, and their sense of belonging within their doctoral program as factors that predict the likelihood of certain career aspirations compared with a career in education. Doctoral candidates' background characteristics that were significant predictors of career aspirations were gender, marital status, dependent status, race, age, and citizenship status. Further, this study identified participant's field of study, the Carnegie Rank of institutions attended, primary type of funding received, length of time to PhD, gender, marital status, dependent status, race, citizenship stats, and age as factors that predict the likelihood of the career outcomes investigated in this study, including doctoral recipients' employment field and primary work activity.

  15. Effects of an integrated geriatric group balance class within an entry-level Doctorate of Physical Therapy program on students’ perceptions of geriatrics and geriatric education in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. Reneker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at determining the effect of an integrated group balance class for community-dwelling older adults within entry-level physical therapist coursework on student perceptions of geriatric physical therapy and geriatric physical therapy education. Twenty-nine Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT students, 21–33 years old, in their second year of coursework in 2012, participated in an integrated clinical experience with exposure to geriatric patients at an outpatient facility at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Akron, Ohio, USA. Student perceptions were collected before and after participation in the 8-week balance class. The Wilcoxon sign-ranked test was used to identify differences in perceptions after participation in the group balance class. Cohen’s d-values were calculated to measure the size of the pre-participation to post-participation effect for each measure. At the conclusion of the group class, the DPT students demonstrated an increase in positive perceptions of geriatric physical therapy in 8 measures, with small effect sizes (d=0.15–0.30. Two perceptions of geriatric physical therapy demonstrated a significant positive increase (P<0.05 with moderate effect sizes (d=0.47 and d=0.50. The students’ perceptions of geriatric education in the curriculum demonstrated a large positive effect for quality (d=1.68 and enjoyment (d=1.96. Positive changes were found in most of the perceptions of geriatrics and geriatric education after participation, suggesting that integrated clinical experiences with geriatric patients are an effective way to positively influence perceptions of physical therapist practice with older adults.

  16. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  17. [The importance of master's degree and doctorate degree in general surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo-Javé, Eduardo Esteban; Mendoza-Barrera, Germán Eduardo; Valderrama-Treviño, Alan Isaac; Alcántara-Medina, Stefany; Macías-Huerta, Nain Abraham; Tapia-Jurado, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The Doctor of Philosophy is the highest academic degree that can be obtained in universities. Graduate Education Program in Medicine in Mexico is divided into 2 major categories: Medical Specialty and Master studies/Doctor of Philosophy. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the importance of master's degrees and Doctor of Philosophy in general surgery. A literature search in PubMed and Medline among others, from 1970 to 2015 with subsequent analysis of the literature reviews found. The physicians who conducted doctoral studies stand out as leaders in research, teaching and academic activities. Dual training with a doctorate medical specialty is a significant predictor for active participation in research projects within the best educational institutions. It is important to study a PhD in the education of doctors specialising in surgery, who show more training in teaching, research and development of academic activities. Currently, although there is a little proportion of students who do not finish the doctoral program, the ones who do are expected to play an important role in the future of medical scientific staff. It has been shown that most doctors with Doctor of Philosophy have wide range of career options. The importance of doctoral studies in the formation of general surgery is due to various reasons; the main one being comprehensively training physician scientists who can develop in clinical, teaching and research. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Masculinity in the doctor's office: Masculinity, gendered doctor preference and doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, Mary S; Sanchez, Diana T

    2016-03-01

    Mortality and morbidity data suggest that men have shorter life expectancies than women and outrank women on several leading causes of death. These gendered disparities may be influenced by psychosocial factors like masculinity. Three studies (Total N=546) examined the role of masculinity in men's doctor choices and doctor-patient interactions. In Studies 1 and 2, men completed measures of masculinity, gender bias, and doctor preference. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the direct relationship between masculinity and male doctor preference and the indirect relationship of masculinity on male doctor preference through an association with gendered competence stereotypes. Participants in Study 3 disclosed symptoms in private followed by disclosure to a male or female interviewer in a clinical setting. Using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), we examined the interaction among symptom reporting, masculinity and doctor gender, controlling for participant comfort. In Study 1, results suggested that masculinity encouraged choice of a male doctor directly and indirectly via beliefs that men make more competent doctors than women; Study 2 directly replicated the results of Study 1. In Study 3, independent of participant comfort, an interaction between interviewer gender and masculinity emerged such that men scoring higher on masculinity reported symptoms less consistently to male interviewers (relative to higher scoring men reporting to female interviewers); the reverse was found for men scoring low on masculinity. Taken together these studies suggest that masculinity may affect men's health by encouraging choice of a male doctor with whom doctor-patient communication may be impaired. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Teaching and Assessing Doctor-Patient Communication Using Remote Standardized Patients and SKYPE: Feedback from Medical Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horber, Dot; Langenau, Erik E.; Kachur, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication has become a priority in medical education. This pilot study evaluated resident physicians' perceptions of teaching and assessing doctor-patient communication skills related to pain management using a web-based format. Fifty-nine resident physicians completed four doctor-patient clinical…

  20. Becoming a Doctoral Researcher in a Digital World: Reflections on the Role of Twitter for Reflexivity and the Internal Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainford, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Twitter and other social networking sites have much to offer doctoral students, especially given that models for doctoral education are increasingly becoming more diverse with more students studying part-time for traditional PhDs, or on programmes such as professional doctorates. Prior research has highlighted the benefits of Twitter but, as other…

  1. [Corruption risks in relations between doctor and patient ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolwitz, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the problem of corruption occurring in the relationship between doctor and patient. The doctor-patient relationship, including the provision of health services, is one of several potential areas of corruption in the health care system. Among the reasons for the existence of corruption in these relationships are the need to obtain better healthcare for the patient, and higher earnings in the case of a doctor. Indications of corruption are utilitarian (action for personal advantage without ethical aspects), but may also be (actually or in the patient's opinion) the only way to obtain services and save health and even life. Corruption between the doctor and the patient can be limited by better organization of the health care system, including the financing of benefits and education of medical personnel and patients, as well as traditional legal measures, such as prevention or the application of criminal sanctions.

  2. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research ... Who We Are What We Do Jobs at NIH Visitor Information Frequently Asked Questions Contact ...

  3. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Toolkits Grants & Funding Grants Home Page Funding Forms Library Due Dates How to Apply About Grants Policy & ... Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation ...

  4. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation ...

  5. [Occupational stress and job burnout in doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Mian-Zhen; Lan, Ya-Jia; Wu, Si-Ying

    2006-03-01

    To investigate the status of job burnout in doctors and its relationship with occupational stress. A total of 561 doctors from three provincial hospitals were randomly selected. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) was used to identify job burnout. The occupation stress inventory revised edition (OSI-R) was used to evaluate the level of occupational stress. Surgeon and doctors working in the internal medicine wards scored significantly higher in job burnout than their colleagues (P < 0.05). The 30-40 years of age group scored highest in exhaustion. The score of professional efficacy decreased with age and increased with educational levels. Role overload, responsibility, physical environment, reaction and self-care were major predictors for exhaustion. Role insufficiency, role overload and responsibility were major predictors for cynicism. Role insufficiency, social support and rational/cognitive were major predictors for professional efficacy. Maintaining moderate professional duty and responsibility, clearly defining job requirements, enriching leisure activities, and improving self-care ability are important measures to preventing job burnout.

  6. TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Hernández Esteve

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations María Soledad Campos Lucena: El control de las arcas municipales a través de la rendición de cuentas. La transformación del proceso del Antiguo al Nuevo régimen y la consolidación del modelo liberal: 1745-1914 The control of municipal coffers by means of account rendering. The change from Ancien Régime to the New Regime and the consolidation of liberalism: 1745-1914 Candelaria Castro Pérez: La institución parroquial a través de los registros contables del Señorío episcopal de la Villa de Agüimes. (1500-1860 The parochial institution seen through the account books of the Episcopal domain of the city of Aguimes (1500-1860 José Julián Hernández Borreguero: El Cabildo Catedral de Sevilla: organización y sistema contable. (1625-1650 Administrative and accounting organization of the Seville Cathedral. (1625-1650 Juan Lanero Fernández: El esplendor de la teneduría de libros: la partida doble en los tratados contables ingleses de la dinastia Tudor (1543-1588 Bookkeeping splendor: double-entry in the English accounting treatises at the time of the Tudor dynasty (1543-1588 María Llompart Bibiloni: Un análisis histórico-contable de la Procuración del Real Patrimonio en el Reino de Mallorca, período 1310-1330 An accounting historical análisis of the Royal Exchequer of the Kingdom of Mallorca (1310-1330

  7. Doctoral Students Becoming Researchers: An Innovative Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah S. Garson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Creating a quality literature review is fundamental to doctoral student professionalization, yet research into how the literature review is taught, learned, or experienced is limited.  Responding to this under-addressed but critical key to doctoral education, the focus of this mixed methods study is on students’ perceptions of a year-long course, co-taught by a faculty member and embedded librarian, devoted specifically to addressing the literature review.  Analysis of students’ course evaluations and written reflections/feedback over an eight year period revealed four primary themes: 1 Entering students’ technological know-how does not guarantee effective information literacy skill and without the requisite skills one-shot library workshops are insufficient for making learning whole;  2 Rather than conceiving of the literature review as a product, constructing a literature review represents a pivotal process in doctoral students’ research and literacy skill development; 3 Creating a literature review, and the process it entails, signals in students the development of their professional researcher identity, involving movement beyond “how to” to address questions of “why” and “for whom”; 4 The literature review course was experienced as a substantively different course than is typical in the doctoral experience, mirroring the course’s  foundational assumption that librarians, instructors, and learners share agency in creating the literature review process. The course curriculum is framed by two simultaneous learning streams: information literacy competencies and student research agenda. The course curriculum aligns information literacy competencies and research methodology with the goal of exploring and purposefully integrating creativity and curiosity in the search and research construction process.

  8. Penumbra: Doctoral support as drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gill; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    Much international doctoral learning research focuses on personal, institutional and learning support provided by supervisors, managed relationships,‘nudging’ robust, conceptual, critical, creative work. Other work focuses on stresses experienced in supervisor-student relationships and doctoral...... journeys. Some considers formal and informal learning communities supporting students on research journeys, and roles played by families, friends and others, sometimes o ering encouragement and sometimes added stress. However, little has been explored concerning often uno cial, largely unrecognised...... sanctioned (‘lightside’), and less well recognised often unsanctioned (‘darkside’) on doctoral research and writing learning journey, instigating questions about doctoral student needs, and the range of support provided, both legitimate, well known, less legitimate. This work concentrates on the ‘darkside’....

  9. The Gritty: Grit and Non-traditional Doctoral Student Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted M. Cross

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As higher education is changing to reach larger numbers of students via online modalities, the issue of student attrition and other measures of student success become increasingly important. While research has focused largely on undergraduate online students, less has been done in the area of online non-traditional doctoral student success, particularly from the student trait perspective. The concept of grit, passion and persistence for long-term goals, has been identified as an important element of the successful attainment of long-term goals. As doctoral education is a long-term goal the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of doctoral student grit scores on student success. Success was measured by examining current student GPA and other factors. Significant relationships were found between grit and current student GPA, grit and the average number of hours students spent on their program of study weekly, and grit and age. The results of this research maybe important for informing how doctoral education is structured and how students might be better prepared for doctoral work.

  10. Healthy Doctors – Sick Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are among the healthiest segments of the population in western countries. Nevertheless, they complain strongly of stress and burnout. Their own explanation is deprofessionalisation: The honourable art of doctoring has been replaced by standardised interventions and production lines; professional autonomy has withered. This view is shared by many medical sociologists who have identified a “golden age of medicine,” or “golden age of doctoring,” starting after World War II and declining around 1970. This article looks at some of the central sociological literature on deprofessionalisation, particularly in a perspective of countervailing powers. It also looks into another rise-and-fall model, proposed by the medical profession itself, where the fall in professional power was generated by the notion that there are no more white spots to explore on the map of medicine. Contemporary doctoring is a case of cognitive dissonance, where the traditional doctor role seems incompatible with modern health care.Keywords: deprofessionalisation, professional autonomy, cognitive dissonance, golden age of doctoring

  11. Talking to Your Doctor

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  12. Talking to Your Doctor

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  13. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Media Contacts Images and B-roll Events Social Media More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  14. The hundredth Gentner Doctoral Student has started at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2016-01-01

    Almost ten years after the start of the programme in 2007, the hundredth Gentner Doctoral Student started his PhD at CERN.   The hundredth Gentner Doctoral Student, Christian Zimmer, in front of the AEgIS detector in the AD hall, where he will spend a significant portion of the next 3 years. In 2007, the German Gentner Doctoral Student Programme was established at CERN, named in honour of the celebrated nuclear physicist Wolfgang Gentner, President of the CERN Council from 1972-74. On 1 July 2016, the 100th Gentner Doctoral Student, Christian Zimmer, started his PhD at CERN, where he will work on setting up the sympathetic laser cooling of antiprotons at the AEgIS experiment. CERN’s Doctoral Student Programme has been running for many years, with 200 students currently enrolled. The Gentner programme is fully integrated into the general CERN Doctoral Student Programme, but is entirely funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The programme sponsors 30 to 40...

  15. Creating pedagogical spaces for developing doctor professional identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandinin, D Jean; Cave, Marie-Therese

    2008-08-01

    Working with doctors to develop their identities as technically skilled as well as caring, compassionate and ethical practitioners is a challenge in medical education. One way of resolving this derives from a narrative reflective practice approach to working with residents. We examine the use of such an approach. This paper draws on a 2006 study carried out with four family medicine residents into the potential of writing, sharing and inquiring into parallel charts in order to help develop doctor identity. Each resident wrote 10 parallel charts over 10 weeks. All residents met bi-weekly as a group with two researchers to narratively inquire into the stories told in their charts. One parallel chart and the ensuing group inquiry about the chart are described. In the narrative reflective practice process, one resident tells of working with a patient and, through writing, sharing and inquiry, integrates her practice and how she learned to be a doctor in one cultural setting into another cultural setting; another resident affirms her relational way of practising medicine, and a third resident begins to see the complexity of attending to patients' experiences. The process shows the importance of creating pedagogical spaces to allow doctors to tell and retell, through narrative inquiry, their stories of their experiences. This pedagogical approach creates spaces for doctors to individually develop their own stories by which to live as doctors through narrative reflection on their interwoven personal, professional and cultural stories as they are shaped by, and enacted within, their professional contexts.

  16. Work of female rural doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Jo

    2004-04-01

    To identify the impact of family life on the ways women practice rural medicine and the changes needed to attract women to rural practice. Census of women rural doctors in Victoria in 2000, using a self-completed postal survey. General and specialist practice. Two hundred and seventy-one female general practitioners and 31 female specialists practising in Rural, Remote and Metropolitan Area Classifications 3-7. General practitioners are those doctors with a primary medical degree and without additional specialist qualifications. Interaction of hours and type of work with family responsibilities. Generalist and specialist women rural doctors carry the main responsibility for family care. This is reflected in the number of hours they work in clinical and non-clinical professional practice, availability for on-call and hospital work, and preference for the responsibilities of practice partnership or the flexibility of salaried positions. Most of the doctors had established a satisfactory balance between work and family responsibilities, although a substantial number were overworked in order to provide an income for their families or meet the needs of their communities. Thirty-six percent of female rural general practitioners and 56% of female rural specialists preferred to work fewer hours. Female general practitioners with responsibility for children were more than twice as likely as female general practitioners without children to be in a salaried position and less likely to be a practice partner. The changes needed to attract and retain women in rural practice include a place for everyone in the doctor's family, flexible practice structures, mentoring by women doctors and financial and personal recognition. Women make up less than a quarter of the rural general practice workforce and an even smaller percentage of the specialist rural medical workforce. As a result their experiences are not well articulated in research on rural medical practice and their needs are

  17. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGAD 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European EmergencyCall 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors will...

  18. Doctor-patient communication in Southeast Asia: a different culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D F; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-03-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative study based on principles of grounded theory. Twenty residents and specialists and 20 patients of a low or high educational level were interviewed in internal medicine outpatient clinics of an Indonesian teaching hospital and two affiliated hospitals. During 26 weeks we engaged in an iterative interview and coding process to identify emergent factors. Patients were generally dissatisfied with doctors' communication style. The doctors indicated that they did not deliberately use a one-way style. Communication style appeared to be associated with characteristics of Southeast Asian culture, the health care setting and medical education. Doctor-patient communication appeared to be affected by cultural characteristics which fell into two broad categories representing key features of Southeast Asian culture, "social distance" and "closeness of relationships", and to characteristics categorized as "specific clinical context". Consideration of these characteristics could be helpful in promoting the use of a partnership communication style.

  19. Doctoral production in South Africa: Statistics, challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The past few years have witnessed new interest in doctoral production in South Africa. In the first section of the article, it is argued that this new interest has its roots in various higher education policy documents over the past decade. The second part of the article presents some of the most recent statistics on various aspects ...

  20. What happens when the doctor denies a patient's request?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsen, Stein; Malterud, Kirsti

    2017-01-01

    doctor relationships were injured or came to an end. Conclusions: The price for denying a patient’s request may be high, and GPs find themselves uncomfortable in such encounters. Skills pertaining to this particular challenge could be improved though education and training, drawing attention to negotiation...

  1. Reframing European Doctoral Training for the New ERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeckaite, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the institutionalization of European higher education and training, as well as research and innovation, policy entered a new phase: a number of financial instruments were simplified and merged. The Erasmus Mundus programme, wherein consortia of European and overseas universities built joint master's or doctoral degrees, was split into two…

  2. First aid and basic life support of junior doctors: A prospective study in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Severien, I.; Metz, J.C.; Berden, H.J.J.M.; Biert, J.

    2006-01-01

    According to the Dutch medical education guidelines junior doctors are expected to be able to perform first aid and basic life support. A prospective study was undertaken to assess the level of first aid and basic life support (BLS) competence of junior doctors at the Radboud University Nijmegen

  3. Not Equal for All: Gender and Race Differences in Salary for Doctoral Degree Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Karen L.; Canché, Manuel González

    2015-01-01

    Despite a recent increase in women and racial/ethnic minorities in U.S. postsecondary education, doctoral recipients from these groups report lower salaries than male and majority peers. With a longitudinal sample of approximately 10,000 respondents from the "Survey of Doctorate Recipients," this study adds to the limited literature…

  4. Research Models Used in Doctoral Theses on Sport Management in Turkey: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Ahmet

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the methodological tendencies in the doctorate theses which were prepared in the field of Sports Management in Turkish between 2007 and 2016 and which were open to access in the database of the Council of Higher Education (CHE) National Theses Center. In this context, 111 doctorate theses prepared in the last…

  5. Undergraduate Origins of Recent (1991-95) Science and Engineering Doctorate Recipients. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Baccalaureate institutions are an essential part of the educational process for persons earning science and engineering doctorates. This report summarizes data on the baccalaureate institutions reported by persons completing doctorates from 1991 through 1995. It provides an institutional context for examining this aspect of the educational…

  6. Is There a Need for a European Doctorate in Health Promotion and Public Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugglberger, Lisa; Hall, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This paper summarises the context and rationale behind developing a European doctorate in health promotion and public health and its relevance to the international context. Since no Pan-European doctorate exists to date, a network of universities and higher education institutions across Europe has been working towards the establishment…

  7. Doctor-Patient Communication in a Southeast Asian Setting: The Conflict between Ideal and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Utarini, Adi; Soebono, Hardyanto; Van Dalen, Jan; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2011-01-01

    Doctor-patient communication has been extensively studied in non-Western contexts and in relation to patients' cultural and education backgrounds. This study explores the perceived ideal communication style for doctor-patient consultations and the reality of actual practice in a Southeast Asian context. We conducted the study in a teaching…

  8. Asthma management in five European countries : doctors' knowledge, attitudes and prescribing behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerlov, P; Veninga, CCM; Muskova, M; Hummers-Pradier, E; Lundborg, CS; Andrew, M; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM; DEP-group, [No Value

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between guideline recommendations on asthma management, and the performance of doctors in five different European health care contexts, Knowledge, attitudes and prescribing behaviour of doctors recruited to an educational project was investigated.

  9. Design-based research and doctoral students: Guidelines for preparing a dissertation proposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrington, Jan; Montgomerie, C.; McKenney, Susan; Seale, J.; Reeves, Thomas C.; Oliver, Ron

    2007-01-01

    At first glance, design-based research may appear to be such a long-term and intensive approach to educational inquiry that doctoral students, most of whom expect to complete their Ph.D. degree in 4-5 years, should not attempt to adopt this approach for their doctoral dissertations. In this paper,

  10. Closing the Loop: The Pay-Off on Your State's Investment. Doctoral Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Ansley

    2014-01-01

    States are investing in their futures through the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Doctoral Scholars Program, which helps minority Ph.D. students become faculty members. The return on investment? Candidates complete their doctorates faster and serve as role models for the increasingly diverse college students they teach as faculty members.…

  11. Married Thai Working Mothers: Coping with Initial Part-Time Doctoral Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinnam, Thanit

    2011-01-01

    Advanced educational attainment can "grow" a career. But acquiring a doctoral qualification adds study to existing work and family responsibilities, especially for women. This phenomenological research explores the experiences of eight Thai working mothers enrolled in the initial stage of part-time doctoral programs in Thailand. A…

  12. The possibility of establishing a doctoral programme in archive studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Chorążyczewski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Doctor studies have been included into formalised education system as a third cycle studies. In the light of ministerial regulations, the archive studies doctoral program ought to encompass classes on archives, methodology of sciences, didactics of higher education studies, the social role of an academic, conducting student internship. Does this mean, that a doctoral seminar in archive studies is excessive? On the contrary, the seminar seems to be the best place to bequeath knowledge and skills on methodology and the proper attitude of a scholar, in awareness of his or her role in the society.By these standards, the seminar should be understood not solely as a place to forge doctoral theses, but also as a site on which to conduct discussion with one's academic authorities and advisors and guest experts; it also should be the key class, taking up the most of the timetable. The validity of preparing an archivist for the role of a university teacher has been questioned.Both the profile of the doctor courses and observation of their effectiveness has led us to believe informal seminar to be the better way of doctoral education for archive students. Perhaps though, the kind of steps, that must be taken if doctor course on archive studies was to be created, is worth considering. Is there a chance, and, is it worth striving for the archive studies to be an independent department? It would not only mean opening doctor programmes, but also the right confer a PhD degree in Humanities, on the subject of archive studies, and not history, as it has hitherto been done. The archive studies have definite research subject, range and methodology. What is noticeable is a kind of archival sensitivity, that allows for all the users and all the purposes for using the resources to be on equal rights. Archive studies have matured, and it is ready to become an independent academic discipline. Thereby, it can be expected, that at last, it's maturity will be put to good

  13. Mrs Hitler and her doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Sandy

    2005-12-01

    The doctor who attended the mother of Adolf Hitler in her terminal illness has been blamed as a cause of the Holocaust. The medical details recorded of this professional relationship are presented and discussed. Dr Bloch's medical care of Mrs Hitler was consistent with the prevailing medical practice of the management of fungating breast carcinoma. Indeed, the general practitioner's care and attention of the family appear to have been astute and supportive. There is nothing to suggest that Dr Bloch's medical care was other than competent. Doctors who have the (mis)fortune to professionally attend major figures of history may be unfairly viewed, despite their appropriate and adequate care.

  14. Prescription habits of dispensing and non-dispensing doctors in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trap, Birna; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Hogerzeil, Hans V

    2002-01-01

    , race, place of education, location of practice and patients seen per day showed that dispensing by doctors was associated with less clinically and economically appropriate prescribing. These findings suggest that the quality of health care--as related to drug use, patient safety and treatment cost......The number of dispensing doctors has increased in the last decade, but the implication of this trend on the quality of health care and drug use is unknown. We present a comparative drug utilization study of 29 dispensing doctors and 28 non-dispensing doctors in Zimbabwe based on standard indicators...... developed by the World Health Organization. Dispensing doctors prescribed significantly more drugs per patient than non-dispensing doctors (2.3 versus 1.7), injected more patients (28.4% versus 9.5%), and prescribed more antibiotics (0.72 versus 0.54) and mixtures (0.43 versus 0.25) per encounter...

  15. The Multiple Roles of Women Pursuing Doctoral Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Malone, Laurell Coleman M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Increases in the employment of women in administrative and managerial careers have drawn attention to a need for research that examines the interdependency of work and family roles, a need that is particularly crucial in the area of academic administration. This was a qualitative study of the strategies and support systems women educational administrators use to deal with the multiple roles they perform in life and work while pursuing doctoral studies. Forty-four women educational admini...

  16. An Exploration of Darkness within Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2016-01-01

    craftsmanship, and research design by observing how their supervisors talk, act, and handle issues in the professional community. However, the formal-informal divide is not adequate if we want to understand the sprawling, mongrel, and diverse forms of student engagement, coping, and learning strategies within...

  17. [Gender patterns in Spanish otolaryngologic doctoral theses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prim-Espada, María Pilar; De Diego-Sastre, Juan Ignacio; Pérez-Fernández, Elia

    2010-01-01

    In last decades women in Spain have a greater access to postgraduate education. The objective of this study was to perform a gender analysis on the Otolaryngology doctoral theses presented in a 25 year-period. The TESEO data base on doctoral theses was searched for theses on Otorhinolaryngology written between 1981 and 2005. As strategy for the research we employed the terms: 1) Otorrinolaringología (Otorhinolaryngology); 2) Cirugía de garganta, nariz y oídos (Ear, nose and throat surgery); 3) Fisiología de la audición (Physiology of hearing); 4) Fisiología del equilibrio (Physiology of balance); 5) Física de la audición (Physics of hearing); and 6) Bioacústica (Bioacoustics). A total of 450 theses (18.0±8.3 theses/year) were found, of which 129 were written by females (28.6%). There was a gender imbalance among authors, with 5.2±3.4 theses/year for women vs. 12.9±6.6 theses/year for men (p=0.0002). Nevertheless, there was a tendency toward equality in the last 10 years (p=0.001). On the other hand, the PhD student's gender was clearly related to the supervisor's gender (p=0.0001). With respect to the main topics in our area (otology, audiology/vestibular diseases, rhinology and pathology of paranasal sinuses and neck diseases), there were no significant differences between males and females (p=0.231). These results indicate a tendency towards equality in the number of men and women successfully completing doctoral studies in Otolaryngology. However, the PhD student's gender is clearly related to the supervisor's gender. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. While Collaboration Is Increasing in the Profession the LIS Dissertation Remains a Solo-Authored Monograph. A Review of: Sugimoto, C. R. (2011. Collaboration in information and library science doctoral education. Library & Information Science Research, 33, 3-11. doi:10.1016/j.lisr.2010.05.003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K. Wakimoto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate collaboration in LIS doctoral education, in particular the extent and perception of collaboration between advisors and advisees, and the dissertation as a collaborative product. Design – Quantitative and qualitative analysis of questionnaire data. Qualitative analysis of interviews. Bibliometric analysis of curricula vitae (CVs and dissertation citations.Setting – American Library Association (ALA-accredited, doctorate-granting schools in the United States and Canada. Subjects – A total of 374 full-time, tenured faculty members with the rank of associate or full professor (advisor group and 294 assistant professors (advisee group comprised the pool of faculty members (n=668 who were sent the questionnaire. Of these, 30 individuals participated in follow-up telephone interviews, which were equally split between the two groups. There were 97 faculty members from the original pool of 668 faculty members were included in the bibliometric analyses. Methods – The author developed two questionnaires, one for the advisors (associate and full professors and one for the advisees (assistant professors, and sent the surveys to faculty members at ALA-accredited schools in the United States and Canada. The questionnaires gathered information about the extent of collaboration and perceptions of collaboration in LIS doctoral education. The author also collected contact information from those interested in participating in a follow-up interview. The author selected the first 30 individuals who responded as the interview participants. The interview participants were split equally between advisors and advisees. A separate subpopulation of 97 faculty members was chosen for the bibliometric analysis phase of the study. These faculty members were chosen with the following criteria: graduation from an ALA-accredited school; full-text of dissertation available online; and a current, full CV available online. CVs were searched to

  19. Are doctors risk takers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikkel D

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dvora Pikkel,1 Yael Sara Pikkel Igal,2 Adi Sharabi-Nov,3,4 Joseph Pikkel2,51Risk Management and Patient Safety Unit, Assuta Medical Center, Ramat Hahayal, Tel Aviv, 2Faculty of Medicine, Bar-Ilan University, 3Research Wing, Ziv Medical Center, Safed, 4Tel-Hai Academic College, Upper Galilee, 5Department of Ophthalmology, Ziv Medical Center, Safed, Israel Objective: Risk taking affects human behavior in general and decisions in medicine in particular. We used game theory to assess physicians' risk-taking tendencies. Methods: Physicians were recruited to the study by advertisement. It was explained that they would receive a sum of money for correct prediction of the flipping of a coin. They could try to sell their opportunity to flip the coin for an amount of money they determined. The sum offered by the participants was considered an indicator of risk taking. A demographic questionnaire assessed age, sex, seniority, and area of specialization of the participants. A multivariate analysis assessed associations between risk-taking behavior and, seniority, and specialization. Results: Sixty-two physicians participated, 36 males and 26 females, seniority 1–34 years. Of a possible range of 0–10, the mean score for risk taking was 5.5 – just slightly more than indifference. Negative correlations were found between risk taking and seniority, and between risk taking and age (β=–0.45, P<0.001 for both. Surgeons and anesthesiologists showed greater risk taking than did other physicians (β=0.69, P<0.05; and females less than males, though the latter correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Understanding the tendency of physicians to risk taking may elucidate their decision-making processes and contribute to understanding of causes of adverse events and to the education of physicians. Keywords: risk taking, game theory, seniority, surgeons, anesthesiologists

  20. Perspectives of Nurses Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Georgia: Implications for Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Rebecca McCombs; Eichelberger, Lisa Wright

    2017-08-01

    Increasing the number of nurses with doctorates is a goal of the nursing profession. The Georgia Nursing Leadership Coalition developed a survey to understand the perspectives of nurses pursuing doctoral degrees in Georgia to improve recruitment and retention strategies. A 26-item online survey was distributed to all students enrolled in Georgia-based doctoral programs in nursing in spring 2014. One hundred fifty responses were received (54% response rate). Most students first seriously considered doctoral education during their master's programs or more than 5 years into practice. For most, obtaining a doctoral degree was a personal life goal. Work-life balance was the most significant barrier. Recruitment of nurses to doctoral programs should focus on messaging, timing, and highlighting the unique aspects of programs. Schools should work to reduce barriers. Understanding students' perspectives of doctoral education in nursing can improve recruitment strategies and increase the number of nurses graduating with doctorates in Georgia. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(8):466-470.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Doctor-patient dialogue--basic aspect of medical consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murariu-Brujbu, Isabella Cristina; Macovei, Luana Andreea

    2013-01-01

    Family medicine is the specialty that provides ongoing primary medical care and improves the health status of the individual, of the family and of the community through preventive, educational, therapeutic and rehabilitation measures. The family doctor often makes the interdisciplinary synthesis, in a flexible manner, either alone or in most cases with interdisciplinary consultation. In the latter case, the family doctor initiates the team work and makes the final evaluation by using the longitudinal follow-up of the disease. The doctor-patient encounter represents the "confrontation" with the greatest moral weight, due to the complexity of the values involved, the status of the doctor in a society, and patient's involvement in decision making. The patient is a person who should be treated with respect, honesty, professionalism and loyalty, whatever the clinical status, severity of illness, mental competence or incompetence. A focus, on an international scale, is represented by the characteristics of a good doctor, family physician included, as the latter is the first link in the network of health services. Each model of consultation varies in a more or less subtle way in priorities assignment, and suggests slight differences regarding the role played by doctor and patient in their collaboration. The qualities of a good family physician include not only the strictly professional competences, that also apply to other medical specialties, but also duties, such as, clearly explaining to patients issues concerning their health, informing them about all the possible preventive measures of diseases, making a diagnosis, initiating and supervising a therapy. Medical responsibility lies at the crossroads between medical science and the conscience of the doctor.

  2. Diabetes and oral health: doctors' knowledge, perception and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Habashneh, Rola; Barghout, Nicola; Humbert, Lewis; Khader, Yousef; Alwaeli, Hayder

    2010-10-01

    To assess Jordanian doctors' knowledge of the connection between diabetes and oral health and assess their willingness to advise their diabetic patients to seek dental treatment and determine the associated factors. Data were collected from 164 doctors practising in Jordan using a structured questionnaire. Chi-squared test and regression analyses were conducted to reveal factors influencing the awareness, perception and knowledge of health care professionals regarding diabetes and oral health. Of the respondents, 70% had heard of the link between diabetes and oral health. The majority agreed that diabetes increased the tendency to have periodontitis but only half advised their diabetic patients to consult a dentist concerning their oral health. Only a third of doctors agreed that oral health was an issue in controlling diabetes. Books, magazines and pamphlets were the main source of information with the rate of 58%, medical journals and medical curriculum were the second and third sources, respectively. General medical practitioners were less informed than specialized doctors about the relationship between oral health and diabetes. Factors that significantly predicted doctors would advise dental visits were: (1) being a specialist (P = 0.037); (2) having positive knowledge about the association between diabetes and oral health (P = 0.02, P = 0.007 and P = 0.004, respectively). There is limited knowledge of the relationships between oral health and diabetes. The more knowledgeable doctors are, the more likely they are to make dental referrals. Screening and referral by health professionals may benefit diabetic patients by improving access to dental care. Therefore, there is a need to educate doctors about oral health and diabetes. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Struggling doctors in specialist training: a case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte; Norberg, Karen; Thomsen, Maria

    ), or transferred (i.e. had unplanned changes in place of training/ward due to failure to thrive or due to inadequate development of competences), or dropped out (i.e. were dismissed from, had resigned from, or changed their speciality). Controls were a random sample of doctors in the source population, who were......Abstract summary The aim of this cummulative incidence case-control study was to examine: if struggling trainees in medical specialist training (cases) tended to struggle already in medical school or not compared to non-struggling controls, and which performance indicators during medical school...... seemed to predict struggling in postgraduate education if any. The study design is rooted in epidemiological methodology. Struggling doctors in specialist training: a case-control study. It has been reported in the international literature, that around 3-10% of doctors in post-garduate specialist...

  4. [Teaching doctor-patient communication - a proposal in practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Irene P; Ribeiro-Silva, Raquel; Pais, Vanessa G; Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida; Castro-Vale, Ivone; Teles, Ana; Almeida, Susana S; Mota-Cardoso, Rui

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, doctor-patient communication was considered a matter of and , and a topic for informal learning. Recently, studies have shown the importance of communication skills in medical practice. Doctor-patient communication skills, such as knowing how to listen, how to observe, and how to inform are today considered important components of Medical Education, although they are often difficult to integrate in Medical Curricula. In the current work, the authors describe the program of Communication in the Doctor-Patient Relationship, initiated in 2001 in the Medical School of the University of Porto, part of its undergraduate program. Future studies will allow us to assess the effectiveness of the learning and application of these skills in clinical practice.

  5. The Doctoral Degree in Dental Hygiene: Creating New Oral Healthcare Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Rogo, Ellen J; Spolarich, Ann Eshenaur

    2016-06-01

    Doctoral dental hygiene education would prepare scholars and leaders to improve population health through changes in oral health policy and delivery. Discussions about doctoral education in dental hygiene have centered on the need to create a cadre of dental hygiene researchers and scholars who will expand the body of knowledge for the profession. It has been proposed that scholars are needed to lead the development of theory and disseminate knowledge unique to the discipline of dental hygiene. Transformation to doctoral education is not a new trend as many other health care disciplines have already implemented curricular models, establishing the doctoral degree for entry level into practice. The Institute of Medicine has called for the exploration of new models for care delivery. Dental hygienists need to be prepared with leadership skills enabling them to participate and lead interprofessional teams and develop policies designed to improve the delivery of oral health care services to enhance population health. Current educational models do not adequately prepare dental hygienists to serve in this capacity. The purpose of this article is to present 2 models of doctoral education for dental hygiene that will illustrate how dental hygienists can be better prepared as scholars and leaders for the profession. These proposed models of doctoral education in dental hygiene present a paradigm shift in dental hygiene education. As with other disciplines that have evolved, both academically and professionally, dental hygiene will be positioned to achieve the hallmark of professional status with this terminal degree. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Doctoral Programs Need Changes to Attract and Retain Underrepresented Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, R. E.; Mayfield, K. K.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscience is currently recognized as the least diverse of all STEM fields. While attention typically focuses on K-12 and undergraduate populations, the extreme lack of diversity among graduate students, and doctoral students in particular, should be examined and addressed. In 2016, members of underrepresented minority (URM) groups made up only 6% of those graduating with geoscience PhDs. In all STEM fields, only 48% of Hispanic/Latino and 38% of Black/African American doctoral studies had earned doctorates within 7 years, with 36% of members of these groups leaving the program entirely. Recent studies suggest that these high attrition rates can be attributed, in part, to a mismatch between motivations of URM members and PhD-granting institutions while students are pursuing scientific education and careers. Traditional STEM doctoral programs do not offer, facilitate, or incentivize substantial opportunities to integrate social justice issues, community involvement, and altruism—factors which have been found to be of more importance to these populations than to male members of well-represented groups. URM members are also less likely to be interested in purely academic research careers, so doctoral programs may be failing to attract (and failing to prepare) diverse populations by not offering experiences beyond typical research and TA duties. In this presentation, trends in motivation and persistence among URM students in STEM will be discussed, in addition to highlighting education and outreach activities that can be successfully incorporated for a more fulfilling, balanced, attractive, and preparatory education experience. Specific activities undertaken and recommended by the presenter in her PhD experience include the following: a federal research internship, a state government policy internship, a formal partnership with a local K-12 teacher though a former NSF GK-12 program, a two-week education workshop aboard a scientific research drillship, and attending a

  7. The Project of the Telemedicine System for a Family Doctors' Practices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puchala, E

    2001-01-01

    ...). The project offers the potential to improve: access to high-quality primary health care, education of family doctors and patients, This is a project which is realised in collaboration of two scientific partners...

  8. Intercultural doctor-patient communication in daily outpatient care: relevant communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paternotte, E.; Scheele, F.; Seeleman, C.M.; Bank, L.; Scherpbier, A.J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intercultural communication (ICC) between doctors and patients is often associated with misunderstandings and dissatisfaction. To develop ICC-specific medical education, it is important to find out which ICC skills medical specialists currently apply in daily clinical consultations.

  9. Personal values of male and female doctors: gender aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neittaanmäki, L; Gross, E B; Virjo, I; Hyppölä, H; Kumpusalo, E

    1999-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the personal values of physicians. It was part of the Physician 93 Study, the purpose of which was to shed light on the life situation, career and future plans of young doctors and their views on medical education. The survey population included all the medical doctors registered during the years 1982-1991 in Finland (N = 4671). In the spring of 1993 a postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 2341 doctors. After two reminder letters, 1818 questionnaires (78%) were returned. 59% of the respondents were women. Subjects were asked to rate on a 4-point scale each of a set of 17 potentially important values listed in the questionnaire, five of which were seen by the majority of physicians as very important. These values were: family life, health, close friends, success in work or in studies and children's success. The potentially important values were conceptualized as indicative of eight important dimensions of the values of physicians: close friends, health. self actualization, success, universal values, well-being, family and ideology. Women doctors rated close friends, health, success, universalism and ideology as more important than men doctors.

  10. The social gradient in doctor-patient communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verlinde Evelyn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective In recent years, the importance of social differences in the physician-patient relationship has frequently been the subject of research. A 2002 review synthesised the evidence on this topic. Considering the increasing importance of social inequalities in health care, an actualization of this review seemed appropriate. Methods A systematic search of literature published between 1965 and 2011 on the social gradient in doctor-patient communication. In this review social class was determined by patient's income, education or occupation. Results Twenty original research papers and meta-analyses were included. Social differences in doctor-patient communication were described according to the following classification: verbal behaviour including instrumental and affective behaviour, non-verbal behaviour and patient-centred behaviour. Conclusion This review indicates that the literature on the social gradient in doctor-patient communication that was published in the last decade, addresses new issues and themes. Firstly, most of the found studies emphasize the importance of the reciprocity of communication. Secondly, there seems to be a growing interest in patient's perception of doctor-patient communication. Practice implications By increasing the doctors' awareness of the communicative differences and by empowering patients to express concerns and preferences, a more effective communication could be established.

  11. Learning through inter- and intradisciplinary problem solving: using cognitive apprenticeship to analyse doctor-to-doctor consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Pachler, Norbert; Nierle, Julia; Genewein, Urs

    2012-12-01

    Today's healthcare can be characterised by the increasing importance of specialisation that requires cooperation across disciplines and specialities. In view of the number of educational programmes for interdisciplinary cooperation, surprisingly little is known on how learning arises from interdisciplinary work. In order to analyse the learning and teaching practices of interdisciplinary cooperation, a multiple case study research focused on how consults, i.e., doctor-to-doctor consultations between medical doctors from different disciplines were carried out: semi-structured interviews with doctors of all levels of seniority from two hospital sites in Switzerland were conducted. Starting with a priori constructs based on the 'methods' underpinning cognitive apprenticeship (CA), the transcribed interviews were analysed according to the principles of qualitative content analysis. The research contributes to three debates: (1) socio-cognitive and situated learning, (2) intra- and interdisciplinary learning in clinical settings, and (3), more generally, to cooperation and problem solving. Patient cases, which necessitate the cooperation of doctors in consults across boundaries of clinical specialisms, trigger intra- as well as interdisciplinary learning and offer numerous and varied opportunities for learning by requesting doctors as well as for on-call doctors, in particular those in residence. The relevance of consults for learning can also be verified from the perspective of CA which is commonly used by experts, albeit in varying forms, degrees of frequency and quality, and valued by learners. Through data analysis a model for collaborative problem-solving and help-seeking was developed which shows the interplay of pedagogical 'methods' of CA in informal clinical learning contexts.

  12. Newborn jaundice - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaundice - what to ask your doctor; What to ask your doctor about newborn jaundice ... What causes jaundice in a newborn child? How common is newborn jaundice? Will the jaundice harm my child? What are the ...

  13. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - child; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - child ... should I discuss with my child's teachers about epilepsy? Will my child need to take medicines during ...

  14. Doctoral Program Selection Using Pairwise Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadisina, Suresh K.; Bhasin, Vijay

    1989-01-01

    The application of a pairwise comparison methodology (Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process) to the doctoral program selection process is illustrated. A hierarchy for structuring and facilitating the doctoral program selection decision is described. (Author/MLW)

  15. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  16. Angina - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about angina and heart disease; Coronary artery disease - what to ask your doctor ... the signs and symptoms that I am having angina? Will I always have the same symptoms? What ...

  17. The Plight of the Woman Doctoral Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Engin Inel; Holmstrom, Robert W.

    1974-01-01

    This study investigated factors underlying discrimination against woman doctoral students. Analyses revealed that faculty attitudes and behavior toward woman doctoral students contributed significantly to their emotional stresses and self-doubts. (Author/NE)

  18. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... What type of symptoms or problems will my child have? Will my child have problems thinking or ...

  19. Proceedings of Arcom Doctoral Workshop Research Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Lloyd

    2018-01-01

    Editorial Editorial Welcome to this special doctoral workshop on Research Methodology which forms part of what is now a well-established support mechanism for researchers in the discipline of the Built Environment and more particularly construction management. The ARCOM doctoral series, around now for some seventeen years, has addressed many of the diverse research areas that PhD researchers in the discipline have chosen to focus on in their doctoral journey. This doctoral workshop has as ...

  20. Children and their parents assessing the doctor-patient interaction: a rating system for doctors' communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Jim; Eiser, Christine; Davies, Helena A

    2005-08-01

    Only a patient and his or her family can judge many of the most important aspects of the doctor-patient interaction. This study evaluates the feasibility and reliability of children and their families assessing the quality of paediatricians' interactions using a rating instrument developed specifically for this purpose. A reliability analysis using generalisability theory on the ratings from 352 doctor-patient interactions across different speciality clinics. Ratings were normally distributed. They were highest for 'overall' performance, and lowest for giving time to discuss the families' agenda. An appropriate sample of adults' ratings provided a reliable score (G = 0.7 with 15 raters), but children's ratings were too idiosyncratic to be reproducible (G = 0.36 with 15 raters). CONCLUSIONS AND FURTHER WORK: Accompanying adults can provide reliable ratings of doctors' interactions with children. Because an adult is usually present at the consultation their ratings provide a highly feasible and authentic approach. Sampling doctors' interactions from different clinics and with patients of both genders provides a universal picture of performance. The method is ideal to measure performance for in-training assessment or revalidation. Further work is in progress to evaluate the educational impact of feeding ratings back to the doctors being assessed, and their use in a range of clinical contexts.

  1. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... Alzheimer's Association. Dementia Care Practice Recommendations ... in a Home Setting. Updated 2009. Alz.org. www.alz.org/national/ ...

  2. The Trouble with Doctoral Aspiration Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James

    2018-01-01

    This article attends to the affective-political dimensions of doctoral aspiration. It considers why doctoral students continue to hope for an 'academic good life' in spite of the depressed and precarious features of the academic present. The article emerges from 2013 research with ten doctoral students in the Arts and Social Sciences, at a…

  3. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Migraine - what to ask your doctor; Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster headache - what to ask your doctor ... How can I tell if the headache I am having is dangerous? What are ... headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? What medical ...

  4. Patient opinion of the doctor-patient relationship in a public hospital in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alan S; Verjee, Mohamud A; Musson, David; Iqbal, Navid A; Mosleh, Tayseer M; Zainel, Abdulwahed A; Al-Salamy, Yassir

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the factors associated with the level of satisfaction of outpatients in their relationship with their doctor at the largest public hospital in Qatar. This study was a cross-sectional survey of attitudes. Researchers surveyed 626 outpatients at Hamad General Hospital in Doha, Qatar from September 2009 to January 2010 using a novel questionnaire assessing satisfaction with patients' interaction(s) with their doctor (spent time with patient, took case seriously, maintained confidentiality, and the overall quality of visit). Mean responses on 4 Likert scale items (one to 5) were as follows: "spent enough time with patient" = 4.39; "doctor took case seriously" = 4.57; "satisfaction with doctor-patient confidentiality" = 4.71; "overall quality of visit" = 4.46. Age, gender, citizenship, level of education, and number of visits did not significantly impact the level of satisfaction. For 73.1% of patients, the physician's qualification was the most important factor in choosing a doctor. Of those surveyed, 40.7% of men and 28.1% of women preferred to see a doctor of their own gender. A positive correlation between perceived communication and satisfaction with the doctor-patient encounter was established. This study found that patients in the Out-Patient Department at Hamad Hospital were highly satisfied with their relationships with their doctors, and physician qualification was the most significant factor in choosing a doctor. A significant number of males and females preferred a physician of their own gender. Communication difficulty correlated with lower satisfaction.

  5. A study of Computing doctorates in South Africa from 1978 to 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D Sanders

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the output of South African universities in terms of computing-related doctorates in order to determine trends in numbers of doctorates awarded and to identify strong doctoral study research areas. Data collected from a variety of sources relating to Computing doctorates conferred since the late 1970s was used to compare the situation in Computing with that of all doctorates. The number of Computing doctorates awarded has increased considerably over the period of study. Nearly three times as many doctorates were awarded in the period 2010–2014 as in 2000–2004. The universities producing the most Computing doctorates were either previously “traditional” universities or comprehensive universities formed by amalgamating a traditional research university with a technikon. Universities of technology have not yet produced many doctorates as they do not have a strong research tradition. The analysis of topic keywords using ACM Computing classifications is preliminary but shows that professional issues are dominant in Information Systems, models are often built in Computer Science and several topics, including computing in education, are evident in both IS and CS. The relevant data is in the public domain but access is difficult as record keeping was generally inconsistent and incomplete. In addition, electronic databases at universities are not easily searchable and access to HEMIS data is limited. The database built for this paper is more inclusive in terms of discipline-related data than others.

  6. The effect of the doctor's sex on the doctor-patient relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Judith

    1982-01-01

    The differences between male and female doctors are investigated, and what patients expect from their doctors is examined. Some conclusions are drawn from the preferences which patients express for male and female doctors and from the different outcomes of male and female doctor-patient interactions.

  7. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  8. The entry-level occupational therapy clinical doctorate: advantages, challenges, and international issues to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Mu, Keli; Wells, Joe

    2015-04-01

    Internationally, occupational therapy education has gone through several paradigm shifts during the last few decades, moving from certificate to diploma to bachelors to masters and now in some instances to clinical doctorate as the entry-level professional credential to practice. In the United States there is a recommendation under consideration by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) that by 2025, all occupational therapy university programs will move to the clinical doctorate level. It should be noted, however, that the AOTA Board can only make recommendations and it is the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) who has regulatory authority to approve such a change. What are the potential implications for the profession, our clients, and funders of occupational therapy services? What are the primary drivers for the move towards the clinical doctorate being the educational entry point? Is the next step in the evolution of occupational therapy education globally a shift to the entry-level clinical doctorate? This article reviews current literature and discusses issues about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate. The published evidence available about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate is summarized and the perceived or frequently cited pros and cons of moving to the clinical doctorate as the singular entry point to occupational therapy practice are considered. The potential impacts of the introduction of the clinical doctorate as the entry-to-practice qualification across the United States on the occupational therapy community internationally will be briefly discussed. If the United States moves toward the entry-level clinical doctorate as the only educational starting point for the profession, will other jurisdictions follow suit? Further discourse and investigation of this issue both inside and outside of the United States is needed so that informed decisions can be made.

  9. For People with Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor For People With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor Isabel ... a doctor with expertise in osteoporosis. For many people, finding a doctor who is knowledgeable about osteoporosis ...

  10. Student assistantships: bridging the gap between student and doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crossley JGM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available James GM Crossley,1,2 Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt1 1University of Sheffield School of Medicine, Sheffield, 2Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Chesterfield, UK Abstract: In 2009, the General Medical Council UK (GMC published its updated guidance on medical education for the UK medical schools – Tomorrow's Doctors 2009. The Council recommended that the UK medical schools introduce, for the first time, a clinical placement in which a senior medical student, “assisting a junior doctor and under supervision, undertakes most of the duties of an F1 doctor”. In the UK, an F1 doctor is a postgraduation year 1 (PGY1 doctor. This new kind of placement was called a student assistantship. The recommendation was considered necessary because conventional UK clinical placements rarely provided medical students with opportunities to take responsibility for patients – even under supervision. This is in spite of good evidence that higher levels of learning, and the acquisition of essential clinical and nontechnical skills, depend on students participating in health care delivery and gradually assuming responsibility under supervision. This review discusses the gap between student and doctor, and the impact of the student assistantship policy. Early evaluation indicates substantial variation in the clarity of purpose, setting, length, and scope of existing assistantships. In particular, few models are explicit on the most critical issue: exactly how the student participates in care and how supervision is deployed to optimize learning and patient safety. Surveys indicate that these issues are central to students' perceptions of the assistantship. They know when they have experienced real responsibility and when they have not. This lack of clarity and variation has limited the impact of student assistantships. We also consider other important approaches to bridging the gap between student and doctor. These include supporting the

  11. Attitude of nigerian resident doctors towards clinical autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanem, V J; Gerry, I E

    2007-03-01

    It is to the disadvantage of the doctors in training that there is a decline in the rate of clinical autopsy world wide. This decline may to an extent depend on the attitude of the physicians. To evaluate the attitude of resident doctors towards the practice of clinical autopsy and to determine their role in the decline of clinical autopsy. We carried out a survey of the attitude of resident doctors undergoing training in the various clinical departments of our teaching hospital towards clinical autopsy practice. This survey was by means of a structured randomly distributed questionnaire. Questions were asked on their willingness to request for autopsy, the number of autopsies that they have requested for so far, what hinders them from requesting for autopsy, the level of participation at autopsy and the importance of autopsies in the health care delivery system Eighteen (30%) out of 60 resident doctors attributed their inability to request for autopsy on their not being in direct control of the patients, while 16 (26.7%) found it difficult to get consent from the relatives. Seventeen per cent of them gave reason of not being able to obtain report from the pathologist, 13.3% said it was difficult to get pathologist to perform autopsy on time while only 11% said they knew the diagnosis in most of their cases. Almost all the resident doctors (98.5%) agreed that autopsy is a necessary procedure and is important for their training and health care delivery system Autopsy rate can increase if the resident doctors receive more blessings to request for autopsy from their consultants. Increased exposure to autopsies and education with regards to the benefits of autopsies at both the undergraduate and post graduate level will contribute to improvement in the rate of clinical autopsy.

  12. Toxoplasmosis - Awareness and knowledge among medical doctors in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efunshile, Akinwale Michael; Elikwu, Charles John; Jokelainen, Pikka

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic parasite causing high disease burden worldwide. A One Health approach is needed to understand, prevent, and control toxoplasmosis, while knowledge gaps in the One Health aspects have been identified among medical professionals in earlier studies. As a One Health collaboration between veterinary and medical fields, we surveyed the knowledge on toxoplasmosis among medical doctors in Nigeria. The knowledge questions, which the participants answered without consulting literature and colleagues, covered epidemiological One Health aspects as well as clinical interspecialty aspects of T. gondii infections. Altogether 522 medical doctors from four tertiary hospitals completed the questionnaire. The mean number of correct answers in the knowledge questions was 7.5, and 8.4% of the participants selected at least 12 of the 17 correct answers. The proportion of medical doctors scoring such a high score was significantly higher among those who reported having seen a case of clinical toxoplasmosis than in those who did not. While 62% of the medical doctors participating in our study knew that cats can shed T. gondii in their feces, 36% incorrectly suggested that humans could do that too. That T. gondii infection can be meatborne was known by 69%, but that it can be also waterborne only by 28% of the medical doctors participating in our study. Most of the medical doctors, 78%, knew that clinical toxoplasmosis may involve the central nervous system, while only 37% answered that it can involve the eyes. Our results suggested knowledge gaps, which need to be addressed in Continuous Medical Education. The identified gaps included both intersectoral One Health aspects and interspecialty aspects: For prevention and management of toxoplasmosis, knowing the main transmission routes and that the parasite can affect several organs is relevant.

  13. Teaching doctors to treat doctors: medical student peer counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, J H; Roenneburg, M; Maly, B J

    1980-01-01

    Physicians' emotional problems need to be recognized and treated. Intervention and prevention in this problem area have been attempted at the Medical College of Wisconsin through a programme of peer counselling designed to teach student physicians how to recognize and treat emotional difficulties faced by their peers. During the 18 months that the programme has been in operation, 20 peer counsellors reported a total 1,185 hours spent in counselling their peers, lending credence to the speculation that doctors will turn to their peers for help if, in medical school, there is acceptance of fallibility and responsiveness on the part of peers.

  14. Postgraduate education in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses recent developments in doctoral education in business studies in Europe. Six key dilemmas relating to fundamental differences between two generic approaches in contemporary doctoral education have been identified. The theoretical basis of the paper is borrowed from institutio...... institutional theory. In closing implications for educators, managers and other decision makers affected by this problem will be addressed....

  15. Bias against foreign-born or foreign-trained doctors: experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Winnifred R; Lalonde, Richard N; Esses, Victoria M

    2010-12-01

    Bias against foreign-born or -trained medical students and doctors is not well understood, despite its documented impact on recruitment, integration and retention. This research experimentally examines the interaction of location of medical education and nationality in evaluations of doctors' competence and trustworthiness. A convenience sample of prospective patients evaluated fictitious candidates for a position as a doctor in community practice at a new local health clinic. All applicants were described as having the same personality profile, legal qualifications to practise, a multi-degree education and relevant work experience. The location of medical education (the candidate's home country or the UK) and national background (Australia or Pakistan) of the applicants were independently experimentally manipulated. Consistent with previous research on skills discounting and bias, foreign-born candidates were evaluated less favourably than native-born candidates, despite their comparable education level, work experience and personality. However, overseas medical education obtained in the First World both boosted evaluations (of competence and trustworthiness) and attenuated bias based on nationality. The present findings demonstrate the selective discounting of foreign-born doctors' credentials. The data show an interaction of location of medical education and birth nationality in bias against foreign doctors. On an applied level, the data document that the benefits of medical education obtained in the First World can extend beyond its direct outcomes (high-quality training and institutional recognition) to the indirect benefit of the attenuation of patient bias based on nationality. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  16. Barefoot Doctors and the "Health Care Revolution" in Rural China: A Study Centered on Shandong Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sanchun; Hu, Danian

    2017-09-01

    Barefoot doctors were rural medical personnel trained en masse, whose emergence and development had a particular political, economic, social, and cultural background. Like the rural cooperative medical care system, the barefoot doctor was a well-known phenomenon in the Cultural Revolution. Complicated regional differences and a lack of reliable sources create much difficulty for the study of barefoot doctors and result in differing opinions of their status and importance. Some scholars greatly admire barefoot doctors, whereas others harshly criticize them. This paper explores the rise and development of barefoot doctors based on a case study of Shandong province. I argue that the promotion of barefoot doctors was a consequence of the medical education revolution and an implementation of the Cultural Revolution in rural public health care, which significantly influenced medical services and development in rural areas. First, barefoot doctors played a significant role in accomplishing the first rural health care revolution by providing primary health care to peasants and eliminating endemic and infectious illnesses. Second, barefoot doctors were the agents who integrated Western and Chinese medicines under the direction of the state. As an essential part of the rural cooperative medical system, barefoot doctor personnel grew in number with the system's implementation. After the Cultural Revolution ended, the cooperative medical system began to disintegrate-a process that accelerated in the 1980s until the system's collapse in the wake of the de-collectivization. As a result, the number of barefoot doctors also ran down steadily. In 1985, "barefoot doctor" as a job title was officially removed from Chinese medical profession, demonstrating that its practice was non-universal and unsustainable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Doctoral conceptual thresholds in cellular and molecular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldon, David F.; Rates, Christopher; Sun, Chongning

    2017-12-01

    In the biological sciences, very little is known about the mechanisms by which doctoral students acquire the skills they need to become independent scientists. In the postsecondary biology education literature, identification of specific skills and effective methods for helping students to acquire them are limited to undergraduate education. To establish a foundation from which to investigate the developmental trajectory of biologists' research skills, it is necessary to identify those skills which are integral to doctoral study and distinct from skills acquired earlier in students' educational pathways. In this context, the current study engages the framework of threshold concepts to identify candidate skills that are both obstacles and significant opportunities for developing proficiency in conducting research. Such threshold concepts are typically characterised as transformative, integrative, irreversible, and challenging. The results from interviews and focus groups with current and former doctoral students in cellular and molecular biology suggest two such threshold concepts relevant to their subfield: the first is an ability to effectively engage primary research literature from the biological sciences in a way that is critical without dismissing the value of its contributions. The second is the ability to conceptualise appropriate control conditions necessary to design and interpret the results of experiments in an efficient and effective manner for research in the biological sciences as a discipline. Implications for prioritising and sequencing graduate training experiences are discussed on the basis of the identified thresholds.

  18. The doctor-patient relationship in living donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovitch, Gabriel M

    2007-11-01

    A therapeutic and effective doctor-patient relationship and patient-doctor relationship is at the core of all successful medical care. The medical and psychological evaluation of a potential kidney donor serves to protect the long-term health of both the donor and the potential recipient. Careful assessment of risk and donor education is at the core of donor evaluation and the decision to progress with donation requires refined clinical judgment by the medical team and critical thinking by the donor. Increasing pressure to increase the numbers of living donor transplants and suggestions by some that the process should be commercialized make it timely to consider the nature of the relationship between the doctor and the patient in the unusual circumstance of living donation. A high rate of complications in recipients of purchased kidneys and a lack of knowledge of the fate of paid donors have been reported. Commercialization of transplantation undermines the therapeutic doctor-patient relationship and threatens the healthy development of the international transplant endeavor.

  19. Depression and doctor-patient communication in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerizadeh, Mytra; Moise, Nathalie; Chang, Bernard P; Edmondson, Donald; Kronish, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Depression may adversely affect health outcomes by influencing doctor-patient communication. We aimed to determine the association between depressive symptoms and doctor-patient communication among patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with a suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We enrolled a consecutive sample of 500 patients evaluated for ACS symptoms from the ED of an urban medical center. Depressive symptoms (8-item Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-8) and doctor-patient communication in the ED (Interpersonal Processes of Care) were assessed during hospitalization. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between depressive symptoms and doctor-patient communication, adjusting for age, sex, race, ethnicity, education, language, health insurance status and comorbidities. Compared to nondepressed patients, depressed patients (PHQ-8≥10) were more likely (Pcommunication on five of seven communication domains: clarity, elicitation of concerns, explanations, patient-centered decision making and discrimination. A greater proportion of depressed versus nondepressed patients reported suboptimal overall communication (39.8% versus 22.9%, Pcommunication (adjusted odds ratio 2.42, 95% confidence interval 1.52-3.87; Pcommunication in the ED than nondepressed patients. Research is needed to determine whether subjectively rated differences in communication are accompanied by observable differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Physicians' professionalism at primary care facilities from patients' perspective: The importance of doctors' communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Merry Indah; Prabandari, Yayi Suryo; Claramita, Mora

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is the core duty of a doctor to be responsible to the society. Doctors' professionalism depicts an internalization of values and mastery of professionals' standards as an important part in shaping the trust between doctors and patients. Professionalism consists of various attributes in which current literature focused more on the perspective of the health professionals. Doctors' professionalism may influence patients' satisfaction, and therefore, it is important to know from the patients' perspectives what was expected of medical doctors' professionalism. This study was conducted to determine the attributes of physician professionalism from the patient's perspective. This was a qualitative research using a phenomenology study design. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 patients with hypertension and diabetes who had been treated for at least 1 year in primary care facilities in the city of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The results of the interview were transcribed, encoded, and then classified into categories. Communication skills were considered as the top priority of medical doctors' attributes of professionalism in the perspectives of the patients. This study revealed that communication skill is the most important aspects of professionalism which greatly affected in the process of health care provided by the primary care doctors. Doctor-patient communication skills should be intensively trained during both basic and postgraduate medical education.

  1. A concordance-based study to assess doctors' and nurses' mental models in Internal Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Blondon

    Full Text Available Interprofessional collaboration between doctors and nurses is based on team mental models, in particular for each professional's roles. Our objective was to identify factors influencing concordance on the expectations of doctors' and nurses' roles and responsibilities in an Internal Medicine ward. Using a dataset of 196 doctor-nurse pairs (14x14 = 196, we analyzed choices and prioritized management actions of 14 doctors and 14 nurses in six clinical nurse role scenarios, and in five doctor role scenarios (6 options per scenario. In logistic regression models with a non-nested correlation structure, we evaluated concordance among doctors and nurses, and adjusted for potential confounders (including prior experience in Internal Medicine, acuteness of case and gender. Concordance was associated with number of female professionals (adjusted OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.73, for acute situations (adjusted OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.13 to 3.62, and in doctor role scenarios (adjusted OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.65. Prior experience and country of training were not significant predictors of concordance. In conclusion, our concordance-based approach helped us identify areas of lower concordance in expected doctor-nurse roles and responsibilities, particularly in non-acute situations, which can be targeted by future interprofessional, educational interventions.

  2. Urgent need of a doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON (24H/24H): 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY r...

  3. Urgent Need of a Doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCE (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 POLICE 117 ANTI POISON CENTRE (24H/24H) 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL  112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04.50-49-65-83 MATERNITY Rue Am&...

  4. Urgent Need of a Doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCE (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 POLICE 117 ANTI POISON CENTRE (24H/24H) 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL  112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04.50-49-65-83 MATERNITY Rue Am...

  5. Urgent need of a doctor

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or : SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or : ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON 24H/24H: 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL : 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 1...

  6. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON: 24H/24H 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 17 r...

  7. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or : SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or : ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON: 24H/24H 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 17 rue du Jura, Ambilly 04-50-87-47-47 EMERGENCIES 17 rue...

  8. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    GENEVA PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor  Or SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) Or ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (7H-23H) 022 748-49-50 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest  022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES  30 Bd de la Cluse  022 382-45-55  MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest  022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer  022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR  Meyrin  022 719-61-11 URGENCES ADULTES  Meyrin  022 719-66-80  URGENCES : AMBULANCE (GENEVE ET VAUD) : 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 767-44-44  FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON 24H/24H  01-251-51-510 APPEL D'URGENCE EUROPEEN 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (ou­or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN  Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie&a...

  9. Doctor's dilemma (medical decision making)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    Disagreement between experts is presumed to be uncommon in medical diagnosis. Radiology is considered to be a particularly objective means of diagnosis and expert radiographic interpretation is expected to be infallible. Five military radiologists were made to review independently chest radiographs of 1256 patients recorded in four image formats and interpret each as positive or negative for tuberculosis. The results were unexpected. Ability to detect tuberculosis varied little between various image formats but the extent of disagreement between doctors was remarkable. The number of cases judged positive varied from 56 to 100 among the five readers. Of cases judged positive at least once, the mean rate of disagreement between pairs of readers was 19%. The validity of these findings have been confirmed repeatedly in several subsequent trials. Other diagnostic modalities show equally surprising rates of diagnostic dissonance. Extensive observer disagreement was found to be a universal problem in medical diagnosis, giving credence to the proverbial adage that 'no two doctors agree'. The magnitude of disagreement between experts is the principal theoretic problem of diagnosis. Even a stochastic theory of diagnosis is devised which accounts for the disagreement between experts, where the disagreement approaches a theoretic maximum even for ideal diagnosticians

  10. Doctor shopping: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Hall, Joanne M

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a significant problem in the United States that poses a serious health risk to Americans and is therefore significant to the field of nursing. The prescription drugs that are designated in the United States as having abuse potential are called controlled or scheduled drugs. The most common types of abused prescription drugs are benzodiazepines prescribed for anxiety, opioids prescribed for pain, and stimulants prescribed for attention deficit disorder. These prescription drugs are abused by taking larger doses than prescribed for nonmedical use to achieve a high or euphoric feeling, or are sold illicitly for profit. In 2009, there were 2.4 million nonmedical users of prescription opioids in the United States. These prescription drugs are often obtained by seeing multiple prescribers, often under false pretenses or with complicity from the prescribers that leads to abuse and illicit sales. The term doctor shopping has been used not only to refer to this phenomenon but has also had other meanings throughout the past decades. Thus, concept analysis is the focus of this article for clarification using the Walker and Avant method. Health implications and suggestions for minimizing doctor shopping are included.

  11. Women who doctor shop for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-04-01

    Doctor shopping is a term used to describe a form of diversion of prescription drugs when patients visit numerous prescribers to obtain controlled drugs for illicit use. Gender differences exist in regard to prescription drug abuse and methods of diversion. The purpose of this phenomenological study guided by the existential philosophy of Merleau-Ponty was to understand the lived experience of female doctor shoppers. Interviews were conducted with 14 women, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Included in the findings are figural aspects of the participants' experience of doctor shopping related to the existential grounds of world, time, body, and others. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) feeding the addiction, (b) networking with addicts, (c) playing the system, and (d) baiting the doctors. The findings suggest several measures that nurses can take to reduce the incidence of doctor shopping and to provide better care for female doctor shoppers.

  12. [Influence of patients' attitude on doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; Qiu, Ze-qi; Zhang, Tuo-hong

    2009-04-18

    To describe the doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship and find out the influencing factors of the patients, gathering evidence to improve the doctor-patient relationship. This study was a cross-sectional study, in which doctors and nurses in 10 hospitals of Beijing, Shandong and Chongqing were surveyed with structured questionnaires and in-depth interviews. The mean score of the doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship was 59.97, which was much lower than the patients'. The patients' socio-demographic characteristics, social economic status (SES) and behavior characteristics influence the interaction of the doctors and the patients. The doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship was influenced by the patients' trust. The doctors' perspective is helpful to define the tension and the cause of the doctor-patient relationship. The patients' characteristics have important influence on the doctor-patient relationship. It's necessary to take action on the patients to improve the doctor-patient relationship.

  13. The Cape doctor 1807-1910: perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Howard

    2004-01-01

    This chapter contrasts the Cape doctor in 1807 and in 1910, and finds that, in a whole variety of ways, the differences between the two were not of degree but of kind. Underlying this sea-change was the germ revolution of the late Victorian era, which transformed the Cape doctor out of all recognition, thereby laying important foundations for the development of the twentieth-century South African doctor.

  14. "Becoming Molecular Girl": Transforming Subjectivities in Collaborative Doctoral Research Studies as Micro-Politics in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi

    2013-01-01

    In the context of Swedish reforms of postgraduate and doctoral education in a global knowledge economy, this article aims to theorise on the documented processes of doing collaborative analysis during elective graduate course-work on deconstructive methodologies in the social sciences, with 10 doctoral students over a period of seven months. I…

  15. Anaphylaxis: lack of hospital doctors' knowledge of adrenaline (epinephrine) administration in adults could endanger patients' safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droste, J; Narayan, N

    2012-06-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is the first line drug to be given in anaphylaxis and can save patients' lives. Conversely, incorrect administration of adrenaline in anaphylaxis has caused patients serious harm, including death. We compared the survey results of doctors' knowledge of adrenaline administration in adults of two District General Hospitals Trusts in England and found, that from 284 Hospital Doctors, 14.4% (n = 41) would administer adrenaline as recommended by published anaphylaxis guidelines. This survey comparison shows that a significant number of hospital doctors, regardless of seniority and specialty, have an educational deficit regarding correct administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) administration in adults with anaphylaxis. Multilevel strategies to educate doctors and prevent patient harm are needed. We propose a mnemonic for remembering the recommended treatment for anaphylaxis in the adult: "A Thigh 500" forAdrenaline into the antero-lateral thigh, 500 micrograms.

  16. Attitudes toward depression among Japanese non-psychiatric medical doctors: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Tsuyuka; Kodaka, Manami; Sakai, Rumi; Ishikura, Fuminobu; Watanabe, Yoichiro; Mann, Anthony; Haddad, Mark; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Inagaki, Masatoshi

    2012-08-16

    Under-recognition of depression is common in many countries. Education of medical staff, focusing on their attitudes towards depression, may be necessary to change their behavior and enhance recognition of depression. Several studies have previously reported on attitudes toward depression among general physicians. However, little is known about attitudes of non-psychiatric doctors in Japan. In the present study, we surveyed non-psychiatric doctors' attitude toward depression. The inclusion criteria of participants in the present study were as follows: 1) Japanese non-psychiatric doctors and 2) attendees in educational opportunities regarding depression care. We conveniently approached two populations: 1) a workshop to depression care for non-psychiatric doctors and 2) a general physician-psychiatrist (G-P) network group. We contacted 367 subjects. Attitudes toward depression were measured using the Depression Attitude Questionnaire (DAQ), a 20-item self-report questionnaire developed for general physicians. We report scores of each DAQ item and factors derived from exploratory factor analysis. We received responses from 230 subjects, and we used DAQ data from 187 non-psychiatric doctors who met the inclusion criteria. All non-psychiatric doctors (n = 187) disagreed with "I feel comfortable in dealing with depressed patients' needs," while 60 % (n = 112) agreed with "Working with depressed patients is heavy going." Factor analysis indicated these items comprised a factor termed "Depression should be treated by psychiatrists" - to which 54 % of doctors (n = 101) agreed. Meanwhile, 67 % of doctors (n = 126) thought that nurses could be useful in depressed patient support. The three factors derived from the Japanese DAQ differed from models previously derived from British GP samples. The attitude of Japanese non-psychiatric doctors concerning whether depression should be treated by psychiatrists was markedly different to that of British GPs. Japanese non

  17. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Attitude to e-learning among newly qualified doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jason; Clapham, Michael

    2014-02-01

    e-Learning plays an increasingly important role in medical education. Much research has focused on the evaluation of individual modules among medical students or more senior trainee doctors. We studied the attitude of newly qualified foundation level-1 doctors (FY1s) towards a blended learning programme to gain insight into the perceived role of e-learning in relation to classroom and experiential learning. The blended learning strategy consisted of weekly 3-hour sessions of lectures and flexible e-learning sessions. A questionnaire survey was conducted among 54 per cent (37/69) of FY1 doctors, towards the end of their first year post qualification. The majority of FY1s had to carry out additional e-learning outside of work. When asked where was best to carry out e-learning, 54 per cent preferred to e-learn both at work and at home, whereas 38 per cent preferred to e-learn outside of work exclusively. An equal preference for a classroom-only strategy and a blended programme was reported. Seventy-three per cent of the FY1s thought that e-learning should not be part of their compulsory weekly teaching programme. Fifty-four per cent of FY1s thought that e-learning had been useful for their education and training in their FY1 year. The e-learning package cited as being most useful was the safe prescribing e-programme, pioneered locally. Newly qualified doctors value e-learning as an adjunct to experiential and lecture-based teaching, and most prefer it as part of a blended learning programme at work or at home. Medical educators must place equal emphasis on the delivery and administration of e-learning as well as on the course design. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Doctor Shortage and Health Services*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-08-14

    Aug 14, 1971 ... Bantu education was started by missionaries who had to carry the full financial burden, because it was viewed with much suspicion by the public. From 1850 to 1925 the view was held that the State should only control Bantu education by subsidizing missionary and other Bantu educational institutions.

  20. Persisting Dreams: The Impact of the Doctoral Socialization Process on Latina Post-Doctoral Career Aspirations

    OpenAIRE

    Westerband, Yamissette

    2016-01-01

    Latinas are underrepresented within the professorate and within doctoral programs, particularly within Research Intensive Institutions. This dissertation explores how the doctoral socialization process impacts the pipeline from the Ph.D. to scholarly careers for Latinas in Research universities. Given the low numbers of representation and production at the doctoral level for Latinas, what happens when they do enter Ph.D. programs? Their doctoral experience must be marked in one way or anot...