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Sample records for mf-dependent lifetimes due

  1. Superconducting quasiparticle lifetimes due to spin-fluctuation scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinlan, S.M.; Scalapino, D.J.; Bulut, N.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting quasiparticle lifetimes associated with spin-fluctuation scattering are calculated. A Berk-Schrieffer interaction with an irreducible susceptibility given by a BCS form is used to model the quasiparticle damping due to spin fluctuations. Results are presented for both s-wave and d-wave gaps. Also, quasiparticle lifetimes due to impurity scattering are calculated for a d-wave superconductor

  2. Lifetime-Enhanced Transport in Silicon due to Spin and Valley Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansbergen, G.P.; Rahman, R.; Verduijn, J.; Tettamanzi, G.C.; Collaert, N.; Biesemans, S.; Klimeck, G.; Hollenberg, L.C.L.; Rogge, S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the observation of lifetime-enhanced transport (LET) based on perpendicular valleys in silicon by transport spectroscopy measurements of a two-electron system in a silicon transistor. The LET is manifested as a peculiar current step in the stability diagram due to a forbidden transition

  3. Estimate of lifetime excess lung cancer risk due to indoor exposure to natural radon-222 daughters in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si-Young Chang; Jeong-Ho Lee; Chung-Woo Ha

    1993-01-01

    Lifetime excess lung cancer risk due to indoor 222 Rn daughters exposure in Korea was quantitatively estimated by a modified relative risk projection model proposed by the U.S. National Academy of Science and the recent Korean life table data. The lifetime excess risk of lung cancer death attributable to annual constant exposure to Korean indoor radon daughters was estimated to be about 230/10 6 per WLM, which seemed to be nearly in the median of the range of 150-450/10 6 per WLM reported by the UNSCEAR in 1988. (1 fig., 2 tabs.)

  4. Lifetime limitations of ohmic, contacting RF MEMS switches with Au, Pt and Ir contact materials due to accumulation of ‘friction polymer’ on the contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaplewski, David A; Nordquist, Christopher D; Dyck, Christopher W; Patrizi, Gary A; Kraus, Garth M; Cowan, William D

    2012-01-01

    We present lifetime limitations and failure analysis of many packaged RF MEMS ohmic contacting switches with Au–Au, Au–Ir, and Au–Pt contact materials operating with 100 µN of contact force per contact in hermetically sealed glass wall packages. All metals were tested using the same switch design in a controlled environment to provide a comparison between the performance of the different materials and their corresponding failure mechanisms. The switch lifetimes of the different contact materials varied from several hundred cycles to 200 million cycles with different mechanisms causing failures for different contact materials. Switches with Au–Au contacts failed due to adhesion when thoroughly cleaned while switches with dissimilar metal contacts (Au–Ir and Au–Pt) operated without adhesion failures but failed due to carbon accumulation on the contacts even in a clean, packaged environment as a result of the catalytic behavior of the contact materials. Switch lifetimes correlated inversely with catalytic behavior of the contact metals. The data suggests the path to increase switch lifetime is to use favorable catalytic materials as contacts, design switches with higher contact forces to break through any residual contamination, and use cleaner, probably smaller, packages. (paper)

  5. Lifetime excess cancer risk due to carcinogens in food and beverages: Urban versus rural differences in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheasley, Roslyn; Keller, C Peter; Setton, Eleanor

    2017-09-14

    To explore differences in urban versus rural lifetime excess risk of cancer from five specific contaminants found in food and beverages. Probable contaminant intake is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contaminant concentrations in combination with dietary patterns. Contaminant concentrations for arsenic, benzene, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) were derived from government dietary studies. The dietary patterns of 34 944 Canadians from 10 provinces were available from Health Canada's Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2, Nutrition (2004). Associated lifetime excess cancer risk (LECR) was subsequently calculated from the results of the simulations. In the calculation of LECR from food and beverages for the five selected substances, two (lead and PERC) were shown to have excess risk below 10 per million; whereas for the remaining three (arsenic, benzene and PCBs), it was shown that at least 50% of the population were above 10 per million excess cancers. Arsenic residues, ingested via rice and rice cereal, registered the greatest disparity between urban and rural intake, with LECR per million levels well above 1000 per million at the upper bound. The majority of PCBs ingestion comes from meat, with values slightly higher for urban populations and LECR per million estimates between 50 and 400. Drinking water is the primary contributor of benzene intake in both urban and rural populations, with LECR per million estimates of 35 extra cancers in the top 1% of sampled population. Overall, there are few disparities between urban and rural lifetime excess cancer risk from contaminants found in food and beverages. Estimates could be improved with more complete Canadian dietary intake and concentration data in support of detailed exposure assessments in estimating LECR.

  6. Evaluation of excessive lifetime cancer risk due to natural radioactivity in the rivers sediments of Northern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Ahmed Qureshi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K present in the rivers sediments of Northern Pakistan were measured using HPGe γ-ray spectrometer to evaluate the radiation health hazard indices and excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR. Average concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in the sediments were found to be 50.66 ± 1.29, 70.15 ± 1.45 and 531.70 ± 5.45 Bq kg−1 respectively. Radium equivalent activity (190.89 Bq kg−1, outdoor external dose (87.47 nGy h−1, indoor external dose (165.39 nGy h−1, and total average annual effective dose (0.92 mSv were calculated. The hazard indices are higher than the world's average values. Total excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR was found to be 3.21 × 10−3 which is relatively higher. Numerous cancer deaths are annually reported from the Northern areas of Pakistan, which may be related to high radioactivity in the area.

  7. Nuclear lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraca, J.M.G.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of the results obtained in experiments of measurement of lifetimes for a detailed knowledge of nuclear structure is referred. Direct methods of measurement of nuclear lifetimes are described, namely, electronic methods, recoil-distance method, doppler shift atenuation method and blocking-method. A brief reference is made to indirect methods for measurement of life-times

  8. Lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossan, D.B.; Warburton, E.K.

    1974-01-01

    Lifetime measurements are discussed, concentrating on the electronic technique, the recoil distance method (RDM), and the Doppler shift attenuation method (DSAM). A brief review of several indirect timing techniques is given, and their specific advantages and applicability are considered. The relationship between lifetimes of nuclear states and the nuclear structure information obtained from them is examined. A short discussion of channeling and microwave methods of lifetime measurement is presented. (23 figures, 171 references) (U.S.)

  9. Late-Life Depressive Symptoms and Lifetime History of Major Depression: Cognitive Deficits are Largely Due to Incipient Dementia rather than Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heser, Kathrin; Bleckwenn, Markus; Wiese, Birgitt; Mamone, Silke; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Stein, Janine; Lühmann, Dagmar; Posselt, Tina; Fuchs, Angela; Pentzek, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Werle, Jochen; Weeg, Dagmar; Bickel, Horst; Brettschneider, Christian; König, Hans-Helmut; Maier, Wolfgang; Scherer, Martin; Wagner, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Late-life depression is frequently accompanied by cognitive impairments. Whether these impairments indicate a prodromal state of dementia, or are a symptomatic expression of depression per se is not well-studied. In a cohort of very old initially non-demented primary care patients (n = 2,709, mean age = 81.1 y), cognitive performance was compared between groups of participants with or without elevated depressive symptoms and with or without subsequent dementia using ANCOVA (adjusted for age, sex, and education). Logistic regression analyses were computed to predict subsequent dementia over up to six years of follow-up. The same analytical approach was performed for lifetime major depression. Participants with elevated depressive symptoms without subsequent dementia showed only small to medium cognitive deficits. In contrast, participants with depressive symptoms with subsequent dementia showed medium to very large cognitive deficits. In adjusted logistic regression models, learning and memory deficits predicted the risk for subsequent dementia in participants with depressive symptoms. Participants with a lifetime history of major depression without subsequent dementia showed no cognitive deficits. However, in adjusted logistic regression models, learning and orientation deficits predicted the risk for subsequent dementia also in participants with lifetime major depression. Marked cognitive impairments in old age depression should not be dismissed as "depressive pseudodementia", but require clinical attention as a possible sign of incipient dementia. Non-depressed elderly with a lifetime history of major depression, who remained free of dementia during follow-up, had largely normal cognitive performance.

  10. Lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, A.R.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in experimental methods of measuring the lifetimes of excited nuclear states is reviewed in three main areas. (a) Doppler Shift Attenuation Measurements (DSAM) Times: 10 -14 - 10 -11 sec.; (b) Recoil Distance Measurements (RDM) Times: 10 -9 - 10 -12 sec.; (c) Direct Electronic Timing Times: down to 10 -10 sec.; A measurement of an excited state lifetime can answer a large number of different questions. Two examples are discussed: (a) The determination of the lifetime of an isomeric transition in 93 Tc and its use in determining an upper limit for the magnitude of the parity non-conserving matrix element - /Hsub(PN)/17/2 + >. (b) The dependence of the strength of M2 transitions on isospin in nuclei in the 1dsub(3/2) -1fsub(7/2) region. (author)

  11. Life-time risk of mortality due to different levels of alcohol consumption in seven European countries: implications for low-risk drinking guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Kevin D; Gmel, Gerrit; Gmel, Gerhard; Mäkelä, Pia; Probst, Charlotte; Room, Robin; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    Low-risk alcohol drinking guidelines require a scientific basis that extends beyond individual or group judgements of risk. Life-time mortality risks, judged against established thresholds for acceptable risk, may provide such a basis for guidelines. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate alcohol mortality risks for seven European countries based on different average daily alcohol consumption amounts. The maximum acceptable voluntary premature mortality risk was determined to be one in 1000, with sensitivity analyses of one in 100. Life-time mortality risks for different alcohol consumption levels were estimated by combining disease-specific relative risk and mortality data for seven European countries with different drinking patterns (Estonia, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy and Poland). Alcohol consumption data were obtained from the Global Information System on Alcohol and Health, relative risk data from meta-analyses and mortality information from the World Health Organization. The variation in the life-time mortality risk at drinking levels relevant for setting guidelines was less than that observed at high drinking levels. In Europe, the percentage of adults consuming above a risk threshold of one in 1000 ranged from 20.6 to 32.9% for women and from 35.4 to 54.0% for men. Life-time risk of premature mortality under current guideline maximums ranged from 2.5 to 44.8 deaths per 1000 women in Finland and Estonia, respectively, and from 2.9 to 35.8 deaths per 1000 men in Finland and Estonia, respectively. If based upon an acceptable risk of one in 1000, guideline maximums for Europe should be 8-10 g/day for women and 15-20 g/day for men. If low-risk alcohol guidelines were based on an acceptable risk of one in 1000 premature deaths, then maximums for Europe should be 8-10 g/day for women and 15-20 g/day for men, and some of the current European guidelines would require downward revision. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Assessment of natural radionuclide content in deposits from drinking water purification station and excess lifetime cancer risk due to gamma radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issa, S.A.M.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Tammam, M.; Elsaman, R.

    2012-01-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclide in deposits samples taken from Thirty-six drinking water purification stations have been measured and determined using gamma-ray spectrometry system using (sodium iodide NaI (Tl) detector). Knowledge of radioactivity present in deposits of drinking water purification station enables one to assess any possible radiological hazard to humankind by the use of such materials. The natural radionuclide ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) contents have been analyzed for the deposits samples with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard nature. The Absorbed dose rate, The annual effective dose equivalent, Radium equivalent activities, Hazard indices (H ex and H in ), Gamma index, Excess lifetime cancer risk and Annual gonadal dose equivalent were calculated for investigated area. Results of the study could serve as an important baseline radiometric data for future epidemiological studies and monitoring initiatives in the study area.

  13. Lifetime Improvement by Battery Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Schmitt, Jens B.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of their batteries. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to

  14. Lifetime improvement by battery scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of its battery. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to the

  15. B meson lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccolo, M.

    1989-01-01

    The lifetime of hadrons containing b-quark has been the subject of extensive experimental work and theoretical speculation; its importance is due to implications on some of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Model, such as the top quark mass and the mixing angles. Since the pioneer measurements of the MAC and MARK II collaborations at PEP in 1983 the progress has been impressive; but many issues still remain open and await further study. In this paper the field's present status is discussed. An overview of the theoretical motivations for this measurements in the Standard Model framework is done. Then the experimental techniques used are reviewed, emphasizing the most recent measurements. A comparison of the results obtained is done and systematic errors are discussed. In conclusion there are some remarks on the further developments foreseen in the near future

  16. Nuclear lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, Georges

    Three direct techniques of lifetime measurement are emphasized: electronic methods and two methods based on the Doppler effect (the recoil distance methods or RDM, the Doppler shift attenuation methods or DSAM). Said direct methods are concerned with the direct measurement of the radioactive decay constants of nuclear excited states. They allow lifetimes of nucleus bound states whose deexcitations occur by electromagnetic transitions, to be determined. Other methods for measuring lifetimes are also examined: microwave techniques and those involving the blocking effect in crystals (direct methods) and also various indirect methods of obtaining lifetimes (γ resonance scattering, capture reactions, inelastic electron and nucleus scattering, and Coulomb deexcitation) [fr

  17. Heritability of lifetime ecstasy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Karin J H; Treur, Jorien L; Vreeker, Annabel; Brunt, Tibor M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I; Vink, Jacqueline M

    2017-09-01

    Ecstasy is a widely used psychoactive drug that users often take because they experience positive effects such as increased euphoria, sociability, elevated mood, and heightened sensations. Ecstasy use is not harmless and several immediate and long term side effects have been identified. Lifetime ecstasy use is likely to be partly influenced by genetic factors, but no twin study has determined the heritability. Here, we apply a classical twin design to a large sample of twins and siblings to estimate the heritability of lifetime ecstasy use. The sample comprised 8500 twins and siblings aged between 18 and 45 years from 5402 families registered at the Netherlands Twin Registry. In 2013-2014 participants filled out a questionnaire including a question whether they had ever used ecstasy. We used the classical twin design to partition the individual differences in liability to ecstasy use into that due to genetic, shared environmental, and residual components. Overall, 10.4% of the sample had used ecstasy during their lifetime, with a somewhat higher prevalence in males than females. Twin modelling indicated that individual differences in liability to lifetime ecstasy use are for 74% due to genetic differences between individuals, whereas shared environmental and residual factors explain a small proportion of its liability (5% and 21%, respectively). Although heritability estimates appeared to be higher for females than males, this difference was not significant. Lifetime ecstasy use is a highly heritable trait, which indicates that some people are genetically more vulnerable to start using ecstasy than others. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The total lifetime costs of smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S.R.; Prescott, E.; Sørensen, T.I.A.

    2004-01-01

    Net costs of smoking in a lifetime perspective and, hence, the economic interests in antismoking policies have been questioned. It has been proposed that the health-related costs of smoking are balanced by smaller expenditure due to shorter life expectancy.......Net costs of smoking in a lifetime perspective and, hence, the economic interests in antismoking policies have been questioned. It has been proposed that the health-related costs of smoking are balanced by smaller expenditure due to shorter life expectancy....

  19. Lifetime of organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corazza, Michael; Krebs, Frederik C; Gevorgyan, Suren A.

    2015-01-01

    tests. Comparison of the indoor and outdoor lifetimes was performed by means of the o-diagram, which constitutes the initial steps towards establishing a method for predicting the lifetime of an organic photovoltaic device under real operational conditions based on a selection of accelerated indoor...

  20. Hadronization, spin and lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Yuval; Nachshon, Itay

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of lifetimes can be done in two ways. For very short lived particles, the width can be measured. For long lived ones, the lifetime can be directly measured, for example, using a displaced vertex. Practically, the lifetime cannot be extracted for particles with intermediate lifetimes. We show that for such cases information about the lifetime can be extracted for heavy colored particles that can be produced with known polarization. For example, a t-like particle with intermediate lifetime hadronizes into a superposition of the lowest two hadronic states, T* and T (the equivalent of B* and B). Depolarization effects are governed by time scales that are much longer than the hadronization time scale, Λ QCD -1 . After a time of order 1/Δm, with Δm≡m(T*)-m(T), half of the initial polarization is lost. The polarization is totally lost after a time of order 1/Γ γ , with Γ γ = Γ(T* → Tγ). Thus, by comparing the initial and final polarization, we get information on the particle's lifetime.

  1. Charmed particle lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Conventional estimates are reviewed for charmed particle lifetimes. Free-quark models give values of (a few) x 10 -13 sec to (a few) x 10 -12 sec. The shorter of these values also follows from an extrapolation based on D → Ke/sup nu/. Possible differences among the lifetimes and production rates of D 0 , D + , F + , C 0 + , the heavy lepton tau, and the fifth quark b are discussed. Extreme values of mixing angles in a six-quark model could extend charmed particle lifetimes by a factor of at most three from the above estimates, while shorter lifetimes than those predicted could occur for some species like D 0 or F + if their nonleptonic decays were enhanced. The predictions are discussed in the light of some current experimental results, and it is estimated that sigma(pp → charm) approx. = 10 μb at 400 GeV/c. 95 references

  2. Precision lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes provide important information necessary for testing atomic theory. The authors employ resonant laser excitation of a fast atomic beam to measure excited state lifetimes by observing the decay-in-flight of the emitted fluorescence. A similar technique was used by Gaupp, et al., who reported measurements with precisions of less than 0.2%. Their program includes lifetime measurements of the low lying p states in alkali and alkali like systems. Motivation for this work comes from a need to test the atomic many-body-perturbation theory (MBPT) that is necessary for interpretation of parity nonconservation experiments in atomic cesium. The authors have measured the cesium 6p 2 P 1/2 and 6p 2 P 3/2 state lifetimes to be 34.934±0.094 ns and 30.499±0.070 ns respectively. With minor changes to the apparatus, they have extended their measurements to include the lithium 2p 2 P 1/2 and 2p 2 P 3/2 states

  3. Filter replacement lifetime prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Hendrik F.; Klein, Levente I.; Manzer, Dennis G.; Marianno, Fernando J.

    2017-10-25

    Methods and systems for predicting a filter lifetime include building a filter effectiveness history based on contaminant sensor information associated with a filter; determining a rate of filter consumption with a processor based on the filter effectiveness history; and determining a remaining filter lifetime based on the determined rate of filter consumption. Methods and systems for increasing filter economy include measuring contaminants in an internal and an external environment; determining a cost of a corrosion rate increase if unfiltered external air intake is increased for cooling; determining a cost of increased air pressure to filter external air; and if the cost of filtering external air exceeds the cost of the corrosion rate increase, increasing an intake of unfiltered external air.

  4. A Satellite Mortality Study to Support Space Systems Lifetime Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, George; Salazar, Ronald; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Dubos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the operational lifetime of satellites and spacecraft is a complex process. Operational lifetime can differ from mission design lifetime for a variety of reasons. Unexpected mortality can occur due to human errors in design and fabrication, to human errors in launch and operations, to random anomalies of hardware and software or even satellite function degradation or technology change, leading to unrealized economic or mission return. This study focuses on data collection of public information using, for the first time, a large, publically available dataset, and preliminary analysis of satellite lifetimes, both operational lifetime and design lifetime. The objective of this study is the illustration of the relationship of design life to actual lifetime for some representative classes of satellites and spacecraft. First, a Weibull and Exponential lifetime analysis comparison is performed on the ratio of mission operating lifetime to design life, accounting for terminated and ongoing missions. Next a Kaplan-Meier survivor function, standard practice for clinical trials analysis, is estimated from operating lifetime. Bootstrap resampling is used to provide uncertainty estimates of selected survival probabilities. This study highlights the need for more detailed databases and engineering reliability models of satellite lifetime that include satellite systems and subsystems, operations procedures and environmental characteristics to support the design of complex, multi-generation, long-lived space systems in Earth orbit.

  5. Possible evidence for the quantization of particle lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, R.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of widths of resonant states supports the hypothesis that particle lifetimes are quantized in units of 1/2 or possibly 1/4 the lifetime of the rho meson: (4.40 +- 0.06) x 10 -24 seconds. The probability that the observed regularity in resonance widths (lifetimes) is simply due to chance is estimated to be less than 2 x 10 -4 . Possible ramifications of this result are considered

  6. B Lifetimes and Mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Harold G.

    2009-01-01

    The Tevatron experiments, CDF and D0, have produced a wealth of new B-physics results since the start of Run II in 2001. We've observed new B-hadrons, seen new effects, and increased many-fold the precision with which we know the properties of b-quark systems. In these proceedings, we will discuss two of the most fruitful areas in the Tevatron B-physics program: lifetimes and mixing. We'll examine the experimental issues driving these analyses, present a summary of the latest results, and discuss prospects for the future.

  7. Quantum system lifetimes and measurement perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najakov, E.

    1977-05-01

    The recently proposed description of quantum system decay in terms of repeated measurement perturbations is modified. The possibility of retarded reductions to a unique quantum state, due to ineffective localization of the decay products at initial time measurements, is simply taken into account. The exponential decay law is verified again. A modified equation giving the observed lifetime in terms of unperturbed quantum decay law, measurement frequency and reduction law is derived. It predicts deviations of the observed lifetime from the umperturbed one, together with a dependence on experimental procedures. The influence of different model unperturbed decay laws and reduction laws on this effect is studied

  8. Lifetime, money and cost-benefit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes briefly many methods for explicit or implicit valuation of the loss of lifetime expectancy due to radiation exposures or other hazards. The health gain from investment in protection is compared with the health gain from a general increase in wealth. It is concluded that in many instances lifetime is valued at 1 to 10 times the gross national product produced in this time. This seems to be reasonable for rich countries whereas it may be questionable for poorer countries. Here, any investment that raises the level of living of the poorer segment of the population may have a greater effect on life expectancy. (author)

  9. Magnon lifetimes in terbium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerrum Moeller, H.; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The lifetimes of magnons propagating in the c-direction of Tb at 4.2 K have been measured by inelastic neutron scattering. In contrast to the behaviour at higher temperatures, where magnon-magnon scattering predominates, the broadening of the magnons increases towards the boundary of the single Brillouin zone, both in the acoustic and optical branches. This suggests that the scattering of the magnons by conduction electrons is important, and the observed lifetimes are consistent with a recent estimate of the magnitude of this effect. The acoustic magnons of very long wavelength behave anomalously, presumably due to dipolar interactions

  10. Lifetimes of heavy flavour particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty, R.

    1994-01-01

    The lifetimes of heavy-flavour hadrons are reviewed. After a brief discussion of the theoretical predictions, the problem of averaging lifetime measurements is discussed. The various experimental measurements are then presented and suitable averages performed. Charmed meson lifetimes are now measured to the few percent level, better that theory can predict, whilst for charmed baryons the lifetime hierarchy has been established for the first time. For beauty hadrons the lifetimes are measured at the 6-10 % level, and are in reasonable agreement with theoretical expectations. Beauty baryon studies ar just beginning. (author)

  11. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  12. Mining the bulk positron lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aourag, H.; Guittom, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to investigate the bulk positron lifetimes of new systems based on data-mining techniques. Through data mining of bulk positron lifetimes, we demonstrate the ability to predict the positron lifetimes of new semiconductors on the basis of available semiconductor data already studied. Informatics techniques have been applied to bulk positron lifetimes for different tetrahedrally bounded semiconductors in order to discover computational design rules. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Energy Savings Lifetimes and Persistence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Ian M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schiller, Steven R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Todd, Annika [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Billingsley, Megan A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goldman, Charles A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schwartz, Lisa C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This technical brief explains the concepts of energy savings lifetimes and savings persistence and discusses how program administrators use these factors to calculate savings for efficiency measures, programs and portfolios. Savings lifetime is the length of time that one or more energy efficiency measures or activities save energy, and savings persistence is the change in savings throughout the functional life of a given efficiency measure or activity. Savings lifetimes are essential for assessing the lifecycle benefits and cost effectiveness of efficiency activities and for forecasting loads in resource planning. The brief also provides estimates of savings lifetimes derived from a national collection of costs and savings for electric efficiency programs and portfolios.

  14. Positron lifetimes in deformed copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinode, Kenji; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Doyama, Masao

    1976-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were performed for Cu samples with different densities of lattice defects. The lifetime spectra were successfully resolved into two components with the help of the well established analysis program. Obtained results were quite consistent with those expected from the trapping model. The positron trapping mechanism from free to trapped states and the initial condition of the model were especially checked. Deduced values obtained for tau sub(c) (lifetime of free positrons) and tau sub(t) (lifetime of trapped positrons) were 122+-5 psec and 176+-5 psec, respectively. (auth.)

  15. Lifetime of Mechanical Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, K.

    1999-07-01

    The gas plant at Kaarstoe was built as part of the Statpipe gas transport system and went on stream in 1985. In 1993 another line was routed from the Sleipner field to carry condensate, and the plant was extended accordingly. Today heavy additional supply- and export lines are under construction, and the plant is extended more than ever. The main role of the factory is to separate the raw gas into commercial products and to pump or ship it to the markets. The site covers a large number of well-known mechanical equipment. This presentation deals with piping, mechanical and structural disciplines. The lifetime of mechanical equipment is often difficult to predict as it depends on many factors, and the subject is complex. Mechanical equipment has been kept in-house, which provides detailed knowledge of the stages from a new to a 14 years old plant. The production regularity has always been very high, as required. The standard of the equipment is well kept, support systems are efficient, and human improvisation is extremely valuable.

  16. Principal and secondary luminescence lifetime components in annealed natural quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ogundare, F.O.; Feathers, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectra from quartz can be separated into components with distinct principal and secondary lifetimes depending on certain combinations of annealing and measurement temperature. The influence of annealing on properties of the lifetimes related to irradiation dose and temperature of measurement has been investigated in sedimentary quartz annealed at various temperatures up to 900 deg. C. Time-resolved luminescence for use in the analysis was pulse stimulated from samples at 470 nm between 20 and 200 deg. C. Luminescence lifetimes decrease with measurement temperature due to increasing thermal effect on the associated luminescence with an activation energy of thermal quenching equal to 0.68±0.01eV for the secondary lifetime but only qualitatively so for the principal lifetime component. Concerning the influence of annealing temperature, luminescence lifetimes measured at 20 deg. C are constant at about 33μs for annealing temperatures up to 600 0 C but decrease to about 29μs when the annealing temperature is increased to 900 deg. C. In addition, it was found that lifetime components in samples annealed at 800 deg. C are independent of radiation dose in the range 85-1340 Gy investigated. The dependence of lifetimes on both the annealing temperature and magnitude of radiation dose is described as being due to the increasing importance of a particular recombination centre in the luminescence emission process as a result of dynamic hole transfer between non-radiative and radiative luminescence centres

  17. Aspects of silicon bulk lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    The best lifetimes attained for bulk crytalline silicon as a function of doping concentrations are analyzed. It is assumed that the dopants which set the Fermi level do not contribute to the recombination traffic which is due to the unknown defect. This defect is assumed to have two charge states: neutral and negative, the neutral defect concentration is frozen-in at some temperature T sub f. The higher doping concentrations should include the band-band Auger effect by using a generalization of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism. The generalization of the SRH mechanism is discussed. This formulation gives a straightforward procedure for incorporating both band-band and band-trap Auger effects in the SRH procedure. Two related questions arise in this context: (1) it may sometimes be useful to write the steady-state occupation probability of the traps implied by SRH procedure in a form which approximates to the Fermi-Dirac distribution; and (2) the effect on the SRH mechanism of spreading N sub t levels at one energy uniformly over a range of energies is discussed.

  18. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs....... social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP.......This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs...... in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about euro860 000 for men and about euro800 000 for women. The largest component was social care costs...

  19. Electricite de France: Lifetime Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combes, Jean-Pierre

    1991-01-01

    Electricite de France produces almost 80% of its electricity by means of standardized PWR nuclear power stations. Starting in 1986, therefore, a project known as the 'Lifetime Project' was developed, whose aim was initially to ensure that the lifetime defined at design stage (40 years in general) could be attained without major difficulty (follow up of the aging process). It then became apparent that it would be useful to know just how far it would be technically and economically possible to go. As a result, the project is now working towards increasing the lifetime of power stations. (author)

  20. Measurement of Charm Meson Lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L.P.; Zhou, G.J.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Lipeles, E.; Schmidtler, M.; Shapiro, A.; Sun, W.M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Jaffe, D.E.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Potter, E.M.; Prell, S.; Sharma, V.; Asner, D.M.; Eppich, A.; Gronberg, J.; Hill, T.S.; Korte, C.M.; Lange, D.J.; Morrison, R.J.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Roberts, D.; Tajima, H.; Behrens, B.H.; Ford, W.T.; Gritsan, A.; Krieg, H.; Roy, J.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Baker, R.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D.G.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Dombrowski, S. von; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Foland, A.D.; Gaidarev, P.; Gibbons, L.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Hopman, P.I.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Meyer, T.O.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Thayer, J.G.; Thies, P.G.; Valant-Spaight, B.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.; Athanas, M.; Avery, P.; Jones, C.D.; Lohner, M.; Prescott, C.; Rubiera, A.I.; Yelton, J.; Zheng, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Briere, R.A.; Ershov, A.; Gao, Y.S.; Kim, D.Y.; Wilson, R.; Browder, T.E.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D

    1999-01-01

    We report measurements of the D 0 , D + , and D + s meson lifetimes using 3.7 fb -1 of e + e - annihilation data collected near the Υ(4S) resonance with the CLEO detector. The measured lifetimes of the D 0 , D + , and D + s mesons are 408.5±4.1 +3.5 -3.4 fs , 1033.6±22.1 +9.9 -12.7 fs , and 486.3±15.0 +4.9 -5.1 fs . The precision of these lifetimes are comparable to those of the best previous measurements, and the systematic errors are very different. In a single experiment we find that the ratio of the D + s and D 0 lifetimes is 1.19±0.04 . copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  1. Deconvolution of Positrons' Lifetime spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderin Hidalgo, L.; Ortega Villafuerte, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we explain the iterative method previously develop for the deconvolution of Doppler broadening spectra using the mathematical optimization theory. Also, we start the adaptation and application of this method to the deconvolution of positrons' lifetime annihilation spectra

  2. A lifetime prediction method for LEDs considering mission profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wang, Huai; Zhan, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    and to benchmark the cost-competitiveness of different lighting technologies. The existing lifetime data released by LED manufacturers or standard organizations are usually applicable only for specific temperature and current levels. Significant lifetime discrepancies may be observed in field operations due...... to the varying operational and environmental conditions during the entire service time (i.e., mission profiles). To overcome the challenge, this paper proposes an advanced lifetime prediction method, which takes into account the field operation mission profiles and the statistical properties of the life data...

  3. Lifetime of the phonons in the PLT ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba-Ortega, J., E-mail: jjbarba@unal.edu.co; Joya, M. R., E-mail: mrinconj@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, carrera 30 # 45-03, Bogotá 1149 (Colombia); Londoño, F. A., E-mail: flondono@fisica.udea.edu.co [Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, Calle 67 #53-108 Of.6-105, Medellin (Colombia)

    2014-11-05

    The lifetimes at higher temperatures on lanthanum-modified lead titanate (PLT) are mainly due to the anharmonic decay of optical phonons into low-energy phonons. The temperature-independent contributions from inherent crystal defects and from boundary scattering become comparable to the phonon scattering contribution at lower temperatures. The thermal interaction is large at higher temperatures which decreases the phonon mean free path, and so the decay lifetime decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. This leads to the increased line width at higher temperatures. We made an estimate of the lifetimes for different concentrations and temperatures in PLT.

  4. Lifetime and performance of NSLS storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halama, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron light sources is measured primarily in terms of beam lifetime, beam size, and the recovery of normal operation after a section of the machine has been brought to atmospheric pressure. The beam lifetime and the beam size depend on the following phenomena: Beam gas interaction which can be either elastic or inelastic scattering on residual gas nuclei or electrons. With the exception of low energy machines, this phenomenon represents the main limiting factor on lifetime; Beam interaction with trapped ions causing both beam loss and defocussing. Residual gas molecules are ionized both by circulating beam and synchrotron radiation. The cross sections for both processes are comparable. The effects of this phenomenon are most troublesome at low energies. The problem can be eliminated by switching to positron beams. Installing clearing electrodes has also been successful; Intrabeam scattering (Touschek effect) is caused by Coulomb scattering among electrons of the same bunch as they execute betatron oscillations. The Touschek effect is strongly dependent on energy and in general is a problem only in low energy machines; and Various instabilities causing both slow and fast beam decay which have been observed in both NSLS rings. A special case due to dust particles that fall into the electron beam is commonly observed in early stages of conditioning. Coherent collective instabilities will not be discussed in this paper. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Lifetime and performance of NSLS storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halama, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron light sources is measured primarily in terms of beam lifetime, beam size, and the recovery of normal operation after a section of the machine has been brought to atmospheric pressure. The beam lifetime and the beam size depend on the following phenomena: Beam gas interaction which can be either elastic or inelastic scattering on residual gas nuclei or electrons. With the exception of low energy machines, this phenomenon represents the main limiting factor on lifetime; Beam interaction with trapped ions causing both beam loss and defocussing. Residual gas molecules are ionized both by circulating beam and synchrotron radiation. The cross sections for both processes are comparable. The effects of this phenomenon are most troublesome at low energies. The problem can be eliminated by switching to positron beams. Installing clearing electrodes has also been successful; Intrabeam scattering (Touschek effect) is caused by Coulomb scattering among electrons of the same bunch as they execute betatron oscillations. The Touschek effect is strongly dependent on energy and in general is a problem only in low energy machines; and Various instabilities causing both slow and fast beam decay which have been observed in both NSLS rings. A special case due to dust particles that fall into the electron beam is commonly observed in early stages of conditioning. Coherent collective instabilities will not be discussed in this paper. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Occupational risk and lifetime exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapp, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Any lowering of annual radiation limits for occupational exposure should be based on industry experience with lifetime doses and not on a worst case career exposure of 47 years. Two decades of experience show a lifetime accumulation of less than 1.5 rem for workers with measurable exposure. This is 5% of the normal lifetime exposure of Americans to natural and medical radiation. Any epidemiology of the US nuclear power workforce's two decade long exposure would have to focus on excess leukemia. Application of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer mortality shows that too few leukemias would be expressed to permit a feasible epidemiology. Ionizing radiation appears to be a mild carcinogen as compared to physical and chemical agents presented in the occupational environment. A realistic factor in determining any change in occupational exposure limits for ionizing radiation should take into account the past performance of the licensee and potential health effects applicable to the workplace. Specifically, the lifetime exposure data for workers at nuclear power plants and naval shipyards should be considered. The nuclear industry and the US Navy have detailed data on the annual exposure of workers with a combined collective exposure approaching 1 million worker-rem. The lifetime dose for naval personnel and shipyard workers averages 1.1 rem J 1990. Shipyard workers have an annual dose of 0.28 rem per work-year and a mean exposure time of 4.4 years. The data apply to workers with measurable dose

  7. RDM lifetime measurement in 167Lu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohilla, Aman; Gupta, C.K.; Chamoli, S.K.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Ashok Kumar; Govil, I.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we are presenting the experiment performed for measuring lifetime in 167 Lu, which provides the measurement of the structural behavior of the nuclei due to single particle excitation. The enhanced γ-ray detection GDA setup present at IUAC was used and the data was acquired in the singles mode with the condition when any two of the BGO's element fire in coincidence with a Ge detector. The online data acquisition program CANDLE was used for data acquire in conjunction with CAMAC based data acquisition hardware

  8. Nanoparticle discrimination based on wavelength and lifetime-multiplexed cathodoluminescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garming, Mathijs W H; Weppelman, I Gerward C; de Boer, Pascal; Martínez, Felipe Perona; Schirhagl, Romana; Hoogenboom, Jacob P; Moerland, Robert J

    2017-08-31

    Nanomaterials can be identified in high-resolution electron microscopy images using spectrally-selective cathodoluminescence. Capabilities for multiplex detection can however be limited, e.g., due to spectral overlap or availability of filters. Also, the available photon flux may be limited due to degradation under electron irradiation. Here, we demonstrate single-pass cathodoluminescence-lifetime based discrimination of different nanoparticles, using a pulsed electron beam. We also show that cathodoluminescence lifetime is a robust parameter even when the nanoparticle cathodoluminescence intensity decays over an order of magnitude. We create lifetime maps, where the lifetime of the cathodoluminescence emission is correlated with the emission intensity and secondary-electron images. The consistency of lifetime-based discrimination is verified by also correlating the emission wavelength and the lifetime of nanoparticles. Our results show how cathodoluminescence lifetime provides an additional channel of information in electron microscopy.

  9. Lifetime results from heavy quark systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadimitriou, V.

    1997-11-01

    We present the latest measurements of weakly decaying b-hadrons from experiments at e + e - and p anti p colliders. These measurements include the average lifetime of b-hadrons, lifetimes of the B - , B 0 and B 0 s mesons, the average lifetime of b-baryons and lifetimes of the Λ b and Ξ b baryons

  10. Genotypic-specific variance in Caenorhabditis elegans lifetime fecundity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, S Anaid; Viney, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Organisms live in heterogeneous environments, so strategies that maximze fitness in such environments will evolve. Variation in traits is important because it is the raw material on which natural selection acts during evolution. Phenotypic variation is usually thought to be due to genetic variation and/or environmentally induced effects. Therefore, genetically identical individuals in a constant environment should have invariant traits. Clearly, genetically identical individuals do differ phenotypically, usually thought to be due to stochastic processes. It is now becoming clear, especially from studies of unicellular species, that phenotypic variance among genetically identical individuals in a constant environment can be genetically controlled and that therefore, in principle, this can be subject to selection. However, there has been little investigation of these phenomena in multicellular species. Here, we have studied the mean lifetime fecundity (thus a trait likely to be relevant to reproductive success), and variance in lifetime fecundity, in recently-wild isolates of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that these genotypes differed in their variance in lifetime fecundity: some had high variance in fecundity, others very low variance. We find that this variance in lifetime fecundity was negatively related to the mean lifetime fecundity of the lines, and that the variance of the lines was positively correlated between environments. We suggest that the variance in lifetime fecundity may be a bet-hedging strategy used by this species.

  11. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy study of Kapton thin foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, G. S.; Ravelli, L.; Löwe, B.; Egger, W.; Keeble, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Variable energy positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (VE-PALS) experiments on polyimide material Kapton are reported. Thin Kapton foils are widely used in a variety of mechanical, electronic applications. PALS provides a sensitive probe of vacancy-related defects in a wide range of materials, including open volume in polymers. Varying the positron implantation energy enables direct measurement of thin foils. Thin Kapton foils are also commonly used to enclose the positron source material in conventional PALS measurements performed with unmoderated radionuclide sources. The results of depth-profiled positron lifetime measurements on 7.6 μm and 25 μm Kapton foils are reported and determine a dominant 385(1) ps lifetime component. The absence of significant nanosecond lifetime component due to positronium formation is confirmed.

  12. Recoil distance lifetime measurements in 122,124Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govil, I. M.; Kumar, A.; Iyer, H.; Li, H.; Garg, U.; Ghugre, S. S.; Johnson, T.; Kaczarowski, R.; Kharraja, B.; Naguleswaran, S.; Walpe, J. C.

    1998-02-01

    Lifetimes of the lower-excited states in 122,124Xe are measured using the recoil-distance Doppler-shift technique. The reactions 110Pd(16O,4n)122Xe and 110Pd(18O,4n)124Xe at a beam energy of 66 MeV were used for this experiment. The lifetimes of the 2+, 4+, 6+, and 8+ states of the ground state band were extracted using the computer code LIFETIME including the corrections due to the side feeding and the nuclear deorientation effects. The lifetime of the 2+ state in 122Xe agrees with the recoil distance method (RDM) measurements but for the 124Xe it does not agree with the RDM measurements but agrees with the Coulomb-excitation experiment. The measured B(E2) values for both the nuclei are compared with the standard algebraic and the multishell models.

  13. Lifetime value in business process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Souček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on lifetime value assessment and its implementation and application in business processes. The lifetime value is closely connected to customer relationship management. The paper presents results of three consecutive researches devoted to issues of customer relationship management. The first two from 2008 and 2010 were conducted as quantitative ones; the one from 2009 had qualitative nature. The respondents were representatives of particular companies. The means for data collection was provided by ReLa system. We will focus on individual attributes of lifetime value of a customer, and relate them to approaches of authors mentioned in introduction. Based on the qualitative research data, the paper focuses on individual customer lifetime value parameters. These parameters include: the cost to the customer relationship acquisition and maintenance, profit generated from a particular customer, customer awareness value, the level of preparedness to adopt new products, the value of references and customer loyalty level. For each of these parameters, the paper provides specific recommendations. Moreover, it is possible to learn about the nature of these parameter assessments in the Czech environment.

  14. Lifetime of heavy flavour particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1985-10-01

    Recent measurements of the lifetime of the tau leptons and charm and beauty hadrons are reviewed and their significance for the couplings of the charged weak current, flavour mixing, and models relating quarks to hadron decay are discussed. 70 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs

  15. NPP lifetime philosophy: the transatlantic difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowry, Christofer

    1998-01-01

    Fundamental institutional and cultural differences in the transatlantic nuclear power industries, and in particular those between the Nordic countries and the United States, have driven divergent plant life management strategies -strategies resulting in distinctly different plant performance. Recognition of the linkage between three key components of overall Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) performance - yearly O and M costs, safety, and effective plant lifetime -is based on different institutional perspectives. In the Nordic countries, explicit recognition of this linkage has been historically translated into an integrated approach to plant performance. American NPPs, however, have been forced to focus primarily on near term O and M performance and regulatory mandated investment. While Nordic NPPs view capital investment in plant lifetime management and modernization as necessary to avoid declining plant performance and the cost of replacement power, American NPPs exhibit reluctance for such investments due to the difficulty of justifying the associated short-term costs. The diverging histories of two NPPs of the same vintage and design, one in Sweden and one in the United States, exemplify the potential ramifications of these approaches. The Swedish plant continues to operate with excellent performance indicators, while undertaking a comprehensive and long-term modernization program. The American facility is likely to be decommissioned due to unsustainable economic performance. (author)

  16. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow......In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping...

  17. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of chemotherapy distribution in solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Marjorie; Watson, Adrienne L.; Anderson, Leah; Largaespada, David A.; Provenzano, Paolo P.

    2017-11-01

    Doxorubicin is a commonly used chemotherapeutic employed to treat multiple human cancers, including numerous sarcomas and carcinomas. Furthermore, doxorubicin possesses strong fluorescent properties that make it an ideal reagent for modeling drug delivery by examining its distribution in cells and tissues. However, while doxorubicin fluorescence and lifetime have been imaged in live tissue, its behavior in archival samples that frequently result from drug and treatment studies in human and animal patients, and murine models of human cancer, has to date been largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate imaging of doxorubicin intensity and lifetimes in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections from mouse models of human cancer with multiphoton excitation and multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Multiphoton excitation imaging reveals robust doxorubicin emission in tissue sections and captures spatial heterogeneity in cells and tissues. However, quantifying the amount of doxorubicin signal in distinct cell compartments, particularly the nucleus, often remains challenging due to strong signals in multiple compartments. The addition of FLIM analysis to display the spatial distribution of excited state lifetimes clearly distinguishes between signals in distinct compartments such as the cell nuclei versus cytoplasm and allows for quantification of doxorubicin signal in each compartment. Furthermore, we observed a shift in lifetime values in the nuclei of transformed cells versus nontransformed cells, suggesting a possible diagnostic role for doxorubicin lifetime imaging to distinguish normal versus transformed cells. Thus, data here demonstrate that multiphoton FLIM is a highly sensitive platform for imaging doxorubicin distribution in normal and diseased archival tissues.

  18. Lifetime of a black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlitz, R.D.; Willey, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    We study the constraints placed by quantum mechanics upon the lifetime of a black hole. In the context of a moving-mirror analog model for the Hawking radiation process, we conclude that the period of Hawking radiation must be followed by a much longer period during which the remnant mass (of order m/sub P/) may be radiated away. We are able to place a lower bound on the time required for this radiation process, which translates into a lower bound for the lifetime of the black hole. Particles which are emitted during the decay of the remnant, like the particles which comprise the Hawking flux, may be uncorrelated with each other. But each particle emitted from the decaying remnant is correlated with one particle emitted as Hawking radiation. The state which results after the remnant has evaporated is one which locally appears to be thermal, but which on a much larger scale is marked by extensive correlations

  19. Luminosity lifetime in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, G.; Finley, D.; Johnson, R.P.; Kerns, Q.; McCarthy, J.; Siemann, R.; Zhang, P.

    1988-01-01

    Since the inauguration of colliding proton-antiproton operations in 1987, the Tevatron has exhibited luminosity lifetimes shorter than expected. During a typical colliding beam storage period, called a store, luminosity is calculated periodically by measuring the charge and emittances of each bunch. The growth of the transverse bunch emittances is the dominant cause of luminosity deterioration. Throughout, this period, the position spectrum of the bunches exhibited betatron signals larger than expected from Schottky noise. A model assuming externally driven betatron oscillations explains both the betatron signals and the emittance growth. A program is underway to improve the Tevatron luminosity lifetime. The abort kickers have been identified as sources of emittance growth, and some quadrupole power supplies are further candidates. Because the horizontal dispersion through the RF cavities is nonzero, RF phase noise has been investigated. Noise in the main dipole regulation circuit has also been studied. 13 refs., 4 figs

  20. Angular distributions as lifetime probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Grossman, Yuval [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their width. There is, however, a problematic region, where the width is too small to be determined directly, and too large to generate a secondary vertex. For a collection of colored, spin polarized particles, hadronization depolarizes the particles prior to their decay. The amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this paper we apply this method to a realistic scenario of a top-like particle that can be produced at the LHC. We study how depolarization affects the angular distributions of the decay products and derive an equation for the distributions that is sensitive to the lifetime.

  1. Direct measurements of the lifetime of medium-heavy hypernuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, X.; Tang, L.; Chen, C.; Margaryan, A.; Wood, S. A.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Badui, R.; Baturin, P.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chen, X.; Chiba, A.; Christy, M. E.; Dalton, M. M.; Danagoulian, S.; De Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fujii, Y.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Gogami, T.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kawama, D.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Markowitz, P.; Marikyan, G.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman; Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.; HKS (JLab E02-017) Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    The lifetime of a Λ particle embedded in a nucleus (hypernucleus) decreases from that of free Λ decay mainly due to the opening of the ΛN → NN weak decay channel. However, it is generally believed that the lifetime of a hypernucleus attains a constant value (saturation) for medium to heavy hypernuclear masses, yet this hypothesis has been difficult to verify. This paper presents a direct measurement of the lifetime of medium-heavy hypernuclei that were hyper-fragments produced by fission or break-up from heavy hypernuclei initially produced with a 2.34 GeV photon-beam incident on thin Fe, Cu, Ag, and Bi target foils. For each event, fragments were detected in coincident pairs by a low-pressure multi-wire proportional chamber system. The lifetime was extracted from decay time spectrum formed by the difference of the time zeros between the pairs. The measured lifetime from each target is actually a statistical average over a range of mass with mean about 1/2 of the target mass and appears to be a constant of about 200 ps. Although this result cannot exclude unexpected shorter or longer lifetimes for some specific hypernuclei or hypernuclear states, it shows that a systematic decrease in lifetime as hypernuclear mass increases is not a general feature for hypernuclei with mean mass up to A ≈ 130. On the other hand, the success of this experiment and its technique shows that the time delayed fissions observed and used by all the lifetime measurements done so far on heavy hypernuclei could likely have originated from hyper-fragments lighter than the assumed masses.

  2. Maintenance engineering of lifetime management programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervia Ruperez, F.

    1997-01-01

    The complexity of nuclear power plants obliges to stablish the adecuated management of its lifetime. This article describes the methodologies and the improvement the evaluation of lifetime programs and specially in Garona and Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plants. (Author)

  3. Review of charm and beauty lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Harry W. K.

    1999-01-01

    A review of the latest experimental results on charm and beauty particle lifetimes is presented together with a brief summary of measurement methods used for beauty particle lifetime measurements. There have been significant updates to the D s + /D 0 , B + /B d 0 and Λ b 0 /B d 0 lifetime ratios which have some theoretical implications. However more precise measurements are still needed before one can make conclusive statements about the theory used to calculate the particle lifetimes

  4. Endogenous fertility and development traps with endogenous lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Fanti, Luciano; Gori, Luca

    2010-01-01

    We extend the literature on endogenous lifetime and economic growth by Chakraborty (2004) and Bunzel and Qiao (2005) to endogenous fertility. We show that development traps due to underinvestments in health cannot appear when fertility is an economic decision variable and the costs of children are represented by a constant fraction of the parents' income used for their upbringing.

  5. Beam lifetime measurement and analysis in Indus-2 electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    was gradually reduced (at 100 mA stored current, average pressure: 1.2 × 10. −9. Torr) due ... of all working beamlines (open for synchrotron radiation users) were kept closed to avoid any variation in ... Beam lifetime (hours). Beam current (mA).

  6. On luminescence lifetimes in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Galloway, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present results of investigations concerning the time dependence of luminescence emission relative to the time of stimulation in quartz. Measurements of time-resolved spectra were performed on a new versatile pulsed light emitting diode system using 525 nm stimulation, an 11 μs duration pulse, a repetition rate of 11 kHz and a 64 μs dynamic range. Effects on luminescence lifetime resulting from sample treatments such as optical stimulation, irradiation, and preheating, are reported

  7. Lifetime measurement in 144Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, H.J.; Gast, W.; Georgiev, A.; Jaeger, H.M.; Lieder, R.M.; Utzelmann, S.; Gierlik, M.; Morek, T.; Przestrzelska, K.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Dewald, A.; Kuehn, R.; Meier, C.; Ender, C.; Haertlein, T.

    1996-01-01

    The lifetime measurements of excited states in 144 Gd were carried out using the Koeln RDM-plunger together with the 2 x 3 CLUSTER detector setup in Heidelberg. The nucleus was populated in the 100 Mo( 48 Ti,4n) 144 Gd reaction at a beam energy of 205 MeV giving a recoil velocity of v/c = 2.6 %. Three and higher fold γ-ray coincidences were measured at 12 target-stopper distances ranged from 0 to 400 μm. Both the dipole and quadrupole bands in 144 Gd have been observed. The analysis is in progress

  8. Lifetime of superheated steam components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoklossa, K.H.; Oude-Hengel, H.H.; Kraechter, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    The current evaluation schemes in use for judging the lifetime expectations of superheated steam components are compared with each other. The influence of pressure and temperature fluctuations, the differences in the strength of the wall, and the spread band of constant-strainrates are critically investigated. The distribution of these contributory effects are demonstrated in the hight of numerous measuring results. As an important supplement to these evaluation schemes a newly developed technique is introduced which is designed to calculate failure probabilities. (orig./RW) [de

  9. The mass-lifetime relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2018-05-01

    In a recent "AstroNote," I described a simple exercise on the mass-luminosity relation for main sequence stars as an example of exposing students in a general education science course of lower mathematical level to the use of quantitative skills such as collecting and analyzing data. Here I present another attempt at a meaningful experience for such students that again involves both the gathering and analysis of numerical data and comparison with accepted result, this time on the relationship of the mass and lifetimes of main sequence stars. This experiment can stand alone or be used as an extension of the previous mass-luminosity relationship experiment.

  10. The puzzle of neutron lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review the role of the neutron lifetime and discuss the present status of measurements. In view of the large discrepancy observed by the two most precise individual measurements so far we describe the different techniques and point out the principle strengths and weaknesses. In particular we discuss the estimation of systematic uncertainties and its correlation to the statistical ones. In order to solve the present puzzle, many new experiments are either ongoing or being proposed. An overview on their possible contribution to this field will be given.

  11. Personality, IQ, and Lifetime Earnings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensowski, Miriam

    2018-01-01

    This paper estimates the effects of personality traits and IQ on lifetime earnings of the men and women of the Terman study, a high-IQ U.S. sample. Age-by-age earnings profiles allow a study of when personality traits affect earnings most, and for whom the effects are strongest. I document...... a concave life-cycle pattern in the payoffs to personality traits, with the largest effects between the ages of 40 and 60. An interaction of traits with education reveals that personality matters most for highly educated men. The largest effects are found for Conscientiousness, Extraversion...

  12. Lifetime measurement in 136Pm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toney, D.; Zhong, Q.; De Angelis, G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the electromagnetic transition probabilities in the doublet bands of 136 Pm. These two bands have been observed up to Iπ = (21 + ). Contrary to the case of 134 Pr, the B(M1)/B(E2) ratios take similar values within the error bars in 136 Pm. This is a strong indication that there is considerable difference between the two nuclei. However, a lifetime measurement in 136 Pm is needed to shed light on the scale and the origin of the difference

  13. Minority Carrier Lifetime Studies of Narrow Bandgap Antimonide Superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoglund, Linda; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Fisher, Anita; Keo, Sam; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study optical modulation response and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to study mid-wave Ga-free InAs/InAsSb superlattices. The minority carrier lifetimes in the different samples varied from 480 ns to 4700 ns, partly due to different background doping concentrations. It was shown that the photoluminescence intensity can be used as a fast non-destructive tool to predict the material quality. It was also demonstrated that it is crucial to use a low excitation power in the photoluminescence measurements in order to get a good correlation between the photoluminescence intensity and the minority carrier lifetime.

  14. Predicting the Lifetimes of Nuclear Waste Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Fraser

    2014-03-01

    As for many aspects of the disposal of nuclear waste, the greatest challenge we have in the study of container materials is the prediction of the long-term performance over periods of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. Various methods have been used for predicting the lifetime of containers for the disposal of high-level waste or spent fuel in deep geological repositories. Both mechanical and corrosion-related failure mechanisms need to be considered, although until recently the interactions of mechanical and corrosion degradation modes have not been considered in detail. Failure from mechanical degradation modes has tended to be treated through suitable container design. In comparison, the inevitable loss of container integrity due to corrosion has been treated by developing specific corrosion models. The most important aspect, however, is to be able to justify the long-term predictions by demonstrating a mechanistic understanding of the various degradation modes.

  15. The lifetime of the nuclear alternators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillard, J.M.; Guigues, B.

    1989-01-01

    The lifetime of an alternator, used in the nuclear domain, is investigated. The preventive actions, concerning the stresses (electrical mechanical or thermal), adopted during the fabrication processes and the severity and frequency of unordinary operating conditions, are analyzed. The aging modes of the alternator main units are studied. The procedures that can be applied to detect the beginning of the degradation, and to avoid an accident during operation are discussed. The turboalternators aging mechanisms are reviewed. It is shown that the mechanical or thermal fatigue, due to regime changements during operation and successive starts, are the main sources of problems. The alternator aging depends on the periodic inspections, on the preventive maintenance, and on the operating conditions [fr

  16. Uncertainties in the proton lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Rudaz, S.; Gaillard, M.K.

    1980-04-01

    We discuss the masses of the leptoquark bosons m(x) and the proton lifetime in Grand Unified Theories based principally on SU(5). It is emphasized that estimates of m(x) based on the QCD coupling and the fine structure constant are probably more reliable than those using the experimental value of sin 2 theta(w). Uncertainties in the QCD Λ parameter and the correct value of α are discussed. We estimate higher order effects on the evolution of coupling constants in a momentum space renormalization scheme. It is shown that increasing the number of generations of fermions beyond the minimal three increases m(X) by almost a factor of 2 per generation. Additional uncertainties exist for each generation of technifermions that may exist. We discuss and discount the possibility that proton decay could be 'Cabibbo-rotated' away, and a speculation that Lorentz invariance may be violated in proton decay at a detectable level. We estimate that in the absence of any substantial new physics beyond that in the minimal SU(5) model the proton lifetimes is 8 x 10 30+-2 years

  17. A Lifetime Prediction Method for LEDs Considering Real Mission Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wang, Huai; Zhan, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    operations due to the varying operational and environmental conditions during the entire service time (i.e., mission profiles). To overcome the challenge, this paper proposes an advanced lifetime prediction method, which takes into account the field operation mission profiles and also the statistical......The Light-Emitting Diode (LED) has become a very promising alternative lighting source with the advantages of longer lifetime and higher efficiency than traditional ones. The lifetime prediction of LEDs is important to guide the LED system designers to fulfill the design specifications...... properties of the life data available from accelerated degradation testing. The electrical and thermal characteristics of LEDs are measured by a T3Ster system, used for the electro-thermal modeling. It also identifies key variables (e.g., heat sink parameters) that can be designed to achieve a specified...

  18. Lifetime embrittlement of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreyns, P.H..; Bourgeois, W.F.; Charpentier, P.L.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Franklin, D.G.; White, C.J.

    1994-08-01

    Over a core lifetime, the reactor materials Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium may become embrittled due to the absorption of corrosion- generated hydrogen and to neutron irradiation damage. Results are presented on the effects of fast fluence on the fracture toughness of wrought Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium; Zircaloy-4 to hafnium butt welds; and hydrogen precharged beta treated and weld metal Zircaloy-4 for fluences up to a maximum of approximately 150 x 10 24 n/M 2 (> 1 Mev). While Zircaloy-4 did not exhibit a decrement in K IC due to irradiation, hafnium and butt welds between hafnium and Zircaloy-4 are susceptible to embrittlement with irradiation. The embrittlement can be attributed to irradiation strengthening, which promotes cleavage fracture in hafnium and hafnium-Zircaloy welds, and, in part, to the lower chemical potential of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 compared to hafnium, which causes hydrogen, over time, to drift from the hafnium end toward the Zircaloy-4 end and to precipitate at the interface between the weld and base-metal interface. Neutron radiation apparently affects the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium in different ways. Possible explanations for these differences are suggested. It was found that Zircaloy-4 is preferred over Zircaloy-2 in hafnium-to- Zircaloy butt-weld applications due to its absence of a radiation- induced reduction in K IC plus its lower hydrogen absorption characteristics compared with Zircaloy-2

  19. Lifetime loss through lung cancer in Denmark and Sweden in relation to radon levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjorup, H.L.; Hansen, H.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Radon levels in Swedish houses are 2.1 times higher than in Danish. Results show no positive correlation with cumulative lifetime loss due to lung cancer for the period 1972-1978, which in Denmark was 2.0 times that in Sweden. Neither do they show any positive correlation with lifetime loss due to leukemia, which was the same in Sweden and Denmark, or with lifetime loss due to total neoplasms. Lung cancer mortality figures resemble those for bronchitis, asthma and emphysema. The authors thus see no special radiogenic effect of the high Swedish radon levels. (author)

  20. Personality, IQ, and Lifetime Earnings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensowski, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Talented individuals are seen as drivers of long-term growth, but how do they realize their full potential? In this paper, I show that lifetime earnings of high-IQ men and women are substantially influenced by their personality traits, in addition to intelligence and education. Personality traits......, as identified in a factor model, significantly affect earnings, but not for young workers. The effects are furthermore heterogeneous by educational attainment. For women, personality traits do not affect family earnings in the same way as own earnings. Personality and IQ also influence earnings indirectly...... through education, which has sizeable positive rates of return for men in this sample. Women’s returns to education past a bachelor’s degree are lowered through worse marriage prospects, which offset gains to education in terms of own earnings. The causal effect of education is identified through matching...

  1. Measurement of the BS lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siccama, I.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the B s lifetime using 3 million hadronic Z decays collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP from 1991 to 1994. Decays of B s mesons are tagged by the reconstruction of a D s - →φπ - or D s - →K *0 K - decay (including the charge conjugated states of these decay modes). The decay time is obtained by reconstructing both the B s momentum and the B s flight distance. The combined result for the D s -lepton and D s -hadron samples is: τ(B s )=1.54±0.31±0.15 ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. (orig./HSI)

  2. Lifetime of Organic Photovoltaics: Status and Predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Madsen, Morten Vesterager; Roth, Bérenger

    2016-01-01

    The results of a meta-analysis conducted on organic photovoltaics (OPV) lifetime data reported in the literature is presented through the compilation of an extensive OPV lifetime database based on a large number of articles, followed by analysis of the large body of data. We fully reveal the prog......The results of a meta-analysis conducted on organic photovoltaics (OPV) lifetime data reported in the literature is presented through the compilation of an extensive OPV lifetime database based on a large number of articles, followed by analysis of the large body of data. We fully reveal...... the progress of reported OPV lifetimes. Furthermore, a generic lifetime marker has been defi ned, which helps with gauging and comparing the performance of different architectures and materials from the perspective of device stability. Based on the analysis, conclusions are drawn on the bottlenecks...

  3. Due diligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghera, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act requires that every employer shall ensure the health and safety of workers in the workplace. Issues regarding the practices at workplaces and how they should reflect the standards of due diligence were discussed. Due diligence was described as being the need for employers to identify hazards in the workplace and to take active steps to prevent workers from potentially dangerous incidents. The paper discussed various aspects of due diligence including policy, training, procedures, measurement and enforcement. The consequences of contravening the OHS Act were also described

  4. The Susquehanna plant lifetime excellence program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the Susquehanna plant lifetime excellence program (SPLEX) blends many of the objectives of a new managing for excellence program with plant life extension objectives to achieve excellence in the lifetime operation and availability of the two-unit Susquehanna steam electric station. Investments in lifetime excellence improvements will provide near-term, as well as plant life extension, benefits. A high-quality lifetime experience record, together with extensive, periodic technical assessments and cost-benefit analyses, will provide conclusive justification for future extensions of the unit operating licenses

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  6. Lifetime of titanium filament at constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.S.; Lanni, C.

    1981-01-01

    Titanium Sublimation Pump (TSP) represents the most efficient and the least expensive method to produce Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) in storage rings. In ISABELLE, a proton storage accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, for example, TSP provides a pumping speed for hydrogen of > 2 x 10 6 l/s. Due to the finite life of titanium filaments, new filaments have to be switched in before the end of filament burn out, to ensure smooth operation of the accelerator. Therefore, several operational modes that can be used to activate the TSP were studied. The constant current mode is a convenient way of maintaining constant evaporating rate by increasing the power input while the filament diameter decreases as titanium evaporates. The filaments used in this experiment were standard Varian 916-0024 filaments made of Ti 85%, Mo 15% alloy. During their lifetime at a constant current of 48 amperes, the evaporation rate rose to a maximum at about 10% of their life and then flattened out to a constant value, 0.25 g/hr. The maximum evaporation rate occurs coincidently with the recrystallization of 74% Ti 26% Mo 2 from microstructure crystalline at higher titanium concentration to macrostructure crystalline at lower titanium concentration. As the macrocrystal grows, the slip plane develops at the grain boundary resulting in high resistance at the slip plane which will eventually cause the filament burn out due to local heating

  7. Fusion-component lifetime analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.

    1982-09-01

    A one-dimensional computer code has been developed to examine the lifetime of first-wall and impurity-control components. The code incorporates the operating and design parameters, the material characteristics, and the appropriate failure criteria for the individual components. The major emphasis of the modeling effort has been to calculate the temperature-stress-strain-radiation effects history of a component so that the synergystic effects between sputtering erosion, swelling, creep, fatigue, and crack growth can be examined. The general forms of the property equations are the same for all materials in order to provide the greatest flexibility for materials selection in the code. The individual coefficients within the equations are different for each material. The code is capable of determining the behavior of a plate, composed of either a single or dual material structure, that is either totally constrained or constrained from bending but not from expansion. The code has been utilized to analyze the first walls for FED/INTOR and DEMO and to analyze the limiter for FED/INTOR

  8. Lifetime Extension Report: Progress on the SAVY-4000 Lifetime Extension Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Cynthia F.; Smith, Paul Herrick; Weis, Eric M.; Blair, Michael W.; Stone, Timothy Amos; Veirs, Douglas Kirk; Reeves, Kirk Patrick; Karns, Tristan; Oka, Jude M.; Keller, Jennie; Meincke, Linda Jeanne; Torres, Joseph Angelo; Herman, Matthew Joseph; Weaver, Brian Phillip; Adams, Jillian Cathleen; Trautschold, Olivia Carol

    2016-01-01

    The 3-year accelerated aging study of the SAVY-4000 O-ring shows very little evidence of significant degradation to samples subjected to aggressive elevated temperature and radiation conditions. Whole container thermal aging studies followed by helium leakage testing and compression set measurements were used to establish an estimate for a failure criterion for O-ring compression set of ?65 %. The whole container aging studies further show that the air flow and efficiency functions of the filter do not degrade significantly after thermal aging. However, the degradation of the water-resistant function leads to water penetration failure after four months at 210°C, but does not cause failure after 10 months at 120°C (130°C is the maximum operating temperature for the PTFE membrane). The thermal aging data for O-ring compression set do not meet the assumptions of standard time-temperature superposition analysis for accelerated aging studies. Instead, the data suggest that multiple degradation mechanisms are operative, with a reversible mechanism operative at low aging temperatures and an irreversible mechanism dominating at high aging temperatures. To distinguish between these mechanisms, we have measured compression set after allowing the sample to physically relax, thereby minimizing the effect of the reversible mechanism. The resulting data were analyzed using two distinct mathematical methods to obtain a lifetime estimate based on chemical degradation alone. Both methods support a lifetime estimate of greater than 150 years at 80°C. Although the role of the reversible mechanism is not fully understood, it is clear that the contribution to the total compression set is small in comparison to that due to the chemical degradation mechanism. To better understand the chemical degradation mechanism, thermally aged O-ring samples have been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), and

  9. Lifetime Extension Report: Progress on the SAVY-4000 Lifetime Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Cynthia F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Weis, Eric M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Blair, Michael W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Manufacturing Engineering and Technology; Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Karns, Tristan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Oka, Jude M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Keller, Jennie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Meincke, Linda Jeanne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Torres, Joseph Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Herman, Matthew Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Weaver, Brian Phillip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences. Statistical Sciences; Adams, Jillian Cathleen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials

    2016-09-20

    The 3-year accelerated aging study of the SAVY-4000 O-ring shows very little evidence of significant degradation to samples subjected to aggressive elevated temperature and radiation conditions. Whole container thermal aging studies followed by helium leakage testing and compression set measurements were used to establish an estimate for a failure criterion for O-ring compression set of ≥65 %. The whole container aging studies further show that the air flow and efficiency functions of the filter do not degrade significantly after thermal aging. However, the degradation of the water-resistant function leads to water penetration failure after four months at 210°C, but does not cause failure after 10 months at 120°C (130°C is the maximum operating temperature for the PTFE membrane). The thermal aging data for O-ring compression set do not meet the assumptions of standard time-temperature superposition analysis for accelerated aging studies. Instead, the data suggest that multiple degradation mechanisms are operative, with a reversible mechanism operative at low aging temperatures and an irreversible mechanism dominating at high aging temperatures. To distinguish between these mechanisms, we have measured compression set after allowing the sample to physically relax, thereby minimizing the effect of the reversible mechanism. The resulting data were analyzed using two distinct mathematical methods to obtain a lifetime estimate based on chemical degradation alone. Both methods support a lifetime estimate of greater than 150 years at 80°C. Although the role of the reversible mechanism is not fully understood, it is clear that the contribution to the total compression set is small in comparison to that due to the chemical degradation mechanism. To better understand the chemical degradation mechanism, thermally aged O-ring samples have been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC

  10. Baselines for Lifetime of Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Ciammaruchi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The process of accurately gauging lifetime improvements in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) or other similar emerging technologies, such as perovskites solar cells is still a major challenge. The presented work is part of a larger effort of developing a worldwide database of lifetimes that can help...

  11. Maximizing System Lifetime by Battery Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Bohnenkamp, H.C.; Katoen, Joost P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is limited by the battery lifetime. Some devices have the option to connect an extra battery, or to use smart battery-packs with multiple cells to extend the lifetime. In these cases, scheduling the batteries over the load to exploit recovery properties usually extends the

  12. FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE LIFETIMES AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Berger, Lieselotte; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-11-01

    To quantify retinal fluorescence lifetimes in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) and to identify disease specific lifetime characteristics over the course of disease. Forty-seven participants were included in this study. Patients with central serous chorioretinopathy were imaged with fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) and compared with age-matched controls. Retinal autofluorescence was excited using a 473-nm blue laser light and emitted fluorescence light was detected in 2 distinct wavelengths channels (498-560 nm and 560-720 nm). Clinical features, mean retinal autofluorescence lifetimes, autofluorescence intensity, and corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT) images were further analyzed. Thirty-five central serous chorioretinopathy patients with a mean visual acuity of 78 ETDRS letters (range, 50-90; mean Snellen equivalent: 20/32) and 12 age-matched controls were included. In the acute stage of central serous chorioretinopathy, retinal fluorescence lifetimes were shortened by 15% and 17% in the respective wavelength channels. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that fluorescence lifetimes were significantly influenced by the disease duration (P autofluorescence lifetimes, particularly in eyes with retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, were associated with poor visual acuity. This study establishes that autofluorescence lifetime changes occurring in central serous chorioretinopathy exhibit explicit patterns which can be used to estimate perturbations of the outer retinal layers with a high degree of statistical significance.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Elson, Daniel S [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hares, Jonathan D [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Unit 9, Hall Farm Workshops, South Moreton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 9AG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gordon.kennedy@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-05-07

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM.

  14. Positron annihilation lifetime study of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krsjak, V.; Szaraz, Z.; Hähner, P.

    2012-01-01

    A comparative positron annihilation lifetime study has been performed on various commercial ferritic and ferritic/martensitic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. Both as-extruded and recrystallized materials were investigated. In the materials with recrystallized coarse-grained microstructures, only the positron trapping at small vacancy clusters and yttria nanofeatures was observed. Materials which had not undergone recrystallization treatment clearly showed additional positron trapping which is associated with dislocations. Dislocation densities were calculated from a two-component decomposition of the positron lifetime spectra by assuming the first component to be a superposition of the bulk controlled annihilation rate and the dislocation controlled trapping rate. The second component (which translates into lifetimes of 240–260 ps) was found to be well separated in all those ODS materials. This paper presents the potentialities and limitations of the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, and discusses the results of the experimental determination of the defect concentrations and sensitivity of this technique to the material degradation due to thermally induced precipitation of chromium-rich α′ phases.

  15. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  16. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  18. Correlated lifetimes of free paraexcitons and excitons trapped at oxygen vacancies in cuprous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koirala, Sandhaya; Naka, Nobuko; Tanaka, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    We have studied transients of luminescence due to free excitons and excitons trapped at oxygen vacancies in cuprous oxide. We find that both trapped and free paraexcitons have lifetime dependent on temperature and on the oxygen concentration. By using samples containing much less copper vacancies relative to oxygen vacancies, we find out the direct correlation between the free paraexciton lifetime and trapped exciton lifetime. - Highlights: ► We have investigated trapping of free excitons at oxygen vacancies in cuprous oxide. ► Lifetimes of free and trapped excitons exhibit correlative temperature dependence. ► Four-level model with the activation energy of 33 meV well explains the observation. ► Comparison is made using the four samples with different vacancy concentrations. ► We clarified the crucial role of the oxygen vacancy in shortening the lifetimes.

  19. Positron lifetime studies in undoped and Sr doped La2CuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, C.S.; Bharathi, A.; Hariharan, Y.; Vasumathi, D.

    1992-01-01

    The results of positron lifetime measurements as a function of temperature, in undoped and Sr doped La 2 CuO 4 are presented. A second component of lifetime with a value of 225 ps is seen to develop after 100degC, whose intensity grows sharply in the range of 100degC to 250degC. The mean lifetime increases from 170 ps to 207 ps as the temperature is increased from room temperature to 300degC. Using the results of the theoretical calculations of positron lifetimes at vacancies in La 2 CuO 4 , it is argued that the increase in lifetime with temperature is due to positron trapping at the thermally generated La vacancies. From a two state trapping model analysis, the formation energy is estimated to be 0.39±0.04 eV

  20. Considerations related to Cernavoda NPP lifetime management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojan, Mihail

    2007-01-01

    Cernavoda NPP, the first CANDU in Europe, is one of the original CANDU 6 plants and the first CANDU 6 producing over 706 MWe. While the first series of CANDU 6 plants (which entered service in the early 1980 s) have now reached the 2/3 of their 30 years design life, the Cernavoda NPP was put into service on the 2nd December 1996. After 10 years of operation the Plant Life Management (PLiM) Program for Cernavoda should be an increasingly important program to Utility ('CNE - Prod') in order to protect the investment and the continued success of plant operation. The goal of the paper is to present some considerations related to Cernavoda NPP lifetime management. The Plant Life Management Program, known as PLiM Program is concerned with the analysis of technical limits of the safe operation - from the point of view of nuclear safety - in NPP units, aiming at attaining the planned 30 years life duration and its extension to 40 or even 50 years of safe and economical operation. For the CANDU reactors the so-called PLiM and PLEX Programs are just applied. These are applied research programs that approach with priority the current practices for assessing the capability of safe operation within the limits of nuclear safety (fitness-for-service assessment). These programs also approach inspection, monitoring are prevention of degrading due to the ageing of critical systems, structures and components (CSSCs). As each nuclear plant is somewhat different in its components and systems, materials composition, procurement, construction, and operational history, directed research and development programs into materials behavior, monitoring techniques, and methods to mitigate ageing are required to support the lifetime management. Over the past 6 years, INR Pitesti (Institute for Nuclear Research - Romania) has been working on R and D Programs to support a comprehensive and integrated Cernavoda NPP Life Management Program (PLiM) that will see the Cernavoda NPP successfully and

  1. Consideration on a limit for lifetime occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Annual dose limits in occupational radiation exposure are merely a secondary constraint in addition to the primary rule of dose reduction and justification. The limits may, therefore, be reached only in rare, special cases. However, in principle, there might be cases in which the annual limit is continuously exhausted throughout a working life; a high total dose of 0.8 Sv could then be reached. In view of this possibility, there have been considerations of an added restriction by limiting the lifetime occupational dose to 0.4 Sv. The implications of such lifetime doses are considered, and it is shown that an exposure up to the maximum of 0.8 Sv will lead to the need for compensation, if a leukaemia were to occur in the exposed worker. A lifetime dose of 0.4 Sv equally spread over a working life will not lead to the critical value of the probability of causation in excess of 0.5. Nevertheless, it could cause such critical values when it is accumulated during shorter periods. More decisive than the probabilities of causation are, however, the absolute numbers of excess cases of leukaemia due to the occupational exposure. It is seen that less than one excess case would be expected if a group of 100 workers were all exposed to the maximum of 0.8 Sv. Since lifetime doses of 0.8 or 0.4 Sv will be accumulated in very few cases and only with special justification, there appears to be little need to introduce a further limit of lifetime exposure in addition to the current annual limit. (orig.)

  2. Lifetime measurement of ATF damping ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okugi, T.; Hayano, H.; Kubo, K.; Naito, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Zimmermann, F.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the ATF damping ring is the development of technologies for producing a low emittance beam required in future linear colliders such as JLC. The lifetime of the damping ring is very short (typically a few minutes). It is limited by elastic beam-gas scattering along with a small dynamic aperture, and by single intra-beam scattering (Touschek effect). The Touschek lifetime strongly depends upon the charge density of the beam, especially, the size of the vertical emittance. In this paper, the authors report the results of beam lifetime measurements in the ATF damping ring and the estimation of the vertical emittance from these measurements

  3. Lifetime of B hadrons from CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Ting.

    1996-08-01

    A review of the lifetimes of B hadrons measured by the CDF collaboration at Fermilab is presented. The data corresponds to 110 pb -1 of p anti p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV. The inclusive B hadron lifetime is measured using a high statistics sample of B → J/ΨΧ decays. Species specific lifetimes of the B + , B 0 , B 0 s , and Λ 0 b are determined using both fully reconstructed decays and partially reconstructed decays consisting of a lepton associated with a charm hadron

  4. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-03-01

    Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

  5. Statistical Models and Methods for Lifetime Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Jerald F

    2011-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition"An indispensable addition to any serious collection on lifetime data analysis and . . . a valuable contribution to the statistical literature. Highly recommended . . ."-Choice"This is an important book, which will appeal to statisticians working on survival analysis problems."-Biometrics"A thorough, unified treatment of statistical models and methods used in the analysis of lifetime data . . . this is a highly competent and agreeable statistical textbook."-Statistics in MedicineThe statistical analysis of lifetime or response time data is a key tool in engineering,

  6. Study on lifetime of C stripping foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongbin; Lu Ziwei; Zhao Yongtao; Li Zhankui; Xu Hushan; Xiao Guoqing; Wang Yuyu; Zhang Ling; Li Longcai; Fang Yan

    2007-01-01

    The carbon stripping foils can be prepared with the AC and DC arc discharge methods, or even sandwiched with AC-DC alternative layers. The lifetime of the carbon stripping foils of 19 μg/cm 2 prepared with different methods and/or structures was measured. The factors affecting the bombarding lifetime of the carbon stripping foils, especially the method of the foil preparation and the structure of the carbon stripping foils, were discussed. It is observed that the foils prepared with the DC arc discharge method have a longer bombarding lifetime than those prepared with the AC arc discharge method. (authors)

  7. Extending hydraulic lifetime of iron walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, P.D.; Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Iron walls for control of groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated solvents and reducible metals are becoming much more widely used and field studies of this technology have proven successful to date. However, there is still much uncertainty in predicting long-term performance. This work focuses on two factors affecting the lifetime of the iron media: plugging at the treatment zone entrance and precipitation in the bulk iron media. Plugging at the system entrance is due principally to dissolved oxygen in the incoming water and is an issue in aerobic aquifers or in ex-situ canister tests. In an in-situ treatment system, plugging would result in a dramatic reduction in flow through the iron zone. Designs to minimize plugging in field applications include use of larger iron particles and admixing sand of comparable size with the iron particles. Mineral precipitation in the bulk iron media can lead to porosity losses in the media, again reducing flow through the treatment zone. Decreases in reactivity of the iron media may also occur. The nature of the mineral precipitation and the factors that affect extent of mineral precipitation are examined by a variety of tools, including tracer tests, aqueous inorganic profiles, and surface analysis techniques. At short treatment times, measured porosity losses are due mainly to entrapment of a film of H 2 gas on the iron surfaces and also to Fe(OH) 2 precipitation. Over longer treatment times precipitation of Fe(OH) 2 and FeCO 3 in low carbonate waters and of Fe(OH) 2 , FeCO 3 and CaCO 3 in higher carbonate waters will begin to dominate porosity losses. Preliminary results of an on-going study to control pH in an iron zone by admixing iron sulfide with iron show no difference in extent of carbonate precipitation versus a 100% iron system, suggesting that these systems are supersaturated with respect to carbonate precipitation

  8. RDM lifetime measurements in 187Tl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamoli, S.K.; Joshi, P.; Kumar, A.; Govil, I.M.; Mukherjee, G.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to study the shape changes in 187 Tl through a measurement of electromagnetic transition probabilities of the high spin states. The Doppler shifted recoil distance technique was used to measure the lifetimes

  9. Improved b lifetime measurement from MAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, W.T.

    1984-03-01

    Two recent publications, from the MAC and Mark II collaborations, have reported the somewhat surprising result that the lifetime of particles made up of b quarks is in the 1 to 2 picosecond range, or somewhat longer than the lifetimes of charm particles. Although the charm decays are favored transitions while those of b particles depend upon off-diagonal elements of the weak flavor mixing matrix, the smallness of the b decay rates in face of the large available phase space indicates that the off-diagonal elements are indeed very small. The possibility for complete determination of the mixing matrix was brought significantly nearer by the availability of the lifetime information; what is needed now is to reduce the uncertainty of the measurements, which was about 33% for both experiments. We describe here an extension of the b lifetime study with the MAC detector, incorporating some new data and improvements in the analysis. 12 references

  10. Lifetime measurements of excited Co I levels

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, W D; Gobel, L H

    1977-01-01

    In the region of 3500 AA the lifetimes of eight excited Cobalt I levels have been measured by means of the zero field level crossing method. The measured lifetimes belong to the odd configurations 3d/sup 7/4s4p and 3d/sup 8/4p and are of the accuracy of about 5%. The hyperfine structure of levels with I not=J has to be taken into account in evaluating lifetimes from level crossing data, because the nuclear spin of the natural isotope /sup 59/Co is I=7/2. Therefore the influence of the line profile of the exciting resonance lines on the lifetimes has been investigated. The results are compared with those of other authors. Furthermore absolute oscillator strengths were calculated with known branching ratios and a new absolute scale has been established. (23 refs).

  11. Quantum lifetime in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1977-02-01

    One of the mechanisms which contribute to beam lifetime in electron storage rings is the quantum emission of energetic photons causing particles to be lost from the rf bucket. This quantum lifetime is among other things important in defining the required aperture in a storage ring. An approximate expression of quantum lifetime, predicted by a one-dimensional model which takes into account only the betatron motion, has been used in most storage ring designs. If the beam is aperture-limited at a position with nonzero dispersion, both the betatron and synchrotron motions have to be included and a two-dimensional model must be used. An exact expression of quantum lifetime for the one-dimensional case and an approximate expression for the two-dimensional case are given

  12. Quantum lifetime in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    One of the mechanisms which contributes to beam lifetime in electron storage rings is the quantum emission of energetic photons causing particles to be lost from the rf bucket. This quantum lifetime is among other things important in defining the required aperture in a storage ring. An approximate expression of quantum lifetime, predicted by a one-dimensional model which takes into account only the betatron motion, has been used in most storage ring designs. If the beam is aperture-limited at a position with nonzero dispersion, both the betatron and synchrotron motions have to be included, and a two-dimensional model must be used. An exact expression of quantum lifetime for the one-dimensional case and an approximate expression for the two-dimensional case are given

  13. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  14. Lifetime measurements of hadrons containing heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forden, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Recent lifetime measurements of heavy particles at PETRA and PEP are reviewed. A comparison of the methods used is given. The world averages for the lifetimes of the D 0 and D +- mesons are found to be (tau/dub D/ 0 ) - 3.97 +/- 0.3 x 10 -13 sec and (tau/dub D +-/) = 8.6 +/- 0.7 x 10 -13 sec. This difference in lifetimes is discussed in light of recent information about exclusive decays. The world average for the lifetime of bottom hadrons is determined to be (tau/sub b/) = 11.0 +/- 1.5 x 10 -13 sec and new estimates for the b quark mixing elements, absolute value V/sub bu/ and absolute value V/sub bc/, are given

  15. DSA lifetime measurements in 21Ne at high recoil velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Heidinger, F.; Kaendler, K.

    1977-01-01

    States in 21 Ne up to 5 MeV excitation energy have been populated using the inverted reaction 2 H( 20 Ne,pγ). The Doppler shift attenuation (DSA) analysis of the pγ coincidence spectra taken in a Ge(Li) detector at 45 0 and 135 0 and an annular silicon surface barrier detector near 0 0 yielded the lifetimes of 8 states in 21 Ne. Due to the large recoil of vi/c approximately equal to 4% three new lifetimes were determined for the short lived levels at 2.80, 4.68 and 4.73 MeV, namely 10 +- 4 fs, 16 +- 4 fs and 10 +- 4 fs, respectively. The results are compared with rotational and shell model calculations. (orig.) [de

  16. Quasiparticle lifetime in a mixture of Bose and Fermi superfluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Zhai, Hui

    2014-12-31

    In this Letter, we study the effect of quasiparticle interactions in a Bose-Fermi superfluid mixture. We consider the lifetime of a quasiparticle of the Bose superfluid due to its interaction with quasiparticles in the Fermi superfluid. We find that this damping rate, i.e., the inverse of the lifetime, has quite a different threshold behavior at the BCS and the BEC side of the Fermi superfluid. The damping rate is a constant near the threshold momentum in the BCS side, while it increases rapidly in the BEC side. This is because, in the BCS side, the decay process is restricted by the constraint that the fermion quasiparticle is located near the Fermi surface, while such a restriction does not exist in the BEC side where the damping process is dominated by bosonic quasiparticles of the Fermi superfluid. Our results are related to the collective mode experiment in the recently realized Bose-Fermi superfluid mixture.

  17. Lifetime management of the nuclear units in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combes, J-P.; Godin, R.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic design study entitled 'Lifetime Project' has been initiated at Electricite de France, to estimate, plan, and maximize the life span of the French PWR plants. It is estimated that the present units will have a lifetime of 30 to 50 years. The life of a unit will be determined by that of its components, by economic considerations (whether it is cheaper to repair or replace the unit), and by safety considerations, which may be affected by changing safety standards. A 'periodic safety reassessment' takes place about every ten years. A list of 18 critical components can be summarized by saying that the main concerns are: radiation embrittlement of and within the reactor vessel, the steam generators, the concrete containment (which can not be replaced), instrumentation and control. Examination of samples from decommissioned plants, such as Chooz A, will provide valuable evidence of mechanisms of degradation due to aging

  18. Lifetime measurement in {sup 195}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, T.; Page, R.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Dewald, A.; Jolie, J.; Melon, B.; Pissulla, T. [Universitaet zu Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); Greenlees, P.T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kroell, T.; Kruecken, R.; Maierbeck, P. [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department E12, Garching (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    The lifetime of the 17/2{sup +} yrast state in {sup 195}Po has been measured using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique to be {tau}=43(11) ps. The lifetime was extracted from the singles {gamma}-ray spectra obtained by using the recoil-decay tagging method. The present work provides more information of the coupling schemes, shapes and configuration mixing in neutron-deficient odd-mass Po nuclei. (orig.)

  19. The measurement of subnanosecond nuclear lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.C.S.

    1974-01-01

    This research dealt with the measurement of subnanosecond nuclear lifetimes using the pulsed beam delayed-coincidence technique. Measurements were performed on isotopes in the f7/2 shell and specifically the isotopes of titanium and vanadium. Experimental investigations were also pursued in 59 Ni and 65 Zn. Several new lifetimes were determined and confirmation was obtained for some previous values which were measured with different techniques. More information was also obtained on certain levels where previous results are in disagreement. (author)

  20. Masses and lifetimes of B hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kkkroll, I.J.

    1996-02-01

    The latest measurements of the masses and lifetimes of weakly decaying B hadrons from experiments at e + e - and p bar p colliders are presented. These measurements include the lifetimes of the bar B o , bar B o s , B - and b baryons, as well as searches for the B c meson. The observation of B*, p-wave B mesons (B**), and excited b baryons using inclusive and exclusive B hadron reconstruction are discussed. Results on b quark flavour tagging are given

  1. Fluorescence lifetime measurement of radical ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Nobuyuki; Kinugasa, Jun-ichiro; Hagiri, Masahide; Nakayama, Toshihiro; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Maki; Daido, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    One-photonic excitation of a charge transfer complex of hexamethoxybenzene (HMB) and nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate (NO + BF 4 - ) in acetonitrile afforded fluorescences emission from excited radical cation of HMB (HMB + *). Lifetime of the excited radical ion species was measured to be 7 ps by the pump-probe transient absorption technique. The lifetime was much shorter than that of free radical ion (63 ps), indicating the presence of an interaction between HMB + * and NO in the excited complex. (author)

  2. Λc photoproduction and lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bizetti, A.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Raso, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Beck, G.A.; Bologna, G.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Picchi, P.; Budinich, M.; Liello, F.; Milotti, E.; Rolandi, L.; Carter, J.; Green, M.G.; Landon, M.P.J.; March, P.V.; Sacks, L.; Sanjari, A.H.; Strong, J.A.; Ciocci, M.A.; Enorini, M.; Fabbri, F.L.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Simonelli, L.; Spillantini, P.; Zallo, A.

    1987-01-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the Λ c baryon photoproduced coherently of a germanium-silicon target is presented. A signal of Λ c → ΔΚ * → pKππ 0 has been observed and the two different decay diagrams for this process are compared. A sample of 9 Λ c decays give a lifetime of 1.1(+0.8-0.4)10 13 s. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iori, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the (Omega) c 0 lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c Σ - , π - and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 ± 19 reconstructed (Omega) c 0 in the (Omega) - π - π + π + and (Omega) - π + decay modes. The lifetime of the (Omega) c 0 is measured to be 65 ± 13(stat) ± 9(sys) fs

  4. Positron lifetime studies on thorium oxide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, D.D.; Muraleedharan, R.V.; Sharma, B.D.

    1982-01-01

    Positron lifetime spectra have been studied for ThO 2 powders, calcined at different temperatures and having different particle sizes. Three lifetime components could be resolved, the longest component being of low intensity. An observed strong dependence on the particle size of the annihilation process and the variation of positronium diffusion constant is explained on the basis of defect density variations in these powders. (author)

  5. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e + e - annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau → nu/sub tau/W and b → cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D 0 lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table

  6. Lifetimes of charm and beauty hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, G.; Dornan, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Major breakthroughs have been achieved in the determination of the lifetimes of charm and beauty hadrons. Much larger data samples than previously have become available and new experimental devices and techniques have been developed and employed. The lifetimes of all weakly decaying singly charmed hadrons have been measured, some with an accuracy of a few percent. The difference in the shortest lifetime - τ(Ω c ) - and the longest one - τ(D + ) - is given by a factor of close to ten. The experimental status of beauty lifetimes, while less complete, has still reached a new level of quality and is now better than 5% for the commoner states. New theoretical tools, based mainly on heavy quark expansions, have been developed; they incorporate as well as transcend earlier phenomenological descriptions. The observed pattern in the charm lifetime ratios is reproduced in a semi-quantitative manner as well as could be expected; as far as the beauty lifetime ratios are concerned some problems may well be emerging. The maturity level achieved in the measurements bodes quite well for future challenges where reliable and efficient tracking of the decay vertices will be crucial. (orig.)

  7. Impacts of PV Array Sizing on PV Inverter Lifetime and Reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangwongwanich, Ariya; Yang, Yongheng; Sera, Dezso

    2017-01-01

    . However, oversizing the PV array will increase the loading of PV inverters, which may have undesired influence on the PV inverter lifetime and reliability. In that case, it may result in a negative impact on the overall PV energy cost, due to the increased maintenance for the PV inverters. This paper...... evaluates the lifetime of PV inverters considering the PV array sizing and installation sites, e.g., Denmark and Arizona. The results reveal that the PV array sizing has a considerable impact on the PV inverter lifetime and reliability, especially in Denmark, where the average solar irradiance level...

  8. Influence of tellurite on lifetime for samarium doped lanthanum lead borate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, A.; Eraiah, B.

    2018-04-01

    Samarium substituted tellurium lanthanum lead borate glass is prepared using melt quenching technique. Luminescence spectra have been recorded upon excitation with 402 nm various transitions from 4G5/2 level, for samarium doped tellurite glasses are studied and also lifetime for all the samples exhibit single exponential behaviour of decay curve. Luminescence spectra of present glasses show quenching effect due to cross-relation channels of samarium ions. The lifetime of glass samples decrease as the tellurite concentration is decreased. So, it evidences that to attain longer lifetime for lasing material one can tune the host by selecting concentration of tellurite.

  9. Solid-state amorphization in the Ni-Zr system investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, M.J.; De La Cruz, R.M.; Leguey, T.; Pareja, R.; Riveiro, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The process of mechanical alloying and amorphization of Ni-Zr powders is investigated by positron lifetime spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The short-lived component of the lifetime spectra is composition and milling-time dependent. The second lifetime component, found during the initial stages of the milling process, appears to be due to annihilation from states trapped at crystalline interface joints. The results indicate that the solid-state reactions induced by ball milling involve the transformation and disappearance of the crystalline interface joints in the powder particles. (orig.)

  10. The human resource conditions of lifetime extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: According to our present knowledge, the lifetime extension of the Hungarian NPP units will be feasible, in both the technological and economic aspects. It is far more difficult, however, to answer the question whether the human resources conditions of the further application of nuclear energetics in Hungary can be satisfied. Many urgent tasks will have to be solved regarding the informing of the public and the nuclear engineering education. The training of nuclear experts is in crisis in many developed industrial countries. The university departments work with a staff mainly consisting of old and quite often near-retirement trainers and the young generation is practically missing. A particularly grave problem is (see Germany) that in a number of countries hardly any student chooses nuclear technology/engineering. Moreover, several nuclear training and research facilities have been shut down. Although the situation in Hungary is not so critical at present, the rising of the new generation of professionals may easily get into a crisis without immediate intervention. The training reactor of BUTE celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2001 and the technical conditions allow some further 20 or 25 years of operation. On the other hand, however, the age distribution of the operating staff can not be sustained even on a few-year term: the average age is 55 years, while 44% of them are retired! Although, due to financing difficulties the rejuvenation of the operating personnel has not been possible for years, it is definitely vital to maintain and develop the reactor and the ongoing educational work. By analysing the age distribution of the workers of the Hungarian energetics one can conclude: 350 to 400 young engineers will have to start work up till 2020 (i.e. 15 to 20 per year), while only 2 to 8 students graduate from the Hungarian universities who acquire some level of nuclear knowledge during their studies. In a co-operation between BUTE and the Paks NPP we are

  11. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.

    1986-01-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed in fall 1983 to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. The chamber had to be placed within the existing central drift chamber, making access for repairs difficult and costly. Therefore for detector elements thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes (straws) were used because of their simplicity and robustness. The diameter of the drift tubes was 6.9 mm. The radial extent of the proposed chamber was from 3 cm to 10 cm, the inner wall of the central drift. It was clear that radiation levels, from synchrotron x-rays and overfocussed electrons, were potentially high. Since the drift distance is short in the straws, it was desirable to operate them at the highest possible gas gain, to achieve the best spatial resolution. There was a likelihood of drawing large currents in the chamber and thus causing radiation damage. Therefore a study of radiation hardness under the conditions of their proposed design was undertaken. In tests, argon-hydrocarbon mixtures consistently became unusable at ∼0.05 C/cm collected charge, due to anode buildup. Argon-CO 2 mixtures, while underquenched, were operational to 0.25 C/cm, at which point loss of cathode material became intolerable. Argon-xenon-CO 2 proved to be quenched as well as argon-hydrocarbons, but was limited by cathode damage. The MAC vertex chamber has operated at a distance of 4.6 cm from the e + e - interaction point at PEP for two years and has shown no aging effects

  12. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of ZnO bulk samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubiaga, A.; Plazaola, F.; Garcia, J. A.; Tuomisto, F.; Munoz-Sanjose, V.; Tena-Zaera, R.

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain a further insight into the knowledge of point defects of ZnO, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was performed on bulk samples annealed under different atmospheres. The samples were characterized at temperatures ranging from 10 to 500 K. Due to difficulties in the conventional fitting of the lifetime spectra caused by the low intensity of the defect signals, we have used an alternative method as a solution to overcome these difficulties and resolve all the lifetime components present in the spectra. Two different vacancy-type defects are identified in the samples: Zn vacancy complexes (V Zn -X) and vacancy clusters consisting of up to five missing Zn-O pairs. In addition to the vacancies, we observe negative-ion-type defects, which are tentatively attributed to intrinsic defects in the Zn sublattice. The effect of the annealing on the observed defects is discussed. The concentrations of the V Zn -X complexes and negative-ion-type defects are in the 0.2-2 ppm range, while the cluster concentrations are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower

  13. Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 162}Yb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    A measurement on lifetimes of high-spin states in the yrast and near-yrast rotational bands in {sup 162}Yb was carried out at ATLAS in order to determine the evolution of collectivity as a function of angular momentum using the {sup 126}Te({sup 40}Ar,4n){sup 162}Yb reaction at 170 MeV. Previous lifetime measurements in the {sup 164,166,168}Yb isotopes showed a dramatic decrease in the transition quadrupole moment Q{sub t} with increasing spin. It was suggested that this decrease in Q{sub t} is brought about by the rotationally-induced deoccupation of high-j configurations, mainly i{sub 13/2} neutrons. If this interpretation is correct, the heavier isotopes should have a larger decrease in Q{sub t} than the lighter mass nuclides due to the position of the Fermi surface in the i{sub 13/2} subshell. Indeed, {sup 160}Yb does not show a clear decrease in Q{sub t} at high spin. No high spin lifetime information exists for {sup 162}Yb, thus this experiment fills the gap of measured Q{sub t}`s in the light Yb series. The data is currently being analyzed.

  14. Plant lifetime management at Jose Cabrera NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jorge; Garcia, Piedad

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained during the development and implementation of the Jose Cabrera NPP Lifetime Management Program according to the methodology applied in the Plant. The implementation of the Lifetime Management Program began in 1995 with the elaboration of the annual revision document 'Lifetime Management Plan', which describes the level of development of the Lifetime Management activities, the results that have been obtained during the implementation of the Program, and the schedule of the upcoming activities. The drawing up of a weighted list of 135 important components and the elaboration of 17 dossiers integrating the ageing mechanisms analysis and its corresponding evaluation, control and mitigation methods, were the result of the activities completed during 1996. A group of 62 component/degradation phenomena pairs with a high degradation risk classification has been considered within the scope of the activity 'Assessment of Maintenance Practices. Improvement Proposal', performed by the plant during 1997 and the first term of 1998 in parallel with other Lifetime Management related activities. The results obtained within this activity have revealed for the components included in the scope of the assessment that the associated degradation phenomena are practically covered by the current maintenance, inspection and testing practices. Recommendations and improvements of the maintenance practices have been particularly proposed from a technical, supporting, proceeding and documentary point of view, and currently an analysis is being made in relation to the feasibility of implementing them at the Jose Cabrera NPP. (author)

  15. Positron lifetime studies of electron irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadnagy, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Single-crystal copper was irradiated with 4.5-MeV electrons producing simple Frenkel defects as well as a significant concentration of divacancies. Mean positron lifetime characteristics, which are sensitive to the presence of vacancies and multivacancies in copper, was monitored after isochronal anneals between 80 and 800 0 K to determine the relative change of characteristic mean lifetimes and their associated intensities. Also a study of the dependence of the mean positron lifetime on the total electron fluence was made and compared with existing theories relating these lifetimes to vacancy or multivacancy concentrations. Numerical data from curve fitting procedures using a conventional trapping model for defect-induced changes in positron lifetimes indicate that upon irradiation with 4.5-MeV electrons at 80 0 K, about 8 percent of the defects produced are divacancy units. Divacancy units appear to be several times more effective in trapping positrons than are monovacancies. Further, the experimental data suggest that the stage III annealing processes in electron-irradiated copper most probably involve the motion and removal of both monovacancies and divacancies. A conglomerate (multivacancy) unit appears to exist as a stable entity even after annealing procedures are carried out at temperatures slightly above the stage III region. Such a stable unit could serve as a nucleation center for the appearance of voids

  16. Improved lifetime of microchannel-plate PMTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A., E-mail: lehmann@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Physikalisches Institut IV, Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Uhlig, F. [Physikalisches Institut IV, Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Höhler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The charged particle identification at the PANDA experiment will be mainly performed with DIRC detectors. Because of their advantageous properties the preferred photon sensors are MCP-PMTs. However, until recently these devices showed serious aging problems which resulted in a diminishing quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode. By applying innovative countermeasures against the aging causes, the manufacturers recently succeeded in drastically improving the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. Especially the application of an ALD coating technique to seal the material of the micro-channels proves very powerful and results in a lifetime of ≈6C/cm{sup 2} integrated anode charge without a substantial QE degradation for the latest PHOTONIS XP85112. This paper will present a comparative measurement of the lifetime of several older and recent MCP-PMTs demonstrating this progress.

  17. Measurement of the $\\tau$ lepton lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The mean lifetime of the \\tau lepton is measured in a sample of 25700 \\tau pairs collected in 1992 with the ALEPH detector at LEP. A new analysis of the 1-1 topology events is introduced. In this analysis, the dependence of the impact parameter sum distribution on the daughter track momenta is taken into account, yielding improved precision compared to other impact parameter sum methods. Three other analyses of the one- and three-prong \\tau decays are updated with increased statistics. The measured lifetime is 293.5 \\pm 3.1 \\pm 1.7 \\fs. Including previous (1989--1991) ALEPH measurements, the combined \\tau lifetime is 293.7 \\pm 2.7 \\pm 1.6 \\fs.

  18. Lifetime for the Ti X spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jagjit; Jha, A K S; Mohan, M

    2010-01-01

    We present configuration interaction calculations for the lifetime of 294 fine-structure levels of the Ti X spectrum in the LSJ coupling scheme. The calculations include all the major correlation effects. The relativistic effects are included by adding the mass correction term, Darwin term and spin-orbit interaction term to the non-relativistic Hamiltonian in the Breit-Pauli approximation. The calculated lifetime values are in very close agreement with other available experimental and theoretical results. We have predicted new lifetime results for levels belonging to 3p 2 3d, 3s 2 4p, 3s3p4s, 3s3p4p and various other configurations of Ti X, where no other theoretical and experimental results are available.

  19. The neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, Wolfgang [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: PENeLOPE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The neutron lifetime τ{sub n}=880.3±1.1 s is an important parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics and in Big Bang cosmology. Several systematic corrections of previously published results reduced the PDG world average by several σ in the last years and call for a new experiment with complementary systematics. The experiment PENeLOPE, currently under construction at the Physik-Department of Technische Universitaet Muenchen, aims to determine the neutron lifetime with a precision of 0.1 s. It will trap ultra-cold neutrons in a magneto-gravitational trap using a large superconducting magnet and will measure their lifetime by both neutron counting and online proton detection. This presentation gives an overview over the latest developments of the experiment.

  20. THE LIFETIME AND POWERS OF FR IIs IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognini, Joe; Bird, Jonathan; Martini, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We have identified and studied a sample of 151 FR IIs found in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the MaxBCG cluster catalog with data from FIRST and NVSS. We have compared the radio luminosities and projected lengths of these FR IIs to the projected length distribution of a range of mock catalogs generated by an FR II model and estimate the FR II lifetime to be 1.9 × 10 8 yr. The uncertainty in the lifetime calculation is a factor of two, primarily due to uncertainties in the intracluster medium (ICM) density and the FR II axial ratio. We furthermore measure the jet power distribution of FR IIs in BCGs and find that it is well described by a log-normal distribution with a median power of 1.1 × 10 37 W and a coefficient of variation of 2.2. These jet powers are nearly linearly related to the observed luminosities, and this relation is steeper than many other estimates, although it is dependent on the jet model. We investigate correlations between FR II and cluster properties and find that galaxy luminosity is correlated with jet power. This implies that jet power is also correlated with black hole mass, as the stellar luminosity of a BCG should be a good proxy for its spheroid mass and therefore the black hole mass. Jet power, however, is not correlated with cluster richness, nor is FR II lifetime strongly correlated with any cluster properties. We calculate the enthalpy of the lobes to examine the impact of the FR IIs on the ICM and find that heating due to adiabatic expansion is too small to offset radiative cooling by a factor of at least six. In contrast, the jet power is approximately an order of magnitude larger than required to counteract cooling. We conclude that if feedback from FR IIs offsets cooling of the ICM, then heating must be primarily due to another mechanism associated with FR II expansion.

  1. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid

  2. Electron Beam Polarization Measurement Using Touschek Lifetime Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Changchun; /Duke U., DFELL; Li, Jingyi; /Duke U., DFELL; Mikhailov, Stepan; /Duke U., DFELL; Popov, Victor; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Wenzhong; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Ying; /Duke U., DFELL; Chao, Alex; /SLAC; Xu, Hong-liang; /Hefei, NSRL; Zhang, Jian-feng; /Hefei, NSRL

    2012-08-24

    Electron beam loss due to intra-beam scattering, the Touschek effect, in a storage ring depends on the electron beam polarization. The polarization of an electron beam can be determined from the difference in the Touschek lifetime compared with an unpolarized beam. In this paper, we report on a systematic experimental procedure recently developed at Duke FEL laboratory to study the radiative polarization of a stored electron beam. Using this technique, we have successfully observed the radiative polarization build-up of an electron beam in the Duke storage ring, and determined the equilibrium degree of polarization and the time constant of the polarization build-up process.

  3. Permeability log using new lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, D.J.; Boyd, J.F.; Fuchs, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Comparative measurements of thermal neutron decay time are obtained for a formation after irradiation with a pulsed neutron source. Chloride ions in formation fluids are concentrated by the electrosmosis effect using charged poles on a well logging sonde. The formation is irradiated with fast neutrons and a first comparative measure of the thermal neutron decay time or neutron lifetime is taken. The chloride ions are then dispersed by acoustic pumping with a magnetostrictive transducer. The formation is then again irradiated with fast neutrons and a comparative measure of neutron lifetime is taken. The comparison is a function of the variation in chloride concentration between the two measurements which is related to formation permeability

  4. An approach for longer lifetime MCFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Tatsumi, Masahiko; Hayano, Takuro [MCFC Research Association, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    For entering into commercialization of MCFC power plants in the beginning of the 21st century, we will devote to research for increasing lifetime as long as 40,000 hours with cell performance decay rate of 0.25 %/1000hrs as the target in FY 1999. This paper will discuss on our approach for longer lifetime MCFCs through electrolyte-loss management and NiO precipitation management as well as micro-structural control of electrodes and matrix plates. Cell voltage decay rate will be estimated by simulation through series of experiments on accelerated conditions.

  5. Lifetimes of some b-flavored hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, S.

    2014-06-01

    Recent measurements of lifetimes of some b-flavored hadrons are presented and interpreted in the context of theoretical models, especially the Heavy Quark Expansion. Decay widths and decay width differences in the B s 0 - B-bar s 0 system are discussed from the studies of decays into the final states J/ψK + K - , J/ψπ + π - , D s + D s - , K + K - and D s ± π ± . Lifetime measurements of the baryons Λ b 0 , Ξ b - , Ξ b 0 , and Ω b - are also shown. (author)

  6. Positron lifetime in vanadium oxide bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryzek, J.; Dryzek, E.

    2003-01-01

    The positron lifetime (PL) and Doppler broadening (DB) of annihilation line measurements have been performed in vanadium oxide bronzes M x V 2 O 5 . The dependence of these annihilation characteristics on the kind and concentration of the metal M donor has been observed. In the PL spectrum only one lifetime component has been detected in all studied bronzes. The results indicate the positron localization in the structural tunnels present in the crystalline lattice of the vanadium oxide bronzes. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Extension of the nuclear power plant lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keramsi, Alain

    2011-01-01

    After a presentation of the French nuclear context (history of the reactor fleet, choice of reactor type, PWR operation principle, competitiveness, environmental performance), this Power Point presentation addresses the context and challenges of the operation lifetime (average fleet age in different countries, examples of extensions, case of the United States, what is at stake with lifetime extension, decennial visits, EDF strategy), discusses the EDF's safety objectives (definition of the three main safety functions, impact of the operation duration and of the coexistence of two generations for the safety functions), discusses how to manage the ageing phenomenon for replaceable and non-replaceable components

  8. Lifetimes for some excited states of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Campos, J.

    1979-01-01

    The lifetimes of some s,p and d levels of sodium have been measured by the delayed coincidence method, using a single-photon counting technique. The results are compared with the calculated values of the present work, and with other results. The lifetimes of the ns, np, and levels up to n10; of the nf levels up to n-9;and of the ng, nh,n1 and nk levels up to n-8, have been calculated and the transition probabilities of lines with origin in these levels are given. (Author) 38 refs

  9. Measurement of the Bs0 lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Mattison, T.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Karger, C.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Ross, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kimfn 19, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    The lifetime of the Bs0 has been measured in a data sample of 8890000 hadronic events recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP. After background subtraction 30.8 ± 6.9 events are attributed to the semileptonic decay of the Bs0 to a Ds- and an opposite-sign lepton. A maximum-likelihood fit to the distribution of the proper times of these events yields a Bs0 lifetime of τBs = 1.92 -0.35+0.45 ± 0.04 ps.

  10. Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2012-06-24

    In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

  11. Variation of minority charge carrier lifetime in high-resistance p-type silicon under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basheleishvili, Z.V.; Garnyk, V.S.; Gorin, S.N.; Pagava, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The minority carrier lifetime (tau) variation was studied in the process of p-type silicon bombardment with fast 8 MeV electrons. The irradiation and all measurements were carried out at room temperature. The tau quantity was measured by the photoconductivity attenuation method at a low injection level 20% measurement error; the resistivity was measured by the four-probe method (10% error). The resistivity and minority charge carrier lifetime tau are shown to increase with the exposure dose. It is supposed that as radiation dose increases, the rearrangement of the centres responsible for reducing the lifetime occurs and results in a tau increase in the material being irradiated, however the tau value observed in the original samples is not attained. The restoration of the minority carrier lifetime in p-type high-resistance silicon with a growing exposure dose might proceed due to reduction in the free carrier concentration

  12. Lifetime Reliability Assessment of Concrete Slab Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    A procedure for lifetime assesment of the reliability of short concrete slab bridges is presented in the paper. Corrosion of the reinforcement is the deterioration mechanism used for estimating the reliability profiles for such bridges. The importance of using sensitivity measures is stressed....... Finally the produce is illustrated on 6 existing UK bridges....

  13. SIRTF thermal design modifications to increase lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    An effort was made to increase the predicted lifetime of the SIRTF dewar by lowering the exterior shell temperature, increasing the radiated energy from the vapor cooled shields and reconfiguring the vapor cooled shields. The lifetime increases can be used to increase the scientific return from the mission and as a trade-off against mass and cost. This paper describes the configurations studied, the steady state thermal model used, the analytical methods and the results of the analysis. Much of the heat input to the outside dewar shell is radiative heat transfer from the solar panel. To lower the shell temperature, radiative cooled shields were placed between the solar panel and the dewar shell and between the bus and the dewar shell. Analysis showed that placing a radiator on the outer vapor cooled shield had a significant effect on lifetime. Lengthening the distance between the outer shell and the point where the vapor cooled shields are attached to the support straps also improved lifetime.

  14. Updated measurement of the $\\tau$ lepton lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    A new measurement of the mean lifetime of the tau lepton is presented. Three different analysis methods are applied to a sample of 90000 tau pairs, collected in 1993 and 1994 with the ALEPH detector at LEP. The average of this measurement and those previously published by ALEPH is tau_tau = 290.1 +- 1.5 +- 1.1 fs.

  15. Lifetime measurements of the rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahnke, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    The lifetime of excited energy levels of Praseodymium, Neodymium, Gadolinium, Holmium and Erbium are measured. The measurements were done on atomic beams excited by laser radiation. The experimental results allow an interpretation of the electronic structure of the rare earths. (BEF)

  16. Materials Education: Opportunities over a Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Schwartz, Lyle H.; Faber, Katherine T.; Cargill III, G. Slade; Houston, Betsy

    2003-10-28

    A report, in the form of abbreviated notes, of the 17th Biennial Conference on National Materials Policy ''Materials Education: Opportunities over a Lifetime'' held May 20-21, 2002 in College Park, MD, sponsored by the Federation of Materials Societies and the University Materials Council.

  17. Smoking expands expected lifetime with musculoskeletal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Juel, Knud

    2003-01-01

    By indirect estimation of mortality from smoking and life table methods we estimated expected lifetime without musculoskeletal diseases among never smokers, ex-smokers, and smokers. We found that although life expectancy of a heavy smoker is 7 years shorter than that of a never smoker, heavy...

  18. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  19. Lifetime and spin measurements in 40Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southon, J.

    1976-01-01

    Lifetimes of levels in 40 Ar populated by the 40 Ar(p,p') reaction have been measured using the Doppler shift attenuation method with a p-γ coincidence technique. A solid argon target was used. The lifetimes determined were (in psec.): 1461 keV level, 1.95 +- 0.15; 2121 keV, >25; 2524 keV, 0.53 +- 0.06; 2893 keV, 4.4 [+2.6,-1.3]; 3208 keV, 0.27. A comprehensive set of branching ratios was also derived and the spins and parities of the 3208 and 4481 keV states were determined to be 2 + and 1 +- respectively. Some of these results suggest that 2 particle -2 hole and 4 particle - 4 hole components are strongly mixed in the low-lying positive parity states in a manner similar to the 2 particle and 4 particle - 2 hole mixing that occurs in 42 Ca. An additional lifetime measurement for the recently discovered high spin state at 3464 keV was carried out using direct electronic timing. The level was excited by the 37 Cl(α,p) reaction and was found to have a lifetime of 1.00 +- 0.03 nsec, which taken together with other evidence indicates that its spin and parity are 6 + . The E2 transition strengths of the 40 Ar 6 + - 4 + - 2 + - 0 + cascade can be simply interpreted in terms of a weak coupling model. (author)

  20. A measurement of the Ds lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, W.; Gerhards, R.; Kirschfink, F.J.; Martyn, H.U.; Rosskamp, P.; Kolanoski, A.; Balkwill, C.; Bowler, M.G.; Burrows, P.N.; Cashmore, R.J.; Dauncey, P.; Heath, G.P.; Mellor, D.J.; Ratoff, P.; Tomalin, I.; Yelton, J.M.; Baranko, G.; Caldwell, A.; Cherney, M.; Izen, J.M.; Muller, D.; Ritz, S.; Storm, D.; Takashima, M.; Wicklung, E.; Wu Saulan; Zobernig, G.

    1987-01-01

    The lifetime of the D S meson has been measured using the TASSO detector at PETRA and found to be (5.7 (+3.6-2.6)±0.9) x 10 -13 s. The method used was to reconstruct fully the decay vertex of the channel D s → φπ ± , φ → K + K - . (orig.)

  1. Updated measurement of the τ lepton lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-11-01

    A new measurement of the mean lifetime of the τ lepton is presented. Three different analysis methods are applied to a sample of 90 000 τ pairs, collected in 1993 and 1994 with the ALEPH detector at LEP. The average of this measurement and those previously published by ALEPH is ττ=290.1+/-1.5+/-1.1 fs.

  2. Cosmological constraints on the neutron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvati, L.; Pagano, L.; Melchiorri, A. [Physics Department, Università di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy); Consiglio, R., E-mail: laura.salvati@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: luca.pagano@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: rconsiglio@na.infn.it, E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it [Physics Department, Università di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    We derive new constraints on the neutron lifetime based on the recent Planck 2015 observations of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB. Under the assumption of standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, we show that Planck data constrains the neutron lifetime to τ{sub n} = (907±69) [s] at 68% c.l.. Moreover, by including the direct measurements of primordial Helium abundance of Aver et al. (2015) and Izotov et al. (2014), we show that cosmological data provide the stringent constraints τ{sub n} = (875±19) [s] and τ{sub n} = (921±11) [s] respectively. The latter appears to be in tension with neutron lifetime value quoted by the Particle Data Group (τ{sub n} = (880.3±1.1) [s]). Future CMB surveys as COrE+, in combination with a weak lensing survey as EUCLID, could constrain the neutron lifetime up to a ∼ 6 [s] precision.

  3. Increasing the lifetime of fuel cell catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latsuzbaia, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss a novel idea of fuel cell catalyst regeneration to increase lifetime of the PEM fuel cell electrode/catalyst operation and, therefore, reduce the catalyst costs. As many of the catalyst degradation mechanisms are difficult to avoid, the regeneration is alternative option to

  4. Lifetime oriented maintenance planning in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straub, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we set up a framework for lifetime oriented maintenance planning as an outcome and input for strategic housing stock management. The maintenance planning holds maintenance activities and costs in the longer term. We consider the maintenance planning as a tool to calculate and implement

  5. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions

  6. Determination of the D mesons lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josa Mutuberria, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    The results from the experiment NA27, performed in the North Area of the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN are presented. The experimental set up was the small, high resolution, rapid cyling bubble chamber LEBC coupled with the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS). More than 2 millions pictures were taken, with 1015000 in teractions in hydrogen. The stastistical sensitivity of the experiment was 38.5 events/μb. A clean sample of 700 charm particle decays was obtained. Estimators with minimal systematic and statistical errors are developed for the determination of the lifetimes of short-lived particles whose individual momenta are unknown. These estimators make use of the measured decay lengths and the a priori known production characteristics. In this way, it is possible to include identified but not fully reconstructed charm decays in the sample to determine their lifetime. The properties of these estimators were extensively studied by means of Montecarlo simulation. The detection of the short-lived particles through the impact parameter of their charged decay products leads to additional complications which are taken into account. The biases and statistical errors inherent in using simpler approximate lifetime estimators are also discussed. These estimators are applied to determine the lifetime of the D o and D +- mesons using the charm data sample from NA27. (Author)

  7. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: Bc lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine

    2008-01-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb -1 of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the B c ± meson is studied in the B c ± → J/ψμ ± + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/ψ + μ invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 ± 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: τ(B c ± ) = 0.448 -0.036 +0.038 (stat) ± 0.032(sys) ps

  8. The association of lifetime insight and cognition in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Zarzuela, Amalia; Peralta, Victor; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2015-03-01

    Poor insight has been related to poor course in psychosis. However, the role of cognition in insight remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of cognition and lifetime psychopathological dimensions on insight in psychosis. We followed up 42 patients with psychotic disorders over 10years. Lifetime psychopathological dimensions and cognitive performance were assessed. Patients were divided into two groups by lifetime patterns of insight and compared with 42 healthy volunteers. Lower IQ and poorer social cognition were associated with higher risks of poorer lifetime insight of feeling ill and global insight respectively. Lifetime negative symptoms were associated with a higher risk of poorer lifetime insight into symptoms. Lifetime lack of insight is independent of cognitive impairment in specific domains, except for social cognition. Higher IQ may contribute to better lifetime awareness of illness, while better ability to manage emotions is involved in lifetime global insight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. NPP Krsko Lifetime Extension - Business Impact for Hrvatska Elektroprivreda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrankic, K.; Krejci, M.; Lebegner, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of possible business impacts for HEP in the case of NPP Krsko life extension. Due to numerous reasons nuclear power plant life extension of ten to twenty years is a common procedure abroad. Having this practise in mind as well as other circumstances in Croatian and Slovenian electric power system, the extension of NPP Krsko lifetime is considered to be a possible scenario. Foreseeable impacts of this decision are evaluated primarily with consideration of its effect on HEPs projected cash flows, though other aspects will be addressed as well. Preserving a well maintained production facility with an extraordinary operational record and stable, or possibly falling overall production costs seems as a very rational choice. This is particularly true having in mind expected rise of electricity demand and energy prices in the region. Having NPP Krsko in operation beyond 2023 implies that no replacement source for NPP Krsko capacity needs to be built. This means avoiding all costs connected with the construction and operation of the replacement plant, assuming it will be fossil fuelled. Due to the high uncertainty of the future fossil fuel prices, the avoidance of replacement plant operational cost is likely to prove as highly rewarding. It should be kept in mind that avoided costs also include the replacement plant greenhouse gases emission costs, thus further enlarging the list of value adding impacts. The latter is valid anticipating the ratification of the Kyoto protocol and joining the European emission trading scheme. In addition to that, the extension of NPP Krsko lifetime would mean that the majority of costs connected with the decommissioning and final waste disposal can be postponed further down the time line. This will have very positive financial and possibly technological impact. Other value creating effects for HEP that are foreseeable as a consequence of the plant lifetime extension include: maintaining the knowledge of

  10. Product lifetime, energy efficiency and climate change: A case study of air conditioners in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    This study proposed a modelling technique for estimating life-cycle CO2 emissions of durable goods by considering changes in product lifetime and energy efficiency. The stock and flow of durable goods was modelled by Weibull lifetime distributions and the trend in annual energy efficiency (i.e., annual electricity consumption) of an "average" durable good was formulated as a reverse logistic curve including a technologically critical value (i.e., limit energy efficiency) with respect to time. I found that when the average product lifetime is reduced, there is a trade-off between the reduction in emissions during product use (use phase), due to the additional purchases of new, more energy-efficient air conditioners, and the increase in emissions arising from the additional production of new air conditioners stimulated by the reduction of the average product lifetime. A scenario analysis focused on residential air conditioners in Japan during 1972-2013 showed that for a reduction of average lifetime of 1 year, if the air conditioner energy efficiency limit can be improved by 1.4% from the estimated current efficiency level, then CO2 emissions can be reduced by approximately the same amount as for an extension of average product lifetime of 1 year. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measuring upconversion nanoparticles photoluminescence lifetime with FastFLIM and phasor plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Lee, Hsien-Ming; Qiu, Hailin; Liao, Shih-Chu Jeff; Coskun, Ulas; Barbieri, Beniamino

    2018-02-01

    Photon upconversion is a nonlinear process in which the sequential of absorption of two or more photons leads to the anti-stoke emission. Different than the conventional multiphoton excitation process, upconversion can be efficiently performed at low excitation densities. Recent developments in lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have led to a diversity of applications, including detecting and sensing of biomolecules, imaging of live cells, tissues and animals, cancer diagnostic and therapy, etc. Measuring the upconversion lifetime provides a new dimension of its imaging and opens a new window for its applications. Due to the long metastable intermediate excited state, UCNP typically has a long excited state lifetime ranging from sub-microseconds to milliseconds. Here, we present a novel development using the FastFLIM technique to measure UCNP lifetime by laser scanning confocal microscopy. FastFLIM is capable of measuring lifetime from 100 ps to 100 ms and features the high data collection efficiency (up to 140-million counts per second). Other than the traditional nonlinear least-square fitting analysis, the raw data acquired by FastFLIM can be directly processed by the model-free phasor plots approach for instant and unbiased lifetime results, providing the ideal routine for the UCNP photoluminescence lifetime microscopy imaging.

  12. RDM lifetime measurements in 107Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andgren, K; Ashley, S F; Regan, P H

    2005-01-01

    Lifetimes for decays linking near-yrast states in 107 Cd have been measured using the recoil distance method (RDM). The nucleus of interest was populated via the 98 Mo( 12 C,3n) 107 Cd fusion-evaporation reaction at an incident beam energy of 60 MeV. From the measured lifetimes, transition probabilities have been deduced and compared with the theoretical B(E2) values for limiting cases of harmonic vibrational and axially deformed rotational systems. Our initial results suggest a rotor-like behaviour for the structure based on the unnatural-parity, h 11/2 orbital in 107 Cd, providing further evidence for the role of this 'shape-polarizing' orbital in stabilizing the nuclear deformation in the A ∼ 100 transitional region

  13. RDM lifetime measurements in 107Cd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andgren, K.; Ashley, S. F.; Regan, P. H.; McCutchan, E. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Casten, R. F.; Clark, R. M.; Gürdal, G.; Keyes, K. L.; Meyer, D. A.; Erduran, M. N.; Papenberg, A.; Pietralla, N.; Plettner, C.; Rainovski, G.; Ribas, R. V.; Thomas, N. J.; Vinson, J.; Warner, D. D.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.

    2005-10-01

    Lifetimes for decays linking near-yrast states in 107Cd have been measured using the recoil distance method (RDM). The nucleus of interest was populated via the 98Mo(12C,3n)107Cd fusion-evaporation reaction at an incident beam energy of 60 MeV. From the measured lifetimes, transition probabilities have been deduced and compared with the theoretical B(E2) values for limiting cases of harmonic vibrational and axially deformed rotational systems. Our initial results suggest a rotor-like behaviour for the structure based on the unnatural-parity, h11/2 orbital in 107Cd, providing further evidence for the role of this 'shape-polarizing' orbital in stabilizing the nuclear deformation in the A ~ 100 transitional region.

  14. Experimental lifetimes for Mg-like chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstroem, L.; Bengtsson, P.; Jupen, C.; Livingston, A.E.; Martinson, I.

    1995-01-01

    The results of beam-foil measurements of lifetimes for low-lying singlet levels in Mg-like chlorine, Cl VI, are presented. The decay curves were analyzed by means of the arbitrarily normalized decay curve method, combined with the recently developed CANYL code, which facilitates studies of decay chains. Cascade corrected data are presented for the levels 3s3p 1 P, 3p 2 1 S, 3p 2 1 D, and 3s3d 1 D, whereas less rigorous lifetime values, based on curve fits, were obtained for the 3p3d 1 D, 3p3d 1 F, and 3s4f 1 F levels. The data are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical values, and previous discrepancies between experiment and theory for short-lived states have been removed

  15. Positron lifetime experiments in indium selenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, R.M. de la; Pareja, R.

    1988-01-01

    Positron lifetime experiments have been performed on as-grown samples which had been isochronally annealed up to 820 K and plastically deformed and these experiments yield a constant lifetime of 282 ± 2 ps which is attributed to bulk positron states in InSe. Electron-irradiated samples exhibit a two-component spectrum, revealing the presence of positron traps which anneal out at about 330 K. The nature of the native shallow donors in InSe is discussed in the light of the results, which support the idea that native donor centres are probably interstitial In atoms rather than Se vacancies. Positron trapping observed in the electron-irradiated samples is attributed to defects related to In vacancies. (author)

  16. Lifetime modelling of lead acid batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, H.; Cronin, T.; Lundsager, P.

    2005-01-01

    The performance and lifetime of energy storage in batteries are an important part of many renewable based energy systems. Not only do batteries impact on the system performance but they are also a significant expenditure when considering the whole lifecycle costs. Poor prediction of lifetime can......, therefore, lead to uncertainty in the viability of the system in the long term. This report details the work undertaken to investigate and develop two different battery life prediction methodologies withspecific reference to their use in hybrid renewable energy systems. Alongside this, results from battery...... tests designed to exercise batteries in similar modes to those that they experience in hybrid systems have also been analysed. These have yieldedbattery specific parameters for use in the prediction software and the first results in the validation process of the software are also given. This work has...

  17. Lifetime measurement of trapped staus using ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sibley, Logan

    I study the creation of long-lived staus at a 14 TeV centre of mass energy in proton-proton collisions at the LHC using both the ATLAS and ACME detectors. The ATLAS overburden or underburden, or even ATLAS itself, may trap the semi-stable staus at that place where they will remain until the time at which they decay, where the stau lifetime ranges between seven days and one year. Using a novel method, one may count the number of muons and pions originating from the stau decay using the standard ATLAS cosmic ray trigger. Using an idealized detector model, I find that this method can lead to measurements of the stau lifetime and SUSY cross-section to within statistical uncertainties of 6% and 1% of their actual values, respectively.

  18. Design, maintenance and lifetime of nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, R.L.; Eisenhut, D.G.; Carey, J.J.; Reynes, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Division D of SMiRT deals with experience feedback relating to the in-service behavior of nuclear components, the design and construction of this equipment, its maintenance and the evaluation and management of its lifetime. The nuclear industry now having reached maturity, with more than 300 units in service worldwide, these problems are now of predominant importance to the activity of the industry and in its development programs. This applies particularly to the problems relating to the lifetime of nuclear plants, problems which are rightly of such concern both to the utilities, in view of the enormous investments involved, and also to the safety authorities. These contributions have been reviewed for the purpose of analyzing the essential points. This analysis highlights the considerable advances achieved during the recent decades in design and maintenance methods and practices. It also identifies the areas in which progress still remains to be made

  19. New parameters influencing hydraulic runner lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabourin, M; Bouffard, D A; Thibault, D; Levesque, M

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, hydraulic runner mechanical design is based on calculation of static stresses. Today, validation of hydraulic runner design in terms of reliability requires taking into account the fatigue effect of dynamics loads. A damage tolerant approach based on fracture mechanics is the method chosen by Alstom and Hydro-Quebec to study fatigue damage in runners. This requires a careful examination of all factors influencing material fatigue behavior. Such material behavior depends mainly on the chemical composition, microstructure and thermal history of the component, and on the resulting residual stresses. Measurement of fracture mechanics properties of various steels have demonstrated that runner lifetime can be significantly altered by differences in the manufacturing process, although remaining in accordance with agreed practices and standards such as ASTM. Carbon content and heat treatment are suspected to influence fatigue lifetime. This will have to be investigated by continuing the current research.

  20. New parameters influencing hydraulic runner lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, M; Bouffard, D A [Alstom Hydro Canada Inc, Hydraulic Engineering, 1350 chemin St-Roch, Sorel-Tracy (Quebec), J3P 5P9 (Canada); Thibault, D [Hydro-Quebec, Institut de Recherche d' Hydro-Quebec 1800 boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes (Quebec), J3X 1S1 (Canada); Levesque, M, E-mail: michel.sabourin@power.alstom.co [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie mecanique C.P.6079, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    Traditionally, hydraulic runner mechanical design is based on calculation of static stresses. Today, validation of hydraulic runner design in terms of reliability requires taking into account the fatigue effect of dynamics loads. A damage tolerant approach based on fracture mechanics is the method chosen by Alstom and Hydro-Quebec to study fatigue damage in runners. This requires a careful examination of all factors influencing material fatigue behavior. Such material behavior depends mainly on the chemical composition, microstructure and thermal history of the component, and on the resulting residual stresses. Measurement of fracture mechanics properties of various steels have demonstrated that runner lifetime can be significantly altered by differences in the manufacturing process, although remaining in accordance with agreed practices and standards such as ASTM. Carbon content and heat treatment are suspected to influence fatigue lifetime. This will have to be investigated by continuing the current research.

  1. A Precise Measurement of the Tau Lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the e+e- -> tau+tau- events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong tau decay channels. Two measurements have been made using events in which both taus decay to a single charged particle. Combining these measurements gave tau_tau (1 prong) = 291.8 +/- 2.3 (stat) +/- 1.5 (sys) fs. A third measurement using taus which decayed to three charged particles yielded tau_tau (3 prong) = 288.6 +/- 2.4 (stat) +/- 1.3 (sys) fs. These were combined with previous DELPHI results to measure the tau lifetime, using the full LEP1 data sample, to be tau_tau = 290.9 +/- 1.4 (stat) +/- 1.0 (sys) fs.

  2. A precise measurement of the tau lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.

    2004-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the e + e - →τ + τ - events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong τ decay channels. Two measurements have been made using events in which both taus decay to a single charged particle. Combining these measurements gave τ τ (1 prong) = 291.8±2.3 stat ±1.5 sys fs. A third measurement using taus which decayed to three charged particles yielded τ τ (3 prong) = 288.6±.4 stat ±1.3 sys fs. These were combined with previous DELPHI results to measure the tau lifetime, using the full LEP1 data sample, to be τ τ = 290.9±1.4 stat ±1.0 sys fs. (orig.)

  3. Lifetime monogamy and the evolution of eusociality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2009-01-01

    and termites is thus analogous to the evolution of multicellularity. Focusing on lifetime monogamy as a universal precondition for the evolution of obligate eusociality simplifies the theory and may help to resolve controversies about levels of selection and targets of adaptation. The monogamy window...... underlines that cooperative breeding and eusociality are different domains of social evolution, characterized by different sectors of parameter space for Hamilton's rule....

  4. Gated Detection Measurements of Phosphorescence Lifetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordan Kostov

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost, gated system for measurements of phosphorescence lifetimes is presented. An extensive description of the system operating principles and metrological characteristics is given. Remarkably, the system operates without optical filtering of the LED excitation source. A description of a practical system is also given and its performance is discussed. Because the device effectively suppresses high-level background fluorescence and scattered light, it is expected to find wide-spread application in bioprocess, environmental and biomedical fields.

  5. A measurement of the Omega /sup -/ lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Bourquin, M; Chatelus, Y; Chollet, J C; Degré, A; Froidevaux, D; Fyfe, A R; Gaillard, J M; Gee, C N P; Gibson, W M; Igo-Kemenes, P; Jeffreys, P W; Merkel, B; Morand, R; Plothow, H; Repellin, J P; Saunders, B J; Sauvage, G; Schiby, B; Siebert, H W; Smith, V J; Streit, K P; Strub, R; Tovey, Stuart N; Tresher, J J

    1979-01-01

    In an experiment at the CERN-SPS charged-hyperon beam, a sample of 2500 Omega /sup -/ to Lambda K/sup -/ decays has been collected at Omega /sup -/ momenta at 98.5 and 115 GeV/c. The Omega /sup -/ lifetime is found to be tau /sub Omega /=(0.822+or-0.028)*10/sup -10/ s. (15 refs).

  6. A bimodal flexible distribution for lifetime data

    OpenAIRE

    Ramires, Thiago G.; Ortega, Edwin M. M.; Cordeiro, Gauss M.; Hens, Niel

    2016-01-01

    A four-parameter extended bimodal lifetime model called the exponentiated log-sinh Cauchy distribution is proposed. It extends the log-sinh Cauchy and folded Cauchy distributions. We derive some of its mathematical properties including explicit expressions for the ordinary moments and generating and quantile functions. The method of maximum likelihood is used to estimate the model parameters. We implement the fit of the model in the GAMLSS package and provide the codes. The flexibility of the...

  7. Fatigue lifetime estimation of railway axles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Pokorný, Pavel; Ševčík, Martin; Fajkoš, R.; Matušek, P.; Hutař, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 73, MAR (2017), s. 139-157 ISSN 1350-6307 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Residual fatigue lifetime * Railway axle * Variable amplitude loading * Fatigue crack propagation * Damage tolerance methodology Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 1.676, year: 2016

  8. Life-Times of Simulated Traffic Jams

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, K.

    1993-01-01

    We study a model for freeway traffic which includes strong noise taking into account the fluctuations of individual driving behavior. The model shows emergent traffic jams with a self-similar appearance near the throughput maximum of the traffic. The lifetime distribution of these jams shows a short scaling regime, which gets considerably longer if one reduces the fluctuations for driving at maximum speed but leaves the fluctuations for slowing down or accelerating unchanged. The outflow from...

  9. The programs for lifetime extension by AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoche, P.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 AREVA launched 2 worldwide programs to meet the demands of its customers: 'AREVA Safety Alliance' that proposes a set of measures for post-Fukushima safety upgrading and 'AREVA Forward Alliance' that is dedicated to lifetime extension projects. Concerning 'AREVA Safety Alliance' about 150 projects have been carried out for 53 customers in 19 countries, as for 'AREVA Forward Alliance' 60% of the lifetime extension projects in the US have been performed by AREVA. In the framework of lifetime extension projects, upgrading measures and services are proposed such as the installation of hydrogen recombiner units, of filtered ventilation systems for severe accidents, or the upgrading of the reactor control system through the implementation of the digital Teleperm XS technology, or recommendations about the methodology to follow for the repair or replacement of important components. The replacement of steam generators and of the pressurizer and with other upgrading works led to a gain of 18.5% on the output power of the Ringhals-4 unit. (A.C.)

  10. Strength and lifetime of polymer glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartenev, G.M.; Kartasov, E.M.

    1981-03-01

    A kinetic equation of the time-dependence of strength (complete isotherm of lifetime) of polymer glasses at stress values ranging from the limiting stress of the occurence of separation breaks to the critical stress is derived. The curvature of lifetime plots occuring at low and high periods of time in the experiments are considered. The ranges of noncritical state, breaks caused by a thermofluctuation mechanism, a transition range and athermal breaks are discerned. The limitations of applicability of the basic empirical equation of the kinetic theory of the time-dependence of strength are explained. Theoretical equations are suggested for calculating various characteristics of the brittle break, as limiting stress and critical stress, relative critical craze length and coefficient of stress concentration at the craze tip with respect to various geometrical configurations of the craze and its position in the sample. With polymethylmethacrylate as an example in the brittle and quasi-brittle state, as characterized by the transition from the rupture of sets of chemical bonds to individual chemical bonds, the thermofluctuation processes of break in polymer glasses are discussed. The application of the thermofluctuation theory of solids to the quasi-brittle fracture is considered. The growth kinetics of crazes and the corresponding equation of lifetime were found to be described by identical (corresponding) analytical expressions by which the changes of the coefficients of stress concentration in the range of microplastic deformation in front of the growing is covered within a wide region of temperature including the brittle temperature.

  11. Deep level transient spectroscopy and minority carrier lifetime study on Ga-doped continuous Czochralski silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yohan; Yan, Yixin; Ostrom, Nels P.; Kim, Jinwoo; Rozgonyi, George

    2012-11-01

    Continuous-Czochralski (c-Cz) crystal growth has been suggested as a viable technique for the fabrication of photovoltaic Si wafers due to its low resistivity variation of any dopant, independent of segregation, compared to conventional Cz. In order to eliminate light induced degradation due to boron-oxygen traps in conventional p-type silicon wafers, gallium doped wafers have been grown by c-Cz method and investigated using four point probe, deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), and microwave-photoconductance decay. Iron-gallium related electrically active defects were identified using DLTS as the main lifetime killers responsible for reduced non-uniform lifetimes in radial and axial positions of the c-Cz silicon ingot. A direct correlation between minority carrier lifetime and the concentration of electrically active Fe-Ga pairs was established.

  12. Special topics reports for the reference tandem mirror fusion breeder: beryllium lifetime assessment. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.; Harris, B.L.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1984-10-01

    The lifetime of beryllium pebbles in the Reference Tandem Mirror Fusion Breeder blanket is estimated on the basis of the maximum stress generated in the pebbles. The forces due to stacking height, lithium flow, and the internal stresses due to thermal expansion and differential swelling are considered. The total stresses are calculated for three positions in the blanket, at a first wall neutron wall loading of 1.3 MW/m 2 . These positions are: (a) near the first fuel zone wall, (b) near the center, and (c) near the back wall. The average lifetime of the pebbles is estimated to be 6.5 years. The specific estimated lifetimes are 2.4 years, 5.4 years, and 15 years for the first fuel zone wall, center and near the back wall, respectively

  13. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  14. Role of motor vehicle lifetime extension in climate change policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Shigemi; Nansai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yasushi; Hubacek, Klaus; Suh, Sangwon; Minx, Jan; Kudoh, Yuki; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2011-02-15

    Vehicle replacement schemes such as the "cash for clunkers" program in the U.S. and the "scrappage scheme" in the UK have featured prominently in the economic stimulation packages initiated by many governments to cope with the global economic crisis. While these schemes were designed as economic instruments to support the vehicle production industry, governments have also claimed that these programs have environmental benefits such as reducing CO2 emissions by bringing more fuel-efficient vehicles onto the roads. However, little evidence is available to support this claim as current energy and environmental accounting models are inadequate for comprehensively capturing the economic and environmental trade-offs associated with changes in product life and product use. We therefore developed a new dynamic model to quantify the carbon emissions due to changes in product life and consumer behavior related to product use. Based on a case study of Japanese vehicle use during the 1990-2000 period, we found that extending, not shortening, the lifetime of a vehicle helps to reduce life-cycle CO2 emissions throughout the supply chain. Empirical results also revealed that even if the fuel economy of less fuel-efficient ordinary passenger vehicles were improved to levels comparable with those of the best available technology, i.e. hybrid passenger cars currently being produced in Japan, total CO2 emissions would decrease by only 0.2%. On the other hand, we also find that extending the lifetime of a vehicle contributed to a moderate increase in emissions of health-relevant air pollutants (NOx, HC, and CO) during the use phase. From the results, this study concludes that the effects of global warming and air pollution can be somewhat moderated and that these problems can be addressed through specific policy instruments directed at increasing the market for hybrid cars as well as extending lifetime of automobiles, which is contrary to the current wisdom.

  15. Power management of remote microgrids considering battery lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalise, Santosh

    Currently, 20% (1.3 billion) of the world's population still lacks access to electricity and many live in remote areas where connection to the grid is not economical or practical. Remote microgrids could be the solution to the problem because they are designed to provide power for small communities within clearly defined electrical boundaries. Reducing the cost of electricity for remote microgrids can help to increase access to electricity for populations in remote areas and developing countries. The integration of renewable energy and batteries in diesel based microgrids has shown to be effective in reducing fuel consumption. However, the operational cost remains high due to the low lifetime of batteries, which are heavily used to improve the system's efficiency. In microgrid operation, a battery can act as a source to augment the generator or a load to ensure full load operation. In addition, a battery increases the utilization of PV by storing extra energy. However, the battery has a limited energy throughput. Therefore, it is required to provide balance between fuel consumption and battery lifetime throughput in order to lower the cost of operation. This work presents a two-layer power management system for remote microgrids. First layer is day ahead scheduling, where power set points of dispatchable resources were calculated. Second layer is real time dispatch, where schedule set points from the first layer are accepted and resources are dispatched accordingly. A novel scheduling algorithm is proposed for a dispatch layer, which considers the battery lifetime in optimization and is expected to reduce the operational cost of the microgrid. This method is based on a goal programming approach which has the fuel and the battery wear cost as two objectives to achieve. The effectiveness of this method was evaluated through a simulation study of a PV-diesel hybrid microgrid using deterministic and stochastic approach of optimization.

  16. Octanol reduces end-plate channel lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Peter W.; McBurney, Robert N.; Van Helden, Dirk

    1978-01-01

    1. Post-synaptic effects of n-octanol at concentrations of 0·1-1 mM were examined in toad sartorius muscles by use of extracellular and voltage-clamp techniques. 2. Octanol depressed the amplitude and duration of miniature end-plate currents and hence depressed neuromuscular transmission. 3. The decay of miniature end-plate currents remained exponential in octanol solutions even when the time constant of decay (τD) was decreased by 80-90%. 4. The lifetime of end-plate channels, obtained by analysis of acetylcholine noise, was also decreased by octanol. The average lifetime measured from noise spectra agreed reasonably well with the time constant of decay of miniature end-plate currents, both in control solution and in octanol solutions. 5. Octanol caused a reduction in the conductance of end-plate channels. Single channel conductance was on average about 25 pS in control solution and 20 pS in octanol. 6. In most cells the normal voltage sensitivity of the decay of miniature end-plate currents was retained in octanol solutions. The lifetime of end-plate channels measured from acetylcholine noise also remained voltage-sensitive in octanol solutions. In some experiments in which channel lifetime was exceptionally reduced the voltage sensitivity was less than normal. 7. In octanol solutions, τD was still very sensitive to temperature changes in most cells although in some the temperature sensitivity of τD was clearly reduced. Changes in τD with temperature could generally be fitted by the Arrhenius equation suggesting that a single step reaction controlled the decay of currents both in control and in octanol solutions. In some cells in which τD became less than 0·3 ms, the relationship between τD and temperature became inconsistent with the Arrhenius equation. 8. As the decay of end-plate currents in octanol solutions remains exponential, and the voltage and temperature sensitivity can be unchanged even when τD is significantly reduced, it seems likely that

  17. Theoretical calculations of positron lifetimes for metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Masataka; Araki, Hideki; Shirai, Yasuharu

    2004-01-01

    Our recent positron lifetime measurements for metal oxides suggest that positron lifetimes of bulk state in metal oxides are shorter than previously reported values. We have performed theoretical calculations of positron lifetimes for bulk and vacancy states in MgO and ZnO using first-principles electronic structure calculations and discuss the validity of positron lifetime calculations for insulators. By comparing the calculated positron lifetimes to the experimental values, it wa found that the semiconductor model well reproduces the experimental positron lifetime. The longer positron lifetime previously reported can be considered to arise from not only the bulk but also from the vacancy induced by impurities. In the case of cation vacancy, the calculated positron lifetime based on semiconductor model is shorter than the experimental value, which suggests that the inward relaxation occurs around the cation vacancy trapping the positron. (author)

  18. Determination of the average lifetime of b-baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.

    1996-01-01

    The average lifetime of b-baryons has been studied using 3.10 6 hadronic Z 0 decays collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP. Three methods have been used, based on the measurement of different observables: the proper decay time distribution of 206 vertices reconstructed with a Λ, a lepton and an oppositely charged pion; the impact parameter distribution of 441 muons with high transverse momentum accompanied by a Λ in the same jet; and the proper decay time distribution of 125 Λ c -lepton decay vertices with the Λ c exclusively reconstructed through its pKπ, pK 0 and Λ3π decay modes. The combined result is: τ(b-baryon)=(1.254 +0.121 -0.109 (stat) ±0.04(syst) +0.03 -0.05 (syst)) ps where the first systematic error is due to experimental uncertainties and the second to the uncertainties in the modelling of the b-baryon production and semi-leptonic decay. Including the measurement recently published by DELPHI based on a sample of proton-muon vertices, the average b-baryon lifetime is: τ(b-baryon)=(1.255 +0.115 -0.102 (stat) ±0.05) ps. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of Fibre Lifetime in Optical Ground Wire Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunvalds, R.; Ciekurs, A.; Porins, J.; Supe, A.

    2017-06-01

    In the research, measurements of polarisation mode dispersion of two OPGWs (optical ground wire transmission lines), in total four fibres, have been carried out, and the expected lifetime of the infrastructure has been assessed on the basis of these measurements. The cables under consideration were installed in 1995 and 2011, respectively. Measurements have shown that polarisation mode dispersion values for cable installed in 1995 are four times higher than that for cable installed in 2011, which could mainly be explained by technological differences in fibre production and lower fibre polarisation mode dispersion requirements in 1995 due to lack of high-speed (over 10 Gbit/s) optical transmission systems. The calculation methodology of non-refusal work and refusal probabilities, using the measured polarisation mode dispersion parameters, is proposed in the paper. Based on reliability calculations, the expected lifetime is then predicted, showing that all measured fibres most likely will be operational within minimum theoretical service life of 25 years accepted by the industry.

  20. Optimizing design of converters using power cycling lifetime models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Ørndrup; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Converter power cycling lifetime depends heavily on converter operation point. A lifetime model of a single power module switched mode power supply with wide input voltage range is shown. A lifetime model is created using a power loss model, a thermal model and a model for power cycling capability...... with a given mission profile. A method to improve the expected lifetime of the converter is presented, taking into account switching frequency, input voltage and transformer turns ratio....

  1. THE LIFETIME AND POWERS OF FR IIs IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antognini, Joe; Bird, Jonathan; Martini, Paul, E-mail: antognini@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: bird@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: martini@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We have identified and studied a sample of 151 FR IIs found in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the MaxBCG cluster catalog with data from FIRST and NVSS. We have compared the radio luminosities and projected lengths of these FR IIs to the projected length distribution of a range of mock catalogs generated by an FR II model and estimate the FR II lifetime to be 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} yr. The uncertainty in the lifetime calculation is a factor of two, primarily due to uncertainties in the intracluster medium (ICM) density and the FR II axial ratio. We furthermore measure the jet power distribution of FR IIs in BCGs and find that it is well described by a log-normal distribution with a median power of 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} W and a coefficient of variation of 2.2. These jet powers are nearly linearly related to the observed luminosities, and this relation is steeper than many other estimates, although it is dependent on the jet model. We investigate correlations between FR II and cluster properties and find that galaxy luminosity is correlated with jet power. This implies that jet power is also correlated with black hole mass, as the stellar luminosity of a BCG should be a good proxy for its spheroid mass and therefore the black hole mass. Jet power, however, is not correlated with cluster richness, nor is FR II lifetime strongly correlated with any cluster properties. We calculate the enthalpy of the lobes to examine the impact of the FR IIs on the ICM and find that heating due to adiabatic expansion is too small to offset radiative cooling by a factor of at least six. In contrast, the jet power is approximately an order of magnitude larger than required to counteract cooling. We conclude that if feedback from FR IIs offsets cooling of the ICM, then heating must be primarily due to another mechanism associated with FR II expansion.

  2. The fiscal consequences of ADHD in Germany: a quantitative analysis based on differences in educational attainment and lifetime earnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Nikolaos; Connolly, Mark P; Sobanski, Esther; Postma, Maarten J

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the long-term fiscal consequences of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on the German government and social insurance system based on differences in educational attainment and the resulting differences in lifetime earnings compared with non-ADHD cohorts. Differences in educational attainment between ADHD and non-ADHD cohorts were linked to education-specific earnings data. Direct and indirect tax rates and social insurance contributions were linked to differences in lifetime, education-specific earnings to derive lost tax revenue in Germany associated with ADHD. For ADHD and non-ADHD cohorts we derived the age-specific discounted net taxes paid by deducting lifetime transfers from lifetime gross taxes paid. The lifetime net tax revenue for a non-ADHD individual was approximately EUR 80,000 higher compared to an untreated ADHD individual. The fiscal burden of untreated ADHD, based on a cohort of n=31,844 born in 2010, was estimated at EUR 2.5 billion in net tax revenue losses compared with an equally-sized non-ADHD cohort. ADHD interventions providing a small improvement in educational attainment resulted in fiscal benefits from increases in lifetime tax gains. ADHD results in long-term financial loss due to lower education attainment and lifetime reduced earnings and resulting lifetime taxes and social contributions paid. Investments in ADHD interventions allowing more children to achieve their educational potential may offer fiscal benefits generating a positive rate of return.

  3. Radiation lifetimes and failure mechanisms of carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auble, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of lifetimes of thin carbon foils under heavy-ion irradiation are compiled and recent advances in stripper foil technology are reviewed. The impact of recent foil lifetime improvements, many by more than an order of magnitude, on heavy-ion electrostatic accelerators is discussed. Foil inhomogeneities, particularly those caused by sputtering are suggested to be a prime factor in usable foil lifetimes

  4. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad...

  5. Plant lifetime management and research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, K.; Nagayama, M.

    1993-01-01

    The importance of nuclear power generation has been increasing in Japan. Because the lower generation cost and more stable fuel supply, in comparison with the case of fossil plants, are beneficial to Japan which has scarce natural resources. In addition, nuclear power generation is expected to help reduce carbon dioxide emission which causes global warming. In these circumstances, the safe and stable operations of nuclear power plants are of prime importance, and the frequency of unscheduled shutdown has been kept low in Japan as a result of thorough periodic inspections supported by aging management. This paper covers the development process of the aging management program and related research programs in The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO). KEPCO runs 11 nuclear power units (PWR). A Table shows the commencement date of commercial operation and operating hours for each unit. The early plants, such as Mihama-2 Unit, have been operated for more than 100,000 hours and are in the phase of aging management. Accordingly, we have been conducting aging management programs since 1987. in order to identify age-related degradation and work out countermeasures.The aging management programs have ensured safe and stable operation of nuclear power plants. Each result of the lifetime assessment has provided the information which helps establishing maintenance programs. For example, the result of the lifetime assessment has been reflected to the intervals of overhaulings and inspections, and the replacement timing of some components. In the future activities of aging management should be revised and should focus lifetime assessment on components which provoke difficulties in inspections because of high radiation exposure or high inspection cost

  6. Lifetime earnings for physicians across specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Paul; Tancredi, Daniel; Jerant, Anthony; Romano, Patrick S; Kravitz, Richard L

    2012-12-01

    Earlier studies estimated annual income differences across specialties, but lifetime income may be more relevant given physicians' long-term commitments to specialties. Annual income and work hours data were collected from 6381 physicians in the nationally representative 2004-2005 Community Tracking Study. Data regarding years of residency were collected from AMA FREIDA. Present value models were constructed assuming 3% discount rates. Estimates were adjusted for demographic and market covariates. Sensitivity analyses included 4 alternative models involving work hours, retirement, exogenous variables, and 1% discount rate. Estimates were generated for 4 broad specialty categories (Primary Care, Surgery, Internal Medicine and Pediatric Subspecialties, and Other), and for 41 specific specialties. The estimates of lifetime earnings for the broad categories of Surgery, Internal Medicine and Pediatric Subspecialties, and Other specialties were $1,587,722, $1,099,655, and $761,402 more than for Primary Care. For the 41 specific specialties, the top 3 (with family medicine as reference) were neurological surgery ($2,880,601), medical oncology ($2,772,665), and radiation oncology ($2,659,657). The estimates from models with varying rates of retirement and including only exogenous variables were similar to those in the preferred model. The 1% discount model generated estimates that were roughly 150% larger than the 3% model. There was considerable variation in the lifetime earnings across physician specialties. After accounting for varying residency years and discounting future earnings, primary care specialties earned roughly $1-3 million less than other specialties. Earnings' differences across specialties may undermine health reform efforts to control costs and ensure adequate numbers of primary care physicians.

  7. RDM lifetimes measurements in 179Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamoli, S.; Joshi, P.; Kumar, A.; Govil, I.M.; Singh, R.P.; Chatturvedi, L.

    2001-01-01

    The study of Re nuclei in the mass region from 170-190 is of particular interest as they lie in a region where the Nilsson orbitals exhibit large driving effects on the nuclear shape, presenting the strong possibility of shape coexistence. To see the variation of the deformation driving property of different bands and the other related phenomena like delay in band crossing frequency for intruder configuration h 92 in these nuclei with increasing in neutron number the lifetime measurement in 179 Re nucleus is done

  8. Comparison of methods for calculating decay lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobocman, W.

    1978-01-01

    A simple scattering model is used to test alternative methods for calculating decay lifetimes, or equivalently, resonance widths. We consider the scattering of s-wave particles by a square well with a square barrier. Exact values for resonance energies and resonance widths are compared with values calculated from Wigner-Weisskopf perturbation theory and from the Garside-MacDonald projection operator formalism. The Garside-MacDonald formalism gives essentially exact results while the predictions of the Wigner-Weisskopf formalism are fairly poor

  9. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, Kenneth T; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  10. Lifetime evaluation of Bohunice NPP components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupca, L.

    2001-01-01

    The paper discuss some aspects of the main primary components lifetime evaluation program in Bohunice NPP which is performed by Nuclear Power Plant Research Institute (NPPRI) Trnava in cooperation with Bohunice and other organizations involved. Facts presented here are based on the NPPRI research report which is regularly issued after each reactor fuel campaign under conditions of project resulted from the contract between NPPRI and Bohunice NPP. For the calculations, there has been used some computer codes adapted (or made) by NPPRI and the results are just the conclusive and very brief, presented here in Tables (Figures). (authors)

  11. Aging and lifetime prediction of O-ring seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koemmling, Anja

    2017-01-01

    In some applications, elastomer seals have to remain leak tight over extended time periods (up to several decades) as an exchange of the seals is not practical. Therefore, it is necessary to be able to predict the lifetime of such seals reliably. For this reason, ageing experiments with O-rings and sheets based on hydrogenated acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR), ethylene propylene diene rubber (EPDM) and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM) were performed over up to two years at different temperatures. For investigating the changes of material properties during ageing, measurements of i.a. hardness and tensile behaviour as well as dynamic-mechanical and thermogravimetric analyses were conducted. For assessing the relaxation and recovery behaviour of the ageing seals, compression stress relaxation and compression set experiments were performed. Furthermore, leakage rate was measured to detect seal failure. By examining the aged samples, both the property changes and the responsible degradation mechanisms were characterised. Additionally, the most suitable approach for lifetime predictions should be determined using the large database of results from different test methods performed at several ageing times and temperatures. This included identifying an end-of-lifetime criterion that correlates with leakage and thus seal failure. Regarding the property changes and degradation mechanisms of HNBR, a pronounced embrittlement was observed due to dominant crosslinking reactions during ageing. These also resulted in a decrease of oxygen permeability, leading to a reduction of the oxygen transport into the interior sample (mainly of the thicker O-rings). This resulted in diffusion-limited oxidation effects (DLO effects), meaning that the interior of the sample aged less strongly than regions close to the surface. During ageing of EPDM, both chain scission and crosslinking occurred, which became noticeable in deteriorated tensile properties and decreased compression force as well as

  12. ''LIFETIME'': a computer program for analyzing Doppler-shift recoil-distance nuclear lifetime data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.C.; Fewell, M.P.; Johnson, N.R.

    1985-10-01

    The program LIFETIME is designed to extract lifetimes of nuclear levels from Doppler-shift recoil-distance experiments by performing a least-square fit to the experimental data (shifted and unshifted photopeak intensities and branching ratios). Initial populations of levels and transition rates between levels are treated as variable parameters. In terms of these parameters the population of each level as a function of time is determined by the Bateman equations, and the shifted and unshifted intensities are calculated. 19 refs., 5 figs

  13. Can the lifetime of the superheater tubes be predicted according to the fuel analyses? Assessment from field and laboratory data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenoja, K. [Kvaerner Pulping Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Lifetime of the superheaters in different power boilers is more or less still a mystery. This is especially true in firing biomass based fuels (biofuels), such as bark, forest residues, and straw. Due to the unhomogeneous nature of the biofuels, the lifetime of the superheaters may vary from case to case. Sometimes the lifetime is significantly shorter than originally expected, sometimes no corrosion even in the hottest tubes is observed. This is one of the main reasons why the boiler operators often demand for a better predictability on the corrosion resistance of the materials to avoid unscheduled shutdowns. (orig.) 9 refs.

  14. Can the lifetime of the superheater tubes be predicted according to the fuel analyses? Assessment from field and laboratory data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenoja, K [Kvaerner Pulping Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    1999-12-31

    Lifetime of the superheaters in different power boilers is more or less still a mystery. This is especially true in firing biomass based fuels (biofuels), such as bark, forest residues, and straw. Due to the unhomogeneous nature of the biofuels, the lifetime of the superheaters may vary from case to case. Sometimes the lifetime is significantly shorter than originally expected, sometimes no corrosion even in the hottest tubes is observed. This is one of the main reasons why the boiler operators often demand for a better predictability on the corrosion resistance of the materials to avoid unscheduled shutdowns. (orig.) 9 refs.

  15. Positron source based on the 48V isotope dedicated to positron lifetime spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryzek, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    In the paper we consider application of the 48 V isotope as a source in the positron lifetime spectroscopy. The isotope was produced in the 48 Ti(p,n) 48 V reaction using 15 MeV proton beam. As a target the natural titanium thin plate was used. The measurements using the typical positron lifetime spectrometer have shown the usefulness of the source obtained for this application. Due to its properties, the source may be used for measurements of positron annihilation characteristics in high temperature or aggressive environments. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Classical calculation of radiative lifetimes of atomic hydrogen in a homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbatsch, M.W.; Hessels, E.A.; Horbatsch, M.

    2005-01-01

    Radiative lifetimes of hydrogenic atoms in a homogeneous magnetic field of moderate strength are calculated on the basis of classical radiation. The modifications of the Keplerian orbits due to the magnetic field are incorporated by classical perturbation theory. The model is complemented by a classical radiative decay calculation using the radiated Larmor power. A recently derived highly accurate formula for the transition rate of a field-free hydrogenic state is averaged over the angular momentum oscillations caused by the magnetic field. The resulting radiative lifetimes for diamagnetic eigenstates classified by n,m and the diamagnetic energy shift C compare well with quantum results

  17. Development of a pico-second life-time spectrometer for positron annihilation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, P.K.; Datta, T.; Tomar, B.S.; Das, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation technique is a sensitive probe to investigate various physico-chemical phenomena due to the ability to provide information about the electron momentum and density in any medium. While measurements on the Doppler broadening and angular correlation of annihilation photons provide information about the electron momentum, the electron density at the annihilation site is obtained, by the positron life-time measurement. This report describes the development, optimization and calibration of a high resolution life-time spectrometer (FWHM=230 ps), based on fast-fast coincidence technique, a relatively new concept in nuclear timing spectroscopy. (author). 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  18. Analysis of key hardware factors and countermeasure for restricting 49-2 swimming pool reactor lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yadong; Guo Yue; Yang Xiao; Wang Yiwei; Wang Zhanwen

    2013-01-01

    Safe operation is the most important factor to determine the lifetime of aged 49-2 swimming pool reactor. In this paper, the hardware factors of lifetime were analyzed, such as the pool concrete aging, corrosion of aluminum container and primary coolant system, and graphite swelling etc., and then the corresponding measures such as surveillance, prevention and maintenance were purposed. The results show that 49-2 swimming pool reactor can continue to operate safely due to that container is safe under 8 degree earthquake, the reactor is safe on flood level of once per millennium, adding dam break, and the ageing condition of primary coolant system and container is acceptable. (authors)

  19. Organic scintillators with long luminescent lifetimes for radiotherapy dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Anders Ravnsborg; Lindvold, Lars René; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    of experiments performed using two organic scintillators, one commercially available and one custom made. The luminescent lifetimes of the scintillators have been measured using i) optical excitation by pulsed UV light, and ii) irradiative excitation using high-energy X-rays from a linac. A luminescent lifetime...... component on the order of 20 μs was estimated for the custom-made organic scintillator, while the commercial scintillator exhibited a fast component of approximately 5 ns lifetime (7 ns as stated by the manufacturer) and an approximate 10 μs lifetime slow component. Although these lifetimes are not long...

  20. Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy with LYSO scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Deller, A.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-08-01

    We have evaluated the application of a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) based detector to single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. We compare this detector directly with a similarly configured PbWO4 scintillator, which is the usual choice for such measurements. We find that the signal to noise ratio obtained using LYSO is around three times higher than that obtained using PbWO4 for measurements of Ps excited to longer-lived (Rydberg) levels, or when they are ionized soon after production. This is due to the much higher light output for LYSO (75% and 1% of NaI for LYSO and PbWO4 respectively). We conclude that LYSO is an ideal scintillator for single-shot measurements of positronium production and excitation performed using a low-intensity pulsed positron beam.

  1. Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy with LYSO scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, A.M., E-mail: a.alonso@ucl.ac.uk; Cooper, B.S.; Deller, A.; Cassidy, D.B.

    2016-08-21

    We have evaluated the application of a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) based detector to single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. We compare this detector directly with a similarly configured PbWO{sub 4} scintillator, which is the usual choice for such measurements. We find that the signal to noise ratio obtained using LYSO is around three times higher than that obtained using PbWO{sub 4} for measurements of Ps excited to longer-lived (Rydberg) levels, or when they are ionized soon after production. This is due to the much higher light output for LYSO (75% and 1% of NaI for LYSO and PbWO{sub 4} respectively). We conclude that LYSO is an ideal scintillator for single-shot measurements of positronium production and excitation performed using a low-intensity pulsed positron beam.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of newborn circumcision in reducing lifetime HIV risk among U.S. males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L Sansom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV incidence was substantially lower among circumcised versus uncircumcised heterosexual African men in three clinical trials. Based on those findings, we modeled the potential effect of newborn male circumcision on a U.S. male's lifetime risk of HIV, including associated costs and quality-adjusted life-years saved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Given published estimates of U.S. males' lifetime HIV risk, we calculated the fraction of lifetime risk attributable to heterosexual behavior from 2005-2006 HIV surveillance data. We assumed 60% efficacy of circumcision in reducing heterosexually-acquired HIV over a lifetime, and varied efficacy in sensitivity analyses. We calculated differences in lifetime HIV risk, expected HIV treatment costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs among circumcised versus uncircumcised males. The main outcome measure was cost per HIV-related QALY saved. Circumcision reduced the lifetime HIV risk among all males by 15.7% in the base case analysis, ranging from 7.9% for white males to 20.9% for black males. Newborn circumcision was a cost-saving HIV prevention intervention for all, black and Hispanic males. The net cost of newborn circumcision per QALY saved was $87,792 for white males. Results were most sensitive to the discount rate, and circumcision efficacy and cost. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Newborn circumcision resulted in lower expected HIV-related treatment costs and a slight increase in QALYs. It reduced the 1.87% lifetime risk of HIV among all males by about 16%. The effect varied substantially by race and ethnicity. Racial and ethnic groups who could benefit the most from circumcision may have least access to it due to insurance coverage and state Medicaid policies, and these financial barriers should be addressed. More data on the long-term protective effect of circumcision on heterosexual males as well as on its efficacy in preventing HIV among MSM would be useful.

  3. Lifetime of MCP-PMTs and other performance features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, A.; Böhm, M.; Eyrich, W.; Miehling, D.; Pfaffinger, M.; Stelter, S.; Uhlig, F.; Ali, A.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kreutzfeld, K.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Wasem, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2018-02-01

    The bar PANDA experiment at FAIR will use DIRC detectors for the separation of hadrons. The compactness of the bar PANDA detector requires the image planes of these detectors to be placed inside the magnetic field of the solenoid. Due to this and other boundary conditions MCP-PMTs were identified as the only suitable photon sensors. Until recently the major obstacle for an application of MCP-PMTs in high rate experiments like bar PANDA were serious aging problems which led to damage at the photo-cathode and a fast declining quantum efficiency as the integrated anode charge (IAC) increased. With new countermeasures against the aging, in particular due to the application of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique to coat the MCP pores, the lifetime of MCP-PMTs has meanwhile increased by a factor >50 which is fully sufficient for bar PANDA. The recent results of our long-term lifetime measurements are discussed. New 2-inch MCP-PMT prototypes from Hamamatsu show an encouraging behavior. However, the currently best performing MCP-PMT is a 2-inch PHOTONIS tube with two ALD-layers which reaches an IAC of >16 C/cm2 without any visible sign of aging. In the second part of these proceedings a new data acquisition system of the PADIWA/TRB type is presented which allows a quasi-parallel measurement of many MCP-PMT performance parameters. Especially unwanted effects like dark-count rate, crosstalk, ion after-pulsing, and recoil electrons can be studied in more detail than ever before. Exemplary results for these parameters are shown. The discussed DAQ system will be used for the comprehensive data quality checks of the MCP-PMTs being built into the DIRCs.

  4. Lifetime modelling of lead acid batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, H.; Cronin, T.; Lundsager, P.

    2005-04-01

    The performance and lifetime of energy storage in batteries are an important part of many renewable based energy systems. Not only do batteries impact on the system performance but they are also a significant expenditure when considering the whole life cycle costs. Poor prediction of lifetime can, therefore, lead to uncertainty in the viability of the system in the long term. This report details the work undertaken to investigate and develop two different battery life prediction methodologies with specific reference to their use in hybrid renewable energy systems. Alongside this, results from battery tests designed to exercise batteries in similar modes to those that they experience in hybrid systems have also been analysed. These have yielded battery specific parameters for use in the prediction software and the first results in the validation process of the software are also given. This work has been part of the European Union Benchmarking research project (ENK6-CT-2001-80576), funded by the European Union, the United States and Australian governments together with other European states and other public and private financing bodies. The project has concentrated on lead acid batteries as this technology is the most commonly used. Through this work the project partner institutions have intended to provide useful tools to improve the design capabilities of organizations, private and public, in remote power systems. (au)

  5. Level Lifetime Measurements in ^150Sm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C. J.; Krücken, R.; Beausang, C. W.; Caprio, M. A.; Casten, R. F.; Cooper, J. R.; Hecht, A. A.; Newman, H.; Novak, J. R.; Pietralla, N.; Wolf, A.; Zyromski, K. E.; Zamfir, N. V.; Börner, H. G.

    2000-10-01

    Shape/phase coexistence and the evolution of structure in the region around ^152Sm have recently been of great interest. Experiments performed at WNSL, Yale University, measured the lifetime of low spin states in a target of ^150Sm with the recoil distance method (RDM) and the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM). The low spin states, both yrast and non-yrast, were populated via Coulomb excitation with a beam of ^16O. The experiments were performed with the NYPD plunger in conjunction with the SPEEDY γ-ray array. The SCARY array of solar cells was used to detect backward scattered projectiles, selecting forward flying Coulomb excited target nuclei. The measured lifetimes yield, for example, B(E2) values for transitions such as the 2^+2 arrow 2^+1 and the 2^+3 arrow 0^+_1. Data from the RDM measurment and the DSAM experiment will be presented. This work was supported by the US DOE under grants DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  6. Digital positron lifetime: the influence of noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krille, Arnold; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Anwand, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the world around where everything seems to go digital as soon as possible, positron lifetime spectrometers are kind of a 'last sanctuary' for analog measurements. Only a few of the newer spectrometers use the analog-digital-converters directly after the photomultipliers and extract the timing information via computer. Judging from their results it seems as if the current available converters and the timing mathematics are only as good as the conventional analog setup in the timing resolution. As it is decided that EPOS [1] will use digital positron lifetime, we try to find some reasons for limited timing resolution by simulating anode pulses from the photomultipliers and measuring the FWHM. We create pulses similar to current state-of-the-art 4GS/s digitizers but can control the level of noise and the bit-depth independently. We found that especially the noise (that would come from the analog electronics in/before the converters) has a great influence on the timing resolution. Also we try to use lowpass filtering to reduce that influence with great success.

  7. Management of nuclear power plants lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutin, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    The factors influencing the management of the service life of nuclear power plants can be of various types and the 'heaviest' ones have to be managed through robust and explicit approaches involving all actors. However, the mastery of the service life starts with the mastery of the technical problems, in particular the physical aging of the facilities. This mastery requires to foresee and anticipate the problems and thus a good understanding of the phenomena involved. This article presents: 1 - the general problem of service life management: lifetime concept, situation of French power plants, service life management policy; 2 - aging mechanisms: embrittlement of steel under irradiation, swelling of materials, thermal aging, fatigue, stress corrosion, aqueous corrosion of metals, corrosion-erosion, mechanisms of concrete degradation, mechanisms of elastomers and polymers degradation, wear; 3 - non-replaceable parts: reactor vessel, containment building; 4 - replaceable parts: cables, instrumentation and control system, core internals, primary loop piping, auxiliary primary piping, pressurizer, primary pump, steam generator tubes, other Ni-Cr-Fe alloy parts, secondary loop piping, turbine, alternator; 5 - non-technical aspects: perenniality of the industrial support, evolution of safety requirements, public acceptance, economical aspects, knowledge and information systems; 6 - situation in foreign countries: status of the world nuclear park, lifetime notion in foreign countries, situation in the USA. (J.S.)

  8. Digital positron lifetime: the influence of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krille, Arnold; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard [Department of Physics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany); Anwand, Wolfgang, E-mail: arnold.krille@physik.uni-halle.de [Institute of Ion Beam Physics, Research Center Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-01-10

    In contrast to the world around where everything seems to go digital as soon as possible, positron lifetime spectrometers are kind of a 'last sanctuary' for analog measurements. Only a few of the newer spectrometers use the analog-digital-converters directly after the photomultipliers and extract the timing information via computer. Judging from their results it seems as if the current available converters and the timing mathematics are only as good as the conventional analog setup in the timing resolution. As it is decided that EPOS [1] will use digital positron lifetime, we try to find some reasons for limited timing resolution by simulating anode pulses from the photomultipliers and measuring the FWHM. We create pulses similar to current state-of-the-art 4GS/s digitizers but can control the level of noise and the bit-depth independently. We found that especially the noise (that would come from the analog electronics in/before the converters) has a great influence on the timing resolution. Also we try to use lowpass filtering to reduce that influence with great success.

  9. New detectors to explore the lifetime frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, John Paul; Curtin, David; Lubatti, H. J.

    2017-04-01

    Long-lived particles (LLPs) are a common feature in many beyond the Standard Model theories, including supersymmetry, and are generically produced in exotic Higgs decays. Unfortunately, no existing or proposed search strategy will be able to observe the decay of non-hadronic electrically neutral LLPs with masses above ∼ GeV and lifetimes near the limit set by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), cτ ≲107-108 m. We propose the MATHUSLA surface detector concept (MAssive Timing Hodoscope for Ultra Stable neutraL pArticles), which can be implemented with existing technology and in time for the high luminosity LHC upgrade to find such ultra-long-lived particles (ULLPs), whether produced in exotic Higgs decays or more general production modes. We also advocate a dedicated LLP detector at a future 100 TeV collider, where a modestly sized underground design can discover ULLPs with lifetimes at the BBN limit produced in sub-percent level exotic Higgs decays.

  10. Lifetime management. Assessment of damage in piping systems operated in the creep range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zickler, S.; Wackenhut, G.; Lammert, R.; Maile, K.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate determination of lifetime exhaustion for heavy duty components is indispensable for a safe and at the same time cost-effective operation of power plants. The most important parameters evaluated hereby are material and geometry parameters, as well as measurement data seized from the ongoing operation of the plant. Concerning the measured parameters, uncertainties within the data may arise and must be taken into account. Due to these uncertainties, appropriate safety margins and factors must be provided within the design phase. On the other side, considering safety aspects by the calculation of the lifetime consumption may lead to a high overestimation of the real value. By avoiding this overestimation, operational reserves could emerge which were really economically relevant. In the following, the assessment of the remaining lifetime of components is presented, while especially focusing on the accurate determination of calculation parameters and some progressive assessment methods.

  11. Real Mission Profile Based Lifetime Estimation of Fuel-cell Power Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    . This paper describes a lifetime prediction method for the power semiconductors used in the power conditioning of a fuel cell based backup system, considering both the long-term standby mode and active operation mode. The annual ambient temperature profile is taken into account to estimate its impact...... on the degradation of MOSFETs during the standby mode. At the presence of power outages, the backup system is activated into the operation mode and the MOSFETs withstand additional thermal stresses due to power losses. A study case of a 1 kW backup system is presented with two annual mission profiles in Denmark...... and India, respectively. The ambient temperature, occurrence frequency of power outages, active operation time and power levels are considered for the lifetime prediction of the applied MOSFETs. Comparisons of the accumulated lifetime consumptions are performed between standby mode and operation mode...

  12. On the Impacts of PV Array Sizing on the Inverter Reliability and Lifetime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangwongwanich, Ariya; Yang, Yongheng; Sera, Dezso

    2018-01-01

    , the total energy yield can be increased under weak solar irradiance conditions. However, oversizing the PV array will increase the loading of PV inverters, which may have undesired influence on the PV inverter reliability and lifetime. In that case, it may result in a negative impact on the overall PV...... energy cost, due to the increased maintenance for the PV inverters. With the above concern, this paper evaluates the reliability and lifetime of PV inverters considering the PV array sizing. The evaluation is based on the mission profile of the installation sites in Denmark and Arizona, where...... the reliability-critical components such as power devices and capacitors are considered. The results reveal that the variation in the PV array sizing can considerably deviate the reliability performance and lifetime expectation of PV inverters, especially for those installed in Denmark, where the average solar...

  13. Survival analysis approach to account for non-exponential decay rate effects in lifetime experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J., E-mail: kevincoakley@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Dewey, M.S.; Huber, M.G. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Huffer, C.R.; Huffman, P.R. [North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Marley, D.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Mumm, H.P. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); O' Shaughnessy, C.M. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 120 E. Cameron Ave., CB #3255, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Schelhammer, K.W. [North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 116 Science Drive, Box 90308, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Thompson, A.K.; Yue, A.T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    In experiments that measure the lifetime of trapped particles, in addition to loss mechanisms with exponential survival probability functions, particles can be lost by mechanisms with non-exponential survival probability functions. Failure to account for such loss mechanisms produces systematic measurement error and associated systematic uncertainties in these measurements. In this work, we develop a general competing risks survival analysis method to account for the joint effect of loss mechanisms with either exponential or non-exponential survival probability functions, and a method to quantify the size of systematic effects and associated uncertainties for lifetime estimates. As a case study, we apply our survival analysis formalism and method to the Ultra Cold Neutron lifetime experiment at NIST. In this experiment, neutrons can escape a magnetic trap before they decay due to a wall loss mechanism with an associated non-exponential survival probability function.

  14. Lifetimes of the low spin states in the superdeformed band of {sup 192}Hg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I Y; Baktash, C; Cullen, D; Garrett, J D; Johnson, N R; McGowan, F K; Winchell, D F [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yu, C H [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Superdeformed (SD) states with a 2:1 axis ratio have been observed in nuclei in the A = 150, 190, and the actinide regions. These states depopulate into normally deformed (ND) states by gamma decay, but so far the linking transitions have not been observed and the depopulation mechanism is not fully understood. Nuclei in different mass regions decay out at states with different spin (I), excitation energy above the ND yrast line (U) and lifetime {tau}. This variation is due to differences in the nuclear properties such as the barrier penetration probability, the level densities and the gamma transition strength of SD and ND states. One important factor is the competition between the collective E2 decay along the SD band and the statistical decay to the ND states. These transition rates, or the partial lifetimes, can be determined if the lifetime and the intensity of the gamma rays depopulating the SD states are known. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  15. Survival analysis approach to account for non-exponential decay rate effects in lifetime experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coakley, K.J.; Dewey, M.S.; Huber, M.G.; Huffer, C.R.; Huffman, P.R.; Marley, D.E.; Mumm, H.P.; O'Shaughnessy, C.M.; Schelhammer, K.W.; Thompson, A.K.; Yue, A.T.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments that measure the lifetime of trapped particles, in addition to loss mechanisms with exponential survival probability functions, particles can be lost by mechanisms with non-exponential survival probability functions. Failure to account for such loss mechanisms produces systematic measurement error and associated systematic uncertainties in these measurements. In this work, we develop a general competing risks survival analysis method to account for the joint effect of loss mechanisms with either exponential or non-exponential survival probability functions, and a method to quantify the size of systematic effects and associated uncertainties for lifetime estimates. As a case study, we apply our survival analysis formalism and method to the Ultra Cold Neutron lifetime experiment at NIST. In this experiment, neutrons can escape a magnetic trap before they decay due to a wall loss mechanism with an associated non-exponential survival probability function.

  16. Modeling of apparent activation energy and lifetime estimation in NAND flash memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyunghwan; Shin, Hyungcheol; Kang, Myounggon; Hwang, Yuchul

    2015-01-01

    Misunderstanding apparent activation energy (E aa ) can cause serious error in lifetime predictions. In this paper, the E aa is investigated for sub 20 nm NAND flash memory. In a high-temperature (HT) regime, the interface trap (N it ) recovery mechanism has the greatest impact on the charge loss. However, the values of E aa and E a(Nit) have a wide difference. Also, the lifetime of the device cannot be estimated by the Arrhenius model due to the E aa roll-off behavior. For the first time, we reveal the origin of abnormal characteristics on E aa and derive a mathematical formula for E aa as a function of each E a(mechanism) in NAND flash memory. Using the proposed E aa equation, the accurate lifetime for the device is estimated. (paper)

  17. Toward a new spacecraft optimal design lifetime? Impact of marginal cost of durability and reduced launch price

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Kailah B.; Saleh, Joseph Homer

    2016-10-01

    The average design lifetime of satellites continues to increase, in part due to the expectation that the satellite cost per operational day decreases monotonically with increased design lifetime. In this work, we challenge this expectation by revisiting the durability choice problem for spacecraft in the face of reduced launch price and under various cost of durability models. We first provide a brief overview of the economic thought on durability and highlight its limitations as they pertain to our problem (e.g., the assumption of zero marginal cost of durability). We then investigate the merging influence of spacecraft cost of durability and launch price, and we identify conditions that give rise cost-optimal design lifetimes that are shorter than the longest lifetime technically achievable. For example, we find that high costs of durability favor short design lifetimes, and that under these conditions the optimal choice is relatively robust to reduction in launch prices. By contrast, lower costs of durability favor longer design lifetimes, and the optimal choice is highly sensitive to reduction in launch price. In both cases, reduction in launch prices translates into reduction of the optimal design lifetime. Our results identify a number of situations for which satellite operators would be better served by spacecraft with shorter design lifetimes. Beyond cost issues and repeat purchases, other implications of long design lifetime include the increased risk of technological slowdown given the lower frequency of purchases and technology refresh, and the increased risk for satellite operators that the spacecraft will be technologically obsolete before the end of its life (with the corollary of loss of value and competitive advantage). We conclude with the recommendation that, should pressure to extend spacecraft design lifetime continue, satellite manufacturers should explore opportunities to lease their spacecraft to operators, or to take a stake in the ownership

  18. Statistical inference for the lifetime performance index based on generalised order statistics from exponential distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali Ahmadi, Mohammad; Doostparast, Mahdi; Ahmadi, Jafar

    2015-04-01

    In manufacturing industries, the lifetime of an item is usually characterised by a random variable X and considered to be satisfactory if X exceeds a given lower lifetime limit L. The probability of a satisfactory item is then ηL := P(X ≥ L), called conforming rate. In industrial companies, however, the lifetime performance index, proposed by Montgomery and denoted by CL, is widely used as a process capability index instead of the conforming rate. Assuming a parametric model for the random variable X, we show that there is a connection between the conforming rate and the lifetime performance index. Consequently, the statistical inferences about ηL and CL are equivalent. Hence, we restrict ourselves to statistical inference for CL based on generalised order statistics, which contains several ordered data models such as usual order statistics, progressively Type-II censored data and records. Various point and interval estimators for the parameter CL are obtained and optimal critical regions for the hypothesis testing problems concerning CL are proposed. Finally, two real data-sets on the lifetimes of insulating fluid and ball bearings, due to Nelson (1982) and Caroni (2002), respectively, and a simulated sample are analysed.

  19. Lifetime-management and lifetime-extension at PAKS nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, Tamas; Ratkai, Sandor; Janosi, Agnes Biro

    2002-01-01

    Paks Nuclear Power Plant provides 38-40% of domestic generation at lowest price. It has an important energy-policy role in Hungary. NPP Paks shall be a decisive and perspectively permanent element of the domestic electricity generation during the next two decades, which shall be ensured by plant safe operation, the lifetime extension and power uprating. Paks Nuclear Power Plant investigated the nuclear power plant's lifetime extension possibilities and alternatives, as well as technical and business feasibility of such alternatives. The feasibility study is based on the evaluation of a representative set of systems, structures and components, operational, test, in-service inspection and maintenance practice, experience and findings of the Periodic Safety Review. The most important results of this study showing the feasibility of 20 years lifetime extension is summarised in the paper. It was found that there are no technical or safety issues or limits, which may inhibit the operation of the Nuclear Power Plant Paks up to 50 years. In case of most systems and equipment the recent monitoring, maintenance and regular reconstruction practice of the NPP Paks allows the lifetime extension without outstanding cost. Replacement or reconstruction of a few equipment and systems requires significant investment costs. Material of reactor vessels of VVER/213 incorporated at Paks, compared to vessels of the similar units, is less sensitive to the embrittlement. At units 3-4 reactor vessels do not require any measure, consequently, any additional cost, even in case of a lifetime of 50 years. At unit 2 to extend the lifetime of the reactor vessel, only heating-up of emergency core cooling tanks is needed in order to decrease thermal stress levels caused by pressure thermal shock (PST) transients. For this purpose cost-effective technical solutions are available. At unit 1, beside the heating-up of the emergency core cooling tanks annealing of the welded joint No. 5/6 close to the

  20. LCP- LIFETIME COST AND PERFORMANCE MODEL FOR DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Lifetime Cost and Performance (LCP) Model was developed to assist in the assessment of Photovoltaic (PV) system design options. LCP is a simulation of the performance, cost, and revenue streams associated with distributed PV power systems. LCP provides the user with substantial flexibility in specifying the technical and economic environment of the PV application. User-specified input parameters are available to describe PV system characteristics, site climatic conditions, utility purchase and sellback rate structures, discount and escalation rates, construction timing, and lifetime of the system. Such details as PV array orientation and tilt angle, PV module and balance-of-system performance attributes, and the mode of utility interconnection are user-specified. LCP assumes that the distributed PV system is utility grid interactive without dedicated electrical storage. In combination with a suitable economic model, LCP can provide an estimate of the expected net present worth of a PV system to the owner, as compared to electricity purchased from a utility grid. Similarly, LCP might be used to perform sensitivity analyses to identify those PV system parameters having significant impact on net worth. The user describes the PV system configuration to LCP via the basic electrical components. The module is the smallest entity in the PV system which is modeled. A PV module is defined in the simulation by its short circuit current, which varies over the system lifetime due to degradation and failure. Modules are wired in series to form a branch circuit. Bypass diodes are allowed between modules in the branch circuits. Branch circuits are then connected in parallel to form a bus. A collection of buses is connected in parallel to form an increment to capacity of the system. By choosing the appropriate series-parallel wiring design, the user can specify the current, voltage, and reliability characteristics of the system. LCP simulation of system performance is site

  1. Accelerated lifetime testing methodology for lifetime estimation of Lithium-ion batteries used in augmented wind power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stan, Ana-Irina

    2013-01-01

    The development of lifetime estimation models for Lithium-ion battery cells, which are working under highly variable mission profiles characteristic for wind power plant applications, requires a lot of expenditures and time resources. Therefore, batteries have to be tested under accelerated...... lifetime ageing conditions. This paper presents a three-stage methodology used for accelerated lifetime testing of Lithium-ion batteries. The results obtained at the end of the accelerated ageing process can be used for the parametrization of a performance-degradation lifetime model. In the proposed...... methodology both calendar and cycling lifetime tests are considered since both components are influencing the lifetime of Lithium-ion batteries. The methodology proposes also a lifetime model verification stage, where Lithium-ion battery cells are tested at normal operating conditions using an application...

  2. Lifetime distributional effects of Social Security retirement benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen; Toder, Eric; Iams, Howard

    couples, as well as on earned retirement benefits of individuals. The reduced importance of auxiliary benefits (due to the higher lifetime covered earnings of women) and the increased proportion of divorced retirees make OASI more progressive--even as net benefits decline--for current and future cohorts than for cohorts who retired in the 1990s. Analysis of these findings suggests that simulations of policy changes in Social Security must take into account the decreasing importance of auxiliary benefits across birth cohorts and the complex changes in individuals' marital histories.

  3. Lifetime analysis of fusion-reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    A one-dimensional computer code has been developed to examine the lifetime of first-wall and impurity-control components. The code incorporates the operating and design parameters, the material characteristics, and the appropriate failure criteria for the individual components. The major emphasis of the modelling effort has been to calculate the temperature-stress-strain-radiation effects history of a component so that the synergystic effects between sputtering erosion, swelling, creep, fatigue, and crack growth can be examined. The general forms of the property equations are the same for all materials in order to provide the greatest flexibility for materials selection in the code. The code is capable of determining the behavior of a plate, composed of either a single or dual material structure, that is either totally constrained or constrained from bending but not from expansion. The code has been utilized to analyze the first walls for FED/INTOR and DEMO

  4. Lifetime management of Magnox power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smitton, C.

    1998-01-01

    Magnox Electric, which is, a subsidiary of BNFL, operates six nuclear power plants that have an average age of about 33 years. The procedures developed to maintain the plants and ensure nuclear safety in longer-term operation are reviewed. The technical limit on station lifetimes is expected to be determined by the effect of ageing on major reactor structures where replacement is impractical. Examination of the effect of ageing confirms that the stations are capable of operating to a life of at least 40 years. The economic factors affecting operation are reviewed, recognising the need to sell electricity in a competitive market. Recently Magnox Electric and BNFL have merged and all plant supporting Magnox operations are now within a single integrated company that will provide further opportunities for improved efficiency. (author)

  5. Towards lifetime electronic health record implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gand, Kai; Richter, Peggy; Esswein, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Integrated care concepts can help to diminish demographic challenges. Hereof, the use of eHealth, esp. overarching electronic health records, is recognized as an efficient approach. The article aims at rigorously defining the concept of lifetime electronic health records (LEHRs) and the identification of core factors that need to be fulfilled in order to implement such. A literature review was conducted. Existing definitions were identified and relevant factors were categorized. The derived assessment categories are demonstrated by a case study on Germany. Seven dimensions to differentiate types of electronic health records were found. The analysis revealed, that culture, regulation, informational self-determination, incentives, compliance, ICT infrastructure and standards are important preconditions to successfully implement LEHRs. The article paves the way for LEHR implementation and therewith for integrated care. Besides the expected benefits of LEHRs, there are a number of ethical, legal and social concerns, which need to be balanced.

  6. The lifetime of the control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avet, B.; Cauquelin, C.

    1989-01-01

    The lifetime of the control rod drives is studied. Their function is to take out or to pull in the control rods. The drive and the experiments carried out, are described. The analysis of the behaviour under operation, the drive inspections and surveyance, are also considered. The results are obtained from: the investigations performed on the fatigue strength of the 900 MW and 1300 MW drives, which allowed to deduce a low of wear and to identify the important aspects to be studied, the measurements of the dynamical stresses of mobile elements and a dynamical calculation model. The study leads to the conclusion that a probabilistic approach is needed for the fatigue damage analysis of some elements. Moreover, a systematic examination is also needed, to verify the agreement betwem the drives calculated aging values and the measured ones [fr

  7. Lifetime assessment of service-exposed components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalwa, G.; Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    A longtime prognosis on the operation of creep-exposed components requires a lifetime analysis. The basis for such an analysis can be improved by an analysis of microstructure and material properties. Actually the grade of material exhaustion has to be regarded as proper assessment quantity. However, stress and time safety also are valuable assessment quantities which should be taken into consideration, especially when the grade of exhaustion is uncertain because of inaccurate input parameters. A correct assessment of the damage state cannot be made without taking into consideration the failure mechanism which has to be assumed for a specific component. With respect to creep the most critical component of a steamline system is the pipe bend because of the risk of large damage events. For this case component metallography by replicas is suggested as preventive test method. The continuation of service of a creep damage pipe bend cannot be recommended. (orig./MM) [de

  8. The lifetime cost of a magnetic refrigerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2016-01-01

    The total cost of a 25 W average load magnetic refrigerator using commercial grade Gd is calculated using a numerical model. The price of magnetocaloric material, magnet material and cost of operation are considered, and all influence the total cost. The lowest combined total cost with a device...... lifetime of 15 years is found to be in the range $150-$400 depending on the price of the magnetocaloric and magnet material. The cost of the magnet is largest, followed closely by the cost of operation, while the cost of the magnetocaloric material is almost negligible. For the lowest cost device...... characteristics are based on the performance of a conventional A+++ refrigeration unit. In a rough life time cost comparison between the AMR device and such a unit we find similar costs, the AMR being slightly cheaper, assuming the cost of the magnet can be recuperated at end of life....

  9. Nonmesonic decays and lifetimes of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itonaga, K.; Ueda, T.; Motoba, T.

    2002-01-01

    The nonmesonic decay rates and the lifetimes of hypernuclei of mass A=4-209 are extensively calculated based on the 1π, correlated-2π, and 1ω exchange potentials. Two types of new hyperon-nucleon potentials have been constructed in which the two pions are correlated and coupled to ρ and/or σ in the exchange process. The roles of these potentials and 1ω exchange potential are discussed. The theoretical decay rates are consistent with the existing data for s-shell and p-shell hypernuclei within the present model. The calculated decay rate increases gradually up to A≅60 and then tends to be almost constant for A(greater-or-similar sign)60. The A-dependent behavior of the hypernuclear lifetimes tends to be constant over the mass region A>30 of hypernuclei in our model. It is most remarkable that the cooperative effect of the correlated-2π and 1ω exchanges enhances the neutron-stimulated decay rate Γ n (proton-stimulated one Γ p ) by 400-450 % (20-30 %) with respect to the standard 1π-exchange estimate for A>5. As a result the Γ n /Γ p ratios for light-to-heavy hypernuclei are calculated to be 0.4-0.5, which values are several times larger than the 1π-exchange estimate. Although the experimental ratios seem still about two times larger than these theoretical values, it has revealed that the representative 2π-exchange and 1ω exchange mechanisms give rise to a clear improvement on the Γ n /Γ p ratios

  10. Mass and lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Muenzenberg, G.

    2007-11-01

    Mass and lifetime measurements lead to the discovery and understanding of basic properties of matter. The isotopic nature of the chemical elements, nuclear binding, and the location and strength of nuclear shells are the most outstanding examples leading to the development of the first nuclear models. More recent are the discoveries of new structures of nuclides far from the valley of stability. A new generation of direct mass measurements which allows the exploration of extended areas of the nuclear mass surface with high accuracy has been opened up with the combination of the Experimental Storage Ring ESR and the FRragment Separator FRS at GSI Darmstadt. In-flight separated nuclei are stored in the ring. Their masses are directly determined from the revolution frequency. Dependent on the half-life two complementary methods are applied. Schottky Mass Spectrometry SMS relies on the measurement of the revolution frequency of electron cooled stored ions. The cooling time determines the lower half-life limit to the order of seconds. For Isochronous Mass Spectrometry IMS the ring is operated in an isochronous ion-optical mode. The revolution frequency of the individual ions coasting in the ring is measured using a time-of-flight method. Nuclides with lifetimes down to microseconds become accessible. With SMS masses of several hundreds nuclides have been measured simultaneously with an accuracy in the 2 x 10 -7 -range. This high accuracy and the ability to study large areas of the mass surface are ideal tools to discover new nuclear structure properties and to guide improvements for theoretical mass models. In addition, nuclear half-lives of stored bare and highly-charged ions have been measured. This new experimental development is a significant progress since nuclear decay characteristics are mostly known for neutral atoms. For bare and highly-charged ions new nuclear decay modes become possible, such as bound-state beta decay. Dramatic changes in the nuclear lifetime

  11. Masses of charmed particles, decay modes and lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajsenberg, A.O.

    1982-01-01

    Basic characteristics of charmed particles obtained up to the middle of 1981 are discussed in the survey. Stated in brief are main predictions of the theory on charmed particles properties. Experimental data on masses, decay modes and lifetimes of D and F mesons as well as charmed baryons are considered. Basic experiments are described. It is pointed out that in the experiments single and pair production events as well as charmed particle decay have been observed. The charmed particles lifetime lies within the limits of 10 -12 - 10 -13 C. The lifetime of D +- mesons is approximately three times longer than the D 0 mesons lifetime. The lifetime of F mesons and Λsub(e) baryons is close to D 0 mesons lifetime [ru

  12. Measurement of the $\\Omega_{c}^{0}$ lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M.I.; Alexandrov, Yu.A.; Barberis, D.; Beck, M.; Berat, C.; Beusch, W.; Boss, M.; Brons, S.; Bruckner, W.; Buenerd, M.; Buscher, C.; Charignon, F.; Chauvin, J.; Chudakov, E.A.; Dropmann, F.; Engelfried, J.; Faller, F.; Fournier, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Godbersen, M.; Grafstrom, P.; Haller, T.; Heidrich, M.; Hurst, R.B.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konorov, I.; Martens, K.; Martin, P.; Masciocchi, S.; Michaels, R.; Muller, U.; Newsom, C.; Paul, S.; Povh, B.; Ren, Z.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, L.; Rudolph, H.; Schmitt, L.; Siebert, H.W.; Simon, A.; Smith, V.J.; Thilmann, O.; Trombini, A.; Vesin, E.; Volkemer, B.; Vorwalter, K.; Walcher, T.; Walder, G.; Werding, R.; Wittmann, E.; Zavertyaev, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    We present the measurement of the lifetime of the Omega_c we have performed using three independent data samples from two different decay modes. Using a Sigma- beam of 340 GeV/c we have obtained clean signals for the Omega_c decaying into Xi- K- pi+ pi+ and Omega- pi+ pi- pi+, avoiding topological cuts normally used in charm analysis. The short but measurable lifetime of the Omega_c is demonstrated by a clear enhancement of the signals at short but finite decay lengths. Using a continuous maximum likelihood method we determined the lifetime to be tau(Omega_c) = 55 +13-11(stat) +18-23(syst) fs. This makes the Omega_c the shortest living weakly decaying particle observed so far. The short value of the lifetime confirms the predicted pattern of the charmed baryon lifetimes and demonstrates that the strong interaction plays a vital role in the lifetimes of charmed hadrons.

  13. Improving, characterizing and predicting the lifetime of organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren A.; Heckler, Ilona Maria; Bundgaard, Eva

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes the recent progress in the stability and lifetime of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In particular, recently proposed solutions to failure mechanisms in different layers of the device stack are discussed comprising both structural and chemical modifications. Upscaling...... characterization reported recently. Lifetime testing and determination is another challenge in the field of organic solar cells and the final sections of this review discuss the testing protocols as well as the generic marker for device lifetime and the methodology for comparing all the lifetime landmarks in one...... common diagram. These tools were used to determine the baselines for OPV lifetime tested under different ageing conditions. Finally, the current status of lifetime for organic solar cells is presented and predictions are made for progress in the near future....

  14. Lifetime income inequality with taxation and public benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Kemptner, Daniel; Haan, Peter; Prowse, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show how taxation, unemployment insurance, welfare, disability benefits and public pensions affect the inequality of lifetime income. Using results from a dynamic life-cycle model estimated using German panel data, we show that taxation and public benefits combined reduce the inequality of lifetime income, measured by the Gini coefficient, by 22\\%. Pensions only slightly reduce inequality in lifetime income. Welfare benefits, meanwhile, make persistent transfers to individua...

  15. LHCb: Measurement of $b$-hadron lifetimes at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Amhis, Y

    2014-01-01

    Lifetimes are among the most fundamental properties of elementary particles. Precision Measurements of $b$-hadron lifetimes are an important tool to test theoretical models such as HQET. These models allow to predict various observables related to B-mixing. Using data collected during Run 1 at the LHC, LHCb measured the lifetime of B-decays including a $J/\\psi$ in the final state.

  16. Insight into carrier lifetime impact on band-modulation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Mukta Singh; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Park, Hyung Jin; Lacord, Joris; Martinie, Sébastien; Barbé, Jean-Charles; Xu, Yue; El Dirani, Hassan; Taur, Yuan; Cristoloveanu, Sorin; Bawedin, Maryline

    2018-05-01

    A systematic study to model and characterize the band-modulation Z2-FET device is developed bringing light to the relevance of the carrier lifetime influence. This work provides guidelines to optimize the Z2-FETs for sharp switching, ESD protection, and 1T-DRAM applications. Lower carrier lifetime in the Z2-FET helps in attaining the sharp switch. We provide new insights into the correlation between generation/recombination, diffusion, electrostatic barriers and carrier lifetime.

  17. Magnetic moments and lifetime measurements with a piezoelectrically driven plunger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments are described leading to precise values for magnetic dipole moments of excited nuclear states and their mean lifetimes. A plunger system is described especially developed for g-factor and lifetime measurements with the coincidence time-differential recoil-into-vacuum technique. Measurements of the g-factors and lifetimes for the 2 1 + state of 20 O and the 5/2 1 + state of 13 C are described. (Auth.)

  18. Measurements of b-hadron lifetimes with the Delphi detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaria, N.

    1996-01-01

    The Delphi collaboration has measured the lifetime of b-hadrons using several different methods. In this talk those exploited only by Delphi and that employ original ideas are presented: for the b-baryons lifetime the p-μ correlation; for the B 0 s the φ-μ, D s -h correlations and D s inclusive analysis. The measurement of the average lifetime of b- hadrons using the impact parameters and the vertices of hadronic final states is also presented. (orig.)

  19. Interpreting aerosol lifetimes using the GEOS-Chem model and constraints from radionuclide measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, B. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science; Pierce, J.R. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science; Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Martin, R.V. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Aerosol removal processes control global aerosol abundance, but the rate of that removal remains uncertain. A recent study of aerosol-bound radionuclide measurements after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident documents {sup 137}Cs removal (e-folding) times of 10.0-13.9 days, suggesting that mean aerosol lifetimes in the range of 3-7 days in global models might be too short by a factor of two. In this study, we attribute this discrepancy to differences between the e-folding and mean aerosol lifetimes. We implement a simulation of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 133}Xe into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and examine the removal rates for the Fukushima case. We find a general consistency between modelled and measured e-folding times. The simulated {sup 137}Cs global burden e-folding time is about 14 days. However, the simulated mean lifetime of aerosol-bound {sup 137}Cs over a 6-month post-accident period is only 1.8 days. We find that the mean lifetime depends strongly on the removal rates in the first few days after emissions, before the aerosols leave the boundary layer and are transported to altitudes and latitudes where lifetimes with respect to wet removal are longer by a few orders of magnitude. We present sensitivity simulations that demonstrate the influence of differences in altitude and location of the radionuclides on the mean lifetime. Global mean lifetimes are shown to strongly depend on the altitude of injection. The global mean {sup 137}Cs lifetime is more than one order of magnitude greater for the injection at 7 km than into the boundary layer above the Fukushima site. Instantaneous removal rates are slower during the first few days after the emissions for a free tropospheric versus boundary layer injection and this strongly controls the mean lifetimes. Global mean aerosol lifetimes for the GEOS-Chem model are 3-6 days, which is longer than that for the {sup 137}Cs injected at the Fukushima site (likely due to precipitation shortly after

  20. Lifetime assessment and lifetime management for key components of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Yikang; Sun Hanhong; Qu Jiadi

    2000-01-01

    On the bases of investigation on recent development of plant lifetime management in the world, the author gives some points of view on how to establish plant lifetime assessment (PLA) and management (PLM) systems for Chinese nuclear power plants. The main points lie in: 1) safety regulatory organizations, utilities and R and D institutes work cooperatively for PLA and PLM; 2) PLA and PLM make a interdependent cycle, which means that a good PLM system ensures authentic input for PLA, while veritable PLA provides valuable feedback for PLM improvement; 3) PLA and PLM should be initiated for some key components. The author also analyzes some important problems to be tackled in PLA and PLM from the view angle of a R and D institute

  1. A Well-Designed Parameter Estimation Method for Lifetime Prediction of Deteriorating Systems with Both Smooth Degradation and Abrupt Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanqiang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deteriorating systems, which are subject to both continuous smooth degradation and additional abrupt damages due to a shock process, can be often encountered in engineering. Modeling the degradation evolution and predicting the lifetime of this kind of systems are both interesting and challenging in practice. In this paper, we model the degradation trajectory of the deteriorating system by a random coefficient regression (RCR model with positive jumps, where the RCR part is used to model the continuous smooth degradation of the system and the jump part is used to characterize the abrupt damages due to random shocks. Based on a specified threshold level, the probability density function (PDF and cumulative distribution function (CDF of the lifetime can be derived analytically. The unknown parameters associated with the derived lifetime distributions can be estimated via a well-designed parameter estimation procedure on the basis of the available degradation recordings of the deteriorating systems. An illustrative example is finally provided to demonstrate the implementation and superiority of the newly proposed lifetime prediction method. The experimental results reveal that our proposed lifetime prediction method with the dedicated parameter estimation strategy can get more accurate lifetime predictions than the rival model in literature.

  2. Micellar effects on positronium lifetime in aqueous SDS solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vass, Sz.; Kajcsos, Zs.; Molnar, B.; Stergiopoulos, Ch.

    1981-09-01

    Positron lifetime measurements have been performed in aqueous SDS (Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate) solutions. The lifetime distributions measured by fast-slow coincidence technique have been found to be influenced by surfactant concentration, which varied in the range of 1.25x10 -3 - 3.2x10 -1 mol/dm 3 (i.e. 2.27x10 -5 - 5.82x10 -3 mole fractions). The lifetime of the long living component connected to positronium formation and decay increases with increasing surfactant concentration. Lifetime data suggest that a direct positronium-micelle electron-exchange reaction leading to pick-off annihilation is contraindicated. (author)

  3. Temperature and phase dependence of positron lifetimes in solid cyclohexane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1985-01-01

    The temperature dependence of position lifetimes in both the brittle and plastic phases of cyclohaxane has been examined. Long-lived components in both phases are associated with the formation of positronium (Ps). Two long lifetimes attributable to ortho-Ps are resolvable in the plastic phase....... The longer of these (≈ 2.5 ns), which is temperature dependent, is ascribed to ortho-Ps trapped at vacancies. The shorter lifetime (≈ 0.9 ns), shows little temperature dependence. In contrast to most other plastic crystals, no sigmoidal behaviour of the average ortho-Ps lifetime is observed. A possibility...

  4. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The obtained global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 +- 0.7 years (2 sigma uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current spectrum recommendations

  5. A positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy study of porous silicon using a continuous lifetime fitting algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derlet, P.M.; Choy, T.C.

    1996-01-01

    In the present work we report on a positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) investigation of porous silicon using a continuous lifetime fitting algorithm. Our motivation lies in the underlying disadvantage in discrete lifetime fitting algorithms where the number of components must initially be assumed since in general a realistic spectrum does not uniquely determine this number. This becomes particularly apparent when looking at highly disordered systems where the notion of a discrete spectrum may be invalid and indeed crucial to an understanding of the optical absorption and photo-luminescence properties. Using the PALS data collected from different porous silicon samples in conjunction with other methods of characterisation, we have extended the findings of previous work. In particular we resolve three rather than two ortho-positronium components, suggesting that there may be an additional intermediary scale of porosity in which ortho-positronium annihilates. We also establish the existence of a very weak ortho-positronium component in the pre-anodised wafers at a time scale approximately equal to the longest time ortho-positronium component seen in porous silicon, suggesting that irregularities of a particular magnitude exist before anodisation and that these may, in part, be the catalyst for the initial pore formation process

  6. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement of NPP borssele: Design lifetime and lifetime extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel of the Borssele nuclear power plant has been investigated taking account of the design lifetime of 40 years and considering 20 years subsequent lifetime extension. The paper presents the current licensing status based on considerations of material test data and of US nuclear regulatory standards. Embrittlement status is also evaluated against German and French nuclear safety standards. Results from previous fracture toughness and Charpy tests are investigated by means of the Master curve toughness transition approach. Finally, state of the art insights are investigated by means of literature research. Regarding the embrittlement status of the reactor pressure vessel of Borssele nuclear power plant it is concluded that there is a profound basis for the current license up to the original end of the design life in 2013. The embrittlement temperature changes only slightly with respect to the acceptance criterion adopted postulating further operation up to 2033. Continued safe operation and further lifetime extension are therefore not restricted by reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

  7. Accelerated Lifetime Testing Methodology for Lifetime Estimation of Lithium-ion Batteries used in Augmented Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stan, Ana-Irina

    2014-01-01

    The development of lifetime estimation models for Lithium-ion battery cells, which are working under highly variable mission profiles characteristic for wind power plant applications, requires a lot of expenditures and time resources. Therefore, batteries have to be tested under accelerated...... lifetime ageing conditions. This paper presents a three-stage methodology used for accelerated lifetime testing of Lithium ion batteries. The results obtained at the end of the accelerated ageing process were used for the parametrization of a performance-degradation lifetime model, which is able to predict...... both the capacity fade and the power capability decrease of the selected Lithium-ion battery cells. In the proposed methodology both calendar and cycling lifetime tests were considered since both components are influencing the lifetime of Lithium-ion batteries. Furthermore, the proposed methodology...

  8. Life-time of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboufirassi, M.; Bougault, R.; Brou, R.; Colin, J.; Durand, D.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Horn, D.; Laville, J.L.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Mahi, M.; Meslin, C.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.

    1998-01-01

    The study of the systems Ne + Au, Ar + Au and Kr + Au has allowed description of the de-excitation and particularly the evolution of the fragment emission time intervals as o function of the compound system excitation energy. The analysis of data obtained by the multidetector NAUTILUS for Pb + Au at 29 MeV/u has permitted the access to another time scale: the lifetime of the two partners before fragmentation. For this system and this energy the predominant process is primarily a two-body process analogue to that observed at lower energies (deep inelastic transfer). This mechanism can lead to a complete relaxation energy and consequently to low relative velocities between the two partners in the exit channel. In contrast to the low energy process where the two partners decay by evaporation, here the energy implied may lead to the rupture of one and/or the other partner in several fragments (2 to 5). For the the most relaxed events the excitation energies may reach the values of 6 MeV/u. Simulations were realized in which the entrance channel i.e. the relaxation of the two partners is described by a classical trajectory calculation. In the exit channel after a time τ one of the two partners splits in several fragments. The study of the trajectories of these fragments allows the determination of the angular distributions relative to the direction of the un-split partner. The comparison between this calculation and the data is given. The τ values vary from a negative value corresponding to a rupture during the interaction of two partners up to a τ of 200 fm/c. The best fit indicates a τ 100 fm/c, this showing that the lifetime of the splitting nucleus is of the order of 100 fm/c after separation of the two partners. By comparing this result with microscopic models one can obtain a better understanding of the system rupture scenario. This study is under way

  9. RDM-lifetime study in 125La

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosta, K.; Droste, C.; Morek, T.

    1995-01-01

    Recoil Distance Method (RDM) lifetime measurements have been carried out at Stony Brook for the 125 La nucleus to examine the collective structure of the decoupled band based on the unique parity πh 11/2 [550]1/2 orbital in comparison to that of the 124 Ba core. The 94 Mo( 35 Cl,2p2n) reaction was used at a beam energy of 155 MeV in conjunction with the Notre Dame plunger. Five BGO-suppressed Ge detectors were employed at ±30 degrees, 90 degrees, 123 degrees, and 150 degrees relative to the beam direction to measure the stopped and shifted γ-ray peaks as a function of target-stopper distance. A 14-element BGO multiplicity filter surrounding the target was recorded along with the γ-ray singles events to allow background reduction from Coulex and radioactivity. Preliminary meanlife slopes observed at 30 degrees for the 15/2 - , 19/2 - , and 23/2 - band members were 140(20), 9(3), and 2(2) ps, respectively. Multiple-level fits and time-dependent alignment corrections have not been made. The resulting B(E2) values will be compared with theoretical calculations

  10. An approach to systematic structural lifetime management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talja, H.; Solin, J.; Rintamaa, R.

    2000-01-01

    Many utilities are currently developing preventive maintenance and plant life management systems for their own use. Consideration of plant specific design and integrity problems support use of tailored programs and/or data bases for plant life management. The final applications will be developed on plant type, utility, plant or system level. However, common features can be included in the systems. The project Plant life management XVO conducted at VTT deals - as a whole - with systematic component lifetime management, operational loads in normal steady state operation and in transients, especially piping vibrations and integrity, NDE, materials ageing, interactions of coolant and materials, environmentally assisted cracking and ageing of reactor internals. One of the major challenges in the project is to define, how these multidisciplinary results should be integrated such that quantitative assessments on remaining safe life and failure risks are possible. In this paper a brief overview on the project is given. The work performed on piping vibration and integrity management is presented in more detail. (author)

  11. Lifetime obtained by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakaroun, M. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France); Antony, R. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)], E-mail: remi.antony@unilim.fr; Taillepierre, P.; Moliton, A. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)

    2007-09-15

    We have fabricated green organic light-emitting diodes based on tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq3) thin films. In order to favor the charge carriers transport from the anode, we have deposited a N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis (3-methylphenyl)-1,1'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (TPD) layer (hole transport layer) on a ITO anode. Cathode is obtained with a calcium layer covered with a silver layer. This silver layer is used to protect the other layers against oxygen during the OLED use. All the depositions are performed under vacuum and the devices are not exposed to air during their realisation. In order to improve the silver layer characteristics, we have realized this layer with the ion beam assisted deposition process. The aim of this process is to densify the layer and then reduce the permeation of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. We have used argon ions to assist the silver deposition. All the OLEDs optoelectronic characterizations (I = f(V), L = f(V)) are performed in the ambient air. We compare the results obtained with the assisted layer with those obtained with a classical cathode realized by thermal unassisted evaporation. We have realized lifetime measurements in the ambient air and we discuss about the assisted layer influence on the OLEDs performances.

  12. Proton radioactivity lifetimes using Skyrme interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routray, T.R.; Tripathy, S.K.; Mishra, Abhishek; Basu, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    The phenomena of proton radioactivity is recent and has been possible with the advent of the radioactive ion beams facilities. The neutron deficient nuclei lying above the proton drip line has positive Q values for protons and are spontaneous proton emitters. This limits the possibilities of the creation of ever more exotic nuclei in the proton rich side of the β stability valley. Limited number of works have been done in calculating the half lives of proton emitting nuclei using different models. But calculation of lifetimes of the proton emitting nuclei using Skyrme interaction has not yet been reported. More than 110 Skyrme sets are available, constructed for different purposes, all having the common feature of giving finite nuclei ground state properties and saturation conditions in nuclear matter. Skyrme sets constructed in the late 90's, particularly the construction of SLy sets and others Skyrme sets developed thereafter, have additional care in constraining the parameters for applications to nuclear matter under extreme conditions. Stone et al. have analyzed the Skyrme sets on the basis of available constraints and have sorted out finally 27 Skyrmes sets which can be admitted for calculation of isospin rich dense nuclear matter. The objective of the work is to examine the predictions of the Skyrme sets on the half lives of the proton emitters

  13. Explore the Lifetime Frontiers with MATHUSLA Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ce; CERN. Geneva. EP Department

    2017-01-01

    Many extensions of the Standard Model (SM) include particles that are neutral, weakly coupled, and long-lived that can decay to final states containing several hadronic jets. Long-lived particles (LLPs) can be detected as displaced decays from the interaction point, or missing energy if they escape. ATLAS and CMS have performed searches at the LHC and significant exclusion limits have been set in recent years. However, the current searches performed at colliders have limitations. An LLP does not interact with the detector and it is only visible once it decays. Unfortunately, no existing or proposed search strategy will be able to observe the decay of non-hadronic electrically neutral LLPs with masses above ~ GeV and lifetimes near the limit set by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis ($c\\tau \\sim 10^7-10^8 m$). Therefore, ultra-long-lived particles (ULLPs) produced at the LHC will escape the main detector with extremely high probability. MATHUSLA (MAssive Timing Hodoscope for Ultra Stable neutraL pArticles) is a surface ...

  14. The lifetime of hypoxic human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Sham, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: For hypoxic and anoxic cells in solid tumors to be a therapeutic problem, they must live long enough to be therapeutically relevant, or else be rapidly recruited into the proliferating compartment during therapy. We have, therefore, estimated lifetime and recruitment rate of hypoxic human tumor cells in multicell spheroids in vitro, or in xenografted tumors in SCID mice. Materials and Methods: Cell turnover was followed by flow cytometry techniques, using antibodies directed at incorporated halogenated pyrimidines. The disappearance of labeled cells was quantified, and verified to be cell loss rather than label dilution. Repopulation was studied in SiHa tumor xenografts during twice-daily 2.5-Gy radiation exposures. Results: The longevity of hypoxic human tumor cells in spheroids or xenografts exceeded that of rodent cell lines, and cell turnover was slower in xenografts than under static growth as spheroids. Human tumor cells remained viable in the hypoxic regions of xenografts for 4-10 days, compared to 3-5 days in spheroids, and 1-3 days for most rodent cells in spheroids. Repopulation was observed within the first few radiation treatments for the SiHa xenografts and, with accumulated doses of more than 10 Gy, virtually all recovered cells had progressed through at least one S-phase. Conclusion: Our results suggest an important difference in the ability of human vs. rodent tumor cells to withstand hypoxia, and raise questions concerning the increased longevity seen in vivo relative to the steady-state spheroid system

  15. Radiative lifetime measurements of rubidium Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branden, D B; Juhasz, T; Mahlokozera, T; Vesa, C; Wilson, R O; Zheng, M; Tate, D A; Kortyna, A

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the radiative lifetimes of ns, np and nd Rydberg states of rubidium in the range 28 ≤ n ≤ 45. To enable long-lived states to be measured, our experiment uses slow-moving (∼100 μK) 85 Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Two experimental techniques have been adopted to reduce random and systematic errors. First, a narrow-bandwidth pulsed laser is used to excite the target nl Rydberg state, resulting in minimal shot-to-shot variation in the initial state population. Second, we monitor the target state population as a function of time delay from the laser pulse using a short-duration, millimetre-wave pulse that is resonant with a one- or two-photon transition to a higher energy 'monitor state', n'l'. We then selectively field ionize the monitor state, and detect the resulting electrons with a micro-channel plate. This signal is an accurate mirror of the nl target state population, and is uncontaminated by contributions from other states which are populated by black body radiation. Our results are generally consistent with other recent experimental results obtained using a method which is more prone to systematic error, and are also in excellent agreement with theory.

  16. Lifetime extension: what challenges for industrialists?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cudelou, C.

    2014-01-01

    Lifetime extension upgrading imposes to compel with ASN (Nuclear Safety Authority) requirements such as: -) to assess the conformity of the installation in a very broad sense by looking for and processing any discrepancy, -) to demonstrate that the facility can face an accident, -) to justify an efficient monitoring of the components that can not be replaced (reactor vessel, containment building), -) to anticipate the replacement of important components like steam generators, -) to study measures for diminishing the thermal and chemical stresses of components, and -) to maintain knowledge and technical competencies. All these requirements are a big challenge for the nuclear industry that will face in the few years to come important tasks. Between 2015 and 2020, it is expected that fifteen 900 MW units and twenty 1300 MW units will have their third decennial outage program. During this period there will also be the second decennial outage program for some 1450 MW units and the first fourth decennial outage program for a 900 MW unit. To succeed in all these challenges, nuclear industry will have to focus on innovation and on a better work organisation. (A.C.)

  17. Lifetime predictions for the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and San Marco spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E. A.; Ward, D. T.; Schmitt, M. W.; Phenneger, M. C.; Vaughn, F. J.; Lupisella, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    Lifetime prediction techniques developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) are described. These techniques were developed to predict the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft orbit, which is decaying due to atmospheric drag, with reentry predicted to occur before the end of 1989. Lifetime predictions were also performed for the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), which was deployed on the 1984 SMM repair mission and is scheduled for retrieval on another Space Transportation System (STS) mission later this year. Concepts used in the lifetime predictions were tested on the San Marco spacecraft, which reentered the Earth's atmosphere on December 6, 1988. Ephemerides predicting the orbit evolution of the San Marco spacecraft until reentry were generated over the final 90 days of the mission when the altitude was less than 380 kilometers. The errors in the predicted ephemerides are due to errors in the prediction of atmospheric density variations over the lifetime of the satellite. To model the time dependence of the atmospheric densities, predictions of the solar flux at the 10.7-centimeter wavelength were used in conjunction with Harris-Priester (HP) atmospheric density tables. Orbital state vectors, together with the spacecraft mass and area, are used as input to the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS). Propagations proceed in monthly segments, with the nominal atmospheric drag model scaled for each month according to the predicted monthly average value of F10.7. Calibration propagations are performed over a period of known orbital decay to obtain the effective ballistic coefficient. Progagations using plus or minus 2 sigma solar flux predictions are also generated to estimate the despersion in expected reentry dates. Definitive orbits are compared with these predictions as time expases. As updated vectors are received, these are also propagated to reentryto continually update the lifetime predictions.

  18. 42 CFR 409.65 - Lifetime reserve days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Scope of Hospital Insurance Benefits § 409.65 Lifetime reserve days. (a... private insurance coverage that begins after the first 90 inpatient days in a benefit period, or if the... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifetime reserve days. 409.65 Section 409.65 Public...

  19. The Lifetime Prediction of LED Drivers and Lamps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, B.

    2017-01-01

    Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) have become a very promising alternative lighting source with the main advantages of a longer lifetime and a higher efficiency than traditional ones. However, the LED lamp’s lifetime is compromised by its driver’s reliability. Although extensive studies have been made on

  20. Estimation of the Service Lifetime of Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper estimation of the service lifetime of concrete bridges is discussed. The main reason for deterioration of concrete bridges is corrosion of the reinforcement. Therefore, modelling of the corrosion process is an important aspect of the estimation of the service lifetime. In this paper...

  1. Lifetime measurement of excited atomic and ionic states of some

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-frequency deflection (HFD) technique with a delayed coincidence single photon counting arrangement is an efficient technique for radiative lifetime measurement. An apparatus for measurement of the radiative lifetime of atoms and molecules has been developed in our laboratory and measurements have been ...

  2. Fine-structure energy levels, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with the experimental results compiled in the NIST Data Base. Many new ... Keywords. Relativistic fine-structure levels; oscillator strengths; lifetimes. ... have calculated oscillator strengths and lifetimes using the Briet–Pauli R-Matrix ..... [2] The Opacity Project Team, The Opacity Project (Institute of Physics Publishing,. Bristol ...

  3. 50 CFR 600.760 - Fishery Negotiation Panel lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fishery Negotiation Panel lifetime. 600... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Fishery Negotiation Panels § 600.760 Fishery Negotiation Panel lifetime. (a) An FNP shall terminate upon either: (1) Submission of...

  4. Calculation of the Touschek lifetime in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Various formulae for calculating the Touschek lifetime of a ribbon beam of electrons are examined. It is shown that two commonly used approximations can give inaccurate results in certain circumstances. A method is suggested for calculating the lifetime accurately and efficiently using a combination of formulae

  5. Level lifetimes of Au52+ in Au plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bo; Zhu Zhiyan; Jiang Gang; Zhu Zhenghe

    2003-01-01

    Based on the extended relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock theory, the level lifetimes, level widths and wavelengths of Au 52+ have been calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The wavelengths obtained are in good agreement with the experimental data available. The relationship between the level lifetimes and the level widths satisfies the Heisenberg uncertainty principle

  6. Extending the Lifetime of Sensor Networks through Adaptive Reclustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Ferrari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the lifetime of clustered sensor networks with decentralized binary detection under a physical layer quality-of-service (QoS constraint, given by the maximum tolerable probability of decision error at the access point (AP. In order to properly model the network behavior, we consider four different distributions (exponential, uniform, Rayleigh, and lognormal for the lifetime of a single sensor. We show the benefits, in terms of longer network lifetime, of adaptive reclustering. We also derive an analytical framework for the computation of the network lifetime and the penalty, in terms of time delay and energy consumption, brought by adaptive reclustering. On the other hand, absence of reclustering leads to a shorter network lifetime, and we show the impact of various clustering configurations under different QoS conditions. Our results show that the organization of sensors in a few big clusters is the winning strategy to maximize the network lifetime. Moreover, the observation of the phenomenon should be frequent in order to limit the penalties associated with the reclustering procedure. We also apply the developed framework to analyze the energy consumption associated with the proposed reclustering protocol, obtaining results in good agreement with the performance of realistic wireless sensor networks. Finally, we present simulation results on the lifetime of IEEE 802.15.4 wireless sensor networks, which enrich the proposed analytical framework and show that typical networking performance metrics (such as throughput and delay are influenced by the sensor network lifetime.

  7. Extending the Lifetime of Sensor Networks through Adaptive Reclustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Gianluigi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the lifetime of clustered sensor networks with decentralized binary detection under a physical layer quality-of-service (QoS constraint, given by the maximum tolerable probability of decision error at the access point (AP. In order to properly model the network behavior, we consider four different distributions (exponential, uniform, Rayleigh, and lognormal for the lifetime of a single sensor. We show the benefits, in terms of longer network lifetime, of adaptive reclustering. We also derive an analytical framework for the computation of the network lifetime and the penalty, in terms of time delay and energy consumption, brought by adaptive reclustering. On the other hand, absence of reclustering leads to a shorter network lifetime, and we show the impact of various clustering configurations under different QoS conditions. Our results show that the organization of sensors in a few big clusters is the winning strategy to maximize the network lifetime. Moreover, the observation of the phenomenon should be frequent in order to limit the penalties associated with the reclustering procedure. We also apply the developed framework to analyze the energy consumption associated with the proposed reclustering protocol, obtaining results in good agreement with the performance of realistic wireless sensor networks. Finally, we present simulation results on the lifetime of IEEE 802.15.4 wireless sensor networks, which enrich the proposed analytical framework and show that typical networking performance metrics (such as throughput and delay are influenced by the sensor network lifetime.

  8. Lifetimes and masses of b-hadrons at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesiak, T.

    1994-07-01

    Latest LEP results concerning hadrons containing b-quarks are reviewed. The average lifetime of the b-hadrons together with the lifetimes of the B u + , B d 0 , B s and Λ b and first mass measurements of the B s and Λ b are presented. (author). 34 refs, 7 figs, 4 tabs

  9. Theoretical lifetimes and fluorescence yields for multiply-ionized fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnell, T.W.; Can, C.; Bhalla, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical lifetimes and multiplet partial fluorescence yields for various fluorine ions with a single K-shell vacancy were calculated. For few-electron systems, the lifetimes and line fluorescence yields were computed in the intermediate coupling scheme with the inclusion of the effects arising from configuration interactions. 6 references

  10. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence lifetime measurements of the macula using the fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Quellec, Gwénolé; Abegg, Mathias; Menke, Marcel N; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute; Kowal, Jens; Blatz, Johannes; La Schiazza, Olivier; Leichtle, Alexander B; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2014-04-03

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) cannot only be characterized by the intensity or the emission spectrum, but also by its lifetime. As the lifetime of a fluorescent molecule is sensitive to its local microenvironment, this technique may provide more information than fundus autofluorescence imaging. We report here the characteristics and repeatability of FAF lifetime measurements of the human macula using a new fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO). A total of 31 healthy phakic subjects were included in this study with an age range from 22 to 61 years. For image acquisition, a fluorescence lifetime ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used. Fluorescence lifetime maps of the retina were recorded in a short- (498-560 nm) and a long- (560-720 nm) spectral channel. For quantification of fluorescence lifetimes a standard ETDRS grid was used. Mean fluorescence lifetimes were shortest in the fovea, with 208 picoseconds for the short-spectral channel and 239 picoseconds for the long-spectral channel, respectively. Fluorescence lifetimes increased from the central area to the outer ring of the ETDRS grid. The test-retest reliability of FLIO was very high for all ETDRS areas (Spearman's ρ = 0.80 for the short- and 0.97 for the long-spectral channel, P macula in healthy subjects. By using a custom-built software, we were able to quantify fluorescence lifetimes within the ETDRS grid. Establishing a clinically accessible standard against which to measure FAF lifetimes within the retina is a prerequisite for future studies in retinal disease.

  11. Validity of LIDAS (LIfetime Depression Assessment Self-report): a self-report online assessment of lifetime major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, M; Middeldorp, C M; de Geus, E J C; Lau, H M; Sinke, M; van Nieuwenhuizen, B; Smit, J H; Boomsma, D I; Penninx, B W J H

    2017-01-01

    There is a paucity of valid, brief instruments for the assessment of lifetime major depressive disorder (MDD) that can be used in, for example, large-scale genomics, imaging or biomarker studies on depression. We developed the LIfetime Depression Assessment Self-report (LIDAS), which assesses lifetime MDD diagnosis according to DSM criteria, and is largely based on the widely used Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Here, we tested the feasibility and determined the sensitivity and specificity for measuring lifetime MDD with this new questionnaire, with a regular CIDI as reference. Sensitivity and specificity analyses of the online lifetime MDD questionnaire were performed in adults with (n = 177) and without (n = 87) lifetime MDD according to regular index CIDIs, selected from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) and Netherlands Twin Register (NTR). Feasibility was tested in an additional non-selective, population-based sample of NTR participants (n = 245). Of the 753 invited persons, 509 (68%) completed the LIDAS, of which 419 (82%) did this online. User-friendliness of the instrument was rated high. Median completion time was 6.2 min. Sensitivity and specificity for lifetime MDD were 85% [95% confidence interval (CI) 80-91%] and 80% (95% CI 72-89%), respectively. This LIDAS instrument gave a lifetime MDD prevalence of 20.8% in the population-based sample. Measuring lifetime MDD with an online instrument was feasible. Sensitivity and specificity were adequate. The instrument gave a prevalence of lifetime MDD in line with reported population prevalences. LIDAS is a promising tool for rapid determination of lifetime MDD status in large samples, such as needed for genomics studies.

  12. Lifetime sedentary living accelerates some aspects of secondary aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Frank W; Laye, Matthew J; Roberts, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    accelerates secondary aging (e.g., speeding the reduction in bone mineral density, maximal oxygen consumption, and skeletal muscle strength and power), but does not alter the primary aging of these systems. Third, a lifetime of physical activity to the age of ∼60-70 yr old totally prevents decrements in some...... role in the secondary aging of many essential physiological functions, and this aging can be prevented through a lifetime of physical activity.......Lifetime physical inactivity interacts with secondary aging (i.e., aging caused by diseases and environmental factors) in three patterns of response. First, lifetime physical inactivity confers no apparent effects on a given set of physiological functions. Second, lifetime physical inactivity...

  13. Lifetime of {sup 44}Ti as probe for supernova models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, J; Meissner, J; Schatz, H; Stech, E; Tischhauser, P; Wiescher, M [Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Bazin, D; Harkewicz, R; Hellstroem, M; Sherrill, B; Steiner, M [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Boyd, R N [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Buchmann, L [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hartmann, D H [Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States); Hinnefeld, J D [Indiana Univ. South Bend, South Bend, IN (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The recent observation of {sup 44}Ti radioactivity in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory allows the determination of the absolute amount of {sup 44}Ti. This provides a test for current supernova models. The main uncertainty is the lifetime of {sup 44}Ti. We report a new measurement of the lifetime of {sup 44}Ti applying a novel technique. A mixed radioactive beam containing {sup 44}Ti as well as {sup 22}Na was implanted and the resulting {gamma}-activity was measured. This allowed the determination of the lifetime of {sup 44}Ti relative to the lifetime of {sup 22}Na, {tau} = (87.0 {+-} 1.9) y. With this lifetime, the {sup 44}Ti abundance agrees with theoretical predictions within the remaining observational uncertainties. (orig.)

  14. Time variation of fluorescence lifetime in enhanced cyan fluorescence protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soonhyouk; Kim, Soo Yong; Park, Kyoungsook; Jeong, Jinyoung; Chung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Sok Won

    2010-01-01

    The lifetime variations of enhanced cyan fluorescence protein (ECFP) in relatively short integration time bins were studied via time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurement. We observed that minimum photon counts are necessary for the lifetime estimation to achieve a certain range of variance. The conditions to decrease the variance of lifetime were investigated and the channel width of the measurement of TCSPC data was found to be another important factor for the variance of lifetime. Though the lifetime of ECFP is best fit by a double exponential, a mono exponential fit for the same integration time is more stable. The results may be useful in the analysis of photophysical dynamics for ensemble molecules in short measurement time windows.

  15. Moisture dependence of positron lifetime in Kevlar-49

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Because of filamentary character of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, there is some concern about the moisture uptake and its effect on plastic composites reinforced with Kevlar-49 fibers. As part of continuing studies of positron lifetime in polymers, we have measured positron lifetime spectra in Kevlar-49 fibers as a function of their moisture content. The long lifetime component intensities are rather low, being only of the order of 2-3 percent. The measured values of long component lifetimes at various moisture levels in the specimens are as follows: 2072 +/- 173 ps (dry); 2013 +/- 193 ps (20.7 percent saturation); 1665 +/- 85 ps (25.7 percent saturation); 1745 +/- 257 ps (32.1 percent saturation); and 1772 +/- 217 ps (100 percent saturation). It is apparent that the long component lifetime at first decreases and then increases as the specimen moisture content increases. These results have been compared with those inferred from Epon-815 and Epon-815/K-49 composite data.

  16. The Male-Female Wage Gap: Lifetime Earnings Losses. Briefing Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Heidi; Whittaker, Julie

    Currently, the median full-time woman worker earns 74.4 percent of the annual earnings of the median man. Over their lifetime, young women stand to lose a great deal of money due to differences in the wages for women and men. Estimates are that the average 25-year-old woman who works full time year round for 40 years will earn $523,000 less than…

  17. Fluvastatin as a micropore lifetime enhancer for sustained delivery across microneedle-treated skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Priyanka; Brogden, Nicole K; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2014-02-01

    Microneedles (MNs), a physical skin permeation enhancement technique, facilitate drug delivery across the skin, thus enhancing the number of drugs that can be delivered transdermally in therapeutically relevant concentrations. The micropores created in the skin by MNs reseal because of normal healing processes of the skin, thus limiting the duration of the drug delivery window. Pore lifetime enhancement strategies can increase the effectiveness of MNs as a drug delivery mechanism by prolonging the delivery window. Fluvastatin (FLU), a HMGCoA reductase inhibitor, was used in this study to enhance the pore lifetime by inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol, a major component of the stratum corneum lipids. The study showed that using FLU as a pretreatment it is possible to enhance the pore lifetime of MN-treated skin and thus allow for sustained drug delivery. The skin recovered within a 30-45-min time period following the removal of occlusion, and there was no significant irritation observed due to the treatment compared to the control sites. Thus, it can be concluded that localized skin treatment with FLU can be used to extend micropore lifetime and deliver drugs for up to 7 days across MN-treated skin. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of lipids during 3T3-L1 cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Sik; Won, Young Jae; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is becoming a big health problem in these days. Since increased body weight is due to increased number and size of the triglyceride-storing adipocytes, many researchers are working on differentiation conditions and processes of adipocytes. Adipocytes also work as regulators of whole-body energy homeostasis by secreting several proteins that regulate processes as diverse as haemostasis, blood pressure, immune function, angiogenesis and energy balance. 3T3-L1 cells are widely used cell line for studying adipogenesis because it can differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype under appropriate conditions. In this paper, we propose an effective fluorescence lifetime imaging technique which can easily distinguish lipids in membrane and those in lipid droplets. Nile red dyes are attached to lipids in 3T3-L1 cells. Fluorescence lifetime images were taken for 2 week during differentiation procedure of 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes. We used 488 nm pulsed laser with 5MHz repetition rate and emission wavelength is 520 nm of Nile Red fluorescent dye. Results clearly show that the lifetime of Nile red in lipid droplets are smaller than those in cell membrane. Our results suggest that fluorescence lifetime imaging can be a very powerful tool to monitor lipid droplet formation in adipocytes from 3T3-L1 cells.

  19. Intrinsic to extrinsic phonon lifetime transition in a GaAs–AlAs superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, F; Garg, J; Chen, G; Maznev, A A; Nelson, K A; Jandl, A; Bulsara, M; Fitzgerald, E A

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the lifetimes of two zone-center longitudinal acoustic phonon modes, at 320 and 640 GHz, in a 14 nm GaAs/2 nm AlAs superlattice structure. By comparing measurements at 296 and 79 K we separate the intrinsic contribution to phonon lifetime determined by phonon–phonon scattering from the extrinsic contribution due to defects and interface roughness. At 296 K, the 320 GHz phonon lifetime has approximately equal contributions from intrinsic and extrinsic scattering, whilst at 640 GHz it is dominated by extrinsic effects. These measurements are compared with intrinsic and extrinsic scattering rates in the superlattice obtained from first-principles lattice dynamics calculations. The calculated room-temperature intrinsic lifetime of longitudinal phonons at 320 GHz is in agreement with the experimentally measured value of 0.9 ns. The model correctly predicts the transition from predominantly intrinsic to predominantly extrinsic scattering; however the predicted transition occurs at higher frequencies. Our analysis indicates that the ‘interfacial atomic disorder’ model is not entirely adequate and that the observed frequency dependence of the extrinsic scattering rate is likely to be determined by a finite correlation length of interface roughness. (paper)

  20. Intrinsic to extrinsic phonon lifetime transition in a GaAs-AlAs superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, F; Garg, J; Maznev, A A; Jandl, A; Bulsara, M; Fitzgerald, E A; Chen, G; Nelson, K A

    2013-07-24

    We have measured the lifetimes of two zone-center longitudinal acoustic phonon modes, at 320 and 640 GHz, in a 14 nm GaAs/2 nm AlAs superlattice structure. By comparing measurements at 296 and 79 K we separate the intrinsic contribution to phonon lifetime determined by phonon-phonon scattering from the extrinsic contribution due to defects and interface roughness. At 296 K, the 320 GHz phonon lifetime has approximately equal contributions from intrinsic and extrinsic scattering, whilst at 640 GHz it is dominated by extrinsic effects. These measurements are compared with intrinsic and extrinsic scattering rates in the superlattice obtained from first-principles lattice dynamics calculations. The calculated room-temperature intrinsic lifetime of longitudinal phonons at 320 GHz is in agreement with the experimentally measured value of 0.9 ns. The model correctly predicts the transition from predominantly intrinsic to predominantly extrinsic scattering; however the predicted transition occurs at higher frequencies. Our analysis indicates that the 'interfacial atomic disorder' model is not entirely adequate and that the observed frequency dependence of the extrinsic scattering rate is likely to be determined by a finite correlation length of interface roughness.

  1. Deformation and lifetime behaviour of cyclic loaded rail and wheel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denne, B.; Lang, K.-H.; Loehe, D. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde 1

    2000-07-01

    Corrugation, shelling and squats are some unexpected technical problems caused by increasing service tonnage, increasing load of the rails and increasing train speed at Deutsche Bahn AG lines since the last decades. As the complex phenomena of rolling contact fatigue in the rail / wheel system is difficult to understand extensive investigations have to be done to describe the multiaxial rolling contact fatigue processes and to develop and verify multiaxial fatigue criteria and lifetime predictions. To reach this aim a reliable fatigue data base of the utilised steels is required. To obtain such data, specimens were worked out of rails and wheels used in high speed traffic. With these specimens the lifetime behaviour and the endurance limit were estimated from push-pull tests. For the rail steel stress and total strain controlled fatigue tests were performed. The resulting lifetime behaviour is compared. In the wheel there are several regions with different microstructures due to the heat treatment at the end of the manufacturing process. Specimens were taken from the wheel rim representing these different microstructures. With these specimens stress controlled fatigue tests were performed. The influence of the different microstructures on the deformation and lifetime behaviour is showed. (orig.)

  2. Portable fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for in-situ interrogation of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Teixeira Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime techniques are potential methods for optical diagnosis and characterization of biological tissues with an in-situ, fast, and noninvasive interrogation. Several diseases may be diagnosed due to differences in the fluorescence spectra of targeted fluorophores, when, these spectra are similar, considering steady-state fluorescence, others may be detected by monitoring their fluorescence lifetime. Despite this complementarity, most of the current fluorescence lifetime systems are not robust and portable, and not being feasible for clinical applications. We describe the assembly of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system in a suitcase, its characterization, and validation with clinical measurements of skin lesions. The assembled system is all encased and robust, maintaining its mechanical, electrical, and optical stability during transportation, and is feasible for clinical measurements. The instrument response function measured was about 300 ps, and the system is properly calibrated. At the clinical study, the system showed to be reliable, and the achieved spectroscopy results support its potential use as an auxiliary tool for skin diagnostics.

  3. NOx lifetimes and emissions of cities and power plants in polluted background estimated by satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method to quantify NOx emissions and corresponding atmospheric lifetimes from OMI NO2 observations together with ECMWF wind fields without further model input for sources located in a polluted background. NO2 patterns under calm wind conditions are used as proxy for the spatial patterns of NOx emissions, and the effective atmospheric NOx lifetime is determined from the change of spatial patterns measured at larger wind speeds. Emissions are subsequently derived from the NO2 mass above the background, integrated around the source of interest. Lifetimes and emissions are estimated for 17 power plants and 53 cities located in non-mountainous regions across China and the USA. The derived lifetimes for the ozone season (May–September are 3.8 ± 1.0 h (mean ± standard deviation with a range of 1.8 to 7.5 h. The derived NOx emissions show generally good agreement with bottom-up inventories for power plants and cities. Regional inventory shows better agreement with top-down estimates for Chinese cities compared to global inventory, most likely due to different downscaling approaches adopted in the two inventories.

  4. Balancing Long Lifetime and Satisfying Fairness in WBAN Using a Constrained Markov Decision Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqi Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important part of the Internet of Things (IOT and the special case of device-to-device (D2D communication, wireless body area network (WBAN gradually becomes the focus of attention. Since WBAN is a body-centered network, the energy of sensor nodes is strictly restrained since they are supplied by battery with limited power. In each data collection, only one sensor node is scheduled to transmit its measurements directly to the access point (AP through the fading channel. We formulate the problem of dynamically choosing which sensor should communicate with the AP to maximize network lifetime under the constraint of fairness as a constrained markov decision process (CMDP. The optimal lifetime and optimal policy are obtained by Bellman equation in dynamic programming. The proposed algorithm defines the limiting performance in WBAN lifetime under different degrees of fairness constraints. Due to the defect of large implementation overhead in acquiring global channel state information (CSI, we put forward a distributed scheduling algorithm that adopts local CSI, which saves the network overhead and simplifies the algorithm. It was demonstrated via simulation that this scheduling algorithm can allocate time slot reasonably under different channel conditions to balance the performances of network lifetime and fairness.

  5. Portable fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for in-situ interrogation of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Teixeira Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime techniques are potential methods for optical diagnosis and characterization of biological tissues with an in-situ, fast, and noninvasive interrogation. Several diseases may be diagnosed due to differences in the fluorescence spectra of targeted fluorophores, when, these spectra are similar, considering steady-state fluorescence, others may be detected by monitoring their fluorescence lifetime. Despite this complementarity, most of the current fluorescence lifetime systems are not robust and portable, and not being feasible for clinical applications. We describe the assembly of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system in a suitcase, its characterization, and validation with clinical measurements of skin lesions. The assembled system is all encased and robust, maintaining its mechanical, electrical, and optical stability during transportation, and is feasible for clinical measurements. The instrument response function measured was about 300 ps, and the system is properly calibrated. At the clinical study, the system showed to be reliable, and the achieved spectroscopy results support its potential use as an auxiliary tool for skin diagnostics. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  6. Positron lifetime studies of the hcp to fcc transformation induced by mechanical attrition of elemental titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, I.; Chattopadhyay, P.P.; Nandi, P.; Nambissan, P.M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystallisation by planetary ball-milling of high purity elemental titanium (Ti) revealed a polymorphic transformation from its normal hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to a face-centered cubic (fcc) phase. Positron lifetime measurements were carried out on samples collected after different hours of milling to characterize the defect structures at grain surfaces. With increasing hours of milling, the nanocrystalline grain size decreased and the positron lifetimes--one related to the annihilation at the grain surfaces and the other to that at the intergranular open volume domains--increased significantly due to the increased free volume at the trapping vacancy sites. However, between 5 to 10 hours of milling, the two lifetimes decreased before resuming increasing once again. This marked deviation from an otherwise expected continuous increase of positron lifetime coincided with structural rearrangement within the system bringing in an enhancement in the density of electrons. The repacking of atoms along the [0001] crystallographic direction could be a possibility for this observation. Positron radiation effects on the migration and agglomeration of nanoparticles are also discussed

  7. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, G.

    1996-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is a technique which makes use of the anti- particle of the electron, the positron (e + ), first predicted by Dirac in 1931. This talk will concentrate on the use of PALS as a technique in characterising macromolecules. PALS has been used by various groups to evaluate many properties that one associates with free volume such as physical ageing, gas permeability, the glass transition, uptake of a solvent, crystallinity, crosslinking, molecular mobility. One area of much interest has been the use of this technique in looking at miscibility of polymer blends. In miscible blends, the interactions of the different polymers may be expected to lead to a negative free volume of mixing because of the strong attraction between the different chains. This may influence the free volume properties. Conversely, if a material is partially miscible or totally immiscible, this should influence both the size and total content of free volume. This should be related to other properties such as mechanical properties and molecular mobility, such as measured by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Variations on this involve copolymerization of crosslinked materials or linear thermoplastics (the ultimate 'molecular' miscibility) and this will also be discussed. Multiphase systems such as water uptake in polymers can vary polymer properties by filling molecular voids, as well as disturbing chain conformations and, in the case of polar polymers, associating with the polymer chains. The effect of polymer molecular structure on free volume - particularly in rigid polymer chains such as substituted poly(phenylenes) and liquid crystalline polymers will also be presented. Indeed, the unusual packing which arises from such anisotropic molecules leads to unusual behaviours both of the homolpolymers and subsequent liquid crystal polymer - liquid crystal polymer blends

  8. Customer Lifetime and After Lifetime Value - Calculations from an Iranian perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Svend; Wilson, Jonathan A.J.; Ebrahimi, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) is an established relationship marketing-centric approach to evaluating the significance of a customer, and what resources should be allocated towards maintaining relations – beyond short-term transactional views. The conceptual argument presented in this paper...... contributes one very simple, yet significant argument, which is both transactional and relational. Namely, a large portion of humanity believes in a life beyond current existence – the Afterlife. Therefore, death in the psyche of such a person does not terminate benefit seeking, and there is value...... in the afterlife. The aim here, is to refine value-based calculations, drawing from varying religious perspectives: reincarnation, heaven, and enlightenment, amongst others....

  9. Probabilistic analysis of divertor plate lifetime in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golinescu, R.P.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Defining a methodology for a reliability estimate of the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor is the objective of the study summarized in this paper. If ITER could be designed such that no transients of any type occurred, the divertor reliability would be controlled by erosion of material during normal operation. The occurrence of several transient events results in important contribution to the expected divertor failure rate. Some transients cause the temperature in the divertor plate (DP) to rise; if these temperatures get too high, the structural elements in the DP will weaken and subsequently suffer structural failure and possibly reach the melting temperature. Using the limited data available leads to the result that there is a high probability that the DP will reliably withstand a peak heat flux of 11 MW/m 2 . However, transient events will lead to a much shorter lifetime than desirable for DP's, mainly due to the expected severe effects of plasma disruptions. If transients occurred, but the shutdown mechanism succeeded to perform without inducing a disruption, divertor reliability could be significantly improved. Improved characterization of the disruption conditions, and enlarged scope of failure modes should be pursued to gain confidence in the present conclusions

  10. A Lifetime's Adventure in Extracellular K+ Regulation: The Scottish Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angus M

    2017-09-01

    In a career that has spanned 45 years and shows no signs of slowing down, Dr Bruce Ransom has devoted considerable time and energy to studying regulation of interstitial K + . When Bruce commenced his studies in 1969 virtually nothing was known of the functions of glial cells, but Bruce's research contributed to the physiological assignation of function to mammalian astrocytes, namely interstitial K + buffering. The experiments that I describe in this review concern the response of the membrane potential (Em) of in vivo cat cortical astrocytes to changes in [K + ] o , an experimental manoeuvre that was achieved in two different ways. The first involved recording the Em of an astrocyte while the initial aCSF was switched to one with different K + , whereas in the second series of experiments the cortex was stimulated and the response of the astrocyte Em to the K + released from neighbouring neurons was recorded. The astrocytes responded in a qualitatively predictable manner, but quantitatively the changes were not as predicted by the Nernst equation. Elevations in interstitial K + are not sustained and K + returns to baseline rapidly due to the buffering capacity of astrocytes, a phenomenon studied by Bruce, and his son Chris, published 27 years after Bruce's initial publications. Thus, a lifetime spent investigating K + buffering has seen enormous advances in glial research, from the time cells were identified as 'presumed' glial cells or 'silent cells', to the present day, where glial cells are recognised as contributing to every important physiological brain function.

  11. Filament heater current modulation for increased filament lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.D.; Williams, H.E. III.

    1996-01-01

    The surface conversion H-minus ion source employs two 60 mil tungsten filaments which are approximately 17 centimeters in length. These filaments are heated to approximately 2,800 degrees centigrade by 95--100 amperes of DC heater current. The arc is struck at a 120 hertz rate, for 800 microseconds and is generally run at 30 amperes peak current. Although sputtering is considered a contributing factor in the demise of the filament, evaporation is of greater concern. If the peak arc current can be maintained with less average heater current, the filament evaporation rate for this arc current will diminish. In the vacuum of an ion source, the authors expect the filaments to retain much of their heat throughout a 1 millisecond (12% duty) loss of heater current. A circuit to eliminate 100 ampere heater currents from filaments during the arc pulse was developed. The magnetic field due to the 100 ampere current tends to hold electrons to the filament, decreasing the arc current. By eliminating this magnetic field, the arc should be more efficient, allowing the filaments to run at a lower average heater current. This should extend the filament lifetime. The circuit development and preliminary filament results are discussed

  12. Determination of the average lifetime of b-baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Belokopytov, Yu; Charpentier, Ph; Gavillet, Ph; Gouz, Yu; Jarlskog, Ch; Khokhlov, Yu; Papadopoulou, Th D

    1996-01-01

    The average lifetime of b-baryons has been studied using 3 \\times 10^6 hadronic Z^0 decays collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP. Three methods have been used, based on the measurement of different observables: the proper decay time distribution of 206 vertices reconstructed with a \\Lambda, a lepton and an oppositely charged pion; the impact parameter distribution of 441 muons with high transverse momentum accompanied by a \\mLs in the same jet; and the proper decay time distribution of 125 \\Lambda_c-lepton decay vertices with the \\Lambda_c exclusively reconstructed through its pK\\pi, pK^0 and \\mLs3\\pi decay modes. The combined result is~:\\par \\begin{center} \\tau(b-baryon) = (1.25^{+0.13}_{-0.11}\\ pm0.04(syst)^{+0.03}_{-0. 05}(syst)) ps\\par \\end{center} where the first systematic error is due to experimental uncertainties and the second to the uncertainties in the modelling of the b-baryon production and semi-leptonic decay. Including the measurement recently published by DELPHI based on a sample of proton-m...

  13. Neutron lifetime measurements with a large gravitational trap for ultracold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Fomin, A. K.; Krasnoshchekova, I. A.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Prudnikov, D. M.; Shoka, I. V.; Chechkin, A. V.; Chaikovskiy, M. E.; Varlamov, V. E.; Ivanov, S. N.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Geltenbort, P.; Zimmer, O.; Jenke, T.; Van der Grinten, M.; Tucker, M.

    2018-05-01

    Neutron lifetime is one of the most important physical constants: it determines parameters of the weak interaction and predictions of primordial nucleosynthesis theory. There remains the unsolved problem of a 3.9σ discrepancy between measurements of this lifetime using neutrons in beams and those with stored ultracold neutrons (UCN). In our experiment we measure the lifetime of neutrons trapped by Earth's gravity in an open-topped vessel. Two configurations of the trap geometry are used to change the mean frequency of UCN collisions with the surfaces; this is achieved by plunging an additional surface into the trap without breaking the vacuum. The trap walls are coated with a hydrogen-less fluorine-containing polymer to reduce losses of UCN. The stability of this coating over multiple thermal cycles between 80 and 300 K was tested. At 80 K, the probability of UCN loss due to collisions with the trap walls is just 1.5% of the probability of β decay. The free neutron lifetime is determined by extrapolation to an infinitely large trap with zero collision frequency. The result of these measurements is τn=881.5 ±0 .7stat ±0 .6syst s which is consistent with the conventional value of 880.2 ± 1.0 s presented by the Particle Data Group. Future prospects for this experiment are in further cooling to 10 K, which will lead to an improved accuracy of measurement. In conclusion we present an analysis of currently available data on various measurements of the neutron lifetime.

  14. Precise measurement of tau lifetime in ALEPH experiment at the LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I.

    1995-02-01

    A new method is presented for the measurement of the tau lifetime using tau decays to hadrons. Precise measurements (σ ∼ 20μm) of impact parameters (d o and z o ) of charged tracks using full vertex detector informations allow the reconstruction of the 3-dimensional point of minimum approach of the track to the beam axis. On the other hand, it is shown that an axis perpendicular to the tau axis can be precisely determined (σ ∼ 10 mrad) in the hadronic-hadronic τ + τ - decay events using kinematics and the back-to-back nature of tau pairs in e + e - colliders. Combination of both quantities yields a generalized IPS relation in 3D space which is not affected by the beam size nor by the tau direction uncertainty. The experimental resolution can be fitted together with lifetime due to the small smearing. The method allows, therefore, a self-consistent and self-calibrating analysis of tau lifetime. The method has good stability against systematical uncertainties like tracking resolution, non-gaussian tails, etc...The method has been applied to the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP in 1992. From 2840 τ + + τ- → hadron + hadron (1-1) decay events and 794 hadron + 3 hadrons (1-3) decay events, the tau lifetimes of 292.9 ± 5.9 ± 2.7fs and 284.6 ± 11.9 ± 5.1fs are obtained respectively. The combined τ lifetimes is 290.8 ± 5.3 ± 2.7fs. Statistical uncertainty corresponds to 1.1/√N τ τ. This result has low statistical correlation with other precision methods. (author). 70 refs., 80 figs., 21 tabs., 7 ann

  15. LIFETIME PHYSICAL INACTIVITY IS ASSOCIATED WITH LUNG CANCER RISK AND MORTALITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannioto, Rikki; Etter, John Lewis; LaMonte, Michael J; Ray, Andrew D; Joseph, Janine M; Al Qassim, Emad; Eng, Kevin H; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2018-01-01

    Investigations of the independent associations of physical inactivity with cancer endpoints have been mounting in the epidemiological literature, in part due to the high prevalence of physical inactivity among cancer patients and to evidence that inactivity associates with carcinogenesis via pathways independent of obesity. Yet, physical inactivity is not currently recognized as a well-established risk or prognostic factor for lung cancer. As such, we examined the associations of lifetime physical inactivity with lung cancer risk and mortality in a hospital-based, case-control study. Materials and Methods: The analyses included data from 660 lung cancer patients and 1335 matched cancer-free controls. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were utilized to assess the association between lifetime physical inactivity and lung cancer risk, and Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to estimate the association between lifetime physical inactivity and mortality among lung cancer cases. Results: We observed a significant positive association between lifetime physical inactivity and lung cancer risk: [Odds ratio (OR)=2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.77-2.81]; the association remained significant among never smokers (OR=3.00, 95% CI:1.33-6.78) and non-smokers (OR=2.33, 95% CI: 1.79-3.02). We also observed a significant positive association between lifetime physical inactivity and lung cancer mortality [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.40, 95% CI: 1.14-1.71]; the association remained significant in non-smokers (HR=1.51, 95% CI: 1.16-1.95). These data add to the body of evidence suggesting that physical inactivity is an independent risk and prognostic factor for cancer. Additional research utilizing prospectively collected data is needed to substantiate the current findings.

  16. Lifetime and Path Length of the Virtual Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyuboshitz, V.L.; Lyuboshitz, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    The concepts of the lifetime and path length of a virtual particle are introduced. It is shown that, near the mass surface of the real particle, these quantities constitute a 4-vector. At very high energies, the virtual particle can propagate over considerable (even macroscopic) distances. The formulas for the lifetime and path length of an ultrarelativistic virtual electron in the process of bremsstrahlung in the Coulomb field of a nucleus are obtained. The lifetime and path length of the virtual photon at its conversion into an electron-positron pair are discussed. The connection between the path length of the virtual particle and the coherence length (formation length) is analyzed

  17. Lifetimes of charmed hadrons revisited. Facts and fancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, B.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of the hierarchy of lifetimes of charmed hadrons is reviewed. The QCD-based theory of pre asymptotic effects in inclusive weak decays dating back to the beginning of the eighties is now entering its mature phase. Combining recent and old results it is shown that the observed hierarchy reflects most intimate features of the hadronic structure. The problem of a wide spread of lifetimes of charmed hadrons is addressed. A number of predictions is given for the hierarchy of lifetimes in the family of the beautiful hadrons. (author). 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Optimal Taxation and Social Insurance in a Lifetime Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovenberg, A. Lans; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    Advances in information technology have improved the administrative feasibility of redistribution based on lifetime earnings recorded at the time of retirement. We study optimal lifetime income taxation and social insurance in an economy in which redistributive taxation and social insurance serve...... to insure (ex ante) against skill heterogeneity as well as disability risk. Optimal disability benefits rise with previous earnings so that public transfers depend not only on current earnings but also on earnings in the past. Hence, lifetime taxation rather than annual taxation is optimal. The optimal tax...

  19. Interlaboratory comparison of positron and positronium lifetimes in polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastlund, C.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Maurer, F.H.J.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison of the results of a series of positron annihilation lifetime measurements performed in 12 laboratories is presented. The measurements were conducted on three different polymer samples, all prepared in one laboratory under standard conditions. The objective of the work was to gain...... insight into the variation in derived positron and positronium lifetimes and intensities measured in the different laboratories on identical specimens. Lifetime data were collected at room temperature by each laboratory following their own standard measurement and data evaluation procedures. The polymers...

  20. Positron lifetime study of neutron-irradiated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinode, Kenji; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Kumakura, Hiroaki; Doyama, Masao; Shiraishi, Kensuke.

    1978-01-01

    Annealing behavior of fast-neutron-irradiated molybdenum was studied by means of positron lifetime technique. It was found that Stage III annealing can be mainly identified as the vacancy migration process from the detailed analyses of data. The void growth after successive high temperature annealings was clearly detected through the changes of positron lifetime parameters. An attempt to analyse the size distribution of voids from positron lifetime spectra was presented, and discussions on the evaluation of void concentration from positron data are also given. (author)

  1. On random age and remaining lifetime for populations of items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finkelstein, M.; Vaupel, J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider items that are incepted into operation having already a random (initial) age and define the corresponding remaining lifetime. We show that these lifetimes are identically distributed when the age distribution is equal to the equilibrium distribution of the renewal theory. Then we...... develop the population studies approach to the problem and generalize the setting in terms of stationary and stable populations of items. We obtain new stochastic comparisons for the corresponding population ages and remaining lifetimes that can be useful in applications. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley...

  2. A study of lifetime within the -12 sec range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorobantu, V.

    1977-01-01

    Lifetimes of excited nuclear states are studied with a particular emphasis on the determination of nuclear lifetimes by means of the Doppler shift decomposition attenuation method - DSAM - which is based on the mathematical theory of stochastic processes; by its own nature, the emission of recoil nuclei, their motion through an amorphous medium and the detection of gamma rays resulting from these nuclei are all stochastic processes as well. Measurements of lifetimes together with other measurements can supply nuclear structure data, as well as information on the slowing-down process of an energetic ion through a certain material. The experimental tests have been carried out on the Tandem accelerator - IFIN, Bucharest. (author)

  3. Study of variables for accelerating lifetime testing of SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploner, Alexandra; Hagen, Anke; Hauch, Anne

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications require lifetimes of several years on the system level. A big challenge is to proof/confirm/demonstrate such exceptionally long lifetimes.Accelerated or compressed testing are possible methods. Activities in this area have been carried out without arriving...... at different current load cycling profiles revealed a strong deviation between predicted and measured lifetime [3].In this study, we present a detailed analysis of durability results for degradation mechanisms of single SOFC components as function of operating conditions. Electrochemical impedance data...

  4. Measurement of the b hadron lifetime with the dipole method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Zimmermann, A.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; St. Denis, R.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barbeiro, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1993-09-01

    A measurement of the average lifetime of b hadrons has been performed with dipole method on a sample of 260 000 hadronic Z decays recorded with the ALEPH detector during 1991. The dipole is the distance between the vertices built in the opposite hemispheres. The mean dipole is extracted from all the events without attempting b enrichment. Comparing the average of the data dipole distribution with a Monte Carlo calibration curve obtained with different b lifetimes, an average b hadron lifetime of 1.51±0.08 ps is extracted.

  5. Positron lifetime spectroscopy of internally oxidised Ag-In alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, D.; Lieb, K.P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of In 2 O 3 precipitates on positron lifetimes after internal oxidation of α-Ag-In alloys have been investigated. A positron trap associated with the lifetime τ 205(3) ps was detected. On the basis of the experimental results obtained for different oxidation kinetics parameters, a trapping model is proposed according to which positrons thermalised in a dislocation field around oxide precipitates are trapped at the oxide/metal phase boundary. The transition from internal to external oxidation of Ag-In was also studied. The positron lifetime in In 2 O 3 was measured to be τ = 263(8) ps. (author)

  6. Atmospheric lifetimes of CFC 11 and CFC 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, A.J.; Steed, J.M.; Miller, C.; Filkin, D.L.; Jesson, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) chemical model of the atmosphere is used to investigate the stratospheric removal rates of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC 11 (CFCl 3 ) and CFC 12 (CF 2 Cl 2 ). Assuming equivalent vertical transport rates, one-dimensional (1-D) models are shown to overestimate the atmospheric lifetime of CFC 11 by approx.10% because of their neglect of latitudinal effects. The present Du Pont 1-D and 2-D models have somewhat different effective transport rates and give steady state CFC 11 atmospheric lifetimes of 75 and 60 years, respectively, assuming no tropospheric destructive mechanism. For CFC 12, the corresponding calculated lifetimes are 140 and 120 years

  7. Lifetime characterization via lognormal distribution of transformers in smart grids: Design optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiodo, Elio; Lauria, Davide; Mottola, Fabio; Pisani, Cosimo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A tool for choosing the transformer rating under highly-intermittent loads is proposed. • Analytical formulation for the aging of transformers in smart grid scenarios is presented. • Randomness of loading profiles are addressed in terms of stochastic processes. • The robustness of the Wiener process is validated for modeling load variability. - Abstract: In this paper, the problem of the optimal rating of transformers in smart grids is properly discussed with respect to the specific load characteristics. The design is based on the accurate prediction of the lifetime degradation of mineral-oil-immersed transformers subject to highly intermittent loads. In fact, by investigating the nature of the loads in the smart grid scenario, it clearly appears that the intermittent nature of the power demand increases drastically. In this context, specific tools for the characterization of the lifetime duration are required, since severe reduction of the transformer’s life can be observed due to overloads, even in the case of short-duration overloads. The classical approaches based on using the equivalent thermal current to predict the transformer’s lifetime might result in incorrect estimates, thus requiring advanced models that can deal with the time variability of the load. In this paper, the randomness of the load powers is addressed in terms of stochastic processes. In particular, the Wiener process is demonstrated to provide robust modeling of load variability. By starting from this assumption, it was demonstrated analytically that the hot-spot temperature, which is a major contributor to the degradation of the transformer’s lifetime, also is a stochastic process. Then, in spite of the nonlinearity of the thermal model, the hot-spot temperature can be represented as a Wiener process, the robustness of which has been verified adequately. By taking into account the nonlinear relationship between the hot-spot temperature and the lifetime, the

  8. Measurements of fluorescence lifetime of group III metalo-8-quinolinolates and their use in analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Y; Hiraki, K; Morishige, K; Takahashi, K [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology; Shigematsu, T

    1976-07-01

    8-Quinolinolates of aluminum, gallium, and indium in chloroform exhibit strong yellowish green fluorescence with an emission maximum at 510, 526, and 528 nm, respectively. The time resolved fluorescence spectra and the fluorescence lifetime properties of these chelates were measured with a time-resolved spectrofluorometer. The fluorescence intensity of these chelates decays exponentially with time t, and obeys the following equation: F=F/sub 0/e-t/tau=F/sub 0/e-k sub(f).t where F/sub 0/ and F are the fluorescence intensity when the exciting light is irradiating and shut off, respectively; tau and k sub(f) being the lifetime and the rate constant for the process of fluorescence emission. The lifetimes of these chelates in chloroform solution at the ordinary temperature were 17.8, 10.1, and 8.4 ns for Al(C/sub 9/H/sub 6/ON)/sub 3/, Ga(C/sub 9/H/sub 6/ON)/sub 3/, and In(C/sub 9/H/sub 6/ON)/sub 3/, respectively. Thus, 8-quinolinolates of group III metals emit the same type radiation with different lifetimes. Between Al-chelate and In-chelate, there were significant difference in the lifetime by 9.4 ns. Then, the logarithmic plot of the composite fluorescence intensity against time is the overlap of some straight lines with different slopes which indicate k sub(f) of various decay processes. The linear portion of the logarithmic plot of the composite fluorescence intensity corresponded to the longer lifetime component (Al-chelate), and by substracting this component from the whole one, the straight line due to the shorter lifetime component (In-chelate) is obtained. Aluminum and indium contents were then determined by comparing the fluorescence intensity of the sample with that of the standard at a definite time (extrapolated to t=0). By using this composite decay curve, the composition of mixtures of nx10/sup -4/ mol/l of Al and In-chelates in chloroform could be determined.

  9. Residual lifetime and 10 year absolute risks of osteoporotic fractures in Chinese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Lei; Winzenberg, Tania M; Chen, Mingsheng; Jiang, Qicheng; Palmer, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    To determine the residual lifetime and 10 year absolute risks of osteoporotic fractures in Chinese men and women. A validated state-transition microsimulation model was used. Microsimulation and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to address the uncertainties in the model. All parameters including fracture incidence rates and mortality rates were retrieved from published literature. Simulated subjects were run through the model until they died to estimate the residual lifetime fracture risks. A 10 year time horizon was used to determine the 10 year fracture risks. We estimated the risk of only the first osteoporotic fracture during the simulation time horizon. The residual lifetime and 10 year risks of having the first osteoporotic (hip, clinical vertebral or wrist) fracture for Chinese women aged 50 years were 40.9% (95% CI: 38.3-44.0%) and 8.2% (95% CI: 6.8-9.3%) respectively. For men, the residual lifetime and 10 year fracture risks were 8.7% (95% CI: 7.5-9.8%) and 1.2% (95% CI: 0.8-1.7%) respectively. The residual lifetime fracture risks declined with age, whilst the 10 year fracture risks increased with age until the short-term mortality risks outstripped the fracture risks. Residual lifetime and 10 year clinical vertebral fracture risks were higher than those of hip and wrist fractures in both sexes. More than one third of the Chinese women and approximately one tenth of the Chinese men aged 50 years are expected to sustain a major osteoporotic fracture in their remaining lifetimes. Due to increased fracture risks and a rapidly ageing population, osteoporosis will present a great challenge to the Chinese healthcare system. While national data was used wherever possible, regional Chinese hip and clinical vertebral fracture incidence rates were used, wrist fracture rates were taken from a Norwegian study and calibrated to the Chinese population. Other fracture sites like tibia, humerus, ribs and pelvis were not included in the analysis, thus these

  10. Modeling and optimization of membrane lifetime in dead-end ultra filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, E.; Roffel, B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a membrane lifetime model is developed and experimentally validated. The lifetime model is based on the Weibull probability density function. The lifetime model can be used to determine an unambiguous characteristic membrane lifetime. Experimental results showed that membrane lifetime

  11. Positron lifetime studies of 100-MeV oxygen irradiated Pb-doped Bi-2223 superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, T.; Viswanath, R.N.; Kanjilal, D.; Kumar, R.; Ramasamy, S.

    2000-01-01

    Positron lifetime studies have been carried out for unirradiated and 100-MeV oxygen ion irradiated Pb-doped Bi-2223 superconductors. The analysis of positron lifetime spectra revealed three lifetime components: a short lifetime, τ1 = 153–196 ps; an intermediate lifetime, τ2 = 269–339 ps; and a long

  12. Reasons for the deviation of I1/I3 and τ1 from the expected lifetime parameters of positronium annihilation in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlubek, G.; Eichler, S.; Huebner, Ch.; Nagel, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    High quality positron lifetime spectra were taken for several amorphous polymers. The spectra were analysed using the routine MELT which assumes continuous lifetime distributions, as well as the discrete-term analysis routine LIFSPECFIT. Disagreements between the analysed lifetime parameters and theoretical expectations, I 1 /I 3 > I p-Ps /I o-Ps =1/3 and τ 1 >τ p-Ps , which are well known, also appear in our results. The disagreements are distinctly larger using a discrete-term routine than when applying MELT (or CONTIN). From the analysis of computer-generated spectra, we found that these disagreements may be well understood by assuming a distribution of e + lifetimes in addition to an o-Ps lifetime distribution, both of which can occur as consequence of size and shape distributions of free-volume holes in amorphous polymers (or of bubbles in molecular liquids). The disagreements appear to be due to the inability of the routines correctly to mirror very broad lifetime distributions. For broad distributions, MELT (and also CONTIN) delivers, as an artefact of the spectrum analysis, a distribution consisting of two narrow subpeaks instead of a single broad one. The lower subpeak of the e + lifetime distribution may mix with the p-Ps lifetime component resulting in artificially large values for τ 1 and I 1 . That is the reason for the unphysical increase of τ 1 and I 1 with decreasing I 3 observed in the analysed parameters of simulated as well as experimental spectra

  13. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  14. Measurement of the B- lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B - using the mode B - → D 0 π - . The B - lifetime is measured as τ B# sup -# = 1.663 ± 0.023 ± 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  15. Lifetime evaluation of plasma-facing materials during a tokamak disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1995-09-01

    Erosion losses of plasma-facing materials in a tokamak reactor during major disruptions, giant ELMS, and large power excursions are serious concerns that influence component survivability and overall lifetime. Two different mechanisms lead to material erosion during these events: surface vaporization and loss of the melt layer. Hydrodynamics and radiation transport in the rapidly developed vapor-cloud region above the exposed area are found to control and determine the net erosion thickness from surface vaporization. A comprehensive self-consistent kinetic model has been developed in which the time-dependent optical properties and the radiation field of the vapor cloud are calculated in order to correctly estimate the radiation flux at the divertor surface. The developed melt layer of metallic divertor materials will, however, be free to move and can be eroded away due to various forces. , Physical mechanisms that affect surface vaporization and cause melt layer erosion are integrated in a comprehensive model. It is found that for metallic components such as beryllium and tungsten, lifetime due to these abnormal events will be controlled and dominated by the evolution and hydrodynamics of the melt layer during the disruption. The dependence of divertor plate lifetime on various aspects of plasma/material interaction physics is discussed

  16. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from indoor and outdoor gamma dose rate of university of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State. ... Therefore, the management of University of Port Harcourt teaching hospital ...

  17. Positron annihilation lifetime study of low temperature irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1997-11-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements have been made for electron and neutron irradiated Fe, Fe-Cr, Fe-Cu, Fe-Si, Fe-16Cr-17Ni specimens, and isochronal annealing behaviors were obtained for these metals and alloys. It was found that vacancies start to migrate at about 200 K in Fe and form microvoids, but by the addition of small amount of alloying elements this behavior was changed depending on the alloying elements. Positron lifetime calculations were made to explain the experimental results using EAM (embedded atom method) type potential for the lattice relaxation and the atomic superposition method for the lifetime calculation. Fairly good agreements were obtained for the positron lifetime in a vacancy in Fe and other alloys. (author)

  18. Fabrication of 94Zr thin target for RDM lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Chandan Kumar; Rohilla, Aman; Chamoli, S.K.; Abhilash, S.R.; Kabiraj, D.; Singh, R.P.; Mehta, D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the activity was to make a thin target of isotopically enriched 94 Zr for lifetime measurement experiment to be done with the plunger setup at the Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC) Delhi

  19. Light Emitting Diode (LED) circular traffic signal lifetime management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this research is to build lifetime curves for red, yellow, and green LED circular traffic signals through 20,000-hr. accelerated stress testing of samples operating under Louisianas environmental conditions.

  20. Reliability-based assessment of polyethylene pipe creep lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelif, Rabia; Chateauneuf, Alaa; Chaoui, Kamel

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime management of underground pipelines is mandatory for safe hydrocarbon transmission and distribution systems. The use of high-density polyethylene tubes subjected to internal pressure, external loading and environmental variations requires a reliability study in order to define the service limits and the optimal operating conditions. In service, the time-dependent phenomena, especially creep, take place during the pipe lifetime, leading to significant strength reduction. In this work, the reliability-based assessment of pipe lifetime models is carried out, in order to propose a probabilistic methodology for lifetime model selection and to determine the pipe safety levels as well as the most important parameters for pipeline reliability. This study is enhanced by parametric analysis on pipe configuration, gas pressure and operating temperature

  1. Measurement of radiative lifetime in atomic samarium using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... gations of radiative lifetime measurement of odd-parity energy level at ... introduced by an electronic delay generator between the two ... cascade repopulation and depopulation, Zeeman and hyperfine quantum beats [6]. The.

  2. Reliability-based assessment of polyethylene pipe creep lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelif, Rabia [LaMI-UBP and IFMA, Campus de Clermont-Fd, Les Cezeaux, BP 265, 63175 Aubiere Cedex (France); LR3MI, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 12, Annaba 23000 (Algeria)], E-mail: rabia.khelif@ifma.fr; Chateauneuf, Alaa [LGC-University Blaise Pascal, Campus des Cezeaux, BP 206, 63174 Aubiere Cedex (France)], E-mail: alaa.chateauneuf@polytech.univ-bpclermont.fr; Chaoui, Kamel [LR3MI, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 12, Annaba 23000 (Algeria)], E-mail: chaoui@univ-annaba.org

    2007-12-15

    Lifetime management of underground pipelines is mandatory for safe hydrocarbon transmission and distribution systems. The use of high-density polyethylene tubes subjected to internal pressure, external loading and environmental variations requires a reliability study in order to define the service limits and the optimal operating conditions. In service, the time-dependent phenomena, especially creep, take place during the pipe lifetime, leading to significant strength reduction. In this work, the reliability-based assessment of pipe lifetime models is carried out, in order to propose a probabilistic methodology for lifetime model selection and to determine the pipe safety levels as well as the most important parameters for pipeline reliability. This study is enhanced by parametric analysis on pipe configuration, gas pressure and operating temperature.

  3. Positron Lifetimes in Pure and Doped Ice and in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Mogensen, O.; Trumpy, Georg

    1972-01-01

    for the other components show a complex behavior. The spectra for mono- and polycrystalline light ice and for polycrystalline heavy ice are identical. For water long lifetime components attributed to ortho-Ps are 1.86 nsec, 27% for H2O and 2.01 nsec, 22% for D2O. Theoretical explanations are suggested. Fast......Positron lifetime spectra were measured in mono- and polycrystalline light ice, polycrystalline heavy ice, doped light ice, as well as in light and heavy water. All spectra were resolved into three components. At temperatures between −196° and −100°C the lifetimes and relative intensities...... of the spectra are found by heating above approximately −120°C. Measurements on a number of fast frozen aqueous solutions of acids, bases, and salts are reported, none of them showing as strong influence on the ortho-Ps lifetime as HF. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics...

  4. Digital positron lifetime spectroscopy: present status and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becvar, F.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution summarizes achievements in instrumentation for positron lifetime measurements with emphasis on digital spectrometric systems. A significant part of the data presented are based on a long-term exploitation of a conventional positron lifetime spectrometer developed at Charles University in early 90s, on bench-mark testing measurements with this spectrometer working temporarily in conjunction with a pair of 8-bit, 4 GS/s digitizers and on analogous measurements with a recently assembled digital positron lifetime spectrometer. In addition, results from testing experiments with microchannel plate photomultipliers are briefly reported. Further development of positron lifetime technique is discussed. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Condition analysis and operating lifetime extension concepts for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzeniewski, Thomas [GMA-Engineering GmbH, Hamburg (Germany). Business Unit Wind Energy

    2014-11-01

    In Germany the basis for the expansion of wind energy was already laid at the beginning of the 1990s. Hence, the first wind turbines already started to reach the end of their permitted lifetime. At that time as today the different wind turbine types were engineered for an operational lifetime of 20 years. As reliable wind turbines types were already available in the 1990s, it is technically and commercially reasonable to consider the extension of their operational lifetime. Of particular interest is the lifetime extension of wind turbine types installed in the beginning of the 2000s. During that period many wind turbine types were launched which absolutely correspond to state-of-the-art technology.

  6. Observation of rotating nuclear molecules and determination of their lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comas, V.; Heinz, S.; Ackermann, D.; Heredia, J.; Hessberger, F.P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Physik, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Long-living rotating nuclear molecules (or ''dinuclear systems'') have been observed at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI in reactions of {sup 64}Ni + {sup 207}Pb at Coulomb barrier energies. The rotation was directly revealed by the velocity spectra of deep inelastic target-like transfer products which are formed during the lifetime of the nuclear molecule and emitted after its breakup. The corresponding rotation angles were about 180 degree pointing to long nuclear interaction times or lifetimes of the system, respectively. We deduced the lifetimes from the lines in the velocity spectra originating from two different rotation angles. Further, the unambiguous correlation of a certain transfer product with its individual velocity spectrum allowed us to study the lifetimes as a function of the number of transferred protons. (orig.)

  7. Clinical results of fluorescence lifetime imaging in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, D.; Quick, S.; Klemm, M.; Hammer, M.; Jentsch, S.; Dawczynski, J.; Becker, W.

    2009-07-01

    A laser scanner ophthalmoscope was developed for in vivo fluorescence lifetime measurements at the human retina. Measurements were performed in 30 degree fundus images. The fundus was excited by pulses of 75 ps (FWHM). The dynamic fluorescence was detected in two spectral channels K1(490-560nm), K2(560-700 nm) by time-correlated single photon counting. The decay of fluorescence was three-exponentially. Local and global alterations in lifetimes were found between healthy subjects and patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and vessel occlusion. The lifetimes T1, T2, and T3 in both channels are changed to longer values in AMD and diabetic retinopathy in comparison with healthy subjects. The lifetime T2 in K1 is most sensitive to metabolic alterations in branch arterial vessel occlusion.

  8. Practices of prolongation of the I and C equipment lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoylov, O.B.; Pronin, V.S.; Savelov, I.D.; Bogomazov, V.A.; Drumov, V.V.; Chudin, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The lifetime of nuclear power plants (NPP) always exceeds the operational time of Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems. Ageing of I and C equipment in NPPs have many aspects. Research of these aspects is being performed in OKB Mechanical Engineering. Under condition of fast development of I and C systems and applying more stringent safety requirements, modernization of the equipment irrespective of its operational condition is getting important. However, an equipment of I and C systems operated in Russia was designed and manufactured applying highest requirements for a reliability of their work during its whole operational time. Therefore, in many cases it is not necessary to replace them in spite of expiration of their specified lifetime. During operation this equipment is maintained in a proper operation condition by a special service procedures stipulated by its development. When the equipment lifetime approaches to its end, lifetime extension for the certain period should be considered. (author)

  9. DC photogun vacuum characterization through photocathode lifetime studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcy Stutzman; Joseph Grames; Matt Poelker; Kenneth Surles-Law; Philip Adderley

    2007-01-01

    Excellent vacuum is essential for long photocathode lifetimes in DC high voltage photoelectron guns. Vacuum Research at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has focused on characterizing the existing vacuum systems at the CEBAF polarized photoinjector and on quantifying improvements for new systems. Vacuum chamber preprocessing, full activation of NEG pumps and NEG coating the chamber walls should improve the vacuum within the electron gun, however, pressure measurement is difficult at pressures approaching the extreme-high-vacuum (XHV) region and extractor gauge readings are not significantly different between the improved and original systems. The ultimate test of vacuum in a DC high voltage photogun is the photocathode lifetime, which is limited by the ionization and back-bombardment of residual gasses. Discussion will include our new load-locked gun design as well as lifetime measurements in both our operational and new photo-guns, and the correlations between measured vacuum and lifetimes will be investigated

  10. Lifetime-Aware Cloud Data Centers: Models and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Chiaraviglio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a model to evaluate the server lifetime in cloud data centers (DCs. In particular, when the server power level is decreased, the failure rate tends to be reduced as a consequence of the limited number of components powered on. However, the variation between the different power states triggers a failure rate increase. We therefore consider these two effects in a server lifetime model, subject to an energy-aware management policy. We then evaluate our model in a realistic case study. Our results show that the impact on the server lifetime is far from negligible. As a consequence, we argue that a lifetime-aware approach should be pursued to decide how and when to apply a power state change to a server.

  11. Positron lifetime calculation for the elements of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo Robles, J M; Ogando, E; Plazaola, F

    2007-04-30

    Theoretical positron lifetime values have been calculated systematically for most of the elements of the periodic table. Self-consistent and non-self-consistent schemes have been used for the calculation of the electronic structure in the solid, as well as different parametrizations for the positron enhancement factor and correlation energy. The results obtained have been studied and compared with experimental data, confirming the theoretical trends. As is known, positron lifetimes in bulk show a periodic behaviour with atomic number. These calculations also confirm that monovacancy lifetimes follow the same behaviour. The effects of enhancement factors used in calculations have been commented upon. Finally, we have analysed the effects that f and d electrons have on positron lifetimes.

  12. Positron lifetime calculation for the elements of the periodic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, J M Campillo; Ogando, E; Plazaola, F

    2007-01-01

    Theoretical positron lifetime values have been calculated systematically for most of the elements of the periodic table. Self-consistent and non-self-consistent schemes have been used for the calculation of the electronic structure in the solid, as well as different parametrizations for the positron enhancement factor and correlation energy. The results obtained have been studied and compared with experimental data, confirming the theoretical trends. As is known, positron lifetimes in bulk show a periodic behaviour with atomic number. These calculations also confirm that monovacancy lifetimes follow the same behaviour. The effects of enhancement factors used in calculations have been commented upon. Finally, we have analysed the effects that f and d electrons have on positron lifetimes

  13. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy source correction determination: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Gurmeet S.; Keeble, David J., E-mail: d.j.keeble@dundee.ac.uk

    2016-02-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) can provide sensitive detection and identification of vacancy-related point defects in materials. These measurements are normally performed using a positron source supported, and enclosed by, a thin foil. Annihilation events from this source arrangement must be quantified and are normally subtracted from the spectrum before analysis of the material lifetime components proceeds. Here simulated PALS spectra reproducing source correction evaluation experiments have been systematically fitted and analysed using the packages PALSfit and MELT. Simulations were performed assuming a single lifetime material, and for a material with two lifetime components. Source correction terms representing a directly deposited source and various foil supported sources were added. It is shown that in principle these source terms can be extracted from suitably designed experiments, but that fitting a number of independent, nominally identical, spectra is recommended.

  14. Predicting sample lifetimes in creep fracture of heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha; Ovaska, Markus; Miksic, Amandine; Laurson, Lasse; Alava, Mikko J.

    2016-08-01

    Materials flow—under creep or constant loads—and, finally, fail. The prediction of sample lifetimes is an important and highly challenging problem because of the inherently heterogeneous nature of most materials that results in large sample-to-sample lifetime fluctuations, even under the same conditions. We study creep deformation of paper sheets as one heterogeneous material and thus show how to predict lifetimes of individual samples by exploiting the "universal" features in the sample-inherent creep curves, particularly the passage to an accelerating creep rate. Using simulations of a viscoelastic fiber bundle model, we illustrate how deformation localization controls the shape of the creep curve and thus the degree of lifetime predictability.

  15. Optimal Control to Increase Energy Production of Wind Farm Considering Wake Effect and Lifetime Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Dao; Su, Chi

    2017-01-01

    as an example. Due to the small range of the effective wake area, it is found that the energy production is almost the same. Finally, the pitch angle curve and active power curve are optimized according to the Maximum Energy Production (MEP) of a wind farm. Upon considering and contrasting the MPPT method...... to maximize the energy production of wind farms by considering the wake effect and the lifetime of wind turbine. It starts with the analysis of the pitch angle curve and active power curve seen from the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) of individual wind turbines. Taking the wake effect into account......, the pitch angle curve and active power curve are optimized with the aim of Maximum Power Generation (MPG) of the wind farm. Afterwards, considering the lifetime of wind turbines, a comparison is offered between the MPPT method and the MPG method for energy production using a simplified two-turbine wind farm...

  16. Methanol conversion to hydrocarbons using modified clinoptilolite catalysts. Investigation of catalyst lifetime and reactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, G J; Themistocleous, T; Copperthwaite, R G

    1988-10-17

    A study of the deactivation and reactivation of modified clinoptilolite catalysts for methanol conversion to hydrocarbons is reported. Clinoptilolite catalysts, modified by either ammonium ion exchange or hydrochloric acid treatment, exhibit a short useful catalyst lifetime for this reaction (ca. 2-3 h) due to a high rate of coke deposition (3-5.10/sup -3/ g carbon/g catalyst/h). A comparative study of reactivation using oxygen, nitrous oxide and ozone/oxygen as oxidants indicated that nitrous oxide reactivation gives improved catalytic performance when compared to the activity and lifetime of the fresh catalyst. Both oxygen and ozone/oxygen were found to be ineffective for the reactivation of clinoptilolite. Initial studies of in situ on-line reactivation are also described. 3 figs., 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Effect of Contamination on the Lifetime of Hydraulic Oils and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marián Kučera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The extensions of service‑lives regarding hydraulic fluids is gaining prominence due to several considerations including environmental pollution, conservation of natural resources and the economic benefits associated with extended service‑life. The presented methods for testing the durability and oxidation stabilities of hydraulic fluids can be simultaneously used in two ways. Firstly for comparing different hydraulic biooils and for selecting more adequate oils with higher oxidation stabilities and longer service lifetimes and secondly for the development of a prognostic model for an accurate prediction of an oil’s condition and its remaining useful lifetime, which could help to extend the service life of the oil without concerns about damaging the equipment.

  18. System, economy and ecology viewpoints of the Krsko NPP lifetime extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novsak, M.; Spiler, J.; Zagar, T.; Pirs, B.; Bole, A.; Bregar, Z.; Cuhalev, I.; Derganc, B.; Ivanjko, S.; Matvoz, D.; Sustersic, A.; Valencic, L.; Zabric, I.; Zlatarev, G.; Babuder, M.

    2007-01-01

    Krsko NPP plant life extension was analysed and evaluated with respect to system, economy and ecology viewpoints. From the system perspective it was established that also in the extended lifetime the plant will remain in operation as a base load electricity supplier. The systematic review was performed to determine its overall competitiveness against advanced coal, gas and new nuclear units. The analysis considered also hydro and renewable sources. Analysis and evaluations resulted in the conclusion that the Krsko NPP lifetime extension is the most effective alternative for base load production due to small additional capital investments, low fuel costs, no new siting requirements, lowest climate and environmental impact, and reliable and safe operation. (author)

  19. Unusual temperature dependence of the positron lifetime in a polymer of intrinsic microporosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima de Miranda, Rodrigo; Kruse, Jan; Raetzke, Klaus; Faupel, Franz; Fritsch, Detlev; Abetz, Volker; Budd, Peter M.; Selbie, James D.; McKeown, Neil B.; Ghanem, Bader S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of polymeric membranes for gas separation is mainly determined by the free volume. Polymers of intrinsic microporosity are interesting due to the high abundance of accessible free volume. We performed measurements of the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime, generally accepted for investigation of free volume, in two polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1 and PIM-7) in the range from 143 to 523 K. The mean value of the free volume calculated from the ortho-positronium lifetime is in the range of typical values for high free volume polymers. However, the temperature dependence of the local free volume is non-monotonous in contrast to the macroscopic thermal expansion. The explanation is linked to the spirocenters in the polymer. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Single pulse two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (SP-FLIM) with MHz pixel rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Weng, Daniel; Hakert, Hubertus; Pfeiffer, Tom; Kolb, Jan Philip; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a chemically specific 3-D sensing modality providing valuable information about the microstructure, composition and function of a sample. However, a more widespread application of this technique is hindered by the need for a sophisticated ultra-short pulse laser source and by speed limitations of current FLIM detection systems. To overcome these limitations, we combined a robust sub-nanosecond fiber laser as the excitation source with high analog bandwidth detection. Due to the long pulse length in our configuration, more fluorescence photons are generated per pulse, which allows us to derive the lifetime with a single excitation pulse only. In this paper, we show high quality FLIM images acquired at a pixel rate of 1 MHz. This approach is a promising candidate for an easy-to-use and benchtop FLIM system to make this technique available to a wider research community.

  1. Lifetime Models for Lithium-ion Batteries used in Virtual Power Plant Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel Ioan

    ; however, because of their advantages, which include fast response, high efficiency, long lifetime and environmental friendliness, Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries represent suitable candidates for integration within VPPs, especially when they are required to provide short- and medium-time services....... The family of Li-ion batteries is broad with many different chemistries available at present on the market. Nonetheless, the Li-ion battery based on the lithium iron phosphate/graphite (further referred LFP/C) chemistry is investigated in this thesis. The lifetime of the Li-ion battery ESS represents a key...... parameter in the analysis of the economic feasibility of integrating such systems in WPPs. Even though their price is decreasing due to the research carried out mainly in the automotive sector, Li-ion batteries are still expensive energy storage devices. Therefore, accurate information about Li...

  2. Nanoscopic properties of silica filled polydimethylsiloxane by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, P.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Maurer, F.H.J.

    2004-01-01

    and the positron annihilation characteristics. The glass transition behavior of the PDMS/SiO2 composites was determined with differential scanning calorimetry. A clear influence on the o-Ps lifetime (73) in the polymer upon addition of nano-sized fumed SiO2 was observed at all temperatures. The observed o......Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was performed on a series of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/fumed silicon dioxide (SiO2) composites at temperatures between -185 and 100degreesC to study the effect of filler content and filler particle size on the free volume properties...... to the behavior of ordinary molecular liquids was observed in this temperature region. The o-Ps yield was strongly reduced in the crystallization region and by addition Of SiO2. The reduction due to filler addition did, however, in the case of nano-sized SiO2 not follow a linear relationship with filler weight...

  3. A novel experimental technique of nuclear lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuminov, O.A.; D'Arrigo, A.; Giardina, G.; Taccone, A.; Vannini, G.; Moroni, A.; Ricci, R.A.; Vannucci, L.

    1995-01-01

    In the present paper a new experimental method to measure nuclear reaction time in the 10 -15 -10 -10 s region is presented. Measurements of the lifetimes of low-lying and long-lived states of 19 F and 20 Ne decaying via α-channel were carried out with the aim of checking the feasibility of the method. The results obtained in this way are compared with the lifetimes known from different techniques. ((orig.))

  4. Measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Gerhards, R; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Wallraff, W; Bock, B; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1986-04-01

    We have determined the D/sup 0/ lifetime from reconstructed vertices of D/sup 0/ mesons produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at an average center of mass energy of 42.2 GeV. From fifteen events the D/sup 0/ lifetime was determined to be (4.3/sup +2.0//sub -1.4/ +- 0.8) . 10/sup -13/s.

  5. Measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Gerhards, R; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, R; Wallraff, W; Bock, B; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1986-10-01

    We have determined the D/sup 0/ lifetime from reconstructed vertices of D/sup 0/ mesons produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilations at an average center of mass energy of 42.2 GeV. From fifteen events the D/sup 0/ lifetime was determined to be (4.3+-1.7+-0.8)x10/sup -13/s.

  6. Measurement of the lifetime difference between Bs mass eigenstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of the lifetimes and polarization amplitudes for B s 0 → J/ψφ and B d 0 → J/ψ K* 0 decays. Lifetimes of the heavy (H) and light (L) mass eigenstates in the B s 0 system are separately measured for the first time by determining the relative contributions of amplitudes with definite CP as a function of the decay time

  7. 26 CFR 1.25A-4 - Lifetime Learning Credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Lifetime Learning Credit. 1.25A-4 Section 1.25A-4... Rates During A Taxable Year § 1.25A-4 Lifetime Learning Credit. (a) Amount of the credit—(1) Taxable years beginning before January 1, 2003. Subject to the phaseout of the education tax credit described in...

  8. A precise measurement of the average b hadron lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Meinhard, H; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stierlin, U; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Duarte, H; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Si Mohand, D; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    An improved measurement of the average b hadron lifetime is performed using a sample of 1.5 million hadronic Z decays, collected during the 1991-1993 runs of ALEPH, with the silicon vertex detector fully operational. This uses the three-dimensional impact parameter distribution of lepton tracks coming from semileptonic b decays and yields an average b hadron lifetime of 1.533 \\pm 0.013 \\pm 0.022 ps.

  9. Measurement of the tau lifetime with the DELPHI detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreazza, A.

    2005-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the e + e → τ + τ - events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong τ decay channels. These are combined with previously published DELPHI results to provide a tau lifetime measurement of τ τ =290.9+/-1.4 stat +/-1.0 sys fs, using the full LEP1 data sample

  10. Mean lifetime of the B$_{s}^{0}$ meson

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Ostankov, A P; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an update of the measurement of the mean lifetime of the B^0_s meson. Combining D_s - \\ell, D_s-h, \\phi - \\ell and inclusive D_s final states from the 3.2 million hadronic \\Zz decays collected by DELPHI between 1991 and 1994, the B^0_s mean lifetime was measured to be: \\tau(B^0_s) = 1.67 ~\\pm 0.14, M014AU

  11. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in dental biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; de Grauw, Cees J.

    2000-12-01

    Dental biofilm consists of micro-colonies of bacteria embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and salivary proteins. pH and oxygen concentration are of great importance in dental biofilm. Both can be measured using fluorescence techniques. The imaging of dental biofilm is complicated by the thickness of the biofilms that can be up to several hundred micrometers thick. Here, we employed a combination of two-photon excitation microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify the oxygen concentration in dental biofilm. Collisional quenching of fluorescent probes by molecular oxygen leads to a reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the probe. We employed this mechanism to measure the oxygen concentration distribution in dental biofilm by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Here, TRIS Ruthenium chloride hydrate was used as an oxygen probe. A calibration procedure on buffers was use to measure the lifetime response of this Ruthenium probe. The results are in agreement with the Stern-Volmer equation. A linear relation was found between the ratio of the unquenched and the quenched lifetime and the oxygen concentration. The biofilm fluorescence lifetime imaging results show a strong oxygen gradient at the buffer - biofilm interface and the average oxygen concentration in the biofilm amounted to 50 μM.

  12. Lifetime measurements in the picosecond range: Achievements and Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, Reiner

    1999-01-01

    This contribution will review the recoil distance method (RDM), its current range of applications as well as future perspectives for the measurement of lifetimes in the picosecond range of excited nuclear levels. Recent Doppler-shift lifetime experiments with large gamma-ray spectrometers have achieved a new level of precision and sensitivity, providing new insights into nuclear structure physics. High precision RDM measurements of near-yrast states in various mass regions have revealed dynamic shape effects beyond the framework of collective models and have also allowed to study the interaction between coexisting shapes. The measurement of lifetimes in superdeformed bands has shown that lifetimes can be measured for nuclear excitations, which are only populated with a few percent of the production cross-section of a nucleus. These experiments have also enabled us to study the mechanism of the decay-out of superdeformed bands. Another example for the need of precise lifetime measurements is the recent verifications of the concept of 'magnetic rotation' in nuclei by the experimental observation of the characteristic drop of B(M1) values as a function of angular momentum. These recent breakthroughs have also opened new perspectives for the use of the RDM technique for more exotic regions of nuclei and nuclear excitations. Here the measurement of lifetimes in neutron rich nuclei, which are not accessible with conventional nuclear reactions using stable beams and targets, is of special interest. Possible experimental approaches and simple estimates for the feasibility of such experiments will be presented. (author)

  13. Fluorescence lifetime evaluation of whole soils from the Amazon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Tadini, Amanda Maria; Nogueira, Marcelo Saito; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Mounier, Stephane; Huaman, Jose Luis Clabel; Dos Santos, Cléber Hilário; Montes, Célia Regina; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira

    2017-08-20

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) is a new tool that can be used to investigate processes of interaction between metal ions and organic matter (OM) in soils, providing a specific analysis of the structure and dynamics of macromolecules. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies in the literature reporting the use of this technique applied to whole/non-fractionated soil samples, making it a potential method for use in future studies. This work describes the use of TRFS to evaluate the fluorescence lifetimes of OM of whole soils from the Amazon region. Analysis was made of pellets of soils from an oxisol-spodosol system, collected in São Gabriel da Cachoeira (Amazonas, Brazil). The fluorescence lifetimes in the oxisol-spodosol system were attributed to two different fluorophores. One was related to complexation of an OM fraction with metals, resulting in a shorter fluorophore lifetime. A short fluorescence lifetime (2-12 ns) could be associated with simpler structures of the OM, while a long lifetime (19-66 ns) was associated with more complex OM structures. This new TRFS technique for analysis of the fluorescence lifetime in whole soil samples complies with the principles of green chemistry.

  14. Positron lifetime calculation for defects and defect clusters in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onitsuka, T.; Ohkubo, H.; Takenaka, M.; Tsukuda, N.; Kuramoto, E.

    2000-01-01

    Calculations of positron lifetime have been made for vacancy type defects in graphite and compared with experimental results. Defect structures were obtained in a model graphite lattice after including relaxation of whole lattice as determined by the molecular dynamics method, where the interatomic potential given by Pablo Andribet, Dominguez-Vazguez, Mari Carmen Perez-Martin, Alonso, Jimenez-Rodriguez [Nucl. Instrum. and Meth. 115 (1996) 501] was used. For the defect structures obtained via lattice relaxation positron lifetime was calculated under the so-called atomic superposition method. Positron lifetimes 204 and 222 ps were obtained for the graphite matrix and a single vacancy, respectively, which can be compared with the experimental results 208 and 233 ps. For planar vacancy clusters, e.g., vacancy loops, lifetime calculation was also made and indicated that lifetime increases with the number of vacancies in a cluster. This is consistent with the experimental result in the region of higher annealing temperature (above 1200 deg. C), where the increase of positron lifetime is seen, probably corresponding to the clustering of mobile vacancies

  15. Empirical membrane lifetime model for heavy duty fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, Natalia; Watson, Mark; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-12-01

    Heavy duty fuel cells used in transportation system applications such as transit buses expose the fuel cell membranes to conditions that can lead to lifetime-limiting membrane failure via combined chemical and mechanical degradation. Highly durable membranes and reliable predictive models are therefore needed in order to achieve the ultimate heavy duty fuel cell lifetime target of 25,000 h. In the present work, an empirical membrane lifetime model was developed based on laboratory data from a suite of accelerated membrane durability tests. The model considers the effects of cell voltage, temperature, oxygen concentration, humidity cycling, humidity level, and platinum in the membrane using inverse power law and exponential relationships within the framework of a general log-linear Weibull life-stress statistical distribution. The obtained model is capable of extrapolating the membrane lifetime from accelerated test conditions to use level conditions during field operation. Based on typical conditions for the Whistler, British Columbia fuel cell transit bus fleet, the model predicts a stack lifetime of 17,500 h and a membrane leak initiation time of 9200 h. Validation performed with the aid of a field operated stack confirmed the initial goal of the model to predict membrane lifetime within 20% of the actual operating time.

  16. Lifetime depression history and sexual function in women at midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyranowski, Jill M; Bromberger, Joyce; Youk, Ada; Matthews, Karen; Kravitz, Howard M; Powell, Lynda H

    2004-12-01

    We examined the association between lifetime depression history and sexual function in a community-based sample of midlife women. Specifically, 914 women aged 42-52 who were participants in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation completed a self-report assessment of their sexual behaviors, sexual desire, sexual arousal, and sexual satisfaction over the past 6 months. On the basis of the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV , participants were categorized into 1 of 3 lifetime major depressive disorder (MDD) history groups: no MDD history, single episode MDD, and recurrent MDD. In line with previous reports, women with a history of recurrent MDD reported experiencing less frequent sexual arousal, less physical pleasure, and less emotional satisfaction within their current sexual relationships. Although the groups did not differ in their reported frequency of sexual desire or partnered sexual behaviors, lifetime depression history was associated with increased rates of self-stimulation (masturbation). Associations between lifetime depression history and lower levels of physical pleasure within partnered sexual relationships and higher rates of masturbation remained significant following control for current depressive symptoms, study site, marital status, psychotropic medication use, and lifetime history of anxiety or substance abuse/dependence disorder. Future research is needed to characterize the temporal and etiologic relationships among lifetime depressive disorder, current mood state, and sexual function in women across the lifespan.

  17. Lifetime Traumatic Experiences and Leisure Physical Inactivity among Adolescent Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Romualdas; Malinauskiene, Vilija; Malinauskas, Mindaugas

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between lifetime traumatic experiences and leisure physical inactivity among adolescent boys and to determine to what extent those associations are mediated by posttraumatic stress symptoms, unhealthy behaviors (smoking, alcohol use), the daily consumption of fresh fruit, and sense of coherence. A self-administered questionnaire combining 3 instruments measured leisure physical activity level (Godin and Shephard), symptoms of posttraumatic stress (IES-revised), lifetime traumatic experiences, sense of coherence (SOC-13, from Antonovsky), and behavioral and dietary patterns in a representative sample of eighth grade boys from a number of Kaunas, Lithuania, secondary schools (N = 885; response rate 88.6%). Fifty-six point eight percent of boys had experienced at least 1 lifetime traumatic event, with a 20.5% prevalence of PTS symptoms, and 5.4% were inactive during leisure time. In the logistic regression models, leisure physical inactivity was associated with lifetime traumatic experiences (adjusted OR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.09-4.98). Sense of coherence and posttraumatic stress symptoms did not mediate those associations. Less-than-daily consumption of fresh fruit showed an independent effect, while smoking and weekly consumption of alcohol did not. Consistent associations between lifetime traumatic experiences and leisure physical inactivity among adolescent boys indicate that the presence of lifetime traumatic events should be taken into account when employing intervention and prevention programs on unhealthy lifestyles (physical inactivity, smoking, and alcohol).

  18. Refractive index sensing using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime is a function of the refractive index of the fluorophore's environment, for example in the case of the biologically important green fluorescent protein (GFP). In order to address the question whether this effect can be exploited to image the local environment of specific proteins in cell biology, we need to determine the distance over which the fluorophore's lifetime is sensitive to the refractive index. To this end, we employ Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) of fluorescein in NaOH buffer at an interface. This approach allows us to map the fluorescence lifetime as a function of distance from a buffer/air and buffer/oil interface. Preliminary data show that the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein increases near a buffer/air interface and decreases near a buffer/oil interface. The range over which this fluorescence lifetime change occurs is found to be of the order several μm which is consistent with a theoretical model based on the full width at half maximum of the emission spectrum proposed by Toptygin

  19. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy using near-infrared contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, R; Sarder, P; Bloch, S; Culver, J; Achilefu, S

    2012-08-01

    Although single-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is widely used to image molecular processes using a wide range of excitation wavelengths, the captured emission of this technique is confined to the visible spectrum. Here, we explore the feasibility of utilizing near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes with emission >700 nm for FLIM of live cells. The confocal microscope is equipped with a 785 nm laser diode, a red-enhanced photomultiplier tube, and a time-correlated single photon counting card. We demonstrate that our system reports the lifetime distributions of NIR fluorescent dyes, cypate and DTTCI, in cells. In cells labelled separately or jointly with these dyes, NIR FLIM successfully distinguishes their lifetimes, providing a method to sort different cell populations. In addition, lifetime distributions of cells co-incubated with these dyes allow estimate of the dyes' relative concentrations in complex cellular microenvironments. With the heightened interest in fluorescence lifetime-based small animal imaging using NIR fluorophores, this technique further serves as a bridge between in vitro spectroscopic characterization of new fluorophore lifetimes and in vivo tissue imaging. © 2012 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Exits in order: How crowding affects particle lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penington, Catherine J.; Simpson, Matthew J. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Baker, Ruth E. [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-28

    Diffusive processes are often represented using stochastic random walk frameworks. The amount of time taken for an individual in a random walk to intersect with an absorbing boundary is a fundamental property that is often referred to as the particle lifetime, or the first passage time. The mean lifetime of particles in a random walk model of diffusion is related to the amount of time required for the diffusive process to reach a steady state. Mathematical analysis describing the mean lifetime of particles in a standard model of diffusion without crowding is well known. However, the lifetime of agents in a random walk with crowding has received much less attention. Since many applications of diffusion in biology and biophysics include crowding effects, here we study a discrete model of diffusion that incorporates crowding. Using simulations, we show that crowding has a dramatic effect on agent lifetimes, and we derive an approximate expression for the mean agent lifetime that includes crowding effects. Our expression matches simulation results very well, and highlights the importance of crowding effects that are sometimes overlooked.

  1. Lifetime physical activity and female stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M; Bardsley, Tyler; Egger, Marlene J

    2015-07-01

    We sought to estimate whether moderate/severe stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in middle-aged women is associated with overall lifetime physical activity (including leisure, household, outdoor, and occupational), as well as lifetime leisure (recreational), lifetime strenuous, and strenuous activity during the teen years. Recruitment for this case-control study was conducted in primary-care-level family medicine and gynecology clinics. A total of 1538 enrolled women ages 39-65 years underwent a Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination to assess vaginal support. Based on Incontinence Severity Index scores, cases had moderate/severe and controls had no/mild SUI. We excluded 349 with vaginal descent at/below the hymen (pelvic organ prolapse), 194 who did not return questionnaires, and 110 with insufficient activity data for analysis. In all, 213 cases were frequency matched 1:1 by age group to controls. Physical activity was measured using the Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire, in which women recall activity from menarche to present. We created separate multivariable logistic regression models for activity measures. SUI odds increased slightly with overall lifetime activity (odds ratio [OR], 1.20 per 70 additional metabolic equivalent of task-h/wk; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.41), and were not associated with lifetime strenuous activity (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.99-1.25). In quintile analysis of lifetime leisure activity, which demonstrated a nonlinear pattern, all quintiles incurred about half the odds of SUI compared to reference (second quintile; P = .009). Greater strenuous activity in teen years modestly increased SUI odds (OR, 1.37 per 7 additional h/wk; 95% CI, 1.09-1.71); OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.15-2.66 in sensitivity analysis adjusting for measurement error. The predicted probability of SUI rose linearly in women exceeding 7.5 hours of strenuous activity/wk during teen years. Teen strenuous activity had a similar effect on SUI odds when

  2. Recording Lifetime Behavior and Movement in an Invertebrate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Sige; Liedo, Pablo; Altamirano-Robles, Leopoldo; Cruz-Enriquez, Janeth; Morice, Amy; Ingram, Donald K.; Kaub, Kevin; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Carey, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of lifetime behavioral changes is essential for understanding aging and aging-related diseases. However, such studies are scarce partly due to the lack of efficient tools. Here we describe and provide proof of concept for a stereo vision system that classifies and sequentially records at an extremely fine scale six different behaviors (resting, micro-movement, walking, flying, feeding and drinking) and the within-cage (3D) location of individual tephritid fruit flies by time-of-day throughout their lives. Using flies fed on two different diets, full sugar-yeast and sugar-only diets, we report for the first time their behavioral changes throughout their lives at a high resolution. We have found that the daily activity peaks at the age of 15–20 days and then gradually declines with age for flies on both diets. However, the overall daily activity is higher for flies on sugar-only diet than those on the full diet. Flies on sugar-only diet show a stronger diurnal localization pattern with higher preference to staying on the top of the cage during the period of light-off when compared to flies on the full diet. Clustering analyses of age-specific behavior patterns reveal three distinct young, middle-aged and old clusters for flies on each of the two diets. The middle-aged groups for flies on sugar-only diet consist of much younger age groups when compared to flies on full diet. This technology provides research opportunities for using a behavioral informatics approach for understanding different ways in which behavior, movement, and aging in model organisms are mutually affecting. PMID:21559058

  3. On the lifetime of wall conditioning layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, H.; Schmid, K.; Eckstein, W.

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by the large-scale application of tungsten as first wall material in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade, we performed a numerical study about the erosion behaviour of boron films from carbon and tungsten substrates using the Monte-Carlo code TRIDYN. We compared the erosion caused by monoenergetic ions as well as the case of a plasma with a temperature of 10 eV containing boron as an impurity. In both cases we obtained, that on tungsten substrates a pure tungsten surface film is formed with some boron inventory buried underneath. For a carbon substrate, however, the boron inventory depletes slowly due to ion beam mixing effects in the case of monoenergetic ion bombardment. In the case of a thermal plasma containing boron as an impurity, an equilibrium boron surface concentration is established at high fluences. This boron concentration is strongly enhanced as compared to the boron impurity concentration in the plasma

  4. The Boston Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury-Lifetime (BAT-L) semistructured interview: evidence of research utility and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Catherine Brawn; Amick, Melissa M; Grande, Laura; McGlynn, Susan; Kenna, Alexandra; Morra, Lindsay; Clark, Alexandra; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E

    2014-01-01

    Report the prevalence of lifetime and military-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans and validate the Boston Assessment of TBI-Lifetime (BAT-L). The BAT-L is the first validated, postcombat, semistructured clinical interview to characterize head injuries and diagnose TBIs throughout the life span. Community-dwelling convenience sample of 131 OEF/OIF veterans. TBI criteria (alteration of mental status, posttraumatic amnesia, and loss of consciousness) were evaluated for all possible TBIs, including a novel evaluation of blast exposure. BAT-L, Ohio State University TBI Identification Method (OSU-TBI-ID). About 67% of veterans incurred a TBI in their lifetime. Almost 35% of veterans experienced at least 1 military-related TBI; all were mild in severity, 40% of them were due to blast, 50% were due to some other (ie, blunt) mechanism, and 10% were due to both types of injuries. Predeployment TBIs were frequent (45% of veterans). There was strong correspondence between the BAT-L and the OSU-TBI-ID (Cohen κ = 0.89; Kendall τ-b = 0.95). Interrater reliability of the BAT-L was strong (κs >0.80). The BAT-L is a valid instrument with which to assess TBI across a service member's lifetime and captures the varied and complex nature of brain injuries across OEF/OIF veterans' life span.

  5. Three-gamma annihilation of ortho-positronium in NiO/γ-Al2O3 catalysts detected by positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.H.; Chen, Z.Q.; Zhang, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    The pore structure of NiO/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts is characterized by positron lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements. A very long lifetime τ 4 of 92 ns is resolved from the positron lifetime spectrum measured for pure Al 2 O 3 , which could be attributed to the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime in large pores. It was also found that the fitted lifetime τ 4 and its corresponding intensity I 4 obtained from the lifetime spectra both decrease with narrowing energy window of the stop channel in the fast–fast coincidence lifetime measurement system. This suggests that the ultra long lifetime is primarily due to the self annihilation of o-Ps which emits three gamma-rays. Such 3γ annihilation is further evidenced by measuring the Doppler broadening of annihilation gamma rays in coincidence with the prompt gamma rays (1.28 MeV) emitted from the 22 Na positron source. In NiO/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts both the lifetime τ 4 and its intensity I 4 decreases with increasing NiO content (from 3 wt% to 40 wt%), which indicates decreasing of the number of 3γ events. The 3γ annihilation parameter analyzed from the coincidence Doppler broadening spectrum shows consistent decrease with increasing NiO content. - Highlights: ► Above paper reported study of the 3-gamma annihilation of o-Ps. ► 3γ annihilation was verified by varying the energy window of the lifetime system. ► A new coincidence Doppler broadening technique is also used to record 3γ events. ► 3γ parameter decreases with NiO content in NiO/γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts.

  6. Spectroscopy and lifetime of bottom and charm hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F. Ukegawa

    2000-01-01

    There are several motivations for studying masses and lifetimes of the hadrons containing a heavy quark, either the bottom or the charm quark. First, the mass and the lifetime are fundamental properties of an elementary particle. Second, the spectroscopy of hadrons gives insights into the QCD potential between quarks. In particular, a symmetry exists for heavy hadrons when the heavy quark mass is taken to be infinite, providing a powerful tool to predict and understand properties of those heavy hadrons. Third, studies of the lifetimes of heavy hadrons probe their decay mechanisms. A measurement of the lifetime, or the total decay width, is necessary when the authors extract magnitudes of elements of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. Again, in the limit of an infinite heavy quark mass things become simple and decay of a heavy hadron should be the decay of the heavy quark Q. This leads to a prediction that all hadrons containing the heavy quark Q should have the same lifetime, that of the quark Q. This is far from reality in the case of charm hadrons, where the D + meson lifetime is about 2.5 times longer than the D 0 meson lifetime. Perhaps the charm quark is not heavy enough. The simple quark decay picture should be a better approximation for the bottom hadrons because of the larger b quark mass. On the experimental side, the measurements and knowledge of the heavy hadrons (in particular bottom hadrons) have significantly improved over the last decade, thanks to high statistics data accumulated by various experiments. The authors shall review recent developments in these studies in the remainder of this manuscript

  7. Diplopia due to Dacryops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Duman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dacryops is a lacrimal ductal cyst. It is known that it can cause globe displacement, motility restriction, and proptosis because of the mass effect. Diplopia due to dacryops has not been reported previously. Here, we present a 57-year-old man with binocular horizontal diplopia that occurred during left direction gaze due to dacryops.

  8. Lifetimes of Multiply Alkylated Cyclopentane Oil in Contact with Various Metals, Evaluated with Vacuum Spiral Orbit Tribometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Stephen V.

    2018-01-01

    The dependence of the lifetimes of small quantities of a Multiply Alkylated Cyclopentane (MAC) lubricant oil, Pennzane (Registered Trademark) 2001A (Nye Lubricants, Inc.), in rolling and sliding contact with different metals was evaluated with a vacuum spiral orbit tribometer. The metals were the bearing alloys 52100 steel, 440C steel, 17-4 PH steel and Nitinol 60 and the elements chromium, vanadium and titanium. The lifetimes of the lubricant oil on different metals fell into distinct groups with 52100 greater than 440C approx. Nitinol 60 greater than 17-4 PH for the order of the lifetimes of the steels and chromium greater than vanadium greater than titanium for the order of the lifetimes for the elements. The limited life of the small quantities of oil is assumed to be due to its consumption by the tribochemical reaction of the oil with the different metal bearing materials. The lifetimes are then inversely related to the reaction rates of the oil molecules with the various metals: the longest life of 52100 steel having the lowest reaction rate and the shortest life of titanium having the highest reaction rate. Mechanisms for the tribochemical reactions are discussed.

  9. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 on crystalline silicon solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Joon; Song, Hee Eun; Chang, Hyo Sik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al 2 O 3 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al 2 O 3 passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al 2 O 3 growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al 2 O 3 passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al 2 O 3 shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al 2 O 3 surface passivation

  10. Positron lifetime in vacancy clusters. Application to the study of vacancy-impurity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbel, C.

    1986-02-01

    Positron lifetime measurements are used to study the vacancy recovery (77-650 K) in 20 K electron irradiated dilute gold or iron alloys in stainless steels. Positron lifetimes in clusters of various shapes and structures are calculated to precise the information obtained by measuring the positron lifetime in a vacancy cluster of unknown size and configuration. From the calculations, we have drawn the following conclusions: - the minimal size of an unknown cluster can be deduced from the measurement of the positron lifetime in the cluster; - a decrease of the positron lifetime when the structure of the cluster evolves, means either a decrease of the size of the cluster, or, the appearance of a relaxed configuration. - The positron lifetime is very useful to discriminate between a spatial planar or relaxed configuration and a tri-dimensional one. In AuGe, AuSb, AuTn alloys, vacancy clusters decorated by solute atoms appear at 250 K. Their configurations are different from those in pure Au. Mobile vacancy-solutes complexes are involved in the clustering process in AuGe, AuSb. The clusters are probably decorated by several solute atoms in AuGe and AuSb where the resistivity evidences a clustering of solute atoms. In AuFe, vacancy-single or multi-complexes stable up to 670 K prevent cluster formation. In FeTi, FeSb, FeAu, vacancy migration is hindered by the formation of vacancy-solute complexes up to 315 K (Ti), up to 670 K (Sb), up to 700 K (Au). In FeSi, FeCu, FeAg, tri-dimensional clusters grow less easily than Fe. This is likely due to the formation of several kinds of small decorated clusters with relaxed or planar configurations. They are peculiarly stable, surviving up to 700 K at least. In Si (resp. Ti) doped 59Fe25Ni16Cr, solute atoms retain the vacancies up to 300 K (resp. 320 K) [fr

  11. Lifetime program in Trillo. Almaraz NNPP's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asensio, J.; Sainero, J.

    2004-01-01

    Life Cycle Management (LCM) as a criterion of improvement of the plant, its operation and maintenance, constitutes a solid technical basis to optimize the life of service under the best conditions of safety and profitability, even beyond the period originally defined as the design life. In this context, in 1997 Almaraz NPP and in 2000 Trillo NPP initiated the establishment of its corresponding Life Cycle Management Plants. Due to the fact the life management activities are inherently of a multi-disciplinary nature, both Almaraz NPP and Trillo have established a specific organization for the Life Cycle Management Plan in order to integrate and coordinate all life cycle management activities. After the experience of more than 7 years in the definition and implementation of Life Cycle Management at Almaraz and Trillo NPPs can be concluded. The Life Cycle Management Programme is a consolidated process at Almaraz and Trillo NPPs. The creation of a specific organization permits to optimize the processes and to take advantage of the synergy's with other plant activities. The Life Cycle Management Committee is the key element in the LCM organisation that articulates all LCM activities and validates their results. (Author)

  12. Characterization of interfaces in Binary and Ternary Polymer Blends by Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    A miscible blend is a single-phase system with compact packing of the polymeric chains/segments due configuration/conformational changes upon blending. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) is the most employed method to ascertain whether the blend is miscible or immiscible. Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS) has been employed in recent times to study miscibility properties of polymer blends by monitoring the ortho-Positronium annihilation lifetimes as function of composition. However, just free volume monitoring and the DSC methods fail to provide the composition dependent miscibility of blends. To overcome this limitation, an alternative approach based on hydrodynamic interactions has been developed to derive this information using the same o-Ps lifetime measurements. This has led to the development of a new method of measuring composition dependent miscibility level in binary and ternary polymer blends. Further, the new method also provides interface characteristics for immiscible blends. The interactions between the blend components has a direct bearing on the strength of adhesion at the interface and hence the hydrodynamic interaction. Understanding the characteristic of interfaces which decides the miscibility level of the blend and their end applications is made easy by the present method. The efficacy of the present method is demonstrated for few binary and ternary blends.

  13. Stress-temperature-lifetime response of nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC composites in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    Time-to-failure tests were conducted in four-point flexure and in air as a function of stress levels and temperatures to study the lifetime response of various Nicalon fiber-reinforced SiC (designated as Nic/SiC) composites with a graphitic interfacial coating. The results indicated that all of the Nic/SiC composites exhibit a similar stress-dependent failure at applied stress greater than a threshold value. In this case, the lifetimes of the composites increased with decrease in both stress level and test temperature. The lifetime of the composites appeared to be relatively insensitive to the thickness of graphitic interface layer and was enhanced somewhat by the addition of oxidation inhibitors. Electron microscopy and oxidation studies indicated that the life of the Nic/SiC composites was governed by the oxidation of the graphitic interfaces and the on of glass(es) in composites due to the oxidation of the fiber and matrix, inhibitor phases

  14. Lifetime estimation of a time projection chamber x-ray polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Brieda, Lubos; Dickens, Patsy L.; Montt de Garcia, Kristina; Hawk, Douglas L.; Hayato, Asami; Jahoda, Keith; Mohammed, Jelila

    2013-09-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) X-ray polarimeter Instrument (XPI) was designed to measure the polarization of 23 sources over the course of its 9 month mission. The XPI design consists of two telescopes each with a polarimeter assembly at the focus of a grazing incidence mirror. To make sensitive polarization measurements the GEMS Polarimeter Assembly (PA) employed a gas detection system based on a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) technique. Gas detectors are inherently at risk of degraded performance arising from contamination from outgassing of internal detector components or due to loss of gas. This paper describes the design and the materials used to build a prototype of the flight polarimeter with the required GEMS lifetime. We report the results from outgassing measurements of the polarimeter subassemblies and assemblies, enclosure seal tests, life tests, and performance tests that demonstrate that the GEMS lifetime is achievable. Finally we report performance measurements and the lifetime enhancement from the use of a getter.

  15. Quasiparticle lifetime broadening in resonant x-ray scattering of NH4NO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, John; Jach, Terrence; Müller, Matthias; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2016-07-01

    It has been previously shown that two effects cause dramatic changes in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra from the N K edge of the insulating crystal ammonium nitrate. First, vibrational disorder causes major changes in the absorption spectrum, originating not only from the thermal population of phonons, but, significantly, from zero-point motion as well. Second, the anomalously large broadening (˜4 eV) of the emission originating from nitrate σ states is due to the unusually short lifetimes of quasiparticles in an otherwise extremely narrow band. In this work, we investigate the coupling of these effects to core and valence excitons that are created as the initial x-ray excitation energy is progressively reduced toward the N edge. Using a G W /Bethe-Salpeter approach, we show the extent to which this anomalous broadening is captured by the G W approximation. The data and calculations demonstrate the importance that the complex self-energies (finite lifetimes) of the valence bands have on the interpretation of emission spectra. We produce a scheme to explain why extreme lifetimes should appear in σ states of other similar compounds.

  16. Minimizing draining waste through extending the lifetime of pilot jobs in Grid environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfiligoi, I; Martin, T; Würthwein, F; Bockelman, B P; Bradley, D C

    2014-01-01

    The computing landscape is moving at an accelerated pace to many-core computing. Nowadays, it is not unusual to get 32 cores on a single physical node. As a consequence, there is increased pressure in the pilot systems domain to move from purely single-core scheduling and allow multi-core jobs as well. In order to allow for a gradual transition from single-core to multi-core user jobs, it is envisioned that pilot jobs will have to handle both kinds of user jobs at the same time, by requesting several cores at a time from Grid providers and then partitioning them between the user jobs at runtime. Unfortunately, the current Grid ecosystem only allows for relatively short lifetime of pilot jobs, requiring frequent draining, with the relative waste of compute resources due to varying lifetimes of the user jobs. Significantly extending the lifetime of pilot jobs is thus highly desirable, but must come without any adverse effects for the Grid resource providers. In this paper we present a mechanism, based on communication between the pilot jobs and the Grid provider, that allows for pilot jobs to run for extended periods of time when there are available resources, but also allows the Grid provider to reclaim the resources in a short amount of time when needed. We also present the experience of running a prototype system using the above mechanism on a few US-based Grid sites.

  17. Quasiparticle Lifetime Broadening in Resonant X-ray Scattering of NH4NO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, John; Jach, Terrence; Müller, Matthias; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2016-07-15

    It has been previously shown that two effects cause dramatic changes in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra from the N K edge of the insulating crystal ammonium nitrate. First, vibrational disorder causes major changes in the absorption spectrum, originating not only from the thermal population of phonons, but, significantly, from zero-point motion as well. Second, the anomalously large broadening ( ~ 4 eV) of the emission originating from nitrate σ states is due to unusually short lifetimes of quasiparticles in an otherwise extremely narrow band. In this work we investigate the coupling of these effects to core and valence excitons that are created as the initial x-ray excitation energy is progressively reduced toward the N edge. Using a GW /Bethe-Salpeter approach, we show the extent to which this anomalous broadening is captured by the GW approximation. The data and calculations demonstrate the importance that the complex self-energies (finite lifetimes) of valence bands have on the interpretation of emission spectra. We produce a scheme to explain why extreme lifetimes should appear in σ states of other similar compounds.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous molecules in live mouse cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindrych, Zdenek; Wang, Tianxiong; Hu, Song; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2017-02-01

    NADH and FAD are important endogenous fluorescent coenzymes participating in key enzymatic reactions of cellular metabolism. While fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD have been used to determine the redox state of cells and tissues, this simple approach breaks down in the case of deep-tissue intravital imaging due to depth- and wavelength-dependent light absorption and scattering. To circumvent this limitation, our research focuses on fluorescence lifetimes of two-photon excited NADH and FAD emission to study the metabolic state of live tissues. In our custom-built scanning microscope we combine tunable femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (operating at 740 nm for NADH excitation and 890 nm for FAD excitation), two GaAsP hybrid detectors for registering individual fluorescence photons and two Becker and Hickl time correlator boards for high precision lifetime measurements. Together with our rigorous FLIM analysis approach (including image segmentation, multi-exponential decay fitting and detailed statistical analysis) we are able to detect metabolic changes in cancer xenografts (human pancreatic cancer MPanc96 cells injected subcutaneously into the ear of an immunodeficient nude mouse), relative to surrounding healthy tissue. Advantageously, with the same instrumentation we can also take high-resolution and high-contrast images of second harmonic signal (SHG) originating from collagen fibers of both the healthy skin and the growing tumor. The combination of metabolic measurements (NADH and FAD lifetime) and morphological information (collagen SHG) allows us to follow the tumor growth in live mouse model and the changes in tumor microenvironment.

  19. Optimized inspection techniques and structural analysis in lifetime management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguado, M.T.; Marcelles, I.

    1993-01-01

    Preservation of the option of extending the service lifetime of a nuclear power plant beyond its normal design lifetime requires correct remaining lifetime management from the very beginning of plant operation. The methodology used in plant remaining lifetime management is essentially based on the use of standard inspections, surveillance and monitoring programs and calculations, such as thermal-stress and fracture mechanics analysis. The inspection techniques should be continuously optimized, in order to be able to detect and dimension existing defects with the highest possible degree of accuracy. The information obtained during the inspection is combined with the historical data of the components: design, quality, operation, maintenance, and transients, and with the results of destructive testing, fracture mechanics and thermal fatigue analysis. These data are used to estimate the remaining lifetime of nuclear power plant components, systems and structures with the highest degree possible of accuracy. The use of this methodology allows component repairs and replacements to be reduced or avoided and increases the safety levels and availability of the nuclear power plant. Use of this strategy avoids the need for heavy investments at the end of the licensing period

  20. Analysis of the experimental positron lifetime spectra by neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdic, S.; Chakarova, R.; Pazsit, I.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of experimental positron lifetime spectra in polymer materials by using various algorithms of neural networks. A method based on the use of artificial neural networks for unfolding the mean lifetime and intensity of the spectral components of simulated positron lifetime spectra was previously suggested and tested on simulated data [Pazsit et al., Applied Surface Science, 149 (1998), 97]. In this work, the applicability of the method to the analysis of experimental positron spectra has been verified in the case of spectra from polymer materials with three components. It has been demonstrated that the backpropagation neural network can determine the spectral parameters with a high accuracy and perform the decomposition of lifetimes which differ by 10% or more. The backpropagation network has not been suitable for the identification of both the parameters and the number of spectral components. Therefore, a separate artificial neural network module has been designed to solve the classification problem. Module types based on self-organizing map and learning vector quantization algorithms have been tested. The learning vector quantization algorithm was found to have better performance and reliability. A complete artificial neural network analysis tool of positron lifetime spectra has been constructed to include a spectra classification module and parameter evaluation modules for spectra with a different number of components. In this way, both flexibility and high resolution can be achieved. (author)

  1. Maximizing Lifetime of Wireless Sensor Networks with Mobile Sink Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yourong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to maximize network lifetime and balance energy consumption when sink nodes can move, maximizing lifetime of wireless sensor networks with mobile sink nodes (MLMS is researched. The movement path selection method of sink nodes is proposed. Modified subtractive clustering method, k-means method, and nearest neighbor interpolation method are used to obtain the movement paths. The lifetime optimization model is established under flow constraint, energy consumption constraint, link transmission constraint, and other constraints. The model is solved from the perspective of static and mobile data gathering of sink nodes. Subgradient method is used to solve the lifetime optimization model when one sink node stays at one anchor location. Geometric method is used to evaluate the amount of gathering data when sink nodes are moving. Finally, all sensor nodes transmit data according to the optimal data transmission scheme. Sink nodes gather the data along the shortest movement paths. Simulation results show that MLMS can prolong network lifetime, balance node energy consumption, and reduce data gathering latency under appropriate parameters. Under certain conditions, it outperforms Ratio_w, TPGF, RCC, and GRND.

  2. Single photon counting fluorescence lifetime detection of pericellular oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A; Lee, David A; Knight, Martin M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy offers a non-invasive method for quantifying local oxygen concentrations. However, existing methods are either invasive, require custom-made systems, or show limited spatial resolution. Therefore, these methods are unsuitable for investigation of pericellular oxygen concentrations. This study describes an adaptation of commercially available equipment which has been optimized for quantitative extracellular oxygen detection with high lifetime accuracy and spatial resolution while avoiding systematic photon pile-up. The oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye, tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride hexahydrate [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+), was excited using a two-photon excitation laser. Lifetime was measured using a Becker & Hickl time-correlated single photon counting, which will be referred to as a TCSPC card. [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+) characterization studies quantified the influences of temperature, pH, cellular culture media and oxygen on the fluorescence lifetime measurements. This provided a precisely calibrated and accurate system for quantification of pericellular oxygen concentration based on measured lifetimes. Using this technique, quantification of oxygen concentrations around isolated viable chondrocytes, seeded in three-dimensional agarose gel, revealed a subpopulation of cells that exhibited significant spatial oxygen gradients such that oxygen concentration reduced with increasing proximity to the cell. This technique provides a powerful tool for quantifying spatial oxygen gradients within three-dimensional cellular models.

  3. Panhypopituitarism Due to Hemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mesut Özkaya; Kadir Gis; Ali Çetinkaya

    2013-01-01

    Hemochromatosis is an iron storage disease. Panhypopituitarism is a clinical condition in which the anterior pituitary hormones are deficient. Herein, we report a rare case of panhypopituitarism due to hemochromatosis. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 125-6

  4. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Luchowski, Rafal; Laursen, Bo W

    2013-01-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20–200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes. (paper)

  5. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just Sørensen, Thomas; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-06-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20-200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes.

  6. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luevano-Gurrola

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  7. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-09-30

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population's health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h(-1). At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h(-1). Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg(-1), for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize.

  8. Lifetime Effective Dose Assessment Based on Background Outdoor Gamma Exposure in Chihuahua City, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano-Gurrola, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Angelica; Pinedo-Alvarez, Carmelo; Carrillo-Flores, Jorge; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia

    2015-01-01

    Determining ionizing radiation in a geographic area serves to assess its effects on a population’s health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the background environmental outdoor gamma dose rates in Chihuahua City. This study also estimated the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risks of the population of this city. To determine the outdoor gamma dose rate in air, the annual effective dose and the lifetime cancer risk, 48 sampling points were randomly selected in Chihuahua City. Outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were carried out by using a Geiger-Müller counter. Outdoor gamma dose rates ranged from 113 to 310 nGy·h−1. At the same sites, 48 soil samples were taken to obtain the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and to calculate their terrestrial gamma dose rates. Radioisotope activity concentrations were determined by gamma spectrometry. Calculated gamma dose rates ranged from 56 to 193 nGy·h−1. Results indicated that the lifetime effective dose of the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is on average 19.8 mSv, resulting in a lifetime cancer risk of 0.001. In addition, the mean of the activity concentrations in soil were 52, 73 and 1097 Bq·kg−1, for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the analysis, the spatial distribution of 232Th, 226Ra and 40K is to the north, to the north-center and to the south of city, respectively. In conclusion, the natural background gamma dose received by the inhabitants of Chihuahua City is high and mainly due to the geological characteristics of the zone. From the radiological point of view, this kind of study allows us to identify the importance of manmade environments, which are often highly variable and difficult to characterize. PMID:26437425

  9. Azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA+): A long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-01-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy have great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is in the order of 20–200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatics dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecules assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immuniglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time by more than 75 %, and a change in the steady-state anisotropy increase of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay for detecting binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with the other red emitting organic dyes. PMID:24058730

  10. Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 180-184}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Ahmad, I.; Crowell, B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Over the past few years, lifetimes were measured, using the recoil distance method, to investigate shape-coexistence and shape transitions in the even mass {sup 182-186}Pt isotopes. In all three cases, one observes a sharp increase in the transition quadrupole moment, Q{sub t}, at low frequencies followed by a rapid and significant decline in the backbending region. It was shown that the initial increase in the Q{sub t} can be explained in terms of the mixing at low spins of two bands of very different deformation, and the decline in the backbending region is brought about by mixing between the ground and a two-quasiparticle band. No lifetime information exists for these nuclei above the backbend, and there is some contention whether or not the backbend is due to the alignment of h{sub 9/2} protons, i{sub 13/2} neutrons or the near simultaneous alignment of both. Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations indicate very different shapes for the nuclei after the backbend, depending on which orbitals align. Thus, lifetime information on the states above the backbend should help determine which interpretation is correct. In order to determine the lifetimes of states in the even mass {sup 180-184}Pt nuclei above the backbend, we performed a recent experiment at Gammasphere using a {sup 64}Ni beam on Pb backed Sn targets in order to populate the nucleus of interest via a 4n reaction. At the time of the experiment, thirty-six Ge detectors were available for use in Gammasphere and approximately 100 x 10{sup 6} 3-fold and higher events were taken for each nucleus. Currently, angle-sorted matrices were created from the data, and spectra representing the ground bands show well developed lineshapes for transitions above the backbend. A full lineshape analysis of the data will begin shortly.

  11. Deference and Due Process

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeule, Cornelius Adrian

    2015-01-01

    In the textbooks, procedural due process is a strictly judicial enterprise; although substantive entitlements are created by legislative and executive action, it is for courts to decide independently what process the Constitution requires. The notion that procedural due process might be committed primarily to the discretion of the agencies themselves is almost entirely absent from the academic literature. The facts on the ground are very different. Thanks to converging strands of caselaw ...

  12. The increase of NADH fluorescence lifetime is associated with the metabolic change during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Han Wen; Yu, Jia Sin; Hsu, Shu Han; Wei, Yau Huei; Lee, Oscar K.; Wang, Hsing Wen

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime of NADH had been used as an optical marker for monitoring cellular metabolism. In our pervious studies, we have demonstrated that NADH lifetime of hMSCs increase gradually with time of osteogenic differentiation. In this study, we measured NADH lifetime of hMSCs from a different donor as well as the corresponding metabolic indices such as ATP level, oxygen consumption and lactate release. We also measure the quantity of Complex I, III, IV and V. The results show that during differentiation more oxygen consumed, higher ATP level expressed and less lactate released, and the increase of NADH lifetime was associated with ATP level. Higher expression of the total Complex protein was observed at 3 and 4 weeks after differentiation than controls. However, Complex I expression did not show significant correlation with the increase of NADH fluorescence lifetime. In summary, we demonstrated that the change of NADH lifetime was associated with the metabolic change during osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The increase of NADH lifetime was in part due to the increased Complex protein interaction in mitochondria after differentiation.

  13. Development of a remaining lifetime management system for NPPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan, J.C.; Regano, M.; Hevia Ruperez, F.

    1994-01-01

    The interest evinced by Spain nuclear power plants in providing a tool to support remaining lifetime management led to UNESA's application to OCIDE in 1992, and the latter's approval, for financing the project to develop a Remaining Lifetime Evaluation System for LWR nuclear power plants. This project is currently being developed under UNESA leadership, and the collaboration of three Spanish engineering companies and a research centre. The paper will describe its objectives, activities, current status and prospects. The project is defined in two phases, the first consisting of the identification and analysis of the main ageing phenomena and their significant parameters and specification of the Remaining Lifetime Evaluation System (RLES), and the second implementation of a pilot application of the RLES to verify its effectiveness. (Author)

  14. Fluorescence lifetime assays: current advances and applications in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritz, Stephan; Doering, Klaus; Woelcke, Julian; Hassiepen, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime assays complement the portfolio of established assay formats available in drug discovery, particularly with the recent advances in microplate readers and the commercial availability of novel fluorescent labels. Fluorescence lifetime assists in lowering complexity of compound screening assays, affording a modular, toolbox-like approach to assay development and yielding robust homogeneous assays. To date, materials and procedures have been reported for biochemical assays on proteases, as well as on protein kinases and phosphatases. This article gives an overview of two assay families, distinguished by the origin of the fluorescence signal modulation. The pharmaceutical industry demands techniques with a robust, integrated compound profiling process and short turnaround times. Fluorescence lifetime assays have already helped the drug discovery field, in this sense, by enhancing productivity during the hit-to-lead and lead optimization phases. Future work will focus on covering other biochemical molecular modifications by investigating the detailed photo-physical mechanisms underlying the fluorescence signal.

  15. Lifetime measurements using the recoil distance method - achievements and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, R.

    2001-01-01

    The recoil distance method (RDM) for measuring pico-second nuclear level lifetimes and its use in nuclear structure studies is reviewed and perspectives for the future are presented. High precision measurements in the mass-130 region, studies of multi-phonon states in rare earth nuclei, the investigation of shape coexistence and the recently discovered phenomenon of 'magnetic rotation' are reviewed. Prospects for lifetime measurements in exotic regions of nuclei such as the measurement of lifetimes in neutron rich nuclei populated via spontaneous and heavy-ion induced fission are discussed. Other prospects include the use of the RDM technique in conjunction with recoil separators. The relevance of these techniques for experiments with radioactive ion beams will be discussed

  16. Positron lifetime measurements on electron irradiated amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, P.; Hautojaervi, P.; Chamberod, A.; Yli-Kauppila, J.; Van Zurk, R.

    1981-08-01

    Great advance in understanding the nature of point defects in crystalline metals has been achieved by employing positron annihilation technique. Positrons detect vacancy-type defects and the lifetime value of trapped positrons gives information on the size of submicroscopic vacancy aglomerates and microvoids. In this paper it is shown that low-temperature electron irradiations can result in a considerable increase in the positron lifetimes in various amorphous alloys because of the formation of vacancy-like defects which, in addition of the pre-existing holes, are able to trap positrons. Studied amorphous alloys were Fe 80 B 20 , Pd 80 Si 20 , Cu 50 Ti 50 , and Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 . Electron irradiations were performed with 3 MeV electrons at 20 K to doses around 10 19 e - /cm 2 . After annealing positron lifetime spectra were measured at 77 K

  17. Lifetime of chaotic attractors in a multidimensional laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pando L, C.L.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    We study the lifetimes of chaotic attractors at crises in a multidimensional laser system. This system describes the CO 2 laser with modulated losses and is known as the four-level model. The critical exponents which are related to the lifetimes of the attractors are estimated in terms of the corresponding eigenvalues and the measured characteristic lifetime in the model. The critical exponents in this model and those of its center manifold version are in good agreement. We conjecture that generically in the four-level model the critical exponents are close to 1/2 at crises. In addition, we compare predictions of a simpler and popular model known as the two-level model with those of the above mentioned models. (author). 21 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  18. Multiphoton autofluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada

    2017-06-01

    The multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging tomograph MPTflex with its flexible 360-deg scan head, articulated arm, and tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cultures. Autofluorescence (AF) lifetime imaging was performed with 250-ps temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution using time-correlated single-photon counting. The two-photon excited AF was based on the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavoproteins. iPS cells generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cocultured with growth-arrested MEFs as feeder cells have been studied. Significant differences on AF lifetime signatures were identified between iPS and feeder cells as well as between their differentiating counterparts.

  19. An improved $\\pi$K atom lifetime measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Yazkov, V

    2016-01-01

    This note describes details of analysis of data samples collected by DIRAC experiment on a Pt target in 2007 and Ni targets in 2008–2010 in order to estimate the lifetime of πK atoms. Experimental results consist of eight distinct data samples: both charge combinations ( π + K − and K + π − atoms) obtained in different experimental conditions corresponding to each year of data taking. Estimations of systematic errors are presented. Taking into account both statistical and systematic uncertainties, the lifetime of πK atoms is estimated by the maximum likelihood method. The above sample comprises the total statistics, available for the analysis, thus the improvement over the previous estimation [1,3] of the πK atom lifetime is achieved.

  20. Optimal Taxation and Social Insurance in a Lifetime Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovenberg, A. Lans; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    Advances in information technology have improved the administrative feasibility of redistribution based on lifetime earnings recorded at the time of retirement. We study optimal lifetime income taxation and social insurance in an economy in which redistributive taxation and social insurance serve......-transfer system does not provide full disability insurance. By offering imperfect insurance and structuring disability benefits so as to enable workers to insure against disability by working harder, social insurance is designed to offset the distortionary impact of the redistributive labor income tax on labor...... to insure (ex ante) against skill heterogeneity as well as disability risk. Optimal disability benefits rise with previous earnings so that public transfers depend not only on current earnings but also on earnings in the past. Hence, lifetime taxation rather than annual taxation is optimal. The optimal tax...

  1. Predicting a future lifetime through Box-Cox transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z

    1999-09-01

    In predicting a future lifetime based on a sample of past lifetimes, the Box-Cox transformation method provides a simple and unified procedure that is shown in this article to meet or often outperform the corresponding frequentist solution in terms of coverage probability and average length of prediction intervals. Kullback-Leibler information and second-order asymptotic expansion are used to justify the Box-Cox procedure. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to evaluate the small sample behavior of the procedure. Certain popular lifetime distributions, such as Weibull, inverse Gaussian and Birnbaum-Saunders are served as illustrative examples. One important advantage of the Box-Cox procedure lies in its easy extension to linear model predictions where the exact frequentist solutions are often not available.

  2. Lifetime of charge carriers in intrinsic indium antimonide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhns, H.; Kruse, H.

    1980-01-01

    The lifetime of additional photoinjected electron-hole pairs in intrinsic InSb at 291 K is investigated by measuring the photoconductive (PC) decay. Apart from studying the usual PC-decay an arangement is used with superimposed magnetic field transverse to the electric field. Depending on the direction of the magnetic field the photoinjected plasma is either driven into the sample's bulk or travels parallel to the illuminated surface. The Auger-lifetime is evaluated from the measurements by a numerical magnetohydrodynamical simulation taking into account surface recombination as well as the Suhl profile of the intrinsic plasma. A lifetime of tau = (57+-3) ns is found which is independent of the magnetic field up to 2.3 T. (author)

  3. Two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy. 2. Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2013-10-03

    In the preceding article, we introduced the theoretical framework of two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (2D FLCS). In this article, we report the experimental implementation of 2D FLCS. In this method, two-dimensional emission-delay correlation maps are constructed from the photon data obtained with the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and then they are converted to 2D lifetime correlation maps by the inverse Laplace transform. We develop a numerical method to realize reliable transformation, employing the maximum entropy method (MEM). We apply the developed actual 2D FLCS to two real systems, a dye mixture and a DNA hairpin. For the dye mixture, we show that 2D FLCS is experimentally feasible and that it can identify different species in an inhomogeneous sample without any prior knowledge. The application to the DNA hairpin demonstrates that 2D FLCS can disclose microsecond spontaneous dynamics of biological molecules in a visually comprehensible manner, through identifying species as unique lifetime distributions. A FRET pair is attached to the both ends of the DNA hairpin, and the different structures of the DNA hairpin are distinguished as different fluorescence lifetimes in 2D FLCS. By constructing the 2D correlation maps of the fluorescence lifetime of the FRET donor, the equilibrium dynamics between the open and the closed forms of the DNA hairpin is clearly observed as the appearance of the cross peaks between the corresponding fluorescence lifetimes. This equilibrium dynamics of the DNA hairpin is clearly separated from the acceptor-missing DNA that appears as an isolated diagonal peak in the 2D maps. The present study clearly shows that newly developed 2D FLCS can disclose spontaneous structural dynamics of biological molecules with microsecond time resolution.

  4. Lifetime Economic Burden of Rape Among U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Cora; DeGue, Sarah; Florence, Curtis; Lokey, Colby N

    2017-06-01

    This study estimated the per-victim U.S. lifetime cost of rape. Data from previous studies was combined with current administrative data and 2011 U.S. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey data in a mathematical model. Rape was defined as any lifetime completed or attempted forced penetration or alcohol- or drug-facilitated penetration, measured among adults not currently institutionalized. Costs included attributable impaired health, lost productivity, and criminal justice costs from the societal perspective. Average age at first rape was assumed to be 18 years. Future costs were discounted by 3%. The main outcome measures were the average per-victim (female and male) and total population discounted lifetime cost of rape. Secondary outcome measures were marginal outcome probabilities among victims (e.g., suicide attempt) and perpetrators (e.g., incarceration) and associated costs. Analysis was conducted in 2016. The estimated lifetime cost of rape was $122,461 per victim, or a population economic burden of nearly $3.1 trillion (2014 U.S. dollars) over victims' lifetimes, based on data indicating >25 million U.S. adults have been raped. This estimate included $1.2 trillion (39% of total) in medical costs; $1.6 trillion (52%) in lost work productivity among victims and perpetrators; $234 billion (8%) in criminal justice activities; and $36 billion (1%) in other costs, including victim property loss or damage. Government sources pay an estimated $1 trillion (32%) of the lifetime economic burden. Preventing sexual violence could avoid substantial costs for victims, perpetrators, healthcare payers, employers, and government payers. These findings can inform evaluations of interventions to reduce sexual violence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A measurement of B$^{+}$ and B$^{0}$ lifetimes using $\\overline{D}$l$^{+}$ events

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fürstenau, H; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, M; McNulty, M; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Ronjin, V M; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stäck, H; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Überschär, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, V; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Wehr, A; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1995-01-01

    A measurement of B meson lifetimes is presented using data collected from 1991 to 1993 by the DELPHI detector at the LEP collider. Samples of events with a D meson and a lepton in the same jet are selected where \\overline{\\mathrm{D}}^0 \\ell^+ and \\mathrm{D}^{*-} \\ell^+ events originate mainly from the semileptonic decays of B^+ and B^0 mesons, respectively. From the reconstructed B decay length and the estimated B momentum, taking into account the dilution due to B decays into \\overline{\\mathrm{D}}^{**} \\ell^+ \

  6. Lifetime measurements of excited states in 196Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotin, H.H.; Katayama, Ichiro; Sakai, Hideyuki; Fujita, Yoshitaka; Fujiwara, Mamoru

    1979-01-01

    The lifetimes of six excited states in 196 Pt up to an excitation energy of 1525 keV were measured by the recoil-distance method (RDM). These levels were populated by Coulomb excitation using both 90 MeV 20 Ne and 220 MeV 58 Ni ion beams. The measured lifetimes of the 2 1 + , 4 1 + , 6 1 + , 2 2 + , 4 2 + and 0 2 + states and the B(E2) values inferred for the depopulating transitions from these levels are presented. With the exception of the 2 1 + state, the meanlives of all other levels are the first such direct experimental determinations to be reported. (author)

  7. MULTI-OBJECTIVE ONLINE OPTIMIZATION OF BEAM LIFETIME AT APS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yipeng

    2017-06-25

    In this paper, online optimization of beam lifetime at the APS (Advanced Photon Source) storage ring is presented. A general genetic algorithm (GA) is developed and employed for some online optimizations in the APS storage ring. Sextupole magnets in 40 sectors of the APS storage ring are employed as variables for the online nonlinear beam dynamics optimization. The algorithm employs several optimization objectives and is designed to run with topup mode or beam current decay mode. Up to 50\\% improvement of beam lifetime is demonstrated, without affecting the transverse beam sizes and other relevant parameters. In some cases, the top-up injection efficiency is also improved.

  8. High Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells with Long Operating Lifetimes

    KAUST Repository

    Peters, Craig H.; Sachs-Quintana, I. T.; Kastrop, John P.; Beaupré , Serge; Leclerc, Mario; McGehee, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells comprising poly[N-9'-hepta-decanyl- 2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2', 1',3'-benzothiadiazole) (PCDTBT) are systematically aged and demonstrate lifetimes approaching seven years, which is the longest reported lifetime for polymer solar cells. An experimental set-up is described that is capable of testing large numbers of solar cells, holding each device at its maximum power point while controlling and monitoring the temperature and light intensity. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A new measurement of the Ξc+ lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOCUS Collaboration; Link, J. M.; Reyes, M.; Yager, P. M.; Anjos, J. C.; Bediaga, I.; Göbel, C.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Pepe, I. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Uribe, C.; Vázquez, F.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J. P.; O'Reilly, B.; Ramirez, J. E.; Vaandering, E. W.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garren, L. A.; Gottschalk, E.; Kasper, P. H.; Kreymer, A. E.; Kutschke, R.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F. L.; Zallo, A.; Cawlfield, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Gardner, R.; Kryemadhi, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Kang, J. S.; Ko, B. R.; Kwak, J. W.; Lee, K. B.; Park, H.; Alimonti, G.; Boschini, M.; Chiodini, G.; D'Angelo, P.; DiCorato, M.; Dini, P.; Giammarchi, M.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Mezzadri, M.; Milazzo, L.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Pontoglio, C.; Prelz, F.; Rovere, M.; Sala, S.; Davenport, T. F.; Agostino, L.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Merlo, M. M.; Pantea, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Segoni, I.; Vitulo, P.; Hernandez, H.; Lopez, A. M.; Mendez, H.; Mendez, L.; Mirles, A.; Montiel, E.; Olaya, D.; Paris, A.; Quinones, J.; Rivera, C.; Xiong, W.; Zhang, Y.; Wilson, J. R.; Cho, K.; Handler, T.; Mitchell, R.; Engh, D.; Hosack, M.; Johns, W. E.; Nehring, M.; Sheldon, P. D.; Stenson, K.; Webster, M.; Sheaff, M.

    2001-12-01

    A precise determination of the charm-strange baryon Ξc+ lifetime is presented. The data were accumulated by the Fermilab high-energy photoproduction experiment FOCUS. The measurement is made with 300Ξc+-->Ξ- π+π+ decays, 130Ξc+-->Σ+K- π+ decays, 45Ξc+-->pK-π+ decays and 58Ξc+-->Λ0K- π+π+ decays. The Ξc+ lifetime is measured to be 0.439+/-0.022+/-0.009 ps.

  10. Weighted oscillator strengths and lifetimes for the S VII spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, F.O.; Cavalcanti, G.H.; Trigueiros, A.G.; Jupen, C.

    2004-01-01

    The weighted oscillator strengths (gf) and the lifetimes presented in this work were carried out in a multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock relativistic approach. In this calculation, the electrostatic parameters were optimized by a least-squares procedure, in order to improve the adjustment to experimental energy levels. This method produces gf-values that are in better agreement with intensity observations and lifetime values that are closer to the experimental ones. In this work, we presented all the experimentally known electric dipole S VII spectral lines

  11. Measurement of the Lifetime of the $\\tau$ Lepton

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Röhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonisch, F; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino

    1996-01-01

    The lifetime of the tau lepton is measured using data collected in 1994 by the L3 detector at LEP. The precise track position information of the Silicon Microvertex Detector is exploited. The tau lepton lifetime is determined from the signed impact parameter distribution for 30 322 tau decays into one charged particle and from the decay length distribution for 3891 tau decays into three charged particles. Combining the two methods we obtain $\\tau_{\\tau}$ = 290.1 $\\pm$ 4.0 fs.

  12. Lifetime estimates for sterilizable silver-zinc battery separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Walmsley, D. E.; Moacanin, J.

    1972-01-01

    The lifetime of separator membranes currently employed in the electrolyte environment of silver-zinc batteries was estimated at 3 to 5 years. The separator membranes are crosslinked polyethylene film containing grafted poly (potassium acrylate)(PKA), the latter being the hydrophilic agent which promotes electrolyte ion transport. The lifetime was estimated by monitoring the rate of loss of PKA from the separators, caused by chemical attack of the electrolyte, and relating this loss rate to a known relationship between battery performance and PKA concentration in the separators.

  13. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-01-01

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom

  14. Spectrum Fatigue Lifetime and Residual Strength for Fiberglass Laminates; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAHL, NEIL K.; MANDELL, JOHN F.; SAMBORSKY, DANIEL D.

    2002-01-01

    This report addresses the effects of spectrum loading on lifetime and residual strength of a typical fiberglass laminate configuration used in wind turbine blade construction. Over 1100 tests have been run on laboratory specimens under a variety of load sequences. Repeated block loading at two or more load levels, either tensile-tensile, compressive-compressive, or reversing, as well as more random standard spectra have been studied. Data have been obtained for residual strength at various stages of the lifetime. Several lifetime prediction theories have been applied to the results. The repeated block loading data show lifetimes that are usually shorter than predicted by the most widely used linear damage accumulation theory, Miner's sum. Actual lifetimes are in the range of 10 to 20 percent of predicted lifetime in many cases. Linear and nonlinear residual strength models tend to fit the data better than Miner's sum, with the nonlinear providing a better fit of the two. Direct tests of residual strength at various fractions of the lifetime are consistent with the residual strength models. Load sequencing effects are found to be insignificant. The more a spectrum deviates from constant amplitude, the more sensitive predictions are to the damage law used. The nonlinear model provided improved correlation with test data for a modified standard wind turbine spectrum. When a single, relatively high load cycle was removed, all models provided similar, though somewhat non-conservative correlation with the experimental results. Predictions for the full spectrum, including tensile and compressive loads were slightly non-conservative relative to the experimental data, and accurately captured the trend with varying maximum load. The nonlinear residual strength based prediction with a power law S-N curve extrapolation provided the best fit to the data in most cases. The selection of the constant amplitude fatigue regression model becomes important at the lower stress, higher

  15. Lifetime Impact Identification for Continuous Improvement of Wind Farm Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kristian R.; Ruitenburg, Richard J.; Madsen, Erik Skov

    2015-01-01

    in the offshore wind industry. In order to identify where to focus CI efforts, we turn to the theory of Asset Life Cycle Management which shows that a shared multidisciplinary understanding of the complete lifetime of a windfarm is critical. Based on a case study at a leading offshore wind farm company......, it is concluded that the Lifetime Impact Identification Analysis delivers such a shared understanding by bringing employees from different backgrounds together. Based on this understanding, CI priorities can be set and management may become proactive instead of having to do ‘fire-fighting’....

  16. A measurement of Rb using a lifetime-mass tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-02-01

    ALEPH's published measurement of Rb = Γ(Z -> bb)/Γ(Z -> hadrons) using a lifetime tag is updated using the full LEP 1 data sample. Considerable effort has been devoted to understanding systematic effects. Charm background is better controlled by combining the lifetime tag with a tag based on the b/c hadron mass difference. Furthermore, the algorithm used to reconstruct the event primary vertex is designed so as to reduce correlations between the two hemispheres of an event. The value of Rb is measured to be 0.2167 +/- 0.0011 (stat) +/- 0.0013 (syst).

  17. Possibility logic applied to pressure vessel residual lifetime prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garribba, S.; Lucia, A.C.; Volta, G.

    1985-01-01

    The adequacy is discussed of a probability measure to deal with the different types of uncertainty affecting any pressure vessel lifetime prediction. A more comprehensive framework derived from the fuzzy set theory and including as particular case possibility and probability measures is considered. With reference to the most critical step of lifetime assessment (the ND inspection), the paper compares the results, obtained adopting a possibility measure or a probability measure, in the representation models, fault tree-event tree, and in the decision models

  18. Measurement of the tau lifetime with the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, Attilio

    2005-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the $e^{+}e^{-}$ to tau /sup +/ tau /sup -/ events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong tau decay channels. These are combined with previously published DELPHI results to provide a tau lifetime measurement of tau /sub tau /=290.9+or-1.4/sub stat/+or-1.0/sub sys/ fs, using the full LEP1 data sample.

  19. Lifetime measurement of the 8s level in francium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, E.; Sprouse, G.D.; Orozco, L.A.; Galvan, A. Perez

    2005-01-01

    We measure the lifetime of the 8s level of 210 Fr atoms on a magneto-optically trapped sample with time-correlated single-photon counting. The 7P 1/2 state serves as the resonant intermediate level for two-step excitation of the 8s level completed with a 1.3-μm laser. Analysis of the fluorescence decay through the 7P 3/2 level gives 53.30±0.44 ns for the 8s level lifetime

  20. Lifetime suicide attempts in juvenile assessment center youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, Scott; McReynolds, Larkin S; DeComo, Robert E; John, Reni; Keating, Joseph M; Wasserman, Gail A

    2008-01-01

    To describe suicide risk in youth seen at a Juvenile Assessment Center (JAC), we examined relationships among self-reported lifetime attempts and demographic, justice, and psychiatric data via logistic regression. Similar to other settings, youth reporting lifetime attempts were more likely to be older, female, not living with both parents and currently arrested for a violent or felony crime. Mood, substance use, and behavior disorder each increased prediction substantially. Anxiety Disorder was associated with elevated attempt rates for boys only. JACs need to develop protocols for identifying suicide risk; further, since suicide history predicts future attempts, Anxiety Disordered boys may be at particular risk.

  1. High Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells with Long Operating Lifetimes

    KAUST Repository

    Peters, Craig H.

    2011-04-20

    Organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells comprising poly[N-9\\'-hepta-decanyl- 2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4\\',7\\'-di-2-thienyl-2\\', 1\\',3\\'-benzothiadiazole) (PCDTBT) are systematically aged and demonstrate lifetimes approaching seven years, which is the longest reported lifetime for polymer solar cells. An experimental set-up is described that is capable of testing large numbers of solar cells, holding each device at its maximum power point while controlling and monitoring the temperature and light intensity. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Injury due to thorotrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takesaburo

    1976-01-01

    A synthetic study was performed on some of those to whom Thorotrast had been injected, in Japan. In the epidemiological study of 147 war woundeds to whom Thorotrast had been injected, it was noted that the Thorotrast injection increased the mortality rate and the incidences of malignant hepatic tumor, liver cirrhosis, and hematological diseases. Clinical study of 44 of them showed that the Thorotrast injection resulted in liver and hematopoietic hypofunctions. Analysis of the dissection of the injected area in 118 cases showed malignant hepatic tumor in 63.5%, liver cirrhosis in 14.4% and hematological diseases in 10.2%. The total of the three types of disease was 88.1%. Histological classification showed that of the malignant hepatic tumors due to Thorotrast, hepatobiliary cancer and hemangioendothelioma of the liver were frequent. By the comparison of the absorbed dose in the liver of the malignant hepatic tumors due to Thorotrast with that of the cancers developed in animal experiments, it was noted that the carcinogenic dose was a mean of 2,000 - 3,000 rad by accumulated dose. It was elucidated that carcinogenesis and fibrination were primary in injury due to Thorotrast, i.e., late injury due to Thorotrast, and that the increase in the accumulated dose in rogans and the increase of the local dose due to the gigantic growth of Thorotrast granules in organs greatly influenced carninogenesis and fibrination. (Chiba, N.)

  3. Impact of lifetime model selections on the reliability prediction of IGBT modules in modular multilevel converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Huai; Wang, Zhongxu

    2017-01-01

    , this paper benchmarks the most commonly-employed lifetime models of power semiconductor devices for offshore Modular Multilevel Converters (MMC) based wind farms. The benchmarking reveals that the lifetime model selection has a significant impact on the lifetime estimation. The use of analytical lifetime...

  4. Anaphylaxis due to caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, Kumiya; Cho, Tatsurai; Tatewaki, Masamitsu; Onishi, Shogo; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Naruo; Fujimatsu, Takayoshi; Hirata, Hirokuni; Fukuda, Takeshi; Fukushima, Yasutsugu

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of anaphylaxis due to caffeine intake. A 27-year-old woman suffered her first episode of anaphylaxis and a positive skin prick test suggested that the anaphylaxis was due to an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to caffeine. She was diagnosed with caffeine allergy and has not had an allergic reaction after avoiding foods and drinks containing caffeine. Although caffeine is known to have antiallergic effects, this case shows that caffeine can be an allergen and cause ...

  5. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: Bc lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the Bc± meson is studied in the Bc± → J/Ψμ± + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/Ψ + μ invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 ± 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: τ(Bc±) = 0.448-0.036+0.038(stat) ± 0.032(sys) ps.

  6. The EPDS-Lifetime: assessment of lifetime prevalence and risk factors for perinatal depression in a large cohort of depressed women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltzer-Brody, S.; Boschloo, L.; Jones, I.; Sullivan, P.F.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal depression (PND) is a common complication of pregnancy and postpartum associated with significant morbidity. We had three goals: (1) to explore the performance of a new lifetime version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS-Lifetime) to assess lifetime prevalence of PND; (2) to

  7. The EPDS-Lifetime : assessment of lifetime prevalence and risk factors for perinatal depression in a large cohort of depressed women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Boschloo, Lynn; Jones, Ian; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Penninx, Brenda W.

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal depression (PND) is a common complication of pregnancy and postpartum associated with significant morbidity. We had three goals: (1) to explore the performance of a new lifetime version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS-Lifetime) to assess lifetime prevalence of PND; (2) to

  8. Development of an NPP residual lifetime evaluation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regano, M.; Ibanez, M.; Hevia, F.

    1993-01-01

    Various reasons have given rise to the need for residual life management of Spain's nuclear power plants which lead to the a project for the development of a residual lifetime evaluation system managed by UNESA and supported by the owner groups. This project is described. 1 fig

  9. Mathematical Model of Lifetime Duration at Insulation of Electrical Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Răduca

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper present a mathematical model of lifetime duration at hydro generator stator winding insulation when at hydro generator can be appear the damage regimes. The estimation to make by take of the programming and non-programming revisions, through the introduction and correlation of the new defined notions.

  10. Suicidal ideation and lifetime attempts in substance and gambling disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Victoria; Koh, Puay Kee; Yang, Yi; Ng, Andrew; Guo, Song; Kandasami, Gomathinayagam; Wong, Kim Eng

    2015-02-28

    Suicidality is more commonly reported among individuals with addictions relative to the general population, though data from Asian countries remain scarce. The medical records of 2187 Singaporean patients with drug (n=879), alcohol (n=754) or gambling (n=554) disorders entering an outpatient treatment service were examined to explore differences in suicidal ideation and lifetime attempts between substance and gambling addictions. The relationship between suicidality, co-morbidity and addiction severity were also examined. 25.0% reported thoughts of suicide in the past month, 11.8% had a suicide plan and 12.2% reported lifetime attempts. Rates of suicidal ideation (thoughts, and plan) but not lifetime attempts were significantly higher among gambling than substance use patients. Co-morbid (DSM-IV axis-1) disorders were found among 32.5%, 38% and 40% of those reporting thoughts, plan and lifetime attempts respectively. Addiction severity was higher and quality of life lower among those reporting suicidal behaviors. Logistic regression revealed co-morbidity, debt, gender (being female) and being a gambling patient as significant predictors of suicidal behaviors. The findings highlight the importance of screening for suicidality, even in the absence of co-morbidity, particularly among gambling disorder patients with debts. Suicide risk should be assessed periodically and referral to suicidal prevention interventions routinely offered to this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of b-flavoured hadron lifetimes at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Ilieva, Simona Ilieva

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this Student Project Note is to describe precise lifetime measurements of b-flavored hadrons at LHCb. The analysis is based on Monte Carlo data simulating Run2 2015 conditions. Decay-time biases introduced at every step of the reconstruction, trigger and selection of candidates are studied. Several methods to correct for Lower acceptance are presented.

  12. Precision lifetime measurements of Ar II 4p doublet levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marger, D.; Schmoranzer, H.

    1990-01-01

    The lifetimes of the Ar II 4p doublet fine-structure levels 4p 2 D 0 5/2 , 4p' 2 F 0 5/2 and 4p' 2 F 0 7/2 were measured by beam-dye laser spectroscopy. The experimental uncertainty was reduced to below 1%. (orig.)

  13. BMI and Lifetime Changes in BMI and Cancer Mortality Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taghizadeh, Niloofar; Boezen, H Marike; Schouten, Jan P; Schröder, Carolien P; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Vonk, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    Body Mass Index (BMI) is known to be associated with cancer mortality, but little is known about the link between lifetime changes in BMI and cancer mortality in both males and females. We studied the association of BMI measurements (at baseline, highest and lowest BMI during the study-period) and

  14. Neutron lifetime and generation time by KENO IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masatoshi

    1991-01-01

    It is believed that Monte Carlo method is suitable to the calculation of neutron lifetime and generation time with reference to the life cycle viewpoint. This paper illustrates that those times obtained by Monte Carlo method are quite different from the results by perturbation method. The neutron lifetime and the generation time for bare and reflected reactors were investigated by the Monte Carlo program, KENO IV. the Monte Carlo procedure is based on tracking and recording the life history of neutrons in a realistic fashion in a fissionable system with minimum nuclear and geometric approximations. The KENO IV provides the multiplication factor, neutron lifetime and generation time simultaneously. The thermal spherical reactors for both bare and reflected reactors were studied using the KENO IV. The reflected reactor is surrounded with 30 cm thick light water. The atomic densities in the regions and the calculated results of the multiplication factor, neutron lifetime and generation time are given. The different definitions of these times between the Monte Carlo method and perturbation theory caused the difference of the results. (K.I.)

  15. Beam lifetime measurement and analysis in Indus-2 electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the beam lifetime measurement and its theoretical analysis are presented using measured vacuum pressure and applied radio frequency (RF) cavity voltage in Indus-2 electron storage ring at 2 GeV beam energy. Experimental studies of the effect of RF cavity voltage and bunched beam filling pattern on beam ...

  16. Existence and lifetime of laser fusion pellets containing tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, J.J.

    1979-05-01

    Cryogenic pellets containing significant amounts of solid tritium cannot be maintained in a pure vacuum for longer than (typically) some tens of seconds because radiative cooling at low temperatures is inefficient. The steady state temperatures in typical one- and two-shell pellet designs both in vacuum and with external cooling, as well as the lifetimes of pellets following cooling removal, are calculated

  17. Determination of the average lifetime of bottom hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Schmitz, D; Siebke, H; Wallraff, W [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentalphysik 1A und 1. Physikalisches Inst.; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1984-12-27

    We have determined the average lifetime of hadrons containing b quarks produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation to be tausub(B)=1.83 x 10/sup -12/ s. Our method uses charged decay products from both non-leptonic and semileptonic decay modes.

  18. Determination of the average lifetime of bottom hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Schmitz, D; Siebke, H; Wallraff, W; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1984-12-27

    We have determined the average lifetime of hadrons containing b quarks produced in e e annihilation to be tausub(B)=1.83x10 S s. Our method uses charged decay products from both non-leptonic and semileptonic decay modes. (orig./HSI).

  19. Lifetimes of superdeformed states in {sup 194}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willsau, P; Hubel, H [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik; Azaiez, F; Deleplanque, M A; Diamond, R M; Korten, W; Macchiavelli, A O; Stephens, F S [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kluge, H [Hahn-Meitner-Institut fuer Kernforschung Berlin G.m.b.H. (Germany); Hannachi, F [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse; Bacelar, J C [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Zernikelaan 25 (Netherlands); Becker, J A; Brinkman, M J; Henry, E A; Kuhnert, A; Wang, T F [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Draper, J A; Rubel, E [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Lifetimes of superdeformed states in {sup 194}Pb were measured by the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Quadrupole moments around 20 eb, that are constant over the observed frequency range, are derived. The results rule out large centrifugal stretching effects. 7 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  20. Lifetime measurements and the nonaxial deformation in 119I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srebrny, J.; Droste, Ch.; Morek, T.; Starosta, K.; Juutinen, S.; Piiparinen, M.

    2000-01-01

    Lifetimes of negative parity levels in four bands in 119 I were determined by RDM and DSAM. The 119 I nuclei were produced in the 109 Ag( 13 C,3n) reaction. Calculations in the frame of the CQPC model show that the model of γ-soft nucleus better describes 119 I than the γ-rigid one. (author)

  1. Lifetime reproductive success in the solitary endoparasitoid, Venturia canescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, J.A.; Harvey, I.F.; Thompson, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps have long been considered excellent organisms in studies examining the evolution of reproductive and life- history strategies. In examining the lifetime reproductive success of parasitoids in the laboratory, most investigations have provided the insects with excess hosts and food,

  2. Effect of material environment on a class of nuclear lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlow, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    The connection between internal conversion of a nuclear transition and EXAFS is pointed out. A prediction is made of sizable variations of lifetimes of nuclear states depending on the surrounding material environment, provided that the transition energy is just above threshold and the internal conversion coefficient is appreciable. 12 refs., 2 figs

  3. Precision measurement of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon lifetime to that of the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson is measured using 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to J/\\psi p K^-$, while the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson decay used is the well known $\\overline{B}^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ K^-$ mode, where the $\\pi^+K^-$ mass is consistent with that of the $\\bar{K}^{*0}(892)$ meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be $0.976\\pm0.012\\pm0.006$, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson lifetime, the $\\Lambda_b^0$ lifetime is found to be $1.482 \\pm 0.018 \\pm 0.012$ ps. In both cases the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  4. Fine-structure energy levels, oscillator strengths and lifetimes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have done relativistic calculations for the evaluation of energy levels, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities and lifetimes for Cr VIII ion. Use has been made of configuration interaction technique by including Briet–Pauli approximation. The energies of various levels from the ground state to excited levels of 3s3p6, ...

  5. Catalyst deterioration over the lifetime of small utility engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Nicholas J; Reisel, John R

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the deterioration of catalysts in small, four-stroke, spark-ignition engines is described. The laboratory testing performed followed a proven test method that mimics the lifetime of a small air-cooled utility engine operating under normal field conditions. The engines used were single-cylinder, 6.5-hp, side-valve engines. These engines have a nominal 125-hr lifetime. The effectiveness of the catalysts was determined by testing exhaust emissions before and after the catalyst to determine the catalyst's efficiency. This was done several times during the lifetime of the engines to determine the deterioration in the performance of the catalysts at lowering pollutant emissions. Additional testing was performed on the catalysts to determine wear patterns, contamination, and recoverable activity. The results indicate that considerable catalyst deterioration is occurring over the lifetime of the engine. The results reveal that soot buildup, poisons, and active surface loss appear to be the contributing factors to the deterioration. These results were determined after analyzing the exhaust emissions data, scanning electron microscope results analysis, and the impact of regeneration attempts. An ANOVA statistical analysis was performed, and it was determined that the emissions are also impacted, to some degree, by time and the engine itself.

  6. Lifetime risk of renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Brand, Jan A J G; Pippias, Maria; Stel, Vianda S

    2017-01-01

    Background: Upcoming KDIGO guidelines for the evaluation of living kidney donors are expected to move towards a personal risk-based evaluation of potential donors. We present the age and sex-specific lifetime risk of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease in 10 European...

  7. A measurement of the neutron lifetime by counting trapped protons

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, W M; Dewey, M S; Fei, X; Gilliam, D M; Greene, G L; Nico, J S; Wietfeldt, F E

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of the neutron lifetime tau sub n performed by trapping and counting decay protons from in-beam neutron decays in a Penning trap is in progress at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A description of the measurement technique, the status of the data analysis, and prospects for improvements in the measurement are discussed.

  8. Lifetime measurement in neutron-rich A ∝ 100 nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, Saba; Jolie, Jan; Regis, Jean-Marc; Saed-Samii, Nima; Warr, Nigel [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Collaboration: EXILL-FATIMA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Rapid shape changes are observed in the region of neutron rich nuclei with a mass around A=100. Precise lifetime measurements are a key ingredient in the systematic study of the evolution of nuclear deformation and the degree of collectivity in this region. Nuclear lifetimes of excited states can be obtained using the fast-timing technique with LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)-scintillators. We used neutron induced fission of {sup 241}Pu in order to study lifetimes of excited states of fission fragments in the A∝100 region. The EXILL-FATIMA array located at the PF1B cold neutron beam line at the Institut Laue-Langevin comprises of 8 BGO-shielded EXOGAM clover detectors and 16 very fast LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)-scintillator detectors, which were installed around the fission target. We have studied the lifetimes of low lying states for the nuclei {sup 98}Zr, {sup 100}Zr and {sup 102}Zr by applying the generalized centroid difference method. In this contribution we report on the used fast-timing setup and present preliminary results for the studied isotopes.

  9. Profiling lifetime episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profiling lifetime episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among patients from rural Sub-Saharan Africa where schistosoma mansoni is endemic. ... female sex, history of blood transfusion, abdominal collaterals, esophageal varices, pattern x periportal fibrosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia) significantly associated ...

  10. Lifetime prediction of ammunition at TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, A.P.M.; Driel, C.A. van; Klerk, W.P.C. de; Keizers, H.L.J.

    2000-01-01

    TNO-PML is an independent R & D organisation, with the Dutch MoD as its most important customer. In 1993, the ‘Lifetime prediction of ammunition’ research programme, funded by the MoD, was started at TNO-PML. One of the reasons for starting this programme was the economical profit that can be made

  11. Extending lifetime of wireless sensor networks using multi-sensor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SOUMITRA DAS

    In this paper a multi-sensor data fusion approach for wireless sensor network based on bayesian methods and ant colony ... niques for efficiently routing the data from source to the BS ... Literature review ... efficient scheduling and lot more to increase the lifetime of ... Nature-inspired algorithms such as ACO algorithms have.

  12. Carbocation lifetimes and entropy of water addition to carbocations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Carbocation lifetimes and entropy of water addition to carbocations dependent on their stability. V JAGANNADHAM. Department of Chemistry, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007, India e-mail: jvandanapu@hotmail.com. MS received 11 January 2002. Abstract. Iminodiazonium ions (α-azidobenzyl carbocations) were ...

  13. Lifetime Prevalence and Socioemotional Effects of Hearing about Community Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Angela; Hurley, Jimmy D.; Shumate, Howard W.; Haden, Sara Chiara

    2006-01-01

    This study extends findings on community violence (CV) exposure in young adults by examining the prevalence, characteristics, and socioemotional effects related to hearing about violence. Surveys of lifetime CV exposure and socioemotional outcomes were completed by 518 male and female undergraduates completed and were divided into groups with…

  14. Characterization of porcine eyes based on autofluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique with ideal characteristics for biological applications. In this study, we propose to characterize three major structures of the porcine eye, the cornea, crystalline lens, and retina using two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2PE-FLIM). Samples were imaged using a laser-scanning microscope, consisting of a broadband sub-15 femtosecond (fs) near-infrared laser. Signal detection was performed using a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector (PML-16PMT). Therefore, spectral analysis of the fluorescence lifetime data was possible. To ensure a correct spectral analysis of the autofluorescence lifetime data, the spectra of the individual endogenous fluorophores were acquired with the 16-channel PMT and with a spectrometer. All experiments were performed within 12h of the porcine eye enucleation. We were able to image the cornea, crystalline lens, and retina at multiple depths. Discrimination of each structure based on their autofluorescence intensity and lifetimes was possible. Furthermore, discrimination between different layers of the same structure was also possible. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first time that 2PE-FLIM was used for porcine lens imaging and layer discrimination. With this study we further demonstrated the feasibility of 2PE-FLIM to image and differentiate three of the main components of the eye and its potential as an ophthalmologic technique.

  15. What Is the Optimal and Sustainable Lifetime of a Mine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich-Wilhelm Wellmer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The first stage of the circular economy, mining, is examined from the perspective of sustainability. The authors discuss how to maximize the use of phosphate rock, a primary commodity. To attract investment capital in a market economy system, a mine has to operate profitably, i.e., its lifetime must be optimized under economic conditions, for example, according to Taylor’s Rule. From a sustainability perspective, however, the lifetime should extend as long as possible and the grades mined be as low as possible. The authors examine methods for optimizing a mine’s lifetime under economic conditions according to practical experience and learning effects to optimize exploration and exploitation. With the condition of sustainability, a recently developed concept of cut-off grade for a layered phosphate deposit is examined and considerations for prolonging a mine’s lifetime are discussed. As there are big losses from the current and potential future value chains above and below the current cut-off grade, we argue that the losses and use efficiency of phosphorus are key parts of a circular economy.

  16. Projected Lifetime Healthcare Costs Associated with HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Miners, Alec; Smith, Colette J

    2015-01-01

    computer simulation model to project the distribution of lifetime outcomes and costs of men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) infected with HIV in 2013 aged 30, over 10,000 simulations. We assumed a resource-rich setting with no loss to follow-up, and that standards and costs of healthcare management remain...

  17. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-06

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  18. Metallized Film Capacitor Lifetime Evaluation and Failure Mode Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gallay, R.

    2015-06-15

    One of the main concerns for power electronic engineers regarding capacitors is to predict their remaining lifetime in order to anticipate costly failures or system unavailability. This may be achieved using a Weibull statistical law combined with acceleration factors for the temperature, the voltage, and the humidity. This paper discusses the different capacitor failure modes and their effects and consequences.

  19. Study of straw chamber lifetime with argon ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cheu, E.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Odian, A.; Pitman, D.; Stockhausen, W.; Toki, W.; Wadley, W.; Wood, C.; Mir, R.

    1989-01-01

    We present detailed laboratory measurements of the lifetime of a small test chamber, simulating the Mark III straw vertex chamber conditions. The tests were carried out with an argon-ethane 50/50 gas mixture at 3 atm absolute pressure and 3.9 kV applied to the wires. After the accumulation of ≅ 0.02 C/cm on a single straw, continuous discharges began. The addition of alcohol or water vapor to the gas mixture was found to extend the lifetime of the straws. Continuous flow of the gas mixture with water vapor through the straws prolonged the lifetime significantly. We present results on the effects of changing the gas mixture inside the straws at regular time intervals. Adding a small percentage of water vapor to the argon-ethane gas and flowing the gas mixture in the straws can improve the lifetime by more than an order of magnitude. An accumulated charge of 1.0 C/cm on a single straw has been obtained. (orig.)

  20. Using Sport Education to Teach the Lifetime Sport of Golf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarboro, Shot; Pritchard, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport activity that can be taught in physical education classes. How one teaches golf in physical education could influence whether students will want to continue to participate outside of physical education. The sport education model (SEM) is an instructional model that promotes student learning in all three domains by ensuring…

  1. Integrated tool for NPP lifetime management in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francia, L. [UNESA, Madrid (Spain); Lopez de Santa Maria, J. [ASCO-Vandellos 2 NPPs l' Hospitalet de l' Infant, Tarragona (Spain); Cardoso, A. [Tecnatom SA, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The project for the Integrated Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management System SIGEVI (Sistema Integrado de GEstion de VIda de Centrales Nucleares) was initiated in April 1998 and finalized in December 2000, the main objective of the project being to develop a computer application facilitating the assessment of the condition and lifetime of nuclear power plant components. This constituted the second phase of a further-reaching project on NPP Lifetime Management. During the first phase of this project, carried out between 1992 and 1995, the methodology and strategy for the lifetime management of the Spanish NPP's were developed. Among others, degradation phenomena were assessed and the most adequate methods for their monitoring were defined. The SIGEVI Project has been performed under the management of UNESA (Spanish Electricity Association) and with the collaboration of different engineering firms and research institutes (Tecnatom, Empresarios Agrupados, Ufisa, Initec and IIT), with Vandellos II as the pilot plant. The rest of the Spanish NPP's have also actively participated through the Project Steering Committee. The following sections describe the scope, the structure and the main functionalities of the system SIGEVI. (authors)

  2. Lifetime analysis for fusion reactor first walls and divertor plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, T.; Tsujimura, S.; Minato, A.; Tone, T.

    1987-01-01

    Lifetime analysis of fusion reactor first walls and divertor plates is performed by (1) a one-dimensional analytical plate model, and (2) a two-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element method. Life-limiting mechanisms and the limits of applicability for these analysis methods are examined. Structural design criteria are also discussed. (orig.)

  3. Designing life-time recycling loops for elastomer products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordermeer, Jacques; Dierkes, Wilma; Blume, Anke; Dijkhuis, Kuno; van Hoek, Hans; Reuvekamp, Louis; Saiwari, Siti

    2017-01-01

    With depletion of natural resources and growing awareness of the limited capabilities of the globe to cope with pollution, the need to design life-time recycling loops for all types of products is steadily increasing. Rubber articles of all sorts and the need for a proper disposal of these at the

  4. The Effect of Polymer Pipe Weld Geometry on Creep Lifetime

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ševčík, Martin; Knésl, Zdeněk; Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 175-178 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC101/09/J027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : creep * stress concentration factor * lifetime * triaxiality Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue , Friction Mechanics

  5. Incorporating Customer Lifetime Value into Marketing Simulation Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Hugh M.; Cannon, James N.; Schwaiger, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Notwithstanding the emerging prominence of customer lifetime value (CLV) and customer equity (CE) in the marketing literature during the past decade, virtually nothing has been done to address these concepts in the literature on simulation and gaming. This article addresses the failing, discussing the nature of CLV and CE and demonstrating how…

  6. Lifetime Estimation of MMC for Offshore Wind Power HVDC Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2014-01-01

    of these could lead to thermo-mechanical fatigues in the components and joints of the power modules and thereby causing reliability challenge. This study focuses on the lifetime evaluation of MMC based on power cycling and thermal cycling considering the mission profiles in the High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC...

  7. Lifetime Estimation of MMC for Offshore Wind Power HVDC Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Qin, Zian

    2016-01-01

    of these could lead to thermomechanical fatigues in the components and joints of the power modules and thereby causing reliability challenge. This study focuses on the lifetime evaluation of MMC based on power cycling and thermal cycling considering the mission profiles in the High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC...

  8. Predicting Customer Lifetime Value in Multi-Service Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.D. Donkers (Bas); P.C. Verhoef (Peter); M.G. de Jong (Martijn)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractCustomer lifetime value (CLV) is a key-metric within CRM. Although, a large number of marketing scientists and practitioners argue in favor of this metric, there are only a few studies that consider the predictive modeling of CLV. In this study we focus on the prediction of CLV in

  9. Measurement of b hadron lifetimes in pp collisions at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny Andres

    2018-01-01

    Precise measurements of the lifetimes of the $B^0$, $B_s^0$, $\\Lambda_b^0$, and $B_c^+$ hadrons using the decay channels $B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^{*}(892)^0$, $B^0 \\to J/\\psi K_s^{0}$, $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi \\phi(1020)$, $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to J/\\psi \\Lambda^0$, and $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+$ were performed. The data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$, was collected by the CMS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ $\\textrm{TeV}$. The $B^0$ lifetime is measured to be $453.0 \\pm 1.6\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 1.5\\textrm{(syst)} $ $\\mu\\textrm{m}$ in $J/\\psi K^{*}(892)^0$ and $457.8 \\pm 2.7\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 2.7\\textrm{(syst)} $ $\\mu\\textrm{m}$ in $J/\\psi K_s^{0}$. The effective lifetime of the $B_s^0$ meson is measured in two decay modes, with contributions from different amounts of the heavy and light eigenstates. This results in two different measured lifetimes: $c\\tau_{B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-} = 502.7 \\pm 10.2\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 3.2\\textrm{(...

  10. DELPHI $\\tau$ lifetime results using all LEP-1 data

    CERN Document Server

    McNulty, R

    2001-01-01

    Using events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995, the tau lepton lifetime has been measured to be (290.7+-1.5+-1.0) fs. Three different methods have been exploited utilising decays of the tau into final states containing one or three charged tracks. (6 refs).

  11. Lifetimes of charged and neutral B hadrons using event topology

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Anykeyev, V B; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fürstenau, H; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stäck, H; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Überschär, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Wehr, A; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zhigunov, V P; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1995-01-01

    The lifetimes of charged and neutral B hadrons have been measured using data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP between 1991 and 1993. B hadrons are tagged as jets with a secondary vertex and the charge of the B candidate is taken to be the sum of the charges of the particles in the secondary vertex. Approximately 1,434,000 multihadronic \\PZz decays yielded 1817 B hadron candidates. The B purity was estimated to be around 99.1\\pm0.3\\%, and 83\\% (70\\%) of the events measured as neutral (charged) came from neutral (charged) B's. The mean lifetimes of charged and neutral B hadrons were found to be \\TAUBC\\pm\\ERRBC\\;(stat.)\\pm\\SYSBC\\;(syst.)~ps and \\TAUBN\\pm\\ERRBN\\;(stat.)\\pm\\SYSBN\\;(syst.)~ps respectively. The ratio of their lifetimes, \\tau_{charged}/\\tau_{neutral}, was \\RAT10^{\\ERRCNP}_{\\ERRCNM}\\;(stat.)\\pm\\SYSR10\\;(syst.). By making assumptions about the \\PsB and \\PlB states, the \\PbBp and \\PbBz meson lifetimes were determined to be \\tau_{{\\rm B}^+}=\\TAUBP\\pm\\ERRBP\\;(stat.)\\pm\\ SYSBP\\;(syst.)~ps and \\tau...

  12. Integrated tool for NPP lifetime management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francia, L.; Lopez de Santa Maria, J.; Cardoso, A.

    2001-01-01

    The project for the Integrated Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management System SIGEVI (Sistema Integrado de GEstion de VIda de Centrales Nucleares) was initiated in April 1998 and finalized in December 2000, the main objective of the project being to develop a computer application facilitating the assessment of the condition and lifetime of nuclear power plant components. This constituted the second phase of a further-reaching project on NPP Lifetime Management. During the first phase of this project, carried out between 1992 and 1995, the methodology and strategy for the lifetime management of the Spanish NPP's were developed. Among others, degradation phenomena were assessed and the most adequate methods for their monitoring were defined. The SIGEVI Project has been performed under the management of UNESA (Spanish Electricity Association) and with the collaboration of different engineering firms and research institutes (Tecnatom, Empresarios Agrupados, Ufisa, Initec and IIT), with Vandellos II as the pilot plant. The rest of the Spanish NPP's have also actively participated through the Project Steering Committee. The following sections describe the scope, the structure and the main functionalities of the system SIGEVI. (authors)

  13. Luminescence and transient lifetime studies for energy transfer of PbS QD films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joanna S.; Ullrich, Bruno; Dass, Chandriker K.; Das, Anirban; Wai, Chien M.; Brown, Gail J.; Hendrickson, Joshua R.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum confined semiconductor materials in colloidal form have drawn great attention in scientific communities due to the size-tunability, which controls their optical properties. PbS quantum dots (QDs) are exciting candidates for quantum optics, particularly due to the control of the QD sizes during the synthetic process enabling the realization of precisely tunable emission properties in the near-infrared region. Differently sized pairs of PbS QDs were deposited onto glass substrates to form thin films using supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) deposition and solvent deposition methods (SDM). The fluorescence and photoluminescence (PL) spectra obtained from these closely packed films prepared by the sc-CO2 method reveal effective Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two different sized dots, while the films composed of three different QD sizes show an even more effective FRET from the smallest to the largest ones. Energy transfer can be observed more directly by temporally resolved PL decay of mixed dots. By means of transient lifetime measurements, a mixed PbS film with 3.1 and 4.7 nm QDs was studied for FRET by time correlated single photon counting. The PL peak of the 3.1 nm QDs is quenched with respect to the emission of the 4.7 nm QDs and decays faster, and the best fit for the lifetime (decay constant)-1 is a biexponential decay mode. The long wavelength decay (4.7 nm QDs) is best fit by a mono-exponential equation. More theoretical and experimental work is required for a thorough understanding of the radiative lifetimes of PbS QDs in mixed QD systems.

  14. Proton decay due to operators of dimension 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, T.M.; Vysotskii, M.I.

    1983-01-01

    Proton decay in supersymmetric unified theories due to operators with d = 5 is studied. The matrix elements of these operators are calculated. The experimental limit on the proton lifetime leads to the following bound on the Majorana mass of the W bosino: M/sub lambdaW/ + ν/sub μ/. For M/sub lambdag/ = 12 GeV, tau/sub p/ = 10 31 yr

  15. Quantum-electrodynamic influences on the lifetime of metastable states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, G.

    2007-01-01

    High-precision lifetime measurements of the metastable 1s 2 2s 2 2p 2 P 0 3/2 level in boronlike Ar XIV and the 3s 2 2p 2 P 0 3/2 level in aluminumlike Fe XIV were performed at the Heidelberg electron beam ion trap (HD-EBIT). The lifetimes were inferred by monitoring their optical decay curves resulting from the magnetic dipole (M1) transition 1s 2 2s 2 2p 2 P 0 3/2 - 2 P 0 1/2 and 3s 2 3p 2 P 0 3/2 - 2 P 0 1/2 to the ground state configuration with transition wavelengths of 441.256 nm and 530.29 nm, respectively. Possible systematic error sources were investigated by studying the dependence of the decay times of the curves on various trapping conditions with high statistical significance. A new trapping scheme for lifetime measurements at an EBIT has been applied and allowed to reach an unprecedented precision in the realm of lifetime determinations on highly charged ions. The results of 9.573(4)( +12 -5 ) ms (stat)(syst) for Ar XIV and 16.726(10)(+17) ms (stat)(syst) for Fe XIV with a relative accuracy of 0.14% and 0.13%, respectively, make these measurements for the first time sensitive to quantum electrodynamic effects like the electron anomalous magnetic moment (EAMM). The results, improving the accuracy of previous measurements by factors of 10 and 6, respectively, show a clear discrepancy of about 3σ and 4σ to the trend of existing theoretical models, which in almost all cases predict a shorter lifetime, when adjusted for the EAMM. The obvious disagreement between experimental results and the predictions points at the incompleteness of the theoretical models used. (orig.)

  16. Future transportation: Lifetime considerations and framework for sustainability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeting, Walter J.; Winfield, Patricia H.

    2012-01-01

    Modern society cannot exist without mobility. It is now essential to maintain access to everyday necessities, as well as being a vital part of most economies. However, our current transportation system is placing unsustainable demands on finite resources of fossil fuels, minerals and materials; change is therefore essential. Identifying rational choices is difficult because a future transport option must not only abate these demands over the entire lifetime, but do so at an affordable cost whilst maintaining acceptable levels of utility. This paper offers a framework to evaluate powertrains for whole life criteria, in order to help validate current and future developments. It supports integrated comparisons of both fuel and vehicle technology combinations for cost, energy and greenhouse gas emissions throughout a vehicles lifetime. Case studies illustrate the use of this framework. All powertrains were found to require considerable amounts of energy and emit some emissions over their whole lifetime. Significant benefits over incumbent vehicles were found to be potentially attainable through the use of alternative powertrains. However, the majority of these benefits were currently found to increase user costs, worsen the vehicle production impacts and be heavily reliant on the source of the vehicles in-use energy. - Highlight: ► Cost, energy and GHG emissions throughout a vehicle’s lifetime are evaluated. ► This paper offers a structure to evaluate powertrains for whole life criteria. ► Substantial amounts of energy and emissions were evident for all options. ► Significant environmental benefits over incumbent vehicles were found. ► In-use benefits were shown to shift impacts to other phases of a vehicle’s lifetime.

  17. A Measurement of the Bs Lifetime at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Sinead [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the proper lifetime of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF experiment at Fermilab. The B$0\\atop{s}$ meson lifetime is measured in its semileptonic decay mode, B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ+vD$-\\atop{s}$. The D$-\\atop{s}$ meson candidates are reconstructed in the decay mode D$-\\atop{s}$ → Φπ, with Φ → K+K-, in a trigger sample which requires a muon or an electron and another track which has a large impact parameters. The large impact parameter track is required by the silicon vertex trigger which is an innovative triggering device which has not previously been used in lifetime measurements. A total of 905 ± B$0\\atop{s}$ candidates are reconstructed in a sample which has an integrated luminosity of 140 pb-1 using data gathered between February 2002 and August 2003. The pseudo-proper lifetime distribution of these candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit. This fit takes into account the missing momentum carried by the neutrino and the bias caused by requiring a track with large impact parameter by modeling these effects in simulations. The fit yields the result for the B$0\\atop{s}$ proper lifetime: cτ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 419 ± 28$+16\\atop{-13}$ μm and τ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 1.397 ± 0.093$+0.053\\atop{-0.043}$ ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  18. Lifetime measurements of the excited states in {sup 145} Sm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, A M; Abdel Samie, Sh; Ahmad, A A [Depatment of Physics, Faculty of Science, ElMinia University, ElMinia, (Egypt); Kuroyanagi, T; Odahara, A; Gono, Y; Morinobu, S [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kyushu University, (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Lifetime of the excited levels in {sup 145} Sm has been measured through the {sup 139} La ({sup 10} B, 4 n){sup 145} Sm nuclear reaction. The optimal beam energy of 49 MeV was determined from the measurements of the excitation function and Cascade program. With the possibility of studying lifetime of this nucleus a conventional plunger system have been designed and constructed at kyushu University tandem accelerator laboratory. A La target of 0.22 mg/cm{sup 2} thickness which was evaporated onto a Au foil of 2 mg/cm{sup 2} thickness was used. Since the recoil velocity was estimated to be 1.76 mm/ns (beta 0.00585), the measurable time range resulted in the range from 5 Ps to 5 ns. The single spectra measurements were performed at the 20 plunger positions in the range from 10 {mu} to 10 mm. Analyses of the data were carried using hypermet and/or GF2 program to obtain the lifetimes. A new list of lifetimes for 12 excited states up to 3.922 MeV excitations for {sup 145} Sm were determined for the first time. Decay curves of the these transitions are discussed. The new lifetimes of excited states in {sup 145} Sm enabled us to understand the electromagnetic properties. The deduced transition probabilities were established and compared with that of N = 83 isotones and the closed shell nucleus {sup 144} Sm. In addition, a nuclear structure of {sup 145} Sm have been discussed and proposed in framework of the shell model. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Societal and Family Lifetime Cost of Dementia: Implications for Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, Eric; Kane, Robert L; Gaugler, Joseph E; MacLehose, Richard F; Dowd, Bryan; Kuntz, Karen M

    2017-10-01

    To estimate the cost of dementia and the extra cost of caring for someone with dementia over the cost of caring for someone without dementia. We developed an evidence-based mathematical model to simulate disease progression for newly diagnosed individuals with dementia. Data-driven trajectories of cognition, function, and behavioral and psychological symptoms were used to model disease progression and predict costs. Using modeling, we evaluated lifetime and annual costs of individuals with dementia, compared costs of those with and without clinical features of dementia, and evaluated the effect of reducing functional decline or behavioral and psychological symptoms by 10% for 12 months (implemented when Mini-Mental State Examination score ≤21). Mathematical model. Representative simulated U.S. incident dementia cases. Value of informal care, out-of-pocket expenditures, Medicaid expenditures, and Medicare expenditures. From time of diagnosis (mean age 83), discounted total lifetime cost of care for a person with dementia was $321,780 (2015 dollars). Families incurred 70% of the total cost burden ($225,140), Medicaid accounted for 14% ($44,090), and Medicare accounted for 16% ($52,540). Costs for a person with dementia over a lifetime were $184,500 greater (86% incurred by families) than for someone without dementia. Total annual cost peaked at $89,000, and net cost peaked at $72,400. Reducing functional decline or behavioral and psychological symptoms by 10% resulted in $3,880 and $680 lower lifetime costs than natural disease progression. Dementia substantially increases lifetime costs of care. Long-lasting, effective interventions are needed to support families because they incur the most dementia cost. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Calculating excess lifetime risk in relative risk models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeth, M.; Pierce, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    When assessing the impact of radiation exposure it is common practice to present the final conclusions in terms of excess lifetime cancer risk in a population exposed to a given dose. The present investigation is mainly a methodological study focusing on some of the major issues and uncertainties involved in calculating such excess lifetime risks and related risk projection methods. The age-constant relative risk model used in the recent analyses of the cancer mortality that was observed in the follow-up of the cohort of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is used to describe the effect of the exposure on the cancer mortality. In this type of model the excess relative risk is constant in age-at-risk, but depends on the age-at-exposure. Calculation of excess lifetime risks usually requires rather complicated life-table computations. In this paper we propose a simple approximation to the excess lifetime risk; the validity of the approximation for low levels of exposure is justified empirically as well as theoretically. This approximation provides important guidance in understanding the influence of the various factors involved in risk projections. Among the further topics considered are the influence of a latent period, the additional problems involved in calculations of site-specific excess lifetime cancer risks, the consequences of a leveling off or a plateau in the excess relative risk, and the uncertainties involved in transferring results from one population to another. The main part of this study relates to the situation with a single, instantaneous exposure, but a brief discussion is also given of the problem with a continuous exposure at a low-dose rate