WorldWideScience

Sample records for mfc fuel manufacturing

  1. Energy sustainability of Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC): A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasi, Tonia; Lombardelli, Giorgia

    2017-07-01

    Energy sustainability analysis and durability of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) as energy source are necessary in order to move from the laboratory scale to full-scale application. This paper focus on these two aspects by considering the energy performances of an original experimental test with MFC conducted for six months under an external load of 1000 Ω. Energy sustainability is quantified using Energy Payback Time, the time necessary to produce the energy already spent to construct the MFC device. The results of experiment reveal that the energy sustainability of this specific MFC is never reached due to energy expenditure (i.e. for pumping) and to the low amount of energy produced. Hence, different MFC materials and architectures were analysed to find guidelines for future MFC development. Among these, only sedimentary fuel cells (Benthic MFCs) seem sustainable from an energetic point of view, with a minimum duration of 2.7 years. An energy balance approach highlights the importance of energy calculation. However, this is very often not taken into account in literature. This study outlines promising methodology for the design of an alternative layout of energy sustainable MFC and wastewater management systems.

  2. Ammonia removal via microbial fuel cell (MFC) dynamic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabiad, I.; Ali, U. F. M.; Zakarya, I. A.; Ibrahim, N.; Radzi, R. W.; Zulkurnai, N. Z.; Azmi, N. H.

    2017-06-01

    Landfill leachate is generally known as high-strength wastewater that is difficult to handle and contains dissolved extracts and suspended matter. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were designed to treat landfill leachate while continuously producing power (voltage output). Three different anodes were tested in MFC reactors: carbon black, activated carbon, and zinc electrodes. Movements in the MFC reactor during treatment were also a key factor for testing. Results showed a difference in ammonia levels in the three anodes used. The study compared the efficiency of static and dynamic modes of MFC in removing ammonia. Continual leachate movement in the reactor could increase the rate of removal of the ammonia components. The setup provided a viable condition for maximum removal because the reactor movement caused the sludge to disintegrate, which allowed ammonia to separate easily from the parent leachate. Ammonia removal also resulted from the transfer of ammonium through the membrane or from ammonia loss. Constant exchange of ionic content benefited the MFC performance by increasing power production and decreasing internal electrode material resistance. This paper presents the results of the analyses of leachate treatment from the solid waste landfill located in Padang Siding Landfill, Perlis. The performance of ammonia removal was enhanced using different types of electrodes. In both modes, activated carbon performed better than black carbon and zinc. The respective percentages of ammonia removal for activated carbon of dynamic over static were 96.6%, 66.6%, and 92.8% for activated carbon, zinc, and black carbon. The results provide further information on the possibility of using MFCs in landfill leachate treatment systems.

  3. Electricity generation from palm oil tree empty fruit bunch (EFB) using dual chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, N. F.; Mahmood, N. A. B. N.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Muhammad, S. A. F. S.; Amalina, N. S.

    2017-06-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been discovered and utilized in laboratory scale for electricity production based on microbial degradation of organic compound. However, various source of fuel has been tested and recently complex biomass such as lignocellulose biomass has been focused on. In the present research, oil palm tree empty fruit bunch (EFB) has been tested for power production using dual chamber MFC and power generation analysis has been conducted to address the performance of MFC. In addition, two microorganisms (electric harvesting microbe and cellulose degrading microbe) were used in the MFC operation. The analysis include voltage produced, calculated current and power. The first section in your paper

  4. Electricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) by Bacterium Isolated from Rice Paddy Field Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhirruddin, Fakhriah; Amid, Azura; Salim, Wan Wardatul Amani Wan; Suhaida Azmi, Azlin

    2018-03-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an alternative approach in generating renewable energy by utilising bacteria that will oxidize organic or inorganic substrates, producing electrons yielded as electrical energy. Different species of exoelectrogenic bacteria capable of generating significant amount of electricity in MFC has been identified, using various organic compounds for fuel. Soil sample taken from rice paddy field is proven to contain exoelectrogenic bacteria, thus electricity generation using mixed culture originally found in the soil, and pure culture isolated from the soil is studied. This research will isolate the exoelectrogenic bacterial species in the rice paddy field soil responsible for energy generation. Growth of bacteria isolated from the MFC is observed by measuring the optical density (OD), cell density weight (CDW) and viable cell count. Mixed bacterial species found in paddy field soil generates maximum power of 77.62 μW and 0.70 mA of current. In addition, the research also shows that the pure bacterium in rice paddy field soil can produce maximum power and current at 51.32 μW and 0.28 mA respectively.

  5. Energy recovery from waste streams with microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.

    2012-09-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based technologies are promising technologies for direct energy production from various wastewaters and waste streams. Beside electrical power production, more emphasis is recently devoted to alternative applications such as hydrogen production, bioremediation, seawater desalination, and biosensors. Although the technologies are promising, a number of hurdles need to be overcome before that field applications are economically feasible. The main purpose of this work was to improve the performance, reduce the construction cost, and expand the application scopes of MFC-based bio-electrochemical systems. To reduce the energy cost in nitrogen removal and during the same process achieve phosphorus elimination, a sediment-type photomicrobial fuel cell was developed based on the cooperation between microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) and electrochemically active bacteria. The main removal mechanism of nitrogen and phosphorus was algae biomass uptake, while nitrification and denitrification process contributed to part of nitrogen removal. The key factors such as algae concentration, COD/N ratios and photoperiod were systemically studied. A self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell was developed for in situ biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors. The hydrogen production increased along with acetate and buffer concentration. The hydrogen production rate of 32.2 mL/L/d and yield of 1.43 mol-H2/mol-acetate were achieved. Alternate exchanging the function between the two cell units was found to be an effective approach to inhibit methanogens. A sensor, based on a submersible microbial fuel cell, was developed for in situ monitoring of microbial activity and biochemical oxygen demand in groundwater. Presence or absence of a biofilm on the anode was a decisive factor for the applicability of the sensor. Temperature, pH, conductivity and inorganic solid content were significantly affecting the sensitivity of the sensor. The sensor showed

  6. Preliminary Study of the Use of Sulphonated Polyether Ether Ketone (SPEEK as Proton Exchange Membrane for Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Permana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonated polyether ether ketone (SPEEK was utilized as a proton exchange membrane (PEM in Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC. The SPEEK performance in producing electricity had been observed in MFC using wastewater and glucose as substrates. The MFC with catering and tofu wastewater produced maximum power density about 0.31 mW/m2 and 0.03 mW/m2, respectively, lower that of MFC with tapioca average power density of 39.4 W/m2 over 48 h. The power density boosted because of the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as inoculum. The study using of S. cerevisiae and Acetobacter acetii, separately, were also conducted in with glucose as substrate. The MFC produced an average power densities were 7.3 and 6.4 mW/m2 for S. cerevisiae and A. acetii, respectively. The results of this study indicated that SPEEK membrane has the potential usage in MFCs and can substitute the commercial membrane, Nafion. Article History: Received: Juni 14th 2017; Received: Sept 25th 2017; Accepted: December 16th 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Putra, H.E., Permana, D and Djaenudin, D. (2018 Preliminary Study of the Use of Sulfonated Polyether Ether Ketone (SPEEK as Proton Exchange Membrane for Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC. International Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 7(1, 7-12. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.7.1.7-12

  7. Scalable microbial fuel cell (MFC) stack for continuous real wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Li; Zheng, Yu; Zhou, Shungui; Yuan, Yong; Yuan, Haoran; Chen, Yong

    2012-02-01

    A tubular air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) stack with high scalability and low material cost was constructed and the ability of simultaneous real wastewater treatment and bioelectricity generation was investigated under continuous flow mode. At the two organic loading rates (ORLs) tested (1.2 and 4.9kg COD/m(3)d), five non-Pt MFCs connected in series and parallel circuit modes treating swine wastewater can enable an increase of the voltage and the current. The parallel stack retained high power output and the series connection underwent energy loss due to the substrate cross-conduction effect. With continuous electricity production, the parallel stack achieved 83.8% of COD removal and 90.8% of NH(4)(+)-N removal at 1.2kg COD/m(3)d, and 77.1% COD removal and 80.7% NH(4)(+)-N removal at 4.9kg COD/m(3)d. The MFC stack system in this study was demonstrated to be able to treat real wastewater with the added benefit of harvesting electricity energy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Importance of temperature and anodic medium composition on microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Romàn, Ó.B.; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated at different temperatures and anodic media. A lag phase of 30 h occurred at 30°C which was half that at room temperature (22°C). The maximum power density at 30°C was 70 mW/m2 and at 22°C was 43 mW/m2. At 15°C, no successful operation...... was observed even after several loadings for a long period of operation. Maximum power density of 320 mW/m2 was obtained with wastewater medium containing phosphate buffer (conductivity: 11.8 mS/cm), which was approx. 4 times higher than the value without phosphate additions (2.89 mS/cm)....

  9. Energy recovery from waste streams with microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng

    to the sediment. The proposed approach may broad the application of sediment MFC technology. A novel submersible microbial desalination cell was developed as an in situ and non-invasive approach for nitrate removal from groundwater. The system performance in terms of power generation and nitrate removal...... efficiency were investigated. The effects of hydraulic retention time, external resistance, other ionic species in the groundwater and external nitrification on the system performance were also elucidated. Over 90% of nitrate was removed from groundwater without energy input, water pressure, draw solution......-based bio-electrochemical systems. To reduce the energy cost in nitrogen removal and during the same process achieve phosphorus elimination, a sediment-type photomicrobial fuel cell was developed based on the cooperation between microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) and electrochemically active bacteria. The main...

  10. Fuel manufacturing and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The efficient utilisation of nuclear fuel requires manufacturing facilities capable of making advanced fuel types, with appropriate quality control. Once made, the use of such fuels requires a proper understanding of their behaviour in the reactor environment, so that safe operation for the design life can be achieved. The International Atomic Energy Agency supports Member States to improve in-pile fuel performance and management of materials; and to develop advanced fuel technologies for ensuring reliability and economic efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides assistance to Member States to support fuel-manufacturing capability, including quality assurance techniques, optimization of manufacturing parameters and radiation protection. The IAEA supports the development fuel modelling expertise in Member States, covering both normal operation and postulated and severe accident conditions. It provides information and support for the operation of Nuclear Power Plant to ensure that the environment and water chemistry is appropriate for fuel operation. The IAEA supports fuel failure investigations, including equipment for failed fuel detection and for post-irradiation examination and inspection, as well as fuel repair, it provides information and support research into the basic properties of fuel materials, including UO 2 , MOX and zirconium alloys. It further offers guidance on the relationship with back-end requirement (interim storage, transport, reprocessing, disposal), fuel utilization and management, MOX fuels, alternative fuels and advanced fuel technology

  11. Nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    The technologies used to manufacture nuclear fuel from uranium ore are outlined, with particular reference to the light water reactor fuel cycle. Capital and operating cost estimates for the processing stages are given, and the relevance to a developing uranium industry in Australia is discussed

  12. Developments in fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.

    1997-01-01

    BNFL has a long tradition of willingness to embrace technological challenge and a dedication to quality. This paper describes advances in the overall manufacturing philosophy at BNFL's Fuel Business Group and then covers how some new technologies are currently being employed in BNFL Fuel Business Group's flagship oxide complex (OFC), which is currently in its final stages of commissioning. This plant represents a total investment of some Pound 200 million. This paper also describes how these technologies are also being deployed in BNFL's MOX plant now being built at Sellafield and, finally, covers some new processes being developed for advanced fuel manufacture. (author)

  13. Flexibility in fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reparaz, A.; Stavig, W.E.; McLees, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    From its inception Exxon Nuclear has produced both BWR and PWR fuels. This is reflected in a product line that, to date, includes over 20 fuel designs. These range from 6x6 design at one end of the spectrum to the recently introduced 17x17 design. The benefits offered include close tailoring of the fuel design to match the customer's requirements, and the ability to rapidly introduce product changes, such as the axial blanket design, with a minimal impact on manufacturing. This flexibility places a number of demands on the manufacturing organization. Close interfaces must be established, and maintained, between the marketing, product design, manufacturing, purchasing and quality organizations, and the information flows must be immediate and accurate. Production schedules must be well planned and must be maintained or revised to reflect changing circumstances. Finally, the manufacturing facilities must be designed to allow rapid switchover between product designs with minor tooling changes and/or rerouting of product flows to alternate work stations. Among the tools used to manage the flow of information and to maintain the tight integration necessary between the various manufacturing, engineering and quality organizations is a commercially available, computerized planning and tracking system, AMAPS. A real-time production data collection system has been designed which gathers data from each production work station for use by the shop floor control module of AMAPS. Accuracy of input to the system is improved through extensive use of bar codes to gather information on the product as it moves through and between work stations. This computerized preparation of material tracing has an impact on direct manufacturing records, quality control records, nuclear material records and accounting and inventory records. This is of benefit to both Exxon Nuclear and its customers

  14. Developments in fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, S.E.; Harrop, G.; Maricalva Gonzalez, J.

    1995-01-01

    The status of the investment and R and D programmes in the UK and Spanish fuel fabrication facilities is outlined. Due to a number of circumstances, BNFL and ENUSA have been in the forefront of capital investment, with associated commitment to engineering and scientific research and development. Carrying through this investment has allowed the embodiment of proven state of the art technologies in the design of fuel fabrication plants, with particular emphasis on meeting the future challenge of health and safety, and product quality, at an acceptable cost. ENUSA and BNFL currently supply fuel, not only to their respective 'home' markets but also to France, Belgium, Sweden, and Germany. Both organisations employ an International Business outlook and partake in focused and speculative R and D projects for the design and manufacture of nuclear fuel. (orig./HP)

  15. Evaluation of energy-distribution of a hybrid microbial fuel cell-membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) for cost-effective wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Bi, Fanghua; Ngo, Huu-Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Jia, Hui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhang, Xinbo

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost hybrid system integrating a membrane-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an anoxic/oxic membrane bioreactor (MBR) was studied for fouling mitigation. The appended electric field in the MBR was supplied by the MFC with continuous flow. Supernatant from an anaerobic reactor with low dissolved oxygen was used as feed to the MFC in order to enhance its performance compared with that fed with synthetic wastewater. The voltage output of MFC maintained at 0.52±0.02V with 1000Ω resister. The electric field intensity could reach to 0.114Vcm(-1). Compared with the conventional MBR (CMBR), the contents rather than the components of foulants on the cake layer of fouled MFC-MBR system was significantly reduced. Although only 0.5% of the feed COD was translated into electricity and applied to MBR, the hybrid system showed great feasibility without additional consumption but extracting energy from waste water and significantly enhancing the membrane filterability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fuel manufacture and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepenack, H.; Raab, K.

    1975-01-01

    The different steps in fuel and fuel element manufacturing from the conversion of UF 6 to UO 2 to the assembling of the whole fuel element are shortly described. Each of this fabrication steps must satisfy well-defined quality criteria which are checked in certain analyses or tests. (RB) [de

  17. Metrology for Fuel Cell Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocker, Michael [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Stanfield, Eric [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2015-02-04

    The project was divided into three subprojects. The first subproject is Fuel Cell Manufacturing Variability and Its Impact on Performance. The objective was to determine if flow field channel dimensional variability has an impact on fuel cell performance. The second subproject is Non-contact Sensor Evaluation for Bipolar Plate Manufacturing Process Control and Smart Assembly of Fuel Cell Stacks. The objective was to enable cost reduction in the manufacture of fuel cell plates by providing a rapid non-contact measurement system for in-line process control. The third subproject is Optical Scatterfield Metrology for Online Catalyst Coating Inspection of PEM Soft Goods. The objective was to evaluate the suitability of Optical Scatterfield Microscopy as a viable measurement tool for in situ process control of catalyst coatings.

  18. Fuel assembly manufacturing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, P.; Villaeys, R.

    1995-01-01

    The device comprises a central support on which the frame is mounted, a magazine which supports the fuel rods in passages aligned with those in the frame and a traction assembly on the opposite side of the magazine and including an array of pull rods designed to be advanced through the passages in the frame, to grip respective fuel rods in magazine and to pull those rods into the passages on the return stroke. 13 figs

  19. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    | NREL Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research and Development NREL's fuel cell manufacturing R&D focuses on improving quality-inspection practices for high costs. A researcher monitoring web-line equipment in the Manufacturing Laboratory Many fuel cell

  20. Information technology in fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshagiri Rao, G.R.; Arora, U.K.; Mohanty, Deepak; Siva Kumar, G.V.S.M.; Banerjee, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    NFC, Hyderabad is engaged in manufacturing of fuel assemblies required for Indian Nuclear Power Programme. During the manufacturing process, the basic Uranium Fuel and Zirconium alloy cladding tubes travels through several work centers, machines and exposes to various process parameters. For analyzing the fuel performance these parameters are indicators and is a requirement to record such history by both manufacturer and customer. NFC has planned to deploy Information Technology (IT) Systems from MDU/UOC Dissolution to Finished Fuel Assembly dispatch stage by using Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID)/Barcode Technologies. IT Systems are connected to electronic weigh balances to acquire material weight data automatically. The IT Systems are also designed to receive data from small Island Systems like Helium leak testing equipments. As a pilot project the system is initially implemented from empty tube Tray preparation stage to Fuel Assembly Packing and dispatch stage, containing about more than 14 processes. The system was built using open source technology platform and was deployed on a cost effective Hardware environment. The present paper describes the development process of the system, Implementation challenges faced and change management. The paper also discusses about fruits of implementation and productivity improvements. (author)

  1. A two-stage microbial fuel cell and anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR) system for effective domestic wastewater treatment.

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao; Ahn, Yongtae; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology for energy-efficient domestic wastewater treatment, but the effluent quality has typically not been sufficient for discharge without further treatment. A two-stage laboratory-scale combined treatment process, consisting of microbial fuel cells and an anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR), was examined here to produce high quality effluent with minimal energy demands. The combined system was operated continuously for 50 days at room temperature (∼25 °C) with domestic wastewater having a total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) of 210 ± 11 mg/L. At a combined hydraulic retention time (HRT) for both processes of 9 h, the effluent tCOD was reduced to 16 ± 3 mg/L (92.5% removal), and there was nearly complete removal of total suspended solids (TSS; from 45 ± 10 mg/L to <1 mg/L). The AFMBR was operated at a constant high permeate flux of 16 L/m(2)/h over 50 days, without the need or use of any membrane cleaning or backwashing. Total electrical energy required for the operation of the MFC-AFMBR system was 0.0186 kWh/m(3), which was slightly less than the electrical energy produced by the MFCs (0.0197 kWh/m(3)). The energy in the methane produced in the AFMBR was comparatively negligible (0.005 kWh/m(3)). These results show that a combined MFC-AFMBR system could be used to effectively treat domestic primary effluent at ambient temperatures, producing high effluent quality with low energy requirements.

  2. A two-stage microbial fuel cell and anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR) system for effective domestic wastewater treatment.

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2014-03-10

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology for energy-efficient domestic wastewater treatment, but the effluent quality has typically not been sufficient for discharge without further treatment. A two-stage laboratory-scale combined treatment process, consisting of microbial fuel cells and an anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (MFC-AFMBR), was examined here to produce high quality effluent with minimal energy demands. The combined system was operated continuously for 50 days at room temperature (∼25 °C) with domestic wastewater having a total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) of 210 ± 11 mg/L. At a combined hydraulic retention time (HRT) for both processes of 9 h, the effluent tCOD was reduced to 16 ± 3 mg/L (92.5% removal), and there was nearly complete removal of total suspended solids (TSS; from 45 ± 10 mg/L to <1 mg/L). The AFMBR was operated at a constant high permeate flux of 16 L/m(2)/h over 50 days, without the need or use of any membrane cleaning or backwashing. Total electrical energy required for the operation of the MFC-AFMBR system was 0.0186 kWh/m(3), which was slightly less than the electrical energy produced by the MFCs (0.0197 kWh/m(3)). The energy in the methane produced in the AFMBR was comparatively negligible (0.005 kWh/m(3)). These results show that a combined MFC-AFMBR system could be used to effectively treat domestic primary effluent at ambient temperatures, producing high effluent quality with low energy requirements.

  3. The manufacturing role in fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    Manufacturing companies have been involved in the CANDU fuel industry for more than 40 years. Early manufacturing contributions were the development of materials and processes used to fabricate the CANDU fuel bundle. As CANDU reactors were commissioned, the manufacturing contribution has been to produce economical, high quality fuel for the CANDU market. (author)

  4. Hazardous Materials Verification and Limited Characterization Report on Sodium and Caustic Residuals in Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799/799A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Mecham

    2010-08-01

    This report is a companion to the Facilities Condition and Hazard Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Sodium Processing Facilities MFC-799/799A and Nuclear Calibration Laboratory MFC-770C (referred to as the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment). This report specifically responds to the requirement of Section 9.2, Item 6, of the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment to provide an updated assessment and verification of the residual hazardous materials remaining in the Sodium Processing Facilities processing system. The hazardous materials of concern are sodium and sodium hydroxide (caustic). The information supplied in this report supports the end-point objectives identified in the Transition Plan for Multiple Facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex, Advanced Test Reactor, Central Facilities Area, and Power Burst Facility, as well as the deactivation and decommissioning critical decision milestone 1, as specified in U.S. Department of Energy Guide 413.3-8, “Environmental Management Cleanup Projects.” Using a tailored approach and based on information obtained through a combination of process knowledge, emergency management hazardous assessment documentation, and visual inspection, this report provides sufficient detail regarding the quantity of hazardous materials for the purposes of facility transfer; it also provides that further characterization/verification of these materials is unnecessary.

  5. CANDU fuel : design/manufacturing interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    The design of CANDU fuel has been the product of intense cooperation among fuel designers and fuel manufacturers. The developments of some of the novel processes in fuel manufacture are outlined. These include the brazed-split-spacer design, the resistance welded endcap and CANLUB coatings. (author)

  6. CERCA's fuel elements instrumentation manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbonnier, G.; Jarousse, C.; Pin, T.; Febvre, M.; Colomb, P.

    2005-01-01

    When research and test reactors wish to further understand the Fuel Elements behavior when operating as well as mastering their irradiation conditions, operators carry out neutron and thermo hydraulic analysis. For thermal calculation, the codes used have to be preliminary validated, at least in the range of the reactor safety operational limits. When some further investigations are requested either by safety authorities or for its own reactor needs, instrumented tools are the ultimate solution for providing representative measurements. Such measurements can be conducted for validating thermal calculation codes, at nominal operating condition as well as during transients ones, or for providing numerous and useful data in the frame of a new products qualification program. CERCA, with many years of experience for implanting thermocouples in various products design, states in this poster his manufacturing background on instrumented elements, plates or targets. (author)

  7. Additive Manufacturing of Fuel Injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadek Tadros, Dr. Alber Alphonse [Edison Welding Institute, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States); Ritter, Dr. George W. [Edison Welding Institute, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States); Drews, Charles Donald [Edison Welding Institute, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States); Ryan, Daniel [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-10-24

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D-printing, has been shifting from a novelty prototyping paradigm to a legitimate manufacturing tool capable of creating components for highly complex engineered products. An emerging AM technology for producing metal parts is the laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) process; however, industry manufacturing specifications and component design practices for L-PBF have not yet been established. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), an industrial gas turbine manufacturer, has been evaluating AM technology for development and production applications with the desire to enable accelerated product development cycle times, overall turbine efficiency improvements, and supply chain flexibility relative to conventional manufacturing processes (casting, brazing, welding). Accordingly, Solar teamed with EWI on a joint two-and-a-half-year project with the goal of developing a production L-PBF AM process capable of consistently producing high-nickel alloy material suitable for high temperature gas turbine engine fuel injector components. The project plan tasks were designed to understand the interaction of the process variables and their combined impact on the resultant AM material quality. The composition of the high-nickel alloy powders selected for this program met the conventional cast Hastelloy X compositional limits and were commercially available in different particle size distributions (PSD) from two suppliers. Solar produced all the test articles and both EWI and Solar shared responsibility for analyzing them. The effects of powder metal input stock, laser parameters, heat treatments, and post-finishing methods were evaluated. This process knowledge was then used to generate tensile, fatigue, and creep material properties data curves suitable for component design activities. The key process controls for ensuring consistent material properties were documented in AM powder and process specifications. The basic components of the project

  8. Potential of Electric Power Production from Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) in Evapotranspiration Reactor for Leachate Treatment Using Alocasia macrorrhiza Plant and Eleusine indica Grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Badrus; Wardhana, Irawan Wisnu

    2018-02-01

    Microbial fuel cell is one of attractive electric power generator from nature bacterial activity. While, Evapotranspiration is one of the waste water treatment system which developed to eliminate biological weakness that utilize the natural evaporation process and bacterial activity on plant roots and plant media. This study aims to determine the potential of electrical energy from leachate treatment using evapotranspiration reactor. The study was conducted using local plant, namely Alocasia macrorrhiza and local grass, namely Eleusine Indica. The system was using horizontal MFC by placing the cathodes and anodes at different chamber (i.e. in the leachate reactor and reactor with plant media). Carbon plates was used for chatode-anodes material with size of 40 cm x 10 cm x1 cm. Electrical power production was measure by a digital multimeter for 30 days reactor operation. The result shows electric power production was fluctuated during reactor operation from all reactors. The electric power generated from each reactor was fluctuated, but from the reactor using Alocasia macrorrhiza plant reach to 70 μwatt average. From the reactor using Eleusine Indica grass was reached 60 μwatt average. Electric power production fluctuation is related to the bacterial growth pattern in the soil media and on the plant roots which undergo the adaptation process until the middle of the operational period and then in stable growth condition until the end of the reactor operation. The results indicate that the evapotranspiration reactor using Alocasia macrorrhiza plant was 60-95% higher electric power potential than using Eleusine Indica grass in short-term (30-day) operation. Although, MFC system in evapotranspiration reactor system was one of potential system for renewable electric power generation.

  9. Potential of Electric Power Production from Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC in Evapotranspiration Reactor for Leachate Treatment Using Alocasia macrorrhiza Plant and Eleusine indica Grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Badrus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell is one of attractive electric power generator from nature bacterial activity. While, Evapotranspiration is one of the waste water treatment system which developed to eliminate biological weakness that utilize the natural evaporation process and bacterial activity on plant roots and plant media. This study aims to determine the potential of electrical energy from leachate treatment using evapotranspiration reactor. The study was conducted using local plant, namely Alocasia macrorrhiza and local grass, namely Eleusine Indica. The system was using horizontal MFC by placing the cathodes and anodes at different chamber (i.e. in the leachate reactor and reactor with plant media. Carbon plates was used for chatode-anodes material with size of 40 cm x 10 cm x1 cm. Electrical power production was measure by a digital multimeter for 30 days reactor operation. The result shows electric power production was fluctuated during reactor operation from all reactors. The electric power generated from each reactor was fluctuated, but from the reactor using Alocasia macrorrhiza plant reach to 70 μwatt average. From the reactor using Eleusine Indica grass was reached 60 μwatt average. Electric power production fluctuation is related to the bacterial growth pattern in the soil media and on the plant roots which undergo the adaptation process until the middle of the operational period and then in stable growth condition until the end of the reactor operation. The results indicate that the evapotranspiration reactor using Alocasia macrorrhiza plant was 60-95% higher electric power potential than using Eleusine Indica grass in short-term (30-day operation. Although, MFC system in evapotranspiration reactor system was one of potential system for renewable electric power generation.

  10. Fact sheet on fuel manufacturing and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section (NFCMS) supports Member States to improve in-pile fuel performance and management of materials; and to develop advanced fuel technologies for ensuring reliability and economic efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle, provides assistance to Member States to support fuel-manufacturing capability, including quality assurance techniques, optimization of manufacturing parameters and radiation protection, supports the development fuel modeling expertise in Member States, covering both normal operation and postulated and severe accident conditions, provides information and support for the operation of Nuclear Power Plant to ensure that the environment and water chemistry is appropriate for fuel operation, supports fuel failure investigations, including equipment for failed fuel detection and for post-irradiation examination and inspection, as well as fuel repair, provides information and support research into the basic properties of fuel materials, including UO2, MOX, (Th, Pu)O2, (Th, U233)O2 fuels and zirconium alloy cladding and fuel assembly components and offers guidance on the relationship with back-end requirement (interim storage, transport, reprocessing, disposal), fuel utilization and management, MOX fuels, alternative fuels and advanced fuel technology and materials, economic and other aspects of nuclear fuel use (e.g. environmental impact). Recently NFCMS provided support to a Member State manufacturing Gadolinia doped fuel and provided in-mast sipping equipment to a Nuclear Power Plant to allow the determination of fuel failure. Member States interested in fuel performance and manufacture should contact the Technical Cooperation Department of the Agency and Member States interested in knowing more about the Agency's programme on source management should contact: C. Ganguly, Section Head, V. Inozemtsev, J. Killeen

  11. Studies and manufacture of plutonium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.; Mustelier, J.P.; Pascard, R.

    1964-01-01

    The studies carried out at the C.E.A. on the properties of fast neutron reactor fuels, the manufacture of fuel elements and their behaviour under irradiation are broadly outlined. The metal fuels studied are the ternary alloys U Pu Mo, U Pu Nb, U Pa Ti, U Pa Zr, the ceramic fuels being mixed uranium and plutonium oxides, carbides and nitrides obtained by sintering. Results are given on the manufacture of uranium fuel elements containing a small proportion of plutonium, used in a critical experiment, and on the first experiments in the manufacture of fuel elements for the reactor Rapsodie. Finally the results of irradiation tests carried out on the prototype fuel pins for Rapsodie are described. (authors) [fr

  12. Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs

  13. Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs.

  14. Regulatory control of fuel design and manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The regulatory control of the design and manufacturing of the nuclear fuel and of the control rods aims to ensure conformance to set requirements during normal operating conditions, anticipated operational transients and postulated accident conditions. The regulatory control of design, manufacturing, receiving inspections and the start of operation of the nuclear fuel are specified in the guide. The regulatory control procedure also applies to the control rods and the shield elements

  15. Manufacturing method for fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi.

    1997-01-01

    In an FBR type reactor, uranium/plutonium mixed oxide fuels (MOX fuels) are used. Nuclear fuel materials containing uranium and plutonium are filled to a portion or all of a plurality of fuel rods. In this case, an equivalent fissile coefficient (B) based on a combustion guarantee method defined by the formula: (B) = (M) · (F) is determined. (M) is a combustion matrix constituted based on the solution of equation of combustion which is a differential equation representing change with time of each of nuclear fuel materials during combustion. (F) is an equivalent fissile coefficient based on a reactivity keeping method which is a coefficient representing a reactivity worth equivalent with plutonium-239. The content of each of the nuclear fuel materials is determined so that the effective multiplication factor at the final stage of the operation cycle is substantially constant by using the equivalent fissile coefficient (B) based on the combustion guarantee method. (I.N.)

  16. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Masaomi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Hirai, Mutsumi; Tanabe, Isami; Yuda, Ryoichi.

    1989-01-01

    In a method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellets by compression molding an oxide powder of nuclear fuel material followed by sintering, a metal nuclear material is mixed with an oxide powder of the nuclear fuel material. As the metal nuclear fuel material, whisker or wire-like fine wire or granules of metal uranium can be used effectively. As a result, a fuel pellet in which the metal nuclear fuel is disposed in a network-like manner can be obtained. The pellet shows a great effect of preventing thermal stress destruction of pellets upon increase of fuel rod power as compared with conventional pellets. Further, the metal nuclear fuel material acts as an oxygen getter to suppress the increase of O/M ratio of the pellets. Further, it is possible to reduce the swelling of pellet at high burn-up degree. (T.M.)

  17. WWER-1000 nuclear fuel manufacturing process at PJSC MSZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morylev, A.; Bagdatyeva, E.; Aksenov, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this report a brief description of WWER-1000 fuel manufacturing process steps at PJSC MSZ as: uranium dioxide powder fabrication; fuel pellet manufacture fuel rod manufacture working assembly and fuel assembly manufacture is given. The implemented innovations are also presented

  18. MFC Communications Infrastructure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

    2012-01-01

    Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

  19. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  20. Computer-assisted nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, J.P.; Schaumann, S.M.; Stone, E.

    1976-01-01

    At the ERDA Savannah River Plant, a process monitor, which incorporates an online digital computer, assists in manufacturing fuel elements used to produce nuclides such as plutonium, tritium, and californium in the plant's nuclear reactors. Also, inventory functions assist in safeguarding fissile material and protecting against accidental nuclear criticality. Terminals at strategic locations throughout the process area enable production operators to send and receive instructions and information on each manufacturing step

  1. Computer-assisted nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, J.P.; Schaumann, C.M.; Stone, E.

    1976-06-01

    At the ERDA Savannah River Plant, a process monitor, which incorporates an online digital computer, assists in manufacturing fuel elements used to produce nuclides such as plutonium, tritium, and californium in the plant's nuclear reactors. Also, inventory functions assist in safeguarding fissile material and protecting against accidental nuclear criticality. Terminals at strategic locations throughout the process area enable production operators to send and receive instructions and information on each manufacturing step. 11 fig

  2. Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

    The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified

  3. Bioelectric production from sediment of pond fishing and molasses using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology-base with the influence of substrate concentration variety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syafitri, L. M.; Saputro, Y. A.; Hana, P. N.; Hardiani, D.; Raharjo, B.

    2018-03-01

    Indonesia is currently faced the problem of the need for electrical energy. MFC is a technology that can be used to generate electricity by utilizing microbial activity. The aims of this study is to manage the molasses waste and sediment of fishery as a substrate in the MFC system. The research method was performed by preparing anode and cathode connected by a salt bridge forming the system of MFC Double Chamber. The result of bacteriology test using Total Plate Count (TPC) method showed that the number of bacterial colonies on the sediment substrate was 4.1 × 106 cfu/gr, while the molasses substrate was 7,1 × 104 cfu/gr. The measurement result of electricity showed that 25% sediment and 75% molasses substrate variation resulted in the highest average voltage and power density that are 0.372 V and 813.191 mW/m2. The conclusion of this research is that the mixture of sediment with molasses substrate can increase the production of electricity produced by MFC system.

  4. Safety in manufacturing of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daste, Bernard

    1980-01-01

    Production of low enriched uranium fuel raises specific safety problems resulting from the very nature of the manufacturing process as from the industrial size generally given to the new facilities for this kind of production. The author exposes the experience so far acquired by F.B.F.C. (Societe franco-belge de fabrication du combustible) which is making important investments in order to meet the fuel needs of the French nuclear programme. After a short description of the fuel and the principal stages of its production, he analyses the potential nuclear hazards of the F.B.F.C. facilities operation and the adequate safety measures taken [fr

  5. Automatic inspection for remotely manufactured fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Vitela, J.E.; Gibbs, K.S.; Benedict, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Two classification techniques, standard control charts and artificial neural networks, are studied as a means for automating the visual inspection of the welding of end plugs onto the top of remotely manufactured reprocessed nuclear fuel element jackets. Classificatory data are obtained through measurements performed on pre- and post-weld images captured with a remote camera and processed by an off-the-shelf vision system. The two classification methods are applied in the classification of 167 dummy stainless steel (HT9) fuel jackets yielding comparable results

  6. CERCA'S experience in UMO fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarousse, Ch.; Lavastre, Y.; Grasse, M.

    2003-01-01

    Considered as a suitable solution for non-proliferation and reprocessing purposes, UMo fuel has been chosen and studied by the RERTR program since 1996. Involved in the RERTR fuel developments since 1978, with more than 20 years of U 3 SI 2 fuel production, and closely linked to the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CERCA was able to define properly, from the beginning, the right R and D actions plan for UMo fuel development. CERCA has already demonstrated during the last 4 years its ability to manufacture plates and fuel elements with high density UMo fuel. UMo full size plates produced for 4 irradiation experiments in 3 European reactors afforded us a unique experience. In addition, as a main part of our R and D effort, we have always studied in depth a key part of the CERCA process outline which is the plate rolling stage. After some preliminary investigation in order to define the phenomenological model describing the behavior of the fuel core when rolling, we have developed a rolling digital simulator. (author)

  7. Experience with quality assurance in fuel design and manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Nilson, F.

    1984-01-01

    The Quality Assurance/Quality Control activities for nuclear fuel design and manufacturing described here are coordinated under a common ''Quality Assurance System For Fuel Assemblies and Associated Core Components'' which regulates the QA-functions of the development, design and manufacturing of fuel assemblies independent of the organizational assignment of the contributing technical groups. Some essential characteristics of the system are shown, using examples from design control, procurement, manufacturing and qualification of special processes. The experience is very good, it allowed a flexible and well controlled implementation of design and manufacturing innovations and contributed to the overall good fuel behavior. (orig.)

  8. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Masao; Oguma, Masaomi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively prevent the bending of nuclear fuel elements in the reactor by grinding the end faces of pellets due to their mutual sliding. Method: In the manufacturing process of nuclear fuel elements, a plurality of pellets whose sides have been polished are fed one by one by way of a feeding mechanism through the central aperture in an electric motor into movable arms and retained horizontally with the central axis by being held on the side. Then, the pellet held by one of the arms is urged to another pellet held by the other of the arms by way of a pressing mechanism and the mating end faces of both of the pellets are polished by mutual sliding. Thereafter, the grinding dusts resulted are eliminated by drawing pressurized air and then the pellets are enforced into a cladding tube. Thus, the pellets are charged into the cladding tube with both polished end faces being contacted to each other, whereby the axial force is uniformly transmitted within the end faces to prevent the bending of the cladding tube. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Establishing a LEU MTR fuel manufacturing facility in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamie, R.W.; Kocher, A.

    2010-01-01

    The South African MTR Fuel Manufacturing Facility was established in the 1970's to supply SAFARI-1 with Fuel Elements and Control Rods. South African capability was developed in parallel with the uranium enrichment program to meet the needs of the Reactor. Further to the July 2005 decision by the South African Governmnent to convert both SAFARI-1 and the Fuel Plant to LEU, the SAFARI-1 phase has been successfully completed and Necsa has commenced with the conversion of the MTR Fuel Manufacturing Facility. In order to establish, validate and qualify the facility, Necsa has entered into a co-operation and technology transfer agreement with AREVA CERCA, the French manufacturer of Research Reactor fuel elements. Past experiences, conversion challenges and the status of the MTR Fuel Facility Project are discussed. On-going co-operation with AREVA CERCA to implement the local manufacture of LEU fuel is explained and elaborated on. (author)

  10. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masao; Oyama, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Takanobu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To discriminate the properties of light white deposits on a clad tube during the process of manufacturing nuclear fuel rods and then remove this to reproduce a good clad tube, thereby enhancing a yield of the clad tube. Structure: When a light white deposits is found to be appeared on outer or inner surface of coating during the process of appearance inspection, this is then permitted to subject to treatment of hot water immersion and discrimination. Requirements for removal of adhered matter in the process of treatment of hot water immersion are that deioned water of specific resistance 5 x 10 5 ohms or more is used with water temperature maintained at 60 to 100 0 C for immersion treatment for 10 to 30 minutes. In this case, however, if the water temperature is more than 80 0 C, the immersion time can be set less than 10 minutes. With the addition of such process described above, about 2.5% of total receiving number can be reproduced. (Yoshihara, H.)

  11. Recent advances in fuel product and manufacturing process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slember, R.J.; Doshi, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses advancements in commercial nuclear fuel products and manufacturing made by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation in response to the commercial nuclear fuel industry's demand for high reliability, increased plant availability and improved operating flexibility. The features and benefits of Westinghouse's most advanced fuel products--VANTAGE 5 for PWR plants and QUAD+ for BWR plants--are described, as well as 'high performance' fuel concepts now under development for delivery in the late 1980s. The paper also disusses the importance of in-process quality control throughout manufacturing towards reducing product variability and improving fuel reliability. (author)

  12. Consolidating indigenous capability for PHWR fuel manufacturing in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraj, R.N., E-mail: cenfc@nfc.gov.in [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Government of India, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    Since inception of Nuclear Power Programme in India greater emphasis was laid on total self- reliance in Fuel manufacturing. For Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), which forms a base for the first stage of the programme, an integrated approach was adopted encompassing different areas of expertise -Design, Construction and Operation of PHWRs; Heavy Water production and Fuel Design and Manufacturing technologies. For the first PHWR constructed about 35 years back with the Canadian collaboration, known as Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS), half the core requirement of fuel was met from the fuel manufactured for the first time in India. Since then the fuel production capabilities were enhanced by setting up an industrial scale fuel manufacturing facility - Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) at Hyderabad, India during early '70s. NFC has been continuously expanding its capacities to meet the fuel demand of all the PHWRs constructed and operated by Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL). Presently, fifteen PHWR 220 MWe units and two PHWR 540 MWe units are in operation and one more PHWR 220 MWe unit is in advanced stage of commissioning in India. While continuously engaged in the manufacture of fuel for these reactors, NFC has been upgrading the production lines with new processes and quality assurance systems. In order to multiply the production capacities, NFC has embarked on developing indigenous capability for design and building of special purpose process equipment for Uranium dioxide powder production, pelletisation and final assembly operations. Some of the equipment having state-of-the-art features includes dryers/furnaces for UO{sub 2} powder, presses/ sintering furnaces for pelletisation and resistance welding equipment/ machining stations for assembly operations. In addition, several campaigns were taken over the years for manufacturing PHWR fuel bundles containing reprocessed Uranium, Thoria and slightly enriched Uranium. The paper

  13. Consolidating indigenous capability for PHWR fuel manufacturing in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraj, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Since inception of Nuclear Power Programme in India greater emphasis was laid on total self- reliance in Fuel manufacturing. For Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), which forms a base for the first stage of the programme, an integrated approach was adopted encompassing different areas of expertise -Design, Construction and Operation of PHWRs; Heavy Water production and Fuel Design and Manufacturing technologies. For the first PHWR constructed about 35 years back with the Canadian collaboration, known as Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS), half the core requirement of fuel was met from the fuel manufactured for the first time in India. Since then the fuel production capabilities were enhanced by setting up an industrial scale fuel manufacturing facility - Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) at Hyderabad, India during early '70s. NFC has been continuously expanding its capacities to meet the fuel demand of all the PHWRs constructed and operated by Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL). Presently, fifteen PHWR 220 MWe units and two PHWR 540 MWe units are in operation and one more PHWR 220 MWe unit is in advanced stage of commissioning in India. While continuously engaged in the manufacture of fuel for these reactors, NFC has been upgrading the production lines with new processes and quality assurance systems. In order to multiply the production capacities, NFC has embarked on developing indigenous capability for design and building of special purpose process equipment for Uranium dioxide powder production, pelletisation and final assembly operations. Some of the equipment having state-of-the-art features includes dryers/furnaces for UO 2 powder, presses/ sintering furnaces for pelletisation and resistance welding equipment/ machining stations for assembly operations. In addition, several campaigns were taken over the years for manufacturing PHWR fuel bundles containing reprocessed Uranium, Thoria and slightly enriched Uranium. The paper summarises

  14. Westinghouse fuel manufacturing systems: a step change in performance improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutyala, Meena

    2009-01-01

    Today's competitive electrical generation industry demands that nuclear power plant operators minimize total operating costs, including fuel cycle cost while maintaining flawless fuel performance. The mission of Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel is to be the industry's most responsive supplier of flawless, value added fuel products and services, as judged by our customers. As nuclear is fast becoming the choice of many countries, existing manufacturing plants and facilities are once again running at full capacity. In this context Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel is committed to deliver a step change in performance improvement worldwide through its manufacturing operations by the introduction of a set of fundamentals collectively named the 'Westinghouse Fuel Manufacturing System' (WFMS), whose key principles are discussed in this paper. (author)

  15. Monolithic fuel injector and related manufacturing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve [Greenville, SC; Johnson, Thomas Edward [Greenville, SC; Lacy, Benjamin [Greenville, SC; York, William David [Greenville, SC; Stevenson, Christian Xavier [Greenville, SC

    2012-05-22

    A monolithic fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle includes a substantially hollow vesicle body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween, an internal baffle plate extending radially outwardly from a downstream end of the bore, terminating short of the peripheral wall, thereby defining upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body, in fluid communication by way of a radial gap between the baffle plate and the peripheral wall. A plurality of integral pre-mix tubes extend axially through the upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body and through the baffle plate, with at least one fuel injection hole extending between each of the pre-mix tubes and the upstream fuel plenum, thereby enabling fuel in the upstream plenum to be injected into the plurality of pre-mix tubes. The fuel injection head is formed by direct metal laser sintering.

  16. Manufacture of fuel and fuel channels and their performance in Indian PHWRs'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalidas, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) at Hyderabad is conglomeration of chemical, metallurgical and mechanical plants, processing uranium and zirconium in two separate streams and culminating in the fuel assembly plant. Apart from manufacturing fuel for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), NFC is also engaged in the manufacture of reactor core structurals for these reactors. NFC has carried our several technological developments over the years and implemented them for the manufacture of fuel, calandria tubes and pressure tubes for PHWRs. Keeping in pace with the Nuclear Power Programme envisaged by the Department of Atomic Energy, NFC had augmented its production capacities in all these areas. The paper highlights several actions initiated in the areas of fuel design, fuel manufacturing, manufacturing of zirconium alloy core structurals, fuel clad tubes and components and their performance in Indian PHWRs. (author)

  17. Manufacture of fuel and fuel channels and their performance in Indian PHWRS - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalidas, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) at Hyderabad is a conglomeration of chemical, metallurgical and mechanical plants, processing uranium and zirconium in two separate streams and culminating in the fuel assembly plant. Apart from manufacturing fuel for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), NFC is also engaged in the manufacture of reactor core structurals for these reactors. NFC has carried out several technological developments over the years and implemented them for the manufacture of fuel, calandria tubes and pressure tubes for PHWRs. Keeping in pace with the Nuclear Power Programme envisaged by the Department of Atomic Energy, NFC had augmented its production capacities in all these areas. The paper highlights several actions initiated in the areas of fuel design, fuel manufacturing, manufacturing of zirconium alloy core structurals, fuel clad tubes and components and their performance in Indian PHWRs. (author)

  18. The manufacture of LEU fuel elements at Dounreay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    Two LEU test elements are being manufactured at Dounreay for test irradiation in the HFR at Petten, The Netherlands. This paper describes the installation of equipment and the development of the fabrication and inspection techniques necessary for the manufacture of LEU fuel plates. The author`s experience in overcoming the technical problems of stray fuel particles, dog-boning, uranium homogeneity and the measurement of uranium distribution is also described.

  19. Manufacturing technologies for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluesen, Andreas; Mueller, Martin; Kimiaie, Nicola; Konradi, Irene; Mergel, Juergen; Stolten, Detlef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Energy Research - IEF-3: Fuel Cells

    2010-07-01

    Fuel cell research is focussing on increasing power density and lifetime and reducing costs of the whole fuel cell system. In order to reach these aims, it is necessary to develop appropriately designed components outgoing from high quality materials, a suitable manufacturing process and a well balanced system. To make use of the advantages that can be obtained by developing production technology, we are mainly improving the coating and assembling techniques for polymer electrolyte fuel cells, especially Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs). Coating is used for making fuel cell electrodes as well as highly conductive contacts. Assembling is used to join larger components like membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and bipolar units consisting of flow fields and the separator plate, as well as entire stacks. On the one hand a reproducible manufacturing process is required to study fine differences in fuel cell performance affected by new materials or new designs. On the other hand a change in each parameter of the manufacturing process itself can change product properties and therefore affect fuel cell performance. As a result, gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) are now produced automatically in square-meter batches, the hot-pressing of MEAs is a fully automated process and by pre-assembling the number of parts that have to be assembled in a stack was reduced by a factor of 10. These achievements make DMFC manufacturing more reproducible and less error-prone. All these and further developments of manufacturing technology are necessary to make DMFCs ready for the market. (orig.)

  20. Degradation resistant fuel cladding materials and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Montes, J. [ENUSA, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    GE has been producing the degradation resistant cladding (zirconium liner and zircaloy-2 surface larger) described here with the cooperation of its primary zirconium vendors since the beginning of 1994. Approximately 24 fuel reloads, or in excess of 250,000 fuel rods, have been produced using this material by GE. GE has also produced tubing for one reload of fuel that is currently being produced by its technology affiliate ENUSA. (orig./HP)

  1. The manufacture of plutonium fuels for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebastard, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the agreement concluded between COGEMA and BELGONUCLEAIRE, reflected in the creation of the COMMOX group which has been made reponsible for promoting and marketing plutonium fuel rods for light water reactors. One then analyses the main aspects of manufacturing this type of fuel and the resources deployed. Finally one indicates the sales prospects scheduled to meet requirements (MELOX plant) [fr

  2. Continuous improvement in manufacturing and inspection of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingon, A.; Ruiz, R.

    2015-01-01

    The manufacturing and inspection process of fuel assemblies in ENUSA is characterized by its robustness acquired over the last thirty years of experience in manufacturing. The reliability of these processes is based on a qualified processes and continuous improvement in the design and upgrading of equipment and optimization of software and manufacturing processes. Additionally, management and quality control systems have been improved in both software and measuring business objectives. this article emphasizes the improvements made over the past five years in management, production and inspection of fuel assemblies. (Author)

  3. Some tooling for manufacturing research reactor fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will discuss some of the tooling necessary to manufacture aluminum-based research reactor fuel plates. Most of this tooling is intended for use in a high-production facility. Some of the tools shown have manufactured more than 150,000 pieces. The only maintenance has been sharpening. With careful design, tools can be made to accommodate the manufacture of several different fuel elements, thus, reducing tooling costs and maintaining tools that the operators are trained to use. An important feature is to design the tools using materials with good lasting quality. Good tools can increase return on investment. (author)

  4. Some Tooling for Manufacturing Research Reactor Fuel Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will discuss some of the tooling necessary to manufacture aluminum-based research reactor fuel plates. Most of this tooling is intended for use in a high-production facility. Some of the tools shown have manufactured more than 150,000 pieces. The only maintenance has been sharpening. With careful design, tools can be made to accommodate the manufacture of several different fuel elements, thus, reducing tooling costs and maintaining tools that the operators are trained to use. An important feature is to design the tools using materials with good lasting quality. Good tools can increase return on investment

  5. External Resistances Applied to MFC Affect Core Microbiome and Swine Manure Treatment Efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Bañeras, Lluis; Puig, Sebastià; Molognoni, Daniele; Vilà-Rovira, Albert; Hernández-del Amo, Elena; Balaguer, Maria D.; Colprim, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can be designed to combine water treatment with concomitant electricity production. Animal manure treatment has been poorly explored using MFCs, and its implementation at full-scale primarily relies on the bacterial distribution and activity within the treatment cell. This study reports the bacterial community changes at four positions within the anode of two almost identically operated MFCs fed swine manure. Changes in the microbiome structure are described according to the MFC fluid dynamics and the application of a maximum power point tracking system (MPPT) compared to a fixed resistance system (Ref-MFC). Both external resistance and cell hydrodynamics are thought to heavily influence MFC performance. The microbiome was characterised both quantitatively (qPCR) and qualitatively (454-pyrosequencing) by targeting bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The diversity of the microbial community in the MFC biofilm was reduced and differed from the influent swine manure. The adopted electric condition (MPPT vs fixed resistance) was more relevant than the fluid dynamics in shaping the MFC microbiome. MPPT control positively affected bacterial abundance and promoted the selection of putatively exoelectrogenic bacteria in the MFC core microbiome (Sedimentibacter sp. and gammaproteobacteria). These differences in the microbiome may be responsible for the two-fold increase in power production achieved by the MPPT-MFC compared to the Ref-MFC. PMID:27701451

  6. Manufacture of spent fuel chopper (Paper No. 26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan Rao, A.; Suthar, R.L.; Mahajan, C.P.

    1987-02-01

    In-house manufacture of spent fuel chopper was the most significant step towards indigenisation of vital equipment needed in a spent fuel reprocessing plant. The chopper used in such a plant receives the highly radioactive spent fuel rods for chopping and distributing the cut pieces into desired online chemical processing equipment. Its design, engineering and manufacture has to be carefully planned and executed to ensure the reliability of the equipment for continuous safe operation, as well as the simplicity from the point of view of maintenance, which essentially has to be done using remote handling equipment. In this paper an attempt has been made to explain briefly the preparation of engineering details, manufacturing layouts and the problems encountered during the manufacture of some of the critical parts of the chopper. (author). 5 figs

  7. Automated manufacturing of breeder reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, D.H.; Benson, E.M.; Bennett, D.W.

    1983-09-01

    The Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) line is an automated, remotely controlled breeder fuel pin fabrication process which is to be installed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The FMEF is presently under construction at Hanford and is scheduled for completion in 1984. The SAF line is scheduled for startup in 1987 and will produce mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel pins for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Radiological protection requirements, computer control equipment, use of robotics, and the fabrication process is described

  8. Metal fuel manufacturing and irradiation performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Walters, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    The advances in metal fuel by the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory are the subject of this paper. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid-metal-cooled reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The advances stressed in the paper include fuel irradiation performance, and improved passive safety. The goals and the safety philosophy of the Integral Fast Reactor Program are stressed

  9. Implications of manufacturing deviations on fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellapandi, P.; Clement Ravi Chandar, S.; Chetal, S.C.; Baldev Raj

    2009-01-01

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) core consists of 181 Fuel subassembly (FSA), 120 blanket SA and shielding SA of steel and B 4 C besides 9 Control Safety Rod SA and 3 Diverse Safety Rod SA. All the subassemblies (SA) stand vertically on the grid plate. PFBR FSA consists of 217 fuel pins of 2540 mm length arranged in a triangular pitch standing vertically on the rails inside a hexagonal duct. The bottom of the hexagon is screwed and welded to a cylindrical foot of length 600 mm. The SA foot has radial slots that provide an entry to the coolant sodium and also houses flow control devices. While the foot of the A handling head is welded to the top of hexagon, provides an aid for fuel handling machine to insert and withdraw the FSA from the grid plate. The length of the FSA is 4500 mm.

  10. Niobia-doped UO2 fuel manufacturing experience at British nuclear fuels Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.; Wood, G.A.; Perkins, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    BNFL Fuel Division has made niobia doped fuel for over twenty years in its Springfields Research and Development facilities. This paper reviews this experience together with feedback from successful in-reactor and laboratory tests. Recent experience in qualifying and manufacturing niobia doped fuel pellets for a European PWR will be described. (author)

  11. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, J.A.B.; Durazzo, M.

    2010-01-01

    IPEN developed and made available for routine production the technology for manufacturing dispersion type fuel elements for use in research reactors. However, the fuel produced at IPEN is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 gU/cm 3 by using the U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion. Increasing the uranium concentration of the fuel is interesting by the possibility of increasing the reactor core reactivity and lifetime of the fuel. It is possible to increase the concentration of uranium in the fuel up to the technological limit of 4.8 gU/cm 3 for the U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion, which is well placed around the world. This new fuel will be applicable in the new Brazilian-Multipurpose Reactor RMB. This study aimed to develop the manufacturing process of high uranium concentration fuel, redefining the procedures currently used in the manufacture of IPEN. This paper describes the main procedures adjustments that will be necessary. (author)

  12. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: jasouza@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    IPEN developed and made available for routine production the technology for manufacturing dispersion type fuel elements for use in research reactors. However, the fuel produced at IPEN is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 g U/c m3 by using the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion. Increasing the uranium concentration of the fuel is interesting by the possibility of increasing the reactor core reactivity and lifetime of the fuel. It is possible to increase the concentration of uranium in the fuel up to the technological limit of 4.8 g U/c m3 for the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion, which is well placed around the world. This new fuel will be applicable in the new Brazilian- Multipurpose Reactor RMB. This study aimed to develop the manufacturing process of high uranium concentration fuel, redefining the procedures currently used in the manufacture of IPEN. This paper describes the main procedures adjustments that will be necessary. (author)

  13. The nuclear fuel cycle: (2) fuel element manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, J.

    1976-01-01

    Large-scale production of nuclear fuel in the United Kingdom is carried out at Springfields Works of British Nuclear Fuels Ltd., a company formed from the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority in 1971. The paper describes in some detail the Springfields Works processes for the conversion of uranium ore concentrate to uranium tetrafluoride, then conversion of the tetrafluoride to either uranium metal for cladding in Magnox to form fuel for the British Mk I gas-cooled reactors, or to uranium hexafluoride for enrichment of the fissile 235 U isotope content at the Capenhurst Works of BNFL. Details are given of the reconversion at Springfields Works of this enriched uranium hexafluoride to uranium dioxide, which is pelleted and then clad in either stainless steel or zircaloy containers to form the fuel assemblies for the British Mk II AGR or advanced gas-cooled reactors or for the water reactor fuels. (author)

  14. The manufacture, quality control and performance of KANUPP fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, M.I.; Salim, M.; Ahmad, I.

    1989-01-01

    KANUPP is a 137 MWe CANDU reactor. The fuel material is high-density sintered pellets (95-97% T.D.) of natural UO 2 in Zircaloy 4 sheaths. Reactor-grade UO 2 powder is precompacted, granulated, blended with 0.2% zinc stearate, and compacted into green pellets. The pellets are sintered in a reducing atmosphere, then finished by grinding, culled, and loaded into Zr-4 tubes. The welded elements are assembled into a fuel bundle. Quality control and quality assurance procedures are followed during all stages of manufacturing. The entire core of KANUPP now consists of locally manufactured fuel. Several bundles have already achieved the design burnup (8650 MWD/TU). There have never been any failures of these fuel bundles. (6 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.)

  15. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S. [M-C Power Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  16. Nuclear fuel manufacturing. Current activities and prospects at INR Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horhoianu, Grigore

    2001-01-01

    Development of the CANDU nuclear fuel is currently conducted world wide onto two principal directions: - increasing the service span of the current type of fuel and improving the efficiency of burnup in reactor; - reducing the costs of fuel manufacturing by improving the design and manufacturing technologies in condition of increasing fuel performance. In parallel, a research program, RAAN, is undergoing, concerning the development of advanced CANDU type fuels (SEU, RU, DUPIC, Th), aiming at reducing the overall costs per fuel cycle. In the INR TRIGA reactor a large number of experimental fuel elements manufactured in INR were irradiated under different conditions specific to the CANDU reactor operation. Post irradiation investigations both destructive and non-destructive were carried out in the hot cells at INR Pitesti. The experimental results were used in order to optimize and evaluate the fuel project, to check the fuel manufacturing technologies as well as to certify the computational codes. The local thermo-mechanical analyses by final element methods, modelling the SCC phenomenon, probabilistic evaluation of performance parameters of the fuel, constitute new directions in the modelling and developing computational code. The developed codes were submitted to a thorough validation process to comply with the quality assurance. The excellent results obtained in INR were confirmed by participation in the FUMEX International Exercises of computer code intercomparison, organized by IAEA Vienna. Progress was also recorded in establishing the behaviour of fuel elements failed during reactor operation and the effect their maintenance in the reactor core could have upon the power reactor operation. A system-expert variant was worked out able for a short term analysis of the decisions referring to removing the failing element at Cernavoda NPP. As advanced CANDU fuel is concerned, until now preliminary variants for a fuel bundle with 43 elements containing slightly

  17. Characterization of Oscillatory Lift in MFC Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Lang Jr, Joseph Reagle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize the response of an airfoil with an oscillatory morphing, Macro-fiber composite (MFC) trailing edge. Correlation of the airfoil lift with the oscillatory input is presented. Modal analysis of the test airfoil and apparatus is used to determine the frequency response function. The effects of static MFC inputs on the FRF are presented and compared to the unactuated airfoil. The transfer function is then used to determine the lift component du...

  18. Six sigma quality for fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbani, M.D.; Onderwater, T.

    1997-01-01

    It is widely recognized that operational performance in product manufacturing is largely determined by understanding and maintaining process capability. By definition, Six Sigma is a statistical unit of measure reflecting process capability that yields less' than 6.8 defects per million product produced. Statistically, this translates into obtaining a long term manufacturing process capability of ± 4.5 standard deviations about the mean within specification limits. The heart of the Six Sigma program developed by the Six Sigma Academy is what we refer to as the Breakthrough Strategy. This rigorous analytical methodology is the driving force in obtaining world class performance of Six Sigma. The methodology applies statistical and practical tools in resolving a problem or improving a product or process. The application of Six Sigma focuses on attacking process input variables (independent) rather than the output variables. Focusing on these independent variables (temperature, power, force, etc.) and the variation in the end product they create, enables us to get to the root of the problem rather than react to the symptoms of the problem. In this manner we prevent defects from occurring rather than inspecting and monitoring the product. Why the need for such an ambitious program? It is estimated that the cost of failure (rework, scrap, warranties, etc.) can be as high as 15% of sales for companies typically operating at 3-4 sigma. In achieving Six Sigma, costs of failure are typically less than 5%. The thought of reducing business costs while achieving the recognition of being our customer's premier choice provides enormous incentive to reach such status. (author)

  19. LEU fuel element produced by the Egyptian fuel manufacturing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, W.I.

    2000-01-01

    The Egyptian Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant, FMPP, is a Material Testing Reactor type (MTR) fuel element facility, for producing the specified fuel elements required for the Egyptian Second Research Reactor, ETRR-2. The plant uses uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 , 19.75% U 235 by wt) as a raw material which is processed through a series of the manufacturing, inspection and test plan to produce the final specified fuel elements. Radiological safety aspects during design, construction, operation, and all reasonably accepted steps should be taken to prevent or reduce the chance of accidents occurrence. (author)

  20. Rapid prototyping methods for the manufacture of fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The potential for the application of this method for the manufacture of metallic bipolar plates (BPP for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs is presented and discussed. Special attention is paid to the fabrication of light elements for the construction of PEMFC stacks designed for mobile applications such as aviation technology and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs.

  1. Method of manufacturing sintered nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarumi, Kazutoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain composite pellets with an improved strength. Method: A core mainly composed of fuel materials is previously prepared, embedded into the central portion of a pellet, silted therearound with cladding material, and then pressmolded and sintered. For instance, a rugby-ball like core body with the maximum outer diameter of 6 mm and the height of 6 mm is made by compressive molding with uranium dioxide powder, then coating material comprising the same powder incorporated with 0.1 % by weight of SiC fibers is filled around the core body, which is molded into a composite pellet by means of pressing and then sintered at 1600 0 C, to obtain a sintered pellet of 93.5 % theoretical density. As the result of the compression test for the pellet, it showed a strength greater by 15 % than that of the similar mono-layer pellet. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Performance of candu-6 fuel bundles manufactured in romania nuclear fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, A.; Barbu, A.; Din, F.; Dinuta, G.; Dumitru, I.; Musetoiu, A.; Serban, G.; Tomescu, A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the performance of nuclear fuel produced by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti during 1995 - 2012 and irradiated in units U1 and U2 from Nuclear Power Plant (N.P.P.) Cernavoda and also present the Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti concern for providing technology to prevent the failure causes of fuel bundles in the reactor. This article presents Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti experience on tracking performance of nuclear fuel in reactor and strategy investigation of fuel bundles notified as suspicious and / or defectives both as fuel element and fuel bundle, it analyzes the possible defects that can occur at fuel bundle or fuel element and can lead to their failure in the reactor. Implementation of modern technologies has enabled optimization of manufacturing processes and hence better quality stability of achieving components (end caps, chamfered sheath), better verification of end cap - sheath welding. These technologies were qualified by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti on automatic and Computer Numerical Control (C.N.C.) programming machines. A post-irradiation conclusive analysis which will take place later this year (2013) in Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (the action was initiated earlier this year by bringing a fuel bundle which has been reported defective by pool visual inspection) will provide additional information concerning potential damage causes of fuel bundles due to manufacturing processes. (authors)

  3. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Masaomi; Masuda, Hiroshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent pellet destruction due to thermal stresses and reduce the swelling or issue of corrosive gaseous fission products. Method: Raw material powder for nuclear fuel pellets constitute so-called secondary particles in which a plurality of primary particles are coagulated. The degree of coagulation of the secondary particles can be determined as the bulk density of the powder. In view of the above, when pellets are sintered by using a powder mixture comprising a powder having the same constitution and different bulk density from the main raw powder as the sub-raw material powder incorporated to the main raw material powder, the pellet tissue provides such a fine porous structure that fine gaps are present a the periphery of high density secondary particles, since there is a difference in the shrinkage factor (sintering-shrinkage degree) between powders of different secondary particle densities in the course of the sintering. Thus, pellets can be prevented from thermal impact destruction and cause no destructive cracks. (Takahashi, M.)

  4. DUPIC nuclear fuel manufacturing and process technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J. J.; Lee, J. W.

    2000-05-01

    In this study, DUPIC fuel fabrication technology and the active fuel laboratory were developed for the study of spent nuclear fuel. A new nuclear fuel using highly radioactive nuclear materials can be studied at the active fuel laboratory. Detailed DUPIC fuel fabrication process flow was developed considering the manufacturing flow, quality control process and material accountability. The equipment layout of about twenty DUPIC equipment at IMEF M6 hot cell was established for the minimization of the contamination during DUPIC processes. The characteristics of the SIMFUEL powder and pellets was studied in terms of milling conditions. The characteristics of DUPIC powder and pellet was studied by using 1 kg of spent PWR fuel at PIEF nr.9405 hot cell. The results were used as reference process conditions for following DUPIC fuel fabrication at IMEF M6. Based on the reference fabrication process conditions, the main DUPIC pellet fabrication campaign has been started at IMEF M6 using 2 kg of spent PWR fuel since 2000 January. As of March 2000, about thirty DUPIC pellets were successfully fabricated

  5. DUPIC nuclear fuel manufacturing and process technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J. J.; Lee, J. W. [and others

    2000-05-01

    In this study, DUPIC fuel fabrication technology and the active fuel laboratory were developed for the study of spent nuclear fuel. A new nuclear fuel using highly radioactive nuclear materials can be studied at the active fuel laboratory. Detailed DUPIC fuel fabrication process flow was developed considering the manufacturing flow, quality control process and material accountability. The equipment layout of about twenty DUPIC equipment at IMEF M6 hot cell was established for the minimization of the contamination during DUPIC processes. The characteristics of the SIMFUEL powder and pellets was studied in terms of milling conditions. The characteristics of DUPIC powder and pellet was studied by using 1 kg of spent PWR fuel at PIEF nr.9405 hot cell. The results were used as reference process conditions for following DUPIC fuel fabrication at IMEF M6. Based on the reference fabrication process conditions, the main DUPIC pellet fabrication campaign has been started at IMEF M6 using 2 kg of spent PWR fuel since 2000 January. As of March 2000, about thirty DUPIC pellets were successfully fabricated.

  6. Technique of manufacturing specimen of irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Duck Seok; Seo, Hang Seok; Min, Duck Kee; Koo, Dae Seo; Lee, Eun Pyo; Yang, Song Yeol

    1999-04-01

    Technique of manufacturing specimen of irradiated fuel rods to perform efficient PIE is developed by analyzing the relation between requiring time of manufacturing specimen and manufacturing method in irradiated fuel rods. It takes within an hour to grind 1 mm of specimen thickness under 150 rpm in speed of grinding, 600 g gravity in force using no.120, no.240, no.320 of grinding paper. In case of no.400 of grinding paper, it takes more an hour to grind the same thickness as above. It takes up to a quarter to grind 80-130 μm in specimen thickness using no.400 of grinding paper. When grinding time goes beyond 15 minutes, the grinding thickness of specimen does not exist. The polishing of specimen with 150 Rpms in speed of grinding machine, 600 g gravity in force, 10 minutes in polishing time using diamond paste 15 μm on polishing cloths amounts to 50 μm in specimen thickness. In case of diamond paste 9 μm on polishing cloth, the polishing of specimen amounts to 20 μm. The polishing thickness of specimen with 15 minutes in polishing time using 6 μm, 3 μm, 1 μm, 1/4 μm does not exist. Technique of manufacturing specimen of irradiated fuel rods will have application to the destructive examination of PIE. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs

  7. Five years of successful CANDU-6 fuel manufacturing in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, A.C.; Pascu, A.; Andrei, G.; Bailescu, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing in Romania at FCN Pitesti, after the completion of the qualification in 1994. Commercial production was resumed early 1995 and fuel bundles produced were entirely delivered to Cernavoda Plant and charged in the reactor. More than 12,000 fuel bundles have been produced in the last five years and the fuel behaved very well. Defective bundles represents less than 0.06% from the total irradiated fuel, and the most defects are associated to the highest power positions. After qualification, FCN focused the effort to improve braze quality and also to maintain a low residual hydrogen content in graphite coated sheaths. The production capacity was increased especially for component manufacturing, appendages tack welding and brazing. A new graphite baking furnace with increased capacity, is under design. In the pelleting area, a rotating press will replace the older hydraulic presses used for pelleting. Plant development taken inter consideration the future demands for Cernavoda Unit 2. (author)

  8. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de

    2011-01-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP developed the technology to produce the dispersion type fuel elements for research reactors and made it available for routine production. Today, the fuel produced in IPEN-CNEN/SP is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 gU/cm 3 for U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion-based and 2.3 gU/cm 3 for U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. The increase of uranium concentration in fuel plates enables the reactivity of the reactor core reactivity to be higher and extends the fuel life. Concerning technology, it is possible to increase the uranium concentration in the fuel meat up to the limit of 4.8 gU/cm 3 in U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion and 3.2 gU/cm 3 U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. These dispersions are well qualified worldwide. This work aims to develop the manufacturing process of both fuel meats with high uranium concentrations, by redefining the manufacturing procedures currently adopted in the Nuclear Fuel Center of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Based on the results, it was concluded that to achieve the desired concentration, it is necessary to make some changes in the established procedures, such as in the particle size of the fuel powder and in the feeding process inside the matrix, before briquette pressing. These studies have also shown that the fuel plates, with a high concentration of U 3 Si 2 -Al, met the used specifications. On the other hand, the appearance of the microstructure obtained from U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel plates with 3.2 gU/cm 3 showed to be unsatisfactory, due to the considerably significant porosity observed. The developed fabrication procedure was applied to U 3 Si 2 production at 4.8 gU/cm 3 , with enriched uranium. The produced plates were used to assemble the fuel element IEA-228, which was irradiated in order to check its performance in the IEA-R1 reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP. These new fuels have potential to be used in the new Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. (author)

  9. Beryllium brazing considerations in CANDU fuel bundle manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmsen, J.; Pant, A.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.

    2010-01-01

    'Full text:' Appendages of CANDU fuel bundle elements are currently joined to zircaloy sheaths by vacuum beryllium brazing. Ongoing environmental and workplace concerns about beryllium combined with the continuous efforts by Cameco Fuel Manufacturing in its improvement process, initiated this study to find a substitute for pure beryllium. The presentation will review the necessary functionality of brazing alloy components and short list a series of alloys with the potential to duplicate the performance of pure beryllium. Modifications to current manufacturing processes based on in-plant testing will be discussed in relation to the use of these alloys. The presentation will conclude with a summary of the progress to date and further testing expected to be necessary.

  10. Improvement of the Zircaloy fuel can manufacturing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The following work has been performed in order to ensure more reliable supply of start material for the manufacture of Zy-2 and Zy-4 fuel cans, and to improve the processing techniques and product quality: 1) Two complete production campaigns with the ingot suppliers Western Zirconium and Ugine Aciers. 2) Development of new ingot dimensions (rolling tests). 3) Development of a mechanized washing and cleansing procedure. 4) Development of a new abrasive treatment technique (wet sand blasting). (orig./HP) [de

  11. Experiences and Trends of Manufacturing Technology of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    The 'Atoms for Peace' mission initiated in the mid-1950s paved the way for the development and deployment of nuclear fission reactors as a source of heat energy for electricity generation in nuclear power reactors and as a source of neutrons in non-power reactors for research, materials irradiation, and testing and production of radioisotopes. The fuels for nuclear reactors are manufactured from natural uranium (∼99.3% 238 U + ∼0.7% 235 U) and natural thorium (∼100% 232 Th) resources. Currently, most power and research reactors use 235 U, the only fissile isotope found in nature, as fuel. The fertile isotopes 238 U and 232 Th are transmuted in the reactor to human-made 239 Pu and 233 U fissile isotopes, respectively. Likewise, minor actinides (MA) (Np, Am and Cm) and other plutonium isotopes are also formed by a series of neutron capture reactions with 238 U and 235 U. Long term sustainability of nuclear power will depend to a great extent on the efficient, safe and secure utilization of fissile and fertile materials. Light water reactors (LWRs) account for more than 82% of the operating reactors, followed by pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), which constitute ∼10% of reactors. LWRs will continue to dominate the nuclear power market for several decades, as long as economically viable natural uranium resources are available. Currently, the plutonium obtained from spent nuclear fuel is subjected to mono recycling in LWRs as uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX), containing up to 12% PuO 2 , in a very limited way. The reprocessed uranium (RepU) is also re-enriched and recycled in LWRs in a few countries. Unfortunately, the utilization of natural uranium resources in thermal neutron reactors is 2 and MOX fuel technology has matured during the past five decades. These fuels are now being manufactured, used and reprocessed on an industrial scale. Mixed uranium- plutonium monocarbide (MC), mononitride (MN) and U-Pu-Zr alloys are recognized as advanced fuels

  12. Development of manufacturing equipment and QC equipment for DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J.J.; Lee, J.W.; Kim, S.S.; Yim, S.P.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, K.H.; Na, S.H.; Kim, W.K.; Shin, J.M.; Lee, D.Y.; Cho, K.H.; Lee, Y.S.; Sohn, J.S.; Kim, M.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this study, DUPIC powder and pellet fabrication equipment, welding system, QC equipment, and fission gas treatment are developed to fabricate DUPIC fuel at IMEF M6 hot cell. The systems are improved to be suitable for remote operation and maintenance with the manipulator at hot cell. Powder and pellet fabrication equipment have been recently developed. The systems are under performance test to check remote operation and maintenance. Welding chamber and jigs are designed and developed to remotely weld DUPIC fuel rod with manipulators at hot cell. Remote quality control equipment are being tested for analysis and inspection of DUPIC fuel characteristics at hot cell. And trapping characteristics is analyzed for cesium and ruthenium released under oxidation/reduction and sintering processes. The design criteria and process flow diagram of fission gas treatment system are prepared incorporating the experimental results. The fission gas treatment system has been successfully manufactured. (Author). 33 refs., 14 tabs., 91 figs

  13. A state of the Art report on Manufacturing technology of high burn-up fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ho; Nam, Cheol; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Byung Kwon; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Myung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1999-09-01

    In order to manufacturing the prototype fuel cladding, overall manufacturing processes and technologies should be thoroughly understood on the manufacturing processes and technologies of foreign cladding tubes. Generally, the important technology related to fuel cladding tube manufacturing processes for PWRs/PHWRs is divided into three stages. The first stage is to produce the zirconium sponge from zirconium sand, the second stage is to produce the zircaloy shell or TREX from zirconium sponge ingot and finally, cladding is produced from TREX or zircaloy shell. Therefore, the manufacturing processes including the first and second stages are described in brief in this technology report in order to understand the whole fuel cladding manufacturing processes. (author)

  14. Development in the manufacture of fuel assembly components at Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the fuel bundle and pellet-clad mechanical and chemical interaction (PCMCI) is the major limiting factor in achieving high burn up in thermal as well as fast reactors. Zircaloy based fuel bundle used for Indian pressurized heavy water reactor consists of number of components such as fuel clad tube, end cap bearing pad and spacer pad. These tubular, bar and sheet components are manufactured at Nuclear Fuel Complex using a series of thermomechanical processes involving hot and cold working with intermediate heat treatment. This paper is aimed at bringing out recent advances in NFC in the manufacture of fuel assembly components. Zircaloy based double clad tube adopting co-extrusion route followed by cold pilgering was successfully produced for its potential usage for high burnup in advance thermal reactors such as Advanced Heavy Water Reactors, This paper also includes process modifications carried out in the manufacture of clad tube and end cap components based on in-depth metallurgical studies. A radial forging process was established for primary breakdown of arc melted ingot which allows for better soundness and homogeneous microstructure. Manufacturing route of bar components for end caps was suitably modified by adopting only barrel straightening to minimize the residual stress and thereby increasing the recovery appreciably. NFC also supplies clad tube for fast breeder reactors where limiting factor for burn up are void swelling and fuel-clad interaction. In view of this, advance claddings such as P/M based 9Cr - Oxide Dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel clad and Zirconium lined T91 (9Cr-1 Mo) steel double clad have been successfully produced. Zirconium lined T91 (9Cr-1 Mo) double clad tubes required was successfully produced by adopting the method of co-pilgering, as a candidate material for clad tubes of Fast Breeder Reactors. (author)

  15. Alternative bipolar plates design and manufacturing for PEM fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Chang Chuan; Norhamidi Muhamad; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    Bipolar plates is one of the important components in fuel cell stack, it comprise up to 80% of the stack volume. Traditionally, these plates have been fabricated from graphite, owing to its chemical nobility, and high electrical and thermal conductivity; but these plates are brittle and relatively thick. Therefore increasing the stack volume and size. Alternatives to graphite are carbon-carbon composite, carbon-polymer composite and metal (aluminum, stainless steel, titanium and nickel based alloy). The use of coated and uncoated metal bipolar plates has received attention recently due to the simplicity of plate manufacturing. The thin nature of the metal substrate allows for smaller stack design with reduced weight. Lightweight coated metals as alternative to graphite plate is being developed. Beside the traditional method of machining and slurry molding, metal foam for bipolar plates fabrication seems to be a good alternative. The plates will be produced with titanium powder by Powder Metallurgy method using space holders technique to produce the meal foam flow-field. This work intends to facilitate the materials and manufacturing process requirements to produce cost effective foamed bipolar plates for fuel cell

  16. quality assurance systems in nuclear fuel procurement and manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S.

    1997-01-01

    Quality is the totality of features and characteristics of a product or service that bear on its ability to satisfy stated or implied needs. Quality control is activities and techniques used to fulfill the requirements of quality. Quality assurance is a system and its main components are requirements. QA program, organization and responsibilities, design and verification, material and its control, manufacturing and process control, inspections, audits and documents: manuals, specifications, instructions. Quality assurance systems are largely based on ISO 9000 series of the International Standards Organization. ISO 9000 series has been adopted and published by Turkish Standards Institute as TS-ISO 9000. International Atomic Energy Agency also published a guide (50-SG-QA11) ''Quality Assurance in the Procurement, Design and Manufacture of Nuclear Fuel Assemblies'' in the safety guide series. In this study the role of quality control in quality assurance systems, inspection and test plans and acceptance and nonconformance quality levels will be explained in relation to nuclear fuel production. Examples of applications in quality assurance systems based on ISO 9000 will be given

  17. Qualification of high-density fuel manufacturing for research reactors at CNEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; De La Fuente, M.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H. [CNEA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    CNEA, the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina, is at the present a qualified supplier of uranium oxide fuel for research reactors. A new objective in this field is to develop and qualify the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuel for this type of reactors. According with the international trend Silicide fuel and U-xMo fuel are included in our program as the most suitable options. The facilities to complete the qualification of high-density MTR fuels, like the manufacturing plant installations, the reactor, the pool side fuel examination station and the hot cells are fully operational and equipped to perform all the activities required within the program. The programs for both type of fuels include similar activities: development and set up of the fuel material manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of miniplates, fabrication and irradiation of full scale fuel elements, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. For silicide fuels most of these steps have already been completed. For U-xMo fuel the activities also include the development of alternative ways to obtain U-xMo powder, feasibility studies for large-scale manufacturing and the economical assessment. Set up of U-xMo fuel plate manufacturing is also well advanced and the fabrication of the first full scale prototype is foreseen during this year. (author)

  18. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong

    2012-01-01

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced

  19. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced.

  20. Design and manufacturing of 05F-01K instrumented capsule for nuclear fuel irradiation in Hanaro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J. (and others)

    2007-07-15

    An instrumented capsule was developed to be able to measure fuel characteristics, such as fuel temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, fuel pellet elongation, and neutron flux, etc., during the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in Hanaro. The instrumented capsule(02F-11K) for measuring and monitoring and monitoring fuel centerline temperature and neutron flux was designed and manufactured. It was successfully irradiated in the test hole OR5 of Hanaro from March 14, 2003 to June 1, 2003 (53.84 full power days at 24 MW). In the year of 2004, 3 test fuel rods and the instrumented capsule(03F-05K) were designed and manufactured to measure fuel centerline temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, and fuel axial deformation during irradiation test. This capsule was irradiated in the test hole OR5 of Hanaro reactor from April 26, 2004 to October 1, 2004 (59.5 EFPD at 24 {approx} 30 MW). The six typed dual instrumented fuel rods, which allow for two characteristics to be measured simultaneously in one fuel rod, have been designed and manufactured to enhance the efficiency of the irradiation test using the instrumented fuel capsule. The 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule was designed and manufactured for a design verification test of the three dual instrumented fuel rods. The irradiation test of the 05F-01K instrumented fuel capsule will be carried out at the OR5 vertical experimental hole of Hanaro.

  1. Advances and highlights of the CNEA qualification program as high density fuel manufacturer for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H. [Unidad de Actividad Combustibles Nucleares Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNE4), Avda. del Libertador, 8250 C1429BNO Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    One of the main objectives of CNEA regarding the fuel for research reactors is the development and qualification of the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuels. The qualification programs for both types of fuels, Silicide fuel and U- x Mo fuel, are similar. They include the following activities: development and set up of the fissile compound manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of mini plates and plates, design and fabrication of fuel assembly prototypes for irradiation, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. This paper describes the different activities performed within each program during the last year and the main advances and achievements of the programs within this period. The main achievements may be summarized in the following activities: Continuation of the irradiation of the first silicide fuel element in the R A3. Completion of the manufacturing of the second silicide fuel element, licensing and beginning of its irradiation in the R A3. Development of the HMD Process to manufacture U-Mo powder (pUMA project). Set up of fuel plates manufacturing at industrial level using U-Mo powder. Preliminary studies and the design for the irradiation of mini plates, plates and full scale fuel elements with U-Mo and 7 g U/cm{sup 3}. PIE destructive studies for the P-04 silicide fuel prototype (accurate burnup determination through chemical analysis, metallography and SEM of samples from the irradiated fuel plates). Improvement and development of new characterization techniques for high density fuel plates quality control including US testing and densitometric analysis of X-ray examinations. The results obtained in this period are encouraging and also allow to foresee a wider participation of CNEA in the international effort to qualify U-Mo as a new material for the manufacturing of research reactor fuels. (author)

  2. Advances and highlights of the CNEA qualification program as high density fuel manufacturer for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Alvarez, L.; Boero, N.; Calabrese, R.; Echenique, P.; Markiewicz, M.; Pasqualini, E.; Ruggirello, G.; Taboada, H.

    2002-01-01

    One of the main objectives of CNEA regarding the fuel for research reactors is the development and qualification of the manufacturing of LEU high-density fuels. The qualification programs for both types of fuels, Silicide fuel and U- x Mo fuel, are similar. They include the following activities: development and set up of the fissile compound manufacturing technology, set up of fuel plate manufacturing, fabrication and irradiation of mini plates and plates, design and fabrication of fuel assembly prototypes for irradiation, post-irradiation examination and feedback for manufacturing improvements. This paper describes the different activities performed within each program during the last year and the main advances and achievements of the programs within this period. The main achievements may be summarized in the following activities: Continuation of the irradiation of the first silicide fuel element in the R A3. Completion of the manufacturing of the second silicide fuel element, licensing and beginning of its irradiation in the R A3. Development of the HMD Process to manufacture U-Mo powder (pUMA project). Set up of fuel plates manufacturing at industrial level using U-Mo powder. Preliminary studies and the design for the irradiation of mini plates, plates and full scale fuel elements with U-Mo and 7 g U/cm 3 . PIE destructive studies for the P-04 silicide fuel prototype (accurate burnup determination through chemical analysis, metallography and SEM of samples from the irradiated fuel plates). Improvement and development of new characterization techniques for high density fuel plates quality control including US testing and densitometric analysis of X-ray examinations. The results obtained in this period are encouraging and also allow to foresee a wider participation of CNEA in the international effort to qualify U-Mo as a new material for the manufacturing of research reactor fuels. (author)

  3. Mixed oxide fuel pellet and manufacturing method thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuda, Ryoichi; Ito, Ken-ichi; Masuda, Hiroshi.

    1993-01-01

    In a method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellets which comprises compression molding a mixed oxide powder containing UO 2 and PuO 2 followed by sintering, a sintering agent having a composition comprising about 40 to 80 wt% of SiO 2 and the balance of Al 2 O 3 is mixed to a mixed oxide at a ratio of about 40ppm to about 0.5 wt% based on the total amount of the mixed oxide and the sintering agent, to prepare a mixture. The mixture is molded into a compression product and then sintered at a weakly acidic atmosphere at a temperature of about 1500degC to 1800degC. With such procedures, the sintering agent forms an eutectic product of a single liquid phase, PuO 2 is dispersed over the entire region of the pellet by way of the liquid phase, formation of a solid solution phase is promoted to annihilate a free PuO 2 phase. Further, growth of crystal grains is promoted. Accordingly, since the MOX fuel pellets prepared according to the present invention have a uniform solid solution state, and no free PuO 2 phase remains, increase of FP gas emission due to local nuclear fission of Pu can be avoided. (T.M.)

  4. Experience in the manufacture and performance of CANDU fuel for KANUPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salim, M.; Ahmed, I.; Butt, P.

    1995-01-01

    Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) a 137 MWe CANDU unit is In operation since 1971. Initially, it was fueled with Canadian fuel bundles. In July 1980 Pakistani manufactured fuel was introduced in the reactor core, irradiated to a burnup of about 7500 MWd-teU -1 and successfully discharged in May 1984. The core was progressively fuelled with Pakistani fuel and in August 1990 the reactor core contained all Pakistani made fuel. As of the present, 3 core equivalent Pakistani fuel bundles have been successfully discharged at an average bumup of 6500 MWd-teU -1 . with a maximum burnup of ∼ 10,200 MWd-teU -1 . No fuel failure of Pakistani bundles has been observed so far. This paper presents the indigenous efforts towards manufacture and operational aspects of KANUPP fuel and compares its behaviour with that of Canadian supplied fuel. The Pakistani fuel has performed well and is as good as the Canadian fuel. (author)

  5. Reduction of cost of poor quality in nuclear fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmqvist, B.

    2000-01-01

    Within ABB reduction of Cost of Poor Quality (COPQ) has become an important process to focus quality improvement initiatives on bottom-line results. The process leads to improved bottom-line results, through cost savings, but it also leads to quality improvements in our processes, products and services. The traditional way of measuring and controlling COPQ in the production workshops is not enough. It is of vital importance to include other non-value creating costs as well, both internally, e.g. in the engineering work, and externally, in delivered products and purchased goods. ABB Atom has since a number of years used the COPQ process in the various steps of nuclear fuel manufacturing. The definition has been expanded to cover, for instance: Scrap, rework and deviations; Margin slippage; Warranty costs; Lack of supplier performance; Excess and obsolete inventory. Each of the COPQ elements has a responsible 'owner' within the management of the Nuclear Fuel Division. The owners form a COPQ task force, which is responsible for analyzing results, setting goals and initiating improvement actions. The COPQ result is updated each month and is presented to all employees in several ways, such as Intranet. For the various COPQ elements improvement initiatives have been implemented. The presentation will describe some of them, such as reduction of: Scrap, rework and deviations through a process with zero defect meetings, high level of process automation, statistical methods; Margin slippage through business process re-engineering; Warranty costs through an improved design review process and expanded testing of new products; Costs for lack in supplier performance through a new concept for supplier QA/QC. It is our strong belief that both ABB Atom and our Customers will benefit from the COPQ process since it leads to a higher quality for nuclear fuel and control rods and facilitates lower product prices. (author)

  6. Manufacture of the first fuel charge for the SUPER-PHENIX 1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajot, J.; Beche, M.; Heyraud, J.

    1988-01-01

    After summarizing same general points on the Super Phenix core, the performances of fuel essemblies, the remainder of this discussion will deal with the manufacture by the CFCa of the first charge of fuel assemblies. The following aspects are considered in sequence - contract - production facilities - manufacturing procedures finally a few assessments will be presented

  7. Hardened over-coating fuel particle and manufacture of nuclear fuel using its fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimuda, Hideharu.

    1990-01-01

    Coated-fuel particles comprise a coating layer formed by coating ceramics such as silicon carbide or zirconium carbide and carbons, etc. to a fuel core made of nuclear fuel materials. The fuel core generally includes oxide particles such as uranium, thorium and plutonium, having 400 to 600 μm of average grain size. The average grain size of the coated-fuel particle is usually from 800 to 900 μm. The thickness of the coating layer is usually from 150 to 250 μm. Matrix material comprising a powdery graphite and a thermosetting resin such as phenol resin, etc. is overcoated to the surface of the coated-fuel particle and hardened under heating to form a hardened overcoating layer to the coated-fuel particle. If such coated-fuel particles are used, cracks, etc. are less caused to the coating layer of the coated-fuel particles upon production, thereby enabling to prevent the damages to the coating layer. (T.M.)

  8. The logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The paper describe the logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant, located in Juzbado in the province of Salamanca. In the the article are described the principal elements in the supply chain and the difficulties of its management derived from the short period for the manufacturing of the nuclear fuel. It's also given a view in relation to the transportation by land sea of the nuclear components, uranium oxide powder and the manufactured fuel. The characteristics of the supply chain are determined by the plant production forecast, by the origin and high technology of the raw materials and by nuclear fuel delivery site locations. (Author)

  9. Reduction of environmental pollution from fuel and target manufacturing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardt, H.A.

    1976-10-01

    Nuclear fuel and target manufacturing processes in the 300 Area generate potential environmental pollutants. Efforts to eliminate or reduce their harmful effects have been pursued for many years by the Raw Materials and Raw Materials Technology departments with assistance from other groups, primarily the Project and Health Physics departments. This report documents: methods adopted to reduce pollution; cost of these methods; amount of pollution reduction achieved; and other benefits in cost savings or quality improvement for January 1968 through December 1975. Capital funds totaling $915,000 were spent on these programs. Annual cost savings of $65,000 were realized, and incidental but significant improvements in product quality were obtained. In no case was product quality degraded. Reductions in releases of pollutants are summarized for water pollution, air pollution, and land pollution. In addition to these reductions, intangible benefits were realized including reduced corrosion of structures and equipment; improved working conditions for personnel; energy savings, both on and offplant; improved utilization of natural resources; and reduced impact to environment, both on and offplant

  10. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalovs, A; Barkanov, E; Gluhihs, S [Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga Technical University, 16/20 Azenes Str., Riga, LV-1048 (Latvia)

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  11. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalovs, A; Barkanov, E; Gluhihs, S

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures

  12. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U 3 O 8 powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated

  13. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-12-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated.

  14. Electrode materials for microbial fuel cells: nanomaterial approach

    KAUST Repository

    Mustakeem, Mustakeem

    2015-11-05

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has the potential to become a major renewable energy resource by degrading organic pollutants in wastewater. The performance of MFC directly depends on the kinetics of the electrode reactions within the fuel cell, with the performance of the electrodes heavily influenced by the materials they are made from. A wide range of materials have been tested to improve the performance of MFCs. In the past decade, carbon-based nanomaterials have emerged as promising materials for both anode and cathode construction. Composite materials have also shown to have the potential to become materials of choice for electrode manufacture. Various transition metal oxides have been investigated as alternatives to conventional expensive metals like platinum for oxygen reduction reaction. In this review, different carbon-based nanomaterials and composite materials are discussed for their potential use as MFC electrodes.

  15. Electrode materials for microbial fuel cells: nanomaterial approach

    KAUST Repository

    Mustakeem, Mustakeem

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has the potential to become a major renewable energy resource by degrading organic pollutants in wastewater. The performance of MFC directly depends on the kinetics of the electrode reactions within the fuel cell, with the performance of the electrodes heavily influenced by the materials they are made from. A wide range of materials have been tested to improve the performance of MFCs. In the past decade, carbon-based nanomaterials have emerged as promising materials for both anode and cathode construction. Composite materials have also shown to have the potential to become materials of choice for electrode manufacture. Various transition metal oxides have been investigated as alternatives to conventional expensive metals like platinum for oxygen reduction reaction. In this review, different carbon-based nanomaterials and composite materials are discussed for their potential use as MFC electrodes.

  16. A feasible approach to implement a commercial scale CANDU fuel manufacturing plant in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shehawy, I.; El-Sharaky, M.; Yasso, K.; Selim, I.; Graham, N.; Newington, D.

    1995-01-01

    Many planning scenarios have been examined to assess and evaluate the economic estimates for implementing a commercial scale CANDU fuel manufacturing plant in Egypt. The cost estimates indicated strong influence of the annual capital costs on total fuel manufacturing cost; this is particularly evident in a small initial plant where the proposed design output is only sufficient to supply reload fuel for a single CANDU-6 reactor. A modular approach is investigated as a possible way, to reduce the capital costs for a small initial fuel plant. In this approach the plant would do fuel assembly operations only and the remainder of a plant would be constructed and equipped in the stages when high production volumes can justify the capital expenses. Such approach seems economically feasible for implementing a small scale CANDU fuel manufacturing plant in developing countries such as Egypt and further improvement could be achieved over the years of operation. (author)

  17. Ceria-thoria pellet manufacturing in preparation for plutonia-thoria LWR fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drera, Saleem S., E-mail: saleem.drera@scatec.no [Thor Energy AS, Karenslyst allé 9C, 0278 Oslo (Norway); Björk, Klara Insulander [Thor Energy AS, Karenslyst allé 9C, 0278 Oslo (Norway); Sobieska, Matylda [Institute for Energy Technology (IFE), Nuclear Materials, Os allé 5, NO-1777, Halden (Norway)

    2016-10-15

    Thorium dioxide (thoria) has potential to assist in niche roles as fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). One such application for thoria is its use as the fertile component to burn plutonium in a mixed oxide fuel (MOX). Thor Energy and an international consortium are currently irradiating plutonia-thoria (Th-MOX) fuel in an effort to produce data for its licensing basis. During fuel-manufacturing research and development (R&D), surrogate materials were utilized to highlight procedures and build experience. Cerium dioxide (ceria) provides a good surrogate platform to replicate the chemical nature of plutonium dioxide. The project’s fuel manufacturing R&D focused on powder metallurgical techniques to ensure manufacturability with the current commercial MOX fuel production infrastructure. The following paper highlights basics of the ceria-thoria fuel production including powder milling, pellet pressing and pellet sintering. Green pellets and sintered pellets were manufactured with average densities of 67.0% and 95.5% that of theoretical density respectively. - Highlights: • High quality Ce−Th fuel production can be accomplished by utilizing powder metallurgical procedures. • Powder morphology is key to obtaining high density fuels. • Optimal pellet pressing is obtained when 3.5–4 tons of force is applied by the pellet press for powder compaction. • Pellet sintering is accomplished effectively in an Air oxidizing atmosphere. • Based on this surrogate work, expected (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel density is 95.5% of theoretical density.

  18. Manufacturing and Construction of Fresh Fuel Storage Rack for a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jinho; Lee, Sangjin; Lee, Jongmin; Ryu, Jeong-Soo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of this study is to provide the manufacturing and construction information regarding the Fresh Fuel Storage Rack (FFSR). The main function of a FFSR is to store and protect the 2 core new fuel assemblies for the operation of the research reactor. The fresh fuel assemblies are stored in a rack made of stainless steel and the storage rack is installed in the fresh fuel storage room. The fresh fuel facility provides fresh fuel assemblies with dry storage space. General design requirements of the fresh fuel storage facilities are given in the ANSI-57.3. Design, manufacturing, and construction of the fresh fuel storage rack are introduced. The analysis is performed to confirm the structural intensity of the fresh fuel storage rack under the seismic loads. The fresh fuel storage rack designed for storage of fresh fuel assemblies should be manufactured and installed with consideration of predicted number of fresh fuel assemblies, structural integrity, resistivity to corrosion and radiation, cleaning, and workability.

  19. Manufacturing and Construction of Fresh Fuel Storage Rack for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jinho; Lee, Sangjin; Lee, Jongmin; Ryu, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide the manufacturing and construction information regarding the Fresh Fuel Storage Rack (FFSR). The main function of a FFSR is to store and protect the 2 core new fuel assemblies for the operation of the research reactor. The fresh fuel assemblies are stored in a rack made of stainless steel and the storage rack is installed in the fresh fuel storage room. The fresh fuel facility provides fresh fuel assemblies with dry storage space. General design requirements of the fresh fuel storage facilities are given in the ANSI-57.3. Design, manufacturing, and construction of the fresh fuel storage rack are introduced. The analysis is performed to confirm the structural intensity of the fresh fuel storage rack under the seismic loads. The fresh fuel storage rack designed for storage of fresh fuel assemblies should be manufactured and installed with consideration of predicted number of fresh fuel assemblies, structural integrity, resistivity to corrosion and radiation, cleaning, and workability

  20. Safety standards, legislation and codes of practice for fuel cell manufacture and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, C.P.

    1999-07-01

    This report examines safety standards, legislation and codes of practice for fuel cell manufacture and operation in the UK, Europe and internationally. Management of health and safety in the UK is discussed, and the characteristics of phosphoric acid (PAFC), proton exchange membrane (PEM), molten carbonate (MCFC), solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells are described. Fuel cell power plant standards and manufacture in the UK, design and operational considerations, end of life disposal, automotive fuel cell system, and fuelling and vehicular concerns are explored, and standards, legislation and codes of practice are explained in the appendix.

  1. A study on manufacturing and quality control technology of DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, H. S.; Lee, Y. W.

    1997-09-01

    A series of experiments are performed to verify the manufacturability of DUPIC fuel and its performance by use of HANARO test reactor. Major works performed during this research period are : analysis of manufacturing process of DUPIC fuel, fabrication technology development such as development of disassembly and decladding method of spent PWR fuel, study on the OREOX process using simulated high burnup fuel, weldability of end cap weld, and development of fabrication equipment including the conceptual and detailed design of DUPIC equipment mainly for the powder preparation, pelletization and fuel element fabrication. A study on the material properties of DUPIC fuel and performance analysis method using irradiation of test fuel was also performed. (author). 91 refs., 274 tabs., 254 figs

  2. A study on manufacturing and quality control technology of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, H. S.; Lee, Y. W. [and others

    1997-09-01

    A series of experiments are performed to verify the manufacturability of DUPIC fuel and its performance by use of HANARO test reactor. Major works performed during this research period are : analysis of manufacturing process of DUPIC fuel, fabrication technology development such as development of disassembly and decladding method of spent PWR fuel, study on the OREOX process using simulated high burnup fuel, weldability of end cap weld, and development of fabrication equipment including the conceptual and detailed design of DUPIC equipment mainly for the powder preparation, pelletization and fuel element fabrication. A study on the material properties of DUPIC fuel and performance analysis method using irradiation of test fuel was also performed. (author). 91 refs., 274 tabs., 254 figs.

  3. Viscoelastic properties of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) produced from agricultural residue corn stover

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rheological properties of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) produced from agricultural residue corn stover were investigated. The corn stover MFC gels exhibited concentration-dependent viscoelastic properties. Higher corn stover MFC concentrations resulted in stronger viscoelastic properties. Th...

  4. Automation in Siemens fuel manufacturing - the basis for quality improvement by statistical process control (SPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drecker, St.; Hoff, A.; Dietrich, M.; Guldner, R.

    1999-01-01

    Statistical Process Control (SPC) is one of the systematic tools to perform a valuable contribution to the control and planning activities for manufacturing processes and product quality. Advanced Nuclear Fuels GmbH (ANF) started a program to introduce SPC in all sections of the manufacturing process of fuel assemblies. The concept phase is based on a realization of SPC in 3 pilot projects. The existing manufacturing devices are reviewed for the utilization of SPC. Subsequent modifications were made to provide the necessary interfaces. The processes 'powder/pellet manufacturing'. 'cladding tube manufacturing' and 'laser-welding of spacers' are located at the different locations of ANF. Due to the completion of the first steps and the experience obtained by the pilot projects, the introduction program for SPC has already been extended to other manufacturing processes. (authors)

  5. Freeze-casting as a Novel Manufacturing Process for Fast Reactor Fuels. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Sridharan, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Advanced burner reactors are designed to reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive isotopes that need to be disposed of as waste. The input feedstock for creating advanced fuel forms comes from either recycle of used light water reactor fuel or recycle of fuel from a fast burner reactor. Fuel for burner reactors requires novel fuel types based on new materials and designs that can achieve higher performance requirements (higher burn up, higher power, and greater margins to fuel melting) then yet achieved. One promising strategy to improved fuel performance is the manufacture of metal or ceramic scaffolds which are designed to allow for a well-defined placement of the fuel into the host, and this in a manner that permits greater control than that possible in the production of typical CERMET fuels.

  6. Freeze-casting as a Novel Manufacturing Process for Fast Reactor Fuels. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegst, Ulrike G.K. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering; Allen, Todd [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced burner reactors are designed to reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive isotopes that need to be disposed of as waste. The input feedstock for creating advanced fuel forms comes from either recycle of used light water reactor fuel or recycle of fuel from a fast burner reactor. Fuel for burner reactors requires novel fuel types based on new materials and designs that can achieve higher performance requirements (higher burn up, higher power, and greater margins to fuel melting) then yet achieved. One promising strategy to improved fuel performance is the manufacture of metal or ceramic scaffolds which are designed to allow for a well-defined placement of the fuel into the host, and this in a manner that permits greater control than that possible in the production of typical CERMET fuels.

  7. Nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacture thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element having a sheath of zirconium or a zirconium alloy and a cross-linked siloxane lacquer coating on the inner surface of the sheath and separating the nuclear fuel material from the sheath is described. The siloxane lacquer coating retards cracking of the sheath by iodine vapor emitted by the fuel during burn-up, and acts as a lubricant for the fuel to prevent rupture of the sheath by thermal ratchetting of the fuel against the sheath and caused by differential thermal expansion between the fuel and the sheath. A silicone grease is applied as a thin layer in the sheath and then baked so that oxidative cleavage of the side chains of the grease occurs to form a cross-linked siloxane lacquer coating bonded to the sheath

  8. Alternate switching between MFC and MEC for H2O2 synthesis and residual removal in Bioelectro-Fenton system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable H2O2 supply and elimination of residual H2O2 are two key challenges to the Fenton processes treating recalcitrant contaminants. In this study, an innovative Bioelectro-Fenton system capable of alternate switching between microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and microbial fuel cell (MFC......) mode of operation was developed to meet the challenges. In the MEC mode, H2O2 was electrochemically produced which reacts with Fenton’s reagent (Fe II) to form hydroxyradical. The residual H2O2 (unused H2O2) is removed as electron acceptor by switching the system to MFC mode. Complete decolorization...

  9. Nuclear fuel manufacture at PJSC NCCP. Technology development and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, Yu.; Enin, A.; Kustov, L.; Mokshin, I.; Pluzhnikov, D.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the PJSC NCCP fuel performance results and measures for improvement of FA and component manufacturing technique. Also it is demonstrated the process capacities, starting from UF6 procurement, its processing, and actual production of finished fuel assemblies as well as FA mounting and modifications of TVSA design

  10. Verification of criticality Safety for ETRR-2 Fuel Manufacturing pilot Plant (FMPP) at Inshas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; Gadalla, A.A.; Orabi, G.

    2006-01-01

    The criticality safety of the fuel manufacturing pilot plant (FMPP) at inshas is studied and analyzed during normal and abnormal operation conditions. the multiplication factor during all stages of the manufacturing processes is determined. several accident scenarios were simulated and the criticality of these accidents were investigated. two codes are used in the analysis : MCNP 4 B code, based on monte Carlo method, and CITATION code , based on diffusion theory. the results are compared with the designer calculations and satisfactory agreement were found. the results of the study indicated that the safety of the fuel manufacturing pilot plant is confirmed

  11. Continuous improvement in manufacturing and inspection of fuel; Mejora continua en fabricacion e inspeccion de combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingon, A.; Ruiz, R.

    2015-07-01

    The manufacturing and inspection process of fuel assemblies in ENUSA is characterized by its robustness acquired over the last thirty years of experience in manufacturing. The reliability of these processes is based on a qualified processes and continuous improvement in the design and upgrading of equipment and optimization of software and manufacturing processes. Additionally, management and quality control systems have been improved in both software and measuring business objectives. this article emphasizes the improvements made over the past five years in management, production and inspection of fuel assemblies. (Author)

  12. Advanced chemical quality control techniques for use in the manufacture of (U-Pu) MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panakkal, J.P.; Prakash, Amrit

    2010-01-01

    Analytical chemistry plays a very important role for nuclear fuel cycle activities be it fuel fabrication, waste management or reprocessing. Nuclear fuels are selected based on the type of reactor. The nuclear fuel has to conform to various stringent chemical specifications like B, rare earths, H, O/M heavy metal content etc. Selection of technique is very important to determine the true specification. This is important particularly when the analyses has to be performed inside leak tight enclosure. The present paper describes the details of the advanced techniques being developed and used in the manufacture of (U,Pu) MOX fuels. (author)

  13. Dose rate analyses for fast reactor fuel manufacturers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.C.; Strode, J.N.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Faust, L.G.

    1976-01-01

    An early appraisal of the radiation exposure situation in the fabrication of plutonium enriched mixed-oxide fuels for fast reactors is presented. Radiation data are presented on fuel process operations measured under actual operating conditions using plutonium containing up to 19 wt percent 240 Pu

  14. Fuel injection nozzle and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, James Christopher; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2017-02-21

    A fuel injection head for use in a fuel injection nozzle comprises a monolithic body portion comprising an upstream face, an opposite downstream face, and a peripheral wall extending therebetween. A plurality of pre-mix tubes are integrally formed with and extend axially through the body portion. Each of the pre-mix tubes comprises an inlet adjacent the upstream face, an outlet adjacent the downstream face, and a channel extending between the inlet and the outlet. Each pre-mix tube also includes at least one fuel injector that at least partially extends outward from an exterior surface of the pre-mix tube, wherein the fuel injector is integrally formed with the pre-mix tube and is configured to facilitate fuel flow between the body portion and the channel.

  15. Design criteria for confidence in the manufacture of BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantharaman, K.; Basu, S.; Anand, A.K.; Mehta, S.K.

    Based on the experience of fuel manufacture for BWR type reactors in India, the parameters which need stringent quality control, are discussed. The design specifications of the fuel rods as well as the cladding material and tubes are reported. The defect mechanisms to be taken into account and the fuel failure in reference to the variation of mechanical properties of the cladding are also described. (K.B.)

  16. CERCA's 25 years experience in U3Si2 fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, JP.; Duban, B.; Lavastre, Y.; Perthuis, S. de

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the experience gained at CERCA in manufacturing, testing, and inspecting U 3 Si 2 fuel elements for various Material Test Reactors (MTR) since the beginning of the RERTR Program in 1978, up to now. It emphasises how the company controls the product to insure compliance with the fuel-related safety parameters. Finally, those statements are considered in the UMo fuel production perspective. (author)

  17. Bio-inspired solutions in design for manufacturing of micro fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omidvarnia, Farzaneh; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the application of biomimetic principles in design for micro manufacturing is investigated. A micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) for power generation in hearing aid devices is considered as the case study in which the bioinspired functions are replicated. The focus in design of μ......DMFC is mainly on solving the problem of fuel delivery to the anode in the fuel chamber. Two different biological phenomena are suggested, and based on them different bioinspired solutions are proposed and modeled in CAD software. Considering the manufacturing constraints and design specifications...

  18. Fault tree analysis of the manufacturing process of nuclear fuel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Weixian; Men Dechun; Sui Yuxue

    1998-08-01

    The nuclear fuel container consists of barrel body, bottom, cover, locking ring, rubber seal ring, and so on. It should be kept sealed in transportation and storage, so keeps the fuel contained from leakage. Its manufacturing process includes blanking, forming, seam welding, assembling, derusting and painting. The seam welding and assembling of barrel body and bottom are two key procedures, and the slope grinding, barrel body flaring and deep drawing of the bottom are important procedures. Faults in the manufacturing process of the nuclear fuel containers are investigated in details as for its quality requirements. A fault tree is established with products being unqualified as the top event. Five causes resulting in process faults are classified and analysed, and some measures are suggested for controlling different failures in manufacturing. More research work should be conducted in rules how to set up fault trees for manufacturing process

  19. An integrated approach for safer, productive and reliable PHWR fuel manufacturing at NFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2013-01-01

    India has been pursuing three-stage nuclear power programme and has developed comprehensive capabilities in all aspects of nuclear power and fuel cycle and is now recognized as a country with advanced nuclear technologies in the comity of nations. The first stage of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) based on natural uranium has reached a state of maturity. In view of civilian nuclear safeguards agreement with NSG and IAEA, Nuclear Power Reactors in India and associated fuel manufacturing facilities at Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) are grouped into IAEA safeguarded and out-of-safeguarded facilities. The civilian nuclear energy generation has to be accelerated for achieving energy security for the country. NFC has pioneered manufacturing technologies of UO 2 fuel, fuel clad and structural components for the PHWRs 220, 540 and PHWR700. Nearly 20 GWe of nuclear energy generation is being planned through PHWR route. Several technological improvements that were carried out recently in the production lines are the key to achieve higher productivity and safety. NFC has also been pursuing capacity augmentation by adding newer equipment in the existing facility and setting up new plants both for uranium production as well as zirconium production. Flexible manufacturing systems consisting of automatic workstations and robots were introduced in the 19 and 37 element PHWR fuel assembly lines. Various safety measures were introduced right from design stage for improving radiological safety for workmen. State-of-art equipment were designed, developed and commissioned for reduction/elimination of fatigue-oriented operations. In addition to natural uranium oxide fuel, NFC has also successfully manufactured virgin slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel and reprocessed depleted uranium fuels which were irradiated in the operating PHWRs. The paper brings out NFC's role in Indian nuclear power program and its manufacturing capabilities for types of PHWR fuel, zircaloy structural

  20. Manufacturing and Construction of Spent Fuel Storage Rack for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangjin; Jung, Kwangsub; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The spent fuel storage rack consists of spent fuel storage racks and support frame. The spent fuel storage racks are installed in the support frame. A spent fuel storage rack consists of frame weldment and storage cell pipe assembly. Storage cell pipe assembly is mounted on the base plate of the frame weldment. The spent fuel storage rack is designed to withstand seismic load and other loads during earthquake. The structural integrity of the spent fuel storage rack is evaluated in accordance with ASME Section III, Subsection NF. Computer Code used for this analysis is ANSYS version 14.0.0. Dead load and seismic load is considered in load condition and hydrodynamic mass is included in the analysis. Design, manufacturing, and construction of the spent fuel storage rack are introduced. The spent fuel storage rack is for storage of spent fuel assemblies. The spent fuel storage rack should be designed, manufactured, and installed with consideration of predicted number of spent fuel assemblies, structural integrity, resistivity to corrosion and radiation, cleaning, and workability.

  1. Method of manufacturing a graphite coated fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Koichi; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the close bondability and homogeneity of a graphite coating formed at the inner surface of a fuel can. Method: A coating containing graphite dispersed in a volatile organic solvent is used and a graphite coating is formed to the inner surface of a fuel can by way of a plunger method. After applying graphite coating, an inert gas is caused to flow at a certain flow rate to the inside of the fuel can horizontally rotaged so that gassification and evaporation of the volatile organic solvent contained in the graphite coating may be promoted. Since drying of the graphite coating coated to the inner surface of the fuel can thus be controlled, a graphite coating with satisfactory close bondability and homogeneity can be formed. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Manufacturing experience and perspectives of WWER nuclear fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, P.; Kolosovskiy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of new shroudless working fuel assembly (PK-3) development, basic design peculiarities of working fuel assembly (PK-3) and the results of PK-3 implementation are presented in this paper. Values of 440.19.000-02 working fuel assembly with debris filter Burnup at Kola NPP unit 2 are given. The main issues settled in the course of TVSA-T implementation like: The development of the design and fabrication method of mixing grids; The development of the design and fabrication method of basic assemblies and components of TVSA-T, including fuel rods of new generation; and The obtainment of specified pellet microstructure with average grain size more than 25μm are listed. The development of the design and fabrication method of removable uprated headpiece of shortened length as well as the development of the design and fabrication method of a tailpiece equipped with a debris filter are also illustrated

  3. Modeling of laser cladding with application to fuel cell manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells have many advantages such as compactness, : lightweight, high power density, low temperature operation and near zero emissions. Although : many research organizations have intensified their efforts toward...

  4. Design and manufacturing of instrumented capsule(03F-05K) for nuclear fuel irradiation in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Sohn, J. M.; Shin, Y. T. [and others

    2004-06-01

    An instrumented capsule is being developed to be able to measure fuel characteristics, such as fuel temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, fuel elongation, and neutron flux, etc., during the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in HANARO. The instrumented capsule(02F-11K) for measuring and monitoring fuel centerline temperature and neutron flux was designed and manufactured. The instrumented capsule includes three test fuel rods installed thermocouple to measure fuel centerline temperature and three SPNDs (self-powered neutron detector) to monitor the neutron flux. Its stability was verified by out-of-pile performance test, and its safety evaluation was also shown that the safety requirements were satisfied. And then, to verify the design of the instrumented capsule in the test hole, it was successfully irradiated in the test hole of HANARO from March 14, 2003 to June 1, 2003 (53.8 full power days at 24 MWth). During irradiation, the centerline temperature of PWR UO{sub 2} fuel pellets fabricated by KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Company and the neutron flux were continuously measured and monitored. In the year of 2004, 3 test fuel rods and the instrumented capsule(03F-05K) were designed and fabricated to measure fuel centerline temperature, internal pressure of fuel rod, and fuel axial deformation during irradiation test. This capsule is being irradiated in the test hole OR5 of HANARO reactor from April 26, 2004.

  5. Manufacturing of 37-element fuel bundles for PHWR 540 - new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, U.K.; Sastry, V.S.; Banerjee, P.K.; Rao, G.V.S.H.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. Atomic Energy, Government of India, Hyderabad (India)

    2003-07-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), established in early seventies, is a major industrial unit of Department of Atomic Energy. NFC is responsible for the supply of fuel bundles to all the 220 MWe PHWRs presently in operation. For supplying fuel bundles for the forthcoming 540 MWe PHWRs, NEC is dovetailing 37-element fuel bundle manufacturing facilities in the existing plants. In tune with the philosophy of self-reliance, emphasis is given to technology upgradation, higher customer satisfaction and application of modern quality control techniques. With the experience gained over the years in manufacturing 19-element fuel bundles, NEC has introduced resistance welding of appendages on fuel tubes prior to loading of UO{sub 2} pellets, use of bio-degradable cleaning agents, simple diagnostic tools for checking the equipment condition, on line monitoring of variables, built-in process control methods and total productive maintenance concepts in the new manufacturing facility. Simple material handling systems have been contemplated for handling of the fuel bundles. This paper highlights the flow-sheet adopted for the process, design features of critical equipment and the methodology for fabricating the 37-element fuel bundles, 'RIGHT FIRST TIME'. (author)

  6. Manufacturing of 37-element fuel bundles for PHWR 540 - new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, U.K.; Sastry, V.S.; Banerjee, P.K.; Rao, G.V.S.H.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), established in early seventies, is a major industrial unit of Department of Atomic Energy. NFC is responsible for the supply of fuel bundles to all the 220 MWe PHWRs presently in operation. For supplying fuel bundles for the forthcoming 540 MWe PHWRs, NEC is dovetailing 37-element fuel bundle manufacturing facilities in the existing plants. In tune with the philosophy of self-reliance, emphasis is given to technology upgradation, higher customer satisfaction and application of modern quality control techniques. With the experience gained over the years in manufacturing 19-element fuel bundles, NEC has introduced resistance welding of appendages on fuel tubes prior to loading of UO 2 pellets, use of bio-degradable cleaning agents, simple diagnostic tools for checking the equipment condition, on line monitoring of variables, built-in process control methods and total productive maintenance concepts in the new manufacturing facility. Simple material handling systems have been contemplated for handling of the fuel bundles. This paper highlights the flow-sheet adopted for the process, design features of critical equipment and the methodology for fabricating the 37-element fuel bundles, 'RIGHT FIRST TIME'. (author)

  7. Fuel assembly, channel box of fuel assembly, fuel spacer of fuel assembly and method of manufacturing channel box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Nishida, Koji; Kawasaki, Terufumi.

    1997-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, fuel rods disposed at corners of side walls of a channel box or in the periphery of the side walls are partially removed, and recessed portions are formed on the side walls of the channel box from which the fuel rods are removed. Spaces closed at the sides are formed in the inner side of the corner portions. Openings are formed for communicating the closed space with the outside of the channel box. Then, the channel area of the outer side of the channel box is increased, through which much water flows to increase the amount of water in the reactor core thereby promoting the moderation of neutrons and providing thermal neutrons suitable to nuclear fission. The degree of freedom for distribution of the spaces in the reactor core is increased to improve neutron economy thereby enabling to utilize reactor fuels effectively. (N.H.)

  8. Fire and blast safety manual for fuel element manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensinger, U.; Koehler, B.; Mester, W.; Riotte, H.G.; Sehrbrock, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The manual aims to enable people involved in the planning, operation, supervision, licensing or appraisal of fuel element factories to make a quick and accurate assessment of blast safety. In Part A, technical plant principles are shown, and a summary lists the flammable materials and ignition sources to be found in fuel element factories, together with theoretical details of what happens during a fire or a blast. Part B comprises a list of possible fires and explosions in fuel element factories and ways of preventing them. Typical fire and explosion scenarios are analysed more closely on the basis of experiments. Part B also contains a list and an assessment of actual fires and explosions which have occurred in fuel element factories. Part C contains safety measures to protect against fire and explosion, in-built fire safety, fire safety in plant design, explosion protection and measures to protect people from radiation and other hazards when fighting fires. A distinction is drawn between UO 2 , MOX and HTR fuel elements. (orig./DG) [de

  9. General features of conceptual design for the pilot plant to manufacture fuel rods from mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, C.A.; Adelfang, P.; Esteban, A.; Aparicio, G.; Friedenthal, M.; Orlando, O.S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper conceptually describes: 1) the processes in the manufacturing lines; 2) the distribution of quality controls and glove boxes in manufacturing lines; 3) the Control and Radiological Safety Room; 4) the Dressing Room; 5) the requirements of the ventilation system. The plant will be located in the first floor of the Radiochemical Processes Laboratory building, occupying a surface of 600 m 2 . The necessary equipment for the following manufacturing lines will be provided: a) conversion from Pu(NO3)4 to PuO 2 (through Pu(III)oxalate); b) manufacture of homogeneous of mixed oxides of U and Pu; c) manufacture of (U,Pu)O 2 pellets; d) manufacture of fuel rods of mixed uranium and plutonium oxides. (Author)

  10. Reclamation and reuse of LEU silicide fuel from manufacturing scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, G.R.; Pace, B.W.; Evans, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide an understanding of the organization which is the sole supplier of United States plate type research and test reactor fuel and LEU core conversions, a brief description of the structure and history is presented. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is a part of McDermott International, Inc. which is a large diversified corporation employing over 20,000 people primarily in engineering and construction for the off-shore oil and power generation industries throughout the world. B and W provides many energy related products requiring precision machining and high quality systems. This is accomplished by using state-of-the-art equipment, technology and highly skilled people. The RTRFE group within B and W has the ability to produce various complexly shaped fuel elements with a wide variety of fuels and enrichments. B and W RTRFE has fabricated over 200,000 plates since 1981 and gained the diversified experience necessary to satisfy many customer requirements. This accomplishment was possible with the support of McDermott International and all of its resources. B and W has always had a commitment to high quality and integrity. This is apparent by the success and longevity (125 years) of the company. A lower cost to convert cores to LEU provides direct support to RERTR and demonstrates Babcock and Wilcox's commitment to the program. As a supporter of RERTR reactor conversion from HEU to LEU, B and W has contributed a significant amount of R and D money to improve the silicide fuel process which ultimately lowers the LEU core costs. In the most recent R and D project, B and W is constructing a LEU silicide reclamation facility to re-use the unirradiated fuel scrap generated from the production process. Remanufacturing use of this fuel completes the fuel cycle and provides a contribution to LEU cores by reducing scrap inventory and handling costs, lowering initial purchase of fuel due to increasing the process yields, and lowering the replacement costs. This

  11. Quality assurance and control in the manufacture of metalclad UO2 reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has carried out a programme since its earliest days that includes the collection and dissemination of information on nuclear fuels. Since the 1960 symposium on Fuel Element Fabrication with Special Emphasis on Cladding Materials there has been an average of one meeting a year reviewing some aspect of fuel fabrication technology. A recent meeting dealing with the fabrication of UO 2 fuels was the Study Group on the Facilities and Technology needed for Nuclear Fuel Manufacture, held in Grenoble in 1972 (Rep. IAEA-158). After that meeting it became apparent that the quality of fuel production was an important aspect that had received inadequate coverage so far, and the Panel on Quality Assurance and Control in Nuclear Fuel Manufacture was convened by the Agency in Vienna in November 1974. In the working papers and discussions at the Panel meeting the viewpoints of different countries and of various interested parties, such as manufacturers, reactor operators and government authorities, were presented

  12. The manufacture process and properties of (U, Gd)O2 burnable poisonous fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Wei; Tang Yueming; Dai Shengping; Yang Youqing; Zuo Guoping; Wu Shihong; Gu Xiaofei; Gu Mingfei

    2006-03-01

    The main properties of important raw powder materials used in the (U, Gd)O 2 burnable poisonous fuel pellets production line of NPIC are presented. The powders included UO 2 , Gd 2 O 3 , (U, Gd) 3 O 8 and necessary additives, such as ammonium oxalate and zinc stearate. And the main properties of (U, Gd)O 2 burnable poisonous fuel pellets and the manufacture processes, such as ball-milling blending, granulation, pressing, sintering and grinding are also described. Moreover, the main effect of the process parameters controlled in the manufacture process have been discussed. (authors)

  13. Radiation protection standards in nuclear-fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilson, R.; Malody, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The authors discuss principally the impact of changes in 10 CFR 20 on the commercial nuclear-fuel-fabrication industry, for which the impact appears to be the most severe, dwelling on the changes affecting occupational exposures. They conclude that the credibility of the nuclear industry as a comparably safe industry could be harmed by the continuing examination of apparent problem areas without establishing an overall perspective regarding employee safety. 21 references

  14. Technical Meeting on Design, Manufacturing and Irradiation Behaviour of Fast Reactors Fuels. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to enable a rationalization and advancement of the design and manufacturing processes, a better selection of promising fuels, and a reduction of the time and costs currently required for R and D and testing, as well as to contribute to the improvement of the safety features of fuels under all operational states and accidental conditions. An overview of the status and perspective of the design, manufacturing and irradiation behaviour of fast reactors fuels were provided during this meeting. The main objectives are the following: Ensure sharing and dissemination of knowledge and expertise; Discuss specific features and issues of existing fuels; Improve knowledge and data for the design and engineering of fast reactor fuel and core structural materials; Discuss perspectives on advanced fuels; Consider modern technological, design and testing tools enabling reliable performance of fuels in current and planned operational environments; Establish international consensus in the developmental efforts on advanced fast reactor technologies, including collaborative programs and experiments. Contribute to the preparation and outline of the planned IAEA Coordinated Research Project on 'Examination of advanced fast reactor fuel and core structural materials. Each of the 24 presentations made at the meeting have been indexed separately

  15. Nuclear fuel in water reactors: Manufacturing technology, operational experience and development objectives in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Knoedler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel industry in the Federal Republic of Germany comprises the full range of manufacturing capabilities for pressurized-, boiling- and heavy-water reactor technology. The existing manufacturing companies are Reaktor-Brennelement Union (RBU) and Alkem. RBU makes natural and enriched UO 2 -fuel assemblies, starting with powder preparation. Facilities to produce UO 2 -gadolinia and UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel are also available. Alkem manufactures mixed-oxide UO 2 /PuO 2 fuel and fuel rods. Zircaloy cladding tubes are produced by Nuklearrohr-Gesellschaft (NRG) and Mannesmannroehren-Werke (MRW). Construction of a new fuel manufacturing plant has been announced by Exxon. Supplementary to quality control, an integrated quality assurance system has been established between the reactor vendor's fuel design and engineering division and the existing manufacturing companies for fuel and tubing. Operating experience with LWR and HWR fuel dates back to 1964/65 and has shown good performance. Possible reasons for a small fraction of defective rods could be identified quickly by a fast feedback system incorporating close co-operation between Kraftwerk Union (KWU) and the utilities. KWU combines fuel development, hot-cell and pool-side service facilities as well as fuel technology linked to manufacturing. The responsibility of KWU for core and fuel design, which enabled an integral optimization, was also an important reason for the successful operation and design flexibility. (author)

  16. Urine transduction to usable energy: A modular MFC approach for smartphone and remote system charging

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, X. A.; Stinchcombe, A.; Greenman, J.; Ieropoulos, I.

    2017-01-01

    This study reports for the first time the full charging of a state-of-the-art mobile smartphone, using Microbial Fuel Cells fed with urine. This was possible by employing a new design of MFC that allowed scaling-up without power density losses. Although it was demonstrated in the past that a basic mobile phone could be charged by MFCs, the present study goes beyond this to show how, simply using urine, charges a modern-day smartphone. Several energy-harvesting systems have been tested and res...

  17. CANDU RU fuel manufacturing basic technology development and advanced fuel verification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chang Hwan; Chang, S.K.; Hong, S.D.

    1999-04-01

    A PHWR advanced fuel named the CANFLEX fuel has been developed through a KAERI/AECL joint Program. The KAERI made fuel bundle was tested at the KAERI Hot Test Loop for the performance verification of the bundle design. The major test activities were the fuel bundle cross-flow test, the endurance fretting/vibration test, the freon CHF test, and the fuel bundle heat-up test. KAERI also has developing a more advanced PHWR fuel, the CANFLEX-RU fuel, using recovered uranium to extend fuel burn-up in the CANDU reactors. For the purpose of proving safety of the RU handling techniques and appraising feasibility of the CANFLEX-RU fuel fabrication in near future, a physical, chemical and radiological characterization of the RU powder and pellets was performed. (author). 54 refs., 46 tabs., 62 figs

  18. CANDU RU fuel manufacturing basic technology development and advanced fuel verification tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hwan; Chang, S.K.; Hong, S.D. [and others

    1999-04-01

    A PHWR advanced fuel named the CANFLEX fuel has been developed through a KAERI/AECL joint Program. The KAERI made fuel bundle was tested at the KAERI Hot Test Loop for the performance verification of the bundle design. The major test activities were the fuel bundle cross-flow test, the endurance fretting/vibration test, the freon CHF test, and the fuel bundle heat-up test. KAERI also has developing a more advanced PHWR fuel, the CANFLEX-RU fuel, using recovered uranium to extend fuel burn-up in the CANDU reactors. For the purpose of proving safety of the RU handling techniques and appraising feasibility of the CANFLEX-RU fuel fabrication in near future, a physical, chemical and radiological characterization of the RU powder and pellets was performed. (author). 54 refs., 46 tabs., 62 figs.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  20. The role of riboflavin in decolourisation of Congo red and bioelectricity production using Shewanella oneidensis-MR1 under MFC and non-MFC conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Ola M; Fapetu, Segun; Kyazze, Godfrey; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2017-03-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria can exchange electrons extracellularly and hold great promise for their use in simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity production. This study investigated the role of riboflavin, an electron carrier, in the decolourisation of Congo red in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model organism. The contribution of the membrane-bound protein MtrC to the decolourisation process was also investigated. Within the range of riboflavin concentrations tested, 20 µM was found to be the best with >95% of the dye (initial concentration 200 mg/L) decolourised in MFCs within 50 h compared to 90% in the case where no riboflavin was added. The corresponding maximum power density was 45 mW/m 2 . There was no significant difference in the overall decolourisation efficiencies of Shewanela oneidensis MR-1 ΔMtrC mutants compared to the wild type. However, in terms of power production the mutant produced more power (P max 76 mW/m 2 ) compared to the wild type (P max 46 mW/m 2 ) which was attributed to higher levels of riboflavin secreted in solution. Decolourisation efficiencies in non-MFC systems (anaerobic bottles) were similar to those under MFC systems indicating that electricity generation in MFCs does not impair dye decolourisation efficiencies. The results suggest that riboflavin enhances both decolourisation of dyes and simultaneous electricity production in MFCs.

  1. Design, Manufacturing and Irradiation Behaviour of Fast Reactor Fuel. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    Fast reactors are vital for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear energy in the long term. They offer vastly more efficient use of uranium resources and the ability to burn actinides, which are otherwise the long-lived component of high level nuclear waste. These reactors require development, qualification, testing and deployment of improved and innovative nuclear fuel and structural materials having very high radiation resistance, corrosion/erosion and other key operational properties. Several IAEA Member States have made efforts to advance the design and manufacture of technologies of fast reactor fuels, as well as to investigate their irradiation behaviour. Due to the acute shortage of fast neutron testing and post-irradiation examination facilities and the insufficient understanding of high dose radiation effects, there is a need for international exchange of knowledge and experience, generation of currently missing basic data, identification of relevant mechanisms of materials degradation and development of appropriate models. Considering the important role of nuclear fuels in fast reactor operation, the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT) proposed a Technical Meeting (TM) on 'Design, Manufacturing and Irradiation Behaviour of Fast Reactors Fuels', which was hosted by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 30 May to 3 June 2011. The TM included a technical visit to the fuel production plant MSZ in Elektrostal. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum to share knowledge, practical experience and information on the improvement and innovation of fuels for fast reactors through scientific presentations and brainstorming discussions. The meeting brought together 34 specialists from national nuclear agencies, R and D and design institutes, fuel vendors and utilities from 10 countries. The presentations were structured into four sections: R and D Programmes on FR Fuel

  2. The continuous improvement in quality management for nuclear fuel manufacturing in CNNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear fuel plant has been keeping good records in quality. Only one pot failure has been found in the fuels loaded in the reactors at more than ten years. The paper describes quality management in nuclear fuel manufacturing and focuses on the continuous improvement on quality system and process by running the quality management system, process by quality control group, and data analyze, the requirements and the improvements for the quality system, the measurement system and the standardization system, the importance of clearance system. It also describes the future plans in quality management

  3. Development of a recovery process of scraps resulting from the manufacture of metallic uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilo, Ruth L.; Kuada, Terezinha A.; Forbicini, Christina A.L.G.O.; Cohen, Victor H.; Araujo, Bertha F.; Lobao, Afonso S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the dissolution of natural metallic uranium fuel samples with aluminium cladding is presented, in order to obtain optimized conditions for the system. The aluminium cladding was dissolved in an alkaline solution of Na OH/Na NO 3 and the metallic uranium with HNO 3 . A fumeless dissolution with total recovery of nitrous gases was achieved. The main purpose of this project was the recovery of uranium from scraps resulting from the manufacture of the metallic uranium fuel or other non specified fuels. (author)

  4. Utility view on QA/QC of WWER-440 fuel design and manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, P.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the legislation implements in the Czech Republic, QA/QC system at CEZ, demonstration and development program (purchaser point of view), audit of QA/QC system for fuel design and manufacturing as well as QA/QC records are discussed

  5. Acquisition Path Analysis for a SFR Fuel Manufacturing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H. L.; Kwon, E. H.; Ahn, S. K.; Ko, W. I.; Kim, H. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The coarse acquisition path analysis does not claim to be complete, but it identifies plausible acquisition paths detailed enough to show that the acquisition path analysis can provide reasonable insights regarding the safeguardability assessment, and demonstrates the availability of safeguards tools and measures, although not complete, required for the implementation of effective and efficient safeguards, including the coverage of the nuclear energy system (NES) by multiple intrinsic features and extrinsic measures. It also identifies strengths, weaknesses and gaps of a system in the area of proliferation resistance in a generally understandable form. The acquisition path analysis demonstrates that all acceptance limits for the safeguardability, in principle, are met although the acceptance limit for the efficiency of the IAEA safeguards can be answered only at the end of the Safeguards-by-Design process, including interaction with IAEA operations. However, procedures for destructive assay (DA) for the verification by the IAEA are not defined. Target values for non-destructive assay (NDA) for this type of nuclear material are also not defined. Therefore, there is a need to finish demonstrations of NDA measurements on novel material types and material flows. The acquisition path analysis also shows some concerns that need to be assured in the system design process: e. g., the ID number of all storage containers in all storage positions can be read or checked without moving the storage container, transfer of TRU fuel and heel/scrap (product stream) should be strictly separated from transfer routes for waste, to make the transfer of TRU fuel and heel/scrap into waste container impossible, etc.

  6. A review on manufacturing technology for long-lived radionuclide fuel compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Doo Seong; Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eung Ho; Chung, Won Myung; Lee, Kui Ill; Woo, Moon Sik; Kim, Yeon Ku; Yoo, Jae Hyung

    1998-03-01

    Thermal neutron reactor (LWR), fast neutron reactor (FBR), accelerator-driven subcritical system have been studied as the potential transmutation devices. The fuel types can be classified according to the concept of each reactor. Oxide fuel is considered in LWR and metal, oxide, and nitride fuels are studied in FBR. In accelerator-driven subcritical system molten salt, metal, and oxide fuels are considered. This review focused on characteristics according to transmutation system, and manufacturing technologies of each fuels. Accelerator-driven system is being proposed as the most reasonable concept in recent, since it has merits in terms of stability and free control of nuclides composition rate in charge of long-lived nuclides. Fluorides molten salt fuel is better chemically stable and corrosion resistant, and lower vapor pressure than chloride molten salt and metal in the fuel type of accelerator-driven system. And then the detail manufacturing technology of fluorides molten salt were reviewed. (author). 62 refs., 23 tabs., 37 figs

  7. Lightweight Design and Welding Manufacturing of a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Powered Car’s Chassis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Ch. Tsirogiannis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the chassis for the hydrogen fuel cell powered car has been involved in the designing and manufacturing aspects, while taking into consideration the mass, strength, stiffness, centre of gravity (COG, and manufacturing cost requirements. Towards this direction, a chassis design is proposed employing a space frame structure and constructed by an aluminium alloy with great strength. The structural design has been derived through the lightweight engineering approaches in conjunction with the part consolidation, Design for Assembly (DFA and Design for Manufacture methods. Moreover, it has been performed in compliance with the safety regulations of the Shell Eco Marathon racing competition. The material’s principal characteristics are the great strength, the low mass, as well as the great workability, machinability, and weldability. Following the national and global environmental issues, the recyclable characteristics of the aluminium alloy are an extra asset. Furthermore, the existence of aluminium alloy manufacturers around the fabricating area provides low cost supply and fast delivery benefits. The integration of the fuel cell powered vehicle is obtained through the designing and the manufacturing processes of the chassis and the parts fitted on the chassis. The manufacturing procedures are described thoroughly; mainly consisting of the cutting and welding processes and the assembling of the parts that are fitted on the chassis. Additionally, the proper welding parameters for the custom chassis design are investigated and are selected after deductive reasoning. The quality control of the weld joints is conducted by non-destructive methods (NDT ensuring the required structural properties of the welds. A combination of the selected material, the specific type of the chassis, and the manufacturing processes lead to construction simplicity in a low manufacturing cost by using the existing laboratory equipment. Furthermore, the

  8. Utilization of radiographic and ultrasonic testing for an evaluation of plate type fuel elements during manufacturing stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Mucio Jose Drummond de; Silva Junior, Silverio Ferreira da; Messias, Jose Marcos; Braga, Daniel Martins; Paula, Joao Bosco de

    2005-01-01

    Structural discontinuities can be introduced in the plate type fuel elements during the manufacturing stages due to mechanical processing conditions. The use of nondestructive testing methods to monitoring the fuel elements during the manufacturing stages presents a significant importance, contributing for manufacturing process improvement and cost reducing. This paper describes a procedure to be used detection and evaluation of structural discontinuities in plate type fuel elements during the manufacturing stages using the ultrasonic testing method and the radiographic testing method. The main results obtained are presented and discussed. (author)

  9. Method of manufacturing gadolinium oxide-incorporated nuclear fuel sintering products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komono, Akira; Seki, Makoto; Omori, Sadayuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To manufacture nuclear fuel sintering products excellent in burning property and mechanical property. Constitution: In the manufacturing step for nuclear fuel sintering products, specific metal oxides are added for promoting the growth of crystal grains in the sintering. Those metal oxides melted at a temperature lower than the sintering temperature of a mixture of nuclear fuel oxide powder and oxide power, or those metal oxides causing eutectic reaction are used as the metal oxide. Particularly, those compounds having oxygen atom - metal atom ratio (O/M) of not less than 2 are preferably used. As such metal oxides usable herein transition metal oxides, e.g., Nb 2 O 5 , TiO 2 , MoO 3 and WO 3 are preferred, with Nb 2 O 3 and TiO 2 being preferred particularly. (Seki, T.)

  10. General description and production lines of the Egyptian fuel manufacturing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, W.I.; Elseaidy, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Egyptian Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant, FMPP, is a new facility, producing an MTR-type fuel elements required for the Egyptian Second Research Reactor, ETRR-2, as well as other plates or elements for an external clients with the same type and enrichment percent or lower, (LEU). General description is presented. The production lines in FMPP, which begin from uranium hexaflouride (UF 6 , 19.7±0.2 % U 235 by wt), aluminum powder, and nuclear grade 6061 aluminium alloy in sheets, bars, and rods with the different heat treatments and dimensions as a raw materials, are processed through a series of the manufacturing, inspection, and quality control plan to produce the final specified MTR-type fuel elements. All these processes and the product control in each step are presented. The specifications of the final product are presented. (author)

  11. Method to manufacture spherical fuel and breeder particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huschka, H.; Kadner, M.

    1976-01-01

    Optimum properties of the pyrolytic carbon cladding layer deposited on fuel and breeder cores are best achieved by forming the layers into exact spherical shells. It is necessary to have a uniform shperical shape of the cores to be coated. This is achieved by converting an oscillating liquid jet flowing out of one or several nozzles, of uranium and/or thorium solutions which drop into an ammonia solution at a quantity of over 3000 drops per minute. The drops prior to plunging into the ammonia solution, according to the invention, firstly run through an ammonia gasfree fall to acquire the shperical shape, then they fall through a zone flowed-through by ammonia gas. The ammonia gas is introduced into the dropping zone so that it flows in the opposite direction to falling and so that in addition a horizontal cross-flowing of the gas between the drops is guaranteed. The spherical drops are thus hardened before entering the ammonia solution. They are then washed as usual, dried and sintered. 4 examples are given to prepare thorium dioxide, uranium carbide and (U,Th) mixed oxide particles. (IHOE) [de

  12. PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, F.D. Jr.; James, B.D. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Mooradian, R.P. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

  13. Advances in the manufacture of clad tubes and components for PHWR fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.; Jha, S.K.; Chandrasekha, B.; Tonpe, S.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Fuel bundles for Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) consists of Uranium di-oxide pellets encapsulated into thin wall Zircaloy clad tubes. Other components such as end caps, bearing pads and spacer pads are the integral elements of the fuel bundle. As the fuel assembly is subjected to severe operating conditions of high temperature and pressure in addition to continual irradiation exposure, all the components are manufactured conforming to stringent specifications with respect to chemical composition, mechanical & metallurgical properties and dimensional tolerances. The integrity of each component is ensured by NDE at different stages of manufacture. The manufacturing route for fuel tubes and components comprise of a combination of thermomechanical processing and each process step has marked effect on the final properties. The fuel tubes are manufactured by processing the extruded blanks in four stage cold pilgering with intermediate annealing and final stress relieving operation. The bar material is produced by hot extrusion followed by multi-pass swaging and intermediate annealing. Spacer pads and bearing pads are manufactured by blanking and coining of Zircaloy sheet which is made by a combination of hot and cold rolling operations. Due to the small size and stringent dimensional requirements of these appendages, selection of production route and optimization of process parameters are important. This paper discusses about various measures taken for improving the recoveries and mechanical and corrosion properties of the tube, sheet and bar materials being manufactured at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad For the production of clad tubes, modifications at extrusion stage to reduce the wall thickness variation, introduction of ultrasonic testing of extruded blanks, optimization of cold working and heat treatment parameters at various stages of production etc. were done. The finished bar material is subjected to 100% Ultrasonic and eddy current testing to ensure

  14. Analysis and optimisation of a mixed fluid cascade (MFC) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, He; Sun, Heng; Sun, Shoujun; Chen, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    A mixed fluid cascade (MFC) process that comprises three refrigeration cycles has great capacity for large-scale LNG production, which consumes a great amount of energy. Therefore, any performance enhancement of the liquefaction process will significantly reduce the energy consumption. The MFC process is simulated and analysed by use of proprietary software, Aspen HYSYS. The effect of feed gas pressure, LNG storage pressure, water-cooler outlet temperature, different pre-cooling regimes, liquefaction, and sub-cooling refrigerant composition on MFC performance are investigated and presented. The characteristics of its excellent numerical calculation ability and the user-friendly interface of MATLAB™ and powerful thermo-physical property package of Aspen HYSYS are combined. A genetic algorithm is then invoked to optimise the MFC process globally. After optimisation, the unit power consumption can be reduced to 4.655 kW h/kmol, or 4.366 kW h/kmol on condition that the compressor adiabatic efficiency is 80%, or 85%, respectively. Additionally, to improve the process further, with regards its thermodynamic efficiency, configuration optimisation is conducted for the MFC process and several configurations are established. By analysing heat transfer and thermodynamic performances, the configuration entailing a pre-cooling cycle with three pressure levels, liquefaction, and a sub-cooling cycle with one pressure level is identified as the most efficient and thus optimal: its unit power consumption is 4.205 kW h/kmol. Additionally, the mechanism responsible for the weak performance of the suggested liquefaction cycle configuration lies in the unbalanced distribution of cold energy in the liquefaction temperature range.

  15. Microbial fuel cell: A green technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong Bor Chyan; Liew Pauline Woan Ying; Muhamad Lebai Juri; Ahmad Zainuri Mohd Dzomir; Leo Kwee Wah; Mat Rasol Awang

    2010-01-01

    Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) was developed which was able to generate bio energy continuously while consuming wastewater containing organic matters. Even though the bio energy generated is not as high as hydrogen fuel cell, the MFC demonstrated great potential in bio-treating wastewater while using it as fuel source. Thus far, the dual-ability of the MFC to generate bio energy and bio-treating organic wastewater has been examined successfully using synthetic acetate and POME wastewaters. (author)

  16. TAPE CALENDERING MANUFACTURING PROCESS FOR MULTILAYER THIN-FILM SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh; Kurt Montgomery

    2004-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the Phases I and II under Contract DE-AC26-00NT40705 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Tape Calendering Manufacturing Process For Multilayer Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells''. The main objective of this project was to develop the manufacturing process based on tape calendering for multilayer solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) using the unitized cell design concept and to demonstrate cell performance under specified operating conditions. Summarized in this report is the development and improvements to multilayer SOFC cells and the unitized cell design. Improvements to the multilayer SOFC cell were made in electrochemical performance, in both the anode and cathode, with cells demonstrating power densities of nearly 0.9 W/cm{sup 2} for 650 C operation and other cell configurations showing greater than 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 75% fuel utilization and 800 C. The unitized cell design was matured through design, analysis and development testing to a point that cell operation at greater than 70% fuel utilization was demonstrated at 800 C. The manufacturing process for both the multilayer cell and unitized cell design were assessed and refined, process maps were developed, forming approaches explored, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques examined.

  17. Fuel development and manufacturing programme in India and advanced fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, M.; Bhardwaj, S.A.; Saxena, A.K.; Anantharaman, K.; Varma, B.P.

    1995-01-01

    The emphasis of self reliance in all areas of nuclear fuel cycle technology is the objective of Department of Atomic Energy, India. To achieve this aim, various organisations are working in close co-operation. This paper contains a brief summary of the work carried out in India on PHWR fuel technology

  18. A method and apparatus for the manufacture of glass microspheres adapted to contain a thermonuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrick, R.G.; Nolen, R.L. Jr.; Solomon, D.E.; King, F.T.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to the manufacture of glass microspheres. It refers to a method according to which a sintered glass-powder, whose particles are calibrated, is introduced into a blow-pipe adapted to project said glass-powder particles into a heated flue, said sintered glass-powder containing a pore-forming agent adapted to expand the glass particles into microspheres which are collected in a chamber situated abode said flue. The method can be applied to the manufacture of microspheres adapted to contain a thermonuclear fuel [fr

  19. Fuel cycle cost, reactor physics and fuel manufacturing considerations for Erbia-bearing PWR fuel with > 5 wt% U-235 content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E. J.; Kucukboyaci, V. N. [Westinghouse Electric Co. LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The efforts to reduce fuel cycle cost have driven LWR fuel close to the licensed limit in fuel fissile content, 5.0 wt% U-235 enrichment, and the acceptable duty on current Zr-based cladding. An increase in the fuel enrichment beyond the 5 wt% limit, while certainly possible, entails costly investment in infrastructure and licensing. As a possible way to offset some of these costs, the addition of small amounts of Erbia to the UO{sub 2} powder with >5 wt% U-235 has been proposed, so that its initial reactivity is reduced to that of licensed fuel and most modifications to the existing facilities and equipment could be avoided. This paper discusses the potentialities of such a fuel on the US market from a vendor's perspective. An analysis of the in-core behavior and fuel cycle performance of a typical 4-loop PWR with 18 and 24-month operating cycles has been conducted, with the aim of quantifying the potential economic advantage and other operational benefits of this concept. Subsequently, the implications on fuel manufacturing and storage are discussed. While this concept has certainly good potential, a compelling case for its short-term introduction as PWR fuel for the US market could not be determined. (authors)

  20. Improvements in quality of as-manufactured fuels for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Tobita, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Kousaku; Kaneko, Mitsunobu; Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Yoshimuta, Shigeharu; Tomimoto, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of coating failure of the fuel particles for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors during coating and compaction processes of the fuel fabrication were studied to determine a way to reduce the defective particle fraction of the as-manufactured fuels. Through the observation of the defective particles, it was found that the coating failure during the coating process was mainly caused by the strong mechanical shocks to the particles given by violent particle fluidization in the coater and by unloading and loading of the particles. The coating failure during the compaction process was probably related to the direct contact with neighboring particles in the fuel compacts. The coating process was improved by optimizing the mode of the particle fluidization and by developing the process without unloading and loading of the particles at intermediate coating process. The compaction process was improved by optimizing the combination of the pressing temperature and the pressing speed of the overcoated particles. Through these modifications of the fabrication process, the quality of the as-manufactured fuel compacts was improved outstandingly. (author)

  1. Work carried out in France on the design, manufacture, handling and development of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.C.; Joly, G.; Gloaguen, A.; Delafosse, J.

    1977-01-01

    Although the ordinary water reactors to be found in France all belong to the PWR type, the fuel used covers a broad range: box assemblies with steel canning at the SENA plant, 15x15 at TIHANGE, 17x17 for 900 MW phases, slug and plate fuel developed by the Atomic Energy Commission and extra-long 17x17 for 1300 MW phases, also being developed. A description of what France is undertaking today with respect to: 1) design; 2) manufacture; 3) management; and 4) development of full assemblies is presented [fr

  2. THE FORMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUSTAINABLE LAYERED FILMS INCORPORATING MICROFIBRILLATED CELLULOSE (MFC)

    OpenAIRE

    Galina Rodionova,; Solenne Roudot; , Øyvind Eriksen,; Ferdinand Männle,; Øyvind Gregersen

    2012-01-01

    Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), TEMPO-pretreated MFC, and hybrid polymer/MFC mix were used for the production of layered films with interesting properties for application in food packaging. The series of samples were prepared from MFC (base layers) using a dispersion-casting method. The same procedure as well as a bar coating technique was applied to form top layers of different basis weights. The barrier properties and formation of the layered films were investigated in relationship to the...

  3. Process and quality control in manufacturing of nuclear fuel assemblies of LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, M.; Hoff, A.; Reimann, P.

    2000-01-01

    Manufacturing of nuclear fuel assemblies requires a multitude of different process and quality methods to assure and maintain a high quality level. In recent years methods have been applied which prevent deviations rather than detect deviant products. This paper gives an example on how to control a complex manufacturing process by using a small number of key parameters and second, it demonstrates the importance of graphical data evaluation and presentation methods. In the past many product and product characteristics were inspected m comparison with specification limits only. However, todays methods allow the early identification of trends, increase of variation, shifts disturbances etc. before the product characteristics exceed the specification limits. These methods are process control charts, x-y-plots, boxplots, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), process capability numbers and others. This paper demonstrates the beneficial use of some of the methods by presenting selected examples applied at Advanced Nuclear Fuels GmbH (ANF). (author)

  4. Considerations for the transition from fuel cell R ampersand D to manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are a growing number of contractors within the present fuel cell community who have the potential of becoming high volume manufacturers of fuel cell power plants or components. Many are transitioning from basic research operations to manufacturing for the first time. Moving a product from the R ampersand D stage to a viable commercial product depends upon many factors. Some companies are more successful at it than others. We believe there is an underlying transition process from invention to market that is much the same for large, well established firms, as it is for start-ups. How well the process is understood and executed often determines the winners and losers in product commercialization. This paper presents a viewpoint on considerations for transitioning a new technology into commercial production and discusses some affects on organizational development

  5. 18 years experience on UF{sub 6} handling at Japanese nuclear fuel manufacturer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujinaga, H.; Yamazaki, N.; Takebe, N. [Japan Nucelar Fuel Conversion Co., Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1991-12-31

    In the spring of 1991, a leading nuclear fuel manufacturing company in Japan, celebrated its 18th anniversary. Since 1973, the company has produced over 5000 metric ton of ceramic grade UO{sub 2} powder to supply to Japanese fabricators, without major accident/incident and especially with a successful safety record on UF{sub 6} handling. The company`s 18 years experience on nuclear fuel manufacturing reveals that key factors for the safe handling of UF{sub 6} are (1) installing adequate facilities, equipped with safety devices, (2) providing UF{sub 6} handling manuals and executing them strictly, and (3) repeating on and off the job training for operators. In this paper, equipment and the operation mode for UF{sub 6} processing at their facility are discussed.

  6. Manufacture of tube billets for fuel cans by vacuum centrifugal casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, V.F.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Chernyj, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    Vacuum device for induction melting with centrifugal casting in the ingot mold with rotation vertical or horisontal axis is presented. Removing and grinding of nonmetallic inclusions are realized by selection of casting conditions and of chemically active reducer, sound metal with high ductility is obtained. Data on micro- and macrostructure of casted tube billets made of 08Kh18N10T and 06Kh16H15M3B stainless steels, designed for manufacture of fuel cans are presented

  7. The manufacture of MTR fuel elements and Mo99 production targets at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium/aluminium alloy elements have been produced at Dounreay for nearly 40 years. In April 1990 the two DIDO-type reactors operated by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) at Harwell were closed, with the result that a large portion of the then current customer base disappeared and, to satisfy the needs of the evolving market, the decision was taken to invest over 1m pounds in new equipment for the manufacture of dispersed fuels and molybdenum production targets. (author)

  8. Quality assurance in the procurement, design and manufacture of nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides requirements and recommendations for quality assurance programmes that are relevant for the unique features of the procurement, design, manufacture, inspection, testing, packaging, shipping, storage, and receiving inspection of fuel assemblies for nuclear power plants. The generic quality assurance requirements of the Code and related Safety Guides are referred to where applicable, and are duplicated in this document where increased emphasis is desirable

  9. Use of alternative fuels in cement manufacture. Effect on clinker and cement characteristics and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares industrial clinker and cement produced using conventional and alternative fuels (animal meal, tyres or a mixture of the two. The results show no relevant differences in terms of mineralogical composition between the clinker manufactured with alternative fuels and the product obtained using conventional fuel. Clinker produced with alternative fuels at any one factory have a very similar or even lower content in heavy metals than the product manufactured with conventional fuel in the same plant (with the sole exception of Zn when the alternative fuel used is shredded tyres. Mineralogical and morphological analyses reveal no significant differences between the two types of products that can be attributed to the type of fuel used in their manufacture. All six types of cement studied are compliant with the existing legislation as regards both physical and chemical properties. Cement compressive strength is found to be to legal standards regardless of the type of fuel used. Finally, the rheological properties of the cement paste are observed to be unaffected by the type of fuel.

    Se han estudiado clínkeres y cementos obtenidos en procesos industriales que han utilizado combustibles convencionales y combustibles alternativos (harinas cárnicas, neumáticos usados y mezclas de ambos. Los resultados obtenidos han demostrado que los clínkeres fabricados con los combustibles alternativos no presentan diferencias significativas en la composición mineralógica respecto a los obtenidos con combustibles convencionales. Los contenidos de metales pesados en los clínkeres procedentes de la misma fábrica (a excepción de los contenidos en Zn en aquéllos que utilizan neumáticos son muy similares o incluso inferiores a los fabricados con combustibles convencionales. Los análisis mineralógico y morfológico de los clínkeres no evidencian diferencias asignables al tipo de combustible utilizado. Todos los cementos estudiados cumplen

  10. Tests for manufacturing technology of disposal canisters for nuclear spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raiko, H.; Salonen, T.; Meuronen, I.; Lehto, K.

    1999-06-01

    The summary and status of the results of the manufacturing technology programmes concerning the disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel conducted by Posiva Oy are given in this report. Posiva has maintained a draft plan for a disposal canister design and an assessment of potential manufacturing technologies for about ten years in Finland. Now, during the year 1999, the first full scale demonstration canister is manufactured in Finland. The technology used for manufacturing of this prototype is developed by Posiva Oy mainly in co-operation with domestic industry. The main partner in developing the manufacturing technology for the copper shell has been Outokumpu Poricopper Oy, Pori, Finland, and the main partner in developing the technology for the iron insert of the canister has been Valmet Oyj Rautpohja Foundry, Jyvaeskylae, Finland. In both areas many subcontractors have been used, predominantly domestic engineering workshops, but also some foreign subcontractors, e.g. for EB-welding, who have had large enough welding equipment. This report describes the developing programmes for canister manufacturing, evaluates the results and presents some alternative methods, and tries to evaluate the pros and contras of them. In addition, the adequacy of the achieved technological know-how is assessed in respect of the required quality of the disposal canister. The following manufacturing technologies have been the concrete topics of the development programme: Electron beam welding technology development for thick-walled copper, Casting of massive copper billets, Hot rolling of thick-walled copper plates, Hot pressing and forging in lid manufacture, Extrusion and drawing of copper tubes, Bending of copper plates by roller or press, Machining of copper, Residual stress removal by heat treatment, Non-destructive testing, Long-term strength of EB-welds, Casting and machining of the iron insert of the canister The specialists from all the main developing partner companies have

  11. Flexible manufacturing systems and their relevance in nuclear fuel fabrication in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel bundle involves several materials and a number of complicated technologies and the process of manufacture has to conform to stringent standards. The Indian Nuclear Programme relies heavily on indigeneous capability of manufacture of nuclear fuels as well as automation of the related facilities. Automation of the existing nuclear facilities is a challenge in view of the characteristic plant environments and process demands as well as the various mechanical and metallurgical steps involved. This paper discusses their requirements and the measures initiated for achieving a high order of automation in Indian nuclear facilities. As a first step, specific automation steps are being incorporated in the existing plants. Such interface automation will enhance productivity and avoid the need for building new totally automated palnts. Flexible manufacturing system as applied here, has a different connotation vis-a-vis conventional manufacturing industry. Robotic devices, even for stacking jobs, have not been used on a large scale the world over. (author). 6 figs

  12. The current state of development works for manufacturing and methods of controlling the nuclear fuel for NPPs of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odeychuk, N.P.; Levenets, V.V.; Krasnorutsky, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of NSC KIPT researches on manufacturing the fuel microspheres and pellets based on uranium dioxide. The data on fuel characteristics for different manufacturing stages are given. The problems of improving the fuel quality with changing the structure characteristics of pellets are considered. Demonstrated is the hardware for pellet controlling and presented are the new ways for developing the methods of controlling the nuclear fuel: X-ray fluorescent analysis; complex of nuclear-physical methods on the base of accelerators; laser-excitation energy-mass-spectrometer. (author)

  13. Advances in the manufacturing and irradiation of reduced enrichment fuels for canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.C.; Foo, M.T.; Berthiaume, L.C.; Herbert, L.N.; Schaefer, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The procedures for manufacturing fuel rods of uranium silicide dispersed in aluminum and clad in aluminum have been optimized to maximize production rates while minimizing scrap losses. Melting and casting, chip machining and core extrusion have all been re-evaluated to improve their efficiency and significant gains have been made, whilst maintaining high quality standards. The results of our irradiation program on mini-elements up to a burnup of 80 atomic percent continue to be encouraging. The upper bound curve of fuel core swelling versus burnup in the range 0-80 atomic percent represents 1% swelling per 10 atomic percent burnup. Fuel core swelling has now been measured directly on six mini-elements from which the clad surface oxide had been removed showing that previous calculated values of core swelling were marginally conservative. (author)

  14. Cost Study for Manufacturing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chick, Lawrence A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gotthold, David W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Whyatt, Greg A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems can be designed to produce electricity from fossil fuels at extremely high net efficiencies, approaching 70%. However, in order to penetrate commercial markets to an extent that significantly impacts world fuel consumption, their cost will need to be competitive with alternative generating systems, such as gas turbines. This report discusses a cost model developed at PNNL to estimate the manufacturing cost of SOFC power systems sized for ground-based distributed generation. The power system design was developed at PNNL in a study on the feasibility of using SOFC power systems on more electric aircraft to replace the main engine-mounted electrical generators [Whyatt and Chick, 2012]. We chose to study that design because the projected efficiency was high (70%) and the generating capacity was suitable for ground-based distributed generation (270 kW).

  15. Rice mill wastewater treatment in microbial fuel cells fabricated using proton exchange membrane and earthen pot at different pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Manaswini; Jana, Partha S; More, Tanaji T; Ghangrekar, M M

    2010-10-01

    Performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), fabricated using an earthen pot (MFC-1) and a proton exchange membrane (MFC-2), was evaluated while treating rice mill wastewater at feed pH of 8.0, 7.0 and 6.0. A third MFC (MFC-3), fabricated using a proton exchange membrane (PEM), was operated as control without pH adjustment of the acidic raw wastewater. Maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of 96.5% and 92.6% were obtained in MFC-1 and MFC-2, respectively, at feed pH of 8.0. MFC-3 showed maximum COD removal of 87%. The lignin removal was 84%, 79%, and 77% and the phenol removal was 81%, 77%, and 76% in MFC-1, MFC-2, and MFC-3, respectively. Maximum sustainable volumetric power was obtained at feed pH of 8.0, and it was 2.3 W/m(3) and 0.53 W/m(3), with 100 ohm external resistance, in MFC-1 and MFC-2, respectively. The power was lower at lower feed pH. MFC-3 generated lowest volumetric power (0.27 W/m(3)) as compared to MFC-1 and MFC-2. More effective treatment of rice mill wastewater and higher energy recovery was demonstrated by earthen pot MFC as compared to MFC incorporated with PEM. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Manufacturing method of fuel assembly and channel box for the fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujieda, Tadashi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Takase, Iwao; Nishino, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Ito, Ken-ichi; Nakajima, Junjiro; Seto, Takehiro.

    1998-01-01

    An MOX fuel assembly to be used for a BWR type reactor comprises a channel box, a great number of fuel rod bundles and a water rod. BP members incorporated with a burnable neutron absorbing poison (BP) are buried in the vicinity of corners of four sides of the channel box in the longitudinal direction. The channel box is formed by fitting the BP members in concaves formed in the longitudinal direction of zircaloy plates, laminating other zircaloy plates and welding the seams. Then, hot rolling, cold rolling and annealing are conducted to form them into a single plate. Integrated two single plates after bending treatment are abutted and welded, and heat-treatment is applied to complete the channel box. With such a constitution, since the BP member is not brought into contact with reactor water directly, crevice corrosion or galvanic corrosion can be prevented. (I.N.)

  17. Nuclear fuel in water reactors: manufacturing technology operational experience and development activities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, R.; Knoedler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel industry in the F.R. Germany comprises the full range of manufacturing capabilities for pressurized - boiling- and heavy water reactor technology. The existing manufacturing companies are RBU and Alkem. RBU makes natural and enriched UO 2 -fuel assemblies, starting with powder preparation. Facilites to produce UO 2 -Gadolinia and UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel are also available. Alkem is manufacturing mixed oxide UO 2 /PuO 2 -fuel and -rods. Zircaloy cladding tubes are produced by NRG and MRW. This constitutes the largest single nuclear fuel manufacturing capacity outside the USA. The companies are interested in export and current capacity trends indicate some overcapacity caused by delays in plant schedules. Construction of a new fuel manufacturing plant in the FRG has been announced by Exxon. Supplementary to quality control in manufacturing an integrated quality assurance-system has been established between the reactor vendor KWU, fuel design and -engineering division, and the existing manufacturing companies for fuel and tubing. The operating experience with LWR and HWR fuel dates back to 1964/65 and proves good performance. No generic problems like densification or rod bow were encountered. Possible reasons for the small fraction of defective rods could be quickly identified by a fast feedback system incorporating a close cooperation between KWU and the utilities. KWU combines fuel development, hot-cell and poolside service facilities as well as fuel technology linking to manufacturing in one hand. The common responsibility of KWU for core- and fuel design which enabled an integral optimization was also an important reason for the successful operation and flexibility in design. Development efforts will be concentrated on tests to improve the understanding of power ramping capability under extreme operational and postulated abnormal conditions, on statistical evaluation of safety aspects and on improved economy. The LWR fuel development was sponsored by the

  18. Parametric effect during power generation from sewage sludge using prototype mfc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, A.R.; Aftab, A.

    2015-01-01

    Pakistan like other countries is also faced with energy crisis, for which there is a need to identify indigenous technologies along with renewable energy sources to satisfy the energy footprint of the country. Use of MFC (Microbial Fuel Cell) technique is currently a step towards this direction that can play an effective role in solving the dual problems of environmental pollution and energy shortage. In this study, sewage sludge from a wastewater treatment plant was collected and used as a substrate for electricity generation in association with other biomass sources. Effect of relevant parameters such as oxygen flow rate, pH and concentration on voltage generation was also analyzed. The experimental results yielded in voltage generation of 2500 mv/l for sewage sludge in comparison to that obtained using carbon manure (270 mv/l), wastewater (229 mv/l) and cow manure (330 mv/l) suggesting towards the potential of sewage sludge for power generation. (author)

  19. The development of a commercial MOX fuel manufacturing capability in the U.K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macphee, D.S.; Young, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    BNFL is implementing a strategy to establish a commercial MOX manufacturing capability within the UK. The design and provision of the fabrication plants is incorporating the considerable experience within the Company of MOX technology, fuel fabrication and nuclear plant design. The first phase of the strategy is complete with the successful operation of the Demonstration Facility. The development programmes supporting the increased scale of operation for a commercial scale facility are substantially complete. Design and construction of a 120t HM/year plant is well advanced supported by a substantial in-house design and project management team. (author)

  20. Casting technology for manufacturing metal rods from simulated metallic spent fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeand, Y. S.; Lee, D. B.; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2000-09-01

    A uranium metal rod 13.5 mm in diameter and 1,150 mm long was produced from simulated metallic spent fuels with advanced casting equipment using the directional-solidification method. A vacuum casting furnace equipped with a four-zone heater to prevent surface oxidation and the formation of surface shrinkage holes was designed. By controlling the axial temperature gradient of the casting furnace, deformation by the surface shrinkage phenomena was diminished, and a sound rod was manufactured. The cooling behavior of the molten uranium was analyzed using the computer software package MAGMAsoft.

  1. Control of criticality risk in the manufacture of fuel elements for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedenthal, M.; Cardenas Yucra, H.R.; Marajofsky, A.; La Gamma de Batistoni, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The control of criticality risk in a chemical plant adopts different forms according to the quantities of fissile material and the type of compounds used. This work presents the treatment of the critical excursion risk adopted in production plants of U 3 O 8 and manufacturing plants of fuel elements for research reactors, located in Constituyentes Atomic Center. The possible events and accidents related to the fissile material control are analyzed, and the systems of administrative control and intrinsic safety through engineering are described. (Author)

  2. Safety aspects of the FMPP (Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant) setup constructed by INVAP in the Arabic Republic of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinat, Enrique; Boero, Norma L.

    1999-01-01

    The FMPP is a fuel plates manufacturing plant for test reactors. This facility was designed, constructed in El Cairo and turned-key handled by INVAP SE to the Arabian Republic of Egypt. In this project, CNEA participated in the transference of technology, elaboration of documents, training of Egyptian personnel and technical services during the setup of the facility in El Cairo. These tasks were undertaken by UPMP (Uranium Powder Manufacturing Plant) and ECRI (Research Reactors Fuel Elements Plant) personnel. Both plants in CNEA served as a FMPP design basis. During the setup of the facility a fuel element with natural uranium was firstly manufactured and then another one using uranium with 20% enrichment. In this paper the responses of the system regarding safety, after finishing the first two stages of manufacturing, are analyzed and evaluated. (author)

  3. Changes in quality management for light water reactor fuel manufacturing: A utility's view of driving forces and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettmann, A.; Skusa, J.; Ketteler, M.

    2000-01-01

    Quality management in LWR fuel manufacturing for the use in German reactors is based on international guidelines and national/local authority requirements defined in operational licenses. The quality management is twofold and comprises a quality assurance system and the check of manufacturing documents including witnessing of fabrication processes and inspections. Utility and authority appointed technical expert witness manufacturing and take part in inspections performed by the manufacturer where the scope is strictly defined and does not provide possibilities of flexible responses to manufacturing occurrences. For future developments in quality management HEW supports strengthening the ideas of quality planning. Analysis of all factors influencing fuel reliability shall be performed prior to manufacturing. This will increase the efforts in reviewing of drawings and specifications. Included here shall be a review of processes that will be used in manufacturing. The qualification and robustness of processes shall be demonstrated with special qualification programs and analysis of manufacturing statistics. Instead of product/project related inspections the use of all manufacturing data will provide a complete picture of the manufacturing quality. By applying statistical methods it will be possible to identify trends in manufacturing before deviations occur. So the basic driving force to implement statistical process control for the utilities is the wish to get comprehensive information of delivered quality, whereas for manufacturers it might be to increase production yields and thus to lower costs. The introduction and full use of statistical process control requires open information about manufacturing processes and inspection results by the manufacturers. This might include data judged to be economically sensitive. It also requires changes in attitude at the utilities and appointed experts. HEW has started to review and change internal guidelines to allow

  4. Manufacture of hypoeutectic Al-Si metal powders for dispersion matriz in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaeli, H A; Harri, S; Acosta, M; Castillo Guerra, R; Rossi, G; Fabro, J O; Rubiolo, G H

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the development of low enriched nuclear fuels for research reactors, U.Mo/Al is the most promising option that has however to be optimized. Indeed at the U.Mo/Al interfaces between U.Mo particles and the Al matrix, an interaction layer grows under irradiation inducing an unacceptable fuel swelling. Adding silicon in limited content into the Al matrix has clearly improved the in-pile fuel behaviour. This breakthrough is attributed to an U.Mo/Al.Si protective layer around U.Mo particles appeared during fuel manufacturing. The present work deals with three techniques applied to produce metal powders of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys: ball milling, centrifugal atomization and gas atomization. Size and microstructure of the particles are analyzed in the three techniques. The best result is found with the gas atomization system, flakes and rods morphology predominates in the produced powders, with particle sizes below 150 microns and the greater mass population (65%) is between 150 and 125 microns. The particle surface is smooth and the high solidification rate provides a good distribution of the α-Al primary and eutectic phase within each particle (author)

  5. Exploitation and use of raw materials resources for manufacturing nuclear fuels. Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgescu, Dan; Nica, Dan Bujor; Iuhas, Tiberius; Muntean, Ioan

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear fuel for Cernavoda Romanian nuclear power plant is based on natural uranium cycle implying mining, concentration-refining and UO 2 manufacturing. For the Uranium National Company securing the raw materials necessary for fuel element manufacturing implies the following sources: - from the production cumulated till the year 2001 in the Security and Consumption Stock; - from the current production of uranium ore. Romania posses two categories of deposits which ensure at present and in the future the uranium ore production: active deposits and production center at Crucea-Botusana; - deposits proposed for the exploitation activity at Tulghes - Grinties. Other two important centers of production in Banat and Bihor ceased the production since 1999 due to the deposit depletion. The uranium reserve of Romania is estimated to 9,233 tones in geological deposits of high confidence level plus 6,344 tones in resources still not searched. The medium- and long-term strategy of CNU to fructify the uranium reserves of Romania is in concordance with the current government policy and is based upon two major investments: - opening a new production unit at Tulghes-Grinties; - Refurbishment of plants R1 and E1. The main amount of uranium currently used for making the needed nuclear fuel comes today from the production center Crucea-Botusana. Here the exploitation is based mainly on pitchblende-rich deposits. Uranium ore processing and concentration is made at 'R' and 'E' plants at Feldioara able to ensure an annual capacity of 300 tones UO 2 . In the assesment of the amount of uranium needed in the nuclear fuel fabrication the degree of uranium recovery was also taken into account. The uranium supply implied by the new electro-nuclear plants to be installed till 2025 was evaluated by taking into account the future advanced fuel solutions, SEU and RU, what will diminish the natural uranium consumption to 55% and 66%, respectively. The price of nuclear fuel has been estimated

  6. Handbook for Small-Scale Densified Biomass Fuel (Pellets) Manufacturing for Local Markets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folk, Richard L.; Govett, Robert L.

    1992-07-01

    Wood pellet manufacturing in the Intermountain West is a recently founded and rapidly expanding energy industry for small-scale producers. Within a three-year period, the total number of manufacturers in the region has increased from seven to twelve (Folk et al., 1988). Small-scale industry development is evolving because a supply of raw materials from small and some medium-sized primary and secondary wood processors that has been largely unused. For the residue producer considering pellet fuel manufacturing, the wastewood generated from primary products often carries a cost associated with residue disposal when methods at-e stockpiling, landfilling or incinerating. Regional processors use these methods for a variety of reasons, including the relatively small amounts of residue produced, residue form, mixed residue types, high transportation costs and lack of a local market, convenience and absence of regulation. Direct costs associated with residue disposal include the expenses required to own and operate residue handling equipment, costs for operating and maintaining a combustor and tipping fees charged to accept wood waste at public landfills. Economic and social costs related to environmental concerns may also be incurred to include local air and water quality degradation from open-air combustion and leachate movement into streams and drinking water.

  7. Improvements by employee motivation in the manufacture of nuclear fuel assemblies for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osseforth, E.; Engel, H.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear fuel assemblies are manufactured on a very high technical level and automation. However there is still a need for more improvement. One of the most important ways is employees motivation, because improvements lives of the ideas, impulses, initiatives and commitments of its employees. It can be realized by the employee himself or a group. Three ways of improvement by employees are mainly implemented at ANF: (i) ANF's 3i - program, based on the standard implementation within Siemens, is the first and an important strategy to improve processes, products and costs. It is to involve all employees and make use of the full potential for improvement The individual employee or a group make a suggestion and receive a commendation depending on the benefits. (ii) Work groups with a high level of responsibility are the second part. The groups mainly organize their work, working time and improvements by themselves. They help each other in job training, are very flexible and able to do also most of the maintenance work. (iii) CIP - groups (Continuous Improvement Process), based on the philosophy of KAMEN is the third strategy. These groups come together to improve all processes in the manufacturing area, also the administration or logistical processes at ANF. CIP - groups are implemented as so called long-term groups, the members are from different levels and departments. By comparing the different ways in order to achieve manufacturing improvements, employees motivation is one of the most important and cheapest part and will increase in significance in future. (author)

  8. Integration of process-oriented control with systematic inspection in FRAMATOME-FBFC fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopff, G.

    2000-01-01

    The classical approach to quality control is essentially based on final inspection of the product conducted through a qualified process. The main drawback of this approach lies in the separation and , therefore, in the low feedback between manufacturing and quality control, leading to a very static quality system. As a remedy, the modern approach to quality management focuses on the need for continuous improvement through process-oriented quality control. In the classical approach, high reliability of nuclear fuel and high quality level of the main characteristics are assumed to be attained, at the manufacturing step, through 100% inspection of the product, generally with automated inspection equipment. Such a 100% final inspection is not appropriate to obtain a homogeneous product with minimum variability, and cannot be a substitute for the SPC tools (Statistical Process Control) which are rightly designed with this aim. On the other hand, SPC methods, which detect process changes and are used to keep the process u nder control , leading to the optimal distribution of the quality characteristics, do not protect against non systematic or local disturbances, at low frequency. Only systematic control is capable of detecting local quality troubles. In fact, both approaches, SPC and systematic inspection, are complementary , because they are remedies for distinct causes of process and product changes. The term 'statistical' in the expression 'SPC' refers less to the sampling techniques than to the control of global distribution parameters of product or process variables (generally location and dispersion parameters). The successive integration levels of process control methods with systematic inspection are described and illustrated by examples from FRAMATOME-FBFC fuel manufacturing, from the simple control chart for checking the performance stability of automated inspection equipment to the global process control system including systematic inspection. This kind of

  9. Stability of zinc stearate under alpha irradiation in the manufacturing process of SFR nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, J.; Vermeulen, J.; Baux, D.; Sauvage, T.; Venault, L.; Audubert, F.; Colin, X.

    2018-03-01

    The manufacture of new fuels for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) will involve powders derived from recycling existing fuels in order to keep on producing electricity while saving natural resources and reducing the amount of waste produced by spent MOX fuels. Using recycled plutonium in this way will significantly increase the amount of 238Pu, a high energy alpha emitter, in the powders. The process of shaping powders by pressing requires the use of a solid lubricant, zinc stearate, to produce pellets with no defects compliant with the standards. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of alpha radiolysis on this additive and its lubrication properties. Experiments were conducted on samples in contact with PuO2, as well as under external helium ion beam irradiation, in order to define the kinetics of radiolytic gas generation. The yield results relating to the formation of these gases (G0) show that the alpha radiation of plutonium can be simulated using external helium ion beam irradiation. The isotopic composition of plutonium has little impact on the yield. However, an increased yield was globally observed with increasing the mean linear energy transfer (LET). A radiolytic degradation process is proposed.

  10. Enusa, Internationalized Enterprise in Nuclear Fuel Manufacture and Associated Engineering Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Calderon, G.

    2000-01-01

    Since the beginning of its activities, in 1972, ENUSA has been providing an important contribution to Spanish nuclear energy development, performing activities in the first part of the nuclear fuel cycle. Few years after starting the production at the juzbado manufacturing plant, ENUSA realised that, in order to be competitive, needed to expand its activities beyond the Spanish border and took the decision of being present in the Nuclear fuel market in Europe internationalizing its activities. ENUSA reached Strategic Alliance with of the most important technology owners, General Electric and Westinghouse. These alliances have allowed the Company to be one of the players in the very competitive European fuel market, and have also been, important to position ENUSA in an industry in process of consolidation. In parallel to these activities, ENUSA has been present in different international R and D projects, being member of the NFIR of EPRI and Halden projects, and promoting other international R and D programs with companies from USA, Japan, etc. This R and D efforts, together with those Alliance, will allow ENUSA to have an advanced product in this new deregulated market, creating value to the service of our customers. (Author)

  11. What is done in France with respect to the design, manufacture, management and development of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.; Traccucci, R.; Joly, G.; Gloaguen, A.; Delafosse, J.

    1977-01-01

    What France is undertaking today concerning nuclear fuel is presented under four headings: (1) Design: The analysis of design and that of fuel behaviour is determined by the constructor through the knowledge of phenomena and the evaluation of materials selection and design criteria as well as the calculation of margins; this task is performed with the help of experimental qualifying programmes. With the means at its disposal the Equipment Department of Electricite de France scrutinizes the studies related to the first charges. Thus, design can be proved satisfactory by analysing fuel operation data. Achievements or expectations concerning the fuel supplied by Framatome for CNA and Tihange are given as illustrations. This work is being continued in the study to promote 17x17 (extra-long) fuel. (2) Manufacture: The Quality Assurance of Framatome (supplier of the fuel now being ordered), already applied at the design study level, provides here the important means necessary to ensure the good quality of the products manufactured. EDF's controlling role, as far as the first charges are concerned, today ranges from examining the constructor's manufacturing specifications to investigating at request possible exceptions. (3) Management: EDF's Thermal Production Department implements a system of integrated management: Requirement forecasting; accounting and financial management; permanent control of radioactive material; physical optimization of fuel renewal and control of operating conditions; and analysis of the technological behaviour in the reactor in order to apply experience gained from it to fuel offered by various suppliers. (4) Development: The Atomic Energy Commission has developed fuel for its water reactors according to two techniques: slug fuel and plate fuel. If required both can be considered for power reactors. (author)

  12. Investigation of mass transport properties of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minelli, Matteo; Baschetti, Marco Giacinti; Doghieri, Ferruccio

    2010-01-01

    , confirming the existence of complex structures below the film surface. In contrast, the diffusion coefficient was definitely affected by plasticization, being higher for glycerol-containing samples and showing in all cases an exponential increase when water was added to the system. Similar behavior...... the existence of complex structures in the different samples. A porous, closely packed fiber network, more homogeneous in the samples containing glycerol, was characteristic of the surface of MFC films; while film cross-sections presented a dense layered structure with no evidence of porosity. Water vapor...... sorption experiments confirmed the hydrophilic character of these cellulosic materials and showed a dual effect of glycerol which reduced the water uptake at low water activity while enhancing it at high relative humidity. The water diffusion in dry samples was remarkably slow for a porous material...

  13. Preliminary design and manufacturing feasibility study for a machined Zircaloy triangular pitch fuel rod support system (grids) (AWBA development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwood, W.A.

    1981-07-01

    General design features and manufacturing operations for a high precision machined Zircaloy fuel rod support grid intended for use in advanced light water prebreeder or breeder reactor designs are described. The grid system consists of a Zircaloy main body with fuel rod and guide tube cells machined using wire EDM, a separate AM-350 stainless steel insert spring which fits into a full length T-slot in each fuel rod cell, and a thin (0.025'' or 0.040'' thick) wire EDM machined Zircaloy coverplate laser welded to each side of the grid body to retain the insert springs. The fuel rods are placed in a triangular pitch array with a tight rod-to-rod spacing of 0.063 inch nominal. Two dimples are positioned at the mid-thickness of the grid (single level) with a 90 0 included angle. Data is provided on the effectiveness of the manufacturing operations chosen for grid machining and assembly

  14. Washing of gel particles in wet chemical manufacture of reactor fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringel, H.

    1980-07-01

    In the manufacture of HTR fuel particles and particles of fertile material by wet chemical methods, the ammonium nitrate formed during the precipitation reaction must be washed out of the gel particles. This washing process has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. A counter-current washer has been developed which in particular takes account of the aspects of refabrication - such as compact construction and minimum waste. A counter-current washing column of 17 mm internal diameter and 640 mm length gives to gel particle throughput of 0.65 1/h. The volume ratio of wash water to gel particles is 5, and the residual nitrate concentration in the particles is 7 x 10 -3 mols of NO - 3 /1. (orig.) [de

  15. Potential criticality accident at the General Electric Nuclear Fuel and Component Manufacturing Facility, May 29, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    At the General Electric Nuclear Fuel and Component Manufacturing facility, located near Wilmington, North Carolina, on May 28 and 29, 1991, approximately 150 kilograms of uranium were inadvertently transferred from safe process tanks to an unsafe tank located at the waste treatment facility, thus creating the potential for a localized criticality safety problem. The excess uranium was ultimately safely recovered when the tank contents were centrifuged to remove the uranium-bearing material. Subsequently, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission dispatched an Incident Investigation Team to determine what happened, to identify probable causes, and to make appropriate findings and conclusions. This report describes the incident, the methodology used by the team in its investigation, and presents the team's findings and conclusions. 48 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Development of the elementary technology and the stack manufacturing process of solid oxide fuel cell (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S.A.; Seo, I.Y.; Lee, S.H. [Ssangyong Research Center (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Most of the SOFC components are composed of ceramics. Energy efficiency of SOFC can be obtained up to 80% with co-generation system and is higher than the traditional electricity generation system (30%). SOFC has having highest efficient among the several fuel cell system and is called {sup T}he 3 rd Generation Fuel Cell`. So the every developed countries are competing to develop this high technology. Key points to develop SOFCs are to select a materials having the similar thermal expansion behaviors and to construct a stable design. At present, three common stack configurations have been proposed and fabricated for SOFCs : sealess tubular design, flat-plat design, monolithic design. Although having disadvantages in the stability of performance and structure, the flat-plate design is commonly adopted rather than tubular design in recent SOFC R and D because of economical merit of commercial scale fabrication. In this study flat-plat design is adopted to develop SOFC in this study. The purpose of this study, the 2 nd year of Phase I, was to apply and progress the fabrication technology of 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} sized unit cell that was developed in 1 st year and to develop elementary technologies of stack manufacturing, i. e., design and fabrication of separator, sealing materials and gas sealing technology. (author) 66 refs., 48 tabs., 195 figs.

  17. Tube in zirconium base alloy for nuclear fuel assembly and manufacturing process of such a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Senevat, J.; Charquet, D.

    1996-01-01

    This patent concerns the description and manufacturing guidelines of a zirconium alloy tube for fuel cladding or fuel assembly guiding. The alloy contains (in weight) 0.4 to 0.6% of tin, 0.5 to 0.8% of iron, 0.35 to 0.50% of vanadium and 0.1 to 0.18% of oxygen. The carbon and silicon tenors range from 100 to 180 ppm and from 80 to 120 ppm, respectively. The alloy contains only zirconium, plus inevitable impurities, and is completely recrystallized. Corrosion resistance tests were performed on tubes made of this alloy and compared to corrosion tests performed on zircaloy 4 tubes. These tests show a better corrosion resistance and a lower corrosion kinetics for the new alloy, even in presence of lithium and iodine, and a lower hydridation rate. The mechanical resistance of this alloy is slightly lower than the one of zircaloy 4 but becomes equivalent or slightly better after two irradiation cycles. The ductility remains always equal or better than for zircaloy 4. (J.S.)

  18. Reactor fuel cladding tube with excellent corrosion resistance and method of manufacturing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takanari; Kanehara, Mitsuo; Abe, Katsuhiro; Nishimura, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a fuel cladding tube having an excellent corrosion resistance and thus a long life, and a suitable manufacturing method therefor. Namely, in the fuel cladding tube, the outer circumference of an inner layer made of a zirconium base alloy is coated with an outer layer made of a metal more corrosion resistant than the zirconium base alloy. Ti or a titanium alloy is suitable for the corrosion resistant metal. In addition, the outer layer can be coated by a method such as vapor deposition or plating, not limited to joining of the inner layer material and the outer layer material. Specifically, a composite material having an inner layer made of a zirconium alloy coated by the outer material made of a titanium alloy is applied with hot fabrication at a temperature within a range of from 500 to 850degC and at a fabrication rate of not less than 5%. The fabrication method includes any of extrusion, rolling, drawing, and casting. As the titanium-base alloy, a Ti-Al alloy or a Ti-Nb alloy containing Al of not more than 20wt%, or Nb of not more than 20wt% is preferred. (I.S.)

  19. Advanced methods of process/quality control in nuclear reactor fuel manufacture. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Nuclear fuel plays an essential role in ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear energy and its acceptance by the public. The economic and market situation is not favorable at present for nuclear fuel designers and suppliers. The reduction in fuel prices (mainly to compete with fossil fuels) and in the number of fuel assemblies to be delivered to customers (mainly due to burnup increase) has been offset by the rising number of safety and other requirements, e.g. the choice of fuel and structural materials and the qualification of equipment. In this respect, higher burnup and thermal rates, longer fuel cycles and the use of MOX fuels are the real means to improve the economics of the nuclear fuel cycle as a whole. Therefore, utilities and fuel vendors have recently initiated new research and development programmes aimed at improving fuel quality, design and materials to produce robust and reliable fuel for safe and reliable reactor operation more demanding conditions. In this connection, improvement of fuel quality occupies an important place and this requires continuous effort on the part of fuel researchers, designers and producers. In the early years of commercial fuel fabrication, emphasis was given to advancements in quality control/quality assurance related mainly to the product itself. Now, the emphasis is transferred to improvements in process control and to implementation of overall total quality management (TQM) programmes. In the area of fuel quality control, statistical methods are now widely implemented, replacing 100% inspection. The IAEA, recognizing the importance of obtaining and maintaining high standards in fuel fabrication, has paid particular attention to this subject. In response to the rapid progress in development and implementation of advanced methods of process/quality control in nuclear fuel manufacture and on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, the IAEA conducted a

  20. Advanced methods of process/quality control in nuclear reactor fuel manufacture. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    Nuclear fuel plays an essential role in ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear energy and its acceptance by the public. The economic and market situation is not favorable at present for nuclear fuel designers and suppliers. The reduction in fuel prices (mainly to compete with fossil fuels) and in the number of fuel assemblies to be delivered to customers (mainly due to burnup increase) has been offset by the rising number of safety and other requirements, e.g. the choice of fuel and structural materials and the qualification of equipment. In this respect, higher burnup and thermal rates, longer fuel cycles and the use of MOX fuels are the real means to improve the economics of the nuclear fuel cycle as a whole. Therefore, utilities and fuel vendors have recently initiated new research and development programmes aimed at improving fuel quality, design and materials to produce robust and reliable fuel for safe and reliable reactor operation more demanding conditions. In this connection, improvement of fuel quality occupies an important place and this requires continuous effort on the part of fuel researchers, designers and producers. In the early years of commercial fuel fabrication, emphasis was given to advancements in quality control/quality assurance related mainly to the product itself. Now, the emphasis is transferred to improvements in process control and to implementation of overall total quality management (TQM) programmes. In the area of fuel quality control, statistical methods are now widely implemented, replacing 100% inspection. The IAEA, recognizing the importance of obtaining and maintaining high standards in fuel fabrication, has paid particular attention to this subject. In response to the rapid progress in development and implementation of advanced methods of process/quality control in nuclear fuel manufacture and on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, the IAEA conducted a

  1. The logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant; Cadena logistica en la fabrica de elementos combustibles de Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The paper describe the logistics and the supply chain in the Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant, located in Juzbado in the province of Salamanca. In the the article are described the principal elements in the supply chain and the difficulties of its management derived from the short period for the manufacturing of the nuclear fuel. It's also given a view in relation to the transportation by land sea of the nuclear components, uranium oxide powder and the manufactured fuel. The characteristics of the supply chain are determined by the plant production forecast, by the origin and high technology of the raw materials and by nuclear fuel delivery site locations. (Author)

  2. Manufacture of core sub-assemblies and fertile fuel assemblies for Indian fast breeder programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraj, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Utilization of the vast reserves of thorium in the Fast Reactors has been the prime goal of nuclear power programme in India. Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) has successfully fabricated axial and radial blanket assemblies for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) containing thoria. Development of technologies for the manufacture of thoria pellets involved characterization of powder obtained by oxalate precipitation and calcination with the addition of small quantities of magnesium during oxalate precipitation. This has resulted in achieving desired sintered densities. Though the magnesia doped thoria has yielded specified densities by sintering the pellets at ∼1600 deg. C, experimental works on activated sintering of the thoria powders containing small quantities of Nb 2 O 5 has yielded similar densities when sintered in air at much lower temperatures. Doping of ThO 2 by Nb 2 O 5 is expected to give rise to oxygen interstitials or vacancies. A higher valency additive like Nb 2 O 5 and an oxidizing atmosphere has resulted in substantially lowering the sintering temperature while a lower valency additive and a reducing sintering atmosphere requires higher sintering temperature. Increase in the diffusion coefficient of thorium is likely to be responsible for activated sintering. Several experimental works on compaction of thoria powder revealed that the desired green density could be achieved at a moderate pressure of 140 MPa. An increase in inter-particle contact is evident by an increase in the green density and also in the specific surface area as the compaction pressure is increased. The compactability and sinterability characteristics seem to be affected by long storage of powder. Ball milling of powder prior to pre-compaction and granulation is found, in addition to breaking the agglomerates, to restore the original characteristics of the powder. The technique of thermal etching has been successfully used for examining the microstructural features of

  3. Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are within the

  4. Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

    2007-09-30

    The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are

  5. Characterization of uranium corrosion products involved in the March 13, 1998 fuel manufacturing facility pyrophoric event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.

    1999-01-01

    Uranium metal corrosion products from ZPPR fuel plates involved in the March 13, 1998 pyrophoric event in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West were characterized using thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and BET gas sorption techniques. Characterization was performed on corrosion products in several different conditions: immediately after separation from the source metal, after low-temperature passivation, after passivation and extended vault storage, and after burning in the pyrophoric event. The ignition temperatures and hydride fractions of the corrosion product were strongly dependent on corrosion extent. Corrosion products from plates with corrosion extents less than 0.7% did not ignite in TGA testing, while products from plates with corrosion extents greater than 1.2% consistently ignited. Corrosion extent is defined as mass of corrosion products divided by the total mass of uranium. The hydride fraction increased with corrosion extent. There was little change in corrosion product properties after low-temperature passivation or vault storage. The burned products were not reactive and contained no hydride; the principal constituents were UO 2 and U 3 O 7 . The source of the event was a considerable quantity of reactive hydride present in the corrosion products. No specific ignition mechanism could be conclusively identified. The most likely initiator was a static discharge in the corrosion product from the 14th can as it was poured into the consolidation can. The available evidence does not support scenarios in which the powder in the consolidation can slowly self-heated to the ignition point, or in which the powder in the 14th can was improperly passivated

  6. Characterization of uranium corrosion products involved in the March 13, 1998 fuel manufacturing facility pyrophoric event.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T.C.

    1999-04-26

    Uranium metal corrosion products from ZPPR fuel plates involved in the March 13, 1998 pyrophoric event in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West were characterized using thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and BET gas sorption techniques. Characterization was performed on corrosion products in several different conditions: immediately after separation from the source metal, after low-temperature passivation, after passivation and extended vault storage, and after burning in the pyrophoric event. The ignition temperatures and hydride fractions of the corrosion product were strongly dependent on corrosion extent. Corrosion products from plates with corrosion extents less than 0.7% did not ignite in TGA testing, while products from plates with corrosion extents greater than 1.2% consistently ignited. Corrosion extent is defined as mass of corrosion products divided by the total mass of uranium. The hydride fraction increased with corrosion extent. There was little change in corrosion product properties after low-temperature passivation or vault storage. The burned products were not reactive and contained no hydride; the principal constituents were UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 7}. The source of the event was a considerable quantity of reactive hydride present in the corrosion products. No specific ignition mechanism could be conclusively identified. The most likely initiator was a static discharge in the corrosion product from the 14th can as it was poured into the consolidation can. The available evidence does not support scenarios in which the powder in the consolidation can slowly self-heated to the ignition point, or in which the powder in the 14th can was improperly passivated.

  7. Assessment of the Current Level of Automation in the Manufacture of Fuel Cell Systems for Combined Heat and Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulsh, M.; Wheeler, D.; Protopappas, P.

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in supporting manufacturing research and development (R&D) for fuel cell systems in the 10-1,000 kilowatt (kW) power range relevant to stationary and distributed combined heat and power applications, with the intent to reduce manufacturing costs and increase production throughput. To assist in future decision-making, DOE requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a baseline understanding of the current levels of adoption of automation in manufacturing processes and flow, as well as of continuous processes. NREL identified and visited or interviewed key manufacturers, universities, and laboratories relevant to the study using a standard questionnaire. The questionnaire covered the current level of vertical integration, the importance of quality control developments for automation, the current level of automation and source of automation design, critical balance of plant issues, potential for continuous cell manufacturing, key manufacturing steps or processes that would benefit from DOE support for manufacturing R&D, the potential for cell or stack design changes to support automation, and the relationship between production volume and decisions on automation.

  8. Technology for manufacturing dispersion nuclear fuel at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, M.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Saliba-Silva, A.M.; Souza, J.A.B.; Riella, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    IPEN has been working for increasing radioisotope production in order to supply the expanding demand for radiopharmaceutical medicines requested by the Brazilian welfare. To reach this objective, the IEA-R1 research reactor power capacity was recently increased from 2 MW to 3.5 MW. Since 1988 IPEN has been manufacturing its own fuel element, initially based on U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel plates with 2.3 g U/cm 3 . To support the reactor power increase, higher uranium density had to be achieved for better irradiation flux and also to minimize the irradiated fuel elements to be stored. Uranium silicide was the chosen option. This paper describes the results of this program and the current status of silicide fuel fabrication and qualification. (author)

  9. Water Quality Monitoring in Developing Countries; Can Microbial Fuel Cells be the Answer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Chouler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The provision of safe water and adequate sanitation in developing countries is a must. A range of chemical and biological methods are currently used to ensure the safety of water for consumption. These methods however suffer from high costs, complexity of use and inability to function onsite and in real time. The microbial fuel cell (MFC technology has great potential for the rapid and simple testing of the quality of water sources. MFCs have the advantages of high simplicity and possibility for onsite and real time monitoring. Depending on the choice of manufacturing materials, this technology can also be highly cost effective. This review covers the state-of-the-art research on MFC sensors for water quality monitoring, and explores enabling factors for their use in developing countries.

  10. CEA and AREVA R and D on V/HTR fuel fabrication with the CAPRI experimental manufacturing line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charollais, Francois; Fonquernie, Sophie; Perrais, Christophe; Perez, Marc; Cellier, Francois; Vitali, Marie-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the French V/HTR fuel development and qualification program, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and AREVA through its program called ANTARES (Areva New Technology for Advanced Reactor Energy Supply) conduct R and D projects covering the mastering of UO 2 coated particle and fuel compact fabrication technology. To fulfill this task, a review of past knowledge, of existing technologies and a preliminary laboratory scale work program have been conducted with the aim of retrieving the know-how on HTR coated particle and compact manufacture: - The different stages of UO 2 kernel fabrication GSP Sol-Gel process have been reviewed, reproduced and improved; - The experimental conditions for the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of coatings have been defined on dummy kernels and development of innovative characterization methods has been carried out; - Former CERCA compacting process has been reviewed and updated. In parallel, an experimental manufacturing line for coated particles, named GAIA, and a compacting line based on former CERCA compacting experience have been designed, constructed and are in operation since early 2005 at CEA Cadarache and CERCA Romans, respectively. These two facilities constitute the CAPRI line (CEA and AREVA PRoduction Integrated line). The major objectives of the CAPRI line are: - to recover and validate past knowledge; - to permit the optimisation of reference fabrication processes for kernels and coatings and the investigation of alternative and innovative fuel design (UCO kernel, ZrC coating); - to test alternative compact process options; - to fabricate and characterize fuel required for irradiation and qualification purpose; - to specify needs for the fabrication of representative V/HTR TRISO fuel meeting industrial standards. This paper presents the progress status of the R and D conducted on V/HTR fuel particle and compact manufacture by mid 2005. (authors)

  11. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  12. Review of best available techniques for the control of pollution from the combustion of fuels manufactured from or including waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report is a technical review of the techniques available for controlling pollution from combustion processes burning fuels (over 3 MW thermal input) manufactured from or including the following: Waste and recovered oil; Refuse derived fuel; Rubber tyres and other rubber waste; Poultry litter; Wood and straw. This review forms the basis for the revision of the Chief Inspector's Guidance Notes referring to the prescribed processes listed with special emphasis on recommending achievable releases to all environmental media. In formulating achievable releases account is taken of technologies in operation in the UK and overseas. (UK)

  13. Design and manufacturing of non-instrumented capsule for advanced PWR fuel pellet irradiation test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Song, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This project is preparing to irradiation test of the developed large grain UO{sub 2} fuel pellet in HANARO for pursuit fuel safety and high burn-up in 'Advanced LWR Fuel Technology Development Project' as a part Nuclear Mid and Long-term R and D Program. On the basis test rod is performed the nuclei property and preliminary fuel performance analysis, test rod and non-instrumented capsule are designed and manufactured for irradiation test in HANARO. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel pellet was referred the non-instrumented capsule for an irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel in HANARO(DUPIC Rig-001) and 18-element HANARO fuel, was designed to ensure the integrity and the endurance of non-instrumented capsule during the long term(2.5 years) irradiation. To irradiate the UO{sub 2} pellets up to the burn-up 70 MWD/kgU, need the time about 60 months and ensure the integrity of non-instrumented capsule for 30 months until replace the new capsule. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule will be based to develope the non-instrumented capsule for the more long term irradiation in HANARO. 22 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  14. Development of a manufacturing process of (Th,U)O2 sintered pellets to be used as nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto Ferreira, R.A.; Santos, A.M. dos; Lameiras, F.S.; Cardoso, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The R and D result of a reliable manufacturing process of sintered (Th,U)O 2 pellets meeting the operational requirements of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is presented. Available technologies were used as much as possible. The R and D effort was directed to perform the required adaptations. The gel precipitation process was adapted successfully to the specific requirements of direct pressing and sintering. This was done mainly by adjusting the composition of the feed solution. The direct pressing and sintering parameters could be kept almost unchanged in relation to the manufacturing of UO 2 pellets. The design criteria of the (Th,U)O 2 nuclear fuel for pressurized light water reactors were identified and settled in the specification for this fuel. This R and D work was made jointly with the Kernforschungsanlage - Juelich, NUKEM and SIEMENS, Group KWU [pt

  15. The beginning of the LEU fuel elements manufacturing in the Chilean Commission of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, H.; Chavez, J.C.; Marin, J.; Lisboa, J.; Olivares, L.; Jimenez, O.

    1998-01-01

    The U 3 Si 2 LEU fuel fabrication program at CCHEN has started with the assembly of four leaders fuel elements for the RECH-1 reactor. This activity has involved a stage of fuel plates qualification, to evaluate fabrication procedures and quality controls and quality assurance. The qualification extent was 50% of the fuel plates, equivalent to the number of plates required for the assembly of two fuel elements. (author)

  16. Benchmarking the expected stack manufacturing cost of next generation, intermediate-temperature protonic ceramic fuel cells with solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Alexis; Ricote, Sandrine; Braun, Robert J.

    2017-11-01

    Recent progress in the performance of intermediate temperature (500-600 °C) protonic ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs) has demonstrated both fuel flexibility and increasing power density that approach commercial application requirements. These developments may eventually position the technology as a viable alternative to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). The PCFCs investigated in this work are based on a BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BZY20) thin electrolyte supported by BZY20/Ni porous anodes, and a triple conducting cathode material comprised of BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-δ (BCFZY0.1). These cells are prepared using a low-cost solid-state reactive sintering (SSRS) process, and are capable of power densities of 0.156 W cm-2 at 500 °C operating directly from methane fuel. We develop a manufacturing cost model to estimate the Nth generation production costs of PCFC stack technology using high volume manufacturing processes and compare them to the state-of-the-art in SOFC technology. The low-cost cell manufacturing enabled by the SSRS technique compensates for the lower PCFC power density and the trade-off between operating temperature and efficiency enables the use of lower-cost stainless steel materials. PCFC stack production cost estimates are found to be as much as 27-37% lower at 550 °C than SOFCs operating at 800 °C.

  17. Safety of operations in the manufacture of driver fuel for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor and modifications to the safety document for the Dragon Fuel Element Production Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, H.; Cross, J.; Flamm, J.

    1965-01-01

    The manufacture of the zirconium containing 'driver' fuel and fuel elements for the First Charge of the Dragon Reactor Experiment has been completed without incident. This is a report on the safety of operations in the Dragon Fuel Element Production Building during an approximately six month period when the 'driver' fuel was manufactured and 25 elements containing this fuel were assembled and exported to the Reactor Building. The opportunity is taken to bring the Safety Document up-to-date and to report on any significant operational failures of equipment. (author)

  18. Study on manufacturing technology of fuel guide tube using HANA alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyungil; Jung, Yangil; Park, Dongjun; Park, Jeongyong; Kim, Ilhyun; Choi, Byungkwon; Jeong, Yonghwan; Park, Sangyoon

    2013-04-01

    This research was focused on the study for the manufacturing technology of HANA alloys to crease the corrosion resistance of 30% as well as the to improve the strength of 10% when compared to the commercial zirconium alloys. The new manufacturing concept having higher corrosion resistance and strength than commercial alloy performance can be obtained in this research. This result was transferred to the KNF and, that will be commercialized. This research result can be summarized like this; Ο Parameter study to increase formability of HANA alloy tube - Study on alloy element and heat-treatment effect - Study on texture development mechanism - Study on final annealing effect Ο Out-of-pile performance evaluation of HANA alloy tube - Corrosion performance evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Mechanical performance evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Recrystallization behavior evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Texture characterization of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Microstructure characterization of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF Ο Manufacturing guideline setup to increase formability of HANA alloy tube - Manufacturing guideline setup to decrease surface defect - Manufacturing guideline setup to increase strength and corrosion resistance - Manufacturing guideline setup to control texture

  19. Manufacturing process optimization of nuclear fuel guide tube using HANA alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Choi, B. K.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, H. G.; Jeong, Y. I.; Park, D. J.; Lim, J. K.

    2010-08-01

    From this project, the advanced manufacturing parameters which were contained of heat-treatment, reduction rate, and new process (2 step) were considered to increase the guide tube performance of HANA material. It was obtained that the strength and corrosion resistance of HANA material were improved by applying the improve manufacturing parameters when compared to the commercial guide tube material. · Manufacturing parameter study to increase mechanical property -Tensile strength increase of 30% by manufacturing parameter setup when compared to the guide tube specification · Manufacturing parameter study to decrease irradiation growth -Theoretical study of the texture effect on sample specimens related to the irradiation growth · Manufacturing parameter study to increase corrosion resistance -Corrosion resistance increase of 30% by manufacturing parameter setup when compared to the commercial guide tube

  20. Manufacturing method of molten carbonate fuel cell. Yoyu tansan prime en nenryo denchi no seizo hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muneuchi, Atsuo; Murata, Kenji

    1989-09-14

    An fuel electrode of a molten carbonate fuel cell is preliminarily dipped with molten carbonate. This operation is troublesome and reduces the productivity because this operation is made by the fuel electrode unit. In this invention, the carbonate is dipped in the process of temperature elevation after the assembly of the fuel cell. In other words, the carbonate electrode is buried in a groove formed in the fuel electrode leaving a gas flowing space; this fuel electrode is layer-built with a matrix and an oxidant electrode to form a unit cell; this unit cell is assembled to compose a fuel cell; while an anti-oxidant gas is fed to a groove of the fuel electrode, temperature is raised up to the operation level, wherein the carbonnate in the groove is molten to be dipped into the fuel electrode. The anti-oxidant gas is such inactive ones as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, argon and helium. 2 figs.

  1. Binder materials for the cathodes applied to self-stratifying membraneless microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Xavier Alexis; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2018-04-19

    The recently developed self-stratifying membraneless microbial fuel cell (SSM-MFC) has been shown as a promising concept for urine treatment. The first prototypes employed cathodes made of activated carbon (AC) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mixture. Here, we explored the possibility to substitute PTFE with either polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) or PlastiDip (CPD; i.e. synthetic rubber) as binder for AC-based cathode in SSM-MFC. Sintered activated carbon (SAC) was also tested due to its ease of manufacturing and the fact that no stainless steel collector is needed. Results indicate that the SSM-MFC having PTFE cathodes were the most powerful measuring 1617 μW (11 W·m -3 or 101 mW·m -2 ). SSM-MFC with PVA and CPD as binders were producing on average the same level of power (1226 ± 90 μW), which was 24% less than the SSM-MFC having PTFE-based cathodes. When balancing the power by the cost and environmental impact, results clearly show that PVA was the best alternative. Power wise, the SAC cathodes were shown being the less performing (≈1070 μW). Nonetheless, the lower power of SAC was balanced by its inexpensiveness. Overall results indicate that (i) PTFE is yet the best binder to employ, and (ii) SAC and PVA-based cathodes are promising alternatives that would benefit from further improvements. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Manufacturing at industrial level of UO2 pellets for the fuel elements of the Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyment, I.G.; Noguera Rojas, Francisco

    1982-01-01

    The interest to produce fuel elements within a policy of self sufficiency arose with the installation of Atucha I. The first steps towards this goal consisted in processing the uranium oxide, transforming it into fuel pellets of high density. The developments towards the fabrication of said pellets, performed by CNEA since 1968, first at a laboratory level and afterwards on an industrial scale, allowed CNEA to obtain its own technological capability to produce 400 kg of UO 2 per day. The fuel pellets manufacturing method developed by CNEA is a powder-metallurgical process, which, besides conventional equipment, involves the use of special equipment that required the performance of systematic testing programmes, as well as special training at operational level. The developed processes respond to a modern and advanced technology. A general scheme of the process, starting with a directly sinterable UO 2 powder, is described, including compacting of the powder into pellets, sintering, control of the temperature in the sintering and reduction zones and of the time of permanence in both zones, and cylindric rectifying of the pellets. During the whole process, specialized personnel controls the operations, after which the material is released by the Quality Control Department. The national contribution to the manufacturing technology of the pellets for fuel elements of power and research reactors was of 100%. (M.E.L.) [es

  3. Post-irradiation examination of U3SIX-AL fuel element manufactured and irradiated in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggirello, Gabriel; Calabroni, Hector; Sanchez, Miguel; Hofman, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    As a part of CNEA's qualification program as a supplier of low enriched Al-U 3 Si 2 dispersion fuel elements for research reactors, a post irradiation examination (PIE) of the first prototype of this kind, called P-04, manufactured and irradiated in Argentina, was carried out. The main purpose of this work was to set up various standard PIE techniques in the hot cell, looking forward to the next steps of the qualification program, as well as to acquire experience on the behaviour of this nuclear material and on the control of the manufacturing process. After an appropriate cooling period, on May 2000 the P-04 was transported to the hot cell in Ezeiza Atomic Centre. Non destructive and destructive tests were performed following the PIE procedures developed in Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), this mainly included dimensional measurement, microstructural observations and chemical burn-up analyses. The methodology and results of which are outlined in this report. The results obtained show a behaviour consistent with that of other fuel elements of the same kind, tested previously. On the other hand the results of this PIE, specially those concerning burn-up analysis and stability and corrosion behaviour of the fuel plates, will be of use for the IAEA Regional Program on the characterization of MTR spent fuel. (author)

  4. Waste to real energy: the first MFC powered mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis A; Ledezma, Pablo; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Papaharalabos, George; Melhuish, Chris; Greenman, John

    2013-10-07

    This communication reports for the first time the charging of a commercially available mobile phone, using Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) fed with real neat urine. The membrane-less MFCs were made out of ceramic material and employed plain carbon based electrodes.

  5. Comparison of HTGR fuel design, manufacture and quality control methods between Japan and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xioming; Takahashi, Masashi; Ueta, Shouhei; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2002-05-01

    The first-loading fuel for the HTTR was started to fabricate at Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) in 1995 and the HTTR reached criticality in 1998. Meanwhile, 10 MW high temperature reactor (HTR-10) was constructed in Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University, and the first-loading fuel was fabricated concurrently. The HTR-10 reached criticality in December 2000. Though fuel type is different, i.e., pin-in-block type for the HTTR and pebble bed type for the HTR-10, the fabrication method of TRISO coated fuel particles is similar to each other. This report describes comparison of fuel design, fabrication process and quality inspection between them. (author)

  6. Quality evaluation of the nuclear fuel manufactured in Romania before 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.; Galeriu, C.A.; Pascu, A.; Bailescu, A.; Andrei, G.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear fuel fabricated in Romania before June 1990 was stored and was not licensed for the use in reactor. A preliminary appraisal performed by AECL and Zircatec experts in 1990, considered this fuel as being of suspect quality. Taking into consideration that Nuclear Fuel Plant was qualified to produce CANDU-6 fuel, only after 1990, RENEL-GEN authorized FCN to evaluate the actual quality of the stock fuel, in 1996. A documented evaluation program was developed and implemented. Stock production of each year was considered as one fuel bundle lot. Quality verification was done on statistical basis. Random sampling was applied, with the condition that each production week was represented in the sample. The results show that the fuel quality is not acceptable for in-reactor use. Recovery solutions for the stock fuel were established and already applied. An independent review of the program, results and recovery solutions, made by AECL confirmed the consistency of the work performed by FCN for stock fuel quality evaluation. (author)

  7. Robotic Manufacturing of 5.5 Meter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Dome Assemblies for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket is the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles have been constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7-axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This presentation will focus on the friction stir welding of 5.5m diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome (LH2 MDA), the common bulkhead manufacturing development articles (CBMDA) and the thermal protection system demonstration dome (TPS Dome). The LH2 MDA was the first full-scale, flight-like Ares I hardware produced under the Constellation Program. It is a 5.5m diameter elliptical dome assembly consisting of eight gore panels, a y-ring stiffener and a manhole fitting. All components are made from aluminumlithium alloy 2195. Conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding was used on this article. An overview of the manufacturing processes will be discussed. The LH2 MDA is the first known fully friction stir welded dome ever produced. The completion of four Common Bulkhead Manufacturing Development Articles (CBMDA) and the TPS Dome will also be highlighted. Each CBMDA and the TPS Dome consists of a 5.5m diameter spun-formed dome friction stir welded to a y-ring stiffener. The domes and y-rings are made of aluminum 2014 and 2219 respectively. The TPS Dome has an additional aluminum alloy 2195 barrel section welded to the y-ring. Manufacturing solutions will be discussed including "fixtureless" welding with self reacting friction stir welding.

  8. Manufacturing of 5.5 Meter Diameter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Domes for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald E.; Carter, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket is the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration s (NASA s) Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles have been constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7-axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This presentation will focus on the friction stir welding of 5.5m diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome (LH2 MDA) and the common bulkhead manufacturing development articles (CBMDA). The LH2 MDA was the first full-scale, flight-like Ares I hardware produced under the Constellation Program. It is a 5.5m diameter elliptical dome assembly consisting of eight gore panels, a y-ring stiffener and a manhole fitting. All components are made from aluminum-lithium alloy 2195. Conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding was used on this article. Manufacturing solutions will be discussed including the implementation of photogrammetry, an advanced metrology technique, as well as fixtureless welding. The LH2 MDA is the first known fully friction stir welded dome ever produced. The completion of four Common Bulkhead Manufacturing Development Articles (CBMDA) will also be highlighted. Each CBMDA consists of a 5.5m diameter spun-formed dome friction stir welded to a y-ring stiffener. The domes and y-rings are made of aluminum 2014 and 2219 respectively. An overview of CBMDA manufacturing processes and the effect of tooling on weld defect formation will be discussed.

  9. Process for the manufacture of a fuel catalyst made of tungsten carbide for electrochemical fuel cells. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines Brennstoffkatalysators aus Wolframcarbid fuer elektrochemische Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baresel, D.; Gellert, W.; Scharner, P.

    1982-05-19

    The invention refers to a process for the manufacture of a fuel catalyst made of tungsten carbide for the direct generation of electrical energy by the oxidation of hydrogen, formaldehyde or formic acid in electrochemical fuel cells. Tungsten carbide is obtained by carburisation of tungsten or tungsten oxide by carbon monoxide. The steps of the process are as follows: dissolving the commercial-quality tungstic acid in ammonium hydroxide; precipitating the tungstic acid with concentrated hydrochloric acid; drying in a vacuum and then heating to 200/sup 0/C to remove the water of crystallisation forming tungsten trioxide; and mixing the tungsten trioxide with zinc powder and heating to 600/sup 0/C. The zinc oxide is dissolved with hydrochloric acid after cooling. The finely divided tungsten obtained in this way is converted with carbon monoxide in a quartz tube at 700/sup 0/C.

  10. Two-stage pretreatment of excess sludge for electricity generation in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Yang-Guo; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2018-01-12

    Thermophiles hydrolysis and acidogens fermentation were sequentially adopted to pretreat excess sludge for microbial fuel cell (MFC) electricity production. The results indicated that MFC fed with the thermophiles-acidogens pretreated sludge (MFC AB), reached a higher removal of ammonia nitrogen than the MFC fed with the heating hydrolysis and acidogens fermentation pretreated sludge (MFC NB). However, compared with the MFC AB, MFC NB presented a better performance for removal of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) (90.08%) and protein (82.42%). As for the electricity production, MFC NB obtained higher voltage of 0.632 V and maximum power density with 1.05 W/m 3 while MFC AB reached maximum voltage of 0.373 V and maximum power density of 0.58 W/m 3 . Bacterial 16S rRNA-based molecular microbial techniques showed that microbial communities on both MFC anode biofilms was diverse and different. The cooperation of fermentation bacteria and electricigen Shewanella baltica in the MFC NB may have contributed towards the improvement of electricity generation.

  11. Atmospheric plasma assisted PLA/microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) multilayer biocomposite for sustainable barrier application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meriçer, Çağlar; Minelli, Matteo; Angelis, Maria G De

    2016-01-01

    Fully bio-based and biodegradable materials, such as polylactic acid (PLA) and microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), are considered in order to produce a completely renewable packaging solution for oxygen barrier applications, even at medium-high relative humidity (R.H.). Thin layers of MFC were coated...... on different PLA substrates by activating film surface with an atmospheric plasma treatment, leading to the fabrication of robust and transparent multilayer composite films, which were then characterized by different experimental techniques. UV transmission measurements confirmed the transparency of multilayer...... films (60% of UV transmission rate), while SEM micrographs showed the presence of a continuous, dense and defect free layer of MFC on PLA surface. Concerning the mechanical behavior of the samples, tensile tests revealed that the multilayer films significantly improved the stress at break value of neat...

  12. Manufacturing and investigation of U-Mo LEU fuel granules by hydride-dehydride processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetskiy, Y.A.; Trifonov, Y.I.; Mitrofanov, A.V.; Samarin, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    Investigations of hydride-dehydride processing for comminution of U-Mo alloys with Mo content in the range 1.9/9.2% have been performed. Some regularities of the process as a function of Mo content have been determined as well as some parameters elaborated. Hydride-dehydride processing has been shown to provide necessary phase and chemical compositions of U-Mo fuel granules to be used in disperse fuel elements for research reactors. Pin type disperse mini-fuel elements for irradiation tests in the loop of 'MIR' reactor (Dmitrovgrad) have been fabricated using U-Mo LEU fuel granules obtained by hydride-dehydride processing. Irradiation tests of these mini-fuel elements loaded to 4 g U tot /cm 3 are planned to start by the end of this year. (author)

  13. Quality management and quality assurance in the manufacture of nuclear fuel elements: new trends and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, K.

    1998-01-01

    Modern instruments for quality assurance are applied with increasing success also in the area of fuel element supply. This new philosophy of quality management is characterized by a clear focus on processes and a commitment to continuous quality improvement. How can these new quality concepts, the application of which is desired by the companies operating nuclear power plants, be implemented and find acceptance? Is it possible that error prevention in place of error correction can increase the quality of fuel elements and at the same time reduce costs? What instruments are available to solve problems specific to fuel element technology? Efforts currently under way to answer these questions are described, particularly with regard to cooperation with fuel element suppliers. Within this context, a new guideline 'Quality System for Fuel Elements' has been developed. (orig.) [de

  14. Manufacturing and testing of fuel cans with barrier coating for LWR type reactors in USA and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Papers on manufacturing methods for fuel cans of zircalloy with barrier coating of zirconium prepared by pressing an internal tube into external one as well as by pressing of two-layer tubes with further rolling are reviewed. Heat treatment based on creation of the assigned gradient of temperature over tube wall cross section in order to change the structure of a thin layer of the outside surfce when conserving the initial structure of the rest cross section is developed to increase corrosion resistance. Eddy current and ultrasound methods for control of quality and thickness of the barrier layer of zirconium are used

  15. 2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Materials Handling Equipment Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, D.; Ulsh, M.

    2012-08-01

    In 2008, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a manufacturing readiness assessment (MRA) of fuel cell systems and fuel cell stacks for back-up power and material handling applications (MHE). To facilitate the MRA, manufacturing readiness levels (MRL) were defined that were based on the Technology Readiness Levels previously established by the US Department of Energy (DOE). NREL assessed the extensive existing hierarchy of MRLs developed by Department of Defense (DoD) and other Federal entities, and developed a MRL scale adapted to the needs of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) and to the status of the fuel cell industry. The MRL ranking of a fuel cell manufacturing facility increases as the manufacturing capability transitions from laboratory prototype development through Low Rate Initial Production to Full Rate Production. DOE can use MRLs to address the economic and institutional risks associated with a ramp-up in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell production. In 2010, NREL updated this assessment, including additional manufacturers, an assessment of market developments since the original report, and a comparison of MRLs between 2008 and 2010.

  16. CONCEPTUAL PROCESS DESCRIPTION FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM-MOLYBDENUM FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Curtis R. Clark; Randall J. Dunavant

    2008-02-01

    The National Nuclear Security Agency Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is tasked with minimizing the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) worldwide. A key component of that effort is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program, previously known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program was initiated in 1978 by the United States Department of Energy to develop the nuclear fuels necessary to enable these conversions. The program cooperates with the research reactors’ operators to achieve this goal of HEU to LEU conversion without reduction in reactor performance. The programmatic mandate is to complete the conversion of all civilian domestic research reactors by 2014. These reactors include the five domestic high-performance research reactors (HPRR), namely: the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory, the National Bureau of Standards Reactor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Missouri University Research Reactor at the University of Missouri–Columbia, and the MIT Reactor-II at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Characteristics for each of the HPRRs are given in Appendix A. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program is currently engaged in the development of a novel nuclear fuel that will enable these conversions. The fuel design is based on a monolithic fuel meat (made from a uranium-molybdenum alloy) clad in Al-6061 that has shown excellent performance in irradiation testing. The unique aspects of the fuel design, however, necessitate the development and implementation of new fabrication techniques and, thus, establishment of the infrastructure to ensure adequate fuel fabrication capability. A conceptual fabrication process description and rough estimates of the total facility throughput are described in this document as a basis for

  17. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  18. Duo_2-Steel cermet manufacturing technology for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Alimah; Budiarto

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of DUO_2-Steel cermet manufacturing technology for PWR SNF casks has been done. DUO_2-Steel cermet consisting of DUO_2 particulates and other particulates, embedded in a steel matrix. Cermet SNF casks have the potential for superior performance compared with casks constructed of other materials. The addition of DUO_2 ceramic particulates can increase SNF cask capacity, improve of repository performance and disposal of excess depleted uranium as potential waste. Two sets of cermet manufacturing technologies are casting and powder metallurgy. Three casting methods are infusion casting, traditional casting and centrifugal casting. While for powder metallurgy methods there are traditional method and new method. DUO_2-Steel cermet have traditionally been produced by powder metallurgy methods. The production of a cask, however, presents special requirements: the manufacture of an annular object with weights up to 100 tons, and methods are being not to manufacture a cermet of this size and geometry. A new powder metallurgy method, is a method for manufacturing cermet for PWR SNF cask. This powder metallurgy techniques have potentials low costs and provides greater freedom In the design of the cermet cask by allowing variable cermet properties. (author)

  19. A study on the manufacturing and processing technologies of DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, J.J.; Lee, J.W.; Kim, S.S.; Yim, S.P.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, K.H.; Na, S.H.; Kim, W.K.; Kang, K.H.; Shin, J.M.; Lee, D.Y.; Cho, K.H.; Lee, Y.S.; Sohn, J.S.; Kim, M.J.

    1999-06-01

    In this study, DUPIC fuel fabrication technologies are developed, characteristics of fuel materials are studied, and characterization experiments for DUPIC powder and pellets are performed at PIEF. SIMFUEL powder and pellets are made of UO 2 mixed with the simulated fission products of spent fuel. Both characteristics of SIMFUEL powder and micro-structure of pellets are analyzed. End cap of DUPIC fuel rod is sealed with laser welding technique. Optimum welding condition is analyzed with results of Micro-hardness, mechanical and metallographic tests. Micro-focus x-ray inspection technique is studied to fine fine defects. DUPIC processes are improved by making OREOX process be multi-functional and by adopting rol compacting process. At PIEF, characterization experiments for DUPIC powder and pellet are performed. The equipment for experiments have been installed at PIEF no. 9405 hot cell, and its process parameters are established. (author). 7 refs., 7 tabs., 37 figs

  20. Development of casting technology for manufacturing metal rods with simulated metallic spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Woo, Y. M.; Jang, S. J.; Kim, J. D; Kim, C. K.; Shin, Y. J.; Lee, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    The advanced casting equipment based on the directional solidification method was developed for manufacturing the uranium metal rod having 13.5 mm diameter and 1,200 mm length. In order to prevent surface-shrunk holes revealed easily in course of casting the small diameter and long rods, the vacuum casting furnace has the four pre-heaters equipped with temperature controller. On the other hand, the computer simulation to estimate the defective location and to analyze the solidus behavior of molten uranium in the mold were also performed by using MAGMA Code. As a result of the experimental and theoretical study, the sound rod has successfully been manufactured

  1. Project proposals on the creation of Russian-American joint enterprise for investigation, development and manufacture of power plants on the basis of solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smotrov, N.V.; Kleschev, Yu.N.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a proposal for a joint Russian-American enterprise for performing scientific investigations, development, and manufacture of fuel cell power plants on the basis of the solid oxide fuel cell. RASOFCo. Russian-American Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Company. RASOFCo will provide the series output of the electrochemical generator (ECG) of 1kW power, then of 5kW and 10kW as well as the development and the output of 10kW power plant with the subsequent output of a power plant of greater power. An ECG based on solid oxide fuel cells uses methane as a fuel. Predicted technical characteristics, market analysis, assessment of potential demands for power plants of low power for Tyumentransgas, participants of the joint enterprise and their founding contributions, strategy for manufacture and financing, and management of RASOFCo are discussed.

  2. Implementation of a quality assurance system for the design and manufacturing of fuel assembly MTR-plate type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koll, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Since more than 30 years ago, fuel assemblies (FA) of the MTR-Plate type, for research reactors, have been developed and produced using well known technologies, with different methods for the design, manufacturing, quality control and subsequent verification of FA behaviour, as well as of the design data. The FA and its reliability has been improved through the recycling of the obtained information. No nuclear accidents or major incidents have taken place that can be blamed to FA due to design, manufacturing or its use. Since the 70's, the use of Quality Assurance methodology has been increased, especially for Nuclear Power Plants, in order to ensure safety for these reactors. The use of QA for reactors for research, testing or other uses, has also been steadily increased, not only due to safety reasons, but also because of its convenience for a good operation, being presently a common requirement of the operator of the installation. Herewith is described the way the QA system that has been developed for the design, manufacturing, quality control and supply of MTR-plate type FA, at the Development Section of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). (Author)

  3. Method of manufacturing leaf spring for PWR type reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Mori, Kazuma.

    1991-01-01

    A leaf spring is manufactured by precision casting using corrosion resistant and heat resistant high strength steel material and, subsequently, the surface is treated with slight surface grinding or pickling. Further, for increasing resistance to stress corrosion cracks (SCC), shot blasting is applied to the surface. This reduces the surface roughness (Rmax) of the leaf spring to less than 0.005 mm, and the dimensional tolerance can be set to +0.005 mm, -0.0 mm. In this way, since the surface roughness is so small as not causing fabrication injury to the surface, the material has sufficient resistance to SCC. Further, since the accuracy for the plate thickness is high, stress distribution as designed can be attained to prevent stress concentration. Then, if a casting die is once prepared, the casting mass production is enabled to reduce the manufacturing cost for the leaf spring. (T.M.)

  4. Correlation between UO2 powder and pellet quality in PHWR fuel manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glodeanu, F.; Spinzi, M.; Balan, V.

    1988-01-01

    Natural uranium dioxide fuel for heavy water reactors has a series of very tightly controlled quality factors: Chemical purity, density and microstructures. Although the fabrication history may consistently affect the fuel quality, the quality factor mentioned above are function mainly of the quality of the powder used as raw material. As regards the fulfilment of the requirements for very high density of the pellets, it was found that in a definite technology the raw material plays the decisive part. Except for the powder sinterability, one found other important subtile parameters, such as the degree of agglomeration and structural homogeneity. The fuel microstructure, very important for in-serive performances of the fuel, is related to a great extent to some powder characteristics (homogeneity, sinterability). This is why much stress was laid on UO 2 power quality evaluation both by standard methods and non-conventional ones (agglomeration, microscopy, X-rays). Some of the characteristics defined by product specification, such as powder sinterability, should be better defined to guarantee the final product quality. (orig.)

  5. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements; Procedimentos de fabricacao de elementos combustiveis a base de dispersoes com alta concentracao de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, J.A.B.; Durazzo, M., E-mail: jasouza@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    IPEN developed and made available for routine production the technology for manufacturing dispersion type fuel elements for use in research reactors. However, the fuel produced at IPEN is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 gU/cm{sup 3} by using the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion. Increasing the uranium concentration of the fuel is interesting by the possibility of increasing the reactor core reactivity and lifetime of the fuel. It is possible to increase the concentration of uranium in the fuel up to the technological limit of 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} for the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion, which is well placed around the world. This new fuel will be applicable in the new Brazilian-Multipurpose Reactor RMB. This study aimed to develop the manufacturing process of high uranium concentration fuel, redefining the procedures currently used in the manufacture of IPEN. This paper describes the main procedures adjustments that will be necessary. (author)

  6. Development and manufacturing of tape casted, anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells; Entwicklung und Herstellung von foliengegossenen, anodengestuetzten Festoxidbrennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafbauer, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells offer high potential in transforming the chemical energy of hydrogen or natural gas into electrical energy. Due to the high efficiency of fuel cells, lots of effort has been made in the improvement of net efficiency and in materials development during the last years. Recently, the introduction of high performance, low-cost production technologies become more and more important. At the Institute of Energy Research IEF-1 of Forschungszentrum Julich, standard SOFCs were processed by time and work consuming methods. On the way to market entrance, product costs have to be reduced drastically. The aim of this thesis is the introduction of a high efficient low-cost processing route for the SOFC manufacturing. Therefore, the well-known and well established shaping technology tape casting was used for generating the anode substrates. As the first goal of this approach, two different tape casting slurries were developed in order to get substrates in the thickness range from 300 to 500 {mu}m after sintering. After shaping of the substrates, sinter regimes for the different necessary coatings were adapted to the novel substrate types in order to obtain cells with high performance and strength. Therefore, the different coating technologies like screen printing and vacuum slip casting were used for cell manufacturing. The optimization of the different coating steps during cell manufacturing led to high performance SOFCs with a 10% higher power output compared to the Julich state-of-the-art SOFC. Additional experiments verified the workability of the novel tape cast substrates for the manufacturing of near-net-shape SOFC. Finally, the novel cell types based on tape cast substrates were assembled to stacks with up to ten repeating units. Stack tests showed identical performance and degradation compared to stacks containing state-of-the-art SOFCs. Thus, the complete lifetime circle of a SOFC starting from powder preparation to stack assembly has been

  7. Quality assurance in the manufacture of metallic uranium fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.K.; Kumar, Arbind; Nanekar, P.P.; Vaidya, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Two Research Reactors viz. CIRUS and DHRUVA are operating at Trombay since 1960 and 1985 respectively. Cirus is a 40 MWth reactor using heavy water as moderator and light water as coolant. Dhruva is a 100 MWth reactor using heavy water as moderator and coolant. The maximum neutron flux of these reactors are 6.7 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s (Cirus) and 1.8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /s (Dhruva). Both these reactors are used for basic research, R and D in reactor technology, isotope production and operator training. Fuel material for these reactors is natural uranium metallic rods claded in finned aluminium (99.5%) tubes. This presentation will discuss various issues related to fabrication quality assurance and reactor behavior of metallic uranium fuel used in research reactors

  8. QC methods and means during pellets and fuel rods manufacturing at JSC 'MSZ'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouznetsov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    The report contains the description of the main methods and devices used in fabrication of pellets and fuel rods to prove their conformity to the requirements of technical specifications. The basic principals, range and accuracy of methods and devices are considered in detail, as well as system of metrological support of measurements. The latter includes the metrological certification and periodical verification of the devices, metrological qualification of measurement procedures, standard samples provision and checking the correctness of the analyses performance. If one makes an overall review of testing methods used in different fuel production plants he will find that most part of methods and devices are very similar. There are still some variations in methods which could be a subject for interesting discussions among specialists. This report contains a brief review of testing methods and devices used at our plant. More detailed description is given to methods which differ from those commonly used. (author)

  9. Process contribution evaluation for COD removal and energy production from molasses wastewater in a BioH2-BioCH4-MFC-integrated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeonghee; Lee, Yun-Yeong; Choi, Hyung Joo; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a three-stage-integrated process using the hydrogenic process (BioH 2 ), methanogenic process (BioCH 4 ), and a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was operated using molasses wastewater. The contribution of individual processes to chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and energy production was evaluated. The three-stage integration system was operated at molasses of 20 g-COD L -1 , and each process achieved hydrogen production rate of 1.1 ± 0.24 L-H 2 L -1 day -1 , methane production rate of 311 ± 18.94 mL-CH 4 L -1 day -1 , and production rate per electrode surface area of 10.8 ± 1.4 g m -2 day -1 . The three-stage integration system generated energy production of 32.32 kJ g-COD -1 and achieved COD removal of 98 %. The contribution of BioH 2 , BioCH 4 , and the MFC reactor was 20.8, 72.2, and, 7.0 % of the total COD removal, and 18.7, 81.2, and 0.16 % of the total energy production, respectively. The continuous stirred-tank reactor BioH 2 at HRT of 1 day, up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket BioCH 4 at HRT of 2 days, and MFC reactor at HRT of 3 days were decided in 1:2:3 ratios of working volume under hydraulic retention time consideration. This integration system can be applied to various configurations depending on target wastewater inputs, and it is expected to enhance energy recovery and reduce environmental impact of the final effluent.

  10. Robotic Manufacturing of 18-ft (5.5m) Diameter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Dome Assemblies for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald E.; Carter, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket was the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles were constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7- axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This paper will focus on the friction stir welding of 18-ft (5.5m) diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome and two common bulkhead manufacturing development articles.

  11. New generation of nuclear fuels: Stability of different stearates under high doses gamma irradiation in the manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebeau, D.; Esnouf, S. [Den-Service d’Etude du Comportement des Radionucléides (SECR), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gracia, J. [Den-Service d' Etudes des Combustibles et Matériaux à base d' Actinides (SECA), CEA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Audubert, F. [Den-Service d' Analyse et de Caractérisation du Comportement des Combustibles (SA3C), CEA, F- 13115 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ferry, M., E-mail: muriel.ferry@cea.fr [Den-Service d’Etude du Comportement des Radionucléides (SECR), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-07-15

    In the future reactors, the pellets radioactivity will increase due to the modification of the plutonium concentration. The stability of the organic additive used as lubricating/deagglomerating agent has thus to be evaluated. Up to now, zinc stearate is employed, but new additives are tested in this study and compared to zinc stearate. In a first part of this paper, the order of magnitude of the dose deposited in the stearates has been estimated. Afterward, three different stearates have been irradiated, using gamma-rays at doses as high as 2000 kGy. Two atmospheres of irradiation were tested, i.e. inert atmosphere and air. Samples were characterized using the following analytical tools: mass spectrometry, thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy. The objective is the evaluation of the ageing of these materials. In the nuclear fuel pellets manufacturing context, the candidate which could replace zinc stearate, if this one is too degraded to fulfill its role of lubricant in the pellets of the future manufacturing, has been determined. - Highlights: •Dose deposition estimation for different stearates. •Stearates radiolysis and radio-oxidization at high doses using gamma-rays. •H{sub 2} emission estimation as a function of atmosphere and dose. •Chemical modifications in stearates as a function of atmosphere and dose. •Comparison of three stearates.

  12. Treatment of soak liquor and bioelectricity generation in dual chamber microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathishkumar, Kuppusamy; Narenkumar, Jayaraman; Selvi, Adikesavan; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Babujanarthanam, Ranganathan; Rajasekar, Aruliah

    2018-02-08

    The discharge of untreated soak liquor from tannery industry causes severe environmental pollution. This study is characterizing the soak liquor as a substrate in the microbial fuel cell (MFC) for remediation along with electricity generation. The dual chamber MFC was constructed and operated. Potassium permanganate was used as cathode solution and carbon felt electrode as anodic and cathodic material, respectively. The soak liquor was characterized by electrochemical studies viz., cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and polarization studies, respectively. The removal percentage of protein, lipid, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were measured before and after treatment with MFC. The results of MFC showed a highest current density of 300 mA/cm 2 and a power density of 92 mW/m 2 . The removal of COD, protein, and lipid were noted as 96, 81, and 97% respectively during MFC process. This MFC can be used in tannery industries for treating soak liquor and simultaneous electricity generation.

  13. Safety aspects of the FMPP (Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant) setup constructed by INVAP in the Arabic Republic of Egypt; Aspectos de seguridad en la puesta en marcha de la FMPP (Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant) construida por INVAP en la Republica Arabe de Egipto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinat, Enrique; Boero, Norma L [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Combustibles Nucleares

    1999-07-01

    The FMPP is a fuel plates manufacturing plant for test reactors. This facility was designed, constructed in El Cairo and turned-key handled by INVAP SE to the Arabian Republic of Egypt. In this project, CNEA participated in the transference of technology, elaboration of documents, training of Egyptian personnel and technical services during the setup of the facility in El Cairo. These tasks were undertaken by UPMP (Uranium Powder Manufacturing Plant) and ECRI (Research Reactors Fuel Elements Plant) personnel. Both plants in CNEA served as a FMPP design basis. During the setup of the facility a fuel element with natural uranium was firstly manufactured and then another one using uranium with 20% enrichment. In this paper the responses of the system regarding safety, after finishing the first two stages of manufacturing, are analyzed and evaluated. (author)

  14. Development of an alternative process for recovery of uranium from rejected plates in the manufacture of MTR type fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores Gonzalez, Jocelyn Natalia

    2011-01-01

    This work discusses the recovery of enriched uranium in U 235 , from fuel plates rejected during the fuel elements manufacturing process for the La Reina Nuclear Studies Center, RECH-1, CCHEN. The plates have an aluminum based alloy coating, AISI-SAE 6061, with U 3 Si 2 powder distributed evenly inside and dispersed in an aluminum matrix. The high cost of enriched uranium means that it must be recovered from plates rejected in the production process because of non-compliance with the plate specifications, and also because some of them undergo destructive testing, to measure the aluminum coating's thickness on each side of the plate. The thickness of the uranium nucleus is measured as well and the size of the defects on the ends of the plate such as 'dog bone' and 'fish tail', that is, for the purposes of quality control. The first step in the process is carried out by dissolving the aluminum in a hot solution of NaOH in order to release the uranium silicide powder that is insoluble in the soda. A second step involves dissolving the uranium silicide in a hot HNO 3 solution, followed by washing and filtering, and then extracting the SX and analyzing its behavior during this stage. During the process 98.9% of the uranium is recovered together with a solution that is enough for the SX process given the experiences that were carried out in the extraction stage

  15. Optimized manufacture of nuclear fuel cladding tubes by FEA of hot extrusion and cold pilgering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillac, Alexis; Ly, Céline

    2018-05-01

    Within the forming route of Zirconium alloy cladding tubes, hot extrusion is used to deform the forged billets into tube hollows, which are then cold rolled to produce the final tubes with the suitable properties for in-reactor use. The hot extrusion goals are to give the appropriate geometry for cold pilgering, without creating surface defects and microstructural heterogeneities which are detrimental for subsequent rolling. In order to ensure a good quality of the tube hollows, hot extrusion parameters have to be carefully chosen. For this purpose, finite element models are used in addition to experimental tests. These models can take into account the thermo-mechanical coupling conditions obtained in the tube and the tools during extrusion, and provide a good prediction of the extrusion load and the thermo-mechanical history of the extruded product. This last result can be used to calculate the fragmentation of the microstructure in the die and the meta-dynamic recrystallization after extrusion. To further optimize the manufacturing route, a numerical model of the cold pilgering process is also applied, taking into account the complex geometry of the tools and the pseudo-steady state rolling sequence of this incremental forming process. The strain and stress history of the tube during rolling can then be used to assess the damage risk thanks to the use of ductile damage models. Once validated vs. experimental data, both numerical models were used to optimize the manufacturing route and the quality of zirconium cladding tubes. This goal was achieved by selecting hot extrusion parameters giving better recrystallized microstructure that improves the subsequent formability. Cold pilgering parameters were also optimized in order to reduce the potential ductile damage in the cold rolled tubes.

  16. Resilience of roof-top Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells during Dutch winter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, M.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Timmers, R.A.; Reas, S.M.T.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell (P-MFC) is in theory a technology that could produce sustainable electricity continuously. We operated two designs of the P-MFC under natural roof-top conditions in the Netherlands for 221 days, including winter, to test its resilience. Current and power densities are

  17. Research report for fiscal 1998. Research into the trends of low-carbon automotive fuel manufacturing technologies; 1998 nendo jidoshayo teitanso nenryo no seizo gijutsu doko chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Studies are made of optimum materials and methods for manufacturing low-carbon fuels for reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When their thermal dynamic limits and the technological maturity are considered, it is inferred that no extensive improvement will be achieved by merely improving on the efficiency of the existing fuels. The use of various high-efficiency driving power sources utterly different in mechanism from the conventional ones, such as those for fuel cell-powered automobiles, and the promotion of the use of low-carbon fuels such as methanol and methane for all kinds of driving power sources including those for the said fuel cell-powered automobiles, will become necessary. The use will also be necessary of recyclable materials. The biomass resources, in particular, since they absorb CO2 gas in their growing process by virtue of photosynthesis, may be said to be free of CO2 gas emissions. They have their own problems, however, which involve the economy of energy consumed for their production, harvesting, transportation, and conversion into fuels. It is therefore required that their whole life cycle be studied before their greenhouse gas reduction effect may be correctly assessed. The quantities of resources available for the production of automotive low-carbon fuels, manufacturing technologies, etc., are first of all put in order for easy perusal. An effective way is assessed for the whole including the life cycle. (NEDO)

  18. Investigation and optimization of the novel UASB-MFC integrated system for sulfate removal and bioelectricity generation using the response surface methodology (RSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baogang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Qi; Feng, Chuanping; Zhu, Yuling; Ye, Zhengfang; Ni, Jinren

    2012-11-01

    COD/sulfate ratio and hydraulic residence time (HRT), both of which influence sulfate loadings jointly, are recognized as the most two important affecting factors for sulfate removal and bioelectricity generation in the novel up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor-microbial fuel cell (UASB-MFC) integrated system. The response surface methodology (RSM) was employed for the optimization of this system and the optimum condition with COD/sulfate ratio of 2.3 and HRT of 54.3h was obtained with the target of maximizing the power output. In terms of maximizing the total sulfate removal efficiency, the obtained optimum condition was COD/sulfate ratio of 3.7 and HRT of 55.6h. Experimental results indicated the undistorted simulation and reliable optimized results. These demonstrated that RSM was effective to evaluate and optimize the UASB-MFC system for sulfate removal and energy recovery, providing a promising guide to further improvement of the system for potential applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Cathode Depth on Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell (sMFC) Performance and Microbial Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minka, Paige R.

    The department of Physics of the University of Glasgow was concerned about losing students after the end of the level 1 Physics course. The current research project started as an attempt to find out the reasons for this, but moved to investigate attitudes towards Physics at several stages during secondary school and attitudes towards science with primary pupils. Analyses of factors, which influence students' intentions towards studying Physics, were performed against the background of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, which interprets people's behaviour by considering three factors: attitude towards behaviour (advantages or disadvantages of being involved in the behaviour, e.g. studying Physics for Honours); subjective norm (approval or disapproval of important people towards engaging in the behaviour, e.g. parents, teacher, general norms of the society); perceived behavioural control (skills, knowledge, cooperation of others, abilities, efforts required to perform the behaviour). Analysis of these factors revealed some reasons for students' withdrawal from Physics after level 1 and pointed to factors which may facilitate students' persistence in the subject. A general analysis of level 1 and level 2 students' attitudes towards different aspects of the university Physics course revealed that the level 1 students' attitudes towards their university course of lectures and course of laboratories tended to be negatively polarised. Recommendations were suggested on the basis of the gathered evidence about how to make students' experience in university Physics more satisfactory for them. The data obtained from the separate analyses of females' and males' attitudes towards university Physics course have showed that attitudes of females and males were similar. The only significant difference between level 1 females and males was found to be the perceived behavioural control factor (students' attitudes towards course difficulty, attitudes towards work load in the course), which was significantly lower for females than for males. Special attention in this work was given to the problem of university Physics laboratory practice. Possibilities to improve students' attitudes towards laboratory work were discussed. This could be done through introduction of pre-lab (aimed to consolidate students' grasp of the necessary background for performing the experiment) and post-lab (aimed to provide students with opportunity to apply the theory they have learned and skills they have obtained from doing laboratory work to solve everyday problems). Examples of pre- and post-labs that were designed for the first term of the level 1 university Physics laboratory practice are given in the Appendix T. The project was extended from the university to the school area where cross-age analyses (measurements at one time with pupils of different age) of pupils' attitudes towards Science/Physics lessons were performed. Pupils from upper Primary P6/P7 up to Higher S5/S6 were involved in the research. These analyses have shown that patterns of Scottish pupils' attitudes towards Science/Physics lessons are not linear with age: attitudes of pupils who were self-selected towards the subject were not always more positive than attitudes of lower level pupils: primary school pupils' attitudes towards science lessons were significantly more positive than attitudes of secondary S2 pupils; pupils doing Standard Grade Physics course were similar in their evaluations of Physics lessons at both S3 and S4 levels; at Higher Grade Physics pupils' attitudes towards science lessons were significantly less positive than attitudes of Standard Grade Physics pupils. Pupils' attitudes towards Science/Physics lessons can be considered as a good indicator of pupils' reactions towards existing syllabuses in Science and Physics. Special attention in this study was devoted to the so-called "problem of girls in Physics". Separate analyses of boys' and girls' interests towards Physics topics revealed that although boys and girls are equally interested in certain areas of the subject, there are areas in Physics where boys and girls interests are significantly different. No differences were found in intensity of boys' and girls' interests towards suggested Physics topics at primary P6/P7 level, S3 and S5/S6 levels. At S2 and S4 levels a significant decline of girls' interests relative to boys interests was observed. S2 and S4 stages are decision making ones when pupils have the opportunity to select courses for the future. It was also revealed that the ratio of boys to girls in Physics once established at S2 level remains unchanged through the years of Standard Grade and Higher Grade Physics courses. This may indicate that if the number of girls in Physics is an issue for concern then attention should be paid to the primary and, especially early secondary years to attract girls to Physics. School Physics courses in Scotland revealed a high retention rate of girls in Physics. Analyses of preferred activities revealed that practical work is the most enjoyable activity in Science/Physics lessons for both girls and boys at every stage of schooling and studying the theory was found to be the least enjoyable activity at school for both genders at every age. The picture was almost the reverse with university Physics students.

  20. Applications of Graphene-Modified Electrodes in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-modified materials have captured increasing attention for energy applications due to their superior physical and chemical properties, which can significantly enhance the electricity generation performance of microbial fuel cells (MFC. In this review, several typical synthesis methods of graphene-modified electrodes, such as graphite oxide reduction methods, self-assembly methods, and chemical vapor deposition, are summarized. According to the different functions of the graphene-modified materials in the MFC anode and cathode chambers, a series of design concepts for MFC electrodes are assembled, e.g., enhancing the biocompatibility and improving the extracellular electron transfer efficiency for anode electrodes and increasing the active sites and strengthening the reduction pathway for cathode electrodes. In spite of the challenges of MFC electrodes, graphene-modified electrodes are promising for MFC development to address the reduction in efficiency brought about by organic waste by converting it into electrical energy.

  1. Cellulose fibres, nanofibrils and microfibrils: The morphological sequence of MFC components from a plant physiology and fibre technology point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinga-Carrasco Gary

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the last decade, major efforts have been made to develop adequate and commercially viable processes for disintegrating cellulose fibres into their structural components. Homogenisation of cellulose fibres has been one of the principal applied procedures. Homogenisation has produced materials which may be inhomogeneous, containing fibres, fibres fragments, fibrillar fines and nanofibrils. The material has been denominated microfibrillated cellulose (MFC. In addition, terms relating to the nano-scale have been given to the MFC material. Several modern and high-tech nano-applications have been envisaged for MFC. However, is MFC a nano-structure? It is concluded that MFC materials may be composed of (1 nanofibrils, (2 fibrillar fines, (3 fibre fragments and (4 fibres. This implies that MFC is not necessarily synonymous with nanofibrils, microfibrils or any other cellulose nano-structure. However, properly produced MFC materials contain nano-structures as a main component, i.e. nanofibrils.

  2. Cellulose fibres, nanofibrils and microfibrils: The morphological sequence of MFC components from a plant physiology and fibre technology point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary

    2011-06-13

    During the last decade, major efforts have been made to develop adequate and commercially viable processes for disintegrating cellulose fibres into their structural components. Homogenisation of cellulose fibres has been one of the principal applied procedures. Homogenisation has produced materials which may be inhomogeneous, containing fibres, fibres fragments, fibrillar fines and nanofibrils. The material has been denominated microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). In addition, terms relating to the nano-scale have been given to the MFC material. Several modern and high-tech nano-applications have been envisaged for MFC. However, is MFC a nano-structure? It is concluded that MFC materials may be composed of (1) nanofibrils, (2) fibrillar fines, (3) fibre fragments and (4) fibres. This implies that MFC is not necessarily synonymous with nanofibrils, microfibrils or any other cellulose nano-structure. However, properly produced MFC materials contain nano-structures as a main component, i.e. nanofibrils.

  3. Effect of stretching on the mechanical properties in melt-spun poly(butylene succinate)/microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Fan, Mao; Zhao, Yongsheng; Jin, Tianxiang; Fu, Qiang

    2016-04-20

    In order to prepare poly(butylene succinate)/microfibrillated cellulose composites with high performance, in this work, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) was first treated by acetylchloride with ball-milling to improve its interfacial compatibility with poly(butylene succinate) (PBS). Then melt stretching processing was adopted to further improve the dispersion and orientation of MFC in as-spun PBS fiber. And the effect of MFC on the crystalline structure and mechanical properties were systematically investigated for the melt-spun fibers prepared with two different draw ratios. The dispersion, alignment of the MFC and interfacial crystalline structure in the composite fibers are significantly influenced by the stretching force during the melt spinning. The possible formation of nanohybrid shish kebab (NHSK) superstructure where aligned MFC as shish and PBS lamellae as kebab has been suggested via SEM and SAXS in the composite fibers prepared at the high draw ratio. Large improvement in tensile strength has been realized at the high draw ratio due to the enhanced orientation and dispersion of MFC as well as the formation of NHSK. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Electricity generation in low cost microbial fuel cell made up of earthenware of different thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, M; Ghangrekar, M M

    2011-01-01

    Performance of four microbial fuel cells (MFC-1, MFC-2, MFC-3 and MFC-4) made up of earthen pots with wall thicknesses of 3, 5, 7 and 8.5 mm, respectively, was evaluated. The MFCs were operated in fed batch mode with synthetic wastewater having sucrose as the carbon source. The power generation decreased with increase in the thickness of the earthen pot which was used to make the anode chamber. MFC-1 generated highest sustainable power density of 24.32 mW/m(2) and volumetric power of 1.04 W/m(3) (1.91 mA, 0.191 V) at 100 Ω external resistance. The maximum Coulombic efficiencies obtained in MFC-1, MFC-2, MFC-3 and MFC-4 were 7.7, 7.1, 6.8 and 6.1%, respectively. The oxygen mass transfer and oxygen diffusion coefficients measured for earthen plate of 3 mm thickness were 1.79 × 10(-5) and 5.38 × 10(-6) cm(2)/s, respectively, which implies that earthen plate is permeable to oxygen as other polymeric membranes. The internal resistance increased with increase in thickness of the earthen pot MFCs. The thickness of the earthen material affected the overall performance of MFCs.

  5. Open external circuit for microbial fuel cell sensor to monitor the nitrate in aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donglin; Liang, Peng; Jiang, Yong; Liu, Panpan; Miao, Bo; Hao, Wen; Huang, Xia

    2018-07-15

    This study employed an open external circuit, rather than a closed circuit applied in previous studies, to operate an microbial fuel cell (MFC) sensor for real-time nitrate monitoring, and achieved surprisingly greater sensitivity (4.42 ± 0.3-6.66 ± 0.4 mV/(mg/L)) when the nitrate was at a concentration of 10-40 mg/L, compared to that of the MFC sensor with a closed circuit (0.8 ± 0.05-1.6 ± 0.1 mV/(mg/L)). The MFC sensor operated in open circuit (O-MFC sensor) delivered much more stable performance than that operated in closed circuit (C-MFC sensor) when affected by organic matter (NaAc). The sensitivity of O-MFC sensor was twice that of C-MFC sensor at a low background concentration of organic matter. When organic matter reached a high concentration, the sensitivity of O-MFC sensor remained at an acceptable level, while that of C-MFC sensor dropped to almost zero. Challenged by a combined shock of organic matter and nitrate, O-MFC sensor delivered evident electrical signals for nitrate warning, while C-MFC failed. Another novel feature of this study lies in a new mathematical model to examine the bioanode process of nitrate monitoring. It revealed that lower capacitance of the bioanode in O-MFC was the major contributor to the improved sensitivity of the device. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Influences of dissolved oxygen concentration on biocathodic microbial communities in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Laura; Cristiani, Pierangela; Villa, Federica; Zecchin, Sarah; Colombo, Alessandra; Cavalca, Lucia; Schievano, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) at cathodic interface is a critical factor influencing microbial fuel cells (MFC) performance. In this work, three MFCs were operated with cathode under different DO conditions: i) air-breathing (A-MFC); ii) water-submerged (W-MFC) and iii) assisted by photosynthetic microorganisms (P-MFC). A plateau of maximum current was reached at 1.06±0.03mA, 1.48±0.06mA and 1.66±0.04mA, increasing respectively for W-MFC, P-MFC and A-MFC. Electrochemical and microbiological tools (Illumina sequencing, confocal microscopy and biofilm cryosectioning) were used to explore anodic and cathodic biofilm in each MFC type. In all cases, biocathodes improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as compared to abiotic condition and A-MFC was the best performing system. Photosynthetic cultures in the cathodic chamber supplied high DO level, up to 16mg O2 L -1 , which sustained aerobic microbial community in P-MFC biocathode. Halomonas, Pseudomonas and other microaerophilic genera reached >50% of the total OTUs. The presence of sulfur reducing bacteria (Desulfuromonas) and purple non-sulfur bacteria in A-MFC biocathode suggested that the recirculation of sulfur compounds could shuttle electrons to sustain the reduction of oxygen as final electron acceptor. The low DO concentration limited the cathode in W-MFC. A model of two different possible microbial mechanisms is proposed which can drive predominantly cathodic ORR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Design and manufacturing of instrumented capsule (02F-06K/02F-11K) for nuclear fuel irradiation test in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Kang, Y. H.; Cho, M. S.; Sohn, J. M.; Choo, K. N.; Kim, D. S.; Oh, J. M.; Shin, Y.T.; Park, S.J.; Kim, Y. J.; Seo, C.G.; Ryu, J.S.; Cho, Y. G.

    2003-02-01

    To measure the characteristics of nuclear fuel during irradiation test, it is necessary to develop the instrumented capsule for the nuclear fuel irradiation test. Then considering the requirements for the nuclear fuel irradiation test and the compatibility with OR test hole in HANARO as well as the requirements for HANARO operation and related equipments, the instrumented capsule for the nuclear fuel irradiation test was designed and successfully manufactured. The structural integrity of the capsule design was verified by performing nuclear physics, structural and thermal analyses. And, not only out-of-pile tests such as pressure drop test, vibration test, endurance test, were performed in HANARO design verification test facility, but the mechanical and hydraulic safety of the capsule and the compatibility of the capsule with HANARO was verified

  8. Manufacture of uranium compounds for research reactors fuel elements. Participation of the UCPP (Uranium compound production plant) in the Egyptian project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, Norma L.; Cinat, Enrique; Yorio, Daniel; Cincotta, Daniel; Ramella, Jose L.; Bruno, Hernan R.; Camacho, Esteban F.; Pertossi, Fernando; Panunzio, Leonardo D.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Sassone, Ariel

    1999-01-01

    UCPP is an international qualified supplier of U 3 O 8 with up to 20 % enrichment in U-235. The characteristics of this powder are those specified for fuel plates manufacture for test reactors. This paper describes the works performed in the plant since its beginning, emphasising those undertaken during the last years. The transference of U 3 O 8 manufacturing technology to INVAP SE, the enterprise that installed a plant of similar characteristics in the Arabian Republic of Egypt, is especially described. (author)

  9. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing high uranium concentration dispersion fuel elements; Procedimentos de fabricacao de elementos combustiveis a base de dispersoes com alta concentracao de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de

    2011-07-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP developed the technology to produce the dispersion type fuel elements for research reactors and made it available for routine production. Today, the fuel produced in IPEN-CNEN/SP is limited to the uranium concentration of 3.0 gU/cm{sup 3} for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion-based and 2.3 gU/cm{sup 3} for U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. The increase of uranium concentration in fuel plates enables the reactivity of the reactor core reactivity to be higher and extends the fuel life. Concerning technology, it is possible to increase the uranium concentration in the fuel meat up to the limit of 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} in U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion and 3.2 gU/cm{sup 3} U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. These dispersions are well qualified worldwide. This work aims to develop the manufacturing process of both fuel meats with high uranium concentrations, by redefining the manufacturing procedures currently adopted in the Nuclear Fuel Center of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Based on the results, it was concluded that to achieve the desired concentration, it is necessary to make some changes in the established procedures, such as in the particle size of the fuel powder and in the feeding process inside the matrix, before briquette pressing. These studies have also shown that the fuel plates, with a high concentration of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al, met the used specifications. On the other hand, the appearance of the microstructure obtained from U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion fuel plates with 3.2 gU/cm{sup 3} showed to be unsatisfactory, due to the considerably significant porosity observed. The developed fabrication procedure was applied to U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} production at 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3}, with enriched uranium. The produced plates were used to assemble the fuel element IEA-228, which was irradiated in order to check its performance in the IEA-R1 reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP. These new fuels have potential to be used in the new Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor - RMB. (author)

  10. Ethanol dehydration via azeotropic distillation with gasoline fractions as entrainers: A pilot-scale study of the manufacture of an ethanol–hydrocarbon fuel blend

    OpenAIRE

    Gomis Yagües, Vicente; Pedraza Berenguer, Ricardo; Saquete Ferrándiz, María Dolores; Font, Alicia; Garcia-Cano, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We establish experimentally and through simulations the economic and technical viability of dehydrating ethanol by means of azeotropic distillation, using a hydrocarbon as entrainer. The purpose of this is to manufacture a ready-to-use ethanol–hydrocarbon fuel blend. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of this proposition, we have tested an azeotropic water–ethanol feed mixture, using a hydrocarbon as entrainer, in a semi pilot-plant scale distillation column. Four different hydrocarbons ...

  11. Proliferation Resistance and Safeguardability Assessment of a SFR Metal Fuel Manufacturing Facility (SFMF) using the INPRO Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H. L.; Ko, W. I.; Park, S. H.; Kim, H. D.; Park, G. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To illustrate the proposed Prosta process, to demonstrate its usefulness, and to provide input to a revision of the INPRO manual in the area of proliferation resistance, a case study has been carried out with a conceptually designed sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) metal fuel manufacturing facility (SFMF), representing novel technology still in the conceptual design phase. A coarse acquisition path analysis has been carried out of the SFMF to demonstrate the assessment process with identified different target materials. The case study demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed PROSA PR assessment process and the interrelationship of the PR assessment with the safeguards-by-design process, identifying potential R and D needs. The PROSA process has been applied to a conceptually designed SFMF, representing novel technology that is still in the conceptual design phase at KAERI. The case study demonstrated that the proposed PROSA process is simpler and easier to perform than the original INPRO methodology and can be applied from the early stage of design showing the relationship of PR assessment to the safeguard-by-design process. New evaluation questionnaire for UR1 is more logical and comprehensive, and provides the legal basis enabling the IAEA to achieve its safeguards objectives including the detection of undeclared nuclear materials and activities. NES information catalogue replacing UR2 was a useful modification and supports safeguardability assessment at the NES and facility level. The proposed PROSA process is also capable to identify strengths and weaknesses of a system in the area of proliferation resistance in a generally understandable form, including R and D gaps that need to be filled in order to meet the criteria for proliferation resistance of a nuclear energy system.

  12. Effects of Operating Parameters on Measurements of Biochemical Oxygen Demand Using a Mediatorless Microbial Fuel Cell Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Chi Hsieh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The conventional Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD method takes five days to analyze samples. A microbial fuel cell (MFC may be an alternate tool for rapid BOD determination in water. However, a MFC biosensor for continuous BOD measurements of water samples is still unavailable. In this study, a MFC biosensor inoculated with known mixed cultures was used to determine the BOD concentration. Effects of important parameters on establishing a calibration curve between the BOD concentration and output signal from the MFC were evaluated. The results indicate monosaccharides were good fuel, and methionine, phenylalanine, and ethanol were poor fuels for electricity generation by the MFC. Ions in the influent did not significantly affect the MFC performance. CN− in the influent could alleviate the effect of antagonistic electron acceptors on the MFC performance. The regression equation for BOD concentration and current density of the biosensor was y = 0.0145x + 0.3317. It was adopted to measure accurately and continuously the BOD concentration in actual water samples at an acceptable error margin. These results clearly show the developed MFC biosensor has great potential as an alternative BOD sensing device for online measurements of wastewater BOD.

  13. Controlling the occurrence of power overshoot by adapting microbial fuel cells to high anode potentials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping; Tokash, Justin C.; Hong, Yiying; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Power density curves for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) often show power overshoot, resulting in inaccurate estimation of MFC performance at high current densities. The reasons for power overshoot are not well understood, but biofilm acclimation

  14. Characterization of Microbial Fuel Cells at Microbially and Electrochemically Meaningful Time scales

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Zhiyong; Yan, Hengjing; Wang, Wei; Mench, Matthew M.; Regan, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The variable biocatalyst density in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode biofilm is a unique feature of MFCs relative to other electrochemical systems, yet performance characterizations of MFCs typically involve analyses at electrochemically relevant

  15. Carbon nanotube-coated macroporous sponge for microbial fuel cell electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing; Ye, Meng; Hu, Liangbing; Liu, Nian; McDonough, James R.; Chen, Wei; Alshareef, Husam N.; Criddle, Craig S.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The materials that are used to make electrodes and their internal structures significantly affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. In this study, we describe a carbon nanotube (CNT)-sponge composite prepared by coating a sponge with CNTs

  16. Graphene–sponges as high-performance low-cost anodes for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing; Yu, Guihua; Liu, Nian; Bao, Zhenan; Criddle, Craig S.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    A high-performance microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode was constructed from inexpensive materials. Key components were a graphene-sponge (G-S) composite and a stainless-steel (SS) current collector. Anode fabrication is simple, scalable

  17. Postirradiation examination of a low enriched U3Si2-Al fuel element manufactured and irradiated at Batan, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Sugondo, S.; Nasution, H.

    1994-01-01

    The first low-enriched U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion plate-type fuel element produced at the Nuclear Fuel Element Center, BATAN, Indonesia, was irradiated to a peak 235 U burnup of 62%. Postirradiation examinations performed to data shows the irradiation behavior of this element to be similar to that of U 3 Si 2 -Al plate-type fuel produced and tested at other institutions. The main effect of irradiation on the fuel plates is a thickness increase of 30--40 μm (2.5-3.0%). This thickness increase is almost entirely due to the formation of a corrosion layer (Boehmite). The contribution of fuel swelling to the thickness increase is rather small (less than 10 μm) commensurate with the burnup of the fuel and the relatively moderate as-fabricated fuel volume fraction of 27% in the fuel meat

  18. Evaluation of Standard and Modified M-FC, MacConkey, and Teepol Media for Membrane Filtration Counting of Fecal Coliforms in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Grabow, W. O. K.; Hilner, C. A.; Coubrough, P.

    1981-01-01

    MacConkey agar, standard M-FC agar, M-FC agar without rosolic acid, M-FC agar with a resuscitation top layer, Teepol agar, and pads saturated with Teepol broth, were evaluated as growth media for membrane filtration counting of fecal coliform bacteria in water. In comparative tests on 312 samples of water from a wide variety of sources, including chlorinated effluents, M-FC agar without rosolic acid proved the medium of choice because it generally yielded the highest counts, was readily obtai...

  19. Microbial fuel cells: a promising alternative for power generation and waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Larios, A. L.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    The current energy crisis has launched a renewed interest on alternative energy sources and non-fossil fuels. One promising technology is the direct production of electricity from organic matter or wastes in microbial fuel cells (MFC). A MFC can be envisioned as an bio-electrochemical reactor that converts the chemical energy stored in chemical bonds into electrical energy via the catalytic activity of microorganisms under anoxic conditions. (Author)

  20. A paper-based microbial fuel cell: instant battery for disposable diagnostic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiwan, Arwa; Mukherjee, Sayantika; Sundermier, Steven; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Choi, Seokheun

    2013-11-15

    We present a microfabricated paper-based microbial fuel cell (MFC) generating a maximum power of 5.5 μW/cm(2). The MFC features (1) a paper-based proton exchange membrane by infiltrating sulfonated sodium polystyrene sulfonate and (2) micro-fabricated paper chambers by patterning hydrophobic barriers of photoresist. Once inoculum and catholyte were added to the MFC, a current of 74 μA was generated immediately. This paper-based MFC has the advantages of ease of use, low production cost, and high portability. The voltage produced was increased by 1.9 × when two MFC devices were stacked in series, while operating lifetime was significantly enhanced in parallel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulation and resolution of voltage reversal in microbial fuel cell stack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugnaux, Marc; Savy, Cyrille; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Hugenin, Gérald; Fischer, Fabian

    2017-08-01

    To understand the biotic and non-biotic contributions of voltage reversals in microbial fuel cell stacks (MFC) they were simulated with an electronic MFC-Stack mimic. The simulation was then compared with results from a real 3L triple MFC-Stack with shared anolyte. It showed that voltage reversals originate from the variability of biofilms, but also the external load plays a role. When similar biofilm properties were created on all anodes the likelihood of voltage reversals was largely reduced. Homogenous biofilms on all anodes were created by electrical circuit alternation and electrostimulation. Conversely, anolyte recirculation, or increased nutriment supply, postponed reversals and unfavourable voltage asymmetries on anodes persisted. In conclusion, voltage reversals are often a negative event but occur also in close to best MFC-Stack performance. They were manageable and this with a simplified MFC architecture in which multiple anodes share the same anolyte. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells for the production of bioelectricity and biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Tao; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2013-01-01

    Today's global energy crisis requires a multifaceted solution. Bioenergy is an important part of the solution. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology stands out as an attractive potential technology in bioenergy. MFCs can convert energy stored in organic matter directly into bioelectricity. MFCs can also be operated in the electrolysis mode as microbial electrolysis cells to produce bioproducts such as hydrogen and ethanol. Various wastewaters containing low-grade organic carbons that are otherwise unutilized can be used as feed streams for MFCs. Despite major advances in the past decade, further improvements in MFC power output and cost reduction are needed for MFCs to be practical. This paper analysed MFC operating principles using bioenergetics and bioelectrochemistry. Several major issues were explored to improve the MFC performance. An emphasis was placed on the use of catalytic materials for MFC electrodes. Recent advances in the production of various biomaterials using MFCs were also investigated.

  3. Microbial fuel cells for direct electrical energy recovery from urban wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodaglio, A G; Molognoni, D; Dallago, E; Liberale, A; Cella, R; Longoni, P; Pantaleoni, L

    2013-01-01

    Application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to wastewater treatment for direct recovery of electric energy appears to provide a potentially attractive alternative to traditional treatment processes, in an optic of costs reduction, and tapping of sustainable energy sources that characterizes current trends in technology. This work focuses on a laboratory-scale, air-cathode, and single-chamber MFC, with internal volume of 6.9 L, operating in batch mode. The MFC was fed with different types of substrates. This study evaluates the MFC behaviour, in terms of organic matter removal efficiency, which reached 86% (on average) with a hydraulic retention time of 150 hours. The MFC produced an average power density of 13.2 mW/m(3), with a Coulombic efficiency ranging from 0.8 to 1.9%. The amount of data collected allowed an accurate analysis of the repeatability of MFC electrochemical behaviour, with regards to both COD removal kinetics and electric energy production.

  4. Microfabricated microbial fuel cell arrays reveal electrochemically active microbes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Hou

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are remarkable "green energy" devices that exploit microbes to generate electricity from organic compounds. MFC devices currently being used and studied do not generate sufficient power to support widespread and cost-effective applications. Hence, research has focused on strategies to enhance the power output of the MFC devices, including exploring more electrochemically active microbes to expand the few already known electricigen families. However, most of the MFC devices are not compatible with high throughput screening for finding microbes with higher electricity generation capabilities. Here, we describe the development of a microfabricated MFC array, a compact and user-friendly platform for the identification and characterization of electrochemically active microbes. The MFC array consists of 24 integrated anode and cathode chambers, which function as 24 independent miniature MFCs and support direct and parallel comparisons of microbial electrochemical activities. The electricity generation profiles of spatially distinct MFC chambers on the array loaded with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 differed by less than 8%. A screen of environmental microbes using the array identified an isolate that was related to Shewanella putrefaciens IR-1 and Shewanella sp. MR-7, and displayed 2.3-fold higher power output than the S. oneidensis MR-1 reference strain. Therefore, the utility of the MFC array was demonstrated.

  5. Track 1 - fuel fabrication: design, manufacture and automation stress field of blister forming in a metallic fuel and its interaction with clad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.; Hussain, M.M.; Singh, R.P.; Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K.; Shah, B.K.; Ståhle, P.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most critical components for the nuclear reactor is nuclear fuel. The fuel is subjected to severe environment of temperature, thermal stress, irradiation and corrosion in a reactor and its behaviour is governed by complex interaction of physical, chemical, mechanical and metallurgical processes which become operative in the reactor environment. A good fuel element should perform reliably in a reactor without experiencing any type of failure during its lifetime. Hence, the fabrication of nuclear fuel elements to the stringent quality requirements as demanded by the designers is a highly specialized and sophisticated technology

  6. The Manufacture of W-UO2 Fuel Elements for NTP Using the Hot Isostatic Pressing Consolidation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert; Mireles, Omar

    2012-01-01

    NTP is attractive for space exploration because: (1) Higher Isp than traditional chemical rockets (2)Shorter trip times (3) Reduced propellant mass (4) Increased payload. Lack of qualified fuel material is a key risk (cost, schedule, and performance). Development of stable fuel form is a critical path, long lead activity. Goals of this project are: Mature CERMET and Graphite based fuel materials and Develop and demonstrate critical technologies and capabilities.

  7. The safety of operations in the Dragon fuel element production building during the manufacture of thorium fuel for the first charge of the Dragon Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutler, H.; Gardham, B.; Holliday, J.

    1965-04-01

    The first charge of fuel and fuel elements for the Dragon Reactor has been completed without significant difficulty. This report covers the safety of operations during the production of the 10 thorium elements together with the final 2 driver elements needed to complete the 37 element charge. (author)

  8. Status of Development and Manufacture of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S and Risø/DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels; Holm-Larsen, Helge; Jørgensen, Mette Juel

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory (Risø/DTU) which includes material synthesis and cost effective ceramic manufacturing methods for anode and metal supported flat planar cells in addition to multilayer assembling for compact stacks with metallic interconnects. The development is focussing on high electrochemical performance...... in SOFC technology includes system development in collaboration with system partners and development and manufacturing of integrated stack assemblies called PowerCore. ©2009 COPYRIGHT ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  9. [Electricity generation from sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater using microbial fuel cell technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Yi; Sun, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Liang; Xiao, Yao; Zhao, Hai

    2010-10-01

    Air cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) were investigated for electricity production from sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater containing 5000 mg/L of chemical oxygen demand (COD). Maximum power density of 334.1 mW/m2, coulombic efficiency (CE) of 10.1% and COD removal efficiency of 92.2% were approached. The effect of phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and COD concentration on the performance of MFC was further examined. The addition of PBS from 50 mmol/L to 200 mmol/L increased the maximum power density and CE by 33.4% and 26.0%, respectively. However, the COD removal efficiency was not relative to PBS concentration in the wastewater. When the COD increased from 625 mg/L to 10 000 mg/L, the maximum value of COD removal efficiency and the maximum power density were gained at the wastewater strength of 5 000 mg/L. But the CE ranged from 28.9% to 10.3% with a decreasing trend. These results demonstrate that sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater can be used for electricity generation in MFC while at the same time achieving wastewater treatment. The increasing of PBS concentration can improve the power generation of MFC. The maximum power density of MFC increases with the rise of COD concentration, but the electricity generation will decrease for the acidification of high wastewater concentration.

  10. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

    1994-10-01

    This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

  11. Investigations on the corrosion resistance of metallic bipolar plates (BPP) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) - understanding the effects of material, coating and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dur, Ender

    Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) systems are promising technology for contributing to meet the deficiency of world`s clean and sustainable energy requirements in the near future. Metallic bipolar plate (BPP) as one of the most significant components of PEMFC device accounts for the largest part of the fuel cell`s stack. Corrosion for metallic bipolar plates is a critical issue, which influences the performance and durability of PEMFC. Corrosion causes adverse impacts on the PEMFC`s performance jeopardizing commercialization. This research is aimed at determining the corrosion resistance of metallic BPPs, particularly stainless steels, used in PEMFC from different aspects. Material selection, coating selection, manufacturing process development and cost considerations need to be addressed in terms of the corrosion behavior to justify the use of stainless steels as a BPP material in PEMFC and to make them commercially feasible in industrial applications. In this study, Ti, Ni, SS304, SS316L, and SS 430 blanks, and BPPs comprised of SS304 and SS316L were examined in terms of the corrosion behavior. SS316L plates were coated to investigate the effect of coatings on the corrosion resistance performance. Stamping and hydroforming as manufacturing processes, and three different coatings (TiN, CrN, ZrN) applied via the Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) method in three different thicknesses were selected to observe the effects of manufacturing processes, coating types and coating thicknesses on the corrosion resistance of BPP, respectively. Uncoated-coated blank and formed BPP were subjected to two different corrosion tests: potentiostatic and potentiodynamic. Some of the substantial results: 1- Manufacturing processes have an adverse impact on the corrosion resistance. 2- Hydroformed plates have slightly higher corrosion resistance than stamped samples. 3- BPPs with higher channel size showed better corrosion resistance. 4- Since none of the uncoated samples

  12. Environmental assessment for the manufacture and shipment of nuclear reactor fuel from the United States to Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has declared 41.9 tons (38 metric tons) of weapons-usable plutonium surplus to the United States' defense needs. A DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement analyzed strategies for plutonium storage and dispositioning. In one alternative, plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel would be irradiated (burned) in a reengineered heavy-water-moderated reactor, such as the Canadian CANDU design. In an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE proposes to fabricate and transport to Canada a limited amount of MOX fuel as part of the Parallex (parallel experiment) Project. MOX fuel from the US and Russia would be used by Canada to conduct performance tests at Chalk River Laboratories. MOX fuel would be fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory and transported in approved container(s) to a Canadian port(s) of entry on one to three approved routes. The EA analyzes the environmental and human health effects from MOX fuel fabrication and transportation. Under the Proposed Action, MOX fuel fabrication would not result in adverse effects to the involved workers or public. Analysis showed that the shipment(s) of MOX fuel would not adversely affect the public, truck crew, and environment along the transportation routes

  13. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Development of DUPIC fuel on manufacturing and quality control technology-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Yung Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Oxidation/reduction process was established after analysis of the effect of process parameter on the sintering behavior using SIMFUEL. Process equipment was studied more detail and some of process equipment items were designed and procured. The chemical analysing method of fission products and fissile content in DUPIC fuel was studied and the behavior and the characteristics of fission products in fuel was also done. Requirement for irradiation in HANARO was analysed to prepare performance evaluation. 100 figs, 48 tabs, 170 refs. (Author).

  14. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Development of DUPIC fuel on manufacturing and quality control technology-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Yung Woo

    1995-07-01

    Oxidation/reduction process was established after analysis of the effect of process parameter on the sintering behavior using SIMFUEL. Process equipment was studied more detail and some of process equipment items were designed and procured. The chemical analysing method of fission products and fissile content in DUPIC fuel was studied and the behavior and the characteristics of fission products in fuel was also done. Requirement for irradiation in HANARO was analysed to prepare performance evaluation. 100 figs, 48 tabs, 170 refs. (Author)

  15. Advanced manufacturing of intermediate temperature, direct methane oxidation membrane electrode assemblies for durable solid oxide fuel cell, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ITN proposes to create an innovative anode supported membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that is capable of long-term operation at...

  16. Manufacture of a UO2-Based Nuclear Fuel with Improved Thermal Conductivity with the Addition of BeO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Chad B.; Brito, Ryan A.; Ortega, Luis H.; Malone, James P.; McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2017-12-01

    The low thermal conductivity of oxide nuclear fuels is a performance-limiting parameter. Enhancing this property may provide a contribution toward establishing accident-tolerant fuel forms. In this study, the thermal conductivity of UO2 was increased through the fabrication of ceramic-ceramic composite forms with UO2 containing a continuous BeO matrix. Fuel with a higher thermal conductivity will have reduced thermal gradients and lower centerline temperatures in the fuel pin. Lower operational temperatures will reduce fission gas release and reduce fuel restructuring. Additions of BeO were made to UO2 fuel pellets in 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 vol pct concentrations with the goals of establishing reliable lab-scale processing procedures, minimizing porosity, and maximizing thermal conductivity. The microstructure was characterized with electron probe microanalysis, and the thermal properties were assessed by light flash analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Reliable, high-density samples were prepared using compaction pressure between 200 and 225 MPa and sintering times between 4 and 6 hours. It was found that the thermal conductivity of UO2 improved approximately 10 pct for each 1 vol pct BeO added over the measured temperature range 298.15 K to 523.15 K (25 °C to 250 °C) with the maximum observed improvement being ˜ 100 pct, or doubled, at 10 vol pct BeO.

  17. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991, and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Inst. of Northern Engineering

    2000-05-01

    This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring, and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1 x 1{degree} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes toward Central-Southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these CO{sub 2} emissions has been reexamined. The emissions of the past two decades were approximately 1% lighter than previously estimated. 37 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of a microbial fuel cell treating artificial dialysis wastewater using graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko

    2016-02-01

    Artificial dialysis wastewater (ADWW) generally contains 800-2,200 mg L-1 of organic matter. Prior to its discharge to the sewage system, ADWW must be treated in order to reduce organic matter to less than 600 mg L-1. This study assesses the applicability of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to the reduction of organic matter in ADWW as an alternative pre-treatment system to aeration. In the MFC, conductive floccular aggregates microbially produced from graphene oxide (GO-flocs) were applied as an anode material in the MFC. The GO-flocs were obtained by anaerobic incubation of graphene oxide (GO) with microorganisms in ADWW at 28 °C for a minimum of 10 days. During incubation, GO in the mixture was transformed into black conductive floccular aggregates having 0.12 mS cm-1, suggesting the microbial reduction of GO to the reduced form. The produced GO-flocs were then used as the anode material in a cylindrical MFC, which was filled with ADWW and covered with a floating, platinum (Pt)-coated carbon cathode. The MFC was polarized via an external resistance of 10 Ω and applied for 120 days by replacing half of the supernatant of the MFC with fresh ADWW, every 6-9 days. As a result, the MFC achieved a 128 mg L-1 d-1 chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) removal rate. For example, the MFC contained 1,500 mg-CODCr L-1 just after replacement, with this concentration being reduced to 1,000 mg-CODCr L-1 after 6-9 days of incubation. At the same time, the MFC showed an average power density of 28 mW m-2 and a maximum power density of 291 mW m-2. These results suggest that a MFC packed with GO-flocs can be used as an alternative biotreatment system, replacing the energy-intensive aeration process.

  19. MTD-MFC: unified framework for investigation of diversity of boiling heat transfer curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekriladze, I.G. [Georgian Technical University, Tbilisi (Georgia)], e-mail: shekri@geo.net.ge

    2009-07-01

    A keynote paper presents just the next attempt to promote a discussion of modern state of art in the field of boiling heat transfer research. It is shown how longstanding disregard of internal contradictions of applicable approaches has resulted theoretical deadlock. Alternatively, it also is shown how resolution of these contradictions opens the ways to breakthrough in boiling heat transfer theory. Basic experimental facts, physical models and correlations are reconsidered. Principal contradictions between experimental knowledge and traditional model of 'the theatre of actors' (MTA) are discussed. Crucial role of pumping effect of growing bubble (PEGB) in boiling heat transfer and hydrodynamics is shown. Basic role of control of HTC by thermodynamic conditions on nucleation sites is demonstrated and consequent model of 'the theatre of director' (MTD) is discussed. Universal MTD-based correlation of boiling HTC of all types of liquids is considered. Unified consistent research framework for developed boiling heat transfer and diverse specific boiling heat transfer regimes is outlined through supplementing MTD by so-called multifactoring concept (MFC). The latter links transition from developed boiling mode to diverse boiling curves to a phenomenon of multiplication of factors influencing HTC. The ways of further research of the boiling problem are discussed. (author)

  20. MTD-MFC: unified framework for investigation of diversity of boiling heat transfer curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekriladze, I.G.

    2009-01-01

    A keynote paper presents just the next attempt to promote a discussion of modern state of art in the field of boiling heat transfer research. It is shown how longstanding disregard of internal contradictions of applicable approaches has resulted theoretical deadlock. Alternatively, it also is shown how resolution of these contradictions opens the ways to breakthrough in boiling heat transfer theory. Basic experimental facts, physical models and correlations are reconsidered. Principal contradictions between experimental knowledge and traditional model of 'the theatre of actors' (MTA) are discussed. Crucial role of pumping effect of growing bubble (PEGB) in boiling heat transfer and hydrodynamics is shown. Basic role of control of HTC by thermodynamic conditions on nucleation sites is demonstrated and consequent model of 'the theatre of director' (MTD) is discussed. Universal MTD-based correlation of boiling HTC of all types of liquids is considered. Unified consistent research framework for developed boiling heat transfer and diverse specific boiling heat transfer regimes is outlined through supplementing MTD by so-called multifactoring concept (MFC). The latter links transition from developed boiling mode to diverse boiling curves to a phenomenon of multiplication of factors influencing HTC. The ways of further research of the boiling problem are discussed. (author)

  1. Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-06-16

    PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

  2. Cradle-to-Gate Life Cycle Assessment of Switchgrass Fuel Pellets Manufactured in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. D. Bergman; D. L. Reed; A. M. Taylor; D. P. Harper; D. G. Hodges

    2015-01-01

    Developing renewable energy sources with low environmental impacts is becoming increasingly important as concerns about consuming fossil fuel sources grow. Cultivating, harvesting, drying, and densifying raw biomass feedstocks into pellets for easy handling and transport is one step forward in this endeavor. However, the corresponding environmental performances must be...

  3. Lactose Bioelectricity on a Microbial Fuel Cell System Parallel Circuit Using Lactobacillus Bulgaricus

    OpenAIRE

    Putra, Adi; Nuryanto, Rahmad; Suyati, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Electrical energy needs in Indonesia is estimated to continue growing by 4.6% per year, and if there is nothing to be done to increase the production of electric energy, this figure will increase threefold by 2030. Microbial Fuel Cells (MFC) is one way to produce alternative electric energy by utilizing organic material as a substrate for bacterial metabolic activity that generate electricity. The aim of this study is to examine lactose bioelectricity in a parallel circuit MFC system using La...

  4. Canadian power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, R.D.

    1976-03-01

    The following subjects are covered: the basic CANDU fuel design, the history of the bundle design, the significant differences between CANDU and LWR fuel, bundle manufacture, fissile and structural materials and coolants used in the CANDU fuel program, fuel and material behaviour, and performance under irradiation, fuel physics and management, booster rods and reactivity mechanisms, fuel procurement, organization and industry, and fuel costs. (author)

  5. Power generation from furfural using the microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yong; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Zhang, Cuiping [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510275 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Furfural is a typical inhibitor in the ethanol fermentation process using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as raw materials. In the literature, no report has shown that furfural can be utilized as the fuel to produce electricity in the microbial fuel cell (MFC), a device that uses microbes to convert organic compounds to generate electricity. In this study, we demonstrated that electricity was successfully generated using furfural as the sole fuel in both the ferricyanide-cathode MFC and the air-cathode MFC. In the ferricyanide-cathode MFC, the maximum power densities reached 45.4, 81.4, and 103 W m{sup -3}, respectively, when 1000 mg L{sup -1} glucose, a mixture of 200 mg L{sup -1} glucose and 5 mM furfural, and 6.68 mM furfural were used as the fuels in the anode solution. The corresponding Coulombic efficiencies (CE) were 4.0, 7.1, and 10.2% for the three treatments, respectively. For pure furfural as the fuel, the removal efficiency of furfural reached up to 95% within 12 h. In the air-cathode MFC using 6.68 mM furfural as the fuel, the maximum values of power density and CE were 361 mW m{sup -2} (18 W m{sup -3}) and 30.3%, respectively, and the COD removal was about 68% at the end of the experiment (about 30 h). Increase in furfural concentrations from 6.68 to 20 mM resulted in increase in the maximum power densities from 361 to 368 mW m{sup -2}, and decrease in CEs from 30.3 to 20.6%. These results indicated that some toxic and biorefractory organics such as furfural might still be suitable resources for electricity generation using the MFC technology. (author)

  6. Heterotrophic Anodic Denitrification in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Drewnowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, pollution caused by energy production systems is a major environmental concern. Therefore, the development of sustainable energy sources is required. Amongst others, the microbial fuel cell (MFC seems to be a possible solution because it can produce clean energy at the same time that waste is stabilized. Unfortunately, mainly due to industrial discharges, the wastes could contain nitrates, or nitrates precursors such ammonia, which could lead to lower performance in terms of electricity production. In this work, the feasibility of coupling anodic denitrification process with electricity production in MFC and the effect of the nitrates over the MFC performance were studied. During the experiments, it was observed that the culture developed in the anodic chamber of the MFC presented a significant amount of denitrificative microorganisms. The MFC developed was able to denitrify up to 4 ppm, without affecting the current density exerted, of about 1 mA/cm2. Regarding the denitrification process, it must be highlighted that the maximum denitrification rate achieved with the culture was about 60 mg·NO3−·L−1·h−1. Based on these results, it can be stated that it is possible to remove nitrates and to produce energy, without negatively affecting the electrical performance, when the nitrate concentration is low.

  7. Production equipment development needs for a 700 metric ton/year light water reactor mixed oxide fuel manufacturing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    A literature search and survey of fuel suppliers was conducted to determine how much development of production equipment is needed for a 700 metric tons/y LWR mixed-oxide (UO 2 --PuO 2 ) fuel fabrication plant. Results indicate that moderate to major production equipment development is needed in the powder and pellet processing areas. The equipment in the rod and assembly processing areas need only minor development effort. Required equipment development for a 700 MT/y plant is not anticipated to delay startup of the plant. The development, whether major or minor, can be done well within the time frame for licensing and construction of the plant as long as conventional production equipment is used

  8. Manufacturing of fuel gas and organic compost containing repellents for insects and other pests, by double fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Farias, R.

    1976-07-27

    Solid waste such as selected trash, harvest residues, and manure are fermented in 2 stages (aerobic fermentation at 80/sup 0/ for 8 to 15 days and anaerobic for 35 to 60 days) to produce a CH/sub 4/-contg. fuel gas with a calorific value of approx. 9500 cal/m/sup 3/, and an organic solid which has repellent effects on insects and other predators. The anaerobic fermentation is carried out in digestors with self-regulable hydraulic seals.

  9. Electricity generation from food wastes and characteristics of organic matters in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Tian, Yu; Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Xiaoyue; Li, Lipin; Su, Xinying

    2016-04-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) was evaluated as an alternative way to recover electricity from canteen based food waste. Characteristics of the organics in food waste before and after the MFC treatment were analyzed to investigate how the organic matters were biodegraded and transformed during the MFC treatment. A maximum power density of 5.6W/m(3) and an average output voltage of 0.51V were obtained. During the MFC operation, the hydrophilic and acidic fractions were more readily degraded, compared to the neutral fractions. Additionally, aromatic compounds in the hydrophilic fraction were more preferentially removed than non-aromatic compounds. The MFC could easily remove the tryptophan protein-like substances in all fractions and aromatic proteins in hydrophilic and hydrophobic neutral fractions. Additionally, the hydrophobic amide-1 proteins and aliphatic components were readily hydrolyzed and biodegraded in the MFC. These findings may facilitate the pretreatment and posttreatment choices for MFC system fed with food waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Electricity generation and microbial community analysis of alcohol powered microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Rae; Jung, Sok Hee; Regan, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2007-09-01

    Two different microbial fuel cell (MFC) configurations were investigated for electricity production from ethanol and methanol: a two-chambered, aqueous-cathode MFC; and a single-chamber direct-air cathode MFC. Electricity was generated in the two-chamber system at a maximum power density typical of this system (40+/-2 mW/m2) and a Coulombic efficiency (CE) ranging from 42% to 61% using ethanol. When bacteria were transferred into a single-chamber MFC known to produce higher power densities with different substrates, the maximum power density increased to 488+/-12 mW/m2 (CE = 10%) with ethanol. The voltage generated exhibited saturation kinetics as a function of ethanol concentration in the two-chambered MFC, with a half-saturation constant (Ks) of 4.86 mM. Methanol was also examined as a possible substrate, but it did not result in appreciable electricity generation. Analysis of the anode biofilm and suspension from a two-chamber MFC with ethanol using 16S rDNA-based techniques indicated that bacteria with sequences similar to Proteobacterium Core-1 (33.3% of clone library sequences), Azoarcus sp. (17.4%), and Desulfuromonas sp. M76 (15.9%) were significant members of the anode chamber community. These results indicate that ethanol can be used for sustained electricity generation at room temperature using bacteria on the anode in a MFC.

  11. A novel low cost polyvinyl alcohol-Nafion-borosilicate membrane separator for microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, B.R. [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Noori, Md.T. [Department of Agriculture and Food Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Ghangrekar, M.M., E-mail: ghangrekar@civil.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India)

    2016-10-01

    Composite membranes were developed from PVA-borosilicate (MP) and PVA-Nafion-borosilicate (MPN) for application in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The membranes were characterized in terms of water uptake, PBS uptake, oxygen diffusion and proton conductivity. Proton conductivity for MPN (0.07 Scm{sup −1}) was found to be higher as compared to that of MP (0.03 Scm{sup −1}). Oxygen diffusion coefficient for MPN was 1.47 fold lower than that for MP. As a result, MFC with PVA-Nafion-borosilicate membrane exhibited maximum power density of 6.8 Wm{sup −3}, which was 151% higher than the power produced by MFC having PVA-borosilicate membrane and it was comparable with MFC using Nafion 117 (7.1 Wm{sup −3}) membrane separator. This study demonstrates that borosilicate glass membrane incorporated with PVA-Nafion matrix can be a suitable alternative to costly polymeric membrane to increase power output of MFC. Using such membranes MFC can be fabricated at around 11 fold reduced cost as compared to Nafion 117. - Highlights: • Novel membranes using PVA and borosilicate composite were fabricated. • Proton diffusion for MPN was comparable with Nafion117. • MFC-PN produced power density comparable to MFC with Nafion 117 membrane. • MPN was fabricated at almost 11 times reduced cost than Nafion 117 membranes.

  12. Manufacturing of FeCrAl/Zr Dual Layer tube for its application to LWR Fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Jun; Lim, Do Wan; Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Hyun Gil; Park, Jeong Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Many advanced materials such as MAX phases, Mo, SiC, and Fe-based alloys are being considered a possible candidate to substitute the Zr-based alloy cladding has been used in light water reactors. Among the proposed candidate materials, Fe-based alloy is one of the most promising candidates owing to its excellent formability, very good high strength, and corrosion resistance at high temperature. However, neutron cross section of FeCrAl alloy is much higher than that of existing Zr-based alloys. In this study, FeCrAl/Zr dual layer tube was manufactured by using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method. The thickness of outer FeCrAl layer was varied from 50 to 250 μm but all the FeCrAl/Zr dual layer tube samples maintained its total thickness of 570 μm. For a detailed microstructural characterization of FeCrAl/Zr dual layer, polarized optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study carried out and its mechanical property was measured by ring compression test. FeCrAl/Zr dual layer tube sample was successfully manufactured with good adhesion between both layers. Inter layer showing gradual element variation was observed at interface. Result obtained from simulated LOCA test indicates that FeCrAl/Zr dual layer tube may maintain its integrity during LOCA and its accident tolerance had greatly improved compared to that of Zr-based alloy.

  13. Manufacturing of In-Pile Test Section(IPS) Mock-up for the 3-Pin Fuel Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. M.; Park, K. N.; Chi, D. Y. (and others)

    2005-10-15

    Manufacturing process of IPS Mock-up was initiated in late of 2003 with DAEWOO Precision industries Company. Manufacturing drawings due to detail drawings are composed of Outer assembly and Inner assembly. Welding of IPS Mock-up was performed by the GMAW(Gas Metal Arc Welding) process. After the welding process, non-destructive examination was conducted. Leak test was performed to the Main cooling water part and Neon gas inter-space gap part by the He gas injection with the pressure of 6.0 kg{sub f}/cm{sup 2} and 30 minutes holding time. the result was shown that there was no leak at the Neon gas inter-space gap part but leak was occurred at Main cooling water part according to imperfect screw of purge plug. so, it was re-finished and test was performed to certify the leak tightness. To satisfy the HANARO Limiting Operation Condition, IPS should be tested ahead of installation at the HANARO reactor by the use of test facilities. IPS Mock-up and its test facilities will be designed and used for the test of 'HANARO flow tube pressure drop', 'IPS inner pressure drop' and 'IPS inner vibration'.

  14. Development of the manufacture and process for DUPIC fuel elements; development of the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Choi, Myong Seon; Yang, Hyun Tae; Kim, Dong Gyun; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Jin Ho [Yeungnam University, Kyongsan (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this research is to set up the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel element. High temperature corrosion test and the SCC test for Zircaloy-4 were performed, and also the possibility of the ultrasonic test technique was verified for the quality evaluation and control of the laser welds in the DUPIC fuel rod end cap. From the evaluation of corrosion properties with measuring the weight gain and observing oxide film of the specimen that had been in the circumstance of steam(400 .deg. C, 1,500 psi) by max. 70 days later, the weight gain of the welded specimens was larger than original tube and the weight increasing rate increased with the exposed days. For the Development of techniques for ultrasonic test, semi-auto ultrasonic test system has been made based on immersion pulse-echo technique using spherically concentrated ultrasonic beam. Subsequently, developed ultrasonic test technique is quite sensible to shape of welds in the inside and outside of tube as well as crack, undercut and expulsion, and also this ultrasonic test, together with metallurgical fracture test, has good reliance as enough to be used for control method of welding process. 43 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  15. Comparison of The Performance of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC Electrodes with Different Carbon Powder Content and Methods of Manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Rohendi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon powder in the gas diffusion layer (GDL contained in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA has an important role in the flow of electrons and reactant gas. Meanwhile, the method of making the electrode is one of the many studies conducted to determine the most appropriate method to use. Comparative study of the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC electrodes with different carbon powder content (vulcan XC-72 in the GDL and methods of manufacture of the electrode between casting and spraying method has been carried out. The spraying method consists of one layer and three layer of catalyst layer (CL. The content of carbon powder in the GDL as much as 3 mg cm-2 has a better performance compared to 1.5 mg cm-2 with an increase of 177.78% current density at 0.6 V. Meanwhile, the manufacture of CL with three-layer spraying method has better performance compared with one-layer spraying and casting method.

  16. Synthesis of Octahedral-Shaped NiO and Approaches to an Anode Material of Manufactured Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Using the Decalcomania Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeran Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Micrometer-sized and octahedral-shaped NiO particles were synthesized by microwave thermal treatment at 300 watt power for 15 min in a microwave chamber to be used as an anode material in solid oxide fuel cells. SEM image and particle size distribution revealed near-perfect octahedral NiO microparticle with sizes ranging from 4.0~11.0 μm. The anode functional layer (AFL, 60 wt% NiO synthesized: commercial 40 wt% YSZ, electrolyte (commercial Yttria-stabilized zirconia, YSZ, and cathode (commercial La0.8Sr0.2MnO3, LSM layers were manufactured using the decalcomania method on a porous anode support, sequentially. The sintered electrolyte at 1450°C for 2 h using the decalcomania method was dense and had a thickness of about 10 μm. The cathode was sintered at 1250°C for 2 h, and it was porous. Using humidified hydrogen as a fuel, a coin cell with a 15 μm thick anode functional layer exhibited maximum power densities of 0.28, 0.38, and 0.65 W/cm2 at 700, 750, and 800°C, respectively. Otherwise, when a commercial YSZ anode functional layer was used, the maximum power density was 0.55 W/cm2 at 800°C.

  17. Study of charge transfer reactions in a microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E.; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique; National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.; Tartakovsky, B. [National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.

    2008-07-01

    Electron transfer reactions in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) were evaluated. The MFC was inoculated with anaerobic mesophilic sludge and operated with carbon felt, carbon cloth, and platinum (Pt) coated carbon cloth. The MFC was then fed with either acetate or glucose as a source of fuel and operated at a temperature of 25 degrees C and a pH of 7. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs demonstrated that the micro-organisms colonized the anodes. Cyclic voltammetry and polarization tests were conducted using different fractions of the anodophilic biofilm in order to determine charge transfer routes. The study characterized the electron transfer mechanisms used by the exoelectrogenic micro-organisms to produce electricity. It was concluded that further research is needed to characterize reaction transfer routes. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Gold nanoparticles produced in situ mediate bioelectricity and hydrogen production in a microbial fuel cell by quantized capacitance charging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathil, Shafeer; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2013-02-01

    Oppan quantized style: By adding a gold precursor at its cathode, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated to form gold nanoparticles that can be used to simultaneously produce bioelectricity and hydrogen. By exploiting the quantized capacitance charging effect, the gold nanoparticles mediate the production of hydrogen without requiring an external power supply, while the MFC produces a stable power density. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Formation of industrial mixed culture biofilm in chlorophenol cultivated medium of microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Huzairy; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng; Ngau, Cornelius

    2016-11-01

    The formation of microbial biofilm while maintaining the electricity output is a challenging topic in microbial fuel cell (MFC) studies. This MFC critical factor becomes more significant when handling with industrial wastewater which normally contains refractory and toxic compounds. This study explores the formation of industrial mixed culture biofilm in chlorophenol cultivated medium through observing and characterizing microscopically its establishment on MFC anode surface. The mixed culture was found to develop its biofilm on the anode surface in the chlorophenol environment and established its maturity and dispersal stages with concurrent electricity generation and phenolic degradation. The mixed culture biofilm engaged the electron transfer roles in MFC by generating current density of 1.4 mA/m2 and removing 53 % of 2,4-dichlorophenol. The results support further research especially on hazardous wastewater treatment using a benign and sustainable method.

  20. Electricity generation and modeling of microbial fuel cell from continuous beer brewery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qing; Wu, Ying; Cao, Dianxue; Zhao, Lixin; Sun, Qian

    2009-09-01

    Electricity production and modeling of microbial fuel cell (MFC) from continuous beer brewery wastewater was studied in this paper. A single air-cathode MFC was constructed, carbon fiber was used as anode and diluted brewery wastewater (COD=626.58 mg/L) as substrate. The MFC displayed an open-circuit voltage of 0.578 V and a maximum power density of 9.52 W/m(3) (264 mW/m(2)). Using the model based on polarization curve, various voltage losses were quantified. At current density of 1.79 A/m(2), reaction kinetic loss and mass transport loss both achieved to 0.248 V; while ohmic loss was 0.046 V. Results demonstrated that it was feasible and stable for producing bioelectricity from brewery wastewater; while the most important factors which influenced the performance of the MFC are reaction kinetic loss and mass transport loss.

  1. Characterization of a microfluidic microbial fuel cell as a power generator based on a nickel electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Yaghmaei, Soheila

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the fabrication of a microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MFC) using nickel as a novel alternative for conventional electrodes and a non-phatogenic strain of Escherichia coli as the biocatalyst. The feasibility of a microfluidic MFC as an efficient power generator for production of bioelectricity from glucose and urea as organic substrates in human blood and urine for implantable medical devices (IMDs) was investigated. A maximum open circuit potential of 459 mV was achieved for the batch-fed microfluidic MFC. During continuous mode operation, a maximum power density of 104 Wm(-3) was obtained with nutrient broth. For the glucose-fed microfluidic MFC, the maximum power density of 5.2 μW cm(-2) obtained in this study is significantly greater than the power densities reported previously for microsized MFCs and glucose fuel cells. The maximum power density of 14 Wm(-3) obtained using urea indicates the successful performance of a microfluidic MFC using human excreta. It features high power density, self-regeneration, waste management and a low production cost (microfluidic MFC as a power supply was characterized based on polarization behavior and cell potential in different substrates, operational modes, and concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Operational, design and microbial aspects related to power production with microbial fuel cells implemented in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, Clara; Guivernau, Miriam; Viñas, Marc; Puigagut, Jaume

    2015-11-01

    This work aimed at determining the amount of energy that can be harvested by implementing microbial fuel cells (MFC) in horizontal subsurface constructed wetlands (HSSF CWs) during the treatment of real domestic wastewater. To this aim, MFC were implemented in a pilot plant based on two HSSF CW, one fed with primary settled wastewater (Settler line) and the other fed with the effluent of a hydrolytic up-flow sludge blanket reactor (HUSB line). The eubacterial and archaeal community was profiled on wetland gravel, MFC electrodes and primary treated wastewater by means of 16S rRNA gene-based 454-pyrosequencing and qPCR of 16S rRNA and mcrA genes. Maximum current (219 mA/m(2)) and power (36 mW/m(2)) densities were obtained for the HUSB line. Power production pattern correlated well with water level fluctuations within the wetlands, whereas the type of primary treatment implemented had a significant impact on the diversity and relative abundance of eubacteria communities colonizing MFC. It is worth noticing the high predominance (13-16% of relative abundance) of one OTU belonging to Geobacter on active MFC of the HUSB line that was absent for the settler line MFC. Hence, MFC show promise for power production in constructed wetlands receiving the effluent of a HUSB reactor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biotreatment of Slaughterhouse Wastewater Accompanied with Sustainable Electricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Z. Ismail

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC for simultaneous bioremediation of slaughterhouse wastewater and sustainable power generation. For the first time, an integrated system of tubular type microbial fuel cell (MFC was used in this study. The MFC consisted of three concentric Plexiglas tubes; the inner tube was the anaerobic anodic compartment, the mid tube was the aerobic biocathodic chamber, and the outer tube act as an aerobic bioreactor for extended nitrification process. The MFC system was connected to a complementary external anaerobic bioreactor for denitrification process. The microbial fuel cell was inoculated with freshly collected activated sludge and was continuously fueled with simulated slaughterhouse wastewater. Results revealed that the removal efficiency of the chemical oxygen demand (COD was up to 99%, and the power generation was 165 mW/m2. Also, results demonstrated that maximum removal of NO3- via the denitrification process in the final effluent was 94.7% when the initial concentration of NO3- in the effluent of the extended bioreactor was 15.2 mg/L. Approximately; complete recovery of nitrogen gas was obtained in the complementary external anaerobic bioreactor. These results indicated that MFC could be a promising approach for slaughterhouse wastewater bioremediation and renewable power generation.

  5. Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torvanger, A.

    1990-11-01

    In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs

  6. Permanent Closure of MFC Biodiesel Underground Storage Tank 99ANL00013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerry L. Nisson

    2012-10-01

    This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the Materials and Fuels Complex biodiesel underground storage tank 99ANL00013 in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, “Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.”

  7. Evaluation of standard and modified M-FC, MacConkey, and Teepol media for membrane filtration counting of fecal coliforms in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabow, W O; Hilner, C A; Coubrough, P

    1981-08-01

    MacConkey agar, standard M-FC agar, M-FC agar without rosolic acid, M-FC agar with a resuscitation top layer, Teepol agar, and pads saturated with Teepol broth, were evaluated as growth media for membrane filtration counting of fecal coliform bacteria in water. In comparative tests on 312 samples of water from a wide variety of sources, including chlorinated effluents, M-FC agar without rosolic acid proved the medium of choice because it generally yielded the highest counts, was readily obtainable, easy to prepare and handle, and yielded clearly recognizable fecal coliform colonies. Identification of 1,139 fecal coliform isolates showed that fecal coliform tests cannot be used to enumerate Escherichia coli because the incidence of E. coli among fecal coliforms varied from an average of 51% for river water to 93% for an activated sludge effluent after chlorination. The incidence of Klebsiella pneumoniae among fecal coliforms varied from an average of 4% for the activated sludge effluent after chlorination to 32% for the river water. The advantages of a standard membrane filtration procedure for routine counting of fecal coliforms in water using M-FC agar without rosolic acid as growth medium, in the absence of preincubation or resuscitation steps, are outlined.

  8. Nuclear power fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havelka, S.; Jakesova, L.

    1982-01-01

    Economic problems are discussed of the fuel cycle (cost of the individual parts of the fuel cycle and the share of the fuel cycle in the price of 1 kWh), the technological problems of the fuel cycle (uranium ore mining and processing, uranium isotope enrichment, the manufacture of fuel elements, the building of long-term storage sites for spent fuel, spent fuel reprocessing, liquid and gaseous waste processing), and the ecologic aspects of the fuel cycle. (H.S.)

  9. Technology choice and development in Brazil: An assessment of Brazil's alternative fuel program and the agriculture, manufacturing, energy, and service sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Lucy A.

    Technology choice profoundly affects a country's development process because capital-intensive and labor-intensive technologies have different socioeconomic linkages within the economy. This research examines the impacts of technology choice through the use of a social accounting matrix (SAM) framework. SAM-based modeling determines the direct and indirect effects of technology choice on development, particularly poverty alleviation in Brazil. Brazil's alternative fuel program was analyzed as a special example of technology choice. Two ethanol production technologies and the gasoline sector were compared; to make the study more robust, labor and capital intensive technologies were evaluated in the production of agriculture, manufacturing, energy, and services. Growth in these economic sectors was examined to assess the effects on employment, factor and household income, energy intensity, and carbon dioxide costs. Poverty alleviation was a focus, so income to unskilled agriculture labor, unskilled non-agriculture labor, and income to rural and urban households in poverty was also analyzed. The major research finding is that overall, labor-intensive technologies generate more employment, factor and household income, environmental and energy benefits to Brazil's economy than capital-intensive technologies. In addition, labor-intensive technologies make a particular contribution to poverty alleviation. The results suggest that policies to encourage the adoption of these technologies, especially in the agriculture and renewable energy sectors, are important because of their intersectoral linkages within the economy. Many studies have shown that Brazil's fuel ethanol program has helped to realize multiple macroeconomic objectives. However, this is the first empirical study to quantify its household income effects. The ethanol industry generated the most household income of the energy sectors. The research confirms a key finding of the appropriate technology literature

  10. An overview of electron acceptors in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucar, Deniz; Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) have recently received increasing attention due to their promising potential in sustainable wastewater treatment and contaminant removal. In general, contaminants can be removed either as an electron donor via microbial catalyzed oxidization at the anode or removed at t...... acceptors (e.g., nitrate, iron, copper, perchlorate) and mediators....

  11. Graphene/biofilm composites for enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production in a biocathode microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tian-shun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jiangsu Branch of China Academy of Science & Technology Development, Nanjing (China); Jin, Yuejuan; Bao, Jingjing [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Kang, Dongzhou, E-mail: kangdz@ybu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji 133002 (China); Xie, Jingjing, E-mail: xiej@njtech.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jiangsu Branch of China Academy of Science & Technology Development, Nanjing (China); College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji 133002 (China); Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Graphene/biofilm was microbially fabricated to cathode of a Cr(VI)-reducing MFC. • High Cr(VI) reduction rate was generated by self-assembled graphene biocathode MFC. • Graphene biocathode improves the electricity production of Cr(VI)-reducing MFC. • High surface area of the graphene provides more adsorption sites for Cr(VI). • Graphene biocathode improves the electron transfer rate in the MFC. - Abstract: In this study, a simple method of biocathode fabrication in a Cr(VI)-reducing microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated. A self-assembling graphene was decorated onto the biocathode microbially, constructing a graphene/biofilm, in situ. The maximum power density of the MFC with a graphene biocathode is 5.7 times that of the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, resulting in 100% removal of Cr(VI) within 48 h, at 40 mg/L Cr(VI), compared with only 58.3% removal of Cr(VI) in the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cyclic voltammogram analyses showed that the graphene biocathode had faster electron transfer kinetics than the graphite felt version. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analysis revealed a possible adsorption-reduction mechanism for Cr(VI) reduction via the graphene biocathode. This study attempts to improve the efficiency of the biocathode in the Cr(VI)-reducing MFC, and provides a useful candidate method for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater, under neutral conditions.

  12. Effect of short-term alkaline intervention on the performance of buffer-free single-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Ren, Yueping; Li, Xiufen; Wang, Xinhua

    2017-06-01

    Anolyte acidification is a drawback restricting the electricity generation performance of the buffer-free microbial fuel cells (MFC). In this paper, a small amount of alkali-treated anion exchange resin (AER) was placed in front of the anode in the KCl mediated single-chamber MFC to slowly release hydroxyl ions (OH - ) and neutralize the H + ions that are generated by the anodic reaction in two running cycles. This short-term alkaline intervention to the KCl anolyte has promoted the proliferation of electroactive Geobacter sp. and enhanced the self-buffering capacity of the KCl-AER-MFC. The pH of the KCl anolyte in the KCl-AER-MFC increased and became more stable in each running cycle compared with that of the KCl-MFC after the short-term alkaline intervention. The maximum power density (P max ) of the KCl-AER-MFC increased from 307.5mW·m -2 to 542.8mW·m -2 , slightly lower than that of the PBS-MFC (640.7mW·m -2 ). The coulombic efficiency (CE) of the KCl-AER-MFC increased from 54.1% to 61.2% which is already very close to that of the PBS-MFC (61.9%). The results in this paper indicate that short-term alkaline intervention to the anolyte is an effective strategy to further promote the performance of buffer-free MFCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Manufacturing Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of...

  14. Emissions of metals and polychlorinated dibenzo(p)dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) from Portland cement manufacturing plants: inter-kiln variability and dependence on fuel-types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Stephen; Ames, Michael; Green, Laura; Botelho, Maria João; Gossman, David; Linkov, Igor; Palma-Oliveira, José

    2011-09-15

    Emissions from Portland cement manufacturing facilities may increase health risks in nearby populations and are thus subject to stringent regulations. Direct testing of pollutant concentrations in exhaust gases provides the best basis for assessing the extent of these risks. However, these tests (i) are often conducted under stressed, rather than typical, operating conditions, (ii) may be limited in number and duration, and (iii) may be influenced by specific fuel-types and attributes of individual kilns. We report here on the results of more than 150 emissions-tests conducted of two kilns at a Portland cement manufacturing plant in Portugal. The tests measured various regulated metals and polychlorinated dibenzo(p)dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs). Stack-gas concentrations of pollutants were found to be highly variable, with standard deviations on the order of mean values. Emission rates of many pollutants were higher when coal was used as the main kiln fuel (instead of petroleum coke). Use of various supplemental fuels, however, had little effect on stack emissions, and few statistically significant differences were observed when hazardous waste was included in the fuel mix. Significant differences in emissions for some pollutants were observed between the two kilns despite their similar designs and uses of similar fuels. All measured values were found to be within applicable regulatory limits. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Feasibility demonstration of using wire electrical-discharge machining, abrasive flow honing, and laser spot welding to manufacture high-precision triangular-pitch Zircaloy-4 fuel-rod-support grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwood, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    Results are reported supporting the feasibility of manufacturing high precision machined triangular pitch Zircaloy-4 fuel rod support grids for application in water cooled nuclear power reactors. The manufacturing processes investigated included wire electrical discharge machining of the fuel rod and guide tube cells in Zircaloy plate stock to provide the grid body, multistep pickling of the machined grid to provide smooth and corrosion resistant surfaces, and laser welding of thin Zircaloy cover plates to both sides of the grid body to capture separate AM-350 stainless steel insert springs in the grid body. Results indicated that dimensional accuracy better than +- 0.001 and +- 0.002 inch could be obtained on cell shape and position respectively after wire EDM and surface pickling. Results on strength, corrosion resistance, and internal quality of laser spot welds are provided

  16. Microbial Fuel Cell Inoculated with Ochrobactrum Tritici KCC210 for Chromium (VI) Measurement in Electroplating Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jongtar; Kuo, Juiling; Cheng, Chiuyu; Chung, Yingchien

    2018-01-01

    Many methods/techniques have been developed for Cr(VI) measurement, but they are often conducted offsite or/and cannot provide real-time for Cr(VI) monitoring. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a self-sustaining device and has great potential as a biosensor for in situ Cr(VI) measurement, especially for wastewater generated from different electroplating units. In this study, Ochrobactrum tritici KCC210, a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing, and exoelectrogenic bacterium, was isolated and inoculated into the MFC to evaluate its feasibility as a Cr(VI) biosensor. The results indicated that O. tritici KCC210 exhibited high adaptability to pH, and temperature under anaerobic conditions. The maximum power density of the MFC biosensor was 17.5±0.9 mW/m2 at 2,000 Ω. A good linear relationship was observed between the Cr(VI) concentration (10-80 mg/L) and voltage output. The stable performance of the MFC biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. Moreover, the developed MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI) concentrations in the actual electroplating wastewater generated from different electroplating units within 15 min with low deviations (-1.8% to 7.8%) in comparison with the values determined using standard method. Thus, the MFC biosensor can measure Cr(VI) concentrations in situ in the effluents and has potential as an early warning detection device.

  17. Redistribution of wastewater alkalinity with a microbial fuel cell to support nitrification of reject water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modin, Oskar; Fukushi, Kensuke; Rabaey, Korneel; Rozendal, René A; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2011-04-01

    In wastewater treatment plants, the reject water from the sludge treatment processes typically contains high ammonium concentrations, which constitute a significant internal nitrogen load in the plant. Often, a separate nitrification reactor is used to treat the reject water before it is fed back into the plant. The nitrification reaction consumes alkalinity, which has to be replenished by dosing e.g. NaOH or Ca(OH)(2). In this study, we investigated the use of a two-compartment microbial fuel cell (MFC) to redistribute alkalinity from influent wastewater to support nitrification of reject water. In an MFC, alkalinity is consumed in the anode compartment and produced in the cathode compartment. We use this phenomenon and the fact that the influent wastewater flow is many times larger than the reject water flow to transfer alkalinity from the influent wastewater to the reject water. In a laboratory-scale system, ammonium oxidation of synthetic reject water passed through the cathode chamber of an MFC, increased from 73.8 ± 8.9 mgN/L under open-circuit conditions to 160.1 ± 4.8 mgN/L when a current of 1.96 ± 0.37 mA (15.1 mA/L total MFC liquid volume) was flowing through the MFC. These results demonstrated the positive effect of an MFC on ammonium oxidation of alkalinity-limited reject water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic control of load increases power and efficiency in a microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premier, Giuliano C.; Kim, Jung Rae; Michie, Iain [Sustainable Environment Research Centre (SERC), Faculty of Advanced Technology, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Mid-Glamorgan CF37 1DL (United Kingdom); Dinsdale, Richard M.; Guwy, Alan J. [Sustainable Environment Research Centre (SERC), Faculty of Health, Sport and Science, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Mid-Glamorgan CF37 1DL (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Increasing power production and coulombic efficiency (CE) of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is a common research ambition as the viability of the technology depends to some extent on these measures of performance. As MFCs are typically time varying systems, comparative studies of controlled and un-controlled external load impedance are needed to show if control affects the biocatalyst development and hence MFC performance. The application of logic based control of external load resistance is shown to increase the power generated by the MFC, when compared to an equivalent system which has a static resistive load. The controlled MFC generated 1600 {+-} 400 C, compared to 300 {+-} 10 C with an otherwise replicate fixed load MFC system. The use of a parsimonious gradient based control was able to increase the CE to within the range of 15.1-22.7%, while the CE for a 200 {omega} statically loaded MFC lay in the range 3.3-3.7%. The controlled MFC improves the electrogenic anodic biofilm selection for power production, indicating that greater power and substrate conversion can be achieved by controlling load impedance. Load control ensured sustainable current demand, applied microbial selection pressures and provided near-optimal impedance for power transference, compared to the un-controlled system. (author)

  19. A novel microbial fuel cell sensor with biocathode sensing element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Liang, Peng; Liu, Panpan; Wang, Donglin; Miao, Bo; Huang, Xia

    2017-08-15

    The traditional microbial fuel cell (MFC) sensor with bioanode as sensing element delivers limited sensitivity to toxicity monitoring, restricted application to only anaerobic and organic rich water body, and increased potential fault warning to the combined shock of organic matter/toxicity. In this study, the biocathode for oxygen reduction reaction was employed for the first time as the sensing element in MFC sensor for toxicity monitoring. The results shown that the sensitivity of MFC sensor with biocathode sensing element (7.4±2.0 to 67.5±4.0mA% -1 cm -2 ) was much greater than that showed by bioanode sensing element (3.4±1.5 to 5.5±0.7mA% -1 cm -2 ). The biocathode sensing element achieved the lowest detection limit reported to date using MFC sensor for formaldehyde detection (0.0005%), while the bioanode was more applicable for higher concentration (>0.0025%). There was a quicker response of biocathode sensing element with the increase of conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO). The biocathode sensing element made the MFC sensor directly applied to clean water body monitoring, e.g., drinking water and reclaimed water, without the amending of background organic matter, and it also decreased the warning failure when challenged by a combined shock of organic matter/toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High performance monolithic power management system with dynamic maximum power point tracking for microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbay, Celal; Carreon-Bautista, Salvador; Sanchez-Sinencio, Edgar; Han, Arum

    2014-12-02

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) that can directly generate electricity from organic waste or biomass is a promising renewable and clean technology. However, low power and low voltage output of MFCs typically do not allow directly operating most electrical applications, whether it is supplementing electricity to wastewater treatment plants or for powering autonomous wireless sensor networks. Power management systems (PMSs) can overcome this limitation by boosting the MFC output voltage and managing the power for maximum efficiency. We present a monolithic low-power-consuming PMS integrated circuit (IC) chip capable of dynamic maximum power point tracking (MPPT) to maximize the extracted power from MFCs, regardless of the power and voltage fluctuations from MFCs over time. The proposed PMS continuously detects the maximum power point (MPP) of the MFC and matches the load impedance of the PMS for maximum efficiency. The system also operates autonomously by directly drawing power from the MFC itself without any external power. The overall system efficiency, defined as the ratio between input energy from the MFC and output energy stored into the supercapacitor of the PMS, was 30%. As a demonstration, the PMS connected to a 240 mL two-chamber MFC (generating 0.4 V and 512 μW at MPP) successfully powered a wireless temperature sensor that requires a voltage of 2.5 V and consumes power of 85 mW each time it transmit the sensor data, and successfully transmitted a sensor reading every 7.5 min. The PMS also efficiently managed the power output of a lower-power producing MFC, demonstrating that the PMS works efficiently at various MFC power output level.

  1. Performance enhancement of microbial fuel cell by applying transient-state regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Peng; Zhang, Changyong; Jiang, Yong; Bian, Yanhong; Zhang, Helan; Sun, Xueliang; Yang, Xufei; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • MFC was operated with transient-state regulation to enhance its performance. • Effects of the TSR parameters on MFC performance were thoroughly investigated. • Long-term operation of MFC in TSR mode allowed 32.7% higher power production. • Anode capacitance helped reduce the MFC’s internal impedance in the TSR mode. - Abstract: A binder-free, pseudocapacitive anode was fabricated by coating reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and manganese oxide (MnO_2) nanoparticles on stainless steel fibre felt (SS). Microbial fuel cell (MFC) equipped with this novel anode yielded a maximum power density of 1045 mW m"−"2, 20 times higher than that of a similar MFC with a bare SS anode (46 mW m"−"2). Transient-state regulation (TSR) was implemented to further improve the MFC’s power generation. The optimal TSR duty cycle ranged from 67% to 95%, and the MFC’s power density increased with TSR frequency. A maximum power density output of 1238 mW m"−"2 was achieved at the TSR duty cycle of 75% and the frequency of 1 Hz, 18.4% greater than that obtained from the steady state operation. The TSR mode delivered better MFC performance especially when the external resistance was small. Long-term operation tests revealed that the current density and power density yielded in the TSR mode were on average 15.0% and 32.7% greater than those in the steady state mode, respectively. The TSR mode was believed to reduce the internal resistance of the MFC while enhance substrate mass transfer and electron transfer within the anode matrix, thereby improving the MFC performance.

  2. Microbial fuel cells for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, Clara; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-11-01

    Clogging in HSSF CW may result in a reduction of system's life-span or treatment efficiency. Current available techniques to assess the degree of clogging in HSSF CW are time consuming and cannot be applied on a continuous basis. Main objective of this work was to assess the potential applicability of microbial fuel cells for continuous clogging assessment in HSSF CW. To this aim, two replicates of a membrane-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) were built up and operated under laboratory conditions for five weeks. The MFC anode was gravel-based to simulate the filter media of HSSF CW. MFC were weekly loaded with sludge that had been accumulating for several years in a pilot HSSF CW treating domestic wastewater. Sludge loading ranged from ca. 20kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the beginning of the study period up to ca. 250kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the end of the study period. Sludge loading applied resulted in sludge accumulated within the MFC equivalent to a clogging degree ranging from 0.2years (ca. 0.5kgTS·m(-3)CW) to ca. 5years (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). Results showed that the electric charge was negatively correlated to the amount of sludge accumulated (degree of clogging). Electron transference (expressed as electric charge) almost ceased when accumulated sludge within the MFC was equivalent to ca. 5years of clogging (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). This result suggests that, although longer study periods under more realistic conditions shall be further performed, HSSF CW operated as a MFC has great potential for clogging assessment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Investigations on the micro-scale surface interactions at the tool and workpiece interface in micro-manufacturing of bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Mevlut Fatih

    coefficient of friction as previously reported by other researchers as one of the consequences of tribological size effect. On the other hand, coefficient of friction values were not affected by the force levels used in the experiments and simulations, whereas plastic strain, equivalent stress, and formability levels were increased with increasing stamping force, as expected. In essence, this study proposed a methodology to investigate the long-run manufacturing effects on dimensional stability and surface characteristics of micro-stamped sheets. It also correlates these parameters to fuel cell performance measures such as interfacial contact and corrosion resistance.

  4. Social manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Hamalainen, Markko; Karjalainen, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    New business models harnessing the power of individuals have already revolutionized service industries and digital content production. In this study, we investigate whether a similar phenomenon is taking place in manufacturing industries. We start by conceptually defining two distinct forms of firm-individual collaboration in manufacturing industries: (1) social cloud manufacturing, in which firms outsource manufacturing to individuals, and (2) social platform manufacturing, in which firms pr...

  5. Microbial fuel cell as new technol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rahimnejad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, great attentions have been paid to microbial fuel cells (MFCs due to their mild operating conditions and using variety of biodegradable substrates as fuel. The traditional MFC consisted of anode and cathode compartments but there are single chamber MFCs. Microorganisms actively catabolize substrate, and bioelectricities are generated. MFCs could be utilized as power generator in small devices such as biosensor. Besides the advantages of this technology, it still faces practical barriers such as low power and current density. In the present article different parts of MFC such as anode, cathode and membrane have been reviewed and to overcome the practical challenges in this field some practical options have been suggested. Also, this research review demonstrates the improvement of MFCs with summarization of their advantageous and possible applications in future application. Also, Different key factors affecting bioelectricity generation on MFCs were investigated and these key parameters are fully discussed.

  6. Bioelectro-Claus processes using MFC technology: Influence of co-substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschitor, A; Soreanu, G; Fernandez-Marchante, C M; Lobato, J; Cañizares, P; Cretescu, I; Rodrigo, M A

    2015-01-01

    This work is focused on the removal of sulphide from wastewater using a two chamber microbial fuel cell, seeded with activated sludge and operated in semi-continuous mode. Two co-substrates were used in order to provide the system for carbon and nutrient source: actual urban wastewater and synthetic wastewater. Results show that sulphide is efficiency depleted (removals over 94%) and that electricity is efficiently produced (maximum power density is 150 mW m(-2)) meanwhile COD is also oxidised (removals higher than 60%). Sulphur and sulphate are obtained as the final products of the oxidation and final speciation depends on the type of co-substrate used. The start-up of the system is very rapid and production of electricity and polarisation curves do not depend on the co-substrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A review on the effect of proton exchange membranes in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rahimnejad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFC liberate electrons while the electron donors are consumed. In the anaerobic anode compartment, substrates such as carbohydrates are utilized and as a result bioelectricity is produced in the MFC. MFCs may be utilized as electricity generators in small devices such as biosensors. MFCs still face practical barriers such as low generated power and current density. Recently, a great deal of attention has been given to MFCs due to their ability to operate at mild conditions and using different biodegradable substrates as fuel. The MFC consists of anode and cathode compartments. Active microorganisms are actively catabolized to carbon sources, therefore generating bioelectricity. The produced electron is transmitted to the anode surface but the generated protons must pass through the proton exchange membrane (PEM in order to reach the cathode compartment. PEM as a key factor affecting electricity generation in MFCs has been investigated here and its importance fully discussed.

  8. Investigating design criteria to build a performing microbial fuel cell running on swine liquid manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D.Y.; Hogue, R.; Dube, P.; Jeanne, T.; Levesque, A. [Inst. de recherche et de developpement en agroenvironnement Inc, Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Theriault, R.; Kaliaguine, S. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study that examined the bacterial and electro-chemical phenomena that takes place in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) operating on swine liquid manure as fuel. An MFC converts the available energy in a bioconvertible substrate directly into electricity while decreasing its chemical oxygen demand (COD). In this study, a first single chamber MFC operating on swine liquid manure was constructed based on a literature review. Various support media filling the anodic chamber were tested in an effort to optimize the surface area on which bacteria may develop according to the hypothesis that large bacteria concentration will improve energy production and reduce treatment time. Bacterial communities extracted from the selected support media were analyzed using molecular technologies such as DNA extraction, PCR amplification, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, cloning and sequencing. The analyses showed that only a few bacteria species coming from raw liquid manure were responsible for electrical activities.

  9. Essential Data and Techniques for Conducting Microbial Fuel Cell and other Types of Bioelectrochemical System Experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and other bioelectrochemical systems are new technologies that require expertise in a variety of technical areas, ranging from electrochemistry to biological wastewater treatment. There are certain data and critical information that should be included in every MFC study, such as specific surface area of the electrodes, solution conductivity, and power densities normalized to electrode surface area and volumes. Electrochemical techniques such as linear sweep voltammetry can be used to understand the performance of the MFC, but extremely slow scans are required for these biological systems compared to more traditional fuel cells. In this Minireview, the critical information needed for MFC studies is provided with examples of how results can be better conveyed through a full description of materials, the use of proper controls, and inclusion of a more complete electrochemical analysis. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Essential Data and Techniques for Conducting Microbial Fuel Cell and other Types of Bioelectrochemical System Experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-04-19

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and other bioelectrochemical systems are new technologies that require expertise in a variety of technical areas, ranging from electrochemistry to biological wastewater treatment. There are certain data and critical information that should be included in every MFC study, such as specific surface area of the electrodes, solution conductivity, and power densities normalized to electrode surface area and volumes. Electrochemical techniques such as linear sweep voltammetry can be used to understand the performance of the MFC, but extremely slow scans are required for these biological systems compared to more traditional fuel cells. In this Minireview, the critical information needed for MFC studies is provided with examples of how results can be better conveyed through a full description of materials, the use of proper controls, and inclusion of a more complete electrochemical analysis. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The CMEMS-Med-MFC-Biogeochemistry operational system: implementation of NRT and Multi-Year validation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salon, Stefano; Cossarini, Gianpiero; Bolzon, Giorgio; Teruzzi, Anna

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean Monitoring and Forecasting Centre (Med-MFC) is one of the regional production centres of the EU Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS). Med-MFC manages a suite of numerical model systems for the operational delivery of the CMEMS products, providing continuous monitoring and forecasting of the Mediterranean marine environment. The CMEMS products of fundamental biogeochemical variables (chlorophyll, nitrate, phosphate, oxygen, phytoplankton biomass, primary productivity, pH, pCO2) are organised as gridded datasets and are available at the marine.copernicus.eu web portal. Quantitative estimates of CMEMS products accuracy are prerequisites to release reliable information to intermediate users, end users and to other downstream services. In particular, validation activities aim to deliver accuracy information of the model products and to serve as a long term monitoring of the performance of the modelling systems. The quality assessment of model output is implemented using a multiple-stages approach, basically inspired to the classic "GODAE 4 Classes" metrics and criteria (consistency, quality, performance and benefit). Firstly, pre-operational runs qualify the operational model system against historical data, also providing a verification of the improvements of the new model system release with respect to the previous version. Then, the near real time (NRT) validation aims at delivering a sustained on-line skill assessment of the model analysis and forecast, relying on the NRT available relevant observations (e.g. in situ, Bio Argo and satellite observations). NRT validation results are operated on weekly basis and published on the MEDEAF web portal (www.medeaf.inogs.it). On a quarterly basis, the integration of the NRT validation activities delivers a comprehensive view of the accuracy of model forecast through the official CMEMS validation webpage. Multi-Year production (e.g. reanalysis runs) follows a similar procedure, and the

  12. Continuous power generation and microbial community structure of the anode biofilms in a three-stage microbial fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyungmi; Okabe, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Urban and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    A mediator-less three-stage two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) system was developed and operated continuously for more than 1.5 years to evaluate continuous power generation while treating artificial wastewater containing glucose (10 mM) concurrently. A stable power density of 28 W/m3 was attained with an anode hydraulic retention time of 4.5 h and phosphate buffer as the cathode electrolyte. An overall dissolved organic carbon removal ratio was about 85%, and coulombic efficiency was about 46% in this MFC system. We also analyzed the microbial community structure of anode biofilms in each MFC. Since the environment in each MFC was different due to passing on the products to the next MFC in series, the microbial community structure was different accordingly. The anode biofilm in the first MFC consisted mainly of bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, identified as Aeromonas sp., while the Firmicutes dominated the anode biofilms in the second and third MFCs that were mainly fed with acetate. Cyclic voltammetric results supported the presence of a redox compound(s) associated with the anode biofilm matrix, rather than mobile (dissolved) forms, which could be responsible for the electron transfer to the anode. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the anode biofilms were comprised of morphologically different cells that were firmly attached on the anode surface and interconnected each other with anchor-like filamentous appendages, which might support the results of cyclic voltammetry. (orig.)

  13. Operational skill assessment of the IBI-MFC Ocean Forecasting System within the frame of the CMEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente Jimenez, Pablo; Garcia-Sotillo, Marcos; Amo-Balandron, Arancha; Aznar Lecocq, Roland; Perez Gomez, Begoña; Levier, Bruno; Alvarez-Fanjul, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Since operational ocean forecasting systems (OOFSs) are increasingly used as tools to support high-stakes decision-making for coastal management, a rigorous skill assessment of model performance becomes essential. In this context, the IBI-MFC (Iberia-Biscay-Ireland Monitoring & Forecasting Centre) has been providing daily ocean model estimates and forecasts for the IBI regional seas since 2011, first in the frame of MyOcean projects and later as part of the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS). A comprehensive web validation tool named NARVAL (North Atlantic Regional VALidation) has been developed to routinely monitor IBI performance and to evaluate model's veracity and prognostic capabilities. Three-dimensional comparisons are carried out on a different time basis ('online mode' - daily verifications - and 'delayed mode' - for longer time periods -) using a broad variety of in-situ (buoys, tide-gauges, ARGO-floats, drifters and gliders) and remote-sensing (satellite and HF radars) observational sources as reference fields to validate against the NEMO model solution. Product quality indicators and meaningful skill metrics are automatically computed not only averaged over the entire IBI domain but also over specific sub-regions of particular interest from a user perspective (i.e. coastal or shelf areas) in order to determine IBI spatial and temporal uncertainty levels. A complementary aspect of NARVAL web tool is the intercomparison of different CMEMS forecast model solutions in overlapping areas. Noticeable efforts are in progress in order to quantitatively assess the quality and consistency of nested system outputs by setting up specific intercomparison exercises on different temporal and spatial scales, encompassing global configurations (CMEMS Global system), regional applications (NWS and MED ones) and local high-resolution coastal models (i.e. the PdE SAMPA system in the Gibraltar Strait). NARVAL constitutes a powerful approach to increase

  14. 33 CFR 183.570 - Fuel filters and strainers: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements... the engine or boat structure independent from its fuel line connections, unless the fuel filter or...

  15. Microbial fuel cell based on electroactive sulfate-reducing biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, Anatoliy; Bratkova, Svetlana; Loukanov, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Regulation and management of electricity generation by variation of residence time. ► Design of microbial fuel cell based on electroactive biofilm on zeolite. ► Engineering solution for removing of the obtained elemental sulfur. - abstract: A two chambered laboratory scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been developed, based on natural sulfate-reducing bacterium consortium in electroactive biofilm on zeolite. The MFC utilizes potassium ferricyanide in the cathode chamber as an electron acceptor that derives electrons from the obtained in anode chamber H 2 S. The molecular oxygen is finally used as a terminal electron acceptor at cathode compartment. The generated power density was 0.68 W m −2 with current density of 3.2 A m −2 at 150 Ω electrode resistivity. The hydrogen sulfide itself is produced by microbial dissimilative sulfate reduction process by utilizing various organic substrates. Finally, elemental sulfur was identified as the predominant final oxidation product in the anode chamber. It was removed from MFC through medium circulation and gathering in an external tank. This report reveals dependence relationship between the progress of general electrochemical parameters and bacterial sulfate-reduction rate. The presented MFC design can be used for simultaneous sulfate purification of mining drainage wastewater and generation of renewable electricity

  16. Manufacture of disposal canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolvi, L.

    2009-12-01

    The report summarizes the development work carried out in the manufacturing of disposal canister components, and present status, in readiness for manufacturing, of the components for use in assembly of spent nuclear fuel disposal canister. The disposal canister consist of two major components: the nodular graphite cast iron insert and overpack of oxygen-free copper. The manufacturing process for copper components begins with a cylindrical cast copper billet. Three different manufacturing processes i.e. pierce and draw, extrusion and forging are being developed, which produce a seamless copper tube or a tube with an integrated bottom. The pierce and draw process, Posiva's reference method, makes an integrated bottom possible and only the lid requires welding. Inserts for BWR-element are cast with 12 square channels and inserts for VVER 440-element with 12 round channels. Inserts for EPR-elements have four square channels. Casting of BWR insert type has been studied so far. Experience of casting inserts for PWR, which is similar to the EPR-type, has been got in co-operation with SKB. The report describes the processes being developed for manufacture of disposal canister components and some results of the manufacturing experiments are presented. Quality assurance and quality control in manufacture of canister component is described. (orig.)

  17. Precision manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Today there is a high demand for high-precision products. The manufacturing processes are now highly sophisticated and derive from a specialized genre called precision engineering. Precision Manufacturing provides an introduction to precision engineering and manufacturing with an emphasis on the design and performance of precision machines and machine tools, metrology, tooling elements, machine structures, sources of error, precision machining processes and precision process planning. As well as discussing the critical role precision machine design for manufacturing has had in technological developments over the last few hundred years. In addition, the influence of sustainable manufacturing requirements in precision processes is introduced. Drawing upon years of practical experience and using numerous examples and illustrative applications, David Dornfeld and Dae-Eun Lee cover precision manufacturing as it applies to: The importance of measurement and metrology in the context of Precision Manufacturing. Th...

  18. CANDU fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanoff, N.V.; Bazeley, E.G.; Hastings, I.J.

    1982-01-01

    CANDU fuel has operated successfully in Ontario Hydro's power reactors since 1962. In the 19 years of experience, about 99.9% of all fuel bundles have performed as designed. Most defects occurred before 1979 and subsequent changes in fuel design, fuel management, reactor control, and manufacturing quality control have reduced the current defect rate to near zero. Loss of power production due to defective fuel has been negligible. The outstanding performance continues while maintaining a low unit energy cost for fuel

  19. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell/Supercapasitor Hybrid Power Management System for a Golf Cart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Afiqah Abd Hamid; Ros Emilia Rosli; Edy Herianto Majlan; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Ramizi Mohamed; Ramli Sitanggang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presented the transformation of a golf cart system powered lead acid battery into an environmental friendly hybrid vehicle. The design developed by using an advantage contributes by the uprising alternative power source candidate which is Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) and the maintenance free energy storage device, a supercapacitor (SC). The fuel cell (FC) stack was an in house manufactured with 450 W (36 V, 12.5 A) power, while the SC was from Maxwell Technologies (48 V, 165 F). This two power sources were controlled by the mechanical relay, meanwhile the reactant (hydrogen) are control by mass flow controller (MFC) both signaled by a National Instrument (NI) devices. The power management controller are programmed in the LabVIEW environment and then downloaded to the NI devices. The experimental result of the power trend was compared before and after the transformation with the same route to validate the effectiveness of the proposed power management strategy. The power management successfully controls the power sharing between power sources and satisfies the load transient. While the reactant control managed to vary the hydrogen mass flow rate feed according to the load demand in vehicular applications. (author)

  20. Self-potential and Complex Conductivity Monitoring of In Situ Hydrocarbon Remediation in Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Revil, A.; Ren, Z.; Karaoulis, M.; Mendonca, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater in both non-aqueous phase liquid and dissolved forms generated from spills and leaks is a wide spread environmental issue. Traditional cleanup of hydrocarbon contamination in soils and ground water using physical, chemical, and biological remedial techniques is often expensive and ineffective. Recent studies show that the microbial fuel cell (MFC) can simultaneously enhance biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil and groundwater and yield electricity. Non-invasive geophysical techniques such as self-potential (SP) and complex conductivity (induced polarization) have shown the potential to detect and characterize the nature of electron transport mechanism of in situ bioremediation of organic contamination plumes. In this study, we deployed both SP and complex conductivity in lab scale MFCs to monitor time-laps geophysical response of degradation of hydrocarbons by MFC. Two different sizes of MFC reactors were used in this study (DI=15 cm cylinder reactor and 94.5cm x 43.5 cm rectangle reactor), and the initial hydrocarbon concentration is 15 g diesel/kg soil. SP and complex conductivity measurements were measured using non-polarizing Ag/AgCl electrodes. Sensitivity study was also performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to test different electrode configurations. The SP measurements showed stronger anomalies adjacent to the MFC than locations afar, and both real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity are greater in areas close to MFC than areas further away and control samples without MFC. The joint use of SP and complex conductivity could in situ evaluate the dynamic changes of electrochemical parameters during this bioremediation process at spatiotemporal scales unachievable with traditional sampling methods. The joint inversion of these two methods to evaluate the efficiency of MFC enhanced hydrocarbon remediation in the subsurface.

  1. Improved performance of microbial fuel cells enriched with natural microbial inocula and treated by electrical current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are increasingly attracting attention as a sustainable technology as they convert chemical energy in organic wastes to electricity. In this study, the effects of different inoculum sources (river sediment, activated sludge and anaerobic sludge) and electrical current stimulation were evaluated using single-chamber air-cathode MFCs as model reactors based on performance in enrichment process and electrochemical characteristics of the reactors. The result revealed the rapid anodic biofilm development and substrate utilization of the anaerobic sludge-inoculated MFC. It was also found that the river sediment-inoculated MFC achieved the highest power output of 195 μW, or 98 mW m −2 , due to better developed anodic biofilm confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The current stimulation enhanced the anodic biofilm attachment over time, and therefore reduced the MFC internal resistance by 27%, increased the electrical capacitance by four folds, and improved the anodic biofilm resilience against substrate deprivation. For mature MFCs, a transient application of a negative voltage (−3 V) improved the cathode activity and maximum power output by 37%. This improvement was due to the bactericidal effect of the electrode potential higher than +1.5 V vs. SHE, demonstrating a substantial benefit of treating MFC cathode after long-term operation using suitable direct electrical current. -- Highlights: •Voltage stimulation (+2 V) during inoculation reduced MFC internal resistance and improved biofilm resilience. •Voltage stimulation increased biofilm electrical capacitance by 5-fold. •Negative voltage stimulation (−3 V) enhanced the maximum power output by 37%. •River sediment MFC obtained higher power due to better anodic biofilm coverage. •Anaerobic sludge quickly developed anodic biofilm for MFC and quickly utilized volatile fatty acids

  2. 49 CFR 529.6 - Requirements for final-stage manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... paragraph (a)(1) of this section, that manufacturer shall prepare a new fuel economy label for that... manufacturer shall attach the fuel economy label furnished by the incomplete automobile manufacturer under § 529.4(c)(2) or by the last intermediate manufacturer under § 529.5(d)(2) or the fuel economy label...

  3. Global emissions of the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) HFC-365mfc, HFC-245fa, HFC-227ea, and HFC-236fa based on atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M. K.; Miller, B. R.; Rigby, M. L.; Reimann, S.; Muhle, J.; Agage, Soge, Snu Members, Kopri Members

    2010-12-01

    We report on the atmospheric measurements and global emissions of the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) HFC-365mfc (CH3CH2CF2CF3, 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane), HFC-245fa (CHF2CH2CF3, 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane), HFC-227ea (CF3CHFCF3, 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane), and HFC-236fa (CF3CH2CF3, 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane). These measurements are from in-situ observations at stations of AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) and SOGE (System for Observations of Halogenated Greenhouse Gases in Europe), and from the Korean station Gosan. We also report on flask sample measurements from the Antarctic stations King Sejong and Troll, and extend our records back to the 1970s using archived air samples of both hemispheres. All data are used in a global 12-box 2-dimensional atmospheric transport model to derive global abundances and emission estimates. All four HFCs have strongly increased in the atmosphere in recent years with growth rates at nearly 10 %, resulting in dry air mole fractions at the end of 2009 of 0.49 ppt for HFC-365mfc, 1.00 ppt for HFC-245fa, and 0.51 ppt for HFC-227ea. HFC-236fa, for which we report the first atmospheric measurements, is less abundant and has grown to 0.069 ppt at the end of 2009. Our model results show rapidly growing emissions of HFC-365mfc and HFC-245fa after 2002 but surprisingly these have now started to decline to globally 2.7 kt/yr (HFC-365mfc) and 6.1 kt/yr (HFC-245fa). On the other hand HFC-227ea and HFC-236fa show uninterrupted growth in their emissions of 2.5 kt/yr and 0.2 kt/yr at the end of 2009.

  4. Increased power generation from primary sludge by a submersible microbial fuel cell and optimum operational conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vologni, Valentina; Kakarla, Ramesh; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have received attention as a promising renewable energy technology for waste treatment and energy recovery. We tested a submersible MFC with an innovative design capable of generating a stable voltage of 0.250 ± 0.008 V (with a fixed 470 Ω resistor) directly from prima...... prolonged the current generation and increased the power density by 7 and 1.5 times, respectively, in comparison with raw primary sludge. These findings suggest that energy recovery from primary sludge can be maximized using an advanced MFC system with optimum conditions....

  5. Additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumith, A; Thomas, M; Shah, Z; Coathup, M; Blunn, G

    2018-04-01

    Increasing innovation in rapid prototyping (RP) and additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is bringing about major changes in translational surgical research. This review describes the current position in the use of additive manufacturing in orthopaedic surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:455-60.

  6. Manufacturing technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  7. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey-Horng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of the microbial fuel cell (MFC-based biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. The MFC voltage decreased as the Cr(VI concentration in the MFC increased. Two satisfactory linear relationships were observed between the Cr(VI concentration and voltage output for various Cr(VI concentration ranges (0.0125–0.3 mg/L and 0.3–5 mg/L. The MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI concentrations in drinking water, groundwater, and electroplating wastewater in 45 min with low deviations (<10%. The use of the biosensor can help in preventing the violation of effluent regulations and the maximum allowable concentration of Cr(VI in water. Thus, the developed MFC biosensor has potential as an early warning detection device for Cr(VI determination even if O. anthropi YC152 is a possible opportunistic pathogen.

  8. Microbial fuel cells for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbella, Clara; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Clogging in HSSF CW may result in a reduction of system's life-span or treatment efficiency. Current available techniques to assess the degree of clogging in HSSF CW are time consuming and cannot be applied on a continuous basis. Main objective of this work was to assess the potential applicability of microbial fuel cells for continuous clogging assessment in HSSF CW. To this aim, two replicates of a membrane-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) were built up and operated under laboratory conditions for five weeks. The MFC anode was gravel-based to simulate the filter media of HSSF CW. MFC were weekly loaded with sludge that had been accumulating for several years in a pilot HSSF CW treating domestic wastewater. Sludge loading ranged from ca. 20 kg TS·m"− "3 CW·year"− "1 at the beginning of the study period up to ca. 250 kg TS·m"− "3 CW·year"− "1 at the end of the study period. Sludge loading applied resulted in sludge accumulated within the MFC equivalent to a clogging degree ranging from 0.2 years (ca. 0.5 kg TS·m"–"3CW) to ca. 5 years (ca. 10 kg TS·m"–"3CW). Results showed that the electric charge was negatively correlated to the amount of sludge accumulated (degree of clogging). Electron transference (expressed as electric charge) almost ceased when accumulated sludge within the MFC was equivalent to ca. 5 years of clogging (ca. 10 kg TS·m"–"3CW). This result suggests that, although longer study periods under more realistic conditions shall be further performed, HSSF CW operated as a MFC has great potential for clogging assessment. - Highlights: • Microbial fuel cells are used as tool for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands. • Microbial fuel cells were loaded with sludge from constructed wetlands. • Sludge retained within the systems simulated a clogging time ranging from 0.2 to ca. 5 years. • Electrons transferred decreased potentially as function of sludge loading. • Microbial fuel cells have potential for clogging assessment

  9. Microbial fuel cells for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbella, Clara; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume, E-mail: jaume.puigagut@upc.edu

    2016-11-01

    Clogging in HSSF CW may result in a reduction of system's life-span or treatment efficiency. Current available techniques to assess the degree of clogging in HSSF CW are time consuming and cannot be applied on a continuous basis. Main objective of this work was to assess the potential applicability of microbial fuel cells for continuous clogging assessment in HSSF CW. To this aim, two replicates of a membrane-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) were built up and operated under laboratory conditions for five weeks. The MFC anode was gravel-based to simulate the filter media of HSSF CW. MFC were weekly loaded with sludge that had been accumulating for several years in a pilot HSSF CW treating domestic wastewater. Sludge loading ranged from ca. 20 kg TS·m{sup −} {sup 3} CW·year{sup −} {sup 1} at the beginning of the study period up to ca. 250 kg TS·m{sup −} {sup 3} CW·year{sup −} {sup 1} at the end of the study period. Sludge loading applied resulted in sludge accumulated within the MFC equivalent to a clogging degree ranging from 0.2 years (ca. 0.5 kg TS·m{sup –3}CW) to ca. 5 years (ca. 10 kg TS·m{sup –3}CW). Results showed that the electric charge was negatively correlated to the amount of sludge accumulated (degree of clogging). Electron transference (expressed as electric charge) almost ceased when accumulated sludge within the MFC was equivalent to ca. 5 years of clogging (ca. 10 kg TS·m{sup –3}CW). This result suggests that, although longer study periods under more realistic conditions shall be further performed, HSSF CW operated as a MFC has great potential for clogging assessment. - Highlights: • Microbial fuel cells are used as tool for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands. • Microbial fuel cells were loaded with sludge from constructed wetlands. • Sludge retained within the systems simulated a clogging time ranging from 0.2 to ca. 5 years. • Electrons transferred decreased potentially as function of sludge loading.

  10. Research on treatment of wastewater containing heavy metal by microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zixuan; Lu, Xun; Yin, Ruixia; Luo, Yunyi; Mai, Hanjian; Zhang, Nan; Xiong, Jingfang; Zhang, Hongguo; Tang, Jinfeng; Luo, Dinggui

    2018-02-01

    With rapid development of social economy, serious problem has been caused by wastewater containing heavy metals, which was difficult to be treated by many kinds of traditional treatment methods, such as complex processes, high cost or easy to cause secondary pollution. As a novel biological treatment technology, microbial fuel cells (MFC) can generate electric energy while dealing with wastewater, which was proposed and extensively studied. This paper introduced the working principle of MFC, the classification of cathode, and the research progress on the treatment of wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cu(II), Ag(I), Mn(II) and Cd(II) by MFC. The study found that different cathode, different heavy metals anddifferent hybrid systems would affect the performance of the system and removal effect for heavy metal in MFC. MFC was a highly potential pollution control technology. Until now, the research was still in the laboratory stage. Its industrial application for recovery of heavy metal ion, improving the energy recovery rate and improvement or innovation of system were worthy of further research.

  11. Selection of electrogenic bacteria for microbial fuel cell in removing Victoria blue R from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Tsai, Teh-Hua; Wu, Pei-Ssu; Tsao, Shuo-En; Huang, Yu-Shan; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2018-01-28

    This study was conducted to select electrogenic bacteria from wastewater sludge. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in the microbial fuel cell (MFC) during the decomposition process of organic pollutants. Five culturable bacteria strains - namely, Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium sp., Aeromonas hydrophila, Citrobacter freundii, and Stenotrophomonas sp. - have a double potential in dye removal and electricity generation. We inoculated the mixed electrogenic bacteria at a specific ratio and treated them with a triphenylmethane dye, Victoria blue R (VBR), to evaluate their electricity generation ability for the artificial and real wastewater. The results of the VBR shock-loading experiment indicated that the inoculated MFC could adapt to shock loading in 1-2 days and exhibited high removal efficiency (95-100%) for 100-800 mg L -1 VBR with a power density of 8.62 ± 0.10 to 34.81 ± 0.25 mW m -2 . The selected electrogenic bacteria in the MFC could use VBR as only electron donor for power generation. The matrix effects of the real wastewater on VBR removal and electricity generation of MFC were insignificant. VBR degradation by the electrogenic bacteria involves a stepwise demethylation process to yield partially dealkylated VBR species. In addition, these results demonstrate the feasibility of inoculating culturable bacteria strains to develop an efficient MFC for purifying wastewater.

  12. Microbial Fuels Cell-Based Biosensor for Toxicity Detection: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoyu Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the unprecedented deterioration of environmental quality, rapid recognition of toxic compounds is paramount for performing in situ real-time monitoring. Although several analytical techniques based on electrochemistry or biosensors have been developed for the detection of toxic compounds, most of them are time-consuming, inaccurate, or cumbersome for practical applications. More recently, microbial fuel cell (MFC-based biosensors have drawn increasing interest due to their sustainability and cost-effectiveness, with applications ranging from the monitoring of anaerobic digestion process parameters (VFA to water quality detection (e.g., COD, BOD. When a MFC runs under correct conditions, the voltage generated is correlated with the amount of a given substrate. Based on this linear relationship, several studies have demonstrated that MFC-based biosensors could detect heavy metals such as copper, chromium, or zinc, as well as organic compounds, including p-nitrophenol (PNP, formaldehyde and levofloxacin. Both bacterial consortia and single strains can be used to develop MFC-based biosensors. Biosensors with single strains show several advantages over systems integrating bacterial consortia, such as selectivity and stability. One of the limitations of such sensors is that the detection range usually exceeds the actual pollution level. Therefore, improving their sensitivity is the most important for widespread application. Nonetheless, MFC-based biosensors represent a promising approach towards single pollutant detection.

  13. Acid Water Neutralization Using Microbial Fuel Cells: An Alternative for Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Leiva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is a complex environmental problem, which has adverse effects on surface and ground waters due to low pH, high toxic metals, and dissolved salts. New bioremediation approach based on microbial fuel cells (MFC can be a novel and sustainable alternative for AMD treatment. We studied the potential of MFC for acidic synthetic water treatment through pH neutralization in batch-mode and continuous-flow operation. We observed a marked pH increase, from ~3.7 to ~7.9 under batch conditions and to ~5.8 under continuous-flow operation. Likewise, batch reactors (non-MFC inoculated with different MFC-enriched biofilms showed a very similar pH increase, suggesting that the neutralization observed for batch operation was due to a synergistic influence of these communities. These preliminary results support the idea of using MFC technologies for AMD remediation, which could help to reduce costs associated with conventional technologies. Advances in this configuration could even be extrapolated to the recovery of heavy metals by precipitation or adsorption processes due to the acid neutralization.

  14. Feasibility investigations on a novel micro-manufacturing process for fabrication of fuel cell bipolar plates: Internal pressure-assisted embossing of micro-channels with in-die mechanical bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Muammer [NSF I/UCR Center for Precision Forming (CPF), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), Richmond, VA (United States); Mahabunphachai, Sasawat [NSF I/UCR Center for Precision Forming (CPF), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), Richmond, VA (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2007-10-25

    In this paper, we present the results of our studies on conceptual design and feasibility experiments towards development of a novel hybrid manufacturing process to fabricate fuel cell bipolar plates that consists of multi-array micro-channels on a large surface area. The premises of this hybrid micro-manufacturing process stem from the use of an internal pressure-assisted embossing process (cold or warm) combined with mechanical bonding of double bipolar plates in a single-die and single-step operation. Such combined use of hydraulic and mechanical forming forces and in-process bonding will (a) enable integrated forming of micro-channels on both surfaces (as anode and cathode flow fields) and at the middle (as cooling channels), (b) reduce the process steps, (c) reduce variation in dimensional tolerances and surface finish, (d) increase the product quality, (e) increase the performance of fuel cell by optimizing flow-field designs and ensuring consistent contact resistance, and (f) reduce the overall stack cost. This paper explains two experimental investigations that were performed to characterize and evaluate the feasibility of the conceptualized manufacturing process. The first investigation involved hydroforming of micro-channels using thin sheet metals of SS304 with a thickness of 51 {mu}m. The width of the channels ranged from 0.46 to 1.33 mm and the height range was between 0.15 and 0.98 mm. Our feasibility experiments resulted in that different aspect ratios of micro-channels could be fabricated using internal pressure in a controllable manner although there is a limit to very sharp channel shapes (i.e., high aspect ratios with narrow channels). The second investigation was on the feasibility of mechanical bonding of thin sheet metal blanks. The effects of different process and material variables on the bond quality were studied. Successful bonding of various metal blanks (Ni201, Al3003, and SS304) was obtained. The experimental results from both

  15. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE ELECTRIC CURRENT GENERATION IN A MICROBIAL FUEL CELL INOCULATED WITH MARINE SEDIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Teleken

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFC are electrochemical devices that utilize the ability of some microorganisms to oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons resulting from their metabolism to an insoluble acceptor. The goal of the present study was to model the kinetics of electrical current generation from an MFC inoculated with marine sediment. For this purpose, a differential equation system was used, including the Nernst-Monod relationship and Ohm's Law, to describe the microbial metabolism and the mechanism of extracellular electron transfer (EET, respectively. The experimental data obtained by cyclic voltammetry analysis were properly described by the model. It was concluded that marine microorganisms preferably use a direct mechanism of EET by means of nanowires to establish the electrochemical contact with the anode. The mathematical modeling could help understand MFC operation and, consequently, contribute to improving power generation from this source.

  16. Understanding energy loss in parallelly connected microbial fuel cells: Non-Faradaic current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Junyeong; Sim, Junyoung; Feng, Yujie; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the mechanisms of energy loss in parallel connection of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is explored using two MFC units producing different open circuit voltage (OCV) and current. In open circuit mode, non-Faradaic current flows in low OCV unit, implying energy loss caused by different OCVs in parallelly stacked MFCs. In a stacked MFC in parallel under close circuit mode, it is confirmed that energy loss occurs until the working voltage in high OCV unit becomes identical to the other unit having low OCV. This result indicates that different voltage between individual MFC units can cause energy loss due to both non-Faradic and Faradaic current that flow from high voltage unit to low voltage unit even in parallelly stacked MFCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

    2010-02-01

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

  18. Microbially-reduced graphene scaffolds to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Shungui; Zhao, Bo; Zhuang, Li; Wang, Yueqiang

    2012-07-01

    A one-pot method is exploited by adding graphene oxide (GO) and acetate into an microbial fuel cell (MFC) in which GO is microbially reduced, leading to in situ construction of a bacteria/graphene network in the anode. The obtained microbially reduced graphene (MRG) exhibits comparable conductivity and physical characteristics to the chemically reduced graphene. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the number of exoelectrogens involved in extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the solid electrode, increases due to the presence of graphene scaffolds, and the EET is facilitated in terms of electron transfer kinetics. As a result, the maximum power density of the MFC is enhanced by 32% (from 1440 to 1905 mW m(-2)) and the coulombic efficiency is improved by 80% (from 30 to 54%). The results demonstrate that the construction of the bacteria/graphene network is an effective alternative to improve the MFC performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lagooning microbial fuel cells: A first approach by coupling electricity-producing microorganisms and algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato, Justo; González del Campo, Araceli; Fernández, Francisco J.; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • An algae cathode of a MFC has been used without artificial mediators or catalysts. • To perform a lagooning wastewater treatment coupled with energy-producing MFC. • The producing electricity operates under day/night irradiation cycles, is shown. - Abstract: The paper focused on the start-up and performance characterisation of a new type of microbial fuel cell (MFC), in which an algae culture was seeded in the cathodic chamber to produce the oxygen required to complete the electrochemical reactions of the MFC, thus circumventing the need for a mechanical aerator. The system did not use mediators or high cost catalysts and it can be started-up easily using a straightforward three-stage procedure. The start-up consists of the separate production of the electricity-producing microorganisms and the algae cultures (stage I), replacement of the mechanical aeration system by the algae culture (stage II) and a change in the light dosage from a continuous input to a dynamic day/night profile. The MFC was operated under a regime of 12 h light and 12 h dark and was also operated in batch and continuous substrate-feeding modes. The same cell voltage was achieved when the cathode compartment was operated with air supplied by aerators, which means that this configuration can perform as well as the traditional one. The results also show the influence of both the organic load and light irradiation on electricity production and demonstrate that this type MFC is a robust and promising technology that can be considered as a first approach to perform a lagooning wastewater treatment with microbial fuel cells

  20. Micro Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing deals with systems that include products, processes, materials and production systems. These systems have functional requirements, constraints, design parameters and process variables. They must be decomposed in a systematic manner to achieve the best possible system performance....... If a micro manufacturing system isn’t designed rationally and correctly, it will be high-cost, unreliable, and not robust. For micro products and systems it is a continuously increasing challenge to create the operational basis for an industrial production. As the products through product development...... processes are made applicable to a large number of customers, the pressure in regard to developing production technologies that make it possible to produce the products at a reasonable price and in large numbers is growing. The micro/nano manufacturing programme at the Department of Manufacturing...

  1. Smart Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jim; Edgar, Thomas; Graybill, Robert; Korambath, Prakashan; Schott, Brian; Swink, Denise; Wang, Jianwu; Wetzel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Historic manufacturing enterprises based on vertically optimized companies, practices, market share, and competitiveness are giving way to enterprises that are responsive across an entire value chain to demand dynamic markets and customized product value adds; increased expectations for environmental sustainability, reduced energy usage, and zero incidents; and faster technology and product adoption. Agile innovation and manufacturing combined with radically increased productivity become engines for competitiveness and reinvestment, not simply for decreased cost. A focus on agility, productivity, energy, and environmental sustainability produces opportunities that are far beyond reducing market volatility. Agility directly impacts innovation, time-to-market, and faster, broader exploration of the trade space. These changes, the forces driving them, and new network-based information technologies offering unprecedented insights and analysis are motivating the advent of smart manufacturing and new information technology infrastructure for manufacturing.

  2. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinauk, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1985, Fragema has been marketing and selling the Advanced Fuel Assemby AFA whose main features are its zircaloy grids and removable top and bottom nozzles. It is this product, which exists for several different fuel assembly arrays and heights, that will be employed in the reactors at Daya Bay. Fragema employs gadolinium as the consumable poison to enable highperformance fuel management. More recently, the company has supplied fuel assemblies of the mixed-oxide(MOX) and enriched reprocessed uranium type. The reliability level of the fuel sold by Fragema is one of the highest in the world, thanks in particular to the excellence of the quality assurance and quality control programs that have been implemented at all stages of its design and manufacture

  3. LEU fuel fabrication in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorsetti, D.R.; Gomez, J.O.; Marajofsky, A.; Kohut, C.

    1985-01-01

    As an Institution, aiming to meet with its own needs, CNEA has been intensively developing reduced enriched fuel to use in its own research and test reactors. Development of the fabrication technology as well as the design, installation and operation of the manufacturing plant, have been carried out with its own funds. Irradiation and post-irradiation of test miniplates have been taking place within the framework of the RERTR program. During the last years, CNEA has developed three LEU fuel types. In the previous RERTR meetings, we presented the technological results obtained with these fuel types. This paper focuses on CNEA LEU fuel element manufacturing status and the trained personnel we can offer in design and manufacture fuel capability. CNEA has its own fuel manufacturing technology; the necessary facilities to start the fuel fabrication; qualified technicians and professionals for: fuel design and behaviour analysis; fuel manufacturing and QA; international recognition of its fuel development and manufacturing capability through its ORR miniplate irradiation; its own natural uranium and the future possibility to enrich up to 20% U 235 ; the probability to offer a competitive fuel manufacturing cost in the international market; the disposition to cooperate with all countries that wish to take part and aim to reach an self-sufficiency in their own fuel supply needs

  4. Electricity production from microbial fuel cell by using yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorasingha, A.; Souvakon, C.; Boonchom, K.

    2006-01-01

    The continuous search for methods to generate electricity from renewable sources such as water, solar energy, wind, nuclear or chemicals was discussed with particular focus on attaining the full power of the microbial fuel cell (MFC). Under ideal environmental conditions, the only byproducts of a biofuel cell would be water and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The production of energy from renewables such as biomass is important for sustainable development and reducing global emissions of CO 2 . Hydrogen can also be an important component of an energy infrastructure that reduces CO 2 emissions if the hydrogen is produced from renewable sources and used in fuel cells. Hydrogen gas can be biologically produced at high concentration from the fermentation of high sugar substrates such as glucose and sucrose. Some of the issues of MFC design were addressed, including the use of cheap substrates to derive microbial electricity. In the MFC, yeast donates electrons to a chemical electron mediator, which in turn transfers the electrons to an electrode, producing electricity. Experimental results showed that glucose yielded the highest peak voltage, but a semi-processed sugar and molasses were similar to glucose in the electricity production pattern. It was noted that this technology is only at the research stages, and more research is needed before household microbial fuel cells can be made available for producing power for prolonged periods of time. Future research efforts will focus on increasing the efficiency, finding alternatives to hazardous electron mediators and finding new microbes. 12 refs., 6 figs

  5. 33 CFR 183.510 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.510 Fuel tanks. (a) Each fuel tank in a boat must have been tested by its manufacturer under § 183.580 and not leak when...

  6. Microbial electro-catalysis in fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, Claire

    2007-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are devices that ensure the direct conversion of organic matter into electricity using bacterial bio-films as the catalysts of the electrochemical reactions. This study aims at improving the comprehension of the mechanisms involved in electron transfer pathways between the adhered bacteria and the electrodes. This optimization of the MFC power output could be done, for example, in exploring and characterizing various electrode materials. The electrolysis experiments carried out on Geobacter sulfurreducens deal with the microbial catalysis of the acetate oxidation, on the one hand, and the catalysis of the fumarate reduction on the other hand. On the anodic side, differences in current densities appeared on graphite, DSA R and stainless steel (8 A/m 2 , 5 A/m 2 and 0.7 A/m 2 respectively). These variations were explained more by materials roughness differences rather than their nature. Impedance spectroscopy study shows that the electro-active bio-film developed on stainless steel does not seem to modify the evolution of the stainless steel oxide layer, only the imposed potential remains determining. On the cathodic side, stainless steel sustained current densities more than twenty times higher than those obtained with graphite electrodes. The adhesion study of G. sulfurreducens on various materials in a flow cell, suggests that the bio-films resist to the hydrodynamic constraints and are not detached under a shear stress threshold value. The installation of two MFC prototypes, one in a sea station and the other directly in Genoa harbour (Italy) confirms some results obtained in laboratory and were promising for a MFC scale-up. (author) [fr

  7. Atmospheric histories and global emissions of the anthropogenic hydrofluorocarbons HFC-365mfc, HFC-245fa, HFC-227ea, and HFC-236fa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Martin K.; Miller, Benjamin R.; Rigby, Matthew; Reimann, Stefan; Mühle, Jens; Krummel, Paul B.; O'Doherty, Simon; Kim, Jooil; Rhee, Tae Siek; Weiss, Ray F.; Fraser, Paul J.; Simmonds, Peter G.; Salameh, Peter K.; Harth, Christina M.; Wang, Ray H. J.; Steele, L. Paul; Young, Dickon; Lunder, Chris R.; Hermansen, Ove; Ivy, Diane; Arnold, Tim; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Kim, Kyung-Ryul; Greally, Brian R.; Hill, Matthias; Leist, Michael; Wenger, Angelina; Prinn, Ronald G.

    2011-04-01

    We report on ground-based atmospheric measurements and emission estimates of the four anthropogenic hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) HFC-365mfc (CH3CF2CH2CF3, 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane), HFC-245fa (CHF2CH2CF3, 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane), HFC-227ea (CF3CHFCF3, 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane), and HFC-236fa (CF3CH2CF3, 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane). In situ measurements are from the global monitoring sites of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), the System for Observations of Halogenated Greenhouse Gases in Europe (SOGE), and Gosan (South Korea). We include the first halocarbon flask sample measurements from the Antarctic research stations King Sejong and Troll. We also present measurements of archived air samples from both hemispheres back to the 1970s. We use a two-dimensional atmospheric transport model to simulate global atmospheric abundances and to estimate global emissions. HFC-365mfc and HFC-245fa first appeared in the atmosphere only ˜1 decade ago; they have grown rapidly to globally averaged dry air mole fractions of 0.53 ppt (in parts per trillion, 10-12) and 1.1 ppt, respectively, by the end of 2010. In contrast, HFC-227ea first appeared in the global atmosphere in the 1980s and has since grown to ˜0.58 ppt. We report the first measurements of HFC-236fa in the atmosphere. This long-lived compound was present in the atmosphere at only 0.074 ppt in 2010. All four substances exhibit yearly growth rates of >8% yr-1 at the end of 2010. We find rapidly increasing emissions for the foam-blowing compounds HFC-365mfc and HFC-245fa starting in ˜2002. After peaking in 2006 (HFC-365mfc: 3.2 kt yr-1, HFC-245fa: 6.5 kt yr-1), emissions began to decline. Our results for these two compounds suggest that recent estimates from long-term projections (to the late 21st century) have strongly overestimated emissions for the early years of the projections (˜2005-2010). Global HFC-227ea and HFC-236fa emissions have grown to average values of 2.4 kt yr-1

  8. Treatment and electricity harvesting from sulfate/sulfide-containing wastewaters using microbial fuel cell with enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Lee, Chin-Yu; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We started up microbial fuel cell (MFC) using enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture. ► Sulfate-reducing bacteria and anode-respiring bacteria were enriched in anodic biofilms. ► The MFC effectively remove sulfate to elementary sulfur in the presence of lactate. ► The present device can treat sulfate laden wastewaters with electricity harvesting. - Abstract: Anaerobic treatment of sulfate-laden wastewaters can produce excess sulfide, which is corrosive to pipelines and is toxic to incorporated microorganisms. This work started up microbial fuel cell (MFC) using enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture as anodic biofilms and applied the so yielded MFC for treating sulfate or sulfide-laden wastewaters. The sulfate-reducing bacteria in anodic biofilm effectively reduced sulfate to sulfide, which was then used by neighboring anode respiring bacteria (ARB) as electron donor for electricity production. The presence of organic carbons enhanced MFC performance since the biofilm ARB were mixotrophs that need organic carbon to grow. The present device introduces a route for treating sulfate laden wastewaters with electricity harvesting.

  9. Treatment and electricity harvesting from sulfate/sulfide-containing wastewaters using microbial fuel cell with enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Duu-Jong, E-mail: cedean@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chin-Yu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Center for Bioscience and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We started up microbial fuel cell (MFC) using enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulfate-reducing bacteria and anode-respiring bacteria were enriched in anodic biofilms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MFC effectively remove sulfate to elementary sulfur in the presence of lactate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The present device can treat sulfate laden wastewaters with electricity harvesting. - Abstract: Anaerobic treatment of sulfate-laden wastewaters can produce excess sulfide, which is corrosive to pipelines and is toxic to incorporated microorganisms. This work started up microbial fuel cell (MFC) using enriched sulfate-reducing mixed culture as anodic biofilms and applied the so yielded MFC for treating sulfate or sulfide-laden wastewaters. The sulfate-reducing bacteria in anodic biofilm effectively reduced sulfate to sulfide, which was then used by neighboring anode respiring bacteria (ARB) as electron donor for electricity production. The presence of organic carbons enhanced MFC performance since the biofilm ARB were mixotrophs that need organic carbon to grow. The present device introduces a route for treating sulfate laden wastewaters with electricity harvesting.

  10. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis of Electrogenic Microbial Communities in Differentially Inoculated Swine Wastewater-Fed Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Khilyas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs are promising new technologies for efficient removal of organic compounds from industrial wastewaters, including that generated from swine farming. We inoculated two pairs of laboratory-scale MFCs with sludge granules from a beer wastewater-treating anaerobic digester (IGBS or from sludge taken from the bottom of a tank receiving swine wastewater (SS. The SS-inoculated MFC outperformed the IGBS-inoculated MFC with regard to COD and VFA removal and electricity production. Using a metagenomic approach, we describe the microbial diversity of the MFC planktonic and anodic communities derived from the different inocula. Proteobacteria (mostly Deltaproteobacteria became the predominant phylum in both MFC anodic communities with amplification of the electrogenic genus Geobacter being the most pronounced. Eight dominant and three minor species of Geobacter were found in both MFC anodic communities. The anodic communities of the SS-inoculated MFCs had a higher proportion of Clostridium and Bacteroides relative to those of the IGBS-inoculated MFCs, which were enriched with Pelobacter. The archaeal populations of the SS- and IGBS-inoculated MFCs were dominated by Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, respectively. Our results show a long-term influence of inoculum type on the performance and microbial community composition of swine wastewater-treating MFCs.

  11. A novel microbial fuel cell sensor with a gas diffusion biocathode sensing element for water and air quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2018-07-01

    Toxicity monitoring is essential for the protection of public health and ecological safety. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) sensors demonstrated good potential in toxicity monitoring, but current MFC sensors can only be used for anaerobic water monitoring. In this study, a novel gas diffusion (GD)-biocathode sensing element was fabricated using a simple method. The GD-biocathode MFC sensor can directly be used for formaldehyde detection (from 0.0005% to 0.005%) in both aerobic and anaerobic water bodies. Electrochemical analysis indicated that the response by the sensor was caused by the toxic inhibition to the microbial activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This study for the first time demonstrated that the GD-biocathode MFC sensor has a detection limit of 20 ppm for formaldehyde and can be used to monitor air pollution. Selective sensitivity to formaldehyde was not achieved as the result of using a mixed-culture, which confirms that it can serve as a generic biosensor for monitoring gaseous pollutants. This study expands the realm of knowledge for MFC sensor applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Medium-chain-length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates-carbon nanotubes composite anode enhances the performance of microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindatu, Y; Annuar, M S M; Subramaniam, R; Gumel, A M

    2017-06-01

    Insufficient power generation from a microbial fuel cell (MFC) hampers its progress towards utility-scale development. Electrode modification with biopolymeric materials could potentially address this issue. In this study, medium-chain-length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA)/carbon nanotubes (C) composite (CPHA) was successfully applied to modify the surface of carbon cloth (CC) anode in MFC. Characterization of the functional groups on the anodic surface and its morphology was carried out. The CC-CPHA composite anode recorded maximum power density of 254 mW/m 2 , which was 15-53% higher than the MFC operated with CC-C (214 mW/m 2 ) and pristine CC (119 mW/m 2 ) as the anode in a double-chambered MFC operated with Escherichia coli as the biocatalyst. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry showed that power enhancement was attributed to better electron transfer capability by the bacteria for the MFC setup with CC-CPHA anode.

  13. Power recovery with multi-anode/cathode microbial fuel cells suitable for future large-scale applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Daqian; Li, Xiang; Raymond, Dustin; Mooradain, James; Li, Baikun [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Multi-anode/cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) incorporate multiple MFCs into a single unit, which maintain high power generation at a low cost and small space occupation for the scale-up MFC systems. The power production of multi-anode/cathode MFCs was similar to the total power production of multiple single-anode/cathode MFCs. The power density of a 4-anode/cathode MFC was 1184 mW/m{sup 3}, which was 3.2 times as that of a single-anode/cathode MFC (350 mW/m{sup 3}). The effect of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was studied as the preliminary factor affecting the MFC performance. The power density of MFCs increased with COD concentrations. Multi-anode/cathode MFCs exhibited higher power generation efficiencies than single-anode/cathode MFCs at high CODs. The power output of the 4-anode/cathode MFCs kept increasing from 200 mW/m{sup 3} to 1200 mW/m{sup 3} as COD increased from 500 mg/L to 3000 mg/L, while the single-anode/cathode MFC showed no increase in the power output at CODs above 1000 mg/L. In addition, the internal resistance (R{sub in}) exhibited strong dependence on COD and electrode distance. The R{sub in} decreased at high CODs and short electrode distances. The tests indicated that the multi-anode/cathode configuration efficiently enhanced the power generation. (author)

  14. Macroporous graphitic carbon foam decorated with polydopamine as a high-performance anode for microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongmei; Yang, Lu; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Xie, Qingji

    2017-09-01

    Herein, a macroporous graphitic carbon foam (MGCF) electrode decorated with polydopamine (PDA) is used as a high-performance anode for microbial fuel cell (MFC) applications. The MGCF is facilely prepared by pyrolysis of a powder mixture comprising maltose, nickel nitrate, and ammonia chloride, without using solid porous template. The MGCF is coated with PDA by self-polymerization of dopamine in a basic solution. The MGCF can provide a large surface area for bacterial attachment, and PDA coated on the MGCF electrode can further promote bacterial adhesion resulting from the improved hydrophility, so the MGCF-PDA electrode as an anode in a MFC can show ultrahigh bacterial loading capacity. Moreover, the electrochemical oxidation of flavins at the MGCF-PDA electrode is greatly accelerated, so the extracellular electron transfer mediated by flavins is improved. As a result, the MFC equipped with a MGCF-PDA anode can show a maximum power density of 1735 mW cm-2, which is 6.7 times that of a MFC equipped with a commercial carbon felt anode, indicating a promising anode for MFC applications.

  15. Polyelectrolyte microparticles for enhancing anode performance in an air–cathode μ-Liter microbial fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yan-Yu; Wang, Hsiang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Microparticles with high consistency and surface area per volume are fabricated. • P(DADMAC) microparticles facilitate microorganism accumulation and charge transfer. • Microbes in microparticles are capable of proliferation and electricity generation. • Microparticles increase limiting current/power output to more than 200% of biofilm. • Microparticles decrease the anode charge-transfer resistance to 44% of biofilm. - Abstract: Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is considered an environmentally friendly energy source because it generates electrical power by digesting organic substrates in the wastewater. However, it is still challenging for MFC to become an economically affordable and highly efficient energy source due to its relatively low power output and coulombic efficiency. The aim of this study is to increase the performance of anode by using polyelectrolyte microparticles to facilitate the accumulation of microorganisms and the collection of electrons. The polyelectrolyte microparticle is subjected to microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and continuous electricity generation in an air–cathode μ-Liter MFCMFC) to validate its biocompatibility, ability in retaining redox species, reduced electron transfer resistance, and sustained energy generation. During the 168-hour operation, microorganisms proliferate inside the microparticle and generate around 250% power output and 200% limiting current of those from microorganism biofilm. The polyelectrolyte microparticle also decreased charge-transfer resistance of anode electrode in air–cathode μMFC by 56% compared with biofilm.

  16. LEAN Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilberg, Arne

    . The mission with the strategy is to obtain competitive production in Denmark and in Western Europe based on the right combination of manufacturing principles, motivated and trained employees, level of automation, and cooperation with suppliers and customers worldwide. The strategy has resulted in technical...

  17. Novel manufacturing process for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) by defined layer structures; Neuartiges Herstellungsverfahren fuer Direkt-Methanol-Brennstoffzellen (DMFC) durch definierte Schichtstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Thomas

    2007-07-17

    A novel method to prepare membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) by a layer-upon-layer fabrication onto a porous substrate is presented. The novel preparation technique is based on a single method for the fabrication of the whole MEA, e.g. spraying one functional layer onto the other, and therefore simplifies its preparation considerably. It also permits new fuel cell designs with in-plane serial connection of single cells. The new concept offers high flexibility in the choice of cell geometry as well as superior control of the structural parameters. Layer thickness, composition, catalyst and ionomer loadings can easily be varied and adapted. Cells fabricated with the new concept are especially suited for low power micro fuel cells operated at ambient conditions. In this work, process parameters enabling such a layer-upon-layer MEA preparation have been developed. Advanced catalyst inks and electrolyte solutions were formulated as precursors for each functional layer. Nafion {sup registered} as well as polyaryl-based polymers were investigated for the fabrication of dense electrolyte layers. Catalyst layers were prepared from inks containing Pt and PtRu-black catalysts which were suspended in suitable solvents with diluted proton-conducting electrolytes. The critical parameters for the layer build-up were identified and optimized afterwards. Various candidate materials for the porous substrate were characterized and selected for further investigation. Experiments and calculation models led to a concept and an advanced design for a serially connected multi-cells unit on the substrate. The inplane conductivity of the electrodes turned out to be the critical parameter resulting in high ohmic losses especially when the electrodes were applied on non-conductive substrates. Various conductive coatings were tested to selectively increase the conductivity of non-conductive substrates, which are prerequisite for serial connection. Only

  18. A novel pilot-scale stacked microbial fuel cell for efficient electricity generation and wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shijia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Xuechen; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Xia

    2016-07-01

    A novel stacked microbial fuel cell (MFC) which had a total volume of 72 L with granular activated carbon (GAC) packed bed electrodes was constructed and verified to present remarkable power generation and COD removal performance due to its advantageous design of stack and electrode configuration. During the fed-batch operation period, a power density of 50.9 ± 1.7 W/m(3) and a COD removal efficiency of 97% were achieved within 48 h. Because of the differences among MFC modules in the stack, reversal current occurred in parallel circuit connection with high external resistances (>100 Ω). This reversal current consequently reduced the electrochemical performance of some MFC modules and led to a lower power density in parallel circuit connection than that in independent circuit connection. While increasing the influent COD concentrations from 200 to 800 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 1.25 h in continuous operation mode, the power density of stacked MFC increased from 25.6 ± 2.5 to 42.1 ± 1.2 W/m(3) and the COD removal rates increased from 1.3 to 5.2 kg COD/(m(3) d). This study demonstrated that this novel MFC stack configuration coupling with GAC packed bed electrode could be a feasible strategy to effectively scale up MFC systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation and Taguchi Optimization of Microbial Fuel Cell Salt Bridge Dimensional Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Dhrupad; Barua, Parimal Bakul; Dey, Nabendu; Nath, Sumitro; Thakuria, Mrinmay; Mallick, Synthia

    2018-01-01

    One major problem of two chamber salt bridge microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is the high resistance offered by the salt bridge to anion flow. Many researchers who have studied and optimized various parameters related to salt bridge MFC, have not shed much light on the effect of salt bridge dimensional parameters on the MFC performance. Therefore, the main objective of this research is to investigate the effect of length and cross sectional area of salt bridge and the effect of solar radiation and atmospheric temperature on MFC current output. An experiment has been designed using Taguchi L9 orthogonal array, taking length and cross sectional area of salt bridge as factors having three levels. Nine MFCs were fabricated as per the nine trial conditions. Trials were conducted for 3 days and output current of each of the MFCs along with solar insolation and atmospheric temperature were recorded. Analysis of variance shows that salt bridge length has significant effect both on mean (with 53.90% contribution at 95% CL) and variance (with 56.46% contribution at 87% CL), whereas the effect of cross sectional area of the salt bridge and the interaction of these two factors is significant on mean only (with 95% CL). Optimum combination was found at 260 mm salt bridge length and 506.7 mm2 cross sectional area with 4.75 mA of mean output current. The temperature and solar insolation data when correlated with each of the MFCs average output current, revealed that both external factors have significant impact on MFC current output but the correlation coefficient varies from MFC to MFC depending on salt bridge dimensional parameters.

  20. UK manufacturers construction joint venture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This report examines the legal and commercial framework for UK manufacturers to collaborate in a construction venture for a small combustion/steam cycle power plant fueled with biomass. The integration of technology and project plan, the working capital and capitalisation, financial aspects, the market plan, turnkey packages, joint venture entities, and collaboration are discussed. (UK)

  1. Romanian nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budan, O.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian nuclear fuel plant as a qualified and authorised CANDU-6 fuel supplier. The re-loading of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 started in the middle

  2. Resilience of roof-top Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells during Dutch winter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helder, Marjolein; Strik, David P.B.T.B.; Timmers, Ruud A.; Raes, Sanne M.T.; Hamelers, Hubertus V.M.; Buisman, Cees J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell (P-MFC) is in theory a technology that could produce sustainable electricity continuously. We operated two designs of the P-MFC under natural roof-top conditions in the Netherlands for 221 days, including winter, to test its resilience. Current and power densities are not stable under outdoor conditions. Highest obtained power density was 88 mW m −2 , which is lower than was achieved under lab-conditions (440 mW m −2 ). Cathode potential was in our case dependent on solar radiation, due to algae growth, making the power output dependent on a diurnal cycle. The anode potential of the P-MFC is influenced by temperature, leading to a decrease in electricity production during low temperature periods and no electricity production during frost periods. Due to freezing of the roots, plants did not survive winter and therefore did not regrow in spring. In order to make a sustainable, stable and weather independent electricity production system of the P-MFC attention should be paid to improving cathode stability and cold insulation of anode and cathode. Only when power output of the Plant-Microbial Fuel Cell can be increased under outdoor conditions and plant-vitality can be sustained over winter, it can be a promising sustainable electricity technology for the future. -- Highlights: ► Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells (P-MFCs) produce sustainable electricity under outdoor conditions. ► During frost periods no electricity is produced in P-MFCs. ► Cathodes limit performance of P-MFCs under outdoor conditions. ► Spartina anglica in P-MFCs does not survive on a roof-top during Dutch winter. ► The P-MFC needs optimization of power output to be a promising sustainable electricity technology

  3. Gas manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, G P

    1913-02-22

    Carbonaceous matter, such as coal, shale, lignite, bitumen, bituminous earth, peat, wood, bark, nutshells, and oil nuts, is distilled and gasified in apparatus comprising an upper retort section having imperforate walls, and a lower generator section; part of the generator gases pass around the retort to heat it, and the remainder pass up through the fuel in the retort; the retort is arranged relatively to the generator so that the whole weight of the fuel in the retort does not act upon that in the generator, and an outlet is provided at the lower end of the retort so that a portion of the coke may be withdrawn when desired.

  4. Multiparametric comparison of chromogenic-based culture methods used to assess the microbiological quality of drinking water and the mFC method combined with a molecular confirmation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, Andrée F; Dion-Dupont, Vanessa; Bisson, Marc-Antoine; Bouchard, Sébastien; Jubinville, Éric; Nkuranga, Martine; Rodrigue, Lynda; Bergeron, Michel G; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2015-03-01

    MI agar and Colilert(®), as well as mFC agar combined with an Escherichia coli-specific molecular assay (mFC + E. coli rtPCR), were compared in terms of their sensitivity, ease of use, time to result and affordability. The three methods yielded a positive E. coli signal for 11.5, 10.8, and 11.5% of the 968 well water samples tested, respectively. One hundred and thirty-six (136) samples gave blue colonies on mFC agar and required confirmation. E. coli-specific rtPCR showed false-positive results in 23.5% (32/136) of cases. In terms of ease of use, Colilert was the simplest method to use while the MI method provided ease of use comparable to all membrane filtration methods. However, the mFC + E. coli rtPCR assay required highly trained employees for confirmation purposes. In terms of affordability, and considering contamination rate of well water samples tested, the Colilert method and the mFC + E. coli rtPCR assay were at least five times more costly than the MI agar method. Overall, compared with the other two methods tested, the MI agar method offers the most advantages to assess drinking water quality.

  5. Semiconductor Manufacturing equipment introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jong Sun

    2001-02-01

    This book deals with semiconductor manufacturing equipment. It is comprised of nine chapters, which are manufacturing process of semiconductor device, history of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, kinds and role of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, construction and method of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, introduction of various semiconductor manufacturing equipment, spots of semiconductor manufacturing, technical elements of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, road map of technology of semiconductor manufacturing equipment and semiconductor manufacturing equipment in the 21st century.

  6. Perspectives on research and development of microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Martinez, A.; Vazquez Larios, A.L.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Poggi Varaldo, H.M. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: hectorpoggi2001@gmail.com; rareli@hotmail.com

    2009-09-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC), is an anoxic electrochemical bioreactor where bacteria grow in the absence of oxygen in a chamber containing an anode which it may be covered by a biofilm. Microorganisms anoxically oxidize the organic substrate and electrons generated are released to the anode. Released protons are transferred to the cathode. Natural or forced aeration of the cathode supplies the oxygen for the final reaction 2H{sup +} + 2e{sup -} + (1/2) O{sub 2} = H{sub 2}O. In this work, we present a critical review on MFC focused on subjects that are receiving a growing interest from the research and technological communities: (i) types of MFC, their relative advantages and disadvantages and ranges of application; (ii) development of biocathodes; (iii) enrichment procedures of microbial communities in MFC. Recent research shows that one-chamber fitted with cathode aerated by natural aeration, and other special types of high performance MFC, have displaced the historical two-chamber MFC. Recent studies showed that electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) can be successfully enriched in MFC. The cost and eventual poisoning of the platinum catalyst used at the cathode is a major limitation to MFC application and economic viability. Researchers have started working on the concept of biocathodes that would use bacteria instead of platinum as a biocatalyst. Microbial enrichment of inocula seeded to MFC may provide a way to enrich the consortium with EAB, thus substantially increasing the transfer of electrons to the anode. Bioaugmentation of consortia in MFC with strains EAB, could contribute to the same goal. [Spanish] Las celdas de combustible microbianas (CCM) son un biorrector anoxico donde las bacterias crecen en ausencia de oxigeno en una camara que contiene un anodo que puede cubrirse con una biopelicula. Los microorganismos oxidan onoxicamente el sustrato organico y los electrones generados se liberan al anodo. Los protones liberados se transfieren al catodo. La

  7. Green Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patten, John

    2013-12-31

    Green Manufacturing Initiative (GMI): The initiative provides a conduit between the university and industry to facilitate cooperative research programs of mutual interest to support green (sustainable) goals and efforts. In addition to the operational savings that greener practices can bring, emerging market demands and governmental regulations are making the move to sustainable manufacturing a necessity for success. The funding supports collaborative activities among universities such as the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Purdue University and among 40 companies to enhance economic and workforce development and provide the potential of technology transfer. WMU participants in the GMI activities included 20 faculty, over 25 students and many staff from across the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences; the College of Arts and Sciences' departments of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Geology; the College of Business; the Environmental Research Institute; and the Environmental Studies Program. Many outside organizations also contribute to the GMI's success, including Southwest Michigan First; The Right Place of Grand Rapids, MI; Michigan Department of Environmental Quality; the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth; and the Michigan Manufacturers Technical Center.

  8. Policy Reform Impact on Food Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Celikkol, Pinar; Dunn, James W.; Stefanou, Spiro E.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of agricultural policies and their reform is of major concern when addressing issues of growth, innovation and consolidation in the food manufacturing sector. Growth is one of the forces fueling the globalization of food manufacturing activities. Market- and policy-driven forces present a myriad of opportunities to influence growth and reorientation of patterns at the nexus where food manufacturing links the food system. The productivity and international competitiveness of the foo...

  9. BNFL Springfields Fuel Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkiainen, S.; Plit, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Fuel Division of British Nuclear Fuels Ltd (BNFL) manufactures nuclear fuel elements for British Magnox and AGR power plants as well as for LWR plants. The new fuel factory - Oxide Fuel Complex (OFC), located in Springfields, is equipped with modern technology and the automation level of the factory is very high. With their quality products, BNFL aims for the new business areas. A recent example of this expansion was shown, when BNFL signed a contract to design and license new VVER-440 fuel for Finnish Loviisa and Hungarian Paks power plants. (author)

  10. Energy harvesting influences electrochemical performance of microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Xin; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can be effective power sources for remote sensing, wastewater treatment and environmental remediation, but their performance needs significant improvement. This study systematically analyzes how active harvesting using electrical circuits increased MFC system outputs as compared to passive resistors not only in the traditional maximal power point (MPP) but also in other desired operating points such as the maximum current point (MCP) and the maximum voltage point (MVP). Results show that active harvesting in MPP increased power output by 81-375% and active harvesting in MCP increased Coulombic efficiency by 207-805% compared with resisters operated at the same points. The cyclic voltammograms revealed redox potential shifts and supported the performance data. The findings demonstrate that active harvesting is a very effective approach to improve MFC performance across different operating points.

  11. Performance of denitrifying microbial fuel cell with biocathode over nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao eHuimin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell (MFC with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN removal rate of 54.80±0.01 g m-3 d-1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode .

  12. Hydrogen manufacturing using plasma reformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A.; Hochgreb, S.; O`Brien, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Manufacturing of hydrogen from hydrocarbon fuels is needed for a variety of applications. These applications include fuel cells used in stationary electric power production and in vehicular propulsion. Hydrogen can also be used for various combustion engine systems. There is a wide range of requirements on the capacity of the hydrogen manufacturing system, the purity of the hydrogen fuel, and capability for rapid response. The overall objectives of a hydrogen manufacturing facility are to operate with high availability at the lowest possible cost and to have minimal adverse environmental impact. Plasma technology has potential to significantly alleviate shortcomings of conventional means of manufacturing hydrogen. These shortcomings include cost and deterioration of catalysts; limitations on hydrogen production from heavy hydrocarbons; limitations on rapid response; and size and weight requirements. In addition, use of plasma technology could provide for a greater variety of operating modes; in particular the possibility of virtual elimination of CO{sub 2} production by pyrolytic operation. This mode of hydrogen production may be of increasing importance due to recent additional evidence of global warming.

  13. Manufacturing and characterisation of electrode membrane assemblies for low temperature fuel cells; Herstellung und Charakterisierung von Membran-Elektroden-Einheiten fuer Niedertemperatur Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaz, Till

    2008-08-22

    The high cost for a Polymer electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) System is still a barrier for commercial breakthrough, which cannot be compensated by the advantages of being pollution free, or nearly noiseless. The most effective way of saving costs is to reduce expensive materials, because the material costs only for the Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) is more than 70% of the total costs of a PEFC Stack. Within the MEA a main part of the costs is due to the catalyst. It is one of the main goals to decrease the catalyst loading by simultaneously increasing the performance or keeping it at least constant. Because in most electrodes only 20-50% of the catalyst in the electrodes is used, enlarging the electrochemical active area is one of the key problems of the PEFC. For being electrochemical active, the catalyst must be reachable for the gases, he must have a good ionic conductivity to the membrane and he must be attached to the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) by electron conductivity. In literature often an inferior ionic contact of the catalyst to the membrane is responsible for the low catalyst utilization. In the first part of the work, model electrodes with different kinds of catalysts and different amounts of electrolyte in the electrodes were investigated to explore the interrelationship between platinum and electrolyte content. Three different catalysts, unsupported Pt- black, 60 wt.% Pt carbon-supported and 20 wt.% Pt carbon-supported with an addition of Nafion powder of 0%, 20%, 40%, 60 wt.%, and 80 wt.% were used. The electrodes were prepared by spraying the electrode material with the DLR dry spray technique directly onto the membrane and then rolling them while hot. Because material solutions were not used, the structure of the electrodes are determinable and predictable. Numerous different in- and ex-situ characterization methods like impedance spectroscopy, U-i characteristic, cyclic voltammetry, proton conductivity measurements, half-cell measurements and

  14. Integrating microbial fuel cells with anaerobic acidification and forward osmosis membrane for enhancing bio-electricity and water recovery from low-strength wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinmeng; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Yuqin; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2017-03-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and forward osmosis (FO) are two emerging technologies with great potential for energy-efficient wastewater treatment. In this study, anaerobic acidification and FO membrane were simultaneously integrated into an air-cathode MFC (AAFO-MFC) for enhancing bio-electricity and water recovery from low-strength wastewater. During a long-term operation of approximately 40 days, the AAFO-MFC system achieved a continuous and relatively stable power generation, and the maximum power density reached 4.38 W/m 3 . The higher bio-electricity production in the AAFO-MFC system was mainly due to the accumulation of ethanol resulted from anaerobic acidification process and the rejection of FO membrane. In addition, a proper salinity environment in the system controlled by the addition of MF membrane enhanced the electricity production. Furthermore, the AAFO-MFC system produced a high quality effluent, with the removal rates of organic matters and total phosphorus of more than 97%. However, the nitrogen removal was limited for the lower rejection of FO membrane. The combined biofouling and inorganic fouling were responsible for the lower water flux of FO membrane, and the Desulfuromonas sp. utilized the ethanol for bio-electricity production was observed in the anode. These results substantially improve the prospects for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy recovery, and further studies are needed to optimize the system integration and operating parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristics of Carbon Nanotubes/Graphene Coatings on Stainless Steel Meshes Used as Electrodes for Air-Cathode Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsuan Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs generate low-pollution power by feeding organic matter to bacteria; MFC applications have become crucial for energy recovery and environmental protection. The electrode materials of any MFC affect its power generation capacity. In this research, nine single-chamber MFCs with various electrode configurations were investigated and compared with each other. A fabrication process for carbon-based electrode coatings was proposed, and Escherichia coli HB101 was used in the studied MFC system. The results show that applying a coat of either graphene or carbon nanotubes (CNTs to a stainless steel mesh electrode can improve the power density and reduce the internal resistance of an MFC system. Using the proposed surface modification method, CNTs and graphene used for anodic and cathodic modification can increase power generation by approximately 3–7 and 1.5–4.5 times, respectively. Remarkably, compared to a standard MFC with an untreated anode, the internal resistances of MFCs with CNTs- and graphene-modified anodes were reduced to 18 and 30% of standard internal resistance. Measurements of the nine systems we studied clearly presented the performance levels of CNTs and graphene applied as surface modification of stainless steel mesh electrodes.

  16. Extending the magnetoelectric efficiency of an MFC/brass/NdFeB energy harvester by coupling a pair of movable magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chung Ming; Wang, Ya

    2017-10-01

    In this letter, an MFC/brass/NdFeB tip magnet three-phase cantilever beam was coupled with a pair of movable magnets to harness energy from alternating magnetic fields. By coupling with a pair of moveable magnets, both bandwidth and magnetoelectric (ME) voltage coefficient (α\\text{V}) were largely increased by 25% and 87.5%, respectively, in comparison with the same harvester coupled with stationary magnets. Such improvements were attributed to magnetic energy introduced by the moving magnets. Experiments also revealed the boundary positions of external magnets (movable and stationary) where the repulsive magnetic forces jumped to the attractive ones, and the stiffness hardening switched to the softening process. These results provided a wide-band nonlinear approach to efficiently harvest/detect the low-frequency alternating magnetic field energies.

  17. Palm oil mill effluent treatment using a two-stage microbial fuel cells system integrated with immobilized biological aerated filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jia; Zhu, Xiuping; Ni, Jinren; Borthwick, Alistair

    2010-04-01

    An integrated system of two-stage microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and immobilized biological aerated filters (I-BAFs) was used to treat palm oil mill effluent (POME) at laboratory scale. By replacing the conventional two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) with a newly proposed upflow membrane-less microbial fuel cell (UML-MFC) in the integrated system, significant improvements on NH(3)-N removal were observed and direct electricity generation implemented in both MFC1 and MFC2. Moreover, the coupled iron-carbon micro-electrolysis in the cathode of MFC2 further enhanced treatment efficiency of organic compounds. The I-BAFs played a major role in further removal of NH(3)-N and COD. For influent COD and NH(3)-N of 10,000 and 125 mg/L, respectively, the final effluents COD and NH(3)-N were below 350 and 8 mg/L, with removal rates higher than 96.5% and 93.6%. The GC-MS analysis indicated that most of the contaminants were satisfactorily biodegraded by the integrated system. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrical output of bryophyte microbial fuel cell systems is sufficient to power a radio or an environmental sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombelli, Paolo; Dennis, Ross J; Felder, Fabienne; Cooper, Matt B; Madras Rajaraman Iyer, Durgaprasad; Royles, Jessica; Harrison, Susan T L; Smith, Alison G; Harrison, C Jill; Howe, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Plant microbial fuel cells are a recently developed technology that exploits photosynthesis in vascular plants by harnessing solar energy and generating electrical power. In this study, the model moss species Physcomitrella patens , and other environmental samples of mosses, have been used to develop a non-vascular bryophyte microbial fuel cell (bryoMFC). A novel three-dimensional anodic matrix was successfully created and characterized and was further tested in a bryoMFC to determine the capacity of mosses to generate electrical power. The importance of anodophilic microorganisms in the bryoMFC was also determined. It was found that the non-sterile bryoMFCs operated with P. patens delivered over an order of magnitude higher peak power output (2.6 ± 0.6 µW m -2 ) than bryoMFCs kept in near-sterile conditions (0.2 ± 0.1 µW m -2 ). These results confirm the importance of the microbial populations for delivering electrons to the anode in a bryoMFC. When the bryoMFCs were operated with environmental samples of moss (non-sterile) the peak power output reached 6.7 ± 0.6 mW m -2 . The bryoMFCs operated with environmental samples of moss were able to power a commercial radio receiver or an environmental sensor (LCD desktop weather station).

  19. Integrated membrane and microbial fuel cell technologies for enabling energy-efficient effluent Re-use in power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Namita; Chilkoor, Govinda; Xia, Lichao; Alvarado, Catalina; Kilduff, James E; Keating, John J; Belfort, Georges; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana

    2017-06-15

    Municipal wastewater is an attractive alternative to freshwater sources to meet the cooling water needs of thermal power plants. Here we offer an energy-efficient integrated microbial fuel cell (MFC)/ultrafiltration (UF) process to purify primary clarifier effluent from a municipal wastewater treatment plant for use as cooling water. The microbial fuel cell was shown to significantly reduce chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the primary settled wastewater effluent upstream of the UF module, while eliminating the energy demand required to deliver dissolved oxygen in conventional aerobic treatment. We investigated surface modification of the UF membranes to control fouling. Two promising hydrophilic monomers were identified in a high-throughput search: zwitterion (2-(Methacryloyloxy)-ethyl-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl ammoniumhydroxide, abbreviated BET SO 3 - ), and amine (2-(Methacryloyloxy) ethyl trimethylammonium chloride, abbreviated N(CH 3 ) 3 + ). Monomers were grafted using UV-induced polymerization on commercial poly (ether sulfone) membranes. Filtration of MFC effluent by membranes modified with BET SO 3 - and N(CH 3 ) 3 + exhibited a lower rate of resistance increase and lower energy consumption than the commercially available membrane. The MFC/UF process produced high quality cooling water that meets the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) recommendations for COD, a suite of metals (Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Si, Mn, S, Ca and Mg), and offered extremely low corrosion rates (<0.05 mm/yr). A series of AC and DC diagnostic tests were used to evaluate the MFC performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Atsushi; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Aoyama, Motoo; Nakajima, Junjiro

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly for an n x n lattice-like BWR type reactor, n is determined to 9 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 4.4% by weight or less. Alternatively, n is determined to 10 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 5.2% by weight or less. An average take-out burnup degree is determined to 39GWd/t or less, and the matrix is determined to 9 x 9 or more, or the average take-out burnup degree is determined to 51GWd/t, and the matrix is determined to 10 x 10 or more and the increase of the margin of the maximum power density obtained thereby is utilized for the compensation of the increase of distortion of power distribution due to decrease of the kinds of plutonium enrichment degree, thereby enabling to reduce the kind of the enrichment degree of MOX fuel rods to one. As a result, the manufacturing step for fuel pellets can be simplified to reduce the manufacturing cost for MOX fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  1. The effect of salinity, redox mediators and temperature on anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelaja, Oluwaseun, E-mail: o.adelaja@my.westminster.ac.uk; Keshavarz, Tajalli, E-mail: t.keshavarz@westminster.ac.uk; Kyazze, Godfrey, E-mail: g.kyazze@westminster.ac.uk

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Effective degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures was achieved using MFC. • Adapted anaerobic microbial consortium was used as inoculum. • Bio-electricity generation was enhanced by 30-fold when riboflavin, was added. • Optimum MFC performance was obtained at mesophilic and moderately saline conditions. • Stable MFC performance was obtained during prolonged fed-batch MFC operation. - Abstract: Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) need to be robust if they are to be applied in the field for bioremediation. This study investigated the effect of temperature (20–50 °C), salinity (0.5–2.5% (w/v) as sodium chloride), the use of redox mediators (riboflavin and anthraquinone-2-sulphonate, AQS) and prolonged fed-batch operation (60 days) on biodegradation of a petroleum hydrocarbon mix (i.e. phenanthrene and benzene) in MFCs. The performance criteria were degradation efficiency, % COD removal and electrochemical performance. Good electrochemical and degradation performance were maintained up to a salinity of 1.5% (w/v) but deteriorated by 35-fold and 4-fold respectively as salinity was raised to 2.5%w/v. Degradation rates and maximum power density were both improved by approximately 2-fold at 40 °C compared to MFC performance at 30 °C but decreased sharply by 4-fold when operating temperature was raised to 50 °C. The optimum reactor performance obtained at 40 °C was 1.15 mW/m{sup 2} maximum power density, 89.1% COD removal and a degradation efficiency of 97.10%; at moderately saline (1% w/v) conditions the maximum power density was 1.06 mW/m{sup 2}, 79.1% COD removal and 91.6% degradation efficiency. This work suggests the possible application of MFC technology in the effective treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated site and refinery effluents.

  2. Interconnection between tricarboxylic acid cycle and energy generation in microbial fuel cell performed by desulfuromonas acetoxidans IMV B-7384

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Maslovska, Olga D.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2015-05-01

    Desulfuromonas acetoxidans IMV B-7384 is exoelectrogenic obligate anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacterium. Its one of the first described electrogenic bacterium that performs complete oxidation of an organic substrate with electron transfer directly to the electrode in microbial fuel cell (MFC). This bacterium is very promising for MFC development because of inexpensive cultivation medium, high survival rate and selective resistance to various heavy metal ions. The size of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 cells is comparatively small (0.4-0.8×1-2 μm) that is highly beneficial while application of porous anode material because of complete bacterial cover of an electrode area with further significant improvement of the effectiveness of its usage. The interconnection between functioning of reductive stage of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle under anaerobic conditions, and MFC performance was established. Malic, pyruvic, fumaric and succinic acids in concentration 42 mM were separately added into the anode chamber of MFC as the redox agents. Application of malic acid caused the most stabile and the highest power generation in comparison with other investigated organic acids. Its maximum equaled 10.07±0.17mW/m2 on 136 hour of bacterial cultivation. Under addition of pyruvic, succinic and fumaric acids into the anode chamber of MFC the maximal power values equaled 5.80±0.25 mW/m2; 3.2±0.11 mW/m2, and 2.14±0.19 mW/m2 respectively on 40, 56 and 32 hour of bacterial cultivation. Hence the malic acid conversion via reductive stage of TCA cycle is shown to be the most efficient process in terms of electricity generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 in MFC under anaerobic conditions.

  3. The effect of salinity, redox mediators and temperature on anaerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in microbial fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelaja, Oluwaseun; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Kyazze, Godfrey

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effective degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures was achieved using MFC. • Adapted anaerobic microbial consortium was used as inoculum. • Bio-electricity generation was enhanced by 30-fold when riboflavin, was added. • Optimum MFC performance was obtained at mesophilic and moderately saline conditions. • Stable MFC performance was obtained during prolonged fed-batch MFC operation. - Abstract: Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) need to be robust if they are to be applied in the field for bioremediation. This study investigated the effect of temperature (20–50 °C), salinity (0.5–2.5% (w/v) as sodium chloride), the use of redox mediators (riboflavin and anthraquinone-2-sulphonate, AQS) and prolonged fed-batch operation (60 days) on biodegradation of a petroleum hydrocarbon mix (i.e. phenanthrene and benzene) in MFCs. The performance criteria were degradation efficiency, % COD removal and electrochemical performance. Good electrochemical and degradation performance were maintained up to a salinity of 1.5% (w/v) but deteriorated by 35-fold and 4-fold respectively as salinity was raised to 2.5%w/v. Degradation rates and maximum power density were both improved by approximately 2-fold at 40 °C compared to MFC performance at 30 °C but decreased sharply by 4-fold when operating temperature was raised to 50 °C. The optimum reactor performance obtained at 40 °C was 1.15 mW/m 2 maximum power density, 89.1% COD removal and a degradation efficiency of 97.10%; at moderately saline (1% w/v) conditions the maximum power density was 1.06 mW/m 2 , 79.1% COD removal and 91.6% degradation efficiency. This work suggests the possible application of MFC technology in the effective treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated site and refinery effluents

  4. Nuclear fuel quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Full text: Quality assurance is used extensively in the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. This methodology is applied to all activities affecting the quality of a nuclear power plant in order to obtain confidence that an item or a facility will perform satisfactorily in service. Although the achievement of quality is the responsibility of all parties participating in a nuclear power project, establishment and implementation of the quality assurance programme for the whole plant is a main responsibility of the plant owner. For the plant owner, the main concern is to achieve control over the quality of purchased products or services through contractual arrangements with the vendors. In the case of purchase of nuclear fuel, the application of quality assurance might be faced with several difficulties because of the lack of standardization in nuclear fuel and the proprietary information of the fuel manufacturers on fuel design specifications and fuel manufacturing procedures. The problems of quality assurance for purchase of nuclear fuel were discussed in detail during the seminar. Due to the lack of generally acceptable standards, the successful application of the quality assurance concept to the procurement of fuel depends on how much information can be provided by the fuel manufacturer to the utility which is purchasing fuel, and in what form and how early this information can be provided. The extent of information transfer is basically set out in the individual vendor-utility contracts, with some indirect influence from the requirements of regulatory bodies. Any conflict that exists appears to come from utilities which desire more extensive control over the product they are buying. There is a reluctance on the part of vendors to permit close insight of the purchasers into their design and manufacturing procedures, but there nevertheless seems to be an increasing trend towards release of more information to the purchasers. It appears that

  5. Bioelectricity generation and microcystins removal in a blue-green algae powered microbial fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yong; Chen Qing; Zhou Shungui; Zhuang Li; Hu Pei

    2011-01-01

    Bioelectricity production from blue-green algae was examined in a single chamber tubular microbial fuel cell (MFC). The blue-green algae powered MFC produced a maximum power density of 114 mW/m 2 at a current density of 0.55 mA/m 2 . Coupled with the bioenergy generation, high removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen were also achieved in MFCs. Over 78.9% of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), 80.0% of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), 91.0% of total nitrogen (total-N) and 96.8% ammonium-nitrogen (NH 3 -N) were removed under closed circuit conditions in 12 days, which were much more effective than those under open circuit and anaerobic reactor conditions. Most importantly, the MFC showed great ability to remove microcystins released from blue-green algae. Over 90.7% of MC-RR and 91.1% of MC-LR were removed under closed circuit conditions (500 Ω). This study showed that the MFC could provide a potential means for electricity production from blue-green algae coupling algae toxins removal.

  6. The modeling of gold recovery from tetrachloroaurate wastewater using a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chansoo; Hu, Naixu

    2013-04-01

    In this study, tetrachloroaurate as an electron acceptor of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been studied to discover the parameters that affect the cost-effective recovery of gold. The modeling and equations for calculating the maximum actual efficiency and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic internal resistance of the MFC were also developed. The maximum power density (Pmax) of 6.58 W/m(2) with a fill factor of 0.717 was achieved for 60 mL volumes of 2000 ppm Au(III) catholyte and 12.2 mM acetate anolyte, respectively. The Pmax can also be predicted simply by measuring Rint by EIS. Additionally, the maximum actual MFC efficiency of about 57% was achieved, and the recovery efficiency of Au and the remaining concentration reached 99.89±0.00% and 0.22±0.00 ppm, respectively, for an Au(III) concentration of 200 ppm. The anodic concentration polarization quenching of the MFC strongly supports a mediator mechanism for the electron transfer from the microorganism to the anode. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Directly applicable microbial fuel cells in aeration tank for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jaehwan; Choi, Soojung; Yu, Hana; Kim, Hyosoo; Kim, Changwon

    2010-04-01

    The application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) for wastewater treatment is a promising strategy for the simultaneous treatment of pollutants and generation of electricity. However, for practical application, there are several limitations to the MFC that involve biological and engineering aspects. In this study, a single-chambered MFC able to submerge into the aeration tank of the activated sludge process was developed to optimize the cell configuration and electrode materials. Among four MFCs with different electrode materials, the MFC with a graphite felt (GF) anode and a GF cathode showed the highest power density of 16.7 W m(-3) and the lowest internal resistance of 17 Omega. When the blower was stopped to evaluate the effect of mixing intensity, the concentration of dissolved oxygen nevertheless remained at 8 mg O2 L(-1), and the cell voltage of MFCs dropped rapidly and reached 30 mV. However, the cell voltage immediately returned to around 200 mV after the blowing of air. The MFCs with a GF cathode were sensitive to mixing intensity. At the very low concentration of 0.2 mg O2 L(-1), the cell voltage remained at a high level of 200 mV when the oxygen close to the cathode remained and mixing was sufficient. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Recycled tire crumb rubber anodes for sustainable power production in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heming; Davidson, Matthew; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong

    One of the greatest challenges facing microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in large scale applications is the high cost of electrode material. We demonstrate here that recycled tire crumb rubber coated with graphite paint can be used instead of fine carbon materials as the MFC anode. The tire particles showed satisfactory conductivity after 2-4 layers of coating. The specific surface area of the coated rubber was over an order of magnitude greater than similar sized graphite granules. Power production in single chamber tire-anode air-cathode MFCs reached a maximum power density of 421 mW m -2, with a coulombic efficiency (CE) of 25.1%. The control graphite granule MFC achieved higher power density (528 mW m -2) but lower CE (15.6%). The light weight of tire particle could reduce clogging and maintenance cost but posts challenges in conductive connection. The use of recycled material as the MFC anodes brings a new perspective to MFC design and application and carries significant economic and environmental benefit potentials.

  9. Nuclear fuel recycling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.R.; Koch, A.K.; Krawczyk, A.

    1981-01-01

    A process is provided for recycling sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellets rejected during fuel manufacture and the swarf from pellet grinding. The scrap material is prepared mechanically by crushing and milling as a high solids content slurry, using scrap sintered UO 2 pellets as the grinding medium under an inert atmosophere

  10. Self-sustaining, solar-driven bioelectricity generation in micro-sized microbial fuel cell using co-culture of heterotrophic and photosynthetic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Choi, Seokheun

    2017-04-01

    Among many energy harvesting techniques with great potential, microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology is arguably the most underdeveloped. Even so, excitement is building, as microorganisms can harvest electrical power from any biodegradable organic source (e.g. wastewater) that is readily available in resource-limited settings. Nevertheless, the requirement for endless introduction of organic matter imposes a limiting factor to this technology, demanding an active feeding system and additional power. Here, we demonstrated self-sustaining bioelectricity generation from a microliter-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) by using the syntrophic interaction between heterotrophic exoelectrogenic bacteria and phototrophs. The MFC continuously generated light-responsive electricity from the heterotrophic bacterial metabolic respiration with the organic substrates produced by photosynthetic bacteria. Without additional organic fuel, the mixed culture in a 90-μL-chamber MFC generated self-sustained current for more than 13 days, while the heterotrophic culture produced current that decreased dramatically within a few hours. The current from the mixed culture was about 70 times greater than that of the device with only photosynthetic bacteria. The miniaturization provided a short start-up time, a well-controlled environment, and small internal resistance. Those advantages will become the general design platform for micropower generation.

  11. Influence of diligent disintegration on anaerobic biomass and performance of microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divyalakshmi, Palanisamy; Murugan, Devaraj; Rai, Chockalingam Lajapathi

    2017-12-01

    To enhance the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFC) by increasing the surface area of cathode and diligent mechanical disintegration of anaerobic biomass. Tannery effluent and anaerobic biomass were used. The increase in surface area of the cathode resulted in 78% COD removal, with the potential, current density, power density and coulombic efficiency of 675 mV, 147 mA m -2 , 33 mW m -2 and 3.5%, respectively. The work coupled with increased surface area of the cathode with diligent mechanical disintegration of the biomass, led to a further increase in COD removal of 82% with the potential, current density, power density and coulombic efficiency of 748 mV, 229 mA m -2 , 78 mW m -2 and 6% respectively. Mechanical disintegration of the biomass along with increased surface area of cathode enhances power generation in vertical MFC reactors using tannery effluent as fuel.

  12. Manufacture of uranium compounds for research reactors fuel elements. Participation of the UCPP (Uranium compound production plant) in the Egyptian project; Elaboracion de compuestos de uranio para ser utilizados en elementos combustibles de reactores de investigacion. Participacion de la planta de fabricacion de compuestos de uranio (PFPU) en el proyecto Egipto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boero, Norma L; Cinat, Enrique; Yorio, Daniel; Cincotta, Daniel; Ramella, Jose L; Bruno, Hernan R; Camacho, Esteban F; Pertossi, Fernando; Panunzio, Leonardo D; Fernandez, Carlos A; Sassone, Ariel [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Combustibles Nucleares

    1999-07-01

    UCPP is an international qualified supplier of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} with up to 20 % enrichment in U-235. The characteristics of this powder are those specified for fuel plates manufacture for test reactors. This paper describes the works performed in the plant since its beginning, emphasising those undertaken during the last years. The transference of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} manufacturing technology to INVAP SE, the enterprise that installed a plant of similar characteristics in the Arabian Republic of Egypt, is especially described. (author)

  13. Quality assurance of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The guide presents the quality assurance requirements to be completed with in the procurement, design, manufacture, transport, handling and operation of the nuclear fuel. The guide also applies to the procurement of the control rods and the shield elements to be placed in the reactor. The guide is mainly aimed for the licensee responsible for the procurement and operation of fuel, for the fuel designer and manufacturer and for other organizations whose activities affect fuel quality, the safety of fuel transport, storage and operation. (2 refs.)

  14. Nano-structured textiles as high-performance aqueous cathodes for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing; Pasta, Mauro; Hu, Liangbing; Yang, Yuan; McDonough, James; Cha, Judy; Criddle, Craig S.; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-textile-Pt cathode for aqueous-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was prepared by electrochemically depositing Pt nanoparticles on a CNT-textile. An MFC equipped with a CNT-textile-Pt cathode revealed a 2.14-fold maximum power density with only 19.3% Pt loading, compared to that with a commercial Pt coated carbon cloth cathode. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Graphene–sponges as high-performance low-cost anodes for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing

    2012-01-01

    A high-performance microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode was constructed from inexpensive materials. Key components were a graphene-sponge (G-S) composite and a stainless-steel (SS) current collector. Anode fabrication is simple, scalable, and environmentally friendly, with low energy inputs. The SS current collector improved electrode conductivity and decreased voltage drop and power loss. The resulting G-S-SS composite electrode appears promising for large-scale applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Resistance welding equipment manufacturing capability for exports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, V.S.; Raju, Y.S.; Somani, A.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Raw, A.; Hermantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderbad (India)

    2010-07-01

    Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel bundle is fully welded and is unique in its design. Appendage welding, end closure welding, and end plate welding is carried out using resistance welding technique. Out of many joining processes available, resistance-welding process is reliable, environment friendly and best suitable for mass production applications. Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), an industrial unit is established in Hyderabad, under the aegis of the Dept of Atomic Energy to manufacture fuel for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors. From inception, NFC has given importance for self-reliance and indigenization with respect to manufacturing process and equipment. Sintering furnaces, centreless grinders, appendage-welding machines, end-closure welding equipment and end-plate welding equipments, which were initially imported, are either indigenized or designed and manufactured in house. NFC has designed, manufactured a new appendage-welding machine for manufacturing 37 element fuel bundles. Recently NFC has bagged an order from IAEA through international bidding for design, manufacture, supply, erection and commissioning of end-closure welding equipment. The paper gives in detail the salient features of these welding equipment. (author)

  17. Manufactured volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, Noemi; Meuli, Martin; Subotic, Ulrike; Moehrlen, Ueli; Mazzone, Luca; Arlettaz, Romaine

    2013-06-01

    Malrotation with a common mesentery is the classical pathology allowing midgut volvulus to occur. There are only a few reports of small bowel volvulus without malrotation or other pathology triggering volvulation. We describe three cases of small bowel volvulus in very premature newborns with a perfectly normal intra-abdominal anatomy and focus on the question, what might have set off volvulation. In 2005 to 2008, three patients developed small bowel volvulus without any underlying pathology. Retrospective patient chart review was performed with special focus on clinical presentation, preoperative management, intraoperative findings, and potential causative explanations. Mean follow-up period was 46 months. All patients were born between 27 and 31 weeks (mean 28 weeks) with a birth weight between 800 and 1,000 g (mean 887 g). They presented with an almost identical pattern of symptoms including sudden abdominal distension, abdominal tenderness, erythema of the abdominal wall, high gastric residuals, and radiographic signs of ileus. All of them were treated with intensive abdominal massage or pelvic rotation to improve bowel movement before becoming symptomatic. Properistaltic maneuvers including abdominal massage and pelvic rotation may cause what we term a "manufactured" volvulus in very premature newborns. Thus, this practice was stopped. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter explains the distinction between fissile and fertile materials, examines briefly the processes involved in fuel manufacture and management, describes the alternative nuclear fuel cycles and considers their advantages and disadvantages. Fuel management is usually divided into three stages; the front end stage of production and fabrication, the back end stage which deals with the fuel after it is removed from the reactor (including reprocessing and waste treatment) and the stage in between when the fuel is actually in the reactor. These stages are illustrated and explained in detail. The plutonium fuel cycle and thorium-uranium-233 fuel cycle are explained. The differences between fuels for thermal reactors and fast reactors are explained. (U.K.)

  19. Evolving Microbial Communities in Cellulose-Fed Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Toczyłowska-Mamińska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of cellulosic wastes make them attractive source of energy for producing electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs. However, electricity production from cellulose requires obligate anaerobes that can degrade cellulose and transfer electrons to the electrode (exoelectrogens, and thus most previous MFC studies have been conducted using two-chamber systems to avoid oxygen contamination of the anode. Single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs typically produce higher power densities than aqueous catholyte MFCs and avoid energy input for the cathodic reaction. To better understand the bacterial communities that evolve in single-chamber air-cathode MFCs fed cellulose, we examined the changes in the bacterial consortium in an MFC fed cellulose over time. The most predominant bacteria shown to be capable electron generation was Firmicutes, with the fermenters decomposing cellulose Bacteroidetes. The main genera developed after extended operation of the cellulose-fed MFC were cellulolytic strains, fermenters and electrogens that included: Parabacteroides, Proteiniphilum, Catonella and Clostridium. These results demonstrate that different communities evolve in air-cathode MFCs fed cellulose than the previous two-chamber reactors.

  20. Models for Microbial Fuel Cells: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chengshuo; Zhang, Daxing; Pedrycz, Witold; Zhu, Yingmin; Guo, Yongxian

    2018-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been widely viewed as one of the most promising alternative sources of renewable energy. A recognition of needs of efficient development methods based on multidisciplinary research becomes crucial for the optimization of MFCs. Modeling of MFCs is an effective way for not only gaining a thorough understanding of the effects of operation conditions on the performance of power generation but also becomes of essential interest to the successful implementation of MFCs. The MFC models encompass the underlying reaction process and limiting factors of the MFC. The models come in various forms, such as the mathematical equations or the equivalent circuits. Different modeling focuses and approaches of the MFC have emerged. In this study, we present a state of the art of MFCs modeling; the past modeling methods are reviewed as well. Models and modeling methods are elaborated on based on the classification provided by Mechanism-based models and Application-based models. Mechanisms, advantages, drawbacks, and application fields of different models are illustrated as well. We exhibit a complete and comprehensive exposition of the different models for MFCs and offer further guidance to promote the performance of MFCs.

  1. Simultaneous electricity production and antibiotics removal by microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Nengwu; Guo, Wenying; Wang, Yun; Huang, Xixian; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Xian, Jinchan

    2018-04-07

    The removal of antibiotics is crucial for improvement of water quality in animal wastewater treatment. In this paper, the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC) in terms of degradation of typical antibiotics was investigated. Electricity was successfully produced by using sludge supernatant mixtures and synthesized animal wastewater as inoculation in MFC. Results demonstrated that the stable voltage, the maximum power density and internal resistance of anaerobic self-electrolysis (ASE) -112 and ASE-116 without antibiotics addition were 0.574 V, 5.78 W m -3 and 28.06 Ω, and 0.565 V, 5.82 W m -3 and 29.38 Ω, respectively. Moreover, when adding aureomycin, sulfadimidine, roxithromycin and norfloxacin into the reactors, the performance of MFC was inhibited (0.51 V-0.41 V), while the output voltage was improved with the decreased concentration of antibiotics. However, the removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen (NH 3 -N) and total phosphorus (TP) were both obviously enhanced. Simultaneously, LC-MS analysis showed that the removal efficiency of aureomycin, roxithromycin and norfloxacin were all 100% and the removal efficiency of sulfadimidine also reached 99.9%. These results indicated that antibiotics displayed significantly inhibitions for electricity performance but improved the quality of water simultaneously. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microbial Fuel Cells under Extreme Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzon del Olmo, Oihane

    I developed a Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) that unprecedentedly works (i.e., produces electricity) under extreme salinity (≈ 100 g/L NaCl). Many industries, such as oil and gas extraction, generate hypersaline wastewaters with high organic strength, accounting for about 5% of worldwide generated effluents, which represent a major challenge for pollution control and resource recovery. This study assesses the potential for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to treat such wastewaters and generate electricity under extreme saline conditions. Specifically, the focus is on the feasibility to treat hypersaline wastewater generated by the emerging unconventional oil and gas industry (hydraulic fracturing) and so, with mean salinity of 100 g/L NaCl (3-fold higher than sea water). The success of this novel technology strongly depends on finding a competent and resilient microbial community that can degrade the waste under extreme saline conditions and be able to use the anode as their terminal electron acceptor (exoelectrogenic capability). I demonstrated that MFCs can produce electricity at extremely high salinity (up to 250 g/l NaCl) with a power production of 71mW/m2. Pyrosequencing analysis of the anode population showed the predominance of Halanaerobium spp. (85%), which has been found in shale formations and oil reservoirs. Promoting Quorum sensing (QS, cell to cell communication between bacteria to control gene expression) was used as strategy to increase the attachment of bacteria to the anode and thus improve the MFC performance. Results show that the power output can be bolstered by adding 100nM of quinolone signal with an increase in power density of 30%, for the first time showing QS in Halanaerobium extremophiles. To make this technology closer to market applications, experiments with real wastewaters were also carried out. A sample of produced wastewater from Barnet Shale, Texas (86 g/L NaCl) produced electricity when fed in an MFC, leading to my discovery of another

  3. Future trends in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guitierrez, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    This series of transparencies presents: the fuel management cycle and key areas (security of supplies, strategies and core management, reliability, spent fuel management), the world nuclear generating capacity, concentrate capacity, enrichment capacity, and manufacturing capacity forecasts, the fuel cycle strategies and core management (longer cycles, higher burnups, power up-rates, higher enrichments), the Spanish nuclear generation cost, the fuel reliability (no defects, robust designs, operational margins, integrated fuel and core design), spent fuel storage (design and safety criteria, fuel performance and integrity). (J.S.)

  4. The impact of fit manufacturing on green manufacturing: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ang Nian; Sin, Tan Chan; Fathullah, M.; Lee, C. C.

    2017-09-01

    Fit manufacturing and Green manufacturing are a new trend principle and concept. They are getting popular in industrial. This paper is identifying the impact between Fit manufacturing and Green manufacturing. Besides Fit manufacturing, Lean manufacturing, Agile manufacturing and Sustainable manufacturing gives big impacts to Green Manufacturing. On top of that, this paper also discuss the benefits of applying Fit manufacturing and Green manufacturing in industrial as well as environment. Hence, applications of Fit manufacturing and Green Manufacturing are increasing year by year.

  5. A high-performance aluminum-feed microfluidic fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifei; Leung, Dennis Y. C.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a six-cell microfluidic fuel cell (MFC) stack is demonstrated. Low-cost aluminum is fed directly to the stack, which produces hydrogen fuel on site, through the Al-H2O reaction. This design is not only cost-efficient, but also eliminates the need for hydrogen storage. Unlike the conventional MFC stacks which generally require complex electrolyte distribution and management, the present Al-feed MFC stack requires only a single electrolyte stream, flowing successively through individual cells, which is finally utilized for hydrogen generation. In this manner, the whole system is greatly simplified while the operational robustness is also improved. With 2 M sodium hydroxide solution as electrolyte and kitchen foil Al as fuel, the present six-cell stack (in series) exhibits an open circuit voltage of nearly 6 V and a peak power density of 180.6 mWcm-2 at room temperature. In addition, an energy density of 1 Whg-1(Al) is achieved, which is quite high and comparable with its proton exchange membrane-based counterparts. Finally, pumpless operation of the present stack, together with its practical applications are successfully demonstrated, including lightening LED lights, driving an electric fan, and cell phone charging.

  6. Fuels Preparation Department monthly report, May 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-17

    This report describes the operation of the fuels preparation department for the month of May, 1958. Manufacturing employee relations, process development, plant improvements, and financial operations are discussed.

  7. World wide IFC phosphoric acid fuel cell implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    International Fuel Cells, a subsidary of United technologies Corporation, is engaged in research and development of all types of fuel cell technologies and currently manufactures alkaline fuel cell power plants for the U.S. manned space flight program and natural gas fueled stationary power plants using phosphoric acid fuel cells. This paper describes the phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants.

  8. Neutral hydrophilic cathode catalyst binders for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Saito, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Improving oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes requires a better understanding of the effects of the catalyst binder chemistry and properties on performance. A series of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) polymers with systematically varying hydrophilicity were designed to determine the effect of the hydrophilic character of the binder on cathode performance. Increasing the hydrophilicity of the PS-b-PEO binders enhanced the electrochemical response of the cathode and MFC power density by ∼15%, compared to the hydrophobic PS-OH binder. Increased cathode performance was likely a result of greater water uptake by the hydrophilic binder, which would increase the accessible surface area for oxygen reduction. Based on these results and due to the high cost of PS-b-PEO, the performance of an inexpensive hydrophilic neutral polymer, poly(bisphenol A-co-epichlorohydrin) (BAEH), was examined in MFCs and compared to a hydrophilic sulfonated binder (Nafion). MFCs with BAEH-based cathodes with two different Pt loadings initially (after 2 cycles) had lower MFC performance (1360 and 630 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) than Nafion cathodes (1980 and 1080 mW m -2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2). However, after long-term operation (22 cycles, 40 days), power production of each cell was similar (∼1200 and 700-800 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) likely due to cathode biofouling that could not be completely reversed through physical cleaning. While binder chemistry could improve initial electrochemical cathode performance, binder materials had less impact on overall long-term MFC performance. This observation suggests that long-term operation of MFCs will require better methods to avoid cathode biofouling. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  10. Design and Testing of Digitally Manufactured Paraffin Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene Hybrid Rocket Motors

    OpenAIRE

    McCulley, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates the application of additive manufacturing techniques for fabricating hybrid rocket fuel grains composed of porous Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene impregnated with paraffin wax. The digitally manufactured ABS substrate provides mechanical support for the paraffin fuel material and serves as an additional fuel component. The embedded paraffin provides an enhanced fuel regression rate while having no detrimental effect on the thermodynamic burn properties of the fuel g...

  11. Additively Manufactured Main Fuel Valve Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleman, David; Richard, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) was utilized to fabricate a liquid hydrogen valve housing typical of those found in rocket engines and main propulsion systems. The SLM process allowed for a valve geometry that would be difficult, if not impossible to fabricate by traditional means. Several valve bodies were built by different SLM suppliers and assembled with valve internals. The assemblies were then tested with liquid nitrogen and operated as desired. One unit was also burst tested and sectioned for materials analysis. The design, test results, and planned testing are presented herein.

  12. Determination of charge transfer resistance and capacitance of microbial fuel cell through a transient response analysis of cell voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Phuc Thi; Moon, Hyunsoo; Kim, Byung Hong; Ng, How Yong; Chang, In Seop

    2010-03-15

    An alternative method for determining the charge transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), easily implemented without a potentiostat, was developed. A dynamic model with two parameters, the charge transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance of electrodes, was derived from a linear differential equation to depict the current generation with respect to activation overvoltage. This model was then used to fit the transient cell voltage response to the current step change during the continuous operation of a flat-plate type MFC fed with acetate. Variations of the charge transfer resistance and the capacitance value with respect to the MFC design conditions (biocatalyst existence and electrode area) and operating parameters (acetate concentration and buffer strength in the catholyte) were then determined to elucidate the validity of the proposed method. This model was able to describe the dynamic behavior of the MFC during current change in the activation loss region; having an R(2) value of over 0.99 in most tests. Variations of the charge transfer resistance value (thousands of Omega) according to the change of the design factors and operational factors were well-correlated with the corresponding MFC performances. However, though the capacitance values (approximately 0.02 F) reflected the expected trend according to the electrode area change and catalyst property, they did not show significant variation with changes in either the acetate concentration or buffer strength. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term performance of a 20-L continuous flow microbial fuel cell for treatment of brewery wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mengqian; Chen, Shing; Babanova, Sofia; Phadke, Sujal; Salvacion, Michael; Mirhosseini, Auvid; Chan, Shirley; Carpenter, Kayla; Cortese, Rachel; Bretschger, Orianna

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been shown as a promising technology for wastewater treatment. Integration of MFCs into current wastewater treatment plant have potential to reduce the operational cost and improve the treatment performance, and scaling up MFCs will be essential. However, only a few studies have reported successful scale up attempts. Fabrication cost, treatment performance and operational lifetime are critical factors to optimize before commercialization of MFCs. To test these factors, we constructed a 20 L MFC system containing two 10 L MFC reactors and operated the system with brewery wastewater for nearly one year. Several operational conditions were tested, including different flowrates, applied external resistors, and poised anodic potentials. The condition resulting in the highest chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency (94.6 ± 1.0%) was a flow rate of 1 mL min-1 (HRT = 313 h) and an applied resistor of 10 Ω across each MFC circuit. Results from each of the eight stages of operation (325 days total) indicate that MFCs can sustain treatment rates over a long-term period and are robust enough to sustain performance even after system perturbations. possible ways to improve MFC performance were discussed for future studies.

  14. Granular activated carbon based microbial fuel cell for simultaneous decolorization of real dye wastewater and electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathil, Shafeer; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2011-12-15

    Decolorization of dye wastewater before discharge is pivotal because of its immense color and toxicities. In this study, a granular activated carbon based microbial fuel cell (GACB-MFC) was used without using any expensive materials like Nafion membrane and platinum catalyst for simultaneous decolorization of real dye wastewater and bioelectricity generation. After 48 hours of GACB-MFC operation, 73% color was removed at anode and 77% color was removed at cathode. COD removal was 71% at the anode and 76% at the cathode after 48 hours. Toxicity measurements showed that cathode effluent was almost nontoxic after 24 hours. The anode effluent was threefold less toxic compared to original dye wastewater after 48 hours. The GACB-MFC produced a power density of 1.7 W/m(3) with an open circuit voltage 0.45 V. One of the advantages of the GACB-MFC system is that pH was automatically adjusted from 12.4 to 7.2 and 8.0 at the anode and cathode during 48 hours operation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Computational investigation of the flow field contribution to improve electricity generation in granular activated carbon-assisted microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Li, Jian; Battaglia, Francine; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer an alternative approach to treat wastewater with less energy input and direct electricity generation. To optimize MFC anodic performance, adding granular activated carbon (GAC) has been proved to be an effective way, most likely due to the enlarged electrode surface for biomass attachment and improved mixing of the flow field. The impact of a flow field on the current enhancement within a porous anode medium (e.g., GAC) has not been well understood before, and thus is investigated in this study by using mathematical modeling of the multi-order Butler-Volmer equation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. By comparing three different CFD cases (without GAC, with GAC as a nonreactive porous medium, and with GAC as a reactive porous medium), it is demonstrated that adding GAC contributes to a uniform flow field and a total current enhancement of 17%, a factor that cannot be neglected in MFC design. However, in an actual MFC operation, this percentage could be even higher because of the microbial competition and energy loss issues within a porous medium. The results of the present study are expected to help with formulating strategies to optimize MFC with a better flow pattern design.

  16. The use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the evaluation of the electrochemical properties of a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Aswin K; Bretschger, Orianna; Nealson, Kenneth H; Mansfeld, Florian

    2008-04-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to determine several electrochemical properties of the anode and cathode of a mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) under different operational conditions. These operational conditions included a system with and without the bacterial catalyst and EIS measurements at the open-circuit potential of the anode and the cathode or at an applied cell voltage. In all cases the impedance spectra followed a simple one-time-constant model (OTCM) in which the solution resistance is in series with a parallel combination of the polarization resistance and the electrode capacitance. Analysis of the impedance spectra showed that addition of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to a solution of buffer and lactate greatly increased the rate of the lactate oxidation at the anode under open-circuit conditions. The large decrease of open-circuit potential of the anode increased the cell voltage of the MFC and its power output. Measurements of impedance spectra for the MFC at different cell voltages resulted in determining the internal resistance (R(int)) of the MFC and it was found that R(int) is a function of cell voltage. Additionally, R(int) was equal to R(ext) at the cell voltage corresponding to maximum power, where R(ext) is the external resistance that must be applied across the circuit to obtain the maximum power output.

  17. Surface-to-surface biofilm transfer: a quick and reliable startup strategy for mixed culture microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Andreas; Bischof, Franz; Wichern, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The startup of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is known to be prone to failure or result in erratic performance impeding the research. The aim of this study was to advise a quick launch strategy for laboratory-scale MFCs that ensures steady operation performance in a short period of time. Different startup strategies were investigated and compared with membraneless single chamber MFCs. A direct surface-to-surface biofilm transfer (BFT) in an operating MFC proved to be the most efficient method. It provided steady power densities of 163 ± 13 mWm(-2) 4 days after inoculation compared to 58 ± 15 mWm(-2) after 30 days following a conventional inoculation approach. The in situ BFT eliminates the need for microbial acclimation during startup and reduces performance fluctuations caused by shifts in microbial biodiversity. Anaerobic pretreatment of the substrate and addition of suspended enzymes from an operating MFC into the new MFC proved to have a beneficial effect on startup and subsequent operation. Polarization methods were applied to characterize the startup phase and the steady state operation in terms of power densities, internal resistance and power overshoot during biofilm maturation. Applying this method a well-working MFC can be multiplied into an array of identically performing MFCs.

  18. Dark fermentation, anaerobic digestion and microbial fuel cells: An integrated system to valorize swine manure and rice bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievano, Andrea; Sciarria, Tommy Pepè; Gao, Yong Chang; Scaglia, Barbara; Salati, Silvia; Zanardo, Marina; Quiao, Wei; Dong, Renjie; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    This work describes how dark fermentation (DF), anaerobic digestion (AD) and microbial fuel cells (MFC) and solid-liquid separation can be integrated to co-produce valuable biochemicals (hydrogen and methane), bioelectricity and biofertilizers. Two integrated systems (System 1: AD+MFC, and System 2: DF+AD+MFC) are described and compared to a traditional one-stage AD system in converting a mixture (COD=124±8.1gO2kg(-1)Fresh Matter) of swine manure and rice bran. System 1 gave a biomethane yield of 182 LCH4kg(-1)COD-added, while System 2 gave L yields of bio-hydrogen and bio-methane of 27.3±7.2LH2kg(-1)COD-added and 154±14LCH4kg(-1)COD-added, respectively. A solid-liquid separation (SLS) step was applied to the digested slurry, giving solid and liquid fractions. The liquid fraction was treated via the MFC-steps, showing power densities of 12-13Wm(-3) (500Ω) and average bioelectricity yields of 39.8Whkg(-1)COD to 54.2Whkg(-1)COD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 33 CFR 183.542 - Fuel systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel systems. 183.542 Section 183... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.542 Fuel systems. (a) Each fuel system in a boat must have been tested by the boat manufacturer and not leak when subjected to the...

  20. Tribology in Manufacturing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The present book aims to provide research advances on tribology in manufacturing technology for modern industry. This book can be used as a research book for final undergraduate engineering course (for example, mechanical, manufacturing, materials, etc) or as a subject on manufacturing at the postgraduate level. Also, this book can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and tribology researchers, mechanical, mechanical, manufacturing and materials engineers, professionals in related industries with manufacturing and tribology.

  1. Development of biologically modified anodes for energy harvesting using microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, James J.; Ganguli, Rahul; Chmelka, Brad

    2012-06-01

    Biological fuel cells hold promise as an alternative energy source to batteries for unattended ground sensor applications due to the fact that they can be extremely long lived. This lifetime can be extended over batteries by scavenging fuel from the deployed environment. Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are one class of such sources that produce usable energy from small organic compounds (i.e. sugars, alcohols, organic acids, and biopolymers) which can be easily containerized or scavenged from the environment. The use of microorganisms as the anodic catalysts is what makes these systems unique from other biofuel cell designs. One of the main drawbacks of engineering a sensor system powered by an MFC is that power densities and current flux are extremely low in currently reported systems. The power density is limited by the mass transfer of the fuel source to the catalyst, the metabolism of the microbial catalysts and the electron transfer from the organism to the anode. This presentation will focus on the development of a new style of microbially-modified anodes which will increase power density to a level where a practical power source can be engineered. This is being achieved by developing a three dimensional matrix as an artificial, conductive biofilm. These artificial biofilms will allow the capture of a consortium of microbes designed for efficient metabolism of the available fuel source. Also it will keep the microbes close to the electrode allowing ready access by fuel and providing a low resistance passage of the liberated electrons from fuel oxidation.

  2. Manufacturing Experience for Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Wendy D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doherty, Ann L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Omberg, Ronald P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Mark T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, Ryan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    This report documents the results of the development and the manufacturing experience gained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) while working with the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) materials MA 956, 14YWT, and 9YWT. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. ODS materials have the potential to provide improved performance for the U-Mo concept.

  3. Fuel Element Technical Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burley, H.H. [ed.

    1956-08-01

    It is the purpose of the Fuel Element Technical Manual to Provide a single document describing the fabrication processes used in the manufacture of the fuel element as well as the technical bases for these processes. The manual will be instrumental in the indoctrination of personnel new to the field and will provide a single data reference for all personnel involved in the design or manufacture of the fuel element. The material contained in this manual was assembled by members of the Engineering Department and the Manufacturing Department at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation between the dates October, 1955 and June, 1956. Arrangement of the manual. The manual is divided into six parts: Part I--introduction; Part II--technical bases; Part III--process; Part IV--plant and equipment; Part V--process control and improvement; and VI--safety.

  4. Progress of air-breathing cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zejie; Mahadevan, Gurumurthy Dummi; Wu, Yicheng; Zhao, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an emerging technology to produce green energy and vanquish the effects of environmental contaminants. Cathodic reactions are vital for high electrical power density generated from MFCs. Recently tremendous attentions were paid towards developing high performance air-breathing cathodes. A typical air-breathing cathode comprises of electrode substrate, catalyst layer, and air-diffusion layer. Prior researches demonstrated that each component influenced the performance of air-breathing cathode MFCs. This review summarized the progress in development of the individual component and elaborated main factors to the performance of air-breathing cathode.

  5. Microbial Fuel Cells using Mixed Cultures of Wastewater for Electricity Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zain, S.M; Roslani, N.S.; Hashim, R.; Anuar, N.; Suja, F.; Basi, N.E.A.; Anuar, N.; Daud, W.R.W.

    2011-01-01

    Fossil fuels (petroleum, natural gas and coal) are the main resources for generating electricity. However, they have been major contributors to environmental problems. One potential alternative to explore is the use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which generate electricity using microorganisms. MFCs uses catalytic reactions activated by microorganisms to convert energy preserved in the chemical bonds between organic molecules into electrical energy. MFC has the ability to generate electricity during the wastewater treatment process while simultaneously treating the pollutants. This study investigated the potential of using different types of mixed cultures (raw sewage, mixed liquor from the aeration tank and return waste activated sludge) from an activated sludge treatment plant in MFCs for electricity generation and pollutant removals (COD and total kjeldahl nitrogen, TKN). The MFC in this study was designed as a dual-chambered system, in which the chambers were separated by a Nafion TM membrane using a mixed culture of wastewater as a bio catalyst. The maximum power density generated using activated sludge was 9.053 mW/ cm 2 , with 26.8 % COD removal and 40 % TKN removal. It is demonstrated that MFC offers great potential to optimize power generation using mixed cultures of wastewater. (author)

  6. Evaluation of Kefir as a New Anodic Biocatalyst Consortium for Microbial Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Gustavo; Schneedorf, José Maurício

    2018-02-21

    Kefir, a combined consortium of bacteria and yeast encapsulated by a polymeric matrix of exopolysaccharides, was used as anodic biocatalyst in a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC). Fermentation was followed during 72 h and polarization curves were obtained from linear sweep voltammetry. The effect of methylene blue as charge-transfer mediator in the kefir metabolism was evaluated. UV/Vis spectrophotometry and cyclic voltammetry were applied to evaluate the redox state of the mediator and to characterize the electrochemical activity, whereas current interruption was used for internal resistance determination. Aiming to establish a relationship between the microbial development inside the anodic chamber with the generated power in the MFC, total titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, carbohydrate assimilation, and microbial counting were assayed. The kefir-based MFC demonstrated a maximum power density of 54 mW m -2 after 24 h fermentation, revealing the potential use of kefir as a biocatalyst for microbial fuel cells.

  7. Marine microbial fuel cell: Use of stainless steel electrodes as anode and cathode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, C.; Basseguy, R.; Etcheverry, L.; Bergel, A. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, CNRS-INPT, Toulouse Cedex (France); Mollica, A. [CNR-ISMAR, Genoa (Italy); Feron, D. [SCCME, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-12-01

    Numerous biocorrosion studies have stated that biofilms formed in aerobic seawater induce an efficient catalysis of the oxygen reduction on stainless steels. This property was implemented here for the first time in a marine microbial fuel cell (MFC). A prototype was designed with a stainless steel anode embedded in marine sediments coupled to a stainless steel cathode in the overlying seawater. Recording current/potential curves during the progress of the experiment confirmed that the cathode progressively acquired effective catalytic properties. The maximal power density produced of 4 mW m{sup -2} was lower than those reported previously with marine MFC using graphite electrodes. Decoupling anode and cathode showed that the cathode suffered practical problems related to implementation in the sea, which may found easy technical solutions. A laboratory fuel cell based on the same principle demonstrated that the biofilm-covered stainless steel cathode was able to supply current density up to 140 mA m{sup -2} at +0.05 V versus Ag/AgCl. The power density of 23 mW m{sup -2} was in this case limited by the anode. These first tests presented the biofilm-covered stainless steel cathodes as very promising candidates to be implemented in marine MFC. The suitability of stainless steel as anode has to be further investigated. (author)

  8. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  9. Romanian concern for advanced fuels development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, Dumitru

    2001-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research (ICN), a subsidiary of Romanian Authority for Nuclear Activities, at Pitesti - Romania, has developed a preliminary design of a fuel bundle with 43 elements named SEU 43 for high burnup in CANDU Reactor. A very high experience in nuclear fuels manufacturing and control has also been accumulated. Additionally, on the nuclear site Pitesti there is the Nuclear Fuel Plant (NFP) qualified to manufacturing CANDU 6 type fuel, the main fuel supplier for NPP Cernavoda. A very good collaboration of ICN with NFP can lead to a low cost upgrading the facilities which ensure at present the CANDU standard fuel fabrication to be able of manufacturing also SEU 43 fuel for extended burnup. The financial founds are allocated by Romanian Authority for Nuclear Activities of the Ministry of Industry and Resources to sustain the departmental R and D program 'Nuclear Fuel'. This Program has the main objective to establish a technology for manufacturing a new CANDU fuel type destined for extended burnup. It is studied the possibility to use the Recovered Uranium (RU) resulted from LWR spent fuel reprocessing facility existing in stockpiles. The International Agency for Atomic Energy (IAEA) sustains also this program. By ROM/4/025/ Model Project, IAEA helps ICN to solve the problems regarding materials (RU, Zircaloy 4 tubes) purchasing, devices' upgrading and personnel training. The paper presents the main actions needing to be create the technical base for SEU 43 fuel bundle manufacturing. First step, the technological experiments and experimental fuel element manufacturing, will be accomplished in ICN installations. Second step, the industrial scale, need thorough studies for each installation from NFP to determine tools and technology modification imposed by the new CANDU fuel bundle manufacturing. All modifications must be done such as to the NFP, standard CANDU and SEU fuel bundles to be manufactured alternatively. (author)

  10. Quality management of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Guide presents the quality management requirements to be complied with in the procurement, design, manufacture, transport, receipt, storage, handling and operation of nuclear fuel. The Guide also applies to control rods and shield elements to be placed in the reactor. The Guide is mainly aimed for the licensee responsible for the procurement and operation of fuel, for the fuel designer and manufacturer and for other organisations, whose activities affect fuel quality and the safety of fuel transport, storage and operation. General requirements for nuclear fuel are presented in Section 114 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Decree and in Section 15 of the Government Decision (395/1991). Regulatory control of the safety of fuel is described in Guides YVL6.1, YVL6.2 and YVL6.3. An overview of the regulatory control of nuclear power plants carried out by STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland) is clarified in Guide YVL1.1

  11. Microbial fuel cell design and characterization for electricity production from wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.; Carmona-Martinez, A.; Solorza-Feria, O.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to design and characterize a lan scale, one chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) that will be used for the treatment of a variety of wastewaters, acidogenic extracts, and leachates. The MFC consisted of a horizontal cylinder built in plexiglass 78 mm long between electrodes) and 48 mm internal diameter. The cylinder was fitted with a circular anode made of stainless steel plate 1 mm thickness and a cathode made of a sandwich of 3 circular layers (from inside to outside): proton exchange membrane, flexible carbon-cloth containing 0.5 mg/cm 2 platinum catalysts, and a perforated plate of stainless steel 1 mm thickness. (Author)

  12. A phosphorus-free anolyte to enhance coulombic efficiency of microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinhua; Li, Haoran; Du, Zhuwei; Ng, How Yong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a phosphorus-free anolyte is prepared by using bicarbonate to replace phosphate buffer for application in two chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Optical density test and Bradford protein assay shows that this phosphorus-free anolyte effectively inhibits the growth and reproduction of microorganisms suspended in the solution and greatly reduces the suspended cell mass. As a result, it considerably enhances the coulombic efficiency (CE) of MFCs. When the acetate concentration is 11 mM, the CE of the MFC using the pH 7 phosphate-containing anolyte is 9.7% and the CE with the pH 8.3 phosphate-containing anolyte is 9.1%, while the CE of the MFC using the phosphorus-free anolyte (pH 8.3) achieves 26.6%. This study demonstrates that this phosphorus-free anolyte holds the potential to enhance the feasibility for practical applications of MFCs.

  13. Power generation using an activated carbon and metal mesh cathode in a microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive activated carbon (AC) air cathode was developed as an alternative to a platinum-catalyzed electrode for oxygen reduction in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). AC was cold-pressed with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder to form the cathode around a Ni mesh current collector. This cathode construction avoided the need for carbon cloth or a metal catalyst, and produced a cathode with high activity for oxygen reduction at typical MFC current densities. Tests with the AC cathode produced a maximum power density of 1220 mW/m2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 36 W/m3 based on liquid volume) compared to 1060 mW/m2 obtained by Pt catalyzed carbon cloth cathode. The Coulombic efficiency ranged from 15% to 55%. These findings show that AC is a cost-effective material for achieving useful rates of oxygen reduction in air cathode MFCs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Manufacturing network evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Farooq, Sami; Johansen, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper examines the effect of changes at the manufacturing plant level on other plants in the manufacturing network and also investigates the role of manufacturing plants on the evolution of a manufacturing network. Design/methodology/approach –The research questions are developed...... different manufacturing plants in the network and their impact on network transformation. Findings – The paper highlights the dominant role of manufacturing plants in the continuously changing shape of a manufacturing network. The paper demonstrates that a product or process change at one manufacturing...... by identifying the gaps in the reviewed literature. The paper is based on three case studies undertaken in Danish manufacturing companies to explore in detail their manufacturing plants and networks. The cases provide a sound basis for developing the research questions and explaining the interaction between...

  15. Modified Gold Electrode and Hollow Mn3O4 Nanoparticles as Electrode Materials for Microbial Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Pramod

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has attracted great attention in the scientific community as it offers the possibility of extraction of electricity from wide range of soluble and dissolved organic waste or renewable biomass, including sludge, waste water and cellulosic biomass. Microbial fuel cells are devices that utilize microbial metabolic processes to convert chemical energy via the oxidation of organic substances to produce electric current. MFCs consist of two chambers, an anode and cathode, separated by ion-permeable materials. The efficiency of producing electricity using the MFC depends on several factors such as immobilization of microorganisms on anode, mode of electron transfer, types of substrate/fuel and effectiveness of cathode materials for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, in order to immobilize the microorganisms on anode materials, we have investigated the surface modification of gold electrode (anode) using alkyl dithiol and aryl thiol with glucose. The modification processes were characterized by using contact angle measurements and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In order to study the effectiveness of cathode materials for ORR, we have synthesized hollow Mn3O 4 nanoparticles which are electrically very poor. Therefore, the hollow nanoparticles were mixed with electrically conductive multi-walled carbon nanotube as support and optimized the mixing process. This composite material shows enhanced ORR activity in all types of pH conditions. In future, we will focus to integrate anode and cathode in MFC to check its efficiency to produce electricity.

  16. The Frontiers of Additive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-03

    Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, has become a ubiquitous tool in science for its precise control over mechanical design. For additive manufacturing to work, a 3-D structure is split into thin 2D slices, and then different physical properties, such as photo-polymerization or melting, are used to grow the sequential layers. The level of control allows not only for devices to be made with a variety of materials: e.g. plastics, metals, and quantum dots, but to also have finely controlled structures leading to other novel properties. While 3-D printing is widely used by hobbyists for making models, it also has industrial applications in structural engineering, biological tissue scaffolding, customized electric circuitry, fuel cells, security, and more.

  17. Fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, C.; Alvarez-Miranda, A.

    2009-01-01

    ENSA is a well known manufacturer of multi-system primary components for the nuclear industry and is totally prepared to satisfy future market requirements in this industry. At the same time that ENSA has been gaining a reputation world wider for the supply of primary components, has been strengthening its commitment and experience in supplying spent fuel components, either pool racks or storage and transportation casks, and offers not only fabrication but also design capabilities for its products. ENSA has supplied Spent Fuel Pool Racks, in spain, Finland, Taiwan, Korea, China, and currently it is in the process of licensing its own rack design in the United States of America for the ESBWR along with Ge-Hitachi. ENSA has supplied racks for 20 pools and 22 different reactors and it has also manufactured racks under all available technologies and developed a design known as Interlock Cell Matrix whose main features are outlined in this article. Another ENSA achievement in rack technology is the use of remote control for re-racking activities instead of using divers, which improves the ALARA requirements. Regarding casks for storage and transportation, ENSA also has al leading worldwide position, with exports prevailing over the Spanish market where ENSA has supplied 16 storage and transportation casks to the Spanish nuclear power Trillo. In some cases, ENSA acts as subcontractor for other clients. Foreign markets are still a major challenge for ENSA. ENSA-is well known for its manufacturing capabilities in the nuclear industry, but has been always involved in design activities through its engineering division, which carries out different tasks: components Design; Tooling Design; Engineering and Documentation; Project Engineering; Calculations, Design and Development Engineering. (Author)

  18. Economy and the fuel market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear fuel manufacturing constitutes a considerable venture for the competitiveness of the nuclear power sector although it represents a relatively modest fraction (around 4%) of the nuclear kWh cost. The COGEMA group is participating through its branches in the control of the most part (32%) of the world manufacturing capacity of fuel for PWR. Amounting up to 242 operating installations this reactor type is the most widespread in the world. The paper discusses the costs, the fuel clients and the fuel suppliers. Data concerning the boiling water and fast neutron reactors, geographical localization of the PWR and VVER reactors all over the world, the PWR and fuel for PWR manufacturers are also presented

  19. US Army Qualification of Alternative Fuels Specified in MIL-DTL-83133H for Ground Systems Use. Final Qualification Report: JP-8 Containing Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene Manufactured Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis or Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    environmental standards, and the Department of Energy (DOE) launched several initiatives to develop a new generation of ‘ultra-clean’ transportation fuels...Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck) – A4 HETS (Heavy Equipment Transporter System) – M1070A1 PLS (Palletized Load System) – A1 DDC 8V92TA 12.0 L...Modulus of Compressibility of Diesel/ Biodiesel /HVO Blends. Energy Fuels. 2011, 26, 1336-1343. 578789 Fuels. Coordinating Research Council, Inc. 2009

  20. Profiles of Material Supplier Industries to the Automotive Manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    This report presents a study of industries supplying materials to the automobile manufacturers. As the automobile industry restructures itself to produce more fuel-efficient vehicles, many of the industries that depend on the automobile will be force...