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Sample records for mexico hydrates research

  1. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  2. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  3. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in

  4. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period

  5. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many

  6. Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutken, Carol [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States). Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology (CMRET)

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert “Bob” Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station

  7. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2

  9. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS

  10. Results at Mallik highlight progress in gas hydrate energy resource research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    The recent studies that project the role of gas hydrates in the future energy resource management are reviewed. Researchers have long speculated that gas hydrates could eventually be a commercial resource for the future. A Joint Industry Project led by ChevronTexaco and the US Department of Energy is designed to characterize gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. Countries including Japan, canada, and India have established large gas hydrate research and development projects, while China, Korea and Mexico are investigating the viability of forming government-sponsored gas hydrate research projects.

  11. Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E. (Chevron); Latham, T. (Chevron); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Hunt, J. (Minerals Management Service); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger); Boswell, R.M. (NETL); Rose, K.K. (NETL); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Hutchinson, D. (USGS); Collett, T. (USGS); Dugan, B. (Rice University); Wood, W. (Naval Research Laboratory)

    2008-05-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand

  12. Oil & Natural Gas Technology A new approach to understanding the occurrence and volume of natural gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico using petroleum industry well logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Ann [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Majumdar, Urmi [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The northern Gulf of Mexico has been the target for the petroleum industry for exploration of conventional energy resource for decades. We have used the rich existing petroleum industry well logs to find the occurrences of natural gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We have identified 798 wells with well log data within the gas hydrate stability zone. Out of those 798 wells, we have found evidence of gas hydrate in well logs in 124 wells (15% of wells). We have built a dataset of gas hydrate providing information such as location, interval of hydrate occurrence (if any) and the overall quality of probable gas hydrate. Our dataset provides a wide, new perspective on the overall distribution of gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico and will be the key to future gas hydrate research and prospecting in the area.

  13. GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

    2004-11-01

    The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically

  14. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  15. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  16. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  17. Deep-towed CSEM survey of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannberg, P.; Constable, S.

    2017-12-01

    Controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) surveys are increasingly being used to remotely detect hydrate deposits in seafloor sediments. CSEM methods are sensitive to sediment pore space resistivity, such as when electrically resistive hydrate displaces the electrically conductive pore fluid, increasing the bulk resistivity of the sediment. In July 2017, a two-week research cruise using an upgraded and expanded "Vulcan" towed receiver system collected over 250 line km of data at four sites in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) thought to have hydrate bearing sediments. Hydrate bearing horizons at the survey sites ranged from 400-700 m below seafloor. Modeling suggested an array with source receiver offsets of up to 1600 m would be needed to properly image the deep hydrate. A deep towed electromagnetic transmitter outputting 270 Amps was towed 100 m above seafloor. Six Vulcan receivers, each recording three-axis electric field data, were towed at 200 m intervals from 600-1600 m behind the transmitter. The four sites surveyed, Walker Ridge 313, Orca Basin, Mad Dog, and Green Canyon 955, are associated with the upcoming GOM^2 coring operation scheduled for 2020. Wells at WR313 and GC955 were logged as part of a joint industry drilling project in 2009 and will be used to ground truth our inversion results. In 2008, WR313 and GC955 were surveyed using traditional CSEM seafloor receivers, accompanied by a single prototype Vulcan towed receiver. This prior survey will allow comparison of results from a seafloor receiver survey with those from a towed receiver survey. Seismic data has been collected at all the sites, which will be used to constrain inversions. In addition to the four hydrate sites surveyed, two lines were towed over Green Knoll, a deep-water salt dome located between Mad Dog and GC955. Presented here are initial results from our recent cruise.

  18. Gas Hydrate Characterization from a 3D Seismic Dataset in the Eastern Deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Dan

    2017-10-26

    The presence of a gas hydrate petroleum system and seismic attributes derived from 3D seismic data are used for the identification and characterization of gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater eastern Gulf of Mexico. In the central deepwater Gulf of Mexico (GoM), logging while drilling (LWD) data provided insight to the amplitude response of gas hydrate saturation in sands, which could be used to characterize complex gas hydrate deposits in other sandy deposits. In this study, a large 3D seismic data set from equivalent and distal Plio-Pleistocene sandy channel deposits in the deepwater eastern Gulf of Mexico is screened for direct hydrocarbon indicators for gas hydrate saturated sands.

  19. Three types of gas hydrate reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico identified in LWD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Woong; Collett, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    High quality logging-while-drilling (LWD) well logs were acquired in seven wells drilled during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II in the spring of 2009. These data help to identify three distinct types of gas hydrate reservoirs: isotropic reservoirs in sands, vertical fractured reservoirs in shale, and horizontally layered reservoirs in silty shale. In general, most gas hydratebearing sand reservoirs exhibit isotropic elastic velocities and formation resistivities, and gas hydrate saturations estimated from the P-wave velocity agree well with those from the resistivity. However, in highly gas hydrate-saturated sands, resistivity-derived gas hydrate-saturation estimates appear to be systematically higher by about 5% over those estimated by P-wave velocity, possibly because of the uncertainty associated with the consolidation state of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Small quantities of gas hydrate were observed in vertical fractures in shale. These occurrences are characterized by high formation resistivities with P-wave velocities close to those of water-saturated sediment. Because the formation factor varies significantly with respect to the gas hydrate saturation for vertical fractures at low saturations, an isotropic analysis of formation factor highly overestimates the gas hydrate saturation. Small quantities of gas hydrate in horizontal layers in shale are characterized by moderate increase in P-wave velocities and formation resistivities and either measurement can be used to estimate gas hydrate saturations.

  20. Subsurface gas hydrates in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Collett, Timothy S.; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; McConnell, Daniel R.; Shelander, Dianna

    2012-01-01

    The northernGulf of Mexico (GoM) has long been a focus area for the study of gashydrates. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, work focused on massive gashydrates deposits that were found to form at and near the seafloor in association with hydrocarbon seeps. However, as global scientific and industrial interest in assessment of the drilling hazards and resource implications of gashydrate accelerated, focus shifted to understanding the nature and abundance of "buried" gashydrates. Through 2005, despite the drilling of more than 1200 oil and gas industry wells through the gashydrate stability zone, published evidence of significant sub-seafloor gashydrate in the GoM was lacking. A 2005 drilling program by the GoM GasHydrate Joint Industry Project (the JIP) provided an initial confirmation of the occurrence of gashydrates below the GoM seafloor. In 2006, release of data from a 2003 industry well in Alaminos Canyon 818 provided initial documentation of gashydrate occurrence at high concentrations in sand reservoirs in the GoM. From 2006 to 2008, the JIP facilitated the integration of geophysical and geological data to identify sites prospective for gashydrate-bearing sands, culminating in the recommendation of numerous drilling targets within four sites spanning a range of typical deepwater settings. Concurrent with, but independent of, the JIP prospecting effort, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted a preliminary assessment of the GoM gashydratepetroleum system, resulting in an estimate of 607 trillion cubic meters (21,444 trillion cubic feet) gas-in-place of which roughly one-third occurs at expected high concentrations in sand reservoirs. In 2009, the JIP drilled seven wells at three sites, discovering gashydrate at high saturation in sand reservoirs in four wells and suspected gashydrate at low to moderate saturations in two other wells. These results provide an initial confirmation of the complex nature and occurrence of gashydrate-bearing sands in

  1. Multicomponent seismic methods for characterizing gas hydrate occurrences and systems in deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Hardage, Bob A.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ characterization and quantification of natural gas hydrate occurrences remain critical research directions, whether for energy resource, drilling hazard, or climate-related studies. Marine multicomponent seismic data provide the full seismic wavefield including partial redundancy, and provide a promising set of approaches for gas hydrate characterization. Numerous authors have demonstrated the possibilities of multicomponent data at study sites around the world. We expand on this work by investigating the utility of very densely spaced (10’s of meters) multicomponent receivers (ocean-bottom cables, OBC, or ocean-bottom seismometers, OBS) for gas hydrate studies in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Advanced processing techniques provide high-resolution compressional-wave (PP) and converted shearwave (PS) reflection images of shallow stratigraphy, as well as P-wave and S-wave velocity estimates at each receiver position. Reflection impedance estimates can help constrain velocity and density, and thus gas hydrate saturation. Further constraint on velocity can be determined through identification of the critical angle and associated phase reversal in both PP and PS wideangle data. We demonstrate these concepts with examples from OBC data from the northeast Green Canyon area and numerically simulated OBS data that are based on properties of known gas hydrate occurrences in the southeast (deeper water) Green Canyon area. These multicomponent data capabilities can provide a wealth of characterization and quantification information that is difficult to obtain with other geophysical methods.

  2. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-07-15

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  3. Research opportunities in salt hydrates for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, J.

    1983-11-01

    The state of the art of salt hydrates as phase change materials for low temperature thermal energy storage is reviewed. Phase equilibria, nucleation behavior and melting kinetics of the commonly used hydrate are summarized. The development of efficient, reliable inexpensive systems based on phase change materials, especially salt hydrates for the storage (and retrieval) of thermal energy for residential heating is outlined. The use of phase change material thermal energy storage systems is not yet widespread. Additional basic research is needed in the areas of crystallization and melting kinetics, prediction of phase behavior in ternary systems, thermal diffusion in salt hydrate systems, and in the physical properties pertinent to nonequilibrium and equilibrium transformations in these systems.

  4. Constraining gas hydrate occurrence in the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope : fine scale analysis of grain-size in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangsterfer, A.; Driscoll, N.; Kastner, M. [Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States). Geosciences Research Division

    2008-07-01

    Methane hydrates can form within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) in sea beds. The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) contains an underlying petroleum system and deeply buried, yet dynamic salt deposits. Salt tectonics and fluid expulsion upward through the sediment column result in the formation of fractures, through which high salinity brines migrate into the GHSZ, destabilizing gas hydrates. Thermogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons also migrate to the seafloor along the GOMs northern slope, originating from the thermal and biogenic degradation of organic matter. Gas hydrate occurrence can be controlled by either primary permeability, forming in coarse-grained sediment layers, or by secondary permeability, forming in areas where hydrofracture and faulting generate conduits through which hydrocarbon-saturated fluids flow. This paper presented a study that attempted to determine the relationship between grain-size, permeability, and gas hydrate distribution. Grain-size analyses were performed on cores taken from Keathley Canyon and Atwater Valley in the GOM, on sections of cores that both contained and lacked gas hydrate. Using thermal anomalies as proxies for the occurrence of methane hydrate within the cores, samples of sediment were taken and the grain-size distributions were measured to see if there was a correlation between gas hydrate distribution and grain-size. The paper described the methods, including determination of hydrate occurrence and core analysis. It was concluded that gas hydrate occurrence in Keathley Canyon and Atwater Valley was constrained by secondary permeability and was structurally controlled by hydrofractures and faulting that acted as conduits through which methane-rich fluids flowed. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  5. Cruise report for a seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Mississippi Canyon region, northern Gulf of Mexico; cruise M1-98-GM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alan K.; Hart, Patrick E.; Pecher, Ingo

    1998-01-01

    During June 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of Mississippi Marine Minerals Technology Center (MMTC) conducted a 12-day cruise in the Mississippi Canyon region of the Gulf of Mexico (Fig. 1). The R/V Tommy Munro, owned by the Marine Research Institute of the University of Southern Mississippi, was chartered for the cruise. The general objective was to acquire very high resolution seismic-reflection data across of the upper and middle continental slope (200-1200-m water depths) to study the acoustic character, distribution and potential effects of gas hydrates within the shallow subsurface, extending from the sea floor down to the base of the gas-hydrate stability zone. The Gulf of Mexico is well known for hydrocarbon resources that include petroleum and related gases. Areas of the Gulf that lie in waters deeper than about 250 m potentially have conditions (e.g., pressure, temperature, near-surface gas content, etc.) that are right for the shallow-subsurface formation of the ice-like substance (gas and water) known as gas hydrate (Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrates have previously been sampled in sea-floor cores and observed as massive mounds in several parts of the northern Gulf, including the Mississippi Canyon region (e.g., Anderson et al., 1992). Extensive seismic data have been recorded in the Gulf, in support of commercial drilling efforts, but few very high resolution data exist in the public domain to aid in gas-hydrate studies. Studies of long-term interest include those on the resource potential of gas hydrates, the geologic hazards associated with dissociation and formation of hydrates, and the impact, if any, of gas-hydrate dissociation on atmospheric warming (i.e., via release of methane, a "greenhouse" gas). Several very high resolution seismic systems (surface-towed, deep-towed, and sea-floor) were used during the cruise to test the feasibility of using such data for detailed structural (geometric) and stratigraphic (physical

  6. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Wyung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gas hydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gas hydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gas hydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP Leg II effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  7. Low temperature X-ray diffraction studies of natural gas hydrate samples from the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawn, C.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.; Sassen, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Geochemical and Environmental Research Group; Ulrich, S.M.; Phelps, T.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Div.; Chakoumakos, B.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Neutron Scattering Science Div.; Payzant, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science

    2008-07-01

    Quantitative studies of natural clathrate hydrates are hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining pristine samples for the sea floor without comprising their integrity. This paper discussed X-ray power diffraction studies conducted to measure natural gas hydrate samples obtained from the Green Canyon in the Gulf of Mexico. Data on the hydrate deposits were initially collected in 2002. The X-ray diffraction data were collected in order to examine the structure 2 (s2) gas hydrates as functions of temperature and time. A diffractometer with a theta-theta goniometer modified with a helium closed cycle refrigerator and temperature controller was used. Aragonite, quartz and halite phases were determined in the decomposed sample. Refined phase fractions for both the ice and the s2 hydrate were obtained as a function of temperature. Results of the study demonstrated that the amount of hydrates decreased with increasing temperatures and amounts of time. Large pieces of the hydrate showed heterogenous ice content. Dissociation rates were higher at lower temperatures. It was concluded that unusual trends observed for the smaller lattice parameter of the hydrates resulted from the formation of ice layers that acted as barriers to the released gases and caused increased isostatic pressures around the hydrate core. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Hydrate-bearing Submarine Landslides in the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, D.; Mason, A.; Cook, A.; Portnov, A.; Hillman, J.

    2017-12-01

    The co-occurrence of submarine landslides and hydrate-bearing sediment suggests that hydrates may play a role in landslide triggering and/or the mobility and dynamic characteristics of the submarine landslide. In turn, the removal of large sections of seafloor perturbs the hydrate stability field by removing overburden pressure and disturbing the temperature field. These potential hydrate-landslide feedbacks are not well understood. Here we combine three-dimensional seismic and petrophysical logs to characterize the deposits of submarine landslides that failed from hydrate-bearing sediments in the Orca Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The Orca Basin contains a regionally mappable bottom simulating reflector, hydrate saturations within sands and muds, as well as numerous landslides. In addition, the Orca Basin features a well-known 123 km2 anoxic hypersaline brine pool that is actively being fed by outcropping salt. Lying at the bottom of the brine pool are deposits of submarine landslides. Slope instability in the Orca Basin is likely associated with near-seafloor salt tectonics. The most prominent landslide scar observable on the seafloor has a correlative deposit that now lies at the bottom of the brine pool 11.6 km away. The headwall is amphitheater-shaped with an average height of 80 meters and with only a minor amount of rubble remaining near the headwall. A total of 8.7 km3 of material was removed and deposited between the lower slopes of the basin and the base of the brine pool. Around the perimeter of the landslide headwall, two industry wells were drilled and well logs show elevated resistivity that are likely caused by gas hydrate. The slide deposits have a chaotic seismic facies with large entrained blocks and the headwall area does not retain much original material, which together suggests a relatively mobile style of landslide and therefore may have generated a wave upon impacting the brine pool. Such a slide-induced wave may have sloshed

  9. Sedimentological Characterization of a Deepwater Methane Hydrate Reservoir in Green Canyon 955, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    Grain size is a controlling factor of hydrate saturation within a Pleistocene channel-levee system investigated by the UT-GOM2-1 expedition within the deepwater northern Gulf of Mexico. Laser diffraction and settling experiments conducted on sediments from 413-440 meters below the seafloor reveal the presence of two interbedded lithologic units, identified as a silty sand and a clayey silt, according Shepard's classification system. The sand-rich lithofacies has low density and high p-wave velocity, suggesting a high degree of hydrate saturation. Conversely, the clay and silt dominated lithofacies is characterized by a higher density and low p-wave velocity, suggesting low hydrate saturation. The sand-rich lithofacies is well-sorted and displays abundant ripple lamination, indicative of deposition within a high-energy environment. The clayey-silt is poorly-sorted and lacks sedimentary structures. The two lithofacies are interbedded throughout the reservoir unit; however, the relative abundance of the sand-rich lithofacies increases with depth, suggesting a potential decrease in flow energy or sediment flux over time, resulting in the most favorable reservoir properties near the base of the unit.

  10. Gas Hydrate Research Database and Web Dissemination Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheal Frenkel; Kenneth Kroenlein; V Diky; R.D. Chirico; A. Kazakow; C.D. Muzny; M. Frenkel

    2009-09-30

    To facilitate advances in application of technologies pertaining to gas hydrates, a United States database containing experimentally-derived information about those materials was developed. The Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database (NIST Standard Reference Database {number_sign} 156) was developed by the TRC Group at NIST in Boulder, Colorado paralleling a highly-successful database of thermodynamic properties of molecular pure compounds and their mixtures and in association with an international effort on the part of CODATA to aid in international data sharing. Development and population of this database relied on the development of three components of information-processing infrastructure: (1) guided data capture (GDC) software designed to convert data and metadata into a well-organized, electronic format, (2) a relational data storage facility to accommodate all types of numerical and metadata within the scope of the project, and (3) a gas hydrate markup language (GHML) developed to standardize data communications between 'data producers' and 'data users'. Having developed the appropriate data storage and communication technologies, a web-based interface for both the new Clathrate Hydrate Physical Property Database, as well as Scientific Results from the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program was developed and deployed at http://gashydrates.nist.gov.

  11. Broadband Seismic Studies at the Mallik Gas Hydrate Research Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L. F.; Huang, J.; Lyons-Thomas, P.; Qian, W.; Milkereit, B.; Schmitt, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    The JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 3L-38, 4L-38 and 5L-38 scientific wells were drilled in the MacKenzie Delta, NWT, Canada in early 2002 primarily for carrying out initial tests of the feasibility of producing methane gas from the large gas hydrate deposits there [1]. As part of this study, high resolution seismic profiles, a pseudo-3D single fold seismic volume and broadband (8~180Hz) multi-offset vertical seismic profiles (VSP) were acquired at the Mallik site. Here, we provide details on the acquisition program, present the results of the 2D field profile, and discuss the potential implications of these observations for the structure of the permafrost and gas hydrate zones. These zones have long been problematic in seismic imaging due to the lateral heterogeneities. Conventional seismic data processing usually assume a stratified, weak-contrast elastic earth model. However, in permafrost and gas hydrate zones this approximation often becomes invalid. This leads to seismic wave scattering caused by multi-scale perturbation of elastic properties. A 3D viscoelastic finite difference modeling algorithm was employed to simulate wave propagation in a medium with strong contrast. Parameters in this modeling analysis are based on the borehole geophysical log data. In addition, an uncorrelated Vibroseis VSP data set was studied to investigate frequency-dependent absorption and velocity dispersion. Our results indicate that scattering and velocity dispersion are important for a better understanding of attenuation mechanisms in heterogeneous permafrost and gas hydrate zones. [1] Dallimore, S.R., Collett, T.S., Uchida, T., and Weber, M., 2005, Overview of the science program for the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program; in Scientific Results from Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate production Research Well Program, MacKenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, (ed.) S.R. Dallimore and T.S. Collett; Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 585, in press.

  12. Seismic Characterization of the Terrebonne Mini-basin, a Hydrate Rich Depositional System in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafov, L. N.; Eze, P. C.; Haines, S. S.; Graham, S. A.; McHargue, T.; Hosford Scheirer, A.

    2017-12-01

    Natural gas bearing hydrates are a focus of research as a potential source of energy and carbon storage because they occur globally in permafrost regions and marine sediment along every continent. This study focuses on the structural and stratigraphic architecture of the Terrebonne mini-basin, northwest Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, to characterize the depositional architecture and to describe possible migration pathways for petroleum. Questions addressed include: a) continuity of sand layers b) effects of faulting and c) ponding versus fill and spill. To address these questions, seven of forty-two high resolution USGS 2D seismic lines were interpreted and then verified with WesternGeco 3D seismic data, yielding three qualitative models for the depositional environment of hydrate-bearing sand intervals. Deeper hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs were deposited as sheet-like turbidite lobes. Two shallower hydrate-bearing intervals display two possible depositional systems which form reservoirs- 1) sandy to muddy channel sealed laterally by muddy levees with associated sandy crevasse splays, and 2) ponded sandy lobes cut by channels filled with sand lags and mud. Additional observations in the 2D seismic include mass transport deposits and possible contourites. Salt movement facilitated mini-basin formation which was then ponded by sediment and followed by episodes of fill-and-spill and erosion. These seismic interpretations indicate periodic salt uplift. Overturn of salt along the northwestern edge of the basin resulted in thrust faults. The faults and erosional surfaces act as seals to reservoirs. The greatest volume of sandy reservoir potential occurs in sheet-like turbidite lobes with high lateral continuity, which facilitates updip migration of deep-sourced thermogenic gas along bedding surfaces. Channel levees serve as lateral seals to gas hydrate reservoirs, whereas faults, erosional surfaces, and shales provide vertical seals. Characterization of the Terrebonne

  13. Do Pleistocene Glacial-Interglacial Cycles Control Methane Hydrate Formation? An Example from Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, B.; Malinverno, A.; Goldberg, D.; Fortin, W.

    2017-12-01

    Well GC955-H was drilled in the Green Canyon region under the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project in 2009. Logging-while-drilling resistivity logs obtained at the well indicate that the saturation of gas hydrate varies between high and low values in an alternating fashion. This trend is observed from 180 to 360mbsf, depths that correspond to the Late Pleistocene. Similar gas hydrate saturation patterns have been observed in other Gulf of Mexico locations (Walker Ridge sites WR313-G and 313-H) in Late Pleistocene sediments. Our hypothesis is that these variations in saturation can be explained by sea level changes through time during glacial-interglacial cycles. A higher amount of organic matter is deposited and buried in the sediment column during glacial intervals when sea level is low. Microbes in the sediment column degrade organic matter and produce methane gas as a byproduct. Higher availability of organic matter in the sediment column can increase the concentration of methane in the sediment pore water and in turn lead to the formation of gas hydrate. We use a time-dependent numerical model of the formation of gas hydrate to test this hypothesis. The model predicts the volume and distribution of gas hydrates using mass balance equations. Model inputs include in situ porosity determined from bulk density logs; local thermal gradient estimated from the depth of the bottom of the gas hydrate stability zone in proximity to the well; and sedimentation rate determined using the biostratigraphy of an industry well in the vicinity of GC955-H. Initial results show a good match between gas hydrate saturation predicted by the model and resistivity logs obtained in the well. We anticipate that this correlation will establish whether a causal link exists between the saturation of gas hydrate in this reservoir and glacioeustatic sea level changes in the Late Pleistocene.

  14. PAHs distribution in sediments associated with gas hydrate and oil seepage from the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiping; Sun, Hongwen; Chang, Ying; Song, Zhiguang; Qin, Xuebo

    2011-12-01

    Six sediment samples collected from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed. Total concentrations of the PAHs ranged from 52 to 403 ng g(-1) dry weight. The lowest PAH concentration without 5-6 rings PAHs appeared in S-1 sample associated with gas hydrate or gas venting. Moreover, S-1 sample had the lowest organic carbon content with 0.85% and highest reduced sulfur level with 1.21% relative to other samples. And, analysis of the sources of PAHs in S-1 sample indicated that both pyrogenic and petrogenic sources, converserly, while S-8, S-10 and S-11 sample suggested petrogenic origin. The distribution of dibenzothiophene, fluorine and dibenzofuran and the maturity parameters of triaromatic steranes suggested that organic matters in S-1 sample were different from that in S-8, S-10 and S-11 sample. This study suggested that organic geochemical data could help in distinguish the characteristic of sediment associated with gas hydrate or with oil seepage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Insights into the dynamics of in situ gas hydrate formation and dissociation at the Bush Hill gas hydrate field, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Evan A.; Kastner, Miriam; Robertson, Gretchen; Jannasch, Hans; Weinstein, Yishai

    2005-07-01

    Four newly designed flux meters called the MOSQUITO (Multiple Orifice Sampler and Quantitative Injection Tracer Observer), capable of measuring fluid flow rates and sampling pore fluid chemistry simultaneously, and two temperature loggers were deployed for 430 days adjacent to the Bush Hill hydrate mound in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GC 185). The main objective of the deployment was to understand how chemistry, temperature, and subsurface hydrology dynamically influence the growth and dissociation of the gas hydrate mound. The flux meters were deployed in a mussel field, in bacterial mats, in a tubeworm field, and at a background site approximately 100 m southwest of the hydrate mound. Results from the longterm chemical monitoring suggest that this system is not in dynamic equilibrium. Gas hydrate actively formed within the mussel field adjacent to the most active gas vent, in the tubeworm field, and at the background site. The hydrology is variable with upward flow rates ranging from 1-90 cm/yr and downward flow rates from 3-130 cm/yr. Two distinct hydrologic pulsing events were sampled across the three mound sites, which advect a fluid from depth that further stabilizes the gas hydrate deposit. The hydrogeochemistry at Bush Hill seems to be influenced by multiple mechanisms such as active formation of gas hydrate, fluid influx and outflux due to active venting of CH4 at transient methane seeps at and near the mound, local salt tectonics, and density driven convection. The fluxes of fluid, solutes, and methane may have a significant impact on the seafloor biochemical environment and the water column chemistry at Bush Hill. (Author)

  16. Interdisciplinary Education and Research in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Soto, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In this article we discuss interdisciplinary teaching and research in Latin America through the lens of Mexican perspectives, in particular the experiences at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The history of these experiences goes back to the creation of the frst interdisciplinary education programs in Mexico in the 1970s and…

  17. Satellite SAR inventory of Gulf of Mexico oil seeps and shallow gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, O.; MacDonald, I. R.; Zimmer, B.; Shedd, W.; Frye, M.

    2009-04-01

    .S. territorial waters, with 481 formations, and Mexican territorial waters, with 78 formations. The formations were ground-truthed against a comprehensive database of 3D seismic cubes that cover the entire northern Gulf of Mexico (Frye 2008). Formations defined by SAR slick targets were consistently associated with gas hydrate prone regions of high surface amplitude and migration features in the sub-bottom. Many of the isolated slicks also appeared to be associated with migration features in the seismic data. Temporal variation among the slicks includes examples of intermittent individual vents within a single formation and broad-scale off-again, on-again appearance of slicks over entire images covering the same areas. References: De Beukelaer, S. M., MacDonald, I., Guinnasso, N. L. J. and Murray, J. A. (2003). Distinct side-scan sonar, RADARSAT SAR, and acoustic profiler signatures of gas and oil seeps on the Gulf of Mexico slope. Geo-Mar Lett 23: 177-186 Frye, M. (2008). Preliminary Evaluation of In-Place Gas Hydrate Resources: Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf. OCS Report, MMS U.S. Department of the Interior. Minerals Management Service. Resource Evaluation Division MacDonald, I., Leifer, I., Sassen, R. and Stine, P. (2002). Transfer of hydrocarbons from natural seeps to the water column and atmosphere. Geofluids, Blackwell Science Ltd 2(2): 95-107 Mitchell, R., MacDonald, I. R. and Kvenvolden, K. A. (1999). Estimation of total hydrocarbon seepage into the Gulf of Mexico based on satellite remote sensing images. Transactions, American Geophysical Union 80(49): Ocean Sciences Meeting Supplement, OS242

  18. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , not all of them are white like snow. Some hydrates from the deep Gulf of Mexico are richly colored in shades of yellow, orange, or even red. The ice-like masses are beautiful, and contrast with the dull gray of deep sea muds. Hydrates from the Blake... volcanoes and associated gas hydrates: Marine Geology, v. 167, p. 29-42. Milkov, A.V. and R. Sassen, 2001a, Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope: Marine Geology, v. 179, pp. 71-83. Milkov, A.V., Sassen, R...

  19. Methane Flux and Authigenic Carbonate in Shallow Sediments Overlying Methane Hydrate Bearing Strata in Alaminos Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Smith

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In June 2007 sediment cores were collected in Alaminos Canyon, Gulf of Mexico across a series of seismic data profiles indicating rapid transitions between the presence of methane hydrates and vertical gas flux. Vertical profiles of dissolved sulfate, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC concentrations in porewaters, headspace methane, and solid phase carbonate concentrations were measured at each core location to investigate the cycling of methane-derived carbon in shallow sediments overlying the hydrate bearing strata. When integrated with stable carbon isotope ratios of DIC, geochemical results suggest a significant fraction of the methane flux at this site is cycled into the inorganic carbon pool. The incorporation of methane-derived carbon into dissolved and solid inorganic carbon phases represents a significant sink in local carbon cycling and plays a role in regulating the flux of methane to the overlying water column at Alaminos Canyon. Targeted, high-resolution geochemical characterization of the biogeochemical cycling of methane-derived carbon in shallow sediments overlying hydrate bearing strata like those in Alaminos Canyon is critical to quantifying methane flux and estimating methane hydrate distributions in gas hydrate bearing marine sediments.

  20. Methane Hydrate Formation from Enhanced Organic Carbon Burial During Glacial Lowstands: Examples from the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverno, A.; Cook, A.; Daigle, H.; Oryan, B.

    2017-12-01

    Methane hydrates in fine-grained marine sediments are often found within veins and fractures occupying discrete depth intervals that are surrounded by hydrate-free sediments. As they are not connected with gas sources beneath the base of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ), these isolated hydrate-bearing intervals have been interpreted as formed by in situ microbial methane. We investigate here the hypothesis that these hydrate deposits form in sediments that were deposited during glacial lowstands and contain higher amounts of labile particulate organic carbon (POC), leading to enhanced microbial methanogenesis. During Pleistocene lowstands, river loads are deposited near the steep top of the continental slope and turbidity currents transport organic-rich, fine-grained sediments to deep waters. Faster sedimentation rates during glacial periods result in better preservation of POC because of decreased exposure times to oxic conditions. The net result is that more labile POC enters the methanogenic zone and more methane is generated in these sediments. To test this hypothesis, we apply an advection-diffusion-reaction model with a time-dependent deposition of labile POC at the seafloor controlled by glacioeustatic sea level variations in the last 250 kyr. The model is run for parameters estimated at three sites drilled by the 2009 Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry Project: Walker Ridge in the Terrebonne Basin (WR313-G and WR313-H) and Green Canyon near the canyon embayment into the Sigsbee Escarpment (GC955-H). In the model, gas hydrate forms in sediments with higher labile POC content deposited during the glacial cycle between 230 and 130 kyr (marine isotope stages 6 and 7). The corresponding depth intervals in the three sites contain hydrates, as shown by high bulk electrical resistivities and resistive subvertical fracture fills. This match supports the hypothesis that enhanced POC burial during glacial lowstands can result in hydrate formation from in situ

  1. Methane Hydrate Formation from Enhanced Organic Carbon Burial During Glacial Lowstands: Examples from the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinverno, Alberto; Cook, Ann; Daigle, Hugh; Oryan, Bar

    2017-12-15

    Methane hydrates in fine-grained marine sediments are often found within veins and fractures occupying discrete depth intervals that are surrounded by hydrate-free sediments. As they are not connected with gas sources beneath the base of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ), these isolated hydrate-bearing intervals have been interpreted as formed by in situ microbial methane. We investigate here the hypothesis that these hydrate deposits form in sediments that were deposited during glacial lowstands and contain higher amounts of labile particulate organic carbon (POC), leading to enhanced microbial methanogenesis. During Pleistocene lowstands, river loads are deposited near the steep top of the continental slope and turbidity currents transport organic-rich, fine-grained sediments to deep waters. Faster sedimentation rates during glacial periods result in better preservation of POC because of decreased exposure times to oxic conditions. The net result is that more labile POC enters the methanogenic zone and more methane is generated in these sediments. To test this hypothesis, we apply an advection-diffusion-reaction model with a time-dependent deposition of labile POC at the seafloor controlled by glacioeustatic sea level variations in the last 250 kyr. The model is run for parameters estimated at three sites drilled by the 2009 Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry Project: Walker Ridge in the Terrebonne Basin (WR313-G and WR313-H) and Green Canyon near the canyon embayment into the Sigsbee Escarpment (GC955-H). In the model, gas hydrate forms in sediments with higher labile POC content deposited during the glacial cycle between 230 and 130 kyr (marine isotope stages 6 and 7). The corresponding depth intervals in the three sites contain hydrates, as shown by high bulk electrical resistivities and resistive subvertical fracture fills. This match supports the hypothesis that enhanced POC burial during glacial lowstands can result in hydrate formation from in situ

  2. Structural and Stratigraphic Controls on Methane Hydrate occurrence and distribution: Gulf of Mexico, Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiswal, Priyank [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this project was to determine structural and stratigraphic controls on hydrate occurrence and distribution in Green Canyon (GC) 955 and Walker Ridge (WR) 313 blocks using seismic and well data. Gas hydrate was discovered in these blocks in coarse- and fine-grained sediments during the 2009 Joint Industrial project (JIP) Leg 11 drilling expedition. Although the immediate interest of the exploration community is exclusively hydrate which is present in coarse–grained sediments, factors that control hydrate and free gas distribution in the two blocks and whether coarse and fine-grained hydrate-bearing units are related in any manner, formed the core of this research. The project spanned from 10/01/2012 to 07/31/2016. In the project, in both the leased blocks, the interval spanning the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) was characterized using a joint analysis of sparse Ocean Bottom Seismic (OBS) and dense, surface–towed multichannel seismic (MCS) data. The project team had the luxury of calibrating their results with two well logs. Advance processing methods such as depth migration and full-waveform inversion (FWI) were used for seismic data analysis. Hydrate quantification was achieved through interpretation of the FWI velocity field using appropriate rock physics models at both blocks. The seismic modeling/inversion methodology (common to both GC955 and WR313 blocks) was as follows. First, the MCS data were depth migrated using a P-wave velocity (VP) model constructed using inversion of reflection arrival times of a few (four in both cases) key horizons carefully picked in the OBS data to farthest possible offsets. Then, the resolution of the traveltime VP model was improved to wavelength scale by inverting OBS gathers up to the highest frequency possible (21.75 Hz for GC955 and 17.5 for WR313) using FWI. Finally, the hydrate saturation (or the volume fraction) was estimated at the well location assuming one of the other hydrate morphology (filling the

  3. International Society of Nephrology-Hydration and Kidney Health Initiative - Expanding Research and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moist, Louise M; Clark, William F; Segantini, Luca; Damster, Sandrine; Le Bellego, Laurent; Wong, Germaine; Tonelli, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a collaborative research initiative to explore the role of hydration in kidney health. Our understanding of the effects of hydration in health and disease is surprisingly limited, particularly when we consider the vital role of hydration in basic human physiology. Recent initiatives and research outcomes have challenged the global medical community to expand our knowledge about hydration, including the differences between water, sugared beverages and other consumables. Identification of the potential mechanisms contributing to the benefits of hydration has stimulated the global nephrology community to advance research regarding hydration for kidney health. Hydration and kidney health has been a focus of research for several research centers with a rapidly expanding world literature and knowledge. The International Society of Nephrology has collaborated with Danone Nutricia Research to promote development of kidney research initiatives, which focus on the role of hydration in kidney health and the global translation of this new information. This initiative supports the use of existing data in different regions and countries to expand dialogue among experts in the field of hydration and health, and to increase scientific interaction and productivity with the ultimate goal of improving kidney health. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Methane Gas Production from Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore Mohanty; Bill Cook; Mustafa Hakimuddin; Ramanan Pitchumani; Damiola Ogunlana; Jon Burger; John Shillinglaw

    2006-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Estimates of the amounts of methane sequestered in gas hydrates worldwide are speculative and range from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet (modified from Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In this project novel techniques were developed to form and dissociate methane hydrates in porous media, to measure acoustic properties and CT properties during hydrate dissociation in the presence of a porous medium. Hydrate depressurization experiments in cores were simulated with the use of TOUGHFx/HYDRATE simulator. Input/output software was developed to simulate variable pressure boundary condition and improve the ease of use of the simulator. A series of simulations needed to be run to mimic the variable pressure condition at the production well. The experiments can be matched qualitatively by the hydrate simulator. The temperature of the core falls during hydrate dissociation; the temperature drop is higher if the fluid withdrawal rate is higher. The pressure and temperature gradients are small within the core. The sodium iodide concentration affects the dissociation pressure and rate. This procedure and data will be useful in designing future hydrate studies.

  5. Electrical anisotropy of gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anne E.; Anderson, Barbara I.; Rasmus, John; Sun, Keli; Li, Qiming; Collett, Timothy S.; Goldberg, David S.

    2012-01-01

    We present new results and interpretations of the electricalanisotropy and reservoir architecture in gashydrate-bearingsands using logging data collected during the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II. We focus specifically on sandreservoirs in Hole Alaminos Canyon 21 A (AC21-A), Hole Green Canyon 955 H (GC955-H) and Hole Walker Ridge 313 H (WR313-H). Using a new logging-while-drilling directional resistivity tool and a one-dimensional inversion developed by Schlumberger, we resolve the resistivity of the current flowing parallel to the bedding, R| and the resistivity of the current flowing perpendicular to the bedding, R|. We find the sandreservoir in Hole AC21-A to be relatively isotropic, with R| and R| values close to 2 Ω m. In contrast, the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic. In these reservoirs, R| is between 2 and 30 Ω m, and R| is generally an order of magnitude higher. Using Schlumberger's WebMI models, we were able to replicate multiple resistivity measurements and determine the formation resistivity the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoir in Hole WR313-H. The results showed that gashydrate saturations within a single reservoir unit are highly variable. For example, the sand units in Hole WR313-H contain thin layers (on the order of 10-100 cm) with varying gashydrate saturations between 15 and 95%. Our combined modeling results clearly indicate that the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic due to varying saturations of gashydrate forming in thin layers within larger sand units.

  6. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  7. UT-GOM2-1: Prospecting, Drilling and Sampling a Coarse-Grained Hydrate Reservoir in Green Canyon 955, the Deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P. B.; Phillips, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    In May 2017, a science team led by the University of Texas-Austin conducted drilling and coring operations from the Helix Q4000 targeting gas hydrates in sand-rich reservoirs in the Green Canyon 955 block in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The UT-GOM2-1 expedition goals were to 1) test two configurations of pressure coring devices to assess relative performance with respect to recovery and quality of samples and 2) gather sufficient samples to allow laboratories throughout the US to investigate a range of outstanding science questions related to the origin and nature of gas hydrate-bearing sands. In the first well (UT-GOM2-1-H002), 1 of the 8 cores were recovered under pressure with 34% recovery. In the second well (UT-GOM2-1-H005), 12 of 13 cores were recovered under pressure with 77% recovery. The pressure cores were imaged and logged under pressure. Samples were degassed both shipboard and dockside to interpret hydrate concentration and gas composition. Samples for microbiological and porewater analysis were taken from the depressurized samples. 21 3 ft pressure cores were returned to the University of Texas for storage, distribution, and further analysis. Preliminary analyses document that the hydrate-bearing interval is composed of two interbedded (cm to m thickness) facies. Lithofacies II is composed of sandy silt and has trough cross bedding whereas Lithofacies III is composed of clayey silt and no bedforms are observed. Lithofacies II has low density (1.7 to 1.9 g/cc) and high velocity (3000-3250 m/s) beds whereas Lithofacies 3 has high density ( 1.9-2.1g/cc) and low velocity ( 1700 m/s). Quantitative degassing was used to determine that Lithofacies II contains high hydrate saturation (66-87%) and Lithofacies III contains moderate saturation ( 18-30%). Gas samples were analyzed periodically in each experiment and were composed of primarily methane with an average of 94 ppm ethane and detectable, but not quantifiable, propane. The core data will provide a

  8. Short- and Long-Term Dynamics of Gas Hydrate at GC600: A Gulf of Mexico Hydrocarbon Seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Johansen, C.; Silva, M.; Daneshgar, S.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.; Shedd, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    The GC600 hydrocarbon seep is located at 1200 m in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Satellite data show it to be one of the most prolific sources of natural oil slicks in the entire GOM. We mapped its seafloor oil and gas vents with 3-D seismic, swath-bathymetry acoustics and submersible observations, documenting gas hydrate deposits, brine pools, benthic fauna, and authigenic carbonates. Geophysical profiles show subbottom locations of salt bodies and migration conduits. We deployed time-lapse imaging systems focused on individual vents to quantify release rates. Oil and gas flow upward along the flanks of an allochthonous salt body from source rocks at 10,000 m and migrate to the seafloor from faults emanating from the salt. Venting to the water column and surface consists of oily bubbles and occurs in two fields separated by ~1 km. The NW vent field (Megaplume) appears to be a more recent expression and hosts about three highly active vents; while the SE vent field (Birthday Candles) hosts more than 10 vents that are generally slower. We measured discharge rates of 2.6 cm3 s-1 and Megaplume and 0.09 cm3 s-1 at Birthday Candles. Although surface deposits of gas hydrate were evident at both vent fields, the Birthday Candles area featured dozens of conical mounds formed by gas hydrate that were dark brown due to large amounts of liquid oil perfused throughout the deposits. Large brine pools indicated gas hydrate formation at the seafloor. Venting occurred in horizontal fissures on the mounds, in which oil and hydrate combined to form short-lived chimneys and balloon-like structures. Ice worms (Hesiocaeca methanicola) were extremely abundant in burrows extending from the sediment into the gas hydrate. Proceeding farther to the SE, venting is reduced and absent, but surface carbonate deposits suggest relict gas hydrate mounds. We propose that the NW to SE trend at GC600 encompasses the progressive development of a biogeochemical filter that sequesters and

  9. Properties of samples containing natural gas hydrate from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, determined using Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing laboratory study, preliminary acoustic, strength, and hydraulic conductivity results are presented from a suite of tests conducted on four natural-gas-hydrate-containing samples from the Mackenzie Delta JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well. The gas hydrate samples were preserved in pressure vessels during transport from the Northwest Territories to Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where multistep tests were performed using GHASTLI (Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument), which recreates pressure and temperature conditions that are stable for gas hydrate. Properties and changes in sediment behaviour were measured before, during, and after controlled gas hydrate dissociation. Significant amounts of gas hydrate occupied the sample pores and substantially increased acoustic velocity and shear strength.

  10. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating. Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p < 0.001. Lower PA with high temperatures did not prevent increased non-renal water losses (i.e., sweating and elevated urine and blood osmolality (r = 0.218 to 0.163 all p < 0.001. When summer and winter data were combined PA was negatively associated with urine osmolality (r = −0.153; p = 0.001. Our data suggest that environmental heat acts to reduce voluntary PA but this is not sufficient to prevent moderate dehydration (increased osmolality. On the other hand, increased PA is associated with improved hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality.

  11. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    effort, the U.S. Congress enacted Public Law 106-­‐193, the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. This Act called for the Secretary of Energy to begin a methane hydrate research and development program in consultation with other U.S. federal agencies. At the same time a new methane hydrate research program had been launched in Japan by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. Since this early start we have seen other countries including India, China, Canada, and the Republic of Korea establish large gas hydrate research and development programs. These national led efforts have also included the investment in a long list of important scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies that have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrate in nature. The most notable expeditions and projects have including the following:-­‐Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 (1995)-­‐Japan Nankai Trough Project (1999-­‐2000)-­‐Ocean Drilling Program Leg 204 (2004)-­‐Japan Tokai-­‐oki to Kumano-­‐nada Project (2004)-­‐Gulf of Mexico JIP Leg I (2005)-­‐Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311 (2005)-­‐Malaysia Gumusut-­‐Kakap Project (2006)-­‐India NGHP Expedition 01 (2006)-­‐China GMGS Expedition 01 (2007)-­‐Republic of Korea UBGH Expedition 01 (2007)-­‐Gulf of Mexico JIP Leg II (2009)-­‐Republic of Korea UBGH Expedition 02 (2010)-­‐MH-­‐21 Nankai Trough Pre-­‐Production Expedition (2012-­‐2013)-­‐Mallik Gas Hydrate Testing Projects (1998/2002/2007-­‐2008)-­‐Alaska Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well (2007)-­‐Alaska Iġnik Sikumi Methane Hydrate Production Test Well (2011-­‐2012)Research coring and seismic programs carried out by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), starting with the ODP Leg 164 drilling of the

  12. Gas composition and isotopic geochemistry of cuttings, core, and gas hydrate from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular and isotopic composition of gases from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well demonstrate that the in situ gases can be divided into three zones composed of mixtures of microbial and thermogenic gases. Sediments penetrated by the well are thermally immature; thus the sediments are probably not a source of thermogenic gas. Thermogenic gas likely migrated from depths below 5000 m. Higher concentrations of gas within and beneath the gas hydrate zone suggest that gas hydrate is a partial barrier to gas migration. Gas hydrate accumulations occur wholly within zone 3, below the base of permafrost. The gas in gas hydrate resembles, in part, the thermogenic gas in surrounding sediments and gas desorbed from lignite. Gas hydrate composition implies that the primary gas hydrate form is Structure I. However, Structure II stabilizing gases are more concentrated and isotopically partitioned in gas hydrate relative to the sediment hosting the gas hydrate, implying that Structure II gas hydrate may be present in small quantities.

  13. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  14. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and anaylsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrateJointIndustryProjectLegII (GOM JIP LegII) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gashydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gashydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gashydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gashydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gashydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gashydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gashydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gashydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gashydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP LegII effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  15. Water Intake and Hydration Indices in Healthy European Adults: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Pepa, Alex; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-04-06

    Hydration status is linked with health, wellness, and performance. We evaluated hydration status, water intake, and urine output for seven consecutive days in healthy adults. Volunteers living in Spain, Germany, or Greece (n = 573, 39 ± 12 years (51.1% males), 25.0 ± 4.6 kg/m² BMI) participated in an eight-day study protocol. Total water intake was estimated from seven-day food and drink diaries. Hydration status was measured in urine samples collected over 24 h for seven days and in blood samples collected in fasting state on the mornings of days 1 and 8. Total daily water intake was 2.75 ± 1.01 L, water from beverages 2.10 ± 0.91 L, water from foods 0.66 ± 0.29 L. Urine parameters were: 24 h volume 1.65 ± 0.70 L, 24 h osmolality 631 ± 221 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο, 24 h specific gravity 1.017 ± 0.005, 24 h excretion of sodium 166.9 ± 54.7 mEq, 24 h excretion of potassium 72.4 ± 24.6 mEq, color chart 4.2 ± 1.4. Predictors for urine osmolality were age, country, gender, and BMI. Blood indices were: haemoglobin concentration 14.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, hematocrit 43% ± 4% and serum osmolality 294 ± 9 mOsmol/kg Η2Ο. Daily water intake was higher in summer (2.8 ± 1.02 L) than in winter (2.6 ± 0.98 L) (p = 0.019). Water intake was associated negatively with urine specific gravity, urine color, and urine sodium and potassium concentrations (p < 0.01). Applying urine osmolality cut-offs, approximately 60% of participants were euhydrated and 20% hyperhydrated or dehydrated. Most participants were euhydrated, but a substantial number of people (40%) deviated from a normal hydration level.

  16. Isotropic, anisotropic, and borehole washout analyses in Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, Alaminos Canyon well 21-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    Through the use of three-dimensional seismic amplitude mapping, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two of the prospects were drilled as part of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Program Leg II in May 2009, and a suite of logging-while-drilling logs was acquired at each well site. Logging-while-drilling logs at the Alaminos Canyon 21–A site indicate that resistivities of approximately 2 ohm-meter and P-wave velocities of approximately 1.9 kilometers per second were measured in a possible gas-hydrate-bearing target sand interval between 540 and 632 feet below the sea floor. These values are slightly elevated relative to those measured in the hydrate-free sediment surrounding the sands. The initial well log analysis is inconclusive in determining the presence of gas hydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because large washouts in the target interval degraded well log measurements. To assess gas-hydrate saturations, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities is required. To meet this need, a method is presented that models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with seawater (drilling fluid). Owing to the anisotropic nature of this geometry, the apparent anisotropic resistivities and velocities caused by the vertical layer are used to correct measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis of the washout-corrected well logs, the gas-hydrate saturation at well site AC21–A was estimated to be in the range of 13 percent. Because gas hydrates in the vertical fractures were observed, anisotropic rock physics models were also applied to estimate gas-hydrate saturations.

  17. GAS METHANE HYDRATES-RESEARCH STATUS, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND ENERGY IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc; Bethany Bolles

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this task as originally conceived was to compile an assessment of methane hydrate deposits in Alaska from available sources and to make a very preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of producing methane from these deposits for remote power generation. Gas hydrates have recently become a target of increased scientific investigation both from the standpoint of their resource potential to the natural gas and oil industries and of their positive and negative implications for the global environment After we performed an extensive literature review and consulted with representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Canadian Geological Survey, and several oil companies, it became evident that, at the current stage of gas hydrate research, the available information on methane hydrates in Alaska does not provide sufficient grounds for reaching conclusions concerning their use for energy production. Hence, the original goals of this task could not be met, and the focus was changed to the compilation and review of published documents to serve as a baseline for possible future research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). An extensive annotated bibliography of gas hydrate publications has been completed. The EERC will reassess its future research opportunities on methane hydrates to determine where significant initial contributions could be made within the scope of limited available resources.

  18. Amount of gas hydrate estimated from compressional- and shear-wave velocities at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The amount of in situ gas hydrate concentrated in the sediment pore space at the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well was estimated by using compressional-wave (P-wave) and shear-wave (S-wave) downhole log measurements. A weighted equation developed for relating the amount of gas hydrate concentrated in the pore space of unconsolidated sediments to the increase of seismic velocities was applied to the acoustic logs with porosities derived from the formation density log. A weight of 1.56 (W=1.56) and the exponent of 1 (n=1) provided consistent estimates of gas hydrate concentration from the S-wave and the P-wave logs. Gas hydrate concentration is as much as 80% in the pore spaces, and the average gas hydrate concentration within the gas-hydrate-bearing section from 897 m to 1110 m (excluding zones where there is no gas hydrate) was calculated at 39.0% when using P-wave data and 37.8% when using S-wave data.

  19. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  20. Long-term Measurement of Sediment Resuspension and Gas Hydrate Stability at a Gulf of Mexico Seep Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaro, M. F.; Bender, L. C.; MacDonald, I. R.

    2003-12-01

    To study the temporal topographic and hydrologic changes in Gulf of Mexico cold seeps, we deployed a deep-sea time-lapse camera, several temperature probes and an ADCP mooring at the continental shelf seep community surrounding a gas hydrate outcropping. The digital camera recorded one still image every six hours for three months in 2001, every two hours for the month of June 2002 and every six hours for the month of July 2002. A pair of 300 kHz Workhorse acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) attached to a 540 meter-long mooring were anchored approximately 2 km from the site in 2002. Temperature probes were deployed at the site over the entire experimental period. The data recovered provide a comprehensive record of gas hydrate mound processes. We calculated biological activity by identifying fauna observed in the time-lapse record and recording the number of individuals and species seen in each image. 1,381 individual organisms representing over 20 species were observed. An average of 4.6 (+/-3.0) organisms were seen in each frame during the three-month deployment, while 3.6 (+/-4.2) were seen per frame in the one-month deployment. An extensive amount of sediment suspension and redistribution occurred during the deployment period. By digitally analyzing the luminosity of the water column above the mound and plotting the results over time the turbidity at the site could be quantified. A 24.1-hour diurnal pattern can be seen in the record, indicating a possible tidal or inertial component to deep-sea currents in this area. Contrary to expectations, there was no major change in shape or size of the gas hydrate outcrop being studied. This indicates a higher degree of stability than laboratory studies or prior in situ observations have shown. The stable topography of the gas hydrate mound combines with high organic output and sediment turnover to serve as a focus of benthic predatory activity. The frequency and recurrence of sediment resuspension indicate that

  1. Community nursing research. Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappsilber, C; Castillo, A A; Gallegos, E C

    1998-01-01

    After a 10-year history of community health nursing research conducted by graduate students at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, Mexico, the faculty recognized a need to synthesize their work into a monograph. The purpose was to guide nursing practice, incorporate the findings into the body of nursing knowledge, and identify future research needs. Starting in 1994, three faculty members reviewed 29 theses written by community nursing majors from 1986 to 1993 to meet the requirements for the master's degree in nursing. They classified the studies according to their principal focus and synthesized the findings to derive common phenomena and themes. The endeavor resulted in a 40-page document and a proposed model in the form of an unpublished monograph.

  2. Lipid biomarkers preserved in hydrate-associated authigenic carbonate rocks of the Gulf of Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pancost, R.D.; Zhang, C.L.; Tavacoli, J.; Talbot, H.M.; Farrimond, P.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Sassen, R.

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is common in ocean-margin sediments, where it is mediated by consortia of Archaea and Bacteria and can result in the formation of authigenic carbonate, including extensive carbonate crusts. Previous work indicates that AOM is associated with Gulf of Mexico

  3. Detailed evaluation of gas hydrate reservoir properties using JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well downhole well-log displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    The JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well project was designed to investigate the occurrence of in situ natural gas hydrate in the Mallik area of the Mackenzie Delta of Canada. Because gas hydrate is unstable at surface pressure and temperature conditions, a major emphasis was placed on the downhole logging program to determine the in situ physical properties of the gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. Downhole logging tool strings deployed in the Mallik 2L-38 well included the Schlumberger Platform Express with a high resolution laterolog, Array Induction Imager Tool, Dipole Shear Sonic Imager, and a Fullbore Formation Microlmager. The downhole log data obtained from the log- and core-inferred gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary interval (897.25-1109.5 m log depth) in the Mallik 2L-38 well is depicted in a series of well displays. Also shown are numerous reservoir parameters, including gas hydrate saturation and sediment porosity log traces, calculated from available downhole well-log and core data. The gas hydrate accumulation delineated by the Mallik 2L-38 well has been determined to contain as much as 4.15109 m3 of gas in the 1 km2 area surrounding the drill site.

  4. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability

  5. High-resolution seismic imaging of the gas and gas hydrate system at Green Canyon 955 in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution 2D seismic data acquired by the USGS in 2013 enable detailed characterization of the gas and gas hydrate system at lease block Green Canyon 955 (GC955) in the Gulf of Mexico, USA. Earlier studies, based on conventional industry 3D seismic data and logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data acquired in 2009, identified general aspects of the regional and local depositional setting along with two gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and one layer containing fracture-filling gas hydrate within fine-grained sediments. These studies also highlighted a number of critical remaining questions. The 2013 high-resolution 2D data fill a significant gap in our previous understanding of the site by enabling interpretation of the complex system of faults and gas chimneys that provide conduits for gas flow and thus control the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. In addition, we have improved our understanding of the main channel/levee sand reservoir body, mapping in fine detail the levee sequences and the fault system that segments them into individual reservoirs. The 2013 data provide a rarely available high-resolution view of a levee reservoir package, with sequential levee deposits clearly imaged. Further, we can calculate the total gas hydrate resource present in the main reservoir body, refining earlier estimates. Based on the 2013 seismic data and assumptions derived from the LWD data, we estimate an in-place volume of 840 million cubic meters or 29 billion cubic feet of gas in the form of gas hydrate. Together, these interpretations provide a significantly improved understanding of the gas hydrate reservoirs and the gas migration system at GC955.

  6. Processing of multichannel seismic reflection data acquired in 2013 for seismic investigations of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John J.; Agena, Warren F.; Haines, Seth; Hart, Patrick E.

    2016-04-13

    As part of a cooperative effort among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, two grids of two-dimensional multichannel seismic reflection data were acquired in the Gulf of Mexico over lease blocks Green Canyon 955 and Walker Ridge 313 between April 18 and May 3, 2013. The purpose of the data acquisition was to fill knowledge gaps in an ongoing study of known gas hydrate accumulations in the area. These data were initially processed onboard the recording ship R/V Pelican for more quality control during the recording. The data were subsequently processed in detail by the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver, Colorado, in two phases. The first phase was to create a “kinematic” dataset that removed extensive noise present in the data but did not preserve relative amplitudes. The second phase was to create a true relative amplitude dataset that included noise removal and “wavelet” deconvolution that preserved the amplitude information. This report describes the processing techniques used to create both datasets.

  7. Halogen systematics in the Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well, Northwest Territories, Canada: Implications for the origin of gas hydrates under terrestrial permafrost conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaru, Hitoshi; Fehn, Udo; Lu, Zunli; Matsumoto, Ryo

    2007-01-01

    The authors report here halogen concentrations in pore waters and sediments collected from the Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well, a permafrost location in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. Iodine and Br are commonly enriched in waters associated with CH 4 , reflecting the close association between these halogens and source organic materials. Pore waters collected from the Mallik well show I enrichment, by one order of magnitude above that of seawater, particularly in sandy layers below the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Although Cl and Br concentrations increase with depth similar to the I profile, they remain below seawater values. The increase in I concentrations observed below the GHSZ suggests that I-rich fluids responsible for the accumulation of CH 4 in gas hydrates are preferentially transported through the sandy permeable layers below the GHSZ. The Br and I concentrations and I/Br ratios in Mallik are considerably lower than those in marine gas hydrate locations, demonstrating a terrestrial nature for the organic materials responsible for the CH 4 at the Mallik site. Halogen systematics in Mallik suggest that they are the result of mixing between seawater, freshwater and an I-rich source fluid. The comparison between I/Br ratios in pore waters and sediments speaks against the origin of the source fluids within the host formations of gas hydrates, a finding compatible with the results from a limited set of 129 I/I ratios determined in pore waters, which gives a minimum age of 29 Ma for the source material, i.e. at the lower end of the age range of the host formations. The likely scenario for the gas hydrate formation in Mallik is the derivation of CH 4 together with I from the terrestrial source materials in formations other than the host layers through sandy permeable layers into the present gas hydrate zones

  8. Mexico | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Developed with IDRC support, the mosquito control strategy became policy in Mexico, and it has ... 187 activities worth CA$27.8 million since 1974 ... improve economic growth in rural-urban territories; increase quality maternal health care for ...

  9. Estimating pore-space gas hydrate saturations from well log acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2008-07-01

    Relating pore-space gas hydrate saturation to sonic velocity data is important for remotely estimating gas hydrate concentration in sediment. In the present study, sonic velocities of gas hydrate-bearing sands are modeled using a three-phase Biot-type theory in which sand, gas hydrate, and pore fluid form three homogeneous, interwoven frameworks. This theory is developed using well log compressional and shear wave velocity data from the Mallik 5L-38 permafrost gas hydrate research well in Canada and applied to well log data from hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaskan permafrost, Gulf of Mexico, and northern Cascadia margin. Velocity-based gas hydrate saturation estimates are in good agreement with Nuclear Magneto Resonance and resistivity log estimates over the complete range of observed gas hydrate saturations.

  10. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  11. International Workshop on Methane Hydrate Research and Development (4th) Held in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada on May 9-11, 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coffin, Richard B; Chapman, Ross

    2006-01-01

    ... on methane hydrate research. The 2.5-day workshop included plenary lectures and panel discussions, conducted as a working event where all participants engaged in open discussions to develop collaborative methane hydrate studies...

  12. The Gulf of Mexico research initiative: It takes a village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Rita R.

    2016-07-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) was established at the time of one of the most significant ecological events in recent memory, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Defined by the discharge of over 150 million gallons of crude oil and the introduction of over 1.8 million gallons of chemical dispersants into the Gulf system, the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon disaster reached the Gulf Coast's wetlands and beaches and impacted the surface and deep ocean. The ecological story of the event reveals a strong linkage between the deep sea research community and research priorities in the Gulf of Mexico (coastal processes, human health, etc.). Deep Sea research efforts have revealed critical parts of the story, providing information on transport, fate, and effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil release and subsequent recovery of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystems.

  13. Pinon-juniper management research at Corona Range and Livestock Research Center in Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres Cibils; Mark Petersen; Shad Cox; Michael Rubio

    2008-01-01

    Description: New Mexico State University's Corona Range and Livestock Research Center (CRLRC) is located in a pinon-juniper (PJ)/grassland ecotone in the southern Basin and Range Province in south central New Mexico. A number of research projects conducted at this facility revolve around soil, plant, livestock, and wildlife responses to PJ woodland management. The...

  14. Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Leslie

    The text explores Mexico's history, geography, art, religion, and lifestyles in the context of its complex economy. The text focuses on Mexico's economy and reasons for its current situation. Part I of this teaching unit includes: Teacher Overview, Why Study Mexico, Mexico Fact Sheet, Map of Mexico, the Land and Climate, History, Government,…

  15. Simulation and Characterization of Methane Hydrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, S.; Gupta, I.

    2017-12-01

    The ever rising global energy demand dictates human endeavor to explore and exploit new and innovative energy sources. As conventional oil and gas reserves deplete, we are constantly looking for newer sources for sustainable energy. Gas hydrates have long been discussed as the next big energy resource to the earth. Its global occurrence and vast quantity of natural gas stored is one of the main reasons for such interest in its study and exploration. Gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances with trapped molecules of gas inside cage-like crystals of water molecules. Gases such as methane, ethane, propane and carbon dioxide can form hydrates but in natural state, methane hydrates are the most common. Subsurface geological conditions with high pressure and low temperature favor the formation and stability of gas hydrates. While the occurrence and potential of gas hydrates as energy source has long been studied, there are still gaps in knowledge, especially in the quantitative research of gas hydrate formation and reservoir characterization. This study is focused on exploring and understanding the geological setting in which gas hydrates are formed and the subsequent changes in rock characteristics as they are deposited. It involves the numerical simulation of methane gas flow through fault to form hydrates. The models are representative of the subsurface geologic setting of Gulf of Mexico with a fault through layers of shale and sandstone. Hydrate formation simulated is of thermogenic origin. The simulations are conducted using TOUGH+HYDRATE, a numerical code developed at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for modeling multiphase flow through porous medium. Simulation results predict that as the gas hydrates form in the pores of the model, the porosity, permeability and other rock properties are altered. Preliminary simulation results have shown that hydrates begin to form in the fault zone and gradually in the sandstone layers. The increase in hydrate

  16. Pharmacies, communication, and condoms. Research report: Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick De Weiss, S

    1995-01-01

    The Institute Mexicano de Investigacion de Familia y Poblacion, A.C. (IMIFAP) tested the effectiveness of a training course and educational materials that were designed to increase the awareness and knowledge of pharmacy employees concerning acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and its prevention, and to promote condoms. 174 employees participated in workshops that included information on transmission and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and AIDS, and condom usage. Pre- and post-session tests were performed to ascertain the short-term retention of information; the long-term effect was assessed via incognito shopper visits and monitoring of condom sales. Short, intensive training, when reinforced by posters, pamphlets, and video, significantly increased knowledge of AIDS (symptoms, transmission, and prevention) and correct condom usage. Awareness of risk behaviors and groups at risk for AIDS improved. Printed materials alone did not have a substantial impact on knowledge or sales of condoms, and increased knowledge alone did not increase information disseminated. After 6 months there was a significantly higher rise in condom sales (16%) in the course-plus-materials group. This group also took a greater initiative in providing information to clients. In spite of these positive results, knowledge and initiative are still unsatisfactory, especially when the role of pharmacies in general health care and the suspected prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and human immunodeficiency virus in Mexico are considered.

  17. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  18. Research on the nanolevel influence of surfactants on structure formation of the hydrated Portland cement compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guryanov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of the structure formation process on a nanolevel of the samples of hydrated Portland cement compositions containing the modifying additives has been conducted with the help of small angle neutron scattering method. Carbonate and aluminum alkaline slimes as well as the complex additives containing surfactants were used as additives. The influence of slimes and surfactants on structural parameters change of Portland cement compositions of the average size of the disseminating objects, fractal dimension samples is considered. These Portland cement compositions are shown to be fractal clusters.

  19. Physical properties of sediments from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    A 1150 m deep gas hydrate research well was drilled in the Canadian Arctic in February and March 1998 to investigate the interaction between the presence of gas hydrate and the natural conditions presented by the host sediments. Profiles of the following measured and derived properties are presented from that investigation: water content, sediment wet bulk density, grain size, porosity, gas hydrate quantity, and salinity. These data indicate that the greatest concentration of gas hydrate is located within sand and gravel deposits between 897 m and 922 m. American Society for Testing and Materials 1997: Standard test method for specific gravity of soil solids by gas pycnometer D 5550-94; in American Society for Testing and Materials, Annual Book of ASTM Standards, v. 04.09, Soil and Rock, West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, p. 380-383.

  20. Estimation of potential distribution of gas hydrate in the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunjuan; Du, Dewen; Zhu, Zhiwei; Liu, Yonggang; Yan, Shijuan; Yang, Gang

    2010-05-01

    Gas hydrate research has significant importance for securing world energy resources, and has the potential to produce considerable economic benefits. Previous studies have shown that the South China Sea is an area that harbors gas hydrates. However, there is a lack of systematic investigations and understanding on the distribution of gas hydrate throughout the region. In this paper, we applied mineral resource quantitative assessment techniques to forecast and estimate the potential distribution of gas hydrate resources in the northern South China Sea. However, current hydrate samples from the South China Sea are too few to produce models of occurrences. Thus, according to similarity and contrast principles of mineral outputs, we can use a similar hydrate-mining environment with sufficient gas hydrate data as a testing ground for modeling northern South China Sea gas hydrate conditions. We selected the Gulf of Mexico, which has extensively studied gas hydrates, to develop predictive models of gas hydrate distributions, and to test errors in the model. Then, we compared the existing northern South China Sea hydrate-mining data with the Gulf of Mexico characteristics, and collated the relevant data into the model. Subsequently, we applied the model to the northern South China Sea to obtain the potential gas hydrate distribution of the area, and to identify significant exploration targets. Finally, we evaluated the reliability of the predicted results. The south seabed area of Taiwan Bank is recommended as a priority exploration target. The Zhujiang Mouth, Southeast Hainan, and Southwest Taiwan Basins, including the South Bijia Basin, also are recommended as exploration target areas. In addition, the method in this paper can provide a useful predictive approach for gas hydrate resource assessment, which gives a scientific basis for construction and implementation of long-term planning for gas hydrate exploration and general exploitation of the seabed of China.

  1. Anisotropic models to account for large borehole washouts to estimate gas hydrate saturations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Alaminos 21 B well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Through the use of 3-D seismic amplitude mapping, several gashydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon (AC) area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two locations were drilled as part of the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (JIP Leg II) in May of 2009 and a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs were acquired at each well site. LWD logs indicated that resistivity in the range of ~2 ohm-m and P-wave velocity in the range of ~1.9 km/s were measured in the target sand interval between 515 and 645 feet below sea floor. These values were slightly elevated relative to those measured in the sediment above and below the target sand. However, the initial well log analysis was inconclusive regarding the presence of gashydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because largewashouts caused by drilling in the target interval degraded confidence in the well log measurements. To assess gashydratesaturations in the sedimentary section drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21B (AC21-B) well, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities was developed. The proposed method models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with sea water (drilling fluid) and the apparent anisotropic resistivity and velocities caused by a vertical layer are used to correct the measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis, the average gashydratesaturation in the target sand section in the AC21-Bwell can be constrained to the range of 8–28%, with 20% being our best estimate.

  2. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  3. Public subscription project for international joint research proposals in fiscal 2000 - public subscription of international proposal (substitution No.3). Report on achievements in research related to industrial utilization and social systematization of gas hydrate technologies; 2000 nendo kokusai kyodo kenkyu teian kobo jigyo - kokusai teian kobo (daitai No.3). Gas hydrate gijutsu no sangyo riyo shakai system ka ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Activities have been advanced to establish necessary basic technologies by making clear the possibilities and problems in applying gas hydrate technologies to industrial fields. Activities have been taken in the following three fields: 1) industrial utilization and social systematization of gas hydrate technologies, 2) conceptual design of gas hydrate utilization technologies, and 3) researches on basic technologies to utilize the gas hydrate technologies in industries. In Item 1), discussions were given on significance of social systematization of the gas hydrate technologies, conditions for social systematization of the gas hydrate technologies, the current status of natural gas development and industrial utilization of the gas hydrate technologies. In Item 2), discussions were given on utilization of gas containability (application to natural gas transportation and storage processes), utilization of cold heat storage performance (utilization to suction air cooling of gas turbine generators), and utilization of gas selectivity (application to gas separation processes and acidic gas (CO2, SOx) separation). (NEDO)

  4. Introduction of the 2007-2008 JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, NWT, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Numasawa, M.; Yasuda, M.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, K.; Wright, J.; Nixon, F.

    2007-12-01

    Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) and Natural Resource Canada (NRCan) have embarked on a new research program to study the production potential of gas hydrates. The program is being carried out at the Mallik gas hydrate field in the Mackenzie Delta, a location where two previous scientific investigations have been carried in 1998 and 2002. In the 2002 program that was undertaken by seven partners from five countries, 468m3 of gas flow was measured during 124 hours of thermal stimulation using hot warm fluid. Small-scale pressure drawdown tests were also carried out using Schlumberger's Modular Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool, gas flow was observed and the inferred formation permeabilities suggested the possible effectiveness of the simple depressurization method. While the testing undertaken in 2002 can be cited as the first well constrained gas production from a gas hydrate deposit, the results fell short of that required to fully calibrate reservoir simulation models or indeed establish the technical viability of long term production from gas hydrates. The objectives of the current JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik production research program are to undertake longer term production testing to further constrain the scientific unknowns and to demonstrate the technical feasibility of sustained gas hydrate production using the depressurization method. A key priority is to accurately measure water and gas production using state-of-art production technologies. The primary production test well was established during the 2007 field season with the re-entry and deepening of JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 well, originally drilled in 1998. Production testing was carried out in April of 2007 under a relatively low drawdown pressure condition. Flow of methane gas was measured from a 12m perforated interval of gas-hydrate-saturated sands from 1093 to 1105m. The results establish the potential of the depressurization method and provide a basis for future

  5. [Psychosocial research and family planning services in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina Fuentes, M; Vernon Carter, R

    1985-01-01

    Psychosocial and service studies round out data from the demographic and contraceptive prevalence studies that have been conducted every 3 years since 1976 in Mexico. The studies can be formative, providing basic information for development of a program, or evaluative, indicating how well a program is performing. Among formative psychosocial studies in Mexico have been knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) studies, which are usually helpful in the initial stages of family planning program implementation. A 1964 study of knowledge and practice in 7 Mexican cities showed that attitudes toward family planning were more traditional and disapproving in Mexico City than in other areas, but that many women wanted no more children. About 1/4 of the population of Mexico City knew no contraceptive methods and about 1/2 knew only less effective traditional methods. By 1979, 72% of women knew at least 1 effective method. KAP studies have demonstrated differences in the family size desires of men and women and in the determinants of attitudes toward birth control. Formative studies of surgical contraception have been psychologically oriented, and have helped provide a rational basis for making the operation accessible to the public. Despite some passing problems, most women have adapted to sterilization and their libidos have normalized by 18 months postoperative. Studies of the knowledge and attitudes of physicians conducted in the early days of family planning programs have helped in the design of programs to inform them of the advantages and side affects of contraceptive methods. Other studies have helped identify traditional midwives with large practices in rural areas who could be trained to deliver family planning services and have demonstrated that they develop a good understanding of contraindications and side effects of oral contraceptives. Teaching materials for IEC programs have been evaluated with small samples, but minimal attention has been given to research on

  6. Formation of submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloviev, V.; Ginsburg, G.D. (Reserch Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean ' ' VNII Okeangeologia' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    1994-03-01

    Submarine gas hydrates have been discoverd in the course of deep-sea drilling (DSDP and ODP) and bottom sampling in many offshore regions. This paper reports on expeditions carried out in the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas. Gas hydrate accumulations were discovered and investigated in all these areas. The data and an analysis of the results of the deep-sea drilling programme suggest that the infiltration of gas-bearing fluids is a necessary condition for gas hydrate accumulation. This is confirmed by geological observations at three scale levels. Firstly, hydrates in cores are usually associated with comparatively coarse-grained, permeable sediments as well as voids and fractures. Secondly, hydrate accumulations are controlled by permeable geological structures, i.e. faults, diapirs, mud volcanos as well as layered sequences. Thirdly, in the worldwide scale, hydrate accumulations are characteristic of continental slopes and rises and intra-continental seas where submarine seepages also are widespread. Both biogenic and catagenic gas may occur, and the gas sources may be located at various distances from the accumulation. Gas hydrates presumably originate from water-dissolved gas. The possibility of a transition from dissolved gas into hydrate is confirmed by experimental data. Shallow gas hydrate accumulations associated with gas-bearing fluid plumes are the most convenient features for the study of submarine hydrate formation in general. These accumulations are known from the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas, the Gulf of Mexico and off northern California. (au) (24 refs.)

  7. The contribution of geomorphological research to environmental issues in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Bocco

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the development of Mexican geomorphology and specially its contribution to environmental issues. To this end, a thorough literature review was carried out; papers were differentiated according to the type of journal (Mexican and international. Special emphasis was placed on analyzing whether the interest on environment was derived from a well defined theoretical framework, in particular in terms of the insertion of geomorphology in the geographic arena in Mexico. The review has focused on secientific papers duly refereed and available at the Internet. Thus other research was not included. However, that the database described in this paper represents a solid sample of the entire universe of the efforts of Mexican geomorphologists.

  8. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basques, Eric O. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  9. International research cooperation project. Assessment report on the R and D of the comprehensive development/utilization technology of energy of gas hydrate resource; Gas hydrate shigen no energy sogo kaihatsu riyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu hyoka hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    As to 'the R and D of the comprehensive development/utilization technology of gas hydrate resource,' assessment was conducted and reported from an aspect of the third party. This R and D is a timely project being aimed at establishing the basic technology on gas hydrate from both aspects of fundamental research and practical research. In the development of gas hydrate resource in the tundra zone, the development of measuring methods for thermal conductivity and dielectric constants advanced the establishment of a guide for exploration and possibilities of assessment of the resource amount. In the development/production, it can be said that the knowledge/information collected by exchanging methane in gas hydrate with CO2 means no needs for new supply of heat and also contributes to the isolation of CO2. As to the utilization technology, the results were rated very high also internationally of tackling the quantitative evaluation method at molecular levels of the gas included in hydrate using Raman spectroscopy to establish the industrial gas separation method using the low-temperature environment in the tundra zone. (NEDO)

  10. Incident at university research facility - pressure testing of gas hydrate cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2014-01-01

    A master student designed a cell for observing the development of gas hydrates as conditions in the cell were changed. The supervisor asked for a pressure test of the cell before the experiments started. The student chose-to perform the pressure test using compressed air and this resulted in one...

  11. Material Research on Salt Hydrates for Seasonal Heat Storage Application in a Residential Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferchaud, C.J.; Zondag, H.A.; De Boer, R. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Water vapor sorption in salt hydrates is a promising method to realize seasonal solar heat storage in the residential sector. Several materials already showed promising performance for this application. However, the stability of these materials needs to be improved for long-term (30 year) application in seasonal solar heat storages. The purpose of this article is to identify the influence of the material properties of the salt hydrates on the performance and the reaction kinetics of the sorption process. The experimental investigation presented in this article shows that the two salt hydrates Li2SO4.H2O and CuSO4.5H2O can store and release heat under the operating conditions of a seasonal solar heat storage in a fully reversible way. However, these two materials show differences in terms of energy density and reaction kinetics. Li2SO4.H2O can release heat with an energy density of around 0.80 GJ/m{sup 3} within 4 hours of rehydration at 25C, while CuSO4.5H2O needs around 130 hours at the same temperature to be fully rehydrated and reaches an energy density of 1.85 GJ/m{sup 3}. Since the two salts are dehydrated and hydrated under the same conditions, this difference in behavior is directly related to the intrinsic properties of the materials.

  12. Prestack Waveform Inversion and Well Log Examination at GC955 and WR313 in the Gulf of Mexico for Estimation of Methane Hydrate Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, W.; Goldberg, D.; Kucuk, H. M.

    2017-12-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring compounds, which, at a molecular scale, are lattice structures of ice embedded with various gas molecules in the lattice voids. Volumetric estimates of associated hydrocarbons vary greatly due to the difficulty in remotely estimating hydrate concentrations in marine sediments but embedded hydrocarbon stores are thought to represent a significant portion of global deposits. Inherent hydrate instabilities obscure our understanding of and complicates processes related to resource extraction and hydrate response to disturbances in the local environment. Understanding the spatial extent and variability of hydrate deposits have important implications for potential economic production, climate change, and assessing natural hazards risks. Seismic reflection techniques are capable of determining the extent of gas hydrate deposits, often through the observation of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). However, BSRs are not present everywhere gas hydrates exist. Using high resolution prestack time migrated seismic data and prestack waveform inversion (PWI) we produce highly resolved velocity models and compare them to co-located well logs. Coupling our PWI results with velocity-porosity relationships and nearby well control, we map hydrate properties at GC955 and WR313. Integrating small scale heterogeneities and variations along the velocity model with in-situ measurements, we develop a workflow aimed to quantify hydrate concentrations observed in seismic data over large areas in great detail regardless of the existence of a BSR.

  13. Overview of the science activities for the 2002 Mallik gas hydrate production research well program, Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T., Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallimore, S. R.; Collett, T. S.; Uchida, T.; Weber, M.

    2003-04-01

    With the completion of scientific studies undertaken as part of the 1998 Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, an international research site was established for the study of Arctic natural gas hydrates in the Mackenzie Delta of northwestern Canada. Quantitative well log analysis and core studies reveal multiple gas hydrate layers from 890 m to 1106 m depth, exceeding 110 m in total thickness. High gas hydrate saturation values, which in some cases exceed 80% of the pore volume, establish the Mallik gas hydrate field as one of the most concentrated gas hydrate reservoirs in the world. Beginning in December 2001 and continuing to the middle of March 2002, two 1188 m deep science observation wells were drilled and instrumented and a 1166 m deep production research well program was carried out. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. In addition the project has been accepted as part of the International Scientific Continental Drilling Program. The Geological Survey of Canada is coordinating the science program for the project and JAPEX Canada Ltd. acted as the designated operator for the fieldwork. Primary objectives of the research program are to advance fundamental geological, geophysical and geochemical studies of the Mallik gas hydrate field and to undertake advanced production testing of a concentrated gas hydrate reservoir. Full-scale field experiments in the production well monitored the physical behavior of the hydrate deposits in response to depressurization and thermal stimulation. The observation wells facilitated cross-hole tomography and vertical seismic profile experiments (before and after production) as well as

  14. Geodiversity and geoheritage research and education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Geosites, geomorphosites, geoheritage, geodiversity and other related research and educational fields have been absent in the curricula of Mexican universities, although some efforts to consider those topics started in 2004 (Garrido, 2004). In the case of Mexico, Geographers have been the main promoters of the study of geoparks and, more recently, geomorphosites; studies on geosites have been developed by geologists although, in all cases, concrete examples are very limited in number since no systematic work has been proposed. A general educational project to promote the study and research on Geoparks (including Geodiversity, Geoconservation, Geosites and Geomorphosites) has been recently proposed atthye Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. The main components of this project include: a) Teaching. Starting only this year, the School of Geography (undergraduate level) incorporated for the first time a subject specifically related to geoparks, geosites and geomorphosites. The subject is complemented with other, more specifically related to the land use management, cartography and (geo)tourism; b) Research. At the Institute of Geography, projects to conduct systematic research on geoparks and related items has just started; c) Natural heritage promotion and Geotourism. In a national context, where tourism has received official attention and extraordinary financial support, Geotourism plays an important part of the educational project. A proposal has been submitted to the Ministry of Tourism so that students are expected to get an official certificate to carry out activities related to the promotion of the natural heritage as a (Geo)tourist Guide. Among general goals, the creation of regional and national networks of geoparks, and participation in international efforts (geosites and geomorphosites lists), are also considered.

  15. Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The background notes on Mexico provide text and recent statistical information on the geography, population, government, economy, and foreign relations, specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement with US. The 1992 population is estimated at 89 million of which 60% are mestizo (Indian-Spanish), 30% are American Indian, 9% are Caucasian, and 1% are other. 90% are Roman Catholic. There are 8 years of compulsory education. Infant mortality is 30/1000 live births. Life expectancy for males is 68 years and 76 years for females. The labor force is comprised of 30% in services, 24% in agriculture and fishing, 19% in manufacturing, 13% in commerce, 7% in construction, 4% in transportation and communication, and .4% in mining. There are 31 states and a federal district. Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was $3200 in 1991. Military expenditures were .5% of GDP in 1991. The average inflation rate is 19%. Mexico City with 20 million is the largest urban center in the world. In recent years, the economy has been restructured with market oriented reforms; the result has been a growth of GDP of 3.6% in 1991 from 2% in 1987. Dependence on oil exports has decreased. There has been privatization and deregulation of state-owned companies. Subsidies to inefficient companies have been stopped. Tariff rates were reduced. The financial debt has been reduced and turned into a surplus of .8% in 1992. Mexico's foreign debt has been reduced from its high in 1987 of $107 billion. Agricultural reforms have been ongoing for 50 years. Land was redistributed, but standards of living and productivity have improved only slightly. Rural land tenure regulations have been changed, and other economic reforms are expected. Mexico engages in ad hoc international groups and is selective about membership in international organizations.

  16. High current betatron research at the University of New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Len, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    Betatrons are among the simplest of high energy accelerators. Their circuit is equivalent to a step-up transformer; the electron beam forms a multi-turn secondary winding. Circulation of the beam around the flux core allows generation of high energy electrons with relatively small core mass. As with any transformer, a betatron is energy inefficient at low beam current; the energy balance is dominated by core losses. This fact has prompted a continuing investigation of high current betatrons as efficient, compact sources of beta and gamma radiation. A program has been supported at the University of New Mexico by the Office of Naval Research to study the physics of high current electron beams in circular accelerators and to develop practical technology for high power betatrons. Fabrication and assembly of the main ring was completed in January of this year. In contrast to other recent high current betatron experiments the UNM device utilizes a periodic focusing system to contain high current beams during the low energy phase of the acceleration cycle. The reversing cusp fields generated by alternating polarity solenoidal lenses cancel beam drift motions induced by machine errors. In consequence, they have found that the cusp geometry has had significantly better stability properties than a monodirectional toroidal field. In comparison to other minimum-Β geometries such as the Stelllatron cusps have open field lines which facilitate beam injection and neutralization

  17. Integrated Risk Research. Case of Study: Motozintla, Chiapas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Jaimes, M.

    2015-12-01

    This integrated risk research include the analysis of all components of individual constituents of risk such hazard identification, hazard exposure, and vulnerability. We determined risk to natural hazards in the community of Motozintla located in southern Mexico in the state of Chiapas (15.37ºN, 92.25ºW. Due to its geographical and geological location, this community is continuously exposed mainly to earthquakes, landslides and floods. We developed integrated studies and analysis of seismic zonation, landslides and flood susceptibility using standard methodologies. Vulnerability was quantified from data collected from local families interviews considering five social variables: characteristics of housing construction, availability of basic public services, family economic conditions, existing community plans for disaster preparedness, and risk perception. Local families surveyed were randomly selected considering a sample statistically significant. Our results were spatially represented using a Geographical Information System (GIS). Structural vulnerability curves were generated for typical housing constructions. Our integrated risk analysis demonstrates that the community of Motozintla has a high level of structural and socio-economical risk to floods and earthquakes. More than half of the population does not know any existing Civil Protection Plan and perceive that they are in high risk to landslides and floods. Although the community is located in a high seismic risk zone, most of the local people believe that cannot be impacted by a large earthquake. These natural and social conditions indicate that the community of Motozintla has a very high level of risk to natural hazards. This research will support local decision makers in developing an integrated comprehensive natural hazards mitigation and prevention program.

  18. A review of eating disorders research in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unikel, Claudia; Bojorquez, Ietza

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to summarize research findings on eating disorders and the current state of the field in Mexico. Papers published in indexed journals and graduate dissertations were retrieved, using "eating disorders," "anorexia nervosa," "bulimia nervosa," "body image," "binge eating," "restrained eating," "weight and shape concern," and "dieting" as keywords. These were combined with the Boolean operator "AND" with "Mexico" and "Latin America." Findings are presented for epidemiology, the validity of assessment instruments, comorbidity, and risk factors. A national representative survey found a prevalence of 1.8% for bulimia nervosa, and no cases of anorexia nervosa. However, the lack of studies with confirmatory clinical interview and other national or regional representative samples makes it difficult to reach conclusions about the actual prevalence. A number of instruments for the detection of eating disorders and disordered eating have been validated for the Mexican population. The comorbidity of eating disorders in Mexico includes drug and alcohol abuse, obesity, and borderline personality disorder. Risk factors found included body weight and cultural pressure to be thin. Future lines of research should include epidemiological studies with representative samples and diagnosis confirmation, longitudinal studies, and the exploration of protective and risk factors specific to this population. We want to acknowledge Dr Richard A. Gordon's encouragement to write this manuscript and his accurate comments on its preliminary and final versions. We also want to thank the participants of the seminar on publications held at the Office of Epidemiological and Psychosocial Studies of the National Institute of Psychiatry for the comments they made to this article. El objetivo de este trabajo es el de resumir los hallazgos de investigación sobre los trastornos alimentarios y el estado actual del campo en México. Se recuperó la obra publicada en revistas

  19. Gas-hydrate concentration estimated from P- and S-wave velocities at the Mallik 2L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcione, José M.; Gei, Davide

    2004-05-01

    We estimate the concentration of gas hydrate at the Mallik 2L-38 research site using P- and S-wave velocities obtained from well logging and vertical seismic profiles (VSP). The theoretical velocities are obtained from a generalization of Gassmann's modulus to three phases (rock frame, gas hydrate and fluid). The dry-rock moduli are estimated from the log profiles, in sections where the rock is assumed to be fully saturated with water. We obtain hydrate concentrations up to 75%, average values of 37% and 21% from the VSP P- and S-wave velocities, respectively, and 60% and 57% from the sonic-log P- and S-wave velocities, respectively. The above averages are similar to estimations obtained from hydrate dissociation modeling and Archie methods. The estimations based on the P-wave velocities are more reliable than those based on the S-wave velocities.

  20. Gulf of Mexico dissolved oxygen model (GoMDOM) research and quality assurance project plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    An integrated high resolution mathematical modeling framework is being developed that will link hydrodynamic, atmospheric, and water quality models for the northern Gulf of Mexico. This Research and Quality Assurance Project Plan primarily focuses on the deterministic Gulf of Me...

  1. Geologic and porous media factors affecting the 2007 production response characteristics of the JOGMEC/NRCan/AURORA Mallik gas hydrate production research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallimore, S. R.; Wright, J. F.; Nixon, F. M. [Natural Resources Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada; Kurihara, M. [Japan Oil Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, K.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, K.; Numasawa, M.; Yasuda, M. [Japan Oil, Gas, Metals National Corp., Chiba (Japan). Technical Research Centre; Imasato, Y. [Schlumberger K.K., Fuchinombe (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The joint research project between Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and the Aurora Research Institute was conducted in an effort to measure and monitor the response of a terrestrial gas hydrate reservoir to pressure draw down. This paper reviewed the geologic setting and porous media conditions of a concentrated gas hydrate production interval between 1093 and 1105 m. The short-duration production test was conducted at the Mallik site in Canada's Mackenzie Delta in April 2007. The production interval consists of a sand-dominated succession with occasional silty sand interbeds. Gas hydrate occurs primarily within the sediment pore spaces, with concentrations ranging between 50-90 per cent. Experiments on pore water salinity and porous media conditions on pressure-temperature stability suggest that the partition between gas hydrate stability and instability should be considered as a phase boundary zone rather than a discrete threshold. The experiment revealed that there are significant changes to the physical properties following gas hydrate dissociation, with sediments containing no hydrate behaving as unconsolidated sands. A strong reservoir response to pressure draw down was observed with increasing gas flow during the testing period. Sand inflow to the well during the test may be attributed to loss of sediment strength during gas hydrate dissociation, with the sediment behaving as a gasified slurry. It was concluded that the gas flow response observed during the 2007 production test at Mallik was highly influenced by porous media properties and by the geological heterogeneities which may initiate high permeability conduits in sediments within the production interval of the Mallik gas hydrate reservoir. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Renewable energy research progress in Mexico: A review

    OpenAIRE

    ALEMÁN-NAVA Gibrán S. Alemán-Nava; CASIANO-FLORES Victor H.; CARDENAS-CHAVEZ Diana L.; DÍAZ-CHAVEZ Rocío; SCARLAT NICOLAE; MAHLKNECHT Jürgen; DALLEMAND Jean-Francois; PARRA Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Mexico ranks 9th in the world in crude oil reserves, 4th in natural gas reserves in America and it is also highly rich in renewable energy sources (solar, wind, biomasss, hydropower and geothermal). However, the potential of this type of energy has not been fully exploited. Hydropower is the renewable energy source with the highest installed capacity within the country (11,603 MW), while geothermal power capacity (958 MW) makes Mexico to be ranked 4th in the use of this energy worldwide. Wind...

  3. Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes the key energy data for Mexico: 1 - energy organizations and policy: Ministry of energy (SENER), Comision Reguladora de Energia (CRE), Ministry of Finances, Ministry of trade and industrial development (SECOFI), national commission for energy savings (CONAE); 2 - companies: federal commission of electricity (CFE), Minera Carbonifera Rio Escondido (MICARE - coal), Pemex (petroleum); 3 - energy production: resources, electric power, petroleum, natural gas; 4 - energy consumption; 5 - stakes and perspectives. Some economic and energy indicators are summarized in a series of tables: general indicators, supply indicators (reserves, refining and electric capacity, energy production, foreign trade), demand indicators (consumption trends, end use, energy independence, energy efficiency, CO 2 emissions), energy status per year and per energy source. (J.S.)

  4. Preliminary report on the economics of gas production from natural gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, M.; Wilson, S.; Patil, S.; Moridis, G.; Boswell, R.; Koh, C.; Sloan, D.

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds in which gas molecules reside inside cages that are formed by hydrogen-bonded water molecules in a crystal lattice. At particularly low temperatures and high pressures, a guest molecule will combine with water to form gas hydrates. Gas hydrates are found in two different settings in which the temperature and pressure conditions are suitable for their existence, notably in Arctic permafrost regions and below the seafloor. Because of the size of this possible future resource, if any of the gas in hydrates can be proven to be economically recoverable, then production from gas hydrates could become an important portion of the world's energy portfolio as demand for natural gas increases along with the technology to compress and distribute natural gas to distant markets. This paper presented a compilation of economic research that was conducted on the resource potential of gas hydrates. The paper reported a preliminary estimate of the price of natural gas that may lead to economically-viable production from North American Arctic region hydrates. The paper also discussed the implications of a recent study on the production of class 3 marine hydrate deposits from the Gulf of Mexico. The state of the art technologies and methods in hydrate reservoir modeling and hydrate reservoir production and petrophysical testing were also discussed. It was concluded that the somewhat optimistic results presented in this report should be interpreted with caution, however, the economically-viable gas production from hydrates was not an unreasonable scenario. 23 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs

  5. Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative; Volume 5, Strategic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    Members of the Task HI (Strategic Evaluation) team were responsible for the development of a methodology to evaluate policies designed to alleviate air pollution in Mexico City. This methodology utilizes information from various reports that examined ways to reduce pollutant emissions, results from models that calculate the improvement in air quality due to a reduction in pollutant emissions, and the opinions of experts as to the requirements and trade-offs that are involved in developing a program to address the air pollution problem in Mexico City. The methodology combines these data to produce comparisons between different approaches to improving Mexico City`s air quality. These comparisons take into account not only objective factors such as the air quality improvement or cost of the different approaches, but also subjective factors such as public acceptance or political attractiveness of the different approaches. The end result of the process is a ranking of the different approaches and, more importantly, the process provides insights into the implications of implementing a particular approach or policy.

  6. Organophosphorous pesticides research in Mexico: epidemiological and experimental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Guerra, M; Pérez-Herrera, N; Quintanilla-Vega, B

    2011-11-01

    Non-persistent pesticides, such as organophosphorous (OP) insecticides have been extensively used in Mexico, and becoming a public health problem. This review presents data of OP use and related toxicity from epidemiological and experimental studies conducted in Mexico. Studies in agricultural workers from several regions of the country reported moderate to severe cholinergic symptoms, including decreased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity (the main acute OP toxic effect that causes an over accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine), revealing the potential risk of intoxication of Mexican farmers. OP exposure in occupational settings has been associated with decreased semen quality, sperm DNA damage and as endocrine disrupter, particularly in agricultural workers. Alterations in female reproductive function have also been observed, as well as adverse effects on embryo development by prenatal exposure in agricultural communities. This illustrates that OP exposure represents a risk for reproduction and offspring well-being in Mexico. The genotoxic effects of this group of pesticides in somatic and sperm cells are also documented. Lastly, we present data about gene-environmental interactions regarding OP metabolizing enzymes, such as paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and its role in modulating their toxicity, particularly on semen quality and sperm DNA integrity. In summary, readers will see the important health problems associated with OP exposure in Mexican populations, thereby the need of capacitation programs to communicate farmers the proper handling of agrochemicals to prevent their toxic effects and of more well designed human studies to support data of the current situation of workers and communities dedicated to agriculture activities.

  7. Planning and Execution of a Marine Methane Hydrate Pressure Coring Program for the Walker Ridge and Green Canyon Areas of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, Gary [Fugro Geoconsulting Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project (and report) is to produce a guide to developing scientific, operational, and logistical plans for a future methane hydrate-focused offshore pressure coring program. This report focuses primarily on a potential coring program in the Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 blocks where previous investigations were undertaken as part of the 2009 Department of Energy JIP Leg II expedition, however, the approach to designing a pressure coring program that was utilized for this project may also serve as a useful model for planning pressure coring programs for hydrates in other areas. The initial portion of the report provides a brief overview of prior investigations related to gas hydrates in general and at the Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 blocks in particular. The main content of the report provides guidance for various criteria that will come into play when designing a pressure coring program.

  8. Chloral Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you are allergic to chloral hydrate, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess ...

  9. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C Mark; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-12-07

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  10. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  11. Archie's Saturation Exponent for Natural Gas Hydrate in Coarse-Grained Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ann E.; Waite, William F.

    2018-03-01

    Accurately quantifying the amount of naturally occurring gas hydrate in marine and permafrost environments is important for assessing its resource potential and understanding the role of gas hydrate in the global carbon cycle. Electrical resistivity well logs are often used to calculate gas hydrate saturations, Sh, using Archie's equation. Archie's equation, in turn, relies on an empirical saturation parameter, n. Though n = 1.9 has been measured for ice-bearing sands and is widely used within the hydrate community, it is highly questionable if this n value is appropriate for hydrate-bearing sands. In this work, we calibrate n for hydrate-bearing sands from the Canadian permafrost gas hydrate research well, Mallik 5L-38, by establishing an independent downhole Sh profile based on compressional-wave velocity log data. Using the independently determined Sh profile and colocated electrical resistivity and bulk density logs, Archie's saturation equation is solved for n, and uncertainty is tracked throughout the iterative process. In addition to the Mallik 5L-38 well, we also apply this method to two marine, coarse-grained reservoirs from the northern Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project: Walker Ridge 313-H and Green Canyon 955-H. All locations yield similar results, each suggesting n ≈ 2.5 ± 0.5. Thus, for the coarse-grained hydrate bearing (Sh > 0.4) of greatest interest as potential energy resources, we suggest that n = 2.5 ± 0.5 should be applied in Archie's equation for either marine or permafrost gas hydrate settings if independent estimates of n are not available.

  12. Nuclear criticality research at the University of New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Two projects at the University of New Mexico are briefly described. The university's Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department has completed the final draft of a primer for MCNP4A, which it plans to publish soon. The primer was written to help an analyst who has little experience with the MCNP code to perform criticality safety analyses. In addition, the department has carried out a series of approach-to-critical experiments on the SHEBA-II, a UO 2 F 2 solution critical assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The results obtained differed slightly from what was predicted by the TWODANT code

  13. Relation between gas hydrate and physical properties at the Mallik 2L-38 research well in the Mackenzie delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Dallimore, S.R.; Collett, T.S.; Jenner, K.A.; Katsube, J.T.; Cranston, R.E.; Wright, J.F.; Nixon, F.M.; Uchida, T.

    2000-01-01

    As part of an interdisciplinary field program, a 1150-m deep well was drilled in the Canadian Arctic to determine, among other goals, the location, characteristics, and properties of gas hydrate. Numerous physical properties of the host sediment were measured in the laboratory and are presented in relation to the lithology and quantity of in situ gas hydrate. Profiles of measured and derived properties presented from that investigation include: sediment wet bulk density, water content, porosity, grain density, salinity, gas hydrate content (percent occupancy of non-sediment grain void space), grain size, porosity, and post-recovery core temperature. The greatest concentration of gas hydrate is located within sand and gravel deposits between 897 and 922 m. Silty sediment between 926 and 952 m contained substantially less, or no, gas hydrate perhaps because of smaller pore size.

  14. [A first analysis of research on social determinants of health in Mexico: 2005-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-de Snyder, V Nelly; Guerra-y Guerra, Germán

    2014-01-01

    To examine the research on social determinants of health (SDH) produced in Mexico during the period 2005-2012, based on the characterization of the national health research system and the scientific production on this topic. Two-stage analyses: Review of Mexican documents and official sources on health research and systematic bibliographic review of the literature on SDH. Although SDH were mentioned in the Specific Action Plan for Health Research 2007-2012, they are not implemented in strategies and goals, as the emphasis is put mostly in infrastructure and administrative aspects of research. In the period studied, 145 articles were published on SDH topics such as health conditions, health systems and nutrition and obesity. In spite of the availability of research on SDH in Mexico, the operationalization of such findings into health policies has not been possible. The current Sectorial Program on Health 2013-2018 represents a window of opportunity to position research findings that promote health equity policies.

  15. Scientific discourse in educational research in Latin America: the case of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Julia Castellanos Quintero

    2011-01-01

    In this article it is presented the state of arts of the analysis of the scientific discourse in educational research in Mexico, particularly, in the curriculum design and development research. The development of the research in the area of university curricula started seriously in the decade of 80´s.The scientific discourse was oriented towards the searching of models and methods of teaching and evaluation, of the best way of the implementation of practicum and the correspondence between the...

  16. A Community of Practice among Educators, Researchers and Scientists for Improving Science Teaching in Southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-Cohernour, Edith J.; Lopez-Avila, Maria T.; Barrera-Bustillos, Maria E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents findings of a project aimed to improve the quality of science education in Southeast Mexico by the creation of a community of practice among scientists, researchers and teachers, involved in the design, implementation and evaluation of a professional development program for mathematics, chemistry, biology and physics secondary…

  17. Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Research Program Data Report 2002-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    The work described in this report summarizes the data collected during 12 oceanographic cruises conducted from 2002-2007. The project was supported by the US EPA Office of Research and Development, in partnership with the US EPA Gulf of Mexico Program Office, the Office of Water,...

  18. The Comparative Research on the Penalty Allocation between Mexico and China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-juan Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available China and Mexico are both developing countries and are at the stage of economic transformation. As the advanced development of economy and industrialization, in both countries, environmental crime has become an unseen and gigantic social threat. The special characteristics of environmental crime have brought about new requirements to the traditional penalty. In order to attack the environmental crime in time and to ensure the seriousness and unity, it's necessary to make a comparison research on the penalty allocation between Mexico and China and analyze the respective advantages and disadvantages to perfect the relative legislation of the two countries.

  19. Research Culture in Higher Education: The Case of a Foreign Language Department in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Hernández Méndez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the case of Mexico, until recently, many universities focused mainly on teaching, but recent changes have led to new appointments in research, administration, and community service. There now seems to be, however, a view of the predominance of research in the academic environment. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to examine and identify, through the lens of organizational theory and a current model of research culture in an academic setting, some characteristics of the research culture in the Department of Languages and Education at a public university in Southeast Mexico. Following the international tendencies and models in higher education, we see that the research culture observed in this university resembles more a market culture than other types of culture, although some traits of hierarchy culture provide cohesion in the organization.

  20. Seismic Characterization and Continuity Analysis of Gas Hydrate Horizons Near the Mallik Research Wells, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellefleur, G.; Riedel, M.; Brent, T.

    2005-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits in arctic environment generally lack the BSR signature diagnostic of their presence in marine seismic data. The absence of the BSR signature complicates the estimation of the resources within or below the permafrost and the determination of their potential impact on future energy supplies, geohazard and climate change. We present results from a detailed seismic characterization of three gas hydrate horizons (A, B and C) intersected below the permafrost in five wells of the Mallik gas hydrate field located in the Mackenzie delta (Northwest Territories, Canada). The detailed seismic characterization included attribute analyses, synthetic modeling and acoustic impedance inversion and allowed estimation of the lateral continuity of the three horizons in the vicinity of the wells. Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data, 3D and 2D industry seismic data and the 5L/2L-38 geophysical logs (density, P-wave sonic velocity) were used for this study. Synthetic modeling using the sonic and density logs reveals that the base of the lower gas hydrate horizons B and C can be identified on the industry 3D and 2D seismic sections as prominent isolated reflections. The uppermost gas hydrate occurrence (horizon A) and potentially other additional smaller-scale layers are identified only on the higher-resolution VSP data. The 3D industry seismic data set processed to preserve the relative true-amplitudes was used for attribute calculations and acoustic impedance inversion. The attribute maps defined areas of continuous reflectivity for horizons B and C and structural features disrupting them. Results from impedance inversion indicate that such continuous reflectivity around the wells is most likely attributable to gas hydrates. The middle gas hydrate occurrence (horizon B) covers an area of approximately 25 000m2. Horizon C, which marks the base of gas hydrate occurrence zone, extends over a larger area of approximately 120 000m2.

  1. Effective-Medium Models for Marine Gas Hydrates, Mallik Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, D. A.; Knapp, C. C.; Knapp, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    saturation to compare with well log data available from the Canadian gas hydrates research site. By directly comparing the infinitely rough and perfectly smooth grain versions of the Hertz-Mindlin type effective-medium model, we provide additional insight to the discrepancies noted in the Gulf of Mexico study.

  2. Report on the achievements in fiscal 1999. Technology to use gas hydrate as a resource (Research and development for exploration, research and development on drilling technologies, investigative research on an environment influence evaluation method, and investigative research on a utilization system); 1999 nendo gas hydrate shigenka gijutsu sendo kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Tansa nado ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu, kussaku gijutsu nado ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu, kankyo eikyo hyokaho no chosa kenkyu, riyo system ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The contents of the research and development performed in the current fiscal year are as follows: (1) research and development for exploration, (2) research and development on drilling technologies, (3) investigative research on an environment influence evaluation method, and (4) investigative research on a utilization system. In Item (1), element analysis data are used to study a method to estimate production environment of hydrate ore beds by using an inorganic ion analyzer and a trace amount element analyzer, the crust thermal flow measuring method is used to discuss a method to analyze the hydrate stability zones together with the data of sea area exploration records, and conceptual design is made on a resource potential evaluation system. In Item (2), experiments and analytical discussions are performed on decomposition control of the gas hydrate solid-liquid interface according to such conditions for the drilling fluid as temperatures and flow rates. Elucidation is given on the initial process of bubble generation for behavior of decomposed gas bubbles. Observation and elucidation are made on two-phase flow behavior of non-Newtonian fluid. In Item (3), conceptual design is carried out on a system to detect elements of shape change in each bed due to fluid movement in a gas hydrate bed and an upper bed. In Item (4), discussions are given on the optimizing conditions for generation and dissociation of gas hydrates. Investigation is made also on a possibility of the transportation and storage system. (NEDO)

  3. Report on the actual state of the basic, applied research and industrial applications of the radiation in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez V, H.

    1991-07-01

    In this report the main works of basic, applied research and industrial applications that are carried out in Mexico, about radiations (radiation chemistry, technology, applications, use and isotope production, etc.): infrastructure, radiation sources, groups and research programs are presented. (Author)

  4. First oceanographic atlas of the Gulf of Mexico. National Award of Oceanographic Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal L., F.; Vidal L., V.M.; Hernandez O., A.

    1991-01-01

    First oceanographic atlas of the Gulf of Mexico National award of oceanographic research. As a result of the research activities applied by Federal Electricity Commission related with oceanographic studies for nuclear stations siting and licensing in coastal areas, doctors Victor Manuel and Francisco Vidal Lorandi and Master in Sciences Abel Hernandez Ochoa got the oceanographic research National award, instituted recently by Mexican Government, by research work published in Oceanographic Atlas of the Gulf of Mexico, Volume II. Atlas presents synthetized oceanographic information about mexican gulf circulation, as well as residence time and water masses distribution. Atlas includes information related with siting and licensing of nuclear stations on shore and has also application, among others, in petroleum, fishery, maritime transportation, and tourism sectors

  5. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  6. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  7. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: Results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, P.; Lall, M.; Mazumdar, A.; Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Riedel, M.; Sain, K.; Sathe, A.V.; Vishwanath, K.; NGHP Expedition 01 Scientific Party

    in Japan (Tsujii et al., 2009) and in the Gulf of Mexico (Boswell et al., 2012a) and the pace of gas-hydrate energy-assessment projects continues to accelerate. Beyond a future energy resource, gas hydrates may in some cases represent a significant...

  8. Hydration and cognition: a critical review and recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R

    2007-10-01

    The limited literature on the effects of dehydration on human cognitive function is contradictory and inconsistent. Although it has been suggested that decrements in cognitive performance are present in the range of a 2 to 3% reduction in body weight, several dose-response studies indicate dehydration levels of 1% may adversely affect cognitive performance. When a 2% or more reduction in body weight is induced by heat and exercise exposure, decrements in visual-motor tracking, short-term memory and attention are reported, but not all studies find behavioral effects in this range. Future research should be conducted using dose-response designs and state-of-the-art behavioral methods to determine the lowest levels of dehydration that produce substantive effects on cognitive performance and mood. Confounding factors, such as caffeine intake and the methods used to produce dehydration, need to be considered in the design and conduct of such studies. Inclusion of a positive control condition, such as alcohol intake, a hypnotic drug, or other treatments known to produce adverse changes in cognitive performance should be included in such studies. To the extent possible, efforts to blind both volunteers and investigators should be an important consideration in study design.

  9. Scientific discourse in educational research in Latin America: the case of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Julia Castellanos Quintero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article it is presented the state of arts of the analysis of the scientific discourse in educational research in Mexico, particularly, in the curriculum design and development research. The development of the research in the area of university curricula started seriously in the decade of 80´s.The scientific discourse was oriented towards the searching of models and methods of teaching and evaluation, of the best way of the implementation of practicum and the correspondence between the professional formation and employment in the national context. In the other hand, the decade of 90´s is characterized by the influence of international educational policies, the use of CIT in the teaching-learning process, the appearance of more competitive occupational market, where professionals should be inserted. The scientific discourse was oriented towards the searching of curricular models that guarantee the correspondence between the professional formation and employment in the international framework. Nowadays an integral educational reform (RIE is taking place in Mexico where the competence approach is considered the guideline of the curriculum design in primary and secondary levels. Nevertheless, at the university level, different curriculum models are being implemented. This speaks about the diversity of the scientific discourse used in the curriculum research in Mexico.

  10. [Skin hydration and hydrating products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplan, H; Nocera, T

    2018-05-01

    One of the skin's principal functions is to protect the body against its environment by maintaining an effective epidermal barrier, not only against external factors, but also to prevent water loss from the body. Indeed, water homeostasis is vital for the normal physiological functioning of skin. Hydration levels affect not only visible microscopic parameters such as the suppleness and softness of skin, but also molecular parameters, enzyme activities and cellular signalling within the epidermis. The body is continually losing some of its water, but this phenomenon is limited and the optimal hydration gradient in skin is ensured via a set of sophisticated regulatory processes that rely on the functional and dynamic properties of the uppermost level of the skin consisting of the stratum corneum. The present article brings together data recently acquired in the fields of skin hydration and the characterisation of dehydrated or dry skin, whether through study of the regulatory processes involved or as a result of changes in the techniques used for in situ measurement, and thus in optimisation of management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. A human reliability analysis of the University of New Mexico's AGN- 201M nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumburgh, G.P.; Heger, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    During 1990--1991, a probabilistic risk assessment was conducted on the University of New Mexico's AGN-201M nuclear research reactor to address the risk and consequence of a maximum hypothetical release accident. The assessment indicated a potential for consequential human error to precipitate Chis scenario. Subsequently, a human reliability analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of human interaction on the reactor's safety systems. This paper presents the results of that investigation

  12. Archie’s saturation exponent for natural gas hydrate in coarse-grained reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ann E.; Waite, William F.

    2018-01-01

    Accurately quantifying the amount of naturally occurring gas hydrate in marine and permafrost environments is important for assessing its resource potential and understanding the role of gas hydrate in the global carbon cycle. Electrical resistivity well logs are often used to calculate gas hydrate saturations, Sh, using Archie's equation. Archie's equation, in turn, relies on an empirical saturation parameter, n. Though n = 1.9 has been measured for ice‐bearing sands and is widely used within the hydrate community, it is highly questionable if this n value is appropriate for hydrate‐bearing sands. In this work, we calibrate n for hydrate‐bearing sands from the Canadian permafrost gas hydrate research well, Mallik 5L‐38, by establishing an independent downhole Sh profile based on compressional‐wave velocity log data. Using the independently determined Sh profile and colocated electrical resistivity and bulk density logs, Archie's saturation equation is solved for n, and uncertainty is tracked throughout the iterative process. In addition to the Mallik 5L‐38 well, we also apply this method to two marine, coarse‐grained reservoirs from the northern Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project: Walker Ridge 313‐H and Green Canyon 955‐H. All locations yield similar results, each suggesting n ≈ 2.5 ± 0.5. Thus, for the coarse‐grained hydrate bearing (Sh > 0.4) of greatest interest as potential energy resources, we suggest that n = 2.5 ± 0.5 should be applied in Archie's equation for either marine or permafrost gas hydrate settings if independent estimates of n are not available.

  13. Gas hydrate occurrence in the Krishna-Godavari offshore basin off the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.

    as the ecology of environment below the water and subsurface as well. Recent gas hydrate expeditions (Hydrate Ridge, Oregon Margin, Cascadian Margin, Gulf of Mexico, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, South China Sea, East Sea) aboard JOIDES... boundaries, and associates with amplitude blanking above and below it. Further, the BSR also indicates a depth below which the hydrate destabilises. Some of the best known world major oilfields (for example the Gulf of Mexico, the Norwegian Sea, and along...

  14. Influence of fluorosurfactants on hydrate formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.U.; Jeong, K.E.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Reasearch Inst. of Chemical Technology, Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, are ice-like solids that forms when natural gas is in contact with liquid water or ice under high pressure and low temperature. There is significant interest in studying the storage and transportation of gas in the form of hydrates. However, a critical problem impacting the industrial application of gas hydrates for storage and transportation of natural gas is the slow formation rate of natural gas hydrate. Researchers have previously reported on the promotion effect of some additives on gas hydrate formation and hydrate gas content. Fluorosurfactants are significantly superior to nonfluorinated surfactants in wetting action, as well as stability in harsh environments, both thermal and chemical. This paper discussed an experimental investigation into the effects of fluorosurfactants with different ionic types on the formation of methane hydrate. The surfactants used were FSN-100 of DuPont Zonyl as non-ionic surfactant and FC-143 of DuPont as anionic surfactant. The paper discussed the experimental apparatus for methane hydrate formation. It also discussed hydrate formation kinetics and the series of hydrate formation experiments that were conducted in the presence of fluorosurfactants. Last, the paper explored the results of the study. It was concluded that anionic fluorosurfactant of FC-143 had a better promoting effect on methane hydrate formation compared with nonionic surfactant of FSN-100. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  15. Research on the removal of radium from uranium effluent by air-aeration hydrated manganese hydroxide adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Chen Shaoqing; Qi Jing

    2002-01-01

    In the acidic leaching uranium process, pyrolusite or manganese oxide (MnO 2 ) powder is often used as an oxidizer. In the processed effluent, manganese ion present as a contaminant in addition to U, Ra, Th, As, Zn, Cu, F, SO 4 2- , etc. Manganese ion content is about 100∼200 mg/1 in effluent. In this case, a new process technique can be developed to treat the effluent using the Mn 2+ present in the effluent. The approach is as follows: The effluent is neutralized by lime milk to pH about 11. As a result, most contaminants are precipitated to meet the uranium effluent discharge standards (U, Th, Mn, SO 4 2- etc.), but radium is still present in the effluent. In this process, manganese ion forms manganese hydroxide Mn(OH) 2 . The manganese hydroxide is easily to oxide to form MnO(OH) 2 by air aeration. This hydrated manganese hydroxide complex can then be used to adsorb radium in effluent. The experiments show: (1) Effluent pH, manganese concentration in effluent, and aeration strength and time etc. influence the radium removal efficiency. Under the test conditions, when manganese in effluent is between 100∼300 mg/l, and pH is over 10.5, radium can be reduced to lower 1.11 Bq/1 in the processed effluent. Higher contents of impurity elements such as aluminum, silicon and magnesium in the effluent affect the removal efficiency; (2) Under the experimental conditions, the lime precipitation air-aeration formed hydrated manganese hydroxide complex sludge is stable. There is no obvious release of radium from the adsorbed hydrated manganese hydroxide complex sludge; (3) The current experiments show that hydrated manganese hydroxide complex sludge has a very good re-adsorption ability for removal of radium from uranium effluent. Some experimental parameters have been measured. (author)

  16. Public subscription project for international joint research proposals in fiscal 2000 - public subscription of international proposal (substitution No.3). Report on achievements in research related to industrial utilization and social systematization of gas hydrate technologies - Separate volume; 2000 nendo kokusai kyodo kenkyu teian kobo jigyo - kokusai teian kobo (daitai No.3). Gas hydrate gijutsu no sangyo riyo shakai system ka ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho (bessatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Investigations were performed on important properties when utilization of gas hydrates to industries is discussed, such as production and decomposition speeds and storage stability. Activities have been taken in the following two fields: 1) experimental studies on production and decomposition of gas hydrates, and 2) summarized view on research related to gas hydrate self-retention effect. In Item 1), a production device of stirring system using rotating blades with gas circulation holes (self-suction type) was fabricated to have discussed the production and decomposition speeds. It was made clear that the production speed is governed by the over-cooling degree under the appropriate gas circulation and appropriate stirring conditions, and that the decomposition speed becomes abnormally high unless the self-retention status is maintained. In Item 2), following the introduction, seven researches were introduced, including the first observation of abnormal reaction of gas hydrate under the decreased pressure condition, the research by Yu. P. Handa related to gas hydrate decomposition below zero degree C, and the research by E. Mayer and A. Hall Brucker related to unexpectedly stable nitrogen, oxygen, carbon monoxide and argon clathrate gas hydrate formed from amorphous solid water. (NEDO)

  17. The Texts of the Instruments connected with the Agency's Assistance to Mexico in Establishing a Research Reactor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-01-30

    The texts of the Supply Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Mexico and the United States of America, and of the Project Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Mexico, in connection with the Agency's assistance to that Government in establishing a research reactor project, are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. These Agreements entered into force on 18 December 1963.

  18. The Texts of the Instruments connected with the Agency's Assistance to Mexico in Establishing a Research Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    The texts of the Supply Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Mexico and the United States of America, and of the Project Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Mexico, in connection with the Agency's assistance to that Government in establishing a research reactor project, are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. These Agreements entered into force on 18 December 1963

  19. The Entrepreneurial University: A Case Study of the University of New Mexico in a Competitive Research Environment, 1972-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Lars G.

    Factors affecting the emergence of the University of New Mexico as a research institution in a period of increased competition for research support are discussed. The case study covers the period of 1972-1978 and focuses on the development of the Office of the Vice President for Research and its entrepreneurial activities, including its increased…

  20. Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume 2, Problem definition, background, and summary of prior research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Air pollution in Mexico City has increased along with the growth of the city, the movement of its population, and the growth of employment created by industry. The main cause of pollution in the city is energy consumption. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account the city`s economic development and its prospects when considering the technological relationships between well-being and energy consumption. Air pollution in the city from dust and other particles suspended in the air is an old problem. However, pollution as we know it today began about 50 years ago with the growth of industry, transportation, and population. The level of well-being attained in Mexico City implies a high energy use that necessarily affects the valley`s natural air quality. However, the pollution has grown so fast that the City must act urgently on three fronts: first, following a comprehensive strategy, transform the economic foundation of the city with nonpolluting activities to replace the old industries, second, halt pollution growth through the development of better technologies; and third, use better fuels, emission controls, and protection of wooded areas.

  1. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  2. [U.S.-Mexico cross-border cooperation in research on diabetes mellitus type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela-Soler, Jaume; Frontini, María; Cerqueira, Maria Teresa; Ruiz-Holguín, Rosalba; Díaz-Apodaca, Beatriz A

    2010-09-01

    To describe and analyze, utilizing a case study approach, the U.S.- Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project, a health research cooperation initiative incorporating the participation of federal, state, and local institutions of both countries. A model of equal representation, participation, consensus, and shared leadership was used, with the participation of more than 130 institutions. A sample of 4 020 people over 18 years of age was obtained by a random, multistage, stratified, clustered design. A questionnaire about diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and health was applied. The statistical analysis took into account the design effect. The prevalence of diagnosed DM2 was 14.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 12.5-17.6) and the prevalence of diagnosed DM2 adjusted by age was 19.5% (95% CI: 16.8-22.6) on the Mexican side of the border and 16.1% (IC95%: 13.5-19.2) on the U.S. border side. There were differences between the DM2 prevalence and risk factors along the border. The U.S.-Mexico Border Diabetes Prevention and Control Project allowed the border zone between the two countries to be considered, for the first time ever, as a unit for epidemiological research. A shared understanding among all participating institutions and entities of sociopolitical structures and procedures is required for effective border health cooperation initiatives.

  3. Report on the actual state of the basic, applied research and industrial applications of the radiation in Mexico; Informe sobre el estado actual de la investigacion basica, aplicada y aplicaciones industriales de la radiacion en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez V, H

    1991-07-15

    In this report the main works of basic, applied research and industrial applications that are carried out in Mexico, about radiations (radiation chemistry, technology, applications, use and isotope production, etc.): infrastructure, radiation sources, groups and research programs are presented. (Author)

  4. Advanced Gas Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Daniel

    2017-12-30

    Prospecting for high saturation gas hydrate deposits can be greatly aided with improved approaches to seismic interpretation and especially if sets of seismic attributes can be shown as diagnostic or direct hydrocarbon indicators for high saturation gas hydrates in sands that would be of most interest for gas hydrate production.

    A large 3D seismic data set in the deep water Eastern Gulf of Mexico was screened for gas hydrates using a set of techniques and seismic signatures that were developed and proven in the Central deepwater Gulf of Mexico in the DOE Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry Project JIP Leg II in 2009 and recently confirmed with coring in 2017.

    A large gas hydrate deposit is interpreted in the data where gas has migrated from one of the few deep seated faults plumbing the Jurassic hydrocarbon source into the gas hydrate stability zone. The gas hydrate deposit lies within a flat-lying within Pliocene Mississippi Fan channel that was deposited outboard in a deep abyssal environment. The uniform architecture of the channel aided the evaluation of a set of seismic attributes that relate to attenuation and thin-bed energy that could be diagnostic of gas hydrates. Frequency attributes derived from spectral decomposition also proved to be direct hydrocarbon indicators by pseudo-thickness that could be only be reconciled by substituting gas hydrate in the pore space. The study emphasizes that gas hydrate exploration and reservoir characterization benefits from a seismic thin bed approach.

  5. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  6. Investment on research and development. The cases of Republic of Korea and Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Licona Michel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strengthen the capacity of production of goods and services, is strategic, as it allows the company and its businesses to compete in global markets.Getting to be in the forefront of the processes requires investment in research and development this institutions for human resource training and development of science and technology play an important role for its professional staff and society in general, have higher skills that are reflected in the development of technology skills that push the growth and modernization of their companies. This paper analyzes the investment in research and the training of professionals, and their importance in the transformation of the production structure in the Republic of Korea and Mexico.

  7. Experimental investigation of methane release from hydrate formation in sandstone through both hydrate dissociation and CO{sub 2} sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husebo, J.; Graue, A.; Kvamme, B. [Bergen Univ., Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Stevens, J.; Howard, J.J. [ConocoPhillips, Ponca City, OK (United States); Baldwin, B.A. [Green Country Petrophysics LLC, Dewey, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Large amounts of natural gas trapped in hydrate reservoirs are found in Arctic regions and in deep offshore locations around the world. Natural gas production from hydrate deposits offer significant potential for future energy needs. However, research is needed in order to propose potential production schemes for natural gas hydrates. Natural gas molecules can be freed from hydrate structured cages by depressurization, by heating and by exposing the hydrate to a substance that will form a thermodynamically more stable hydrate structure. This paper provided a comparison of two approaches for releasing methane from methane hydrate in porous sandstone. The study scope covered the dissociation rate of methane hydrate in porous media through depressurization, and also referred to previous work done on producing methane from hydrates in sandstone while sequestering carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The study was conducted in a laboratory setting. The paper discussed the experimental design which included the placing of a pressure- and temperature-controlled sample holder inside the bore of a magnetic resonance imager. The experimental procedures were then outlined, with reference to hydrate formation; carbon dioxide sequestration; hydrate dissociation experiments with constant volume; and hydrate dissociation experiments at constant pressure. The constant volume experiments demonstrated that in order to dissociate a large amount of hydrate, the initial depressurization had to be significantly lower than the hydrate stability pressure. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  9. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  10. Health research funding in Mexico: the need for a long-term agenda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Martínez-Martínez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The legal framework and funding mechanisms of the national health research system were recently reformed in Mexico. A study of the resource allocation for health research is still missing. We identified the health research areas funded by the National Council on Science and Technology (CONACYT and examined whether research funding has been aligned to national health problems. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected the information to create a database of research grant projects supported through the three main Sectoral Funds managed by CONACYT between 2003 and 2010. The health-related projects were identified and classified according to their methodological approach and research objective. A correlation analysis was carried out to evaluate the association between disease-specific funding and two indicators of disease burden. From 2003 to 2010, research grant funding increased by 32% at a compound annual growth rate of 3.5%. By research objective, the budget fluctuated annually resulting in modest increments or even decrements during the period under analysis. The basic science category received the largest share of funding (29% while the less funded category was violence and accidents (1.4%. The number of deaths (ρ = 0.51; P<0.001 and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs; ρ = 0.33; P = 0.004 were weakly correlated with the funding for health research. Considering the two indicators, poisonings and infectious and parasitic diseases were among the most overfunded conditions. In contrast, congenital anomalies, road traffic accidents, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were the most underfunded conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Although the health research funding has grown since the creation of CONACYT sectoral funds, the financial effort is still low in comparison to other Latin American countries with similar development. Furthermore, the great diversity of the funded topics compromises the efficacy of the

  11. The Road to Grow, Enrich and Strength Cooperation Between Undergrad and Research Institutions in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Domínguez, M. Á.; Perez-Campos, X.; García Vertiz, D.; Martínez, L.; Torres Sánchez, E.

    2017-12-01

    Earth sciences undergrad programs have rapidly increased in the past years in Mexico. To form the future generation of geoscientist it is important to involve young undergrad students into research activities so they can develop the interest in science. Several inter-institutional programs are already attending this matter within the Mexican geoscientific community. Two of them, "Verano de la Investigación Científica 2017 (Summer of Scientific Research 2017)" and "Programa Delfín, Interinstitucional para el fortalecimiento de la investigación y el posgrado del Pacífico (Dolphin Program)", applied by the Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, gave the opportunity to three Geophysics Engineering students to carry out management, processing and analysis of seismic data to study the rate of seismicity over the north and south of Mexico and its relationship with the oil production industry; as well as study the seismic structure beneath a city located within a volcanic arc, in which case the study resolved a two layer model corresponding to the midcrust and the Mohorövičić discontinuities. These programs not only allowed the students to enrich and strengthen their knowledge in seismology, it also gave them an insight of the general geoscientific research activities. Furthermore, it provided the opportunity for a Ph.D. student, to take the role of a young advisor, which has helped train the student on skills needed for a future academic path, such as mentoring, assistance, encouragement and leadership.

  12. Methane hydrates in marine sediments - Untapped source of energy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jauhari, P.

    (Egorov et al 1999). Many known gas seep areas and mud volcanoes are characterised by the formation of authigenic carbonates. In the Gulf of Mexico, which is the best studied area, the association of bacterial mats, gas hydrates and authigenic carbonates... of methane hydrates offshore southern Mexico. In : Watkins, J.S., Moore J.R. et al. (Eds). Initial Reports deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 66. Washington, D.C., US Government Printing Office, pp. 547-556. Singh, A., & Singh, B.D. 1999. Methane Gas...

  13. Methods of gas hydrate concentration estimation with field examples

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, D.; Dash, R.; Dewangan, P.

    physics and seismic inversion: examples from the northern deepwater Gulf of Mexico: The Leading Edge, 23, 60-66. Dash R., 2007, Crustal structure and marine gas hydrate studies near Vancouver Island using seismic tomography: PhD thesis, University...-resistivity logs: Examples from Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico: SEG expanded abstracts, 26, 1579-1583. Singh, S. C., Minshull, T. A., and Spence, G. D., 1993, Velocity structure of a gas hydrate reflector: Science, 260, 204-207. Sloan, E. D. Jr., 1998, Clathrate...

  14. Volume of hydration in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, E; Belzile, M; Watanabe, S; Fainsinger, R L

    1996-03-01

    In this retrospective study we reviewed the volume and modality of hydration of consecutive series of terminal cancer patients in two different settings. In a palliative care unit 203/290 admitted patients received subcutaneous hydration for 12 +/- 8 days at a daily volume of 1015 +/- 135 ml/day. At the cancer center, 30 consecutive similar patients received intravenous hydration for 11.5 +/- 5 days (P > 0.2) but at a daily volume of 2080 +/- 720 ml/day (P palliative care unit patients required discontinuation of hydration because of complications. Hypodermoclysis was administered mainly as a continuous infusion, an overnight infusion, or in one to three 1-h boluses in 62 (31%), 98 (48%) and 43 (21%) patients, respectively. Our findings suggest that, in some settings, patients may be receiving excessive volumes of hydration by less comfortable routes such as the intravenous route. Increased education and research in this area are badly needed.

  15. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  16. [Institutional ethics committees in Mexico: the ambiguous boundary between health care ethics and research ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Martínez, Edith; Lifshitz-Guinzberg, Alberto; Medesigo-Micete, José; Bedolla, Miguel

    2008-08-01

    To identify ethics committees in medical practice in Mexico and possible implications stemming from their composition and functions. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from January-December 2005. A survey was sent by e-mail to the hospitals and family medicine centers with at 10 practices within the Mexican Institute for Social Security (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social) (n=437) and the Institute for Security and Social Services for State Employees (Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado) (n=167) and to the Mexican Ministry of Health's most important health care centers (n=15). The following items were analyzed: name of the committee, date of formation, current status, composition, functions, and level of authority. In all, 116 committees were identified, with various names. Of these, 101 (87.1%) were active. The committees were formed from 1985-2006, with a spike occurring in 2004-2005. Of the active committees, 59 (58.4%) were charged with ethical problems/dilemmas related to clinical practice as well as those related to research projects. Of the committee members, 357 (59.0%) held managing positions in the establishment to which the committee pertained; most were medical professionals (71.5%), followed by nursing staff (11.9%). Among the members of the active committees, 77.9% had not received training in ethics. Legal conflicts can be expected, mainly within the organizations whose committees have the authority to determine a course of action. An integrated plan is needed that will set standards for the composition and proceedings of Mexico's ethics committees and the improved training of committee members.

  17. Using open hole and cased-hole resistivity logs to monitor gas hydrate dissociation during a thermal test in the mallik 5L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.I.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, R.E.; Dubourg, I.

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates, which are naturally occurring ice-like combinations of gas and water, have the potential to provide vast amounts of natural gas from the world's oceans and polar regions. However, producing gas economically from hydrates entails major technical challenges. Proposed recovery methods such as dissociating or melting gas hydrates by heating or depressurization are currently being tested. One such test was conducted in northern Canada by the partners in the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program. This paper describes how resistivity logs were used to determine the size of the annular region of gas hydrate dissociation that occurred around the wellbore during the thermal test in the Mallik 5L-38 well. An open-hole logging suite, run prior to the thermal test, included array induction, array laterolog, nuclear magnetic resonance and 1.1-GHz electromagnetic propagation logs. The reservoir saturation tool was run both before and after the thermal test to monitor formation changes. A cased-hole formation resistivity log was run after the test.Baseline resistivity values in each formation layer (Rt) were established from the deep laterolog data. The resistivity in the region of gas hydrate dissociation near the wellbore (Rxo) was determined from electromagnetic propagation and reservoir saturation tool measurements. The radius of hydrate dissociation as a function of depth was then determined by means of iterative forward modeling of cased-hole formation resistivity tool response. The solution was obtained by varying the modeled dissociation radius until the modeled log overlaid the field log. Pretest gas hydrate production computer simulations had predicted that dissociation would take place at a uniform radius over the 13-ft test interval. However, the post-test resistivity modeling showed that this was not the case. The resistivity-derived dissociation radius was greatest near the outlet of the pipe that circulated hot water in the wellbore

  18. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of New Mexico Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-252)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of New Mexico (UNM) for renewal of Operating License No. R-102 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of New Mexico without endangering the health and safety of the public. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  19. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative: A Funding Model for Science, Engineering, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, R. R.

    2016-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill, a massive ecological event, resulted in the tragic loss of 11 lives, and an environmental release of more than 130 million gallons of crude oil. Approximately 1.8 million gallons of dispersants were used in remediation efforts. An immediate response by BP was to establish a ten-year research program, with funding of 500 million. The funding was to determine the impact and long-term ecological and public health effects of oil spills and to develop improved preparation in the event of future oil or gas release into the environment. This Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI), established by BP, provided independent leadership for both the program and administration of the 500 million funding, and the Research Board provides oversight, assisted by excellent staff. The Research Board of the GoMRI comprises twenty scientists, many of whom have prior scientific research administrative expertise. The Research Board, in accordance with its charge, develops research programs and carries out their evaluation and oversight, employing the peer review and operational principles of the National Science Foundation and the National Academies of Science. With these guiding principles, the Research Board established procedures for conflict of interest oversight and requesting and evaluating research programs. It has also focused on communicating the research findings accurately and responsibly. The GoMRI Research Board operates with transparency and ensures availability of all scientific results and data. GoMRI, currently midway through its 10-year mandate, has funded more than 3,000 scientists, representing 278 institutions in 42 states and 17 countries, who have produced more than 1,000 peer-reviewed publications to date. The Research Board is exploring mechanisms by which the GoMRI science findings can be communicated to the broader community and the public and to continue availability of data when the program has ended. A major contribution

  20. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutken, Carol [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Macelloni, Leonardo [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); D' Emidio, Marco [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dunbar, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Higley, Paul [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  1. Exogenous origin of hydration on asteroid (16) Psyche: the role of hydrated asteroid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdellidou, C.; Delbo', M.; Fienga, A.

    2018-04-01

    Asteroid (16) Psyche, which for a long time was the largest M-type with no detection of hydration features in its spectrum, was recently discovered to have a weak 3-μm band and thus it was eventually added to the group of hydrated asteroids. Its relatively high density, in combination with the high radar albedo, led researchers to classify the asteroid as a metallic object. It is believed that it is possibly a core of a differentiated body, a remnant of `hit-and-run' collisions. The detection of hydration is, in principle, inconsistent with a pure metallic origin for this body. Here, we consider the scenario in which the hydration on its surface is exogenous and was delivered by hydrated impactors. We show that impacting asteroids that belong to families whose members have the 3-μm band can deliver hydrated material to Psyche. We developed a collisional model with which we test all dark carbonaceous asteroid families, which contain hydrated members. We find that the major source of hydrated impactors is the family of Themis, with a total implanted mass on Psyche of the order of ˜1014 kg. However, the hydrated fraction could be only a few per cent of the implanted mass, as the water content in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, the best analogue for the Themis asteroid family, is typically a few per cent of their mass.

  2. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  3. Standardization and software infrastructure for gas hydrate data communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroenlein, K.; Chirico, R.D.; Kazakov, A.; Frenkel, M. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Div.; Lowner, R. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany); Wang, W. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Computer Network Information Center; Smith, T. [MIT Systems, Flushing, NY (United States); Sloan, E.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Centre for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    The perceived value of gas hydrates as an energy resource for the future has led to extensive hydrate research studies and experiments. The hydrate deposits are widely dispersed throughout the world, and many countries are now investigating methods of extracting gas hydrate resources. This paper described a gas hydrates markup language (GHML) developed as an international standard for data transfer and storage within the gas hydrates community. The language is related to a hydrates database developed to facilitate a greater understanding of naturally occurring hydrate interactions with geophysical processes, and aid in the development of hydrate technologies for resource recovery and storage. Recent updates to the GHML included the addition of ThermoML, a communication standard for thermodynamic data into the GHML schema. The standard will be used to represent all gas hydrates thermodynamic data. A new element for the description of crystal structures has also been developed, as well as a guided data capture tool. The tool is available free of charge and is publicly licensed for use by gas hydrate data producers. A web service has also been provided to ensure that access to GHML files for gas hydrates and data files are available for users. It was concluded that the tool will help to ensure data quality assurance for the conversion of data and meta-data within the database. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Research on the availability and environmental aspects of geothermal electric power plants in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulas, P.; Mercado, S.

    1984-01-01

    Although geothermal electric power plants will make only a modest contribution to annual power generation in Mexico until the year 2000 (at present there is a capacity of 205 MW(e) in operation and 440 MW(e) under construction), new areas are being developed and, in the plants that have been in operation for several years, criteria such as the capacity factor (>85%) and the cost per kW.h generated are favourable. The main problem lies in determining the generation capacity which should be installed at the end of the exploration period. There is an economic risk here since the generation capacity is extremely uncertain and in order to reduce this risk the well production record must be carefully studied. Considerable research is being carried out in this area to improve the physical and numerical techniques available. Research is also being conducted to improve the cementing quality of the well pipes and to try to prevent or eliminate corrosion of these pipes. Study of the problem of silica incrustation has led to the adoption of economic techniques for its prevention or removal. Possibilities for the commercial utilization of waste have been studied for brine and are about to be started for gases. Heat exchangers which could turn the heat at present being wasted to account for electricity generation are also being investigated. (author)

  5. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative: Managing a Multidisciplinary Data Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, M. K.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Reed, D.

    2011-12-01

    On April 20, 2010 the Deepwater Horizon drilling unit located in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, experienced a catastrophic wellhead blowout. Roughly 5 billion barrels of oil and 1 million U.S. gallons of dispersant were released near the wellhead over the next three months. Within weeks of the blowout, BP announced the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GRI) and pledged 50M/yr over 10 years for independent scientific research on the spill's impact on the ecosystem. Two months after the blowout three institutions were awarded a total of 25M in fast-track grants (Louisiana State University, Northern Gulf Institute, and Florida Institute of Oceanography). Soon after the Alabama Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium and the National Institutes of Health were awarded 5M and 10M, respectively. These five institutions began to generate data almost immediately. First year grants funded 100's of researchers from nearly 100 research units. Their activities included numerical modeling, field data collection, and laboratory experiments. Measured parameters included those associated with chemical analyses of oil, gas, and dispersants, studies of bacteria, plants and animals -from phytoplankton to marsh grasses, from zooplankton to cetaceans. Studies were conducted from estuaries to the deep Gulf, from atmosphere to sediments. Parameters from physical oceanography, marine meteorology, and biogeochemistry were measured in abundance. Additionally, impact studies on human mental, physical health and businesses were made. Proposals for years 2-4 of the program were to be awarded in August 2011 supporting 4-8 research consortia. Consortia may have up to 20 named researchers. In aggregate, these studies yielded a multidisciplinary data explosion. Following the fast-track awards the GRI Administrative Unit (AU) was established and a data management activity initiated. That activity became the GRI Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC). "Cooperative" emphasizes the

  6. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  7. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  8. Research and technological development on heat pumps in Mexico operating with geothermal energy; Investigacion y desarrollo tecnologico sobre bombas de calor en Mexico operando con energia geotermica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Gutierrez, Alfonso; Barragan Reyes, Rosa Maria; Arellano Gomez, Victor Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) and the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) carried out in the past an extensive work of research and development (R&D) on heat pumps (HP). The systems tried on include heat pumps by mechanical compression, thermal absorption and thermal transformers. This paper briefly describes the main aspects of R&D on heat pumps and presents a more detailed description of three of the main studies: a) a Heat Pump (HP) by mechanical compression water-water type, designed for brine purification, operating with low pressure geothermal steam at the geothermal field Los Azufres, Michoacan, Mexico; b) a HP by absorption for cooling and refrigeration, operating with ammoniac/water and low enthalpy geothermal energy, which was tested in the geothermal fields of Los Azufres, Michoacan and Cerro Prieto, Baja California, and c) a thermal transformer by absorption, named Heat Pump by Absorption Type 2, which was tested to evaluate the behavior of diverse ternary solutions as working fluids. To date, there are plans to install and test a geothermal heat pump (connected to the subsoil), in Cerro Prieto, Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico. [Spanish] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) y la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) realizaron un trabajo extenso de investigacion y desarrollo (I&D) sobre bombas de calor (BC) en el pasado. Los sistemas que se probaron incluyen bombas de calor por compresion mecanica, absorcion y transformadores termicos. Este trabajo describe brevemente los principales aspectos de I&D sobre bombas de calor y se da una descripcion mas detallada de tres de los principales estudios: a) una Bomba de Calor (BC) por compresion mecanica tipo agua-agua, disenada para purificacion de salmueras, operando con vapor geotermico de baja presion en el campo geotermico de Los Azufres, Michoacan; b) una BC por absorcion para enfriamiento y refrigeracion, operando con amoniaco/agua y energia geotermica de baja entalpia

  9. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative: Multidisciplinary data management from the ground up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, L. M.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    As more journals and funding organizations require data to be made available, more and more scientists are being exposed to the world of data science, metadata development, and data standards so they can ensure future funding and publishing success. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is the vehicle by which the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GOMRI) is making all data collected in this program publically available. This varied group of researchers all have different levels of experience with data management standards and protocols, thus GRIIDC has evolved to embrace the cooperative nature of our work and develop a number of tools and training materials to help ensure data managers and researchers in the GoMRI program are submitting high quality data and metadata that will be useful for years to come. GRIIDC began with a group of 8 data managers many of which had only ever managed their own data, who were then expected to manage the data of a large group of geographically distant researchers. As the program continued to evolve these data managers worked with the GRIIDC team to help identify and develop much needed resources for training and communication for themselves and the scientists they represented. This essential cooperation has developed a team of highly motivated scientists, computer programmers and data scientists who are working to ensure a data and information legacy that promotes continual scientific discovery and public awareness of the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem and beyond.

  10. Methylmercury in the Gulf of Mexico: State of Knowledge and Research Needs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    The Interagency Working Group on Methylmercury was formed in response to concern about potential adverse effects on human health associated with consumption of fish and shellfish in the Gulf of Mexico...

  11. Actionable Science in the Gulf of Mexico: Connecting Researchers and Resource Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartigue, J.; Parker, F.; Allee, R.; Young, C.

    2017-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) RESTORE Science Program was established in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill to to carry out research, observation, and monitoring to support the long-term sustainability of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem, including its fisheries. Administered in partnership with the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Science Program emphasizes a connection between science and decision-making. This emphasis translated into an engagement process that allowed for resource managers and other users of information about the ecosystem to provide direct input into the science plan for the program. In developing funding opportunities, the Science Program uses structured conversations with resource managers and other decision makers to focus competitions on specific end user needs. When evaluating proposals for funding, the Science Program uses criteria that focus on applicability of a project's findings and products, end user involvement in project planning, and the approach for transferring findings and products to the end user. By including resource managers alongside scientific experts on its review panels, the Science Program ensures that these criteria are assessed from both the researcher and end user perspectives. Once funding decisions are made, the Science Program assigns a technical monitor to each award to assist with identifying and engaging end users. Sharing of best practices among the technical monitors has provided the Science Program insight on how best to bridge the gap between research and resource management and how to build successful scientist-decision maker partnerships. During the presentation, we will share two case studies: 1) design of a cooperative (fisheries scientist, fisheries managers, and fishers), Gulf-wide conservation and monitoring program for fish spawning aggregations and 2) development of habitat-specific ecosystem indicators for use by federal and state resource managers.

  12. Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ''root causes'' for implementing corrective actions

  13. Pulsed power opening switch research at the University of New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Opening switch research at the University of New Mexico (UNM) is directed toward moderate-current (--10 kA) devices with potential applications to high-power charged particle accelerators. Two devices with the capacity for controlling gigawatt high-voltage circuits, the grid-controlled plasma flow switch and the scanned-beam switch, are under investigation. Both switches are conceptually simple; they involve little collective physics and are within the capabilities of current technology. In the plasma flow switch, the flux of electrons into a high-voltage power gap is controlled by a low-voltage control grid. Plasma generation is external to, and independent of, the power circuit. In the closed phase, plasma fills the gap so that the switch has a low on-state impedance. Pulse repetition rates in the megahertz range should be feasible. In single-shot proof-of-principle experiments, a small area switch modulated a 3-MW circuit; a 20-ns opening time was observed. The scanned-beam switch will utilize electric field deflection to direct the power of a sheet electron beam. The beam is to be alternately scanned to two inverse diodes connected to output transmission lines. The switch is expected to generate continuous-wave pulse trains for applications such as high-frequency induction linacs. Theoretical studies indicate that 10-GW devices in the 100-MHz range with 70-percent efficiency should be technologically feasible

  14. Territorial Governance. A Comparative Research of Local Agro-Food Systems in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Torres-Salcido

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article attempts to provide a theoretical discussion on territorial governance by presenting both the neo-institutionalist position and the De Sousa Santos’ alternative models, with a view of highlighting the dimensions that can be relevant to understanding the territorial dynamics of Local Agro-food Systems (LAFS. The paper aims to build up a system of indicators, structured in four dimensions, concerning the territorial governance of LAFS: (i multi-level coordination; (ii democratic participation and accountability; (iii cooperation among producers and other stakeholders and (iv relationships with the environment. We verify, as a hypothesis, that the typology of markets to which the identity-based products are directed plays a decisive role in the way that processes of territorial governance of LAFS are constructed. The results of an empirical research, developed in four LAFS in Mexico, are presented: prickly pear cactus in Morelos, blackberry in Michoacán, cuitlacoche (corn smut in Tlaxcala and coffee in Veracruz. Two types of territorial governance of LAFS may be distinguished: those that can be strengthened by the geographical and organisational proximity of the markets and the action of local stakeholders and governments—prickly pear cactus and cuitlacoche—versus those which are devoted to export and are conducted by large companies in which marketing networks involve certification mechanisms and a large number of institutions—coffee and blackberry.

  15. The tissue bank at the national nuclear research institute in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esther Martínez-Pardo, María; Lourdes Reyes-Frías, Ma

    2003-01-01

    The Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ, The National Nuclear Research Institute) received during 1997-1998 strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), to establish the first and only one tissue bank (BTR ININ tissue bank) in Mexico that uses ionising radiation as sterilising agent. In that time, the BTR staff was trained in different tissue banks in several countries. Basic equipment for tissue processing donated by the IAEA was received in 1998. In July, 1999 the Mexican Health Secretariat gave the Sanitary License No. 1062000001 to the BTR to operate as an official organ and tissue bank. In August, 2001 the ININ and the Hospital Materno Infantil (HMI-ISSEMYM) signed an agreement to collaborate in amnion processing. The hospital is responsible for donor selection, serology tests, tissue procurement and washing, since this hospital is the BTR amnion supplier. The tissues are collected by ININ weekly with complete documentation. The BTR is responsible for processing: cleaning, air drying, packaging, labelling, microbiological control and sterilisation by gamma irradiation. The sterilised tissue is kept under quarantine for 6 months to obtain the results of the donor second serology test. From March to June, 2002 the BTR has processed 347.86 units (50 cm(2) each), is say, 17,393 cm(2). In addition, the pig skin xenograft process has been implemented and a protocol for clinical applications of it is running at the Hospital Central Sur de Alta Especialidad (PEMEX). Also the ININ tissue bank present status and perspectives are described.

  16. Basics of development of gas hydrate deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makogon, Yuri F.; Holditch, Stephen A.; Makogon, Taras Y.

    2005-07-01

    Natural gas hydrate deposits could possibly be an important energy resource during this century. However, many problems associated with producing these deposits must first be solved. The industry must develop new technologies to produce the gas, to forecast possible tectonic cataclysms in regions of gas hydrate accumulations, and to prevent damage to the environment. These global issues must be addressed by every company or country who wants to produce gas hydrate deposits. Cooperative research between industry and universities can lead to technology breakthroughs in coming years. This paper reviews the Messoyakha field and the Blake Ridge and Nankai areas to explain a methodology for estimating how much gas might be producible from gas hydrate deposits (GHDs) under various conditions. The Messoyakha field is located on land, while the Blake Ridge and Nankai areas are offshore. Messoyakha is the first and the only GHD where gas production from hydrates has reached commercial flow rates. The Blake Ridge GHD has been studied for 20 years and 11 wells have been drilled to collect gas-hydrate samples. The potential resources of gas (gas in place) from Blake Ridge is estimated at 37.7Oe10{sup 12} m{sup 3} (1.330 Tcf) in hydrate form and 19.3Oe10{sup 12}m{sup 3} (681 Bcf) [5] in free gas. To estimate how much of the potential resource can be produced we need a thorough understanding of both the geologic and the thermodynamic characteristics of the formations. (Author)

  17. Gas hydrate exploration activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keun-Pil Park, K.P. [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Gas Hydrate R and D Organization, Ministry of Knowledge Economy, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Korea's first gas hydrate research project was launched in 1996 to study the gas hydrate potential in the Ulleung Basin of the East Sea. It involved a series of laboratory experiments followed by a preliminary offshore seismic survey and regional reconnaissance geophysical and marine geological surveys. The bottom simulating reflector (BSR) was interpreted to show wide area distribution in the southern part of the Ulleung Basin, and its average burial depth was 187 m below the sea floor in the East Sea. A three-phase 10-year National Gas Hydrate Development Program was launched in 2004 to estimate the potential reserves in the East Sea. It will involve drilling to identify natural gas hydrates and to determine the most optimized production methods. Drilling sites were proposed based on five indicators that imply gas hydrate occurrence, notably BSR, gas vent, enhanced seismic reflection, acoustic blanking and gas seeping structure. The UBGH-X-01 gas hydrate expedition in the East Sea Ulleung Basin involved 5 logging while drilling (LWD) surveys at three high priority sites. One wire line logging was implemented at the site of the UBGH09. A total 334 m of non-pressurized conventional cores and 16 pressure cores were obtained in late 2007. The UBGH-X-01 was successfully completed, recovering many natural samples of gas hydrate from 3 coring sites in the East Sea. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Innovative Applications : Open Educational Resources and Mobile Resources Repository for the Instruction of Educational Researchers in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Mortera-Gutierrez, Fernando J.

    2010-01-01

    The movement of Open Educational Resources (OER) is one of the most important trends that are helping education through the Internet worldwide. "Tecnológico de Monterrey" (http://tecvirtual.itesm.mx/) in Mexico, with other Mexican higher education institutions, is creating an Internet/web based repository of OERs and Mobile Resources for the instruction and development of educational researchers at undergraduate, Master's and Doctoral level. There is a lack of open educational resources and m...

  19. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  20. CTD data collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico from 1977-07-13 to 1977-07-23 (NODC Accession 7800876)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico. Data were collected from 13 July 1977 to 23 July...

  1. Benthic organisms collected using sediment sampler from the SW RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico from 22 September 1977 to 16 December 1977 (NODC Accession 8100224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organisms were collected using sediment sampler casts from the SW RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico from 22 September 1977 to 16 December 1977. Data were...

  2. Moving from a Predominantly Teaching Oriented Culture to a Research Productivity Mission: The Case of Mexico and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gregorutti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study qualitatively analyzes the culture conflicts professors in the United States and Mexico are experiencing with the increasing pressures to produce more research about higher education. The first dataset was collected from 36 faculty members from 12 small and medium sized private, doctorate-granting universities. These universities are located in 11 states across the United States. The remaining data came from 44 faculty members employed at four small and medium sized private, doctoral granting universities in four states across Mexico. Results showed that universities in the US are transitioning from a predominantly teaching college culture to a more research orientation. Although the sampled universities continue to offer established graduate programs, faculty members continue to struggle with their teaching requirements and conflicts research productivity pressures place on their teaching and mentoring time with students. Participating faculty members employed in the US were not evenly interested in research opportunities due to the diverse mission objectives promoted by their respective institutions. On the other hand, faculty members employed in Mexico were generally more concerned with their research productivity and subsequent factors, which negatively impact their research productivity. Mexican faculty members rarely cited conflicts between their institutional missions and teaching objectives. This study is highly relevant to policy makers, higher education administrators, and scholars interested in comparative and international higher education. Administrators can benefit from the findings in this study, which provides faculty members’ perceptions and describes departmental structures and organizational dynamics employed to advance greater research and development opportunities. This study concludes with a discussion on how administrators and faculty members should handle the pressures for research productivity and

  3. Infrared spectroscopy for monitoring gas hydrates in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, G.T.; Luzinova, Y.; Mizaikoff, B. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Raichlin, Y.; Katzir, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Tel-Aviv (Israel). Shool of Physics and Astronomy

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduced the first principles for monitoring gas hydrate formation and dissociation in aqueous solution by evaluating state-responsive infrared (IR) absorption features of water with fiberoptic evanescent field spectroscopy. A first order linear functional relationship was also derived according to Lambert Beer's law in order to quantify the percentage gas hydrate within the volume of water probed via the evanescent field. In addition, spectroscopic studies evaluating seafloor sediments collected from a gas hydrate site in the Gulf of Mexico revealed minimal spectral interferences from sediment matrix components. As such, evanescent field sensing strategies were established as a promising perspective for monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrates in oceanic environments. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  4. FY 1998 annual report on the preliminary research and development of techniques for developing resources from gas-hydrate. Studies on gas-hydrate exploration, excavation techniques, methods for assessing environmental impacts, and gas hydrate handling systems; 1998 nendo gas hydrate shigenka gijutsu sendoken kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Tansanado ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu, kussaku gijutsu nado ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu, kankyo eikyo hyokaho no kenkyu kaihatsu, riyo system ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This R and D project is for the preliminary studies on development of the following 4 types of techniques for developing resources from gas-hydrates (GH): (1) gas-hydrate exploration, (2) excavation techniques, (3) methods for assessing environmental impacts, and (4) gas hydrate handling systems. The FY 1988 R and D results are described. For gas-hydrate exploration, the methods for analyzing inorganic ions and trace quantities of elements, which are necessary for accurately estimating the offshore GH around Japan, are established; and case studies are conducted for methods of predicting GH deposit forming mechanisms, and stability fields of GH, based on terrestrial heat flow and seismic data. For excavation techniques, GH decomposition rate is analyzed using a laboratory system which reproduces conditions of excavation of GH layers. For methods for assessing environmental impacts, a geo-hazard predicting model is established, to study ground displacement and gas leakage sensing systems and data transmission systems to cope with the hazards. For gas hydrate handling systems, an overall system is studied, and storage and transportation systems are outlined. (NEDO)

  5. Oceanic hydrates: more questions than answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laherrere, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Methane hydrates create problems by blocking pipelines and casing; they are also accused of contributing to environmental problems (e.g. global warming). Methane hydrates are also found in permafrost areas and in oceanic sediments where the necessary temperature and pressure for stability occur. Claims for the widespread occurrence in thick oceanic deposits are unfounded: apparently indirect evidence from seismic reflectors, seismic hydrocarbon indicators, logs and free samples is unreliable. At one time, hydrate was seen as a static, biogenic, continuous, huge resource but that view is changing to one of a dynamic, overpressurised, discontinuous and unreliable resource. Only Japan and India are currently showing any serious interest in hydrates. Academic research has raised more questions than answers. It is suggested that more hard exploratory evidence rather than theoretical study is required

  6. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  7. Experimental solid state NMR of gas hydrates : problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudrakovski, I.; Lu, H.; Ripmeester, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences; Kumar, R.; Susilo, R. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Luzi, M. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Solid State NMR is a suitable spectroscopic technique for hydrate research for several reasons, including its capability to distinguish between different structural types of hydrates, its quantitative nature and potential for both in-situ and time resolved experiments. This study illustrated the applications of solid state NMR for compositional and structural studies of clathrate hydrates, with particular emphasis on experimental techniques and potential ways to overcome technical difficulties. In order to use the method to its full capacity, some instrumental developments are needed to adapt it to the specific experimental requirements of hydrate studies, such as very low temperatures and high pressures. This presentation discussed the quantification of the Carbon-13 spectra with examples from natural and synthetic hydrates prepared from multi-component mixtures of hydrocarbons. The main approach used for the first two examples was Carbon-13 NMR with Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) at -100 degrees C. The detailed characterization of mixed hydrogen hydrates required low temperature hydrogen MAS. The quantification problems encountered during these experiments were also discussed. The purpose of these recent experimental developments was to prompt wider application of Solid State NMR in hydrate research. NMR proved to be a viable method for analyzing the composition and structure of multi-component mixed gas hydrates; characterizing natural gas hydrates; and, evaluating the formation conditions and properties of mixed hydrogen hydrates. The limitations of the method were highlighted and sensible choices of experimental conditions and techniques that ensure accurate results were discussed. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  9. Hydrates on tap: scientists say natural gas hydrates may be tough nut to crack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J.

    2001-12-01

    Gas hydrates are methane molecules trapped in cages of water molecules, yielding a substance with a slushy, sherbet-like consistency. Drilling for hydrates is similar to conventional oil and gas drilling, however, the secret to economic production still remains hidden. Hydrates exist in abundance in such places as deep ocean floor and below ground in some polar regions. The real challenge lies in producing gas from this resource, inasmuch as there is no existing technology for production of gas specifically from methane hydrates. This paper describes an international research program, involving a five-country partnership to spud the first of three wells into the permafrost of the Mackenzie River Delta in the Northwest Territories. The project, worth about $15 million, has brought together public funding and expertise from Japan, Germany, India as well as the Canadian and US Geological Surveys and the US Dept. of Energy in an effort to gain information on the production response of gas hydrates. The operator of the project is Japan Petroleum Exploration Company of Canada, a subsidiary of Japan National Oil Corporation. Since Japan is poor in domestic hydrocarbon resources, but is surrounded by deep water that contains potential for gas hydrates, Japan has a great deal riding on the success of this project. Germany and the United States are also very much interested. Current thinking is that gas is in contact with the hydrates and that it should be possible to develop a free gas reservoir as if it were a conventional deposit. As the free gas is drawn off, the pressure is reduced on the hydrates in contact with it , the hydrates dissociate from the gas and replenish the conventional reservoir. So far this is still only a theory, but it appears to be a sensible approach to hydrate production. 1 photo.

  10. Carbon dioxide gas hydrates accumulation in freezing and frozen sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuvilin, E.; Guryeva, O. [Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Geology

    2008-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrates and methane hydrates can be formed, and exist under natural conditions. The permafrost area has been considered as an environment for the potential disposal of CO{sub 2}. The favorable factors for preserving CO{sub 2} in liquid and gas hydrate states in frozen sediments and under permafrost horizons are great thickness of frozen sediments; low permeability in comparison with thawed sediments; and favourable conditions for hydrates formation. Therefore, research on the formation and existence conditions of CO{sub 2} gas hydrates in permafrost and under permafrost sediments are of great importance for estimation of CO{sub 2} disposal conditions in permafrost, and for working out specific sequestration schemes. This paper presented the results of an experimental study on the process of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas hydrates formation in the porous media of sediments under positive and negative temperatures. Sediment samples of various compositions including those selected in the permafrost area were used. The research was conducted in a special pressure chamber, which allowed to monitor pressure and temperature. The study used the monitoring results in order to make quantitative estimation of the kinetics of CO{sub 2} hydrates accumulation in the model sediments. Results were presented in terms of kinetics of CO{sub 2} hydrates accumulation in the porous media at positive and negative temperatures; kinetics of CO{sub 2} hydrates accumulation in various porous media; gas hydrate-former influence on kinetics of hydrates accumulation in frozen sediments; and influence of freezing on CO{sub 2} hydrates accumulation in porous media. It was concluded that hydrate accumulation took an active place in porous media not only under positive, but also under high negative temperatures, when the water was mainly in the form of ice in porous media. 27 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  11. Report on the research and development achievements in fiscal 1999 on the international research cooperation project for comprehensive development and utilization technologies for gas hydrate resources; 1999 nendo gas hydrate shigen no energy sogo kaihatsu riyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This paper reports the achievements in fiscal 1999 on development of gas hydrate resources. As a result of synthesizing gas hydrates in deposit systems, identifying stability zones in compositions, and studying thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of the deposits, the estimation accuracy has been enhanced steadily in estimating hydrate existing areas in actual frost areas. In the collecting technologies, a proposal was presented for a system by which carbon dioxide is introduced into ground beds at the same time as recovering gases, and gas hydrates are displaced with carbon dioxide hydrates. The displacement phenomenon was verified experimentally by controlling temperatures and pressures. Even below the freezing point, the production rate of the carbon dioxide hydrates is fast if it is above minus 4 degrees C. Salt diffusion behavior important in control of the production and decomposition, and action mechanisms of production and suppression agents were made clear microscopically. Experimental and theoretical discussions were given on dynamics of the production and decomposition. The cage occupation rate of methane hydrates was quantitatively measured successfully by using the Raman spectroscopy. Hydrates of gas mixture were utilized to have verified the possibility of separating the gas mixture constituents. (NEDO)

  12. High School Track Choice and Financial Constraints: Evidence from Urban Mexico. Policy Research Working Paper 7427

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, Ciro; Bobba, Matteo; Pariguana, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Parents and students from different socioeconomic backgrounds value differently school characteristics, but the reasons behind this preference heterogeneity are not well understood. In the context of the centralized school assignment system in Mexico City, this study analyzes how a large household income shock affects choices over high school…

  13. The Brain Drain in Mexico--A Subject for Research...or Agenda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupetit, Sylvie Didou

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the present state of the discussion and data regarding the brain drain in Mexico. From current data, recent trends show certain peculiarities in the national picture, pointing to an increase in the number of free movers, and a decrease in the number of young people who obtain Mexican government…

  14. Pecan Research and Outreach in New Mexico: Logic Model Development and Change in Communication Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammis, Theodore W.; Shukla, Manoj K.; Mexal, John G.; Wang, Junming; Miller, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Universities develop strategic planning documents, and as part of that planning process, logic models are developed for specific programs within the university. This article examines the long-standing pecan program at New Mexico State University and the deficiencies and successes in the evolution of its logic model. The university's agricultural…

  15. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JONES, K.W.; FENG, H.; TOMOV, S.; WINTER, W.J.; EATON, M.; MAHAJAN, D.

    2004-01-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2)

  16. The Texts of the Instruments connected with the Agency's Assistance to Mexico in Establishing a Research Reactor Project. A Second Supply Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    As a sequel to the assistance which the Agency has provided to the Government of Mexico in connection with a research reactor project, a Second Supply Agreement has been concluded between the Agency and the Governments of Mexico and the United States of America. This Agreement entered into force on 4 October 1972, and the text is reproduced herein for the information of all Members

  17. The Texts of the Instruments connected with the Agency's Assistance to Mexico in Establishing a Research Reactor Project. A Second Supply Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-11-17

    As a sequel to the assistance which the Agency has provided to the Government of Mexico in connection with a research reactor project, a Second Supply Agreement has been concluded between the Agency and the Governments of Mexico and the United States of America. This Agreement entered into force on 4 October 1972, and the text is reproduced herein for the information of all Members.

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models and to research teams for developing future gas-hydrate projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and has been documented by the project team. This Topical Report documents drilling and coring operations and other daily activities.

  19. Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC): Developing a Data Sharing Culture in the Wake of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, L. M.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon BP Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico, BP committed $500 million (USD) for a research program that investigates the impacts of oil, dispersed oil, and dispersant on the environment and to develop strategies for response to future disasters. This research program, the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI), is mandated to make all the data produced available to the public. To fulfill this goal, GoMRI developed the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC). GRIIDC is the vehicle by which GoMRI is addressing the data and information needs of this large and varied community of more than 3,000 scientists. The mission of GRIIDC is to ensure a data and information legacy that promotes continual scientific discovery and public awareness of the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem. As part of its effort to encourage data sharing among scientists interested in oil-spill related research in the Gulf of Mexico GRIIDC provides tools to researchers to facilitate all aspects of the data management process, from developing data management plans, to creating robust metadata records, to ensuring the data is made discoverable by the public. GRIIDC also provides a service to ensure that GoMRI funded publications have any associated data linked and available. This cradle to grave approach to data management has been extremely effective in developing data management practices that will ensure better data stewardship and preservation of all the data created in the GoMRI research program.

  20. Self-assessment of application of the Code of Conduct on the safety of research reactors - Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamani-Alegria, Y.R.; Salgado-Gonzalez, J.R.; Miranda-Aldaco, J.

    2009-01-01

    In Mexico, the nuclear regulatory body is the National Commission on Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS), and there is one research reactor, a TRIGA MARK III, operated by the National Institute for Nuclear Research (ININ). The main aspects of the Self-assessment of application of The Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor are given for the case of the TRIGA reactor. Furthermore, in this paper we give a brief description of the legal framework of the licensing process, for nuclear activities in a research reactor, there are also highlights of the major reactor features, the uses of the reactor for isotope production, the management and verification of safety, the radiation protection management program, the emergency planning and the training and qualification of the operation personnel. (author)

  1. Current state of the auto-evaluation process of the behaviour code in the safety of research reactors in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamani A, Y. R.; Salgado G, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    In Mexico, the regulator organism in nuclear matter is the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, and a nuclear research reactor exists, the TRIGA Mark III, operated by the National Institute of Nuclear Research. In this work the main aspects of the current state and the future challenges are presented with relationship to the installation of the auto-evaluation process of the behaviour code in the safety of research reactors for the TRIGA reactor case. Additionally, the legal mark of the licensing process for the nuclear activities in a research reactor is described in a brief way, and the main characteristics of the reactor, the uses for the isotopes production, the administration and the verification of the safety, the administration program of the radiological protection, the emergency plan and the operation personnel qualification are emphasized. (Author)

  2. Indian continental margin gas hydrate prospects : results of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) expedition 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, T [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Riedel, M. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Cochran, J.R. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory; Boswell, R. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Kumar, P. [Pushpendra Kumar Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Mumbai (India). Inst. of Engineering and Ocean Technology; Sathe, A.V. [Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Uttaranchal (India). KDM Inst. of Petroleum Exploration

    2008-07-01

    The geologic occurrence of gas hydrate deposits along the continental margins of India were investigated in the first expedition of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP). The objective was to determine the regional context and characteristics of the gas hydrate deposits through scientific ocean drilling, logging, and analytical activities. A research drill ship was the platform for the drilling operation. The geological and geophysical studies revealed 2 geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences, notably the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The NGHP Expedition 01 focused on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these 2 diverse settings. The study established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin was discovered to be the one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented, while site 17 in the Andaman Sea had the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known. The existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin was also discovered. Most of the gas hydrate occurrences discovered during this expedition appeared to contain mostly methane which was generated by microbial processes. However, there was also evidence of a thermal origin for a portion of the gas within the hydrates of the Mahanadi Basin and the Andaman offshore area. Gas hydrate in the Krishna-Godavari Basin appeared to be closely associated with large scale structural features, in which the flux of gas through local fracture systems, generated by the regional stress regime, controlled the occurrence of gas hydrate. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  3. Research Note. Occurrence of gastrointestinal helminths in commensal rodents from Tabasco, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Cigarroa-Toledo N.; Santos-Martinez Y. De Los; Zaragoza-Vera C. V.; Garcia-Rodriguez M. M.; Baak-Baak C. M.; Machain-Williams C.; Garcia-Rejon J. E.; Panti-May J. A.; Torres-Chable O. M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and species composition of helminths in commensal rodents captured inside private residences in the city of Villahermosa in Tabasco, Mexico. Trapping was performed at each house for three consecutive nights from October to December 2015. Fifty commensal rodents were captured: 23 Rattus norvegicus, 16 Mus musculus and 11 Rattus rattus. Rodents were transported alive to the laboratory and held in cages until they defecated. Feces were analyz...

  4. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Gas Hydrates Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    The Gas Hydrates Project at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) focuses on the study of methane hydrates in natural environments. The project is a collaboration between the USGS Energy Resources and the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Programs and works closely with other U.S. Federal agencies, some State governments, outside research organizations, and international partners. The USGS studies the formation and distribution of gas hydrates in nature, the potential of hydrates as an energy resource, and the interaction between methane hydrates and the environment. The USGS Gas Hydrates Project carries out field programs and participates in drilling expeditions to study marine and terrestrial gas hydrates. USGS scientists also acquire new geophysical data and sample sediments, the water column, and the atmosphere in areas where gas hydrates occur. In addition, project personnel analyze datasets provided by partners and manage unique laboratories that supply state-of-the-art analytical capabilities to advance national and international priorities related to gas hydrates.

  5. The nuclear research in Mexico (1986-1994). Bibliometrics of papers published in journals outside of the Latin American region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido R, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mexican research in nuclear science during 1986-1994 has been studied through the bibliometric analysis of the output of scientific papers published by Mexican institutions in non Latin American journals of international circulation. Bibliographic references were compiled from the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database as well as from proceedings and annual reports of Mexican research institutions within the field of interest. After careful normalization, data from the 920 detected papers were keyboarded and checked in a database used for the evaluation of the number of papers by discipline, source institutions and departments, authors, coauthors, publication year as well as publishing journals and their geographic origin, language of publication and the interactions of all these parameters. Results were expressed in reports, and summarized in tables and figures to visualize the state of this research field in Mexico. (Author)

  6. The impact of permafrost-associated microorganisms on hydrate formation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Liebner, Susanne; Spangenberg, Erik; Wagner, Dirk; Schicks, Judith M.

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between gas hydrates, microorganisms and the surrounding sediment is extremely complex: On the one hand, microorganisms producing methane provide the prerequisite for gas hydrate formation. As it is known most of the gas incorporated into natural gas hydrates originates from biogenic sources. On the other hand, as a result of microbial activity gas hydrates are surrounded by a great variety of organic compounds which are not incorporated into the hydrate structure but may influence the formation or degradation process. For gas hydrate samples from marine environments such as the Gulf of Mexico a direct association between microbes and gas hydrates was shown by Lanoil et al. 2001. It is further assumed that microorganisms living within the gas hydrate stability zone produce biosurfactants which were found to enhance the hydrate formation process significantly and act as nucleation centres (Roger et al. 2007). Another source of organic compounds is sediment organic matter (SOM) originating from plant material or animal remains which may also enhance hydrate growth. So far, the studies regarding this relationship were focused on a marine environment. The scope of this work is to extend the investigations to microbes originating from permafrost areas. To understand the influence of microbial activity in a permafrost environment on the methane hydrate formation process and the stability conditions of the resulting hydrate phase we will perform laboratory studies. Thereby, we mimic gas hydrate formation in the presence and absence of methanogenic archaea (e.g. Methanosarcina soligelidi) and other psychrophilic bacteria isolated from permafrost environments of the Arctic and Antarctic to investigate their impact on hydrate induction time and formation rates. Our results may contribute to understand and predict the occurrences and behaviour of potential gas hydrates within or adjacent to the permafrost. Lanoil BD, Sassen R, La Duc MT, Sweet ST, Nealson KH

  7. GIS of selected geophysical and core data in the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope collected by the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Paskevich, Valerie F.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Winters, William J.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1982 the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected a large amount of surficial and shallow subsurface geologic information in the deep-water parts of the US EEZ in the northern Gulf of Mexico. These data include digital sidescan sonar imagery, digital seismic-reflection data, and descriptions and analyses of piston and gravity cores. The data were collected during several different projects that addressed surficial and shallow subsurface geologic processes. Some of these datasets have already been published, but the growing interest in the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico warrants integrating these existing USGS datasets and associated interpretations into a Geographic Information System (GIS) to provide regional background information for ongoing and future gas hydrate research. This GIS is organized into five different components that contain (1) information needed to develop an assessment of gas hydrates, (2) background information for the Gulf of Mexico, (3) cores collected by the USGS, (4) seismic surveys conducted by the USGS, and (5) sidescan sonar surveys conducted by the USGS. A brief summary of the goals and findings of the USGS field programs in the Gulf of Mexico is given in the Geologic Findings section, and then the contents of each of the five data categories are described in greater detail in the GIS Data Catalog section.

  8. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lei; Zhao Qinglin; Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-01-01

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV–VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C 3 A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration. Highlights: ► Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C 3 A and ettringite have been studied. ► C 3 A–gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. ► Welan gum retards the process of C 3 A–gypsum hydration. ► The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  9. Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume IV. Characterization and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauzy, A. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    This volume describes the methods and the data gathered in an attempt to measure and characterize the meteorological factors and the concentration of different pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. The main objective of this document was to provide input for the simulation models and to obtain information that could be used to test and improve the models` performance. Four field campaigns were conducted, as well as routine monitoring, in order to obtain a database of atmospheric dynamics and air pollution characteristics. Sections include Airborne measurements, Remote sensing measurements, and Traditional (in situ) measurements.

  10. Rapid assessment procedures in environmental sanitation research: a case study from the northern border of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Enrique; Alamo, Urinda; Kendall, Tamil; Brunkard, Joan; Scrimshaw, Susan

    2006-01-01

    There is a need to enhance the quality and sustainability of environmental health programs in Mexico. What socio-cultural factors influenced the adoption or rejection of Clean Water in Homes programs in this population? We applied rapid appraisal procedures (RAP) to evaluate these community-based programs. Qualitative study conducted in communities along Mexico's northern border. We conducted informal dialogues, semi-structured interviews, field notes and observations. Home visits used a checklist to observe: sources of water, handwashing, as well as human waste and garbage disposal patterns. Data analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti, which facilitated comparison and illustration of discrepancies, the elaboration of emerging issues and relationships between them. Community members perceived that the Clean Water program was a top-down intervention. Water is perceived as a political issue and a matter of corruption. Inequity also limits solidarity activities involved in environmental sanitation. Migration to the United States of America (US) contributes to community fragmentation, which in turn dilutes communal efforts to improve water and sanitation infrastructure. While targeting women as program "recipients", the Clean Water program did not take gendered spheres of decision-making into account. Community members and authorities discussed the main results in "assemblies", particularly addressing the needs of excluded groups. The oversight of not exploring community members' needs and priorities prior to program implementation resulted in interventions that did not address the structural (economic, infrastructure) and socio-cultural barriers faced by community members to undertake the health-promoting behaviour change, and provoked resentment.

  11. Research Note. Occurrence of gastrointestinal helminths in commensal rodents from Tabasco, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigarroa-Toledo N.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and species composition of helminths in commensal rodents captured inside private residences in the city of Villahermosa in Tabasco, Mexico. Trapping was performed at each house for three consecutive nights from October to December 2015. Fifty commensal rodents were captured: 23 Rattus norvegicus, 16 Mus musculus and 11 Rattus rattus. Rodents were transported alive to the laboratory and held in cages until they defecated. Feces were analyzed for helminth eggs using the Sheather’s flotation technique. The overall prevalence of helminths in rodents was 60 %: R. norvegicus was more likely to be parasitized (87.0 % than R. rattus (63.6 % and M. musculus (18.8 %. Eggs from at least 13 species of helminths were identified: Hymenolepis diminuta, Rodentolepis nana, Moniliformis moniliformis, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Heterakis spumosa, Mastophorus muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Strongyloides ratti, Syphacia obvelata, Syphacia muris, Toxocara sp., Trichosomoides crassicauda, and Trichuris muris. This is the first study to report the presence of H. polygyrus, S. ratti and T. crassicauda in commensal rodents in Mexico. In conclusion, our results suggest that helminths commonly infect commensal rodents in Villahermosa and therefore rodents present a health risk to inhabitants in this region.

  12. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  13. Methane Hydrate Field Program. Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, Tim [U.S. Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States); Bahk, Jang-Jun [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea); Frye, Matt [U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Sterling, VA (United States); Goldberg, Dave [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States); Husebo, Jarle [Statoil ASA, Stavenger (Norway); Koh, Carolyn [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Malone, Mitch [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shipp, Craig [Shell International Exploration and Production Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Torres, Marta [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Myers, Greg [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Divins, David [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Morell, Margo [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-12-31

    This topical report represents a pathway toward better understanding of the impact of marine methane hydrates on safety and seafloor stability and future collection of data that can be used by scientists, engineers, managers and planners to study climate change and to assess the feasibility of marine methane hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Our understanding of the occurrence, distribution and characteristics of marine methane hydrates is incomplete; therefore, research must continue to expand if methane hydrates are to be used as a future energy source. Exploring basins with methane hydrates has been occurring for over 30 years, but these efforts have been episodic in nature. To further our understanding, these efforts must be more regular and employ new techniques to capture more data. This plan identifies incomplete areas of methane hydrate research and offers solutions by systematically reviewing known methane hydrate “Science Challenges” and linking them with “Technical Challenges” and potential field program locations.

  14. [Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. Biomedical research and the defense of a single standard of attention in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Bello, María Alejandra; Dirce, Guilhem; Salinas, Mario Alberto

    2004-01-01

    In the Helsinki Declaration, which established the ethical principles for research with human subjects, article 5 states, "...concern about the well-being of human beings should always come before the interests of science and of society..." Research proposals should include this commitment, both in developed and developing countries. In countries like Argentina, Brazil and Mexico, much of the population experience situations of great injustice, including a lack of equal access to health care. In some cases, sectors of the pharmaceutical industry may see these deficiencies as offering opportunities for carrying out research and achieving economic profits, something which carries the risk of perpetuating and even intensifying the unjust situations and violations of human rights--these population groups already suffer from. This situation implies the need for commitment to and ethical reflection upon human rights related to health. Agreements are needed between the actors involved in health research: sources of funding, researchers, public policy makers, and the study subjects themselves, in order to protect the latter's rights, including continuity of medical treatment for research subjects, when necessary.

  15. [Aging in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras de Lehr, E

    1986-01-01

    Demographic social and economic aspects of the situation of the elderly in Mexico are described with special emphasis upon education programmes and types of care in nursing homes. Considering the future trends of an increase in Mexico's elderly population, the author calls for more efforts in research and training in the field of gerontology. First results in this area are reported.

  16. Experimental Equipment Validation for Methane (CH4) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad Khan, Muhammad; Yaqub, Sana; Manner, Naathiya; Ani Karthwathi, Nur; Qasim, Ali; Mellon, Nurhayati Binti; Lal, Bhajan

    2018-04-01

    Clathrate hydrates are eminent structures regard as a threat to the gas and oil industry in light of their irritating propensity to subsea pipelines. For natural gas transmission and processing, the formation of gas hydrate is one of the main flow assurance delinquent has led researchers toward conducting fresh and meticulous studies on various aspects of gas hydrates. This paper highlighted the thermodynamic analysis on pure CH4 and CO2 gas hydrates on the custom fabricated equipment (Sapphire cell hydrate reactor) for experimental validation. CO2 gas hydrate formed at lower pressure (41 bar) as compared to CH4 gas hydrate (70 bar) while comparison of thermodynamic properties between CH4 and CO2 also presented in this study. This preliminary study could provide pathways for the quest of potent hydrate inhibitors.

  17. Neutron inelastic scattering studies of crystal hydrates. Part of a coordinated programme on the application of research reactor neutron scattering techniques in the study of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amilius, Z.

    1977-12-01

    Using an inverted berillium filter spectrometer, neutrons inelastically scattered from the samples of hydrated and deuterated crystals of Cu Cl 2 .2H 2 O, Cu Cl 2 .2H 2 O and K 2 Cu Cl 2 .2D 2 O were measured, with the objective of determining the librational frequencies of the water molecule. The experiments were performed at room temperature only, permitting to draw only limited conclusions on the assignment of specific librational modes to the peak in the observed neutron spectra

  18. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Carolyn Ann [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  19. Research Self-Efficacy Sources and Research Motivation in a Foreign Language University Faculty in Mexico: Implications for Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Cruz, María del Rosario; Perales-Escudero, Moisés Damián

    2016-01-01

    The research self-efficacy and motivation of foreign language (FL) faculty in periphery countries is under-researched, yet there is a need to understand the impact of public policies that drive such faculty to conduct research. This paper reports a qualitative case study investigating research self-efficacy and research motivation in a group of…

  20. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siriwardane, H.J.; Kutuk, B.

    1992-03-01

    This report deals with a study directed towards a modeling effort on production related ground movements and subsidence resulting from hydrate dissociation. The goal of this research study was to evaluate whether there could be subsidence related problems that could be an impediment to hydrate production. During the production of gas from a hydrate reservoir, it is expected that porous reservoir matrix becomes more compressible which may cause reservoir compression (compaction) under the influence of overburden weight. The overburden deformations can propagate its influence upwards causing subsidence near the surface where production equipment will be located. In the present study, the reservoir compaction is modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The present study is expected to provide a ''lower bound'' solution to the subsidence caused by hydrate reservoir depletion. The reservoir compaction anticipated during hydrate production was modeled by using the finite element method, which is a powerful computer modeling technique. The ground movements at the reservoir roof (i.e. reservoir compression) cause additional stresses and disturbance in the overburden strata. In this study, the reservoir compaction was modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The resulting stresses and ground movements were computed by using the finite element method. Based on the parameters used in this investigation, the maximum ground subsidence could vary anywhere from 0.50 to 6.50 inches depending on the overburden depth and the size of the depleted hydrate reservoir

  1. Evaluation of the aptitude for the service of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino C, J.; Gachuz M, M.; Diaz S, A.; Arganis J, C.; Gonzalez R, C.; Nava G, T.; Medina R, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    This work describes the evaluation of the structural integrity of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico, which was realized in July 2001, as an element to determine those actions for preventive and corrective maintenance which owner must do it for a safety and efficient operation of the component in the next years. (Author)

  2. ¿Y después qué? ... : action-research and ethnography on governance, actors and development in Southern Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guevara, F.

    2007-01-01

    The research justification and objectives. Mexico is one of the most natural resource-rich places in the world. However, it is also a country that has shown many contrasts in the use of its resources, human relations and the overall distribution of its richness. The justification of this

  3. Dehydration behaviour of hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dette, S.S.; Stelzer, T.; Jones, M.J.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaften, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Immersing a crystalline solvate in a suitable anti-solvent can induce phase transformation to solvent-free solid phase. In certain cases the solvent-mediated phase transition results in the generation of hollow, tubular structures. Both the tube dimensions of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate anhydrate (skga) and the dehydration kinetics of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate monohydrate (skgm) can be modified by the antisolvent employed. An explanation for the variable dehydration behaviour of skgm in the antisolvents is presented here. Furthermore, other crystalline hydrates were dehydrated in dry methanol. Providing an operational window can be found, any hydrate material could possibly find use in the production of tubes (micro- or nanotubes for different applications). The experimental conditions selected (dry methanol as antisolvent, dehydration temperature at 25 C) for the dehydration did not lead to the anhydrate tube growth for all hydrates investigated. Based upon the results presented here a first hypothesis is presented to explain this effect. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Mobile populations and HIV/AIDS in Central America and Mexico: research for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, Mario N; Leyva, Rene; Negroni, Mirka J; Rueda, Celina M

    2002-12-01

    To present a multi-centre study that analyses the socioeconomic, cultural and political contexts that give rise to population mobility, and its relationship to vulnerability to sexually transmitted infections (STI)/HIV/AIDS, in order to provide information that can be used to design appropriate and focused interventions. In each of 11 transit stations (border towns, port cities, areas where mobile populations congregate) in Central America and Mexico, a household survey of the local population was conducted to analyse demographic, socioeconomic characteristics, and information known and opinions held about HIV/AIDS and mobile populations. In-depth interviews with key informants, community members and mobile populations were held to ascertain knowledge about prevention and transmission of STI/HIV/AIDS. Likewise, an ethnographic study was undertaken to identify interactions between local and mobile populations. The transit stations share low educational levels among the local population, few public services, repeated human rights violations, violence, poverty and corrupt authorities. Within this social context, transactional sex, sex for survival, rape and non-professional commercial sex happen in conditions that increase the risk of the transmission of STI/HIV, such as infrequent condom use. Migrant women and sex workers are particularly vulnerable in this context. A wide gap exists between information about STI/HIV transmission and reported prevention practices. Given the conditions that exist in these transit stations, interventions should be multisectoral, sustainable, and should defend the human rights of various groups, including women and people living with HIV/AIDS.

  5. Potential impact on climate of the exploitation of methane hydrate deposits offshore

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Glasby, G.P.

    . Brewer (2000) has identified two examples, one in the Eel River Basin off the coast of northern California (Brooks, Field, & Kennicutt, 1991) and the other in the Gulf of Mexico (MacDonald et al., 1994), where the methane hydrate deposits lie almost... of Mexico (an example of the structural type of deposit) are potentially the most attractive deposits economically. In particular, it was considered that devel- opment costs for these deposits would be low because the accumulations are located at relatively...

  6. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  7. Does the "sleeping Dragon" Really Sleep?: the Case for Continuous Long-Term Monitoring at a Gulf of Mexico Cold Seep Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. M.; Lapham, L.; Farr, N.; Lutken, C.; MacDonald, I. R.; Macelloni, L.; Riedel, M.; Sleeper, K.; Chanton, J.

    2011-12-01

    Continuous porewater monitoring indicates that the methane flux away from exposed hydrate mounds can vary considerably over time. Recently, we retrieved a Pore Fluid Array instrument pack from a hydrate outcrop adjacent to a NEPTUNE Canada observatory node. The sampler was designed to continuously collect and store sediment pore fluids over the course of 9 months. On analysis, we observed a 35mM variation in methane concentrations corresponding with an abrupt shift in current direction at the site. Video and resistivity data have led to previous speculation that hydrate growth and dissolution/dissociation may be seasonally variable. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that the persistence of hydrate outcrops may be extremely dynamic, driven by fluctuations in physical conditions on short time scales. Short-term monitoring in the Gulf of Mexico within Mississippi Canyon lease block 118 (MC118), a known hydrate-bearing site, indicates that physical conditions even at these depths (~540-890m) may be highly variable. Pressure can vary within hours, and recorded temperature changes of ~1.5°C have been associated with passing storms. Moreover, increased particle abundance was observed at the site in 2007 suggesting that organic matter flux to the sediments may vary on the scale of months to years. These inputs have the potential to alter the chemical environment surrounding the hydrate, thereby affecting dissolution rates. Continuous, long-term observations of physical conditions at MC118 could provide information about the potential for natural perturbations to impact hydrate dynamics on the scale of weeks or even days necessary for assessing the long-term persistence of hydrate outcrops. Sleeping Dragon is a massive hydrate outcrop at MC118 that has been monitored since 2006. Three years ago, researchers returning to the site found it visibly diminished relative to previous observations. This apparent shift toward net dissolution of the mound may have been

  8. Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Greg [Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report: Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report; Methane Hydrate Workshop Report; Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan; and Final Scientific/Technical Report.

  9. Skin Hydration Assessment through Modern Non-Invasive Bioengineering Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Maria-Magdalena; Poenaru, Elena; Poenaru, Calin; Constantin, Traian

    2014-03-01

    Non-invasive bioengineering technologies continuously discovered and developed in recent decades provide a significant input to research development and remarkably contribute to the improvement of medical education and care to our patients. Assessing skin hydration by using the capacitance method for a group of patients with allergic contact dermatitis versus healthy subjects, before and after applying a moisturiser (assessing the immediate and long-term effectiveness of hydration). For both groups, but especially for the patients with dry skin, there was a clear improvement of hydration, statistically significant after applying the moisturiser. In the case of the patients with allergic contact dermatitis, hydration was at a maximum immediately after the first application, and then maintained an increased level after 7 and 28 days, respectively. In the healthy subjects, the increase in hydration was lower, but progressive. The moisturiser determined an increase in hydration for all age groups, but those who showed the most obvious effect were the young adults (18-29 years old) with an increase of 19.9%.The maintenance effect of hydration lasted for 28 days, while the improvement was important for allergic skin (17.1%) and significant for healthy skin (10.9%). The assessment of epidermal hydration performed by using the corneometer showed very good hydration of the stratum corneum for both groups studied, with immediate and long-term effect. This study also showed that the degree of skin hydration was inversely proportional with age. The corneometer is easy to use, efficient and widely utilised in international studies for measurements in healthy or pathological conditions, for quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of various preparations intended for application to the skin surface, under well-controlled and standardised conditions.

  10. Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging: system calibration using hydration phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Garritano, James; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Tewari, Priyamvada; Sung, Shijun; Maccabi, Ashkan; Nowroozi, Bryan; Babakhanian, Meghedi; Sanghvi, Sajan; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) hydration sensing continues to gain traction in the medical imaging community due to its unparalleled sensitivity to tissue water content. Rapid and accurate detection of fluid shifts following induction of thermal skin burns as well as remote corneal hydration sensing have been previously demonstrated in vivo using reflective, pulsed THz imaging. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of this technology were recently confirmed in a parallel 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging study, in which burn areas are associated with increases in local mobile water content. Successful clinical translation of THz sensing, however, still requires quantitative assessments of system performance measurements, specifically hydration concentration sensitivity, with tissue substitutes. This research aims to calibrate the sensitivity of a novel, reflective THz system to tissue water content through the use of hydration phantoms for quantitative comparisons of THz hydration imagery.Gelatin phantoms were identified as an appropriate tissue-mimicking model for reflective THz applications, and gel composition, comprising mixtures of water and protein, was varied between 83% to 95% hydration, a physiologically relevant range. A comparison of four series of gelatin phantom studies demonstrated a positive linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with statistically significant hydration sensitivities (p hydration). The THz-phantom interaction is simulated with a three-layer model using the Transfer Matrix Method with agreement in hydration trends. Having demonstrated the ability to accurately and noninvasively measure water content in tissue equivalent targets with high sensitivity, reflective THz imaging is explored as a potential tool for early detection and intervention of corneal pathologies.

  11. Effect of bubble size and density on methane conversion to hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leske, J.; Taylor, C.E.; Ladner, E.P.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. One area of investigation is the storage of methane as methane hydrates. An economical and efficient means of storing methane in hydrates opens many commercial opportunities such as transport of stranded gas, off-peak storage of line gas, etc.We have observed during our investigations that the ability to convert methane to methane hydrate is enhanced by foaming of the methane–water solution using a surfactant. The density of the foam, along with the bubble size, is important in the conversion of methane to methane hydrate.

  12. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  13. THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF GAS HYDRATES

    OpenAIRE

    Недоступ, В. И.; Недоступ, О. В.

    2015-01-01

    The interest to gas hydrates grows last years. Therefore working out of reliable settlement-theoretical methods of definition of their properties is necessary. The thermodynamic model of gas hydrates in which the central place occupies a behaviour of guest molecule in cell is described. The equations of interaction of molecule hydrate formative gas with cell are received, and also an enthalpy and energy of output of molecule from a cell are determined. The equation for calculation of thermody...

  14. Catalysis of gas hydrates by biosurfactants in seawater-saturated sand/clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R. E.; Kothapalli, C.; Lee, M.S. [Mississippi State University, Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, MS (United States); Woolsey, J. R. [University of Mississippi, Centre of Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, MS (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Large gas hydrate mounds have been photographed in the seabed of the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. According to industry experts, the carbon trapped within gas hydrates is two or three times greater than all known crude oil, natural gas and coal reserves in the world. Gas hydrates, which are ice-like solids formed from the hydrogen bonding of water as water temperature is lowered under pressure to entrap a suitable molecular-size gas in cavities of the developing crystal structure, are found below the ocean floor to depths exhibiting temperature and pressure combinations within the appropriate limits. The experiments described in this study attempt to ascertain whether biosurfactant byproducts of microbial activity in seabeds could catalyze gas hydrate formation. Samples of five possible biosurfactants classifications were used in the experiments. Results showed that biosurfactants enhanced hydrate formation rate between 96 per cent and 288 percent, and reduced hydrate induction time 20 per cent to 71 per cent relative to the control. The critical micellar concentration of rhamnolipid/seawater solution was found to be 13 ppm at hydrate-forming conditions. On the basis of these results it was concluded that minimal microbial activity in sea floor sands could achieve the threshold concentration of biosurfactant that would greatly promote hydrate formation. 28 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Lectures held at the congress on ``Gas hydrates: problem substance / resource``, organised by the GDMK Division for ``Exploration and Extraction`` and the Institute for Mineral Oil and Natural Gas Research, in Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Harz) on 6/7 November 1997. Author`s manuscripts; Vortraege der Veranstaltung ``Gashydrate: Problemstoff/Resource`` des GDMK-Fachbereichs `Aufsuchung und Gewinnung` und dem Institut fuer Erdoel- und Erdgasforschung am 06. und 07. November 1997 in Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Harz). Autorenmanuskripte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The following topics are dealt with in detail: the chemical and physical properties of gas hydrates as derivable from their phase behaviour; the significance and occurrence of gas hydrates in offshore areas; gas hydrates and permafrost in continental northern West Siberia; information on HYACE, a research project of the European Union on test drilling for gas hydrates in offshore areas; sediment-mechanical criteria of gas hydrate formation in deep-sea sediments; gas hydrate formation in gas cavern storages; the use of hydrate inhibitors in operating natural gas storages; and the inhibition of gas hydrates with kinetic inhibitors. Eight abstracts were abstracted individually for the Energy Database. (MSK) [Deutsch] Folgende Themen werden detailliert behandelt: die chemischen und physikalischen Eigenschaften von Gashydraten,welche aus dem Phasenverhalten der Gashydrate herzuleiten sind; zur Bedeutung und Vorkommen von Gashydraten im Offshore-Bereich; Gashydrate und Permafrost im kontinentalen noerdlichen Westsibirien; Informationen zu HYACE, einem Forschungsprojekt der Europaeischen Union zu Probebohrungen nach Gashydraten im Offshore-Bereich; sedimentmechanische Kriterien bei der Gashydratbildung in Tiefseesedimenten; die Gashydratbildung in Gaskavernenspeichern; der Einsatz von Hydratinhibitoren beim Betrieb von Erdgasspeichern sowie die Inhibierung von Gashydraten mit kinetischen Inhibitoren. Fuer die Datenbank Energy wurden acht Beitraege einzeln aufgenommen.

  16. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Li, Zongjin; Zhang, Xixiang; Ma, Hongyan; Ge, Shenguang

    2017-01-01

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10

  17. [h Index and scientific output of researchers in medicine from the University of Guadalajara, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduro, Arturo; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Rivera, Horacio; Roman, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate by the h index the scientific output of researchers from the University of Guadalajara who belong to the Sistema Nacional de Investigadores in the field of Medicine and Health Sciences. Researchers from the University of Guadalajara were selected from the Active SNI Researchers 2013 file. The scientific output of researchers in the fields of Medicine/Health Sciences and Biology/Chemistry was evaluated using the h index estimated by the Scopus website. A sample of capital researchers and Emeritus scientists was taken to perform the same procedure and compare data. The total number of researchers in the University of Guadalajara who are members of the SNI was 711, of which 67.2 % were level I and in less proportion were level II and III. Only 24.2 % of them were classified in the fields of Medicine/Health Sciences and Biology/Chemistry. The average h index value of researchers level I, II and III in Medicine/Health Sciences field was 5.4, 10.5 and 14.5, respectively. Capital and Emeritus scientists had an average h index of 23.4 and 19.8, respectively. The h index measures the quantity and quality of the scientific output and it also avoids bias in the evaluation process. It should be useful for future evaluations of the SNI members and for medical doctors who sign up for the National Academy of Medicine.

  18. Hydrate-CASM for modeling Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente Ruiz, M.; Vaunat, J.; Marin Moreno, H.

    2017-12-01

    A clear understanding of the geomechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing sediments (MHBS) is crucial to assess the stability of the seafloor and submarine infrastructures to human and natural loading changes. Here we present the Hydrate-CASM, a new elastoplastic constitutive model to predict the geomechanical behavior of MHBS. Our model employs the critical state model CASM (Clay and Sand Model) because of its flexibility in describing the shape of the yield surface and its proven ability to predict the mechanical behavior of sands, the most commercially viable hydrate reservoirs. The model considers MHBS as a deformable elastoplastic continuum, and hydrate-related changes in the stress-strain behavior are predicted by a densification mechanism. The densification attributes the mechanical contribution of hydrate to; a reduction of the available void ratio; a decrease of the swelling line slope; and an increase of the volumetric yield stress. It is described by experimentally derived physical parameters except from the swelling slope coefficient that requires empirical calibration. The Hydrate-CASM is validated against published triaxial laboratory tests performed at different confinement stresses, hydrate saturations, and hydrate morphologies. During the validation, we focused on capturing the mechanical behavior of the host sediment and consider perturbations of the sediment's mechanical properties that could result from the sample preparation. Our model successfully captures the experimentally observed influence of hydrate saturation in the magnitude and trend of the stiffness, shear strength, and dilatancy of MHBS. Hence, we propose that hydrate-related densification changes might be a major factor controlling the geomechanical response of MHBS.

  19. Prediction of gas hydrate saturation throughout the seismic section in Krishna Godavari basin using multivariate linear regression and multi-layer feed forward neural network approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singh, Y.; Nair, R.R.; Singh, H.; Datta, P.; Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.

    , Goldberg DS, Malinverno A (2014) Natural gas hydrates oc- cupying fractures: a focus on non-vent sites on the Indian continen- tal margin and the northern Gulf of Mexico. Mar Pet Geol 58:278– 291 Dafflon B, Barrash W (2012) 3-D stochastic estimation..., Collett TS (2012) Pore-and fracture-filling gas hydrate reser- voirs in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Green Canyon 955 H well. Mar Pet Geol 34:62–71 Lu S, McMechan GA (2004) Elastic imdedance inversion of multichan- nel...

  20. A Review of the Methane Hydrate Program in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Oyama

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, methane hydrate R&D in Japan was examined in the context of Japan’s evolving energy policies. Methane hydrates have been studied extensively in Japanese national R&D programs since 1993, with the goal of utilizing them as an energy resource. Currently, the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH 21 is in the third phase of a project that began in early 2002. Based on publicly available reports and other publications, and presentations made at the ten International Workshops for Methane Hydrate Research and Development, we have attempted to provide a timeline and a succinct summary of the major technical accomplishments of MH 21 during project Phases 1, 2, and 3.

  1. Methane hydrates. A possible energy source in the twenty-first century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorassi, S.

    1998-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of particular crystal structures, to be found in nature both in arctic and Antarctic regions and under seas and oceans, and consisting of water and gas molecules, the so-called 'gas hydrates', are dealt with. Technical problems related to gas recovery (methane in particular) from hydrates, above all under sea level, mainly due to their reduced stability, are examined. On the ground of these considerations, various gas recovery methods from hydrate fields are described. An overall evaluation of methane availability as hydrates all over the world, as well as a comparison between extraction costs from hydrate and well as a comparison between extraction costs from hydrate and conventional fields, are made. Finally, short-term programmes on research and development of methane hydrate fields in some areas of the Earth are described [it

  2. University of New Mexico Undergraduate Breast Cancer Training Program: Pathway to Research Careers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffith, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    We have established a three-phase training program to motivate talented undergraduate students, especially students from under-represented Southwestern minorIties, to pursue careers in breast cancer research...

  3. University of New Mexico Undergraduate Breast Cancer Training Program: Pathway to Research Careers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffith, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    We have established a three-phase training program to motivate talented undergraduate students, especially students from under-represented southwester minorities, to pursue careers in breast cancer research...

  4. University of New Mexico Undergraduate Breast Cancer Training Program: Pathway to Research Careers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2005-01-01

    We have established a three-phase training program to motivate talented undergraduate students, especially students from under-represented Southwestern minorities, to pursue careers in breast cancer research...

  5. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  6. Powering Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This article examines Mexico's demand for electricity and the market for independent power generation. The topics discussed in the article include the outlook for the 1990s for growth in Mexico's economy and energy demand, renewable energy, energy conservation, small-scale, off-grid renewable energy systems, and estimates of Mexico's market for electric power generating equipment

  7. 2007 USGS/NPS/NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL): Northern Gulf of Mexico Barrier Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the northern Gulf of Mexico barrier islands and Naval Live Oaks was produced from...

  8. Mexico Geoid Heights (MEXICO97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' geoid height grid for Mexico, and North-Central America, is the MEXICO97 geoid model. The computation used about one million terrestrial and marine gravity...

  9. The Hybrid Threat: Crime, Terrorism and Insurgency in Mexico. Proceedings of the Joint Policy and Research Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    to name a few. Drug trafficking in Mexico is big, if illicit, business. The most notorious players include the Sinaloa Cartel, the Gulf Cartel...091311.pdf. A Joint CSL-HSPI Study12 problem didn’t originate in Mexico, but migrated there in force after Colombia cracked down on its own drug lords...four’ – Jua´rez, Gulf, Sinaloa , and Tijuana – which operate generally in the north. But, perhaps foreshadowing a fourth generation in the gangs

  10. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  11. Critical guest concentration and complete tuning pattern appearing in the binary clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, J.H.; Lee, H. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Kim, D.Y. [SK Engineering and Construction, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. [Hanwha Chemical R and D Center, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.W. [Kongju National Univ., Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ripmeester, J.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates, or gas hydrates, are stabilized by van der Waals interaction between a guest molecule and a host framework. Because of their property, they are a potential resource in the exploitation of natural gas hydrates, as a material for the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), as a means of storage and transportation of natural gas, as well as hydrogen storage. Clathrate hydrate research can be divided into two categories that emphasize either macroscopic or microscopic approaches. However, these two approaches need to be closely linked for a better understanding of the structures and processes involving both natural phenomena and hydrates for industrial processes. Details on the molecular scale that concern the less usual properties of clathrate hydrates remain unknown. This paper presented the results of a study that reported on the existence of a critical guest concentration (CGC) and established the complete tuning pattern that occurred in the binary hydrates, including water-soluble hydrate formers (promoters) and water-insoluble guests. The paper presented the experimental procedures, including formation of the methane (CH{sub 4}) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) binary hydrate; a schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus; and formation of the CH{sub 4} and t-BuNH{sub 2} binary hydrate. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic measurements and thermodynamic measurements were also presented. It was concluded that the CGC value appeared to primarily depend on the chemical nature of a liquid guest component participating in the binary hydrate formation. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  12. Balancing Accuracy and Computational Efficiency for Ternary Gas Hydrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic accumulations of natural gas hydrates hold vast organic carbon reserves, which have the potential of meeting global energy needs for decades. Estimates of vast amounts of global natural gas hydrate deposits make them an attractive unconventional energy resource. As with other unconventional energy resources, the challenge is to economically produce the natural gas fuel. The gas hydrate challenge is principally technical. Meeting that challenge will require innovation, but more importantly, scientific research to understand the resource and its characteristics in porous media. Producing natural gas from gas hydrate deposits requires releasing CH4 from solid gas hydrate. The conventional way to release CH4 is to dissociate the hydrate by changing the pressure and temperature conditions to those where the hydrate is unstable. The guest-molecule exchange technology releases CH4 by replacing it with a more thermodynamically stable molecule (e.g., CO2, N2). This technology has three advantageous: 1) it sequesters greenhouse gas, 2) it releases energy via an exothermic reaction, and 3) it retains the hydraulic and mechanical stability of the hydrate reservoir. Numerical simulation of the production of gas hydrates from geologic deposits requires accounting for coupled processes: multifluid flow, mobile and immobile phase appearances and disappearances, heat transfer, and multicomponent thermodynamics. The ternary gas hydrate system comprises five components (i.e., H2O, CH4, CO2, N2, and salt) and the potential for six phases (i.e., aqueous, liquid CO2, gas, hydrate, ice, and precipitated salt). The equation of state for ternary hydrate systems has three requirements: 1) phase occurrence, 2) phase composition, and 3) phase properties. Numerical simulation of the production of geologic accumulations of gas hydrates have historically suffered from relatively slow execution times, compared with other multifluid, porous media systems, due to strong nonlinearities and

  13. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  14. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  15. Doing Business in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    On 1 July 2001, a far-reaching free trade agreement between the EFTA States and Mexico entered into force. ”Doing Business in Mexico” provides targeted assistance to Swiss Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) that wish to tap the potential of Mexico as both an export destination and investment location. This comprehensive guide contains information and advice on market research, market entry, and investment in this fascinating country. Part I introduces the reader to this fascinating ...

  16. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER, NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, NW Atlantic and NE Pacific from 1987-01-08 to 1987-07-01 (NODC Accession 8700254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and Northwest Atlantic Ocean from...

  17. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts in the Gulf of Mexico and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1985-10-20 to 1985-12-14 (NODC Accession 8700105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the Gulf of Mexico and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from 30 October 1985 to...

  18. Temperature profile and other data from CTD Casts in the Gulf of Mexico and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms from 1982-03-26 to 1983-11-26 (NODC Accession 8500267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean...

  19. Temperature profile and other data collected using BT, XBT, and other instruments from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Gulf of Mexico from 1982-08-18 to 1985-04-06 (NODC Accession 8900211)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using XBT, BT, and other instruments from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the Gulf of Mexico from 18...

  20. Temperature profile and chemical data from CTD casts in the North Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1976-10-08 to 1977-10-30 (NODC Accession 8000168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and chemical data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico from 08 October 1976 to...

  1. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and VIRGINIA KEY in the Gulf of Mexico from 1978-06-12 to 1978-12-19 (NODC Accession 7900250)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and VIRGINIA KEY in the Gulf of Mexico from 12 June 1978 to 19 December...

  2. Mexico and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, M

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on migration and HIV/AIDS in Mexico and Central America, including Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. Most migrants travel to the US through Mexico. US-Mexico trade agreements created opportunities for increased risk of HIV transmission. The research literature focuses on Mexico. Most countries, with the exception of Belize and Costa Rica, are sending countries. Human rights of migrants are violated in transit and at destination. Migration policies determine migration processes. The Mexican-born population in the US is about 3% of US population and 8% of Mexico's population. About 22% arrived during 1992-97, and about 500,000 are naturalized US citizens. An additional 11 million have a Mexican ethnic background. Mexican migrants are usually economically active men who had jobs before leaving and were urban people who settled in California, Texas, Illinois, and Arizona. Most Mexican migrants enter illegally. Many return to Mexico. The main paths of HIV transmission are homosexual, heterosexual, and IV-drug-injecting persons. Latino migrants frequently use prostitutes, adopt new sexual practices including anal penetration among men, greater diversity of sexual partners, and use of injectable drugs.

  3. The nuclear research in Mexico (1986-1994). Bibliometrics of papers published in journals outside of the Latin American region; La investigacion nuclear en Mexico (1986-1994). Bibliometria de trabajos publicados en revistas fuera de la region latinoamericana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido R, S A

    2007-07-01

    Mexican research in nuclear science during 1986-1994 has been studied through the bibliometric analysis of the output of scientific papers published by Mexican institutions in non Latin American journals of international circulation. Bibliographic references were compiled from the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database as well as from proceedings and annual reports of Mexican research institutions within the field of interest. After careful normalization, data from the 920 detected papers were keyboarded and checked in a database used for the evaluation of the number of papers by discipline, source institutions and departments, authors, coauthors, publication year as well as publishing journals and their geographic origin, language of publication and the interactions of all these parameters. Results were expressed in reports, and summarized in tables and figures to visualize the state of this research field in Mexico. (Author)

  4. Alcohol cosurfactants in hydrate antiagglomeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, J Dalton; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2008-08-28

    Because of availability, as well as economical and environmental considerations, natural gas is projected to be the premium fuel of the 21st century. Natural gas production involves risk of the shut down of onshore and offshore operations because of blockage from hydrates formed from coproduced water and hydrate-forming species in natural gas. Industry practice has been usage of thermodynamic inhibitors such as alcohols often in significant amounts, which have undesirable environmental and safety impacts. Thermodynamic inhibitors affect bulk-phase properties and inhibit hydrate formation. An alternative is changing surface properties through usage of polymers and surfactants, effective at 0.5 to 3 weight % of coproduced water. One group of low dosage hydrate inhibitors (LDHI) are kinetic inhibitors, which affect nucleation rate and growth. A second group of LDHI are antiagglomerants, which prevent agglomeration of small hydrate crystallites. Despite great potential, work on hydrate antiagglomeration is very limited. This work centers on the effect of small amounts of alcohol cosurfactant in mixtures of two vastly different antiagglomerants. We use a model oil, water, and tetrahydrofuran as a hydrate-forming species. Results show that alcohol cosurfactants may help with antiagglomeration when traditional antiagglomerants alone are ineffective. Specifically, as low as 0.5 wt. % methanol cosurfactant used in this study is shown to be effective in antiagglomeration. Without the cosurfactant there will be agglomeration independent of the AA concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of alcohol cosurfactants in hydrate antiagglomerants. It is also shown that a rhamnolipid biosurfactant is effective down to only 0.5 wt. % in such mixtures, yet a quaternary ammonium chloride salt, i. e., quat, results in hydrate slurries down to 0.01 wt. %. However, biochemical surfactants are less toxic and biodegradable, and thus their use may prove beneficial even if at

  5. Application of gas hydrate formation in separation processes: A review of experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslamimanesh, Ali; Mohammadi, Amir H.; Richon, Dominique; Naidoo, Paramespri; Ramjugernath, Deresh

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Review of gas hydrate technology applied to separation processes. ► Gas hydrates have potential to be a future sustainable separation technology. ► More theoretical, simulation, and economic studies needed. - Abstract: There has been a dramatic increase in gas hydrate research over the last decade. Interestingly, the research has not focussed on only the inhibition of gas hydrate formation, which is of particular relevance to the petroleum industry, but has evolved into investigations on the promotion of hydrate formation as a potential novel separation technology. Gas hydrate formation as a separation technology shows tremendous potential, both from a physical feasibility (in terms of effecting difficult separations) as well as an envisaged lower energy utilization criterion. It is therefore a technology that should be considered as a future sustainable technology and will find wide application, possibly replacing a number of current commercial separation processes. In this article, we focus on presenting a brief description of the positive applications of clathrate hydrates and a comprehensive survey of experimental studies performed on separation processes using gas hydrate formation technology. Although many investigations have been undertaken on the positive application of gas hydrates to date, there is a need to perform more theoretical, experimental, and economic studies to clarify various aspects of separation processes using clathrate/semi-clathrate hydrate formation phenomena, and to conclusively prove its sustainability.

  6. Multidisciplinary investigations exploring indicators of gas hydrate occurrence in the Krishna–Godavari Basin offshore, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Paropkari, A.L.; Borole, D.V.; Rao, B.R.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Desa, M.; Kocherla, M.; Joao, H.M.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Pattan, J.N.; Khadge, N.H.; PrakashBabu, C.; Sathe, A.V.; Kumar, P.; Sethi, A.K.

    , in the Gulf of Mexico, the Norwegian Sea, and along the northern Cascadian margin— are long known not only for their conventional hydrocarbon potential but also for their gas hydrate accumulation fields (e.g. Brooks et al. 1986; Kennicutt et al. 1988... in future studies attempting to collect long cores and extract methane gas for exploration purposes in the Krishna–Godavari Basin. Hardage and Roberts (2006) have summarized the mechanism of hydrate formation in the Gulf of Mexico by adopting the concept...

  7. Modelling a deep water oil/gas spill under conditions of gas hydrate formation and decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, L.; Yapa, P.D.

    2000-01-01

    A model for the behavior of oil and gas spills at deepwater locations was presented. Such spills are subjected to pressures and temperatures that can convert gases to gas hydrates which are lighter than water. Knowing the state of gases as they rise with the plume is important in predicting the fate of an oil or gas plume released in deepwater. The objective of this paper was to develop a comprehensive jet/plume model which includes computational modules that simulate the gas hydrate formation/decomposition of gas bubbles. This newly developed model is based on the kinetics of hydrate formation and decomposition coupled with mass and heat transfer phenomena. The numerical model was successfully tested using results of experimental data from the Gulf of Mexico. Hydrate formation and decomposition are integrated with an earlier model by Yapa and Zheng for underwater oil or gas jets and plumes. The effects of hydrate on the behavior of an oil or gas plume was simulated to demonstrate the models capabilities. The model results indicate that in addition to thermodynamics, the kinetics of hydrate formation/decomposition should be considered when studying the behavior of oil and gas spills. It was shown that plume behavior changes significantly depending on whether or not the local conditions force the gases to form hydrates. 25 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs

  8. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  9. 3D pore-type digital rock modeling of natural gas hydrate for permafrost and numerical simulation of electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huaimin; Sun, Jianmeng; Lin, Zhenzhou; Fang, Hui; Li, Yafen; Cui, Likai; Yan, Weichao

    2018-02-01

    Natural gas hydrate is being considered as an alternative energy source for sustainable development and has become a focus of research throughout the world. In this paper, based on CT scanning images of hydrate reservoir rocks, combined with the microscopic distribution of hydrate, a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model was used to construct 3D hydrate digital rocks of different distribution types, and the finite-element method was used to simulate their electrical characteristics in order to study the influence of different hydrate distribution types, hydrate saturation and formation of water salinity on electrical properties. The results show that the hydrate digital rocks constructed using the DLA model can be used to characterize the microscopic distribution of different types of hydrates. Under the same conditions, the resistivity of the adhesive hydrate digital rock is higher than the cemented and scattered type digital rocks, and the resistivity of the scattered hydrate digital rock is the smallest among the three types. Besides, the difference in the resistivity of the different types of hydrate digital rocks increases with an increase in hydrate saturation, especially when the saturation is larger than 55%, and the rate of increase of each of the hydrate types is quite different. Similarly, the resistivity of the three hydrate types decreases with an increase in the formation of water salinity. The single distribution hydrate digital rock constructed, combined with the law of microscopic distribution and influence of saturation on the electrical properties, can effectively improve the accuracy of logging identification of hydrate reservoirs and is of great significance for the estimation of hydrate reserves.

  10. Energy from gas hydrates - assessing the opportunities and challenges for Canada: report of the expert panel on gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-09-01

    Gas hydrates form when water and natural gas combine at low temperatures and high pressures in regions of permafrost and in marine subseafloor sediments. Estimates suggest that the total amount of natural gas bound in hydrate form may exceed all conventional gas resources, or even the amount of all combined hydrocarbon energy. Gas from gas hydrate could provide a potentially vast new source of energy to offset declining supplies of conventional natural gas in North America and to provide greater energy security for countries such as Japan and India that have limited domestic sources. However, complex issues would need to be addressed if gas hydrate were to become a large part of the energy future of Canada. Natural Resources Canada asked the Council of Canadian Academies to assemble a panel of experts to examine the challenges for an acceptable operational extraction of gas hydrates in Canada. This report presented an overview of relevant contextual background, including some basic science; the medium-term outlook for supply and demand in markets for natural gas; broad environmental issues related to gas hydrate in its natural state and as a fuel; and an overview of Canada's contribution to knowledge about gas hydrate in the context of ongoing international research activity. The report also presented current information on the subject and what would be required to delineate and quantify the resource. Techniques for extracting gas from gas hydrate were also outlined. The report also addressed safety issues related to gas hydrate dissociation during drilling operations or release into the atmosphere; the environmental issues associated with potential leakage of methane into the atmosphere and with the large volumes of water produced during gas hydrate dissociation; and jurisdictional and local community issues that would need to be resolved in order to proceed with the commercial exploitation of gas hydrate. It was concluded that there does not appear to be

  11. Permafrost-associated gas hydrates of Northern Alaska: A possible source of atmospheric methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collett, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous researchers have suggested that destabilized gas hydrates may be contributing to this buildup in atmospheric methane. Little is known about the geologic or geochemical nature of gas hydrates, even though they are known to occur in numerous arctic sedimentary basins. Because of the abundance of available geologic data, the author's research has focused on assessing the distribution of gas hydrates within the onshore regions of northern Alaska; currently, onshore permafrost-associated gas hydrates are believed to be insulated from most atmospheric temperature changes and are not at this time an important source of atmospheric methane. Their onshore gas hydrate studies, however, can be used to develop geologic analogs for potential gas hydrate occurrences within unexplored areas, such as the thermally unstable nearshore continental shelf. On the North Slope, gas hydrates have been identified in 36 industry wells by using well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were recovered in a core by an oil company. Most gas hydrates they identified occur in six laterally continuous Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sandstone and conglomerate units; all these hydrates are geographically restricted to the area overlying the eastern part of the Kuparuk River Oil Field and the western part of the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field. Stable carbon isotope geochemical analysis of well cuttings suggests that the identified hydrates originated from a mixture of deep-source thermogenic gas and shallow microbial gas that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. They postulate that the thermogenic gas migrated from deeper reservoirs along the faults thought to be migration pathways for the large volumes of shallow, heavy oil found in the same area

  12. Major factors influencing the generation of natural gas hydrate in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Khlebnikov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current researches related to natural gas hydrate mainly focus on its physical and chemical properties, as well as the approaches to the production (decomposition of hydrate. Physical modeling of the flow process in hydrate deposits is critical to the study on the exploitation or decomposition of hydrate. However, investigation of the dynamic hydrate process by virtue of porous media like sand-packed tubes which are widely used in petroleum production research is rarely reported in literature. In this paper, physical simulation of methane hydrate generation process was conducted using river sand-packed tubes in the core displacement apparatus. During the simulation, the influences of parameters such as reservoir temperature, methane pressure and reservoir model properties on the process of hydrate generation were investigated. The following results are revealed. First, the use of ice-melted water as the immobile water in the reservoir model can significantly enhance the rate of methane hydrate generation. Second, the process driving force in porous media (i.e., extents to which the experimental pressure or temperature deviating those corresponding to the hydrate phase equilibrium plays a key role in the generation of methane hydrate. Third, the induction period of methane hydrate generation almost does not change with temperature or pressure when the methane pressure is above 1.4 folds of the hydrate phase equilibrium pressure or the laboratory temperature is lower than the phase equilibrium temperature by 3 °C or more. Fourth, the parameters such as permeability, water saturation and wettability don't have much influence on the generation of methane hydrate.

  13. Contributions of the National Institute of Nuclear Research to the advance of Science and Technology in Mexico. Commemorative edition 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque M, G.; Jimenez R, M.; Monroy G, F.; Romero H, S.; Serment G, J.

    2010-01-01

    From the second decade of the X X century the applications of the nuclear energy have been important part of the scientific and technological patrimony in Mexico. Records exist with regard to the use of the radioisotopes and the radiations in our country in that time, and in a formal way until the year of 1950, in a process that culminates with the creation of the Comision Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN. January 1, 1956). In January 12, 1972 were published the Organic Law that created to the Instituto Nacional de Energia Nuclear, being responsible for the works that the CNEN developed. The current Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) was constituted starting from the Regulation Law of the constitutional Article 27 in nuclear matter of January 26, 1979, abrogated and substituted by the Law in force of February 4, 1985. In this lapse they were undertaken multitude of projects with results and diverse achievements. From their creation, the mission of the ININ and the previous institutions has been to realize research in science and nuclear technology, to promote their peaceful uses and to diffuse the achieved advances, always searching for to link them to the economic, social, scientific and technological development of the country. In this occasion with the purpose of participating in the commemoration of the bicentennial of the independence and centennial of the Mexican revolution in our country, the ININ decided to publish this work, directed to a wide public, with the intention of providing a vision the most complete and appropriate possible of the activities in research and technology that it is carries out at the moment. This work also seeks to be a diffusion instrument of the tasks that they are carried out in the institute, in diverse subjects as: the basic research, the nuclear applications in the health, the agriculture and the industry, the studies on the contamination and the environment; the dosimetry; the radiological protection; as

  14. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  15. Observed correlation between the depth to base and top of gas hydrate occurrence from review of global drilling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, M.; Collett, T. S.

    2017-07-01

    A global inventory of data from gas hydrate drilling expeditions is used to develop relationships between the base of structure I gas hydrate stability, top of gas hydrate occurrence, sulfate-methane transition depth, pressure (water depth), and geothermal gradients. The motivation of this study is to provide first-order estimates of the top of gas hydrate occurrence and associated thickness of the gas hydrate occurrence zone for climate-change scenarios, global carbon budget analyses, or gas hydrate resource assessments. Results from publically available drilling campaigns (21 expeditions and 52 drill sites) off Cascadia, Blake Ridge, India, Korea, South China Sea, Japan, Chile, Peru, Costa Rica, Gulf of Mexico, and Borneo reveal a first-order linear relationship between the depth to the top and base of gas hydrate occurrence. The reason for these nearly linear relationships is believed to be the strong pressure and temperature dependence of methane solubility in the absence of large difference in thermal gradients between the various sites assessed. In addition, a statistically robust relationship was defined between the thickness of the gas hydrate occurrence zone and the base of gas hydrate stability (in meters below seafloor). The relationship developed is able to predict the depth of the top of gas hydrate occurrence zone using observed depths of the base of gas hydrate stability within less than 50 m at most locations examined in this study. No clear correlation of the depth to the top and base of gas hydrate occurrences with geothermal gradient and sulfate-methane transition depth was identified.

  16. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C 3 S, C 2 S) and aluminates (C 3 A, C 4 AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm -1 monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the 1 H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) and wide

  17. Gas hydrates: entrance to a methane age or climate threat?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krey, Volker; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Grubler, Arnulf; O'Neill, Brian; Riahi, Keywan; Canadell, Josep G; Abe, Yuichi; Andruleit, Harald; Archer, David; Hamilton, Neil T M; Johnson, Arthur; Kostov, Veselin; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Langhorne, Nicholas; Nisbet, Euan G; Riedel, Michael; Wang Weihua; Yakushev, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Methane hydrates, ice-like compounds in which methane is held in crystalline cages formed by water molecules, are widespread in areas of permafrost such as the Arctic and in sediments on the continental margins. They are a potentially vast fossil fuel energy source but, at the same time, could be destabilized by changing pressure-temperature conditions due to climate change, potentially leading to strong positive carbon-climate feedbacks. To enhance our understanding of both the vulnerability of and the opportunity provided by methane hydrates, it is necessary (i) to conduct basic research that improves the highly uncertain estimates of hydrate occurrences and their response to changing environmental conditions, and (ii) to integrate the agendas of energy security and climate change which can provide an opportunity for methane hydrates-in particular if combined with carbon capture and storage-to be used as a 'bridge fuel' between carbon-intensive fossil energies and zero-emission energies. Taken one step further, exploitation of dissociating methane hydrates could even mitigate against escape of methane to the atmosphere. Despite these opportunities, so far, methane hydrates have been largely absent from energy and climate discussions, including global hydrocarbon assessments and the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  18. Microstructure of hydrated cement pastes as determined by SANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, T.; Bertram, W.; Aldridge, L.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Technologists have known how to make concrete for over 2000 years but despite painstaking research no one has been able to show how and why concrete sets. Part of the problem is that the calcium silicate hydrate (the gel produced by hydrating cement) is amorphous and cannot be characterised by x-ray crystallographic techniques. Small angle neutron scattering on instrument V12a at BENSC was used to characterise the hydration reactions and show the growth of the calcium silicate hydrates during initial hydration and the substantial differences in the rate of growth and structure as different additives are used. SANS spectra were measured as a function of the hydration from three different types of cement paste: 1) Ordinary Portland Cement made with a water to cement ratio of about 0.4; 2) A blend of Ordinary Portland Cement(25%) and Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (75%) with a water to cement ration of about 0.4; 3) A dense paste made from silica fume(24%), Ordinary Portland Cement (76%) at a water to powder ratio of 0.18. The differences in the spectra are interpreted in terms of differences between the microstructure of the pastes

  19. Exergy analysis of a gas-hydrate cool storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Yuehong; Liu, Xiao; Jiang, Minghe

    2014-01-01

    Based on exergy analysis of charging and discharging processes in a gas-hydrate cool storage system, the formulas for exergy efficiency at the sensible heat transfer stage and the phase change stage corresponding to gas-hydrate charging and discharging processes are obtained. Furthermore, the overall exergy efficiency expressions of charging, discharging processes and the thermodynamic cycle of the gas-hydrate cool storage system are obtained. By using the above expressions, the effects of number of transfer units, the inlet temperatures of the cooling medium and the heating medium on exergy efficiencies of the gas-hydrate cool storage system are emphatically analyzed. The research results can be directly used to evaluate the performance of gas-hydrate cool storage systems and design more efficient energy systems by reducing the sources of inefficiency in gas-hydrate cool storage systems. - Highlights: • Formulas for exergy efficiency at four stages are obtained. • Exergy efficiency expressions of two processes and one cycle are obtained. • Three mainly influencing factors on exergy efficiencies are analyzed. • With increasing the inlet temperature of cooling medium, exergy efficiency increases. • With decreasing the inlet temperature of heating medium, exergy efficiency increases

  20. Hydration dependent dynamics in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Greg L.; Bardaro, Michael F.; Echodu, Dorothy C.; Drobny, Gary P.; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    The essential role played by local and collective motions in RNA function has led to a growing interest in the characterization of RNA dynamics. Recent investigations have revealed that even relatively simple RNAs experience complex motions over multiple time scales covering the entire ms-ps motional range. In this work, we use deuterium solid-state NMR to systematically investigate motions in HIV-1 TAR RNA as a function of hydration. We probe dynamics at three uridine residues in different structural environments ranging from helical to completely unrestrained. We observe distinct and substantial changes in 2 H solid-state relaxation times and lineshapes at each site as hydration levels increase. By comparing solid-state and solution state 13 C relaxation measurements, we establish that ns-μs motions that may be indicative of collective dynamics suddenly arise in the RNA as hydration reaches a critical point coincident with the onset of bulk hydration. Beyond that point, we observe smaller changes in relaxation rates and lineshapes in these highly hydrated solid samples, compared to the dramatic activation of motion occurring at moderate hydration

  1. Seismic characterization of hydrates in faulted, fine-grained sediments of Krishna-Godavari basin: Unified imaging

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jaiswal, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Zelt, C.A.

    (Clennell et al., 1999). However, in basins affected by structural deformation, local fluid and heat flow, and spatially variable sedimentation, e.g., Gulf of Mexico (Ding et al., 2008) and Krishna-Godavari (Dewangan et al., 2011), the BSR profile may..., northern Gulf of Mexico: Part I. A seismic approach based on geologic model, inversion, and rock physics principles. Marine and Petroleum Geology 25, 830-844. Daigle, H., Dugan, B., 2011. Capillary controls on methane hydrate distribution and fracturing...

  2. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  3. Qualitative Inquiry with Women in Poverty in Mexico City: Reflections on the Emotional Responses of a Research Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Salgado, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    While conducting a qualitative inquiry involving in-depth interviews on the perceptions of health risks within a group of profoundly poor urban families in the southern part of Mexico City, Martinez-Salgado and her interdisciplinary team of women interviewers got involved in emotionally complex situations with the women participants in the study.…

  4. Assessing the conditions favorable for the occurrence of gas hydrate in the Tuonamu area Qiangtang basin, Qinghai–Tibetan, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianglin; Wang Jian; Fu Xiugen; Zheng Chenggang; Chen Yanting

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This is a pioneer research on the exploration of gas hydrate in Qiangtang basin. ► The factors influencing the stable of gas hydrate in Tuonamu area were studied. ► Simulation shows that gas hydrate stable zone is about 300 m thick in target area. ► Source condition is the key factor for the formation of gas hydrate in this area. ► The areas around the deeper faults are favorable targets for gas hydrate. - Abstract: Qiangtang basin, which is located in the largest continuous permafrost area in Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau, is expected to be a strategic area of gas hydrate exploitation in China. However, relatively little work has been done on the exploration of gas hydrate in this area. In this work, we evaluated the factors controlling the formation of gas hydrate in the Tuonamu area and provided a preliminary insight into gas hydrate distribution in it on the basis of the core samples, seismic data and laboratory analysis. It can be concluded that the source rock in the deeper formation would be dominant thermogenic source for the formation of gas hydrate in Tuonamu area. The thickness of gas hydrate stable zone in this area is about 300 m. The gas hydrate in the area most probably is in the form of gas-hydrate-water. The source condition is the key factor for the formation of gas hydrate and the gas hydrate layer would be mainly present in the form of interlayer in this area. The areas around the deeper faults are the favorable targets for the exploration of gas hydrate in the Tuonamu area.

  5. Reconsideration on Hydration of Sodium Ion: From Micro-Hydration to Bulk Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Zhou; Chunhui, Fang; Yan, Fang; Fayan, Zhu; Haiwen, Ge; Hongyan, Liu

    2017-12-01

    Micro hydration structures of the sodium ion, [Na(H2O) n ]+, n = 1-12, were probed by density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level in both gaseous and aqueous phase. The predicted equilibrium sodium-oxygen distance of 0.240 nm at the present level of theory. The four-, five- and six-coordinated cluster can transform from each other at the ambient condition. The analysis of the successive water binding energy and natural charge population (NBO) on Na+ clearly shows that the influence of Na+ on the surrounding water molecules goes beyond the first hydration shell with the hydration number of 6. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamic simulation shows that only the first hydration sphere can be found, and the hydration number of Na+ is 5.2 and the hydration distance ( r Na-O) is 0.235 nm. All our simulations mentioned in the present paper show an excellent agreement with the diffraction result from X-ray scattering study.

  6. CO2 injection into submarine, CH4-hydrate bearing sediments: Parameter studies towards the development of a hydrate conversion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusner, Christian; Bigalke, Nikolaus; Kossel, Elke; Haeckel, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    In the recent past, international research efforts towards exploitation of submarine and permafrost hydrate reservoirs have increased substantially. Until now, findings indicate that a combination of different technical means such as depressurization, thermal stimulation and chemical activation is the most promising approach for producing gas from natural hydrates. Moreover, emission neutral exploitation of CH4-hydrates could potentially be achieved in a combined process with CO2 injection and storage as CO2-hydrate. In the German gas hydrate initiative SUGAR, a combination of experimental and numerical studies is used to elucidate the process mechanisms and technical parameters on different scales. Experiments were carried out in the novel high-pressure flow-through system NESSI (Natural Environment Simulator for sub-Seafloor Interactions). Recent findings suggest that the injection of heated, supercritical CO2 is beneficial for both CH4 production and CO2 retention. Among the parameters tested so far are the CO2 injection regime (alternating vs. continuous injection) and the reservoir pressure / temperature conditions. Currently, the influence of CO2 injection temperature is investigated. It was shown that CH4 production is optimal at intermediate reservoir temperatures (8 ° C) compared to lower (2 ° C) and higher temperatures (10 ° C). The reservoir pressure, however, was of minor importance for the production efficiency. At 8 ° C, where CH4- and CO2-hydrates are thermodynamically stable, CO2-hydrate formation appears to be slow. Eventual clogging of fluid conduits due to CO2-rich hydrate formation force open new conduits, thereby tapping different regions inside the CH4-hydrate sample volume for CH4gas. In contrast, at 2 ° C immediate formation of CO2-hydrate results in rapid and irreversible obstruction of the entire pore space. At 10 ° C pure CO2-hydrates can no longer be formed. Consequently the injected CO2 flows through quickly and interaction with

  7. Preliminary assessment of the waveform inversion method for interpretation of cross-well seismic data from the thermal production test, JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Research Center for Seismology and Volcanology; Shimizu, S. [Japan National Oil Co., Chiba (Japan); Asakawa, E. [JGI Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Kamei, R.; Matsuoka, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Civil and Earth Resources Engineering

    2005-07-01

    The JAPEX/JNOC/GSC et al. Mallik 3L-38 and 4L-38 test wells were subjected to repeated cross-well seismic surveys before and during the gas production test from the gas-hydrate-bearing layer at a depth of about 905 to 920 m. High-resolution velocity images in the gas-hydrate-bearing layer were obtained using the frequency-domain nonlinear waveform inversion method. An acoustic waveform inversion method was used along with the frequency-domain approach in order to detect the change in acoustic properties of the gas-hydrate-bearing layer resulting from gas production. The layered structures with small lateral heterogeneities were reconstructed by tomography analysis of preprocessed waveform data using a smaller number of source-receiver pairs. Preliminary results reveal high velocity and very high attenuation in the gas-hydrate-bearing layers. No obvious velocity decreases were noted. Information for further detailed processing was also gathered.

  8. A high yield process for hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giavarini, C.; Maccioni, F. [Univ. of Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Due to the large quantities of natural gas stored in deep ocean hydrates, hydrate reservoirs are a substantial energy resource. Hydrates concentrate methane by as much as a factor of 164. As such, several natural gas transportation and storage systems using gas hydrates have been studied, and many of them are nearing practical use. In these systems, the hydrate is produced as a slurry by a spray process at approximately 7 megapascal (MPa), and then shaped into pellets. The use of a spray process, instead of a conventional stirred vessel is necessary in order to reach high hydrate concentrations in the hydrate-ice system. This paper presented a new procedure to produce a bulk of concentrated methane hydrate in a static traditional reactor at moderate pressure, controlling pressure and temperature in the interval between ice melting and the hydrate equilibrium curve. This paper discussed the experimental procedure which included formation of methane hydrate at approximately 5 MPa and 2 degrees Celsius in a reaction calorimeter at a volume of two liters. Results were also discussed. It was concluded that the procedure seemed suitable for the development of a gas hydrate storage and transport technology. It was found that the spray procedure took more time, but could be sped up and made continuous by using two vessels, one for hydrate formation and the other for hydrate concentration. The advantage was the production of a concentrated hydrate, using a simpler equipment and working at lower pressures respect to the spray process. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Permafrost-associated natural gas hydrate occurrences on the Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T.S.; Lee, M.W.; Agena, W.F.; Miller, J.J.; Lewis, K.A.; Zyrianova, M.V.; Boswell, R.; Inks, T.L.

    2011-01-01

    In the 1960s Russian scientists made what was then a bold assertion that gas hydrates should occur in abundance in nature. Since this early start, the scientific foundation has been built for the realization that gas hydrates are a global phenomenon, occurring in permafrost regions of the arctic and in deep water portions of most continental margins worldwide. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the in-place natural gas hydrate resources of the United States. That study suggested that the amount of gas in the gas hydrate accumulations of northern Alaska probably exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources on the North Slope. Researchers have long speculated that gas hydrates could eventually become a producible energy resource, yet technical and economic hurdles have historically made gas hydrate development a distant goal. This view began to change in recent years with the realization that this unconventional resource could be developed with existing conventional oil and gas production technology. One of the most significant developments was the completion of the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well on the Alaska North Slope, which along with the Mallik project in Canada, have for the first time allowed the rational assessment of gas hydrate production technology and concepts. Almost 40 years of gas hydrate research in northern Alaska has confirmed the occurrence of at least two large gas hydrate accumulations on the North Slope. We have also seen in Alaska the first ever assessment of how much gas could be technically recovered from gas hydrates. However, significant technical concerns need to be further resolved in order to assess the ultimate impact of gas hydrate energy resource development in northern Alaska. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Evaluating the impact of Mexico's drug policy reforms on people who inject drugs in Tijuana, B.C., Mexico, and San Diego, CA, United States: a binational mixed methods research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela M; Garfein, Richard S; Wagner, Karla D; Mehta, Sanjay R; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Moreno-Zuniga, Patricia Gonzalez; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2014-02-12

    Policymakers and researchers seek answers to how liberalized drug policies affect people who inject drugs (PWID). In response to concerns about the failing "war on drugs," Mexico recently implemented drug policy reforms that partially decriminalized possession of small amounts of drugs for personal use while promoting drug treatment. Recognizing important epidemiologic, policy, and socioeconomic differences between the United States-where possession of any psychoactive drugs without a prescription remains illegal-and Mexico-where possession of small quantities for personal use was partially decriminalized, we sought to assess changes over time in knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and infectious disease profiles among PWID in the adjacent border cities of San Diego, CA, USA, and Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. Based on extensive binational experience and collaboration, from 2012-2014 we initiated two parallel, prospective, mixed methods studies: Proyecto El Cuete IV in Tijuana (n = 785) and the STAHR II Study in San Diego (n = 575). Methods for sampling, recruitment, and data collection were designed to be compatible in both studies. All participants completed quantitative behavioral and geographic assessments and serological testing (HIV in both studies; hepatitis C virus and tuberculosis in STAHR II) at baseline and four semi-annual follow-up visits. Between follow-up assessment visits, subsets of participants completed qualitative interviews to explore contextual factors relating to study aims and other emergent phenomena. Planned analyses include descriptive and inferential statistics for quantitative data, content analysis and other mixed-methods approaches for qualitative data, and phylogenetic analysis of HIV-positive samples to understand cross-border transmission dynamics. Investigators and research staff shared preliminary findings across studies to provide feedback on instruments and insights regarding local phenomena. As a result, recruitment and data

  11. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6......Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...

  12. Storage capacity of hydrogen in gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Takaaki; Ogata, Kyohei; Hashimoto, Shunsuke; Sugahara, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2010-01-01

    The storage capacity of H 2 in the THF, THT, and furan hydrates was studied by p-V-T measurements. We confirmed that the storage and release processes of H 2 in all hydrates could be performed reversibly by pressure swing without destroying of hydrate cages. H 2 absorption in both THT and furan hydrates is much faster than THF hydrate in spite of same unit-cell structure. On the other hand, the storage amounts of H 2 are coincident in the all additive hydrates and would reach at about 1.0 mass% asymptotically.

  13. Designing a reservoir flow rate experiment for the GOM hydrate JIP leg 2 LWD drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullapalli, I.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reik, B.; Kamal, M.; Jones, E. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., San Ramon, CA (United States); Moridis, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, CA (United States); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Studies have indicated that the Gulf of Mexico may contain large deep sea hydrate deposits. This paper provided details of short-term production profiles obtained from a geological model of hydrate deposits located in the Gulf area. A well test analysis tool was used to obtain the production parameters. Pressure transients from numerical simulations of various well test designs were used to provide estimates of important flow parameters. The aim of the study was to determine the type and duration of a well test capable of providing data to support the accurate modeling of gas hydrate deposits. Parameters studied in the test included the effects of permeability and hydrate saturation as a function of the duration of the flow test. Results indicated that production using a constant bottom hole pressure is an appropriate method of impacting hydrate dissociation by depressurization. However, changes in transient pressure plots could not be characterized in order to identify regions of varying saturation levels. Results suggested that the rate of effective water to effective gas was higher than rates obtained from relative permeability relations due to low gas saturation levels. Fluid saturation regions were in areas of low confidence in relative permeability curves. However, it was not possible to calculate absolute permeability of the reservoir for systems with short production periods. Further studies are needed to determine effective permeability using history matching and a hydrate simulator. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 27 figs.

  14. Methane rising from the Deep: Hydrates, Bubbles, Oil Spills, and Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, I.; Rehder, G. J.; Solomon, E. A.; Kastner, M.; Asper, V. L.; Joye, S. B.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated methane concentrations in near-surface waters and the atmosphere have been reported for seepage from depths of nearly 1 km at the Gulf of Mexico hydrate observatory (MC118), suggesting that for some methane sources, deepsea methane is not trapped and can contribute to atmospheric greenhouse gas budgets. Ebullition is key with important sensitivity to the formation of hydrate skins and oil coatings, high-pressure solubility, bubble size and bubble plume processes. Bubble ROV tracking studies showed survival to near thermocline depths. Studies with a numerical bubble propagation model demonstrated that consideration of structure I hydrate skins transported most methane only to mid-water column depths. Instead, consideration of structure II hydrates, which are stable to far shallower depths and appropriate for natural gas mixtures, allows bubbles to survive to far shallower depths. Moreover, model predictions of vertical methane and alkane profiles and bubble size evolution were in better agreement with observations after consideration of structure II hydrate properties as well as an improved implementation of plume properties, such as currents. These results demonstrate the importance of correctly incorporating bubble hydrate processes in efforts to predict the impact of deepsea seepage as well as to understand the fate of bubble-transported oil and methane from deepsea pipeline leaks and well blowouts. Application to the DWH spill demonstrated the importance of deepsea processes to the fate of spilled subsurface oil. Because several of these parameters vary temporally (bubble flux, currents, temperature), sensitivity studies indicate the importance of real-time monitoring data.

  15. Formation and dissociation of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-THF hydrates compared to CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 4}-THF hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giavarini, C.; Maccioni, F.; Broggi, A. [Roma Univ. La Sapienza, Roma (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Politi, M. [ENEL-RICERCHE, Brindisi (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    Carbon sequestration involves the removal of greenhouse gases from industrial or utility plant streams and their long term storage so that they cannot interact with the climate system. Different methods for selective carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) removal are in commercial use and are based on, gas absorption, membrane process, and cryogenic fractionation. In addition, disposal of captured CO{sub 2} in the ocean and in geological reservoirs has been proposed by researchers. Another challenge is to take advantage of the properties of CO{sub 2} hydrates for carbon sequestration since it could have a number of uses such as chemical production. As such, it is important to understand the hydrate decomposition kinetics during storage, transportation, and disposal. This paper presented a project that involved the separation of carbon dioxide from the flue gases of powers plants, in the form of hydrate. The project also involved the storage, use, and disposal of the hydrate. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the decomposition kinetics of CO{sub 2} hydrate containing different quantities of ice, at low pressures and temperatures between -3 and 0 degrees Celsius. In addition, in order to evaluate the tetrahydrofuran (THF) stabilization effect, the study examined the influence of THF on the formation and decomposition kinetics of mixed THF-methane (CH{sub 4}) and THF-CO{sub 2} hydrates. Preservation tests were conducted to determine the best pressure and temperature conditions for the mixed-hydrates conservation, with reference to the simple hydrates. The paper described the apparatus for the formation and dissociation tests which consisted of a jacketed stainless steel reactor, equipped with stirrer. The paper also described the hydrate formation procedure as well as hydrate characterization. Last, the paper discussed the hydrate dissociation tests that were conducted immediately after hydrate formation in the reactor. It was concluded that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic

  16. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  17. Thermodynamic studies on semi-clathrate hydrates of TBAB + gases containing carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslamimanesh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    CO 2 capture has become an important area of research mainly due to its drastic greenhouse effects. Gas hydrate formation as a separation technique shows tremendous potential, both from a physical feasibility as well as an envisaged lower energy utilization criterion. Briefly, gas (clathrate) hydrates are non-stoichiometric, ice-like crystalline compounds formed through a combination of water and suitably sized guest molecule(s) under low-temperatures and elevated pressures. As the pressure required for gas hydrate formation is generally high, therefore, aqueous solution of tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) is added to the system as a gas hydrate promoter. TBAB generally reduces the required hydrate formation pressure and/or increases the formation temperature as well as modifies the selectivity of hydrate cages to capture CO 2 molecules. TBAB also takes part in the hydrogen-bonded cages. Such hydrates are called 'semi-clathrate' hydrates. Evidently, reliable and accurate phase equilibrium data, acceptable thermodynamic models, and other thermodynamic studies should be provided to design efficient separation processes using the aforementioned technology. For this purpose, phase equilibria of clathrate/semi-clathrate hydrates of various gas mixtures containing CO 2 (CO 2 + CH 4 /N 2 /H 2 ) in the presence of pure water and aqueous solutions of TBAB have been measured in this thesis. In the theoretical section of the thesis, a thermodynamic model on the basis of the van der Waals and Platteeuw (vdW-P) solid solution theory along with the modified equations for determination of the Langmuir constants of the hydrate formers has been successfully developed to represent/predict equilibrium conditions of semi-clathrate hydrates of CO 2 , CH 4 , and N 2 . Later, several thermodynamic consistency tests on the basis of Gibbs-Duhem equation as well as a statistical approach have been applied on the phase equilibrium data of the systems of mixed/simple clathrate hydrates

  18. Anti-Agglomerator of Tetra-n-Butyl Ammonium Bromide Hydrate and Its Effect on Hydrate-Based CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB was widely used in the research fields of cold storage and CO2 hydrate separation due to its high phase change latent heat and thermodynamic promotion for hydrate formation. Agglomeration always occurred in the process of TBAB hydrate generation, which led to the blockage in the pipeline and the separation apparatus. In this work, we screened out a kind of anti-agglomerant that can effectively solve the problem of TBAB hydrate agglomeration. The anti-agglomerant (AA is composed of 90% cocamidopropyl dimethylamine and 10% glycerol, which can keep TBAB hydrate of 19.3–29.0 wt. % in a stable state of slurry over 72 h. The microscopic observation of the morphology of the TBAB hydrate particles showed that the addition of AA can greatly reduce the size of the TBAB hydrate particles. CO2 gas separation experiments found that the addition of AA led to great improvement on gas storage capacity, CO2 split fraction and separation factor, due to the increasing of contact area between gas phase and hydrate particles. The CO2 split fraction and separation factor with AA addition reached up to 70.3% and 42.8%, respectively.

  19. Thermal properties of methane hydrate by experiment and modeling and impacts upon technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warzinski, R.P.; Gamwo, I.K.; Rosenbaum, E.J. [United States Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory; Myshakin, E.M. [NETL Support Contractor, South Park, PA (United States); Jiang, H.; Jordan, K.D. [Pittsburgh Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; English, N.J. [Dublin University College, Dublin (Ireland). Conway Inst. of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, Centre for Synthesis and Chemical Biology; Shaw, D.W. [Geneva College, Beaver Falls, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The current hydrate research at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) involves both experimental and theoretical work on developing models and methods for predicting the behaviour of gas hydrates in their natural environment under production of climate change scenarios. The modeling efforts include both fundamental and reservoir scale simulations and economic modeling. The thermal properties of methane hydrate are important for hydrate production, seafloor stability and climate change scenarios. A new experimental technique and advanced molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) have determined the thermal properties of pure methane hydrate under conditions similar to naturally occurring hydrate-bearing sediments. The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity values of low-porosity methane hydrate formed in the laboratory were measured using an innovative single-sided, Transient Plane Source (TPS) technique. The results were in good agreement with results from an equilibrium MDS method using in-plane polarization of the water molecules. MDS was also performed using a non-equilibrium model with a fully polarizable force field for water. The Tough+Hydrate reservoir simulator was also used to evaluate the impact of thermal conductivity on gas production from a hydrate-bearing reservoir. 42 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  20. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  1. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  2. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  3. Impacts of Hydrate Distribution on the Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Seol, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In general, hydrate makes the sediments hydraulically less conductive, thermally more conductive, and mechanically stronger; yet the dependency of these physical properties on hydrate saturation varies with hydrate distribution and morphology. Hydrate distribution in sediments may cause the bulk physical properties of their host sediments varying several orders of magnitude even with the same amount of hydrate. In natural sediments, hydrate morphology is inherently governed by the burial depth and the grain size of the host sediments. Compare with patchy hydrate, uniformly distributed hydrate is more destructive to fluid flow, yet leads to higher gas and water permeability during hydrate dissociation due to the easiness of forming percolation paths. Water and hydrate have similar thermal conductivity values; the bulk thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments depends critically on gas-phase saturation. 60% of gas saturation may result in evident thermal conductivity drop and hinder further gas production. Sediments with patchy hydrate yield lower stiffness than that with cementing hydrate but higher stiffness than that with pore filling and loading bearing hydrate. Besides hydrate distribution, the stress state and loading history also play an important role in the mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments.

  4. Gas hydrate-related proxies inferred from multidisciplinary investigations in the India offshoe areas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.; Sathe, A.V.; Sethi, A.K.

    ., Potential distribution of met h ane h y drates along the Indian continental margins. Curr. Sci ., 1998, 74 , 466 ? 468. 6. Milkov, A. V., Sassen, R. and DeFreitas, D., Gas H y drate in the Gulf of Mexico. Applied Gas Hydrate R e search Program, Year... of California, Mexico. Mar. Chem ., 1983, 14 , 89 ? 106. 24. Torres, M. E. et al ., Barite fronts in cont i nental margin sediments: A new look at b arium mobilization in the zone of su l fate reduction and formation of heavy barites in diagenetic...

  5. FY 1998 result report. Research/development on the energy overall development/utilization technology of gas hydrate resource; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Gas haidoreto shigen no energy sogo kaihatsu riyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This study is aimed at studying for survey of gas hydrate (GH) deposit required for GH resource development and gathering of it, and further at studying for industrial utilization technology development of GH which is different in formation condition depending on kind of gas with which it reacts. The results of FY 1998 are as follows. In the study of the situation of existence of gas hydrate in the tundra, the sedimentary environment of the tundra where natural gas hydrate exists was simulated in laboratory to measure thermal conductivity of the sediments including GH. In this fiscal year, design/fabrication/calibration were conducted of the GH synthesizer and thermal analyzer. In the study of GH gathering technology in the tundra, a technology is discussed for recovering gas from GH layer and at the same time substituting CO2 hydrate for GH by blowing CO2 into the geologic layer. In FY 1998, formation/dissociation behaviors were first studied of methane/CO2 mixture hydrate. For the overall energy development of GH resource and promotion of R and D of the utilization technology, studies were made on physical properties of GH and development of the usage. (NEDO)

  6. Effects of Attenuation of Gas Hydrate-bearing Sediments on Seismic Data: Example from Mallik, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellefleur, G.; Riedel, M.; Brent, T.

    2007-05-01

    Wave attenuation is an important physical property of hydrate-bearing sediments that is rarely taken into account in site characterization with seismic data. We present a field example showing improved images of hydrate- bearing sediments on seismic data after compensation of attenuation effects. Compressional quality factors (Q) are estimated from zero-offset Vertical Seismic Profiling data acquired at Mallik, Northwest Territories, Canada. During the last 10 years, two internationally-partnered research drilling programs have intersected three major intervals of sub-permafrost gas hydrates at Mallik, and have successfully extracted core samples containing significant amount of gas hydrates. Individual gas hydrate intervals are up to 40m in thickness and are characterized by high in situ gas hydrate saturation, sometimes exceeding 80% of pore volume of unconsolidated clastic sediments having average porosities ranging from 25% to 40%. The Q-factors obtained from the VSP data demonstrate significant wave attenuation for permafrost and hydrate- bearing sediments. These results are in agreement with previous attenuation estimates from sonic logs and crosshole data at different frequency intervals. The Q-factors obtained from VSP data were used to compensate attenuation effects on surface 3D seismic data acquired over the Mallik gas hydrate research wells. Intervals of gas hydrate on surface seismic data are characterized by strong reflectivity and effects from attenuation are not perceptible from a simple visual inspection of the data. However, the application of an inverse Q-filter increases the resolution of the data and improves correlation with log data, particularly for the shallowest gas hydrate interval. Compensation of the attenuation effects of the permafrost likely explains most of the improvements for the shallow gas hydrate zone. Our results show that characterization of the Mallik gas hydrates with seismic data not corrected for attenuation would tend to

  7. Advanced research and development of gas hydrate resources. R and D of exploration and others - R and D of excavation technologies and others - surveys/researches on methods of evaluating environmental effects - surveys/researches on application systems; Gas hydrate shigenka gijutsu sendo kenkyu kaihatsu. Tansa nado ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu / kussaku gijutsu nado ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu / kankyo eikyo hyokaho no chosa kenkyu / riyo system ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Gas hydrate is a clathrate compound in a gaseous molecule as the host, stable under relatively mild environments. It is deposited in the 600m or deeper sea bottoms to form the gas hydrate deposit and massively occurring in the sea areas around Japan. This deposit has been studied viewed from natural gas resources, causes for natural hazards and contribution to the global warming. This project excavates a well in the deposit, to study possibilities of the technologies for decomposing, fluidizing and lifting the hydrate as the gas source, and for establishing the natural gas transporting/mooring systems in which its characteristics are utilized. The R and D activities are directed to the 4 areas, (1) development of the exploration technologies to determine the deposit sea area, quantity and conditions, (2) development of the stable well-excavation technologies, (3) studies on the effects of gas production on the environments, and development of the system for predicting the effects, (4) and studies on the application systems. The item (3) finds out the transportation/storage system possibly more economical than the current freezing/liquefaction technologies. The item (3) has the development themes of evaluating the geohazards caused by excavation and gas production, and their effects on the ecological systems. (NEDO)

  8. Modeling the influence of limestone addition on cement hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ragab Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the influence of using Portland limestone cement “PLC” on cement hydration by characterization of its microstructure development. The European Standard EN 197-1:2011 and Egyptian specification ESS 4756-1/2009 permit the cement to contain up to 20% ground limestone. The computational tools assist in better understanding the influence of limestone additions on cement hydration and microstructure development to facilitate the acceptance of these more economical and ecological materials. μic model has been developed to enable the modeling of microstructural evolution of cementitious materials. In this research μic model is used to simulate both the influence of limestone as fine filler, providing additional surfaces for the nucleation and growth of hydration products. Limestone powder also reacts relatively slow with hydrating cement to form monocarboaluminate (AFmc phase, similar to the mono-sulfoaluminate (AFm phase formed in ordinary Portland cement. The model results reveal that limestone cement has accelerated cement hydration rate, previous experimental results and computer model “cemhyd3d” are used to validate this model.

  9. The Art of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccardi, Marianne

    1997-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of books for grades K and up which explores the folklore, poetry, fiction, and art of Mexico, and focuses on the Mayans and Aztecs and Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. Also suggests various research, reading, drama, music, social studies, physical education, and art activities and lists related videos and Internet…

  10. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A; Gamboa-Suárez, A; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I

    2017-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  11. Hydration modeling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Al-Mattarneh, Hashem; Mustapha, Kamal N.; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in the last ten years [1,2]. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the

  12. Research Culture in Higher Education: The Case of a Foreign Language Department in Mexico (Cultura de la investigación: el caso de un Departamento de Lenguas Extranjeras en México)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Méndez, Edith; Reyes Cruz, María del Rosario

    2014-01-01

    In the case of Mexico, until recently, many universities focused mainly on teaching, but recent changes have led to new appointments in research, administration, and community service. There now seems to be, however, a view of the predominance of research in the academic environment. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to examine and…

  13. Frozen heat: Global outlook on methane gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudoin, Yannick; Solgaard, Anne

    2010-09-15

    The United Nations Environment Programme via its collaborating center in Norway, UNEP/GRID-Arendal, is undertaking an assessment of the state of the knowledge of methane gas hydrates. The Global Outlook on Methane Gas Hydrates seeks to bridge the gap between the science, research and development activities related to this potential large scale unconventional source of natural gas and the needs of decision makers and the general public to understand the underlying societal and environmental drivers and impacts. The Outlook aims to provide credible and unbiased information sourced from stakeholders representing the environment, government, industry and society.

  14. Halting of the calcium aluminate cement hydration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, A.P.; Borba, N.Z; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium aluminate cement reactions with water lead to the anhydrous phases dissolution resulting a saturated solution, followed by nucleation and crystal growth of the hydrate compounds. This is a dynamic process, therefore, it is necessary to use suitable methods to halt the hydration in order to study the phase transformations kinetics of such materials. In this work two methods are evaluated: use of acetone and microwave drying, aiming to withdraw the free water and inhibit further reactions. X ray diffraction and thermogravimetric tests were used to quantify the phases generated in the cement samples which were kept at 37 deg C for 1 to 15 days. The advantages and disadvantages of those procedures are presented and discussed. The use of microwave to halt the hydration process seems to be effective to withdraw the cement free water, and it can further be used in researches of the refractory castables area, endodontic cements, etc. (author)

  15. Permeability of sediment cores from methane hydrate deposit in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Egawa, K.; Ito, T.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Nagao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Effective and absolute permeability are key parameters for gas production from methane-hydrate-bearing sandy sediments. Effective and/or absolute permeability have been measured using methane-hydrate-bearing sandy cores and clayey and silty cores recovered from Daini Atsumi Knoll in the Eastern Nankai Trough during the 2012 JOGMEC/JAPEX Pressure coring operation. Liquid-nitrogen-immersed cores were prepared by rapid depressurization of pressure cores recovered by a pressure coring system referred to as the Hybrid PCS. Cores were shaped cylindrically on a lathe with spraying of liquid nitrogen to prevent hydrate dissociation. Permeability was measured by a flooding test or a pressure relaxation method under near in-situ pressure and temperature conditions. Measured effective permeability of hydrate-bearing sediments is less than tens of md, which are order of magnitude less than absolute permeability. Absolute permeability of clayey cores is approximately tens of μd, which would perform a sealing function as cap rocks. Permeability reduction due to a swelling effect was observed for a silty core during flooding test of pure water mimicking hydrate-dissociation-water. Swelling effect may cause production formation damage especially at a later stage of gas production from methane hydrate deposits. This study was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) that carries out Japan's Methane Hydrate R&D Program conducted by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  16. Numerical simulation studies of gas production scenarios from hydrate accumulations at the Mallik Site, McKenzie Delta, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy S.; Dallimore, Scott R.; Satoh, Tohru; Hancock, Stephen; Weatherill, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The Mallik site represents an onshore permafrost-associated gas hydrate accumulation in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. An 1150 m deep gas hydrate research well was drilled at the site in 1998. The objective of this study is the analysis of various gas production scenarios from several gas-hydrate-bearing zones at the Mallik site. The TOUGH2 general-purpose simulator with the EOSHYDR2 module were used for the analysis. EOSHYDR2 is designed to model the non-isothermal CH(sub 4) (methane) release, phase behavior and flow under conditions typical of methane-hydrate deposits by solving the coupled equations of mass and heat balance, and can describe any combination of gas hydrate dissociation mechanisms. Numerical simulations indicated that significant gas hydrate production at the Mallik site was possible by drawing down the pressure on a thin free-gas zone at the base of the hydrate stability field. Gas hydrate zones with underlying aquifers yielded significant gas production entirely from dissociated gas hydrate, but large amounts of produced water. Lithologically isolated gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs with no underlying free gas or water zones, and gas-hydrate saturations of at least 50% were also studied. In these cases, it was assumed that thermal stimulation by circulating hot water in the well was the method used to induce dissociation. Sensitivity studies indicated that the methane release from the hydrate accumulations increases with gas-hydrate saturation, the initial formation temperature, the temperature of the circulating water in the well, and the formation thermal conductivity. Methane production appears to be less sensitive to the rock and hydrate specific heat and permeability of the formation

  17. Regional Mapping and Resource Assessment of Shallow Gas Hydrates of Japan Sea - METI Launched 3 Years Project in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.

    2014-12-01

    Agency of Natural Resources and Energy of METI launched a 3 years shallow gas hydrate exploration project in 2013 to make a precise resource assessment of shallow gas hydrates in the eastern margin of Japan Sea and around Hokkaido. Shallow gas hydrates of Japan Sea occur in fine-grained muddy sediments of shallow subsurface of mounds and gas chimneys in the form of massive nodular to platy accumulation. Gas hydrate bearing mounds are often associated with active methane seeps, bacterial mats and carbonate concretions and pavements. Gases of gas hydrates are derived either from deep thermogenic, shallow microbial or from the mixed gases, contrasting with totally microbial deep-seated stratigraphically controlled hydrates. Shallow gas hydrates in Japan Sea have not been considered as energy resource due to its limited distribution in narrow Joetsu basin. However recently academic research surveys have demonstrated regional distribution of gas chimney and hydrate mound in a number of sedimentary basins along the eastern margin of Japan Sea. Regional mapping of gas chimney and hydrate mound by means of MBES and SBP surveys have confirmed that more than 200 gas chimneys exist in 100 km x 100 km area. ROV dives have identified dense accumulation of hydrates on the wall of half collapsed hydrate mound down to 30 mbsf. Sequential LWD and shallow coring campaign in the Summer of 2014, R/V Hakurei, which is equipped with Fugro Seacore R140 drilling rig, drilled through hydrate mounds and gas chimneys down to the BGHS (base of gas hydrate stability) level and successfully recovered massive gas hydrates bearing sediments from several horizons.

  18. Research on heat pumps in Mexico operating with geothermal energy and waste heat; Investigacion sobre bombas de calor en Mexico operando con energia geotermica y calor de desecho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, A; Barragan-Reyes, R.M; Arellano-Gomez, V [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: aggarcia@iie.org.mx

    2008-01-15

    The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas and the Comision Federal de Electricidad have done research and development (R&D) on heat pumps (HP) in past years. Tested systems include mechanical compression, absorption and heat-transformers. The main R&D aspects on HP are briefly described, and also a more detailed description about three of the main studies is presented: (a) a mechanical compression HP of the water-water type operated with low-pressure geothermal steam at the Los Azufres; Mich., geothermal field, and designed for purification of brine; (b) an absorption HP for cooling and refrigeration operating with ammonia-water and low-enthalpy geothermal energy, which was tested in the Los Azufres and Cerro Prieto, BC, geothermal fields; and (c) a heat-transformer by absorption-Absorption Heat Pump Type II-tested to assess the performance of several ternary solutions as work fluids. Plans exist to install and test a geothermal heat pump at Cerro Prieto or Mexicali, BC. [Spanish] El Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas y la Comision Federal de Electricidad han realizado trabajo de investigacion y desarrollo (I&D) sobre bombas de calor (BC) en el pasado. Los sistemas probados incluyen compresion mecanica, absorcion y transformadores termicos. Este trabajo describe brevemente los principales aspectos de I&D sobre bombas de calor en forma general, y se da una descripcion mas detallada de tres de los principales estudios: (a) una BC por compresion mecanica tipo agua-agua disenada para purificacion de salmueras operando con vapor geotermico de baja presion en el campo geotermico de Los Azufres, Mich.; (b) una BC por absorcion para enfriamiento y refrigeracion operando con amoniaco-agua y energia geotermica de baja entalpia, la cual fue probada en los campos geotermicos de Los Azufres y Cerro Prieto, BC; y (c) un transformador termico por absorcion -llamado Bomba de Calor por Absorcion Tipo II--, el cual fue probado para evaluar el comportamiento de diversas

  19. Observed gas hydrate morphologies in marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry, Northamptonshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The morphology of gas hydrate in marine sediments determines the basic physical properties of the sediment-hydrate matrix and provides information regarding the formation of gas hydrate deposits, and the nature of the disruption that will occur on dissociation. Small-scale morphology is useful in estimating the concentrations of gas hydrate from geophysical data. It is also important for predicting their response to climate change or commercial production. Many remote techniques for gas hydrate detection and quantification depend on hydrate morphology. In this study, morphology of gas hydrate was examined in HYACINTH pressure cores from recent seagoing expeditions. Visual and infrared observations from non-pressurized cores were also used. The expeditions and pressure core analysis were described in detail. This paper described the difference between two types of gas hydrate morphologies, notably pore-filling and grain-displacing. Last, the paper addressed the impact of hydrate morphology. It was concluded that a detailed morphology of gas hydrate is an essential component for a full understanding of the past, present, and future of any gas hydrate environment. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K

    1996-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Hydrated electron: a destroyer of perfluorinated carboxylates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Li; Dong Wenbo; Hou Huiqi

    2006-01-01

    As a class, perfluorinated carboxylate (PFCA) was ranked among the most prominent organohalogen contaminants in environment with respect to thermal, chemical and biological inertness. Hydrated electron (e aq - ), a highly reactive and strongly reductive species, has been reported to readily decompose perfluoroaromatic compounds via intermolecular electron transfer process in aqueous solution. Question then arose: what would happen if perfluorinated carboxylates encountered with hydrated electron? Original laboratory trial on the interaction between F(CF 2 ) n COO - (n=1, 3, 7) and hydrated electron was attempted by using laser flash photolysis technique in this research work. Abundant hydrated electron (e aq - ) could be produced by photolysis of 1.25 x 10 -4 M K 4 Fe(CN) 6 in nitrogen saturated water. In the presence of F(CF 2 ) n COO - (n=1, 3, 7), the decay of e aq - was observed to enhance dramatically, indicating e aq - was able to attack PFCAs. On addition of perfluorinated carboxylates, the loss of e aq - was mainly due to the following channels. By mixing the solution of K 4 Fe(CN) 6 with excess K 3 Fe(CN) 6 and PFCAs, e aq - turned to decayed corresponding to mixed first- and second-order kinetics. Rate constants for the reactions of e aq - with PFCAs could be then easily determined by monitoring the decay of e aq - absorption at 690 nm. Since perfluorinated carboxylates were salts, the influence of ionic strength on k 3 was examined systematically by carrying out experiments of varying ionic strength ranging from 0.009 up to 0.102 M by adding NaClO 4 . In this manner, the second order rate constants for e-aq with CF 3 COO - , C 3 F 7 COO - , C 7 F 15 COO - were derived to be (1.9±0.2) x 10 6 M -1 S -1 (μ=0), (7.1±0.2) x 10 6 M -1 S -1 (μ=0) and (1.7±0.5) x10 7 M -1 S -1 (μ=0.009 M) respectively. Apparently, the length of F(CF 2 ) n group exerted substantial influence on the rate constant. Further study on byproducts analysis by ion chromatography

  3. Evaluation of the aptitude for the service of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico; Evaluacion de la aptitud para el servicio de la piscina del reactor TRIGA Mark III del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, J.; Gachuz M, M.; Diaz S, A.; Arganis J, C.; Gonzalez R, C.; Nava G, T.; Medina R, M.J. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales del ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    This work describes the evaluation of the structural integrity of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico, which was realized in July 2001, as an element to determine those actions for preventive and corrective maintenance which owner must do it for a safety and efficient operation of the component in the next years. (Author)

  4. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  5. Field Data and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Löwner

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Data and information exchange are crucial for any kind of scientific research activities and are becoming more and more important. The comparison between different data sets and different disciplines creates new data, adds value, and finally accumulates knowledge. Also the distribution and accessibility of research results is an important factor for international work. The gas hydrate research community is dispersed across the globe and therefore, a common technical communication language or format is strongly demanded. The CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group is creating the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML, a standard based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML to enable the transport, modeling, and storage of all manner of objects related to gas hydrate research. GHML initially offers an easily deducible content because of the text-based encoding of information, which does not use binary data. The result of these investigations is a custom-designed application schema, which describes the features, elements, and their properties, defining all aspects of Gas Hydrates. One of the components of GHML is the "Field Data" module, which is used for all data and information coming from the field. It considers international standards, particularly the standards defined by the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium and the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium. Various related standards were analyzed and compared with our requirements (in particular the Geographic Markup Language (ISO19136, GML and the whole ISO19000 series. However, the requirements demanded a quick solution and an XML application schema readable for any scientist without a background in information technology. Therefore, ideas, concepts and definitions have been used to build up the modules of GHML without importing any of these Markup languages. This enables a comprehensive schema and simple use.

  6. Fire extinction utilizing carbon dioxide hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, T.; Aida, E.; Yokomori, T.; Ohmura, R.; Ueda, T. [Keio Univ., Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates formed with nonflammable gases may be suitable for use as fire extinguishing agents because dissociation of the hydrates results in the temperature decrease in the combustion field and the nonflammable gases released from the dissociated hydrates prevent the supply of the oxygen to the combustion field. This paper discussed experiments in which ordinary ice and dry ice were used to evaluate the performance of CO{sub 2} hydrate as a fire extinguishing agent. The paper described the apparatus and procedure for the preparation of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystals. A schematic of the reactor to form CO{sub 2} hydrate and a photograph of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystal formed in the study were also presented. Other illustrations, photographs, and tables that were presented included a schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus used for the flame extinction experiments; a photograph of CO{sub 2} hydrate powder; sequential video graphs of the flame extinction by the supply of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystals to the methanol pool flame and the relevant illustration; and heat of CO{sub 2} hydrate dissociation, water vaporization and sublimation of dry ice. It was concluded that the critical mass of the CO{sub 2} hydrate required to extinguish a flame was much less than that of ordinary ice, indicating the superiority of CO{sub 2} hydrate to the ice. In addition, the experiments also revealed that the size of the CO{sub 2} hydrate particles had a significant effect on the performance of flame extinction. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  7. Assessing Individual Intellectual Output in Scientific Research: Mexico's National System for Evaluating Scholars Performance in the Humanities and the Behavioral Sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Frixione

    Full Text Available Assessing the research of individual scholars is currently a matter of serious concern and worldwide debate. In order to gauge the long-term efficacy and efficiency of this practice, we carried out a limited survey of the operation and outcome of Mexico's 30-year old National System of Investigators or SNI, the country's main instrument for stimulating competitive research in science and technology. A statistical random sample of researchers listed in the area of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences-one of SNI's first and better consolidated academic divisions comprising a wide range of research disciplines, from philosophy to pedagogy to archaeology to experimental brain research-was screened comparing individual ranks or "Levels of distinction" to actual compliance with the SNI's own evaluation criteria, as reflected in major public databases of scholarly production. The same analysis was applied to members of a recent Review Committee, integrated by top-level researchers belonging to that general area of knowledge, who have been in charge of assessing and ranking their colleagues. Our results for both sets of scholars show wide disparity of individual productivity within the same SNI Level, according to all key indicators officially required (books issued by prestigious publishers, research articles appeared in indexed journals, and formation of new scientists, as well as in impact estimated by numbers of citations. Statistical calculation from the data indicates that 36% of members in the Review Committee and 53% of researchers in the random sample do not satisfy the official criteria requested for their appointed SNI Levels. The findings are discussed in terms of possible methodological errors in our study, of relevance for the SNI at large in relation to independent appraisals, of the cost-benefit balance of the organization as a research policy tool, and of possible alternatives for its thorough restructuring. As it currently stands SNI is

  8. Assessing Individual Intellectual Output in Scientific Research: Mexico's National System for Evaluating Scholars Performance in the Humanities and the Behavioral Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frixione, Eugenio; Ruiz-Zamarripa, Lourdes; Hernández, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the research of individual scholars is currently a matter of serious concern and worldwide debate. In order to gauge the long-term efficacy and efficiency of this practice, we carried out a limited survey of the operation and outcome of Mexico's 30-year old National System of Investigators or SNI, the country's main instrument for stimulating competitive research in science and technology. A statistical random sample of researchers listed in the area of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences-one of SNI's first and better consolidated academic divisions comprising a wide range of research disciplines, from philosophy to pedagogy to archaeology to experimental brain research-was screened comparing individual ranks or "Levels of distinction" to actual compliance with the SNI's own evaluation criteria, as reflected in major public databases of scholarly production. The same analysis was applied to members of a recent Review Committee, integrated by top-level researchers belonging to that general area of knowledge, who have been in charge of assessing and ranking their colleagues. Our results for both sets of scholars show wide disparity of individual productivity within the same SNI Level, according to all key indicators officially required (books issued by prestigious publishers, research articles appeared in indexed journals, and formation of new scientists), as well as in impact estimated by numbers of citations. Statistical calculation from the data indicates that 36% of members in the Review Committee and 53% of researchers in the random sample do not satisfy the official criteria requested for their appointed SNI Levels. The findings are discussed in terms of possible methodological errors in our study, of relevance for the SNI at large in relation to independent appraisals, of the cost-benefit balance of the organization as a research policy tool, and of possible alternatives for its thorough restructuring. As it currently stands SNI is not a model for

  9. LopheliaII2012: Coral Research on Oil Rigs in the Gulf of Mexico on TDI-Brooks Vessel Brooks McCall between 2012-07-12 and 2012-07-24

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The final year of a multi-year effort to study Lophelia coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico is occurring on the TDI-Brooks research vessel, Brooks McCall,...

  10. Maintaining rigor in research: flaws in a recent study and a reanalysis of the relationship between state abortion laws and maternal mortality in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, Blair G; Saavedra-Avendano, Biani; Lozano, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    A recent publication [Koch E, Chireau M, Pliego F, Stanford J, Haddad S, Calhoun B, Aracena P, Bravo M, Gatica S, Thorp J. Abortion legislation, maternal healthcare, fertility, female literacy, sanitation, violence against women and maternal deaths: a natural experiment in 32 Mexican states. BMJ Open 2015;5(2):e006013] claimed that Mexican states with more restrictive abortion laws had lower levels of maternal mortality. Our objectives are to replicate the analysis, reanalyze the data and offer a critique of the key flaws of the Koch study. We used corrected maternal mortality data (2006-2013), live births, and state-level indicators of poverty. We replicate the published analysis. We then reclassified state-level exposure to abortion on demand based on actual availability of abortion (Mexico City versus the other 31 states) and test the association of abortion access and the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) using descriptives over time, pooled chi-square tests and regression models. We included 256 state-year observations. We did not find significant differences in MMR between Mexico City (MMR=49.1) and the 31 states (MMR=44.6; p=.44). Using Koch's classification of states, we replicated published differences of higher MMR where abortion is more available. We found a significant, negative association between MMR and availability of abortion in the same multivariable models as Koch, but using our state classification (beta=-22.49, 95% CI=-38.9; -5.99). State-level poverty remains highly correlated with MMR. Koch makes errors in methodology and interpretation, making false causal claims about abortion law and MMR. MMR is falling most rapidly in Mexico City, but our main study limitation is an inability to draw causal inference about abortion law or access and maternal mortality. We need rigorous evidence about the health impacts of increasing access to safe abortion worldwide. Transparency and integrity in research is crucial, as well as perhaps even more in

  11. Determining the mechanism and parameters of hydrate formation and loss in glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Sarah K; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2014-11-01

    Water-solid interactions are known to play a major role in the chemical and physical stability of food materials. Despite its extensive use throughout the food industry, the mechanism and parameters of hydrate formation and loss in glucose are not well characterized. Hydrate formation in alpha-anhydrous glucose (α-AG) and hydrate loss in glucose monohydrate (GM) were studied under equilibrium conditions at various relative humidity (RH) values using saturated salt slurries for 1 y. The mechanism of hydrate formation and hydrate loss were determined through mathematical modeling of Dynamic Vapor Sorption data and Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the mechanisms. The critical temperature for hydrate loss in GM was determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The moisture sorption profiles of α-AG and GM were also studied under dynamic conditions using an AquaSorp Isotherm Generator. Hydrate formation was observed at and above 68% RH at 25 °C and the conversion of α-AG to GM can best be described as following a nucleation mechanism, however, diffusion and/or geometric contraction mechanisms were also observed by Raman spectroscopy subsequent to the coalescence of initial nucleation sites. Hydrate loss was observed to occur at and below 11% RH at 25 °C during RH storage and at 70 °C during TGA. The conversion of GM to α-AG follows nucleation and diffusion mechanisms. Hydrate formation was evident under dynamic conditions in α-AG and GM prior to deliquescence. This research is the first to report hydrate formation and loss parameters for crystalline α-AG and GM during extended storage at 25 ˚C. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Electrical Conductive Mechanism of Gas Hydrate-Bearing Reservoirs in the Permafrost Region of Qilian Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, C.; Zou, C.; Tang, Y.; Liu, A.; Hu, X.

    2017-12-01

    In the Qilian Mountain, gas hydrates not only occur in pore spaces of sandstones, but also fill in fractures of mudstones. This leads to the difficulty in identification and evaluation of gas hydrate reservoir from resistivity and velocity logs. Understanding electrical conductive mechanism is the basis for log interpretation. However, the research is insufficient in this area. We have collected well logs from 30 wells in this area. Well logs and rock samples from DK-9, DK-11 and DK-12 wells were used in this study. The experiments including SEM, thin section, NMR, XRD, synthesis of gas hydrate in consolidated rock cores under low temperature and measurement of their resistivity and others were performed for understanding the effects of pore structure, rock composition, temperature and gas hydrate on conductivity. The results show that the porosity of reservoir of pore filling type is less than 10% and its clay mineral content is high. As good conductive passages, fractures can reduce resistivity of water-saturated rock. If fractures in the mudstone are filled by calcite, resistivity increases significantly. The resistivity of water-saturated rock at 2°C is twice of that at 18°C. The gas hydrate formation process in the sandstone was studied by resistivity recorded in real time. In the early stage of gas hydrate formation, the increase of residual water salinity may lead to the decrease of resistivity. In the late stage of gas hydrate formation, the continuity decrease of water leads to continuity increase of resistivity. In summary, fractures, rock composition, temperature and gas hydrate are important factors influencing resistivity of formation. This study is helpful for more accurate evaluation of gas hydrate from resistivity log. Acknowledgment: We acknowledge the financial support of the National Special Program for Gas Hydrate Exploration and Test-production (GZH201400302).

  13. Hydrate equilibrium data for the CO2 + N2 system with the use of tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB), cyclopentane (CP) and their mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzirakis, Fragkiskos; Stringari, Paolo; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Carbon Dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) is nowadays an important area of research for decreasing CO2 emissions worldwide. Hydrates can become of great importance in the future as they form the basis for a new technology that can be used for CO2 capture from flue gases (hydrate...... crystallization). In this work hydrate equilibrium data are measured and compared with literature data. In particular, experimental results for hydrate dissociation with several promoters are presented. The isochoric method is used to determine the gas hydrate dissociation points. Different CO2 + N2 gas mixtures...

  14. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  15. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  16. The Extent of CH4 Emission and Oxidation in Thermogenic and Biogenic Gas Hydrate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, M.; Solem, C.; Bartlett, D.; MacDonald, I.; Valentine, D.

    2003-12-01

    The role of methane hydrate in the global methane budget is poorly understood, because relatively little is known about the transport of gaseous and dissolved methane through the seafloor into the ocean, from the water column into the atmosphere, and the extent of water-column methanotrophy that occurs en route. We characterize the transport and consumption of methane in three distinct gas hydrate environments, spanning the spectrum of thermogenic and biogenic methane occurrences: Bush Hill in the Gulf of Mexico, Eel River off the coast of Northern California, and the Noth and South Hydrate Ridges on the Cascadia Oregon margin. At all the sites studied a significant enrichment in δ 13CH4 with distance along isopycnals away from the methane source is observed, indicative of extensive aerobic bacterial methane oxidation in the water column. The effects of this process are principally pronounced in the mostly biogenic methane setting, with δ 13C-CH4 measured as high as -12 permil (PDB) between North and South Hydrate Ridge. The δ 13C-CH4 values ranged from -12 to -67 permil at Hydrate Ridge, -34 to -52 permil at Eel River, and -41 to -49 permil at Bush Hill. The large variation in methane carbon isotope ranges between the sites suggest that major differences exist in both the rates of aerobic methane oxidation and system openness at the studied locations. A mean kinetic isotope fractionation factor is being determined using a closed-system Rayleigh distillation model. An approximate regional methane flux from the ocean into the atmosphere is being estimated for the Gulf of Mexico, by extrapolation of the flux value from the Bush Hill methane plume over 390 plume locations having persistent oil slicks on the ocean surface, mapped by time series satellite data.

  17. Vertical seismic profile data from well Mallik 2L-38 for gas hydrate studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Y [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Walia, R [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada) School of Earth and Ocean Sciences; Hyndman, R [Geological Survey of Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada) Pacific Geoscience Centre

    1999-07-01

    A gas hydrate research well was drilled in the Canadian Arctic to study gas hydrates in a permafrost setting in a collaborative research project between the Japan National Oil Corp., the Geological Survey of Canada and other agencies. The multidisciplinary study included an electromagnetic survey, permafrost and gas hydrate coring, comprehensive downhole geophysical logging and measurement. Laboratory studies concerned studies on recovered cuttings and core including sedimentology, physical properties, geochemistry, and reservoir characteristics of the Mallik gas accumulation. As part of the Mallik 2L-38 field program, a vertical seismic profiling survey was conducted at zero and other offset source positions with three component receiver tools and horizontal and vertical vibration sources. A special effort was made to record shear wave data, which will be used to estimate the effect of gas hydrate on formation velocities and to determine gas hydrate concentration as a function of the Mallik gas accumulation. From the initial VSP analysis, certain conclusions follow: 1) zero offset vertical vibration component Z and horizontal X component data give reliable velocity determination within the gas hydrate formation zone. P wave velocities from offset VSP data show an excellent consistency with that from offset data and with the sonic log. And 2) the VSP data permit reliable identification of gas hydrate bearing zones. Abstract only included.

  18. Vertical seismic profile data from well Mallik 2L-38 for gas hydrate studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Y [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Walia, R [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Hyndman, R D; Sakai, A

    1999-01-01

    A gas hydrate research well was drilled in the Canadian Arctic to determine gas hydrates in a permafrost setting in a collaborative research project between the Japan National Oil Corp., and the Geological Survey of Canada with the participation of other agencies. The multidisciplinary study included an electromagnetic survey, permafrost and gas hydrate coring, and comprehensive downhole geophysical logging and measurement. Laboratory studies on recovered cores and cuttings included sedimentology, physical properties, geochemistry, and reservoir characteristics of the Mallik gas accumulation. As part of the field program, a vertical seismic profiling survey was conducted at zero and offset source positions with 3 component receiver tools and horizontal and vertical vibration sources. A special effort was made to record shear wave data, and results from this work were combined with down hole logs and regional surface seismic data. The data will be used also to determine the effect of gas hydrates on formation velocities and to measure gas hydrate concentrations as a function of depth in the formation penetrated by the well. Certain conclusions followed from the initial VSP analysis. 1) Zero offset vertical vibration Z component and horizontal X component data give reliable velocity estimation within the gas hydrate formation zone, and P wave velocities from offset data indicate excellent consistency with that from zero offset data and with the sonic log. 2) The VSP data permitted reliable identification of gas hydrate bearing zones. 4 refs.

  19. Decomposition of methane hydrate for hydrogen production using microwave and radio frequency in-liquid plasma methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, Ismail; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Toyota, Hiromichi

    2015-01-01

    This research involves two in-liquid plasma methods of methane hydrate decomposition, one using radio frequency wave (RF) irradiation and the other microwave radiation (MW). The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a practical process for decomposition of methane hydrate directly at the subsea site for fuel gas production. The mechanism for methane hydrate decomposition begins with the dissociation process of methane hydrate formed by CH_4 and water. The process continues with the simultaneously occurring steam methane reforming process and methane cracking reaction, during which the methane hydrate is decomposed releasing CH_4 into H_2, CO and other by-products. It was found that methane hydrate can be decomposed with a faster rate of CH_4 release using microwave irradiation over that using radio frequency irradiation. However, the radio frequency plasma method produces hydrogen with a purity of 63.1% and a CH conversion ratio of 99.1%, which is higher than using microwave plasma method which produces hydrogen with a purity of 42.1% and CH_4 conversion ratio of 85.5%. - Highlights: • The decomposition of methane hydrate is proposed using plasma in-liquid method. • Synthetic methane hydrate is used as the sample for decomposition in plasma. • Hydrogen can be produced from decomposition of methane hydrate. • Hydrogen purity is higher when using radio frequency stimulation.

  20. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  1. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  2. Microstructure of natural hydrate host sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Kerkar, P.B.; Mahajan, D.; Lindquist, W.B.; Feng, H.

    2007-01-01

    There is worldwide interest in the study of natural gas hydrate because of its potential impact on world energy resources, control on seafloor stability, significance as a drilling hazard and probable impact on climate as a reservoir of a major greenhouse gas. Gas hydrates can (a) be free floating in the sediment matrix (b) contact, but do not cement, existing sediment grains, or (c) actually cement and stiffen the bulk sediment. Seismic surveys, often used to prospect for hydrates over a large area, can provide knowledge of the location of large hydrate concentrations because the hydrates within the sediment pores modify seismic properties. The ability to image a sample at the grain scale and to determine the porosity, permeability and seismic profile is of great interest since these parameters can help in determining the location of hydrates with certainty. We report here on an investigation of the structure of methane hydrate sediments at the grain-size scale using the synchrotron radiation-based computed microtomography (CMT) technique. Work has started on the measurements of the changes occurring as tetrahydrofuran hydrate, a surrogate for methane hydrate, is formed in the sediment

  3. Sustainability and power in health promotion: community-based participatory research in a reproductive health policy case study in New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rosilda; Plaza, Veronica; Wallerstein, Nina

    2016-03-01

    Health promotion programs are commonly viewed as value-free initiatives which seek to improve health, often through behavior change. An opposing view has begun to emerge that health promotion efforts, especially ones seeking to impact health policy and social determinants of health, are vulnerable to political contexts and may depend on who is in power at the time. This community-based participatory research study attempts to understand these interactions by applying a conceptual model focused on the power context, diverse stakeholder roles within this context, and the relationship of political levers and other change strategies to the sustainability of health promotion interventions aimed at health policy change. We present a case study of a health promotion coalition, New Mexico for Responsible Sex Education (NMRSE), as an example of power dynamics and change processes. Formed in 2005 in response to federal policies mandating abstinence-only education, NMRSE includes community activists, health promotion staff from the New Mexico Department of Health, and policy-maker allies. Applying an adapted Mayer's 'power analysis' instrument, we conducted semi-structured stakeholder interviews and triangulated political-context analyses from the perspective of the stakeholders.We identified multiple understandings of sustainability and health promotion policy change, including: the importance of diverse stakeholders working together in coalition and social networks; their distinct positions of power within their political contexts; the role of science versus advocacy in change processes; the particular challenges for public sector health promotion professionals; and other facilitators versus barriers to action. One problem that emerged consisted of the challenges for state employees to engage in health promotion advocacy due to limitations imposed on their activities by state and federal policies. This investigation's results include a refined conceptual model, a power

  4. Application of empirical hydration distribution functions around polar atoms for assessing hydration structures of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Daisuke; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Empirical distribution functions of water molecules in protein hydration are made. ► The functions measure how hydrogen-bond geometry in hydration deviate from ideal. ► The functions assess experimentally identified hydration structures of protein. - Abstract: To quantitatively characterize hydrogen-bond geometry in local hydration structures of proteins, we constructed a set of empirical hydration distribution functions (EHDFs) around polar protein atoms in the main and side chains of 11 types of hydrophilic amino acids (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 113 (2009) 11274). The functions are the ensemble average of possible hydration patterns around the polar atoms, and describe the anisotropic deviations from ideal hydrogen bond geometry. In addition, we defined probability distribution function of hydration water molecules (PDFH) over the hydrophilic surface of a protein as the sum of EHDFs of solvent accessible polar protein atoms. The functions envelop most of hydration sites identified in crystal structures of proteins (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 114 (2010) 4652). Here we propose the application of EHDFs and PDFHs for assessing crystallographically identified hydration structures of proteins. First, hydration water molecules are classified with respect to the geometry in hydrogen bonds in referring EHDFs. Difference Fourier electron density map weighted by PDFH of protein is proposed to identify easily density peaks as candidates of hydration water molecules. A computer program implementing those ideas was developed and used for assessing hydration structures of proteins

  5. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  6. Hydration and temperature in tennis - a practical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Mark S

    2006-03-01

    Competitive tennis is typically played in warm and hot environments. Because hypohydration will impair tennis performance and increases the risk of heat injury, consumption of appropriate fluid levels is necessary to prevent dehydration and enhance performance. The majority of research in this area has focused on continuous aerobic activity - unlike tennis, which has average points lasting less than ten seconds with rest periods dispersed between each work period. For this reason, hydration and temperature regulation methods need to be specific to the activity. Tennis players can sweat more than 2.5 L·h(-1) and replace fluids at a slower rate during matches than in practice. Latter stages of matches and tournaments are when tennis players are more susceptible to temperature and hydration related problems. Sodium (Na(+)) depletion, not potassium (K(+)), is a key electrolyte in tennis related muscle cramps. However, psychological and competitive factors also contribute. CHO drinks have been shown to promote fluid absorption to a greater degree than water alone, but no performance benefits have been shown in tennis players in short matches. It is advisable to consume a CHO beverage if practice or matches are scheduled longer than 90-120 minutes. Key PointsAlthough substantial research has been performed on temperature and hydration concerns in aerobic activities, there is little information with regard to tennis performance and safetyTennis athletes should be on an individualized hydration schedule, consuming greater than 200ml of fluid every changeover (approximately 15 minutes).Optimum hydration and temperature regulation will reduce the chance of tennis related muscle cramps and performance decrements.

  7. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes: sequence d'hydratation multi-echelle determination des energies macroscopiques a partir des proprietes microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, F

    2006-10-15

    Smectites have interesting properties which make them potential candidates for engineered barriers in deep geological nuclear waste repository: low permeability, swelling and cations retention. The subject of this thesis consists in the determination of the relationship between hydration properties, swelling properties and cations mobility in relation with confinement properties of clayey materials. The aim is to understand and to predict the behaviour of water in smectites, following two research orientations: the mechanistic aspects and the energetic aspects of the hydration of smectites. We worked on the Na-Ca montmorillonite contained in the MX80 bentonite, with the exchanged homo ionic structure (saturated with alkaline cations and calcium cations). The approach crosses the various scales (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic) and implied the study of the various components of the system (layer-cation-water), by using original experimental methods (thermo-poro-metry and electric conductivity for various relative humidities (RH) and electrostatic calculations. Initially, the dry state is defined by SCTA (scanning calorimetry thermal analysis). Then a classical characterization of the smectite porosity for the dry state is carried out using mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption. We evidenced the existence of a meso-porosity which radius varies from 2 to 10 nm depending on the compensating cation. The thermo-poro-metry and conductivity experiments performed at various hydration states made it possible to follow the increase in the pore sizes and the cations mobility as a function of the hydration state. We highlight in particular the existence of an osmotic mesoscopic swelling for low RH (approximately 50-60%RH for Li and Na). By combining the results of thermo-poro-metry, X-ray diffraction and electric conductivity, we are able to propose a complete hydration sequence for each cation, showing the crucial role of the compensating cation in the hydration of

  8. Neuropsychology in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky Shejet, Feggy; Velez Garcia, Alicia

    2016-11-01

    This invited paper explores the diverse pathways that have led to the development of neuropsychology in Mexico. The authors conducted a review of the literature and their own experiences to describe the seminal events and people relevant to the development of this area of research and practice. The master's degree is the usual level of educational attainment for those who wish to practice clinical neuropsychology. As of now, there is not a board certification process in neuropsychology, although there is one in clinical psychology. Neuropsychology and other mental health disciplines in Mexico and Latin America have historically been poorly funded, and have lacked optimal means of communication as to research findings and clinical initiatives and standards. However, there is reason to think that this will be improved upon in coming years.

  9. Significance of Hemispheric Security for Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-07

    La Seguridad Internacional, la Nueva Geopolitica Continental y Mexico ,” Seminario Internacional sobre Misiones de Paz, Seguridad y Defensa, Rio de...USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT SIGNIFICANCE OF HEMISPHERIC SECURITY FOR MEXICO by LTC Enrique Garcia Jaramillo Cavalry, Mexican Army COL Joseph R...xx-xx-2002 to xx-xx-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Significance of Hemispheric Security for Mexico Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  10. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  11. Contributions of the National Institute of Nuclear Research to the advance of Science and Technology in Mexico. Commemorative edition 2010; Contribuciones del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares al avance de la ciencia y la tecnologia en Mexico. Edicion conmemorativa 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque M, G.; Jimenez R, M.; Monroy G, F.; Romero H, S.; Serment G, J. (ed.) [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    From the second decade of the X X century the applications of the nuclear energy have been important part of the scientific and technological patrimony in Mexico. Records exist with regard to the use of the radioisotopes and the radiations in our country in that time, and in a formal way until the year of 1950, in a process that culminates with the creation of the Comision Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN. January 1, 1956). In January 12, 1972 were published the Organic Law that created to the Instituto Nacional de Energia Nuclear, being responsible for the works that the CNEN developed. The current Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) was constituted starting from the Regulation Law of the constitutional Article 27 in nuclear matter of January 26, 1979, abrogated and substituted by the Law in force of February 4, 1985. In this lapse they were undertaken multitude of projects with results and diverse achievements. From their creation, the mission of the ININ and the previous institutions has been to realize research in science and nuclear technology, to promote their peaceful uses and to diffuse the achieved advances, always searching for to link them to the economic, social, scientific and technological development of the country. In this occasion with the purpose of participating in the commemoration of the bicentennial of the independence and centennial of the Mexican revolution in our country, the ININ decided to publish this work, directed to a wide public, with the intention of providing a vision the most complete and appropriate possible of the activities in research and technology that it is carries out at the moment. This work also seeks to be a diffusion instrument of the tasks that they are carried out in the institute, in diverse subjects as: the basic research, the nuclear applications in the health, the agriculture and the industry, the studies on the contamination and the environment; the dosimetry; the radiological protection; as

  12. Gas Hydrates | Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary Report - Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates, Volume 204 Initial Report Mallik 2002 GSC Bulletin 585 : Scientific results from the Mallik 2002 gas hydrate production well program Offshore gas hydrate sample

  13. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  14. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, F.

    2006-10-01

    Smectites have interesting properties which make them potential candidates for engineered barriers in deep geological nuclear waste repository: low permeability, swelling and cations retention. The subject of this thesis consists in the determination of the relationship between hydration properties, swelling properties and cations mobility in relation with confinement properties of clayey materials. The aim is to understand and to predict the behaviour of water in smectites, following two research orientations: the mechanistic aspects and the energetic aspects of the hydration of smectites. We worked on the Na-Ca montmorillonite contained in the MX80 bentonite, with the exchanged homo ionic structure (saturated with alkaline cations and calcium cations). The approach crosses the various scales (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic) and implied the study of the various components of the system (layer-cation-water), by using original experimental methods (thermo-poro-metry and electric conductivity for various relative humidities (RH) and electrostatic calculations. Initially, the dry state is defined by SCTA (scanning calorimetry thermal analysis). Then a classical characterization of the smectite porosity for the dry state is carried out using mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption. We evidenced the existence of a meso-porosity which radius varies from 2 to 10 nm depending on the compensating cation. The thermo-poro-metry and conductivity experiments performed at various hydration states made it possible to follow the increase in the pore sizes and the cations mobility as a function of the hydration state. We highlight in particular the existence of an osmotic mesoscopic swelling for low RH (approximately 50-60%RH for Li and Na). By combining the results of thermo-poro-metry, X-ray diffraction and electric conductivity, we are able to propose a complete hydration sequence for each cation, showing the crucial role of the compensating cation in the hydration of

  15. Sedimentological Properties of Natural Gas Hydrates-Bearing Sands in the Nankai Trough and Mallik Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T.; Tsuji, T.; Waseda, A.

    2009-12-01

    sands should have permeability of 1 x 10-15 to 5 x 10-15 m2 (1 to 5 millidarcies). Most of gas hydrates fill the intergranular pore systems of sandy layers, which are derived from the sedimentary facies such as channels and crevasse splay/levee deposits. It is remarked that those sandy strata are usually composed of arenite sands with matrix-free intergranular pore systems. Gas hydrates are less frequently found in fine-grained sediments such as siltstone and mudstone from overbank deposits. Methane gas accumulation and original pore space large enough to occur within host sediments may be required for forming highly saturated gas hydrate in pore system. The distribution of a porous and coarser-grained host rock should be one of the important factors to control the occurrence of gas hydrate, as well as physicochemical conditions. This appears to be a similar mode for conventional oil and gas accumulations, and this knowledge is important to predicting the location of other hydrate deposits and their eventual energy resource. This study was performed as a part of the MH21 Research Consortium on methane hydrate in Japan.

  16. Increasing Public Access to Scientific Research through Stakeholder Involvement: Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, S. C.; Stephens, S. H.; DeLorme, D. E.; Ruple, D.; Graham, L.

    2013-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) has the potential to have a myriad of deleterious effects on coastal ecology and human infrastructure. Stakeholders, including managers of coastal resources, must be aware of potential consequences of SLR and adjust their plans accordingly to protect and preserve the resources under their care. Members of the public, particularly those who live or work in coastal areas, should also be informed about the results of scientific research on the effects of SLR. However, research results are frequently published in venues or formats to which resource managers and the broader public have limited access. It is imperative for scientists to move beyond traditional publication venues in order to more effectively disseminate the results of their research (Dennison, W. 2007, Estu. Coast. Shelf Sci. 77, 185). One potentially effective way to advance public access to research is to incorporate stakeholder involvement into the research project process in order to target study objectives and tailor communication products toward stakeholder needs (Lemos, M. & Morehouse, B. 2005, Glob. Env. Chg. 15, 57). However, it is important to manage communication and clarify participant expectations during this type of research (Gawith, M. et al. 2009, Glob. Env. Chg. 19, 113). This presentation describes the process being undertaken by an ongoing 5-year multi-disciplinary NOAA-funded project, Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (EESLR-NGOM), to improve accessibility and utility of scientific research results through stakeholder engagement. The EESLR-NGOM project is assessing the ecological risks from SLR along the Mississippi, Alabama and Florida Panhandle coasts, coastal habitats, and floodplains. It has incorporated stakeholder involvement throughout the research process so as to better target and tailor the emerging research products to meet resource managers' needs, as well as to facilitate eventual public dissemination of results. An

  17. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo, E-mail: Yongkoo.Seol@netl.doe.gov; Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field.

  18. Clathrate hydrates - the energy of the future an overview and a postulated formation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are non-stoichiometric compounds that form when water and certain low molecular weight hydrocarbons coexist at high pressures and low temperatures. The majority of the earth hydrocarbons are in the hydrate phase and are primarily located along the ocean bottoms and to a lesser degree in the permafrost regions. In addition, hydrate formation is induced in undersea gas transmission lines and causes costly pipeline plugs and requires expensive inhibition measures to be taken. Therefore, both a stick and a carrot motivate hydrate research. They are a costly and dangerous nuisance to the oil and gas industry and represent a tremendous, untapped energy resource of the future. The formation mechanism of clathrate hydrate formation has always been shrouded in mystery, and an ongoing debate has ensued as to whether their formation is a bulk or surface phenomenon. Molecular dynamics simulation and fractal modeling suggest that this may be an irrelevant issue and that two independent factors contribute to the symmetrical ordered structure of clathrate hydrates: hydrophobic hydration of hydrocarbon molecules in water and formation of linked cavities as these small clusters aggregate. (Author)

  19. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field

  20. Influence of smectite hydration and swelling on atrazine sorption behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Mark A; Laird, David A; Thompson, Michael L; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J; Aggarwal, Vaneet; Johnston, Cliff T; Boyd, Stephen A

    2005-05-01

    Smectites, clay minerals commonly found in soils and sediments, vary widely in their ability to adsorb organic chemicals. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of surface charge density and properties of exchangeable cations in controlling the affinity of smectites for organic molecules. In this study, we induced hysteresis in the crystalline swelling of smectites to test the hypothesis that the extent of crystalline swelling (or interlayer hydration status) has a large influence on the ability of smectites to adsorb atrazine from aqueous systems. Air-dried K-saturated Panther Creek (PC) smectite swelled less (d(001) = 1.38 nm) than never-dried K-PC (d(001) = 1.7 nm) when rehydrated in 20 mM KCl. Correspondingly, the air-dried-rehydrated K-PC had an order of magnitude greater affinity for atrazine relative to the never-dried K-PC. Both air-dried-rehydrated and never-dried Ca-PC expanded to approximately 2.0 nm in 10 mM CaCl2 and both samples had similar affinities for atrazine that were slightly lower than that of never-dried K-PC. The importance of interlayer hydration status in controlling sorption affinity was confirmed by molecular modeling, which revealed much greater interaction between interlayer water molecules and atrazine in a three-layer hydrate relative to a one-layer hydrate. The entropy change on moving atrazine from a fully hydrated state in the bulk solution to a partially hydrated state in the smectite interlayers is believed to be a major factor influencing sorption affinity. In an application test, choice of background solution (20 mM KCl versus 10 mM CaCl2) and air-drying treatments significantly affected atrazine sorption affinities for three-smectitic soils; however, the trends were not consistent with those observed for the reference smectite. Further, extending the initial rehydration time from 24 to 240 h (prior to adding atrazine) significantly decreased the soil's sorption affinity for atrazine. We conclude that interlayer

  1. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  2. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  3. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  4. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  5. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs

  6. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    . In our experiments, the amplitude of an ultrasonic pressure wave is gradually increased (0–20 atm) while we simultaneously measure the Raman spectra from the hydrated protein (β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme). We detected two types of spectral changes: first, up to 70% increase in the intensity......Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells...... the presence of an ultrasonic pressure, a protein and its hydration shells are in thermodynamic and charge equilibrium, i.e. a protein and its hydration shells exchange charges. The ultrasonic wave disrupts these equilibria which are regained within 30–45 min after the ultrasonic pressure is shut off....

  7. Authigenic Gypsum in Gas-Hydrate Associated Sediments from the East Coast of India (Bay of Bengal)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kocherla, M.

    operation respectively. This is NIO contribution no… 10 4.0 References. Aharon, P., Graber, E. R. Roberts, H. H., 1992. Dissolved carbon and delta c-13 anomalies in the water column caused by hydrocarbon seeps on the northwestern Gulf of Mexico... hydrate. Geology, 24: 655–658. Botz, R., Faber, E., Whiticar, M, Brooks, J.M., 1988. Authigenic carbonates in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 88: 263-272. Bohrmann, G., Greinert, J., Suess, E., Torres, M., 1998...

  8. September 1985 Mexico City, Mexico Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The magnitude 8.1 earthquake occurred off the Pacific coast of Mexico. The damage was concentrated in a 25 square km area of Mexico City, 350 km from the epicenter....

  9. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  10. HYDRATION AND TEMPERATURE IN TENNIS - A PRACTICAL REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Mark S. Kovacs

    2006-01-01

    Competitive tennis is typically played in warm and hot environments. Because hypohydration will impair tennis performance and increases the risk of heat injury, consumption of appropriate fluid levels is necessary to prevent dehydration and enhance performance. The majority of research in this area has focused on continuous aerobic activity - unlike tennis, which has average points lasting less than ten seconds with rest periods dispersed between each work period. For this reason, hydration a...

  11. Contribution of formative research to design an environmental program for obesity prevention in schools in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvecchio, Anabelle; Théodore, Florence L; Safdie, Margarita; Duque, Tiffany; Villanueva, María Ángeles; Torres, Catalina; Rivera, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and key findings of formative research conducted to design a school-based program for obesity prevention. Formative research was based on the ecological model and the principles of social marketing. A mixed method approach was used. Qualitative (direct observation, indepth interviews, focus group discussions and photo-voice) and quantitative (closed ended surveys, checklists, anthropometry) methods were employed. Formative research key findings, including barriers by levels of the ecological model, were used for designing a program including environmental strategies to discourage the consumption of energy dense foods and sugar beverages. Formative research was fundamental to developing a context specific obesity prevention program in schools that seeks environment modification and behavior change.

  12. Postgraduate Professional Pedagogical Education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyzhko, Olena

    2015-01-01

    This article is the result of scientific comparative-pedagogical research, which purpose was to highlight the main features of postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico. The author found that the postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico is performed by public and private higher education institutions: higher…

  13. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  14. Impact of CO{sub 2} hydrates on ocean carbon dioxide deposition options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P C

    1995-04-01

    The objective of the research project described in this report was to contribute to the research on greenhouse gases and the global environment. The focus is on the concept of storing large amounts of CO{sub 2} in the ocean. The project was divided into three subtasks: (1) a comprehensive study of the thermodynamic, physical and chemical properties of the seawater/CO{sub 2}/hydrate system, (2) establishment of a micro-scale kinetic model for CO{sub 2} hydrate formation and stability, based on (1), and (3) establishment of macro-scale models for various ocean deposition options based on (2). A database of selected thermodynamic functions has been set up. A large database of oceanic data has also been made; for any given coordinates at sea a computer program provides the temperature, salinity and oxygen profiles from the sea surface to the sea floor. The kinetic model predicts the formation and pseudo-stability of a very thin hydrate film which acts as an inhibitor for diffusion of CO{sub 2} into the sea water. The model predicts that the hydrate film reduces the overall flux from a liquid CO{sub 2} source with about 90%. Thermodynamically, pure CO{sub 2} in contact with water might form hydrates at depths below about 400 m, which would indicate that hydrate formation could play a role for all ocean CO{sub 2} deposition options. However, this study shows that other mechanisms significantly reduce the role of hydrate formation. It is finally concluded that although more modelling and experimental work is required within this field of research, the hydrate film may play an important role for all options except from shallow water injection. 86 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs.

  15. Can hydrate dissolution experiments predict the fate of a natural hydrate system?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, K.C.; Peltzer, E.T.; Dunk, R.M.; Walz, P.M.; Brewer, P.G. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Moss Landing, CA (United States); Dendy Sloan, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring compounds found in permafrost regions and in oceans. In the natural environment, sufficient temperature and pressure conditions for hydrate formation exist over a significant portion of the ocean. However, in addition to pressure and temperature, the chemical potential of the gas in the hydrate must be equal to the surrounding waters. If the concentration of the gas in surrounding water is under-saturated with respect to the gas in the hydrate, the hydrate will dissolve to drive the system towards chemical equilibrium. This paper presented a dissolution study of exposed hydrate from outcrops at Barkley Canyon, located off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A previous field experiment on synthetic methane hydrate samples had demonstrated that mass transfer controlled dissolution in under-saturated seawater. However, seafloor hydrate outcrops have been shown to have significant longevity compared to expected dissolution rates based upon convective boundary layer diffusion calculations. An in-situ dissolution experiment was performed on two distinct natural hydrate fabrics in order to help resolve this apparent disconnect between the dissolution rates of synthetic and natural hydrate. The paper presented a map of Barkley Canyon and discussed the field measurements and methods for the study. Exposed outcrops of gas hydrates were cored using a specially constructed stainless steel coring device and a hydraulic ram was located inside the corer. Hydrate samples were cored directly using the a manipulator arm and then injected into a sampling cell. The hydrate was then added to an open mesh exposure container, which allowed for exposure to ambient benthic currents with minimal disturbance. As well, in order to observe the slow dissolution of the hydrate in seawater at Barkley Canyon, time-lapse photography was employed. Last, the paper presented the results of the hydrate fabric porosities and hydrate dissolution rates. It was

  16. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  17. A Computationally Efficient Equation of State for Ternary Gas Hydrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The potential energy resource of natural gas hydrates held in geologic accumulations, using lower volumetric estimates, is sufficient to meet the world demand for natural gas for nearly eight decades, at current rates of increase. As with other unconventional energy resources, the challenge is to economically produce the natural gas fuel. The gas hydrate challenge is principally technical. Meeting that challenge will require innovation, but more importantly, scientific research to understand the resource and its characteristics in porous media. The thermodynamic complexity of gas hydrate systems makes numerical simulation a particularly attractive research tool for understanding production strategies and experimental observations. Simply stated, producing natural gas from gas hydrate deposits requires releasing CH4 from solid gas hydrate. The conventional way to release CH4 is to dissociate the hydrate by changing the pressure and temperature conditions to those where the hydrate is unstable. Alternatively, the guest-molecule exchange technology releases CH4 by replacing it with more thermodynamically stable molecules (e.g., CO2, N2). This technology has three advantageous: 1) it sequesters greenhouse gas, 2) it potentially releases energy via an exothermic reaction, and 3) it retains the hydraulic and mechanical stability of the hydrate reservoir. Numerical simulation of the production of gas hydrates from geologic deposits requires accounting for coupled processes: multifluid flow, mobile and immobile phase appearances and disappearances, heat transfer, and multicomponent thermodynamics. The ternary gas hydrate system comprises five components (i.e., H2O, CH4, CO2, N2, and salt) and the potential for six phases (i.e., aqueous, nonaqueous liquid, gas, hydrate, ice, and precipitated salt). The equation of state for ternary hydrate systems has three requirements: 1) phase occurrence, 2) phase composition, and 3) phase properties. Numerical simulations that predict

  18. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  19. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  20. An Improved Clearing and Mounting Solution to Replace Chloral Hydrate in Microscopic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Villani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: This study presents Visikol™, a new proprietary formulation that can be used as an efficient replacement for chloral hydrate as a clearing agent for microscopic examination. In the United States, chloral hydrate is regulated and therefore difficult to acquire. Methods and Results: Fresh and dry samples of the following plants: ginger (Zingiber officinale, maté (Ilex paraguariensis, lime basil (Ocimum americanum, oregano (Origanum vulgare, and mouse-ear cress (Arabidopsis thaliana, were cleared using Visikol or chloral hydrate solution and compared using a light microscope. Conclusions: This new method can be used successfully to clear specimens, allowing identification of diagnostic characteristics for the identification of plant materials. Visikol is as effective as chloral hydrate in providing clarity and resolution of all tissues examined. Tissues become transparent, allowing observation of deeper layers of cells and making it effective in research, botanical and quality control, and for educational applications.

  1. Considering multiple occupancy of cavities in clathrate hydrate phase equilibrium calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asiaee, Alireza; Raeissi, Sona [Natural Gas Engineering Department, School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariati, Alireza, E-mail: shariati@shirazu.ac.i [Natural Gas Engineering Department, School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: A model is presented to predict dissociation pressures of gas hydrates at various temperatures. The present model is applicable on a wide range of equilibrium conditions. The simple calculation procedure presented here saves considerably the calculation time. - Abstract: One of the major assumptions of the original van der Waals-Platteeuw (vdWP) model is the single occupancy of hydrate cavities. In this work, the vdWP model is modified to also account for multiple occupancies of hydrate cavities by small molecules. The developed model is evaluated by calculating the hydrate equilibrium conditions with either oxygen or nitrogen as guest molecules in pure form, as well as mixtures of nitrogen and propane (molecules of these pure gases and those in (nitrogen + propane) have double occupancy in large cavities of structure II up to a certain concentration of propane). The results of this modified model show good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  2. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources: Annual report, October 1986--September 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, G.D.; Kamath, V.A.; Godbole, S.P.; Patil, S.L.; Paranjpe, S.G.; Mutalik, P.N.; Nadem, N.

    1987-10-01

    Solid ice-like mixtures of natural gas and water in the form of natural gas hydrated have been found immobilized in the rocks beneath the permafrost in Arctic basins and in muds under the deep water along the American continental margins, in the North Sea and several other locations around the world. It is estimated that the arctic areas of the United States may contain as much as 500 trillion SCF of natural gas in the form of gas hydrates (Lewin and Associates, 1983). While the US Arctic gas hydrate resources may have enormous potential and represent long term future source of natural gas, the recovery of this resource from reservoir frozen with gas hydrates has not been commercialized yet. Continuing study and research is essential to develop technologies which will enable a detailed characterization and assessment of this alternative natural gas resource, so that development of cost effective extraction technology.

  3. Considering multiple occupancy of cavities in clathrate hydrate phase equilibrium calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asiaee, Alireza; Raeissi, Sona; Shariati, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A model is presented to predict dissociation pressures of gas hydrates at various temperatures. → The present model is applicable on a wide range of equilibrium conditions. → The simple calculation procedure presented here saves considerably the calculation time. - Abstract: One of the major assumptions of the original van der Waals-Platteeuw (vdWP) model is the single occupancy of hydrate cavities. In this work, the vdWP model is modified to also account for multiple occupancies of hydrate cavities by small molecules. The developed model is evaluated by calculating the hydrate equilibrium conditions with either oxygen or nitrogen as guest molecules in pure form, as well as mixtures of nitrogen and propane (molecules of these pure gases and those in (nitrogen + propane) have double occupancy in large cavities of structure II up to a certain concentration of propane). The results of this modified model show good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  4. Trade and Development: Proceedings of the Winter 1986 Meeting of the International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium (Texcoco, Mexico, December 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Mathew D., Ed.

    Three levels of papers are contained in this proceedings. The first set contains full research papers presented during the theme day of the meeting. The following papers were given: "International Trade and Factor Movements in Development Theory, Policy, and Experience" (T. N. Srinivasan); "Government in the Process of Trade and…

  5. Gender Gaps in North American Research Productivity: Examining Faculty Publication Rates in Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Gonzalez, Laura; Metcalfe, Amy Scott; Galaz-Fontes, Jesus F.; Fisher, Donald; Snee, Iain

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses gender gaps in North American research productivity, which may be influenced by personal and family variables, as well as professional and work-related variables. The study was conducted as part of the "Changing Academic Profession (CAP) International Survey", conducted in 2007-08. Using articles as indicator…

  6. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Doris E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.

    2018-01-01

    The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS) 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis), gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations). Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (de)hydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules) and (form III) differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products. PMID:29520359

  7. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  8. HyFlux - Part I: Regional Modeling of Methane Flux From Near-Seafloor Gas Hydrate Deposits on Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Asper, V.; Garcia, O. P.; Kastner, M.; Leifer, I.; Naehr, T.; Solomon, E.; Yvon-Lewis, S.; Zimmer, B.

    2008-12-01

    HyFlux - Part I: Regional modeling of methane flux from near-seafloor gas hydrate deposits on continental margins MacDonald, I.R., Asper, V., Garcia, O., Kastner, M., Leifer, I., Naehr, T.H., Solomon, E., Yvon-Lewis, S., and Zimmer, B. The Dept. of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) has recently awarded a project entitled HyFlux: "Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere." The project will address this problem with a combined effort of satellite remote sensing and data collection at proven sites in the Gulf of Mexico where gas hydrate releases gas to the water column. Submarine gas hydrate is a large pool of greenhouse gas that may interact with the atmosphere over geologic time to affect climate cycles. In the near term, the magnitude of methane reaching the atmosphere from gas hydrate on continental margins is poorly known because 1) gas hydrate is exposed to metastable oceanic conditions in shallow, dispersed deposits that are poorly imaged by standard geophysical techniques and 2) the consumption of methane in marine sediments and in the water column is subject to uncertainty. The northern GOM is a prolific hydrocarbon province where rapid migration of oil, gases, and brines from deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs occurs through faults generated by salt tectonics. Focused expulsion of hydrocarbons is manifested at the seafloor by gas vents, gas hydrates, oil seeps, chemosynthetic biological communities, and mud volcanoes. Where hydrocarbon seeps occur in depths below the hydrate stability zone (~500m), rapid flux of gas will feed shallow deposits of gas hydrate that potentially interact with water column temperature changes; oil released from seeps forms sea-surface features that can be detected in remote-sensing images. The regional phase of the project will quantify verifiable sources of methane (and oil) the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and selected margins (e.g. Pakistan Margin, South China Sea

  9. Mobile exhibition in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-04-15

    Since January this year, a mobile atomic energy exhibition has been touring the principal cities of Mexico. In organizing this exhibition, the National Nuclear Energy Commission of Mexico was assisted by the International Atomic Energy Agency which has placed its second mobile radioisotope laboratory at the disposal of the Mexican authorities. In many States of the Republic, the visit of the mobile laboratory has given a powerful impetus to atomic training and research. Universities have made use of the laboratory for the training of young scientists in the basic isotope techniques. As a sequel to the work initiated with its aid, some universities are planning to start regular training courses in this field. The laboratory, which is a gift to the Agency from the United States, has been put to its first assignment in Mexico. It will shortly be sent to Argentina for a period of six months for use in training courses. IAEA's first mobile radioisotope unit, also donated by the United States, has been used for training purposes in Austria, the Federal Republic of Germany, Greece and Yugoslavia, and has now been sent to the Far East

  10. Mobile exhibition in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    Since January this year, a mobile atomic energy exhibition has been touring the principal cities of Mexico. In organizing this exhibition, the National Nuclear Energy Commission of Mexico was assisted by the International Atomic Energy Agency which has placed its second mobile radioisotope laboratory at the disposal of the Mexican authorities. In many States of the Republic, the visit of the mobile laboratory has given a powerful impetus to atomic training and research. Universities have made use of the laboratory for the training of young scientists in the basic isotope techniques. As a sequel to the work initiated with its aid, some universities are planning to start regular training courses in this field. The laboratory, which is a gift to the Agency from the United States, has been put to its first assignment in Mexico. It will shortly be sent to Argentina for a period of six months for use in training courses. IAEA's first mobile radioisotope unit, also donated by the United States, has been used for training purposes in Austria, the Federal Republic of Germany, Greece and Yugoslavia, and has now been sent to the Far East

  11. Youth programmes in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez De Macias, G

    1990-12-01

    Research indicates that in-school adolescents in Mexico have their first sexual contact at the average age of 15.5 years. In 50% of cases, such contact is with a boyfriend or girlfriend, 28.1% with a fiance, and 18.3% with a prostitute. First sexual intercourse occurs with a spouse in only 1.3% of cases. Since only one in six young people in Mexico use a form of contraception, many unwanted pregnancies outside of marriage result. 450,000 births in 1989 were to mothers below 20 years old, with 15% of births annually being among teenage mothers. An estimated three million abortions occur annually in Mexico, and abortions are the fifth major cause of death at the national level. Teen pregnancy is decisively linked with poor living conditions and life expectancy, a relatively lower level of education, and rural residence. As for psychological and anthropological variables, most teens who become pregnant belong to large, unstable families with poor family communication, and are characterized as submissive, highly dependent, and of low self-esteem. Targeting students, workers, and other youths, the MEXFAM Youth Program selects and trains program coordinators over age 21 and volunteer promoters of both sexes aged 16-20 in urban/marginal communities. Promoters offer information to their peers and other youths in their local communities, distribute barrier contraceptives, and channel medical, psychological, and legal services to young people in need. Program procedure is described.

  12. Early hydration of portland cement with crystalline mineral additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahhal, V.; Talero, R.

    2005-01-01

    This research presents the effects of finely divided crystalline mineral additions (quartz and limestone), commonly known as filler, on the early hydration of portland cements with very different mineralogical composition. The used techniques to study the early hydration of blended cements were conduction calorimeter, hydraulicity (Fratini's test), non-evaporable water and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that the stimulation and the dilution effects increase when the percentage of crystalline mineral additions used is increased. Depending on the replacement proportion, the mineralogical cement composition and the type of crystalline addition, at 2 days, the prevalence of the dilution effect or the stimulation effect shows that crystalline mineral additions could act as sites of heat dissipation or heat stimulation, respectively

  13. Numerical studies of gas production from several CH4 hydrate zones at the Mallik site, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Dallimore, S.R.; Satoh, T.; Hancock, S.; Weatherill, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mallik site represents an onshore permafrost-associated gas hydrate accumulation in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. A gas hydrate research well was drilled at the site in 1998. The objective of this study is the analysis of various gas production scenarios from five methane hydrate-bearing zones at the Mallik site. In Zone #1, numerical simulations using the EOSHYDR2 model indicated that gas production from hydrates at the Mallik site was possible by depressurizing a thin free gas zone at the base of the hydrate stability field. Horizontal wells appeared to have a slight advantage over vertical wells, while multiwell systems involving a combination of depressurization and thermal stimulation offered superior performance, especially when a hot noncondensible gas was injected. Zone #2, which involved a gas hydrate layer with an underlying aquifer, could yield significant amounts of gas originating entirely from gas hydrates, the volumes of which increased with the production rate. However, large amounts of water were also produced. Zones #3, #4 and #5 were lithologically isolated gas hydrate-bearing deposits with no underlying zones of mobile gas or water. In these zones, thermal stimulation by circulating hot water in the well was used to induce dissociation. Sensitivity studies indicated that the methane release from the hydrate accumulations increased with the gas hydrate saturation, the initial formation temperature, the temperature of the circulating water in the well, and the formation thermal conductivity. Methane production appears to be less sensitive to the specific heat of the rock and of the hydrate, and to the permeability of the formation. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  15. On the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh Mazumdar, A.S.; Guha, S.N.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron in oxygenated as well as oxygen-free solutions at different pH were undertaken. Since sup(-e)aq is known to react rapidly with O 2 yielding the transient O 2 - ion, the latter was looked for through its interaction with phosphite ions resulting in their oxidation near the cathode. It appears from the results that in electrolytic processes, the primary electron (esup(-)sub(cathode)) probably reacts directly with reactive solutes like oxygen, bypassing the hydration step. Data obtained in oxygen-free solutions, however, support the possible formation of hydrated electron at least in alkaline solutions. (author)

  16. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  17. Gas hydrate concentration and characteristics within Hydrate Ridge inferred from multicomponent seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Sen, Mrinal K.; Bangs, Nathan L.

    2007-12-01

    A seismic experiment composed of streamer and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) surveys was conducted in the summer of 2002 at southern Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, to map the gas hydrate distribution within the hydrate stability zone. Gas hydrate concentrations within the reservoir can be estimated with P wave velocity (Vp); however, we can further constrain gas hydrate concentrations using S wave velocity (Vs), and use Vs through its relationship to Vp (Vp/Vs) to reveal additional details such as gas hydrate form within the matrix (i.e., hydrate cements the grains, becomes part of the matrix frame or floats in pore space). Both Vp and Vs can be derived simultaneously by inverting multicomponent seismic data. In this study, we use OBS data to estimate seismic velocities where both gas hydrate and free gas are present in the shallow sediments. Once Vp and Vs are estimated, they are simultaneously matched with modeled velocities to estimate the gas hydrate concentration. We model Vp using an equation based on a modification of Wood's equation that incorporates an appropriate rock physics model and Vs using an empirical relation. The gas hydrate concentration is estimated to be up to 7% of the rock volume, or 12% of the pore space. However, Vp and Vs do not always fit the model simultaneously. Vp can vary substantially more than Vs. Thus we conclude that a model, in which higher concentrations of hydrate do not affect shear stiffness, is more appropriate. Results suggest gas hydrates form within the pore space of the sediments and become part of the rock framework in our survey area.

  18. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  19. Completed dataset from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) collected during the response to the Deepwater Horizon incident in the Gulf of Mexico onboard the M/V Ryan Chouest Cruise 1 through Cruise 15 from 2010-06-05 to 2010-09-14 (NODC Accession 0086283)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In response to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, scientists from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) conducted on-site monitoring of...

  20. Hydration rate and strength development of low-heat type portland cement mortar mixed with pozzolanic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Jun

    1998-01-01

    Recently, low-heat type Portland cement was specified in Japan Industrial Standards (JIS). Its hydration proceeds slowly. The results of the research so far obtained indicate that slow hydration of cement and mixing of pozzolanic materials with cement make micro-structure of harded cement paste dense and durable. In this study, a blended cement using low-heat type Portland cement and some of pozzolanic materials has been newly developed and its strength property and hydration ratio were checked. The followings are conclusion. (1) Hydration rate of cement paste varies with the replacement ratio of pozzolanic materials. (2) A good liner relationship between strength and total hydration rate of cement paste was observed. (3) A proper replacement ratio of both base-cement and pozzolanic material for manufacturing a blended cement is 50%. (author)

  1. Study on Characteristic of Self-preservation Effect of CO2 Hydrate according to Temperature, Particle Diameter and Shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon-Soo; Kang, Seong-Pil; Park, So-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrate studies are attracting attention of many researchers as an innovative, economic and environmentally friendly technology when it is applied to CO 2 capture, transport, and storage. In this study, we investigated whether CO 2 hydrate shows the self-preservation effect or not, that is the key property for developing a novel CO 2 transport/storage method. Especially the degree of self-preservation effect for CO 2 hydrate was studied according to the particle size of CO 2 hydrate samples. We prepared three kinds of CO 2 hydrate samples varying their particle diameter as millimeter, micron and nano size and measured their change of weight at -15 - -30 .deg. C under atmospheric pressure during 3 weeks. According to our experimental result, the lower temperature, larger particle size, and compact structure for higher density are the better conditions for obtaining self-preservation effect

  2. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA

  3. The crisis of the informant authority on ethnographic research. Covered methodologies and research on human right and vulnerable population: Two case studies in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Muñoz Martínez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Drawing upon two case studies from two different researches, both related to the field of sexual health, sexual citizenship and human rights, and both making different use of undercover investigation techniques, we discuss some of the reaches and limitations of methodological approaches not-based on informed consent. Two questions constitute the core of this work: Is there research that from the beginning, development and/or products, always complies with informed consent? And, if the unfinished nature of informed consent is a state of affairs and a research option, when do we make clear that a research is partially or totally undercover? Who does it? What for? In this case, the methodologies and their specific practices need to make visible and problematize, through the call to their transformation, the fields of ideologically configured social relations that constitute them.

  4. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  5. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products...

  6. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  7. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Farrell, Helen [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Howard, James [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Raterman, Kevin [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Silpngarmlert, Suntichai [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Martin, Kenneth [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Bruce [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Perry [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  8. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  9. Mexico; Mexique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes the key energy data for Mexico: 1 - energy organizations and policy: Ministry of energy (SENER), Comision Reguladora de Energia (CRE), Ministry of Finances, Ministry of trade and industrial development (SECOFI), national commission for energy savings (CONAE); 2 - companies: federal commission of electricity (CFE), Minera Carbonifera Rio Escondido (MICARE - coal), Pemex (petroleum); 3 - energy production: resources, electric power, petroleum, natural gas; 4 - energy consumption; 5 - stakes and perspectives. Some economic and energy indicators are summarized in a series of tables: general indicators, supply indicators (reserves, refining and electric capacity, energy production, foreign trade), demand indicators (consumption trends, end use, energy independence, energy efficiency, CO{sub 2} emissions), energy status per year and per energy source. (J.S.)

  10. The impact of fire suppression tasks on firefighter hydration: a critical review with consideration of the utility of reported hydration measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Adam; Pope, Rodney; Orr, Robin Marc

    2016-01-01

    Firefighting is a highly stressful occupation with unique physical challenges, apparel and environments that increase the potential for dehydration. Dehydration leaves the firefighter at risk of harm to their health, safety and performance. The purpose of this review was to critically analyse the current literature investigating the impact of fighting 'live' fires on firefighter hydration. A systematic search was performed of four electronic databases for relevant published studies investigating the impact of live fire suppression on firefighter hydration. Study eligibility was assessed using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. The included studies were critically appraised using the Downs and Black protocol and graded according to the Kennelly grading system. Ten studies met the eligibility criteria for this review. The average score for methodological quality was 55 %, ranging from 50 % ('fair' quality) to 61 % ('good' quality) with a 'substantial agreement' between raters ( k  = .772). Wildfire suppression was considered in five studies and structural fire suppression in five studies. Results varied across the studies, reflecting variations in outcome measures, hydration protocols and interventions. Three studies reported significant indicators of dehydration resulting from structural fire suppression, while two studies found mixed results, with some measures indicating dehydration and other measures an unchanged hydration status. Three studies found non-significant changes in hydration resulting from wildfire firefighting and two studies found significant improvements in markers of hydration. Ad libitum fluid intake was a common factor across the studies finding no, or less severe, dehydration. The evidence confirms that structural and wildfire firefighting can cause dehydration. Ad libitum drinking may be sufficient to maintain hydration in many wildfire environments but possibly not during intense, longer duration, hot structural fire operations

  11. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris E. Braun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations. Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (dehydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules and (form III differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products.

  12. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  13. Problems of ecological and technical safety by exploration and production of natural gas hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrates - the firm crystal connections form water (liquid water, ice, water vapor and low-molecular waterproof natural gases (mainly methane whose crystal structure effectively compresses gas e.s.: each cubic meter of hydrate can yield over 160 m3 of methane.In present time, the exploitation of the Messoyahsk (Russia and Mallik (Canada deposits of gas hydrates is conducted actively. The further perfection of prospecting methods in the field of studying gas hydrates containing sediments depends on the improvement of geophysical and the well test research, among which native-state core drilling is one of the major. Sampling a native-state core from gas hydrates sediments keeps not only the original composition but structural - textural features of their construction.Despite of the appeal to use gas hydrates as a perspective and ecologically pure fuel possessing huge resources, the investigation and development of their deposits can lead to a number of negative consequences connected with hazards arising from the maintenance of their technical and ecological safety of carrying out. Scales of the arising problems can change from local to regional and even global.

  14. Properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourounis, S.; Tsivilis, S.; Tsakiridis, P.E.; Papadimitriou, G.D.; Tsibouki, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The present research study investigates the properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag, a by-product of the conversion process of iron to steel. For this purpose, a reference sample and three cements containing up to 45% w/w steel slag were tested. The steel slag fraction used was the '0-5 mm', due to its high content in calcium silicate phases. Initial and final setting time, standard consistency, flow of normal mortar, autoclave expansion and compressive strength at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days were measured. The hydrated products were identified by X-ray diffraction while the non-evaporable water was determined by TGA. The microstructure of the hardened cement pastes and their morphological characteristics were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It is concluded that slag can be used in the production of composite cements of the strength classes 42.5 and 32.5 of EN 197-1. In addition, the slag cements present satisfactory physical properties. The steel slag slows down the hydration of the blended cements, due to the morphology of contained C 2 S and its low content in calcium silicates

  15. Investigation of the Methane Hydrate Formation by Cavitation Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, H.; Nagao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate (hereafter called "MH") is crystalline solid compound consisting of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages and methane gas molecules enclosed in the cage. When using MH as an energy resource, MH is dissociated to methane gas and water and collect only the methane gas. The optimum MH production method was the "depressurization method". Here, the production of MH means dissociating MH in the geologic layers and collecting the resultant methane gas by production systems. In the production of MH by depressurization method, MH regeneration was consider to important problem for the flow assurance of MH production system. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the effect of flow phenomena in the pipeline on hydrate regeneration. Cavitation is one of the flow phenomena which was considered a cause of MH regeneration. Large quantity of microbubbles are produced by cavitation in a moment, therefore, it is considered to promote MH formation. In order to verify the possible of MH regeneration by cavitation, it is necessary to detailed understanding the condition of MH formation by cavitation. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on MH formation using by cavitation. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate the formation MH by using cavitation in the various temperature and pressure condition, and to clarify the condition of MH formation by using observation results.

  16. Nonlinear fluid dynamics of nanoscale hydration water layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhe, Wonho; Kim, Bongsu; Kim, Qhwan; An, Sangmin

    In nature, the hydration water layer (HWL) ubiquitously exists in ambient conditions or aqueous solutions, where water molecules are tightly bound to ions or hydrophilic surfaces. It plays an important role in various mechanisms such as biological processes, abiotic materials, colloidal interaction, and friction. The HWL, for example, can be easily formed between biomaterials since most biomaterials are covered by hydrophilic molecules such as lipid bilayers, and this HWL is expected to be significant to biological and physiological functions. Here (1) we present the general stress tensor of the hydration water layer. The hydration stress tensor provided the platform form for holistic understanding of the dynamic behaviors of the confined HWL including tapping and shear dynamics which are until now individually studied. And, (2) through fast shear velocity ( 1mm/s) experiments, the elastic turbulence caused by elastic property of the HWL is indirectly observed. Our results may contribute to a deeper study of systems where the HWL plays an important role such as biomolecules, colloidal particles, and the MEMS. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government(MSIP) (2016R1A3B1908660).

  17. Lithological controls on gas hydrate saturation: Insights from signal classification of NMR downhole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Klaus; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Henninges, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) downhole data are analyzed with a new strategy to study gas hydrate-bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). NMR logging is a powerful tool to study geological reservoir formations. The measurements are based on interactions between the magnetic moments of protons in geological formation water and an external magnetic field. Inversion of the measured raw data provides so-called transverse relaxation time (T2) distribution curves or spectra. Different parts of the T2 curve are related with distinct pore radii and corresponding fluid components. A common practice in the analysis of T2 distribution curves is to extract single-valued parameters such as apparent total porosity. Moreover, the derived total NMR apparent porosity and the gamma-gamma density log apparent porosity can be combined to estimate gas hydrate saturation in hydrate-bearing sediments. To avoid potential loss of information, in our new approach we analyze the entire T2 distribution curves as quasi-continuous signals to characterize the rock formation. The approach is applied to NMR data measured in gas hydrate research well Mallik 5L-38. We use self-organizing maps, a neural network clustering technique, to subdivide the data set of NMR T2 distribution curves into classes with a similar and distinctive signal shape. The method includes (1) preparation of data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning, (3) cluster definition, and (4) classification and depth mapping of all NMR signals. Each signal class thus represents a specific pore size distribution which can be interpreted in terms of distinct lithologies and reservoir types. A key step in the interpretation strategy is to reconcile the NMR classes with other log data not considered in the clustering analysis, such as gamma ray, photo-electric factor, hydrate saturation, and other logs. Our results defined six main lithologies within the target zone. Gas hydrate layers were recognized by their low signal

  18. Controls on methane expulsion during melting of natural gas hydrate systems. Topic area 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flemings, Peter [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-01-14

    zone and vent at the seafloor. Gas venting through the regional hydrate stability zone is accomplished by alteration of the regional equilibrium conditions (creation of three phase conditions) by increased salinity and heat due to hydrate formation, due to gas fracturing, or a combination of both. This research will explore the controls on whether methane reaches the seafloor (or atmosphere) as the original hydrate deposit dissociates and what the magnitude of these fluxes are. This hypothesis has significant implications for the forcings and feedbacks associated with climate change. It is described below the observations and models that have led to formulating this hypothesis.

  19. Radioactive waste management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, L.; Reyes L, J.; Jimenez D, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the radioactive waste management in Mexico, particularly the activities that the National Institute of Nuclear Research (NINR) is undertaking in this field. Classification and annual generation of radioactive waste, together with practices and facilities relating to the management of radioactive waste are addressed. The respective national legal framework and policy are outlined. (author)

  20. Gas hydrate formation and dissipation histories in the northern margin of Canada: Beaufort-Mackenzie and the Sverdrup Basins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majorowicz, J.; Osadetz, K.; Šafanda, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 1 (2012), 879393/1-879393/17 ISSN 1687-8833 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : gas hydrates * Canadian Arctic continental margin * permafrost Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  1. New Mexico Geothermal Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witcher, J.C.; Whittier, J.; Morgan, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the New Mexico Geothermal Data Base (NMGDB) which is a comprehensive public-domain data base of low-temperature geothermal resource information for New Mexico that is designed to assist researchers and developers. A broad range of geoscience, engineering, climatic, economic, and land status information are complied in the dBASE III PLUS data base management system for use on an IBM or IBM-compatible personal computer. A user friendly menu format with on-screen prompts allows easy and convenient use

  2. Growth of a Hydrate Mound in the Sea of Japan over 300 ka as Revealed by U-Th Ages of MDAC and by H2S Concentrations of Massive Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.; Snyder, G. T.; Hiruta, A.; Kakizaki, Y.; Huang, C. Y.; Shen, C. C.

    2017-12-01

    level fall, resulting in the dissociation of gas hydrates right above the BGHS and an enhancement of methane flux through the gas chimney. This study was conducted under the commission from AIST as a part of the methane hydrate research project funded by METI. Reference [1] Matsumoto et al. (2017), Fire in the Ice, 17, 1-6.

  3. Health technology assessment in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Frenk, Julio

    2009-07-01

    The history of health technology assessment (HTA) in Mexico is examined, starting with the efforts to incorporate this topic into the policy agenda and culminating with the recent creation of a specialized public agency. Information was gathered through a bibliographic search and interviews with actors involved in HTA in Mexico. HTA efforts were developed in Mexico since the mid-1980s with the participation both of academics and of policy makers, a relationship that eventually led to the creation of the Center for Technological Excellence within the Ministry of Health. Institutionalization of HTA in resource-constrained settings requires the development of a critical mass of researchers involved in this field, the implementation of information efforts, and the establishment of strong relationships between HTA experts and policy makers.

  4. Proyecto Costa Escondida: Interdisciplinary Research at the Ancient Maya Port Site of Vista Alegre, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, J.; Rissolo, D.; Beddows, P. A.; Goodman, B.; Smith, D.

    2013-05-01

    shoreline and possible terrestrial features during some of the occupational phases of Vista Alegre are most likely drowned today. The isotope record indicates large changes in the proportion of freshwater and high evaporation rates have occurred throughout the site's history. Superposition of these seasonal cycles on the long-term rise in sea level means that water may have been much more readily accessible to the Maya that inhabited this site than it is today. By correlating the environmental data with the archaeological evidence from Vista Alegre, our research sheds light on the varying adaptive strategies employed by these coastal inhabitants. By carefully correlating changing paleoenvironmental data with broader sociopolitical changes, we are in a strong position to address the challenges faced, and opportunities pursued, by these coastal peoples in a holistic manner.

  5. The rise of health biotechnology research in Latin America: A scientometric analysis of health biotechnology production and impact in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyzes the patterns of health biotechnology publications in six Latin American countries from 2001 to 2015. The countries studied were Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba and Mexico. Before our study, there were no data available on HBT development in half of the Latin-American countries we studied, i.e., Argentina, Colombia and Chile. To include these countries in a scientometric analysis of HBT provides fuller coverage of HBT development in Latin America. The scientometric study used the Web of Science database to identify health biotechnology publications. The total amount of health biotechnology production in the world during the period studied was about 400,000 papers. A total of 1.2% of these papers, were authored by the six Latin American countries in this study. The results show a significant growth in health biotechnology publications in Latin America despite some of the countries having social and political instability, fluctuations in their gross domestic expenditure in research and development or a trade embargo that limits opportunities for scientific development. The growth in the field of some of the Latin American countries studied was larger than the growth of most industrialized nations. Still, the visibility of the Latin American research (measured in the number of citations) did not reach the world average, with the exception of Colombia. The main producers of health biotechnology papers in Latin America were universities, except in Cuba were governmental institutions were the most frequent producers. The countries studied were active in international research collaboration with Colombia being the most active (64% of papers co-authored internationally), whereas Brazil was the least active (35% of papers). Still, the domestic collaboration was even more prevalent, with Chile being the most active in such collaboration (85% of papers co-authored domestically) and Argentina the least active (49% of papers). We conclude that the

  6. The rise of health biotechnology research in Latin America: A scientometric analysis of health biotechnology production and impact in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-de la O, Dante Israel; Thorsteinsdóttir, Halla; Calderón-Salinas, José Víctor

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyzes the patterns of health biotechnology publications in six Latin American countries from 2001 to 2015. The countries studied were Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba and Mexico. Before our study, there were no data available on HBT development in half of the Latin-American countries we studied, i.e., Argentina, Colombia and Chile. To include these countries in a scientometric analysis of HBT provides fuller coverage of HBT development in Latin America. The scientometric study used the Web of Science database to identify health biotechnology publications. The total amount of health biotechnology production in the world during the period studied was about 400,000 papers. A total of 1.2% of these papers, were authored by the six Latin American countries in this study. The results show a significant growth in health biotechnology publications in Latin America despite some of the countries having social and political instability, fluctuations in their gross domestic expenditure in research and development or a trade embargo that limits opportunities for scientific development. The growth in the field of some of the Latin American countries studied was larger than the growth of most industrialized nations. Still, the visibility of the Latin American research (measured in the number of citations) did not reach the world average, with the exception of Colombia. The main producers of health biotechnology papers in Latin America were universities, except in Cuba were governmental institutions were the most frequent producers. The countries studied were active in international research collaboration with Colombia being the most active (64% of papers co-authored internationally), whereas Brazil was the least active (35% of papers). Still, the domestic collaboration was even more prevalent, with Chile being the most active in such collaboration (85% of papers co-authored domestically) and Argentina the least active (49% of papers). We conclude that the

  7. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Oscar, E-mail: oamendoz@unal.edu.co [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia); Giraldo, Carolina [Cementos Argos S.A., Medellín (Colombia); Camargo, Sergio S. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/COPPE, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tobón, Jorge I. [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  8. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Oscar; Giraldo, Carolina; Camargo, Sergio S.; Tobón, Jorge I.

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure

  9. Experimental Study on Hydrate Induction Time of Gas-Saturated Water-in-Oil Emulsion using a High-Pressure Flow Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv X.F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrate is one of the critical precipitates which have to be controlled for subsea flow assurance. The induction time of hydrate is therefore a significant parameter. However, there have been few studies on the induction time of the natural gas hydrate formation in a flow loop system. Consequently, a series of experiments were firstly performed, including water, natural gas and Diesel oil, on the hydrate induction time under various conditions such as the supercooling and supersaturation degree, water cut, anti-agglomerant dosage, etc. The experiments were conducted in a high-pressure hydrate flow loop newly constructed in the China University of Petroleum (Beijing, and dedicated to flow assurance studies. Then, based on previous research, this study puts forward a method for induction time, which is characterized by clear definition, convenient measurement and good generality. Furthermore, we investigated the influences of the experimental parameters and analyzed the experimental phenomena for the hydrate induction time in a flowing system.

  10. The influence of Na2O on the hydration of C3A II. Suspension hydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, G.A.C.M.; Stein, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of Na2O on the hydration of C3A was studied in suspensions from the start of the reaction onwards. The heat evolution rate in very early stages of the hydration, measured at varying NaOH concentrations, and SEM, indicate that at NaOH concentrations larger then 0.1 M the reaction

  11. Distinguishing between hydrated, partially hydrated or unhydrated clinker in hardened concrete using microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Rooij, M.R. de; Visser, J.H.M.; Nijland, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydration of clinker particles is since long a topic of interest in both designing and optimizing cement composition and its quantity used in concrete. The interest for carefully observing and also quantifying the type or stage of clinker hydration in hardened cement paste is twofold. Firstly, the

  12. Methane hydrate dissociation using inverted five-spot water flooding method in cubic hydrate simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Li, Xiao-Sen; Li, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The combination forms of the hydrate dissociation methods in different well systems are divided into 6 main patterns. Dissociation processes of methane hydrate in porous media using the inverted five-spot water flooding method (Pattern 4) are investigated by the experimental observation and numerical simulation. In situ methane hydrate is synthesized in the Cubic Hydrate Simulator (CHS), a 5.832-L cubic reactor. A center vertical well is used as the hot water injection well, while the four vertical wells at the corner are the gas and water production wells. The gas production begins simultaneously with the hot water injection, while after approximately 20 min of compression, the water begins to be produced. One of the common characteristics of the inverted five-spot water flooding method is that both the gas and water production rates decrease with the reduction of the hydrate dissociation rate. The evaluation of the energy efficiency ratio might indicate the inverted five-spot water flooding as a promising gas producing method from the hydrate reservoir. - Highlights: • A three-dimensional 5.8-L cubic pressure vessel is developed. • Gas production of hydrate using inverted five-spot flooding method is studied. • Water/gas production rate and energy efficiency ratio are evaluated. • Temperature distributions of numerical simulation and experiment agree well. • Hydrate dissociation process is a moving boundary problem in this study

  13. Hydration in advanced cancer: can bioelectrical impedance analysis improve the evidence base? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Amara Callistus; Mayland, Catriona R; Mason, Stephen R; Khodabukus, Andrew F; Varro, Andrea; Ellershaw, John E

    2013-09-01

    Decisions surrounding the administration of clinically assisted hydration to patients dying of cancer can be challenging because of the limited understanding of hydration in advanced cancer and a lack of evidence to guide health care professionals. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has been used to assess hydration in various patient groupings, but evidence for its use in advanced cancer is limited. To critically appraise existing methods of hydration status assessment in advanced cancer and review the potential for BIA to assess hydration in advanced cancer. Searches were carried out in four electronic databases. A hand search of selected peer-reviewed journals and conference abstracts also was conducted. Studies reporting (de)hydration assessment (physical examination, biochemical measures, symptom assessment, and BIA) in patients with advanced cancer were included. The results highlight how clinical examination and biochemical tests are standard methods of assessing hydration, but limitations exist with these methods in advanced cancer. Furthermore, there is disagreement over the evidence for some commonly associated symptoms with dehydration in cancer. Although there are limitations with using BIA alone to assess hydration in advanced cancer, analysis of BIA raw measurements through the method of bioelectrical impedance vector analysis may have a role in this population. The benefits and burdens of providing clinically assisted hydration to patients dying of cancer are unclear. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis shows promise as a hydration assessment tool but requires further study in advanced cancer. Innovative methodologies for research are required to add to the evidence base and ultimately improve the care for the dying. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. THCM Coupled Model for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments: Data Analysis and Design of New Field Experiments (Marine and Permafrost Settings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marcelo J. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Santamarina, J. Carlos [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-14

    Gas hydrates are solid compounds made of water molecules clustered around low molecular weight gas molecules such as methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Methane hydrates form under pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions that are common in sub-permafrost layers and in deep marine sediments. Stability conditions constrain the occurrence of gas hydrates to submarine sediments and permafrost regions. The amount of technically recoverable methane trapped in gas hydrate may exceed 104tcf. Gas hydrates are a potential energy resource, can contribute to climate change, and can cause large-scale seafloor instabilities. In addition, hydrate formation can be used for CO2 sequestration (also through CO2-CH4 replacement), and efficient geological storage seals. The experimental study of hydrate bearing sediments has been hindered by the very low solubility of methane in water (lab testing), and inherent sampling difficulties associated with depressurization and thermal changes during core extraction. This situation has prompted more decisive developments in numerical modeling in order to advance the current understanding of hydrate bearing sediments, and to investigate/optimize production strategies and implications. The goals of this research has been to addresses the complex thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical THCM coupled phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments, using a truly coupled numerical model that incorporates sound and proven constitutive relations, satisfies fundamental conservation principles. Analytical solutions aimed at verifying the proposed code have been proposed as well. These tools will allow to better analyze available data and to further enhance the current understanding of hydrate bearing sediments in view of future field experiments and the development of production technology.

  15. Hydration of urea and alkylated urea derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Compressibility data and broadband dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of urea and some of its alkylated derivatives have been evaluated to yield their numbers Nh of hydration water molecules per molecule of solute. Nh values in a broad range of solute concentrations are discussed and are compared to hydration numbers of other relevant molecules and organic ions. Consistent with previous results, it is found that urea differs from other solutes in its unusually small hydration number, corresponding to just one third of the estimated number of nearest neighbor molecules. This remarkable hydration behavior is explained by the large density φH of hydrogen bonding abilities offered by the urea molecule. In terms of currently discussed models of reorientational motions and allied dynamics in water and related associating liquids, the large density φH causes a relaxation time close to that of undisturbed water with most parts of water encircling the solute. Therefore only a small part of disturbed ("hydration") water is left around each urea molecule. Adding alkyl groups to the basic molecule leads to Nh values which, within the series of n-alkylurea derivatives, progressively increase with the number of methyl groups per solute. With n-butylurea, Nh from dielectric spectra, in conformity with many other organic solutes, slightly exceeds the number of nearest neighbors. Compared to such Nh values, hydration numbers from compressibility data are substantially smaller, disclosing incorrect assumptions in the formula commonly used to interpret the experimental compressibilities. Similar to other series of organic solutes, effects of isomerization have been found with alkylated urea derivatives, indicating that factors other than the predominating density φH of hydrogen bond abilities contribute also to the hydration properties.

  16. New Mexico Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of parks in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using available data from a...

  17. New Mexico State Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the generalized physical boundaries of New Mexico State Parks, in polygonal form with limited attributes, compiled using...

  18. New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data provides locations and non-spatial attributes of many ghost towns in the State of New Mexico, compiled from various sources. Locations provided with...

  19. Accessibility and Affordability of Tertiary Education in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Peru within a Global Context. Policy Research Working Paper 4517

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yuki; Blom, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the financing of tertiary education in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Peru, comparing the affordability and accessibility of tertiary education with that in high-income countries. To measure affordability, the authors estimate education costs, living costs, grants, and loans. Further, they compute the participation rate,…

  20. Environmental Assessment and FONSI for the Joint United States/Republic of Korea Research and Development Study for Improved Underground Ammunition Storage Technologies Tests, Magdalena, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    pine (Pinus edulis) on the south-facing slopes and New Mexico locust (Robina neomexicana) and scrub oak ( Quercus gambelii) on the north facing slopes...condition of the area. The disturbed area would be reseeded with a mixture of native species such as Arizona fescue (Festuca arizonica ), squirrel-tail

  1. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    . For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems......The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually...

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  3. Strength Estimation for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments From Direct Shear Tests of Hydrate-Bearing Sand and Silt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhichao; Dai, Sheng; Ning, Fulong; Peng, Li; Wei, Houzhen; Wei, Changfu

    2018-01-01

    Safe and economic methane gas production, as well as the replacement of methane while sequestering carbon in natural hydrate deposits, requires enhanced geomechanical understanding of the strength and volume responses of hydrate-bearing sediments during shear. This study employs a custom-made apparatus to investigate the mechanical and volumetric behaviors of carbon dioxide hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to direct shear. The results show that both peak and residual strengths increase with increased hydrate saturation and vertical stress. Hydrate contributes mainly the cohesion and dilatancy constraint to the peak strength of hydrate-bearing sediments. The postpeak strength reduction is more evident and brittle in specimens with higher hydrate saturation and under lower stress. Significant strength reduction after shear failure is expected in silty sediments with high hydrate saturation Sh ≥ 0.65. Hydrate contribution to the residual strength is mainly by increasing cohesion at low hydrate saturation and friction at high hydrate saturation. Stress state and hydrate saturation are dominating both the stiffness and the strength of hydrate-bearing sediments; thus, a wave velocity-based peak strength prediction model is proposed and validated, which allows for precise estimation of the shear strength of hydrate-bearing sediments through acoustic logging data. This method is advantageous to geomechanical simulators, particularly when the experimental strength data of natural samples are not available.

  4. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  5. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this

  6. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  7. Effect of overpressure on gas hydrate distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, G.; Chapman, W.G.; Hirasaki, G.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Dickens, G.R.; Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrate systems can be characterized by high sedimentation rates and/or low permeability sediments, which can lead to pore pressure higher than hydrostatic. This paper discussed a study that examined this effect of overpressure on gas hydrate and free gas distribution in marine sediments. A one-dimensional numerical model that coupled sedimentation, fluid flow, and gas hydrate formation was utilized. In order to quantify the relative importance of sedimentation rates and low permeability sediments, a dimensionless sedimentation-compaction group (scN) was defined, that compared the absolute permeability of the sediments to the sedimentation rate. Higher values of scN mean higher permeability or low sedimentation rate which generally yield hydrostatic pore pressure while lower values of scN normally create pore pressure greater than hydrostatic. The paper discussed non-hydrostatic consolidation in gas hydrate systems, including mass balances; constitutive relationships; normalized variables; and dimensionless groups. A numerical solution to the problem was presented. It was concluded that simulation results demonstrated that decreasing scN not only increased pore pressure above hydrostatic values, but also lowered the lithostatic stress gradient and gas hydrate saturation. This occurred because overpressure resulted in lower effective stress, causing higher porosity and lower bulk density of the sediment. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 appendix.

  8. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.; Yoon, S.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  9. Methane hydrates in quaternary climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennett, J. P.; Hill, T. M.; Behl, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrate reservoir in marine sediments is known to contain a large volume of exchangeable carbon stored as solid methane hydrate and associated free gas. This reservoir has been shown to be potentially unstable in response to changing intermediate water temperature and sea level (pressure). Evidence continues to grow for past episodes of major methane release at times of climatic warming. Yet few studies of late Quaternary climate change include methane hydrates as an integral part of the global climate system, in spite of the largest known oscillations at this time in sea level and upper ocean temperature changes for the Cenozoic or earlier, conditions that favor instability of the methane hydrate reservoir. Abrupt increases in atmospheric methane recorded in polar ice cores are widely believed to have resulted, not from ocean-floor methane degassing, but instead from continental wetland activation, a hypothesis thus far unsupported by geological data. Furthermore, as part of this Wetland Methane Hypothesis, the abrupt methane increases have been seen as a response to climatic warming rather than contributing significantly to the change. An alternative view (formulated as the Clathrate Gun Hypothesis) is that the speed, magnitude and timing of abrupt climate change in the recent geologic past are consistent with the process of major degassing of methane hydrates. We summarize aspects of this hypothesis here and needs to test this hypothesis. (Author)

  10. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  11. English Teaching in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Discusses teaching English in Mexico, a country with important social, cultural, and economic ties to the United States. Looks at the various English teaching situations as well as teacher education for teachers in Mexico. Concludes that the English teaching situation in Mexico reflects great diversity and growth, and that the knowledge of English…

  12. Psychology in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eleonora Rubio

    2011-01-01

    The first formal psychology course taught in Mexico was in 1896 at Mexico's National University; today, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM in Spanish). The modern psychology from Europe and the US in the late 19th century were the primary influences of Mexican psychology, as well as psychoanalysis and both clinical and experimental…

  13. Seismic Modeling Of Reservoir Heterogeneity Scales: An Application To Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Bellefleur, G.; Milkereit, B.

    2008-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates, a type of inclusion compound or clathrate, are composed of gas molecules trapped within a cage of water molecules. The occurrence of gas hydrates in permafrost regions has been confirmed by core samples recovered from the Mallik gas hydrate research wells located within Mackenzie Delta in Northwest Territories of Canada. Strong vertical variations of compressional and shear sonic velocities and weak surface seismic expressions of gas hydrates indicate that lithological heterogeneities control the distribution of hydrates. Seismic scattering studies predict that typical scales and strong physical contrasts due to gas hydrate concentration will generate strong forward scattering, leaving only weak energy captured by surface receivers. In order to understand the distribution of hydrates and the seismic scattering effects, an algorithm was developed to construct heterogeneous petrophysical reservoir models. The algorithm was based on well logs showing power law features and Gaussian or Non-Gaussian probability density distribution, and was designed to honor the whole statistical features of well logs such as the characteristic scales and the correlation among rock parameters. Multi-dimensional and multi-variable heterogeneous models representing the same statistical properties were constructed and applied to the heterogeneity analysis of gas hydrate reservoirs. The petrophysical models provide the platform to estimate rock physics properties as well as to study the impact of seismic scattering, wave mode conversion, and their integration on wave behavior in heterogeneous reservoirs. Using the Biot-Gassmann theory, the statistical parameters obtained from Mallik 5L-38, and the correlation length estimated from acoustic impedance inversion, gas hydrate volume fraction in Mallik area was estimated to be 1.8%, approximately 2x108 m3 natural gas stored in a hydrate bearing interval within 0.25 km2 lateral extension and between 889 m and 1115 m depth

  14. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  15. Morphology studies on gas hydrates interacting with silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, J.; Servio, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates or gas hydrates are non-stoichiometric, crystalline compounds that form when small molecules come in contact with water at certain temperatures and pressures. Natural gas hydrates are found in the ocean bottom and in permafrost regions. It is thought that the amount of energy stored in natural hydrates is at least twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. In addition, trapping carbon dioxide as a hydrate in the bottom of the ocean has been suggested as an alternative means of reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Naturally occurring clathrates are found in close interaction with fine grained particles of very small mean pore diameters. Even though an increasing amount of hydrate equilibrium data for small diameter porous media has become available, the morphological behavior of hydrates subject to such conditions is yet to be explored. This paper presented a study that visually examined hydrate formation and decomposition of gas hydrates while interacting with fine grains of silica gel. The study showed still frames from high-resolution video recordings for hydrate formation and decomposition. The paper discussed the experiment including the apparatus as well as the results of hydrate formation and hydrate dissociation. This study enabled for the first time to observe clathrate morphology while hydrates interacted closely with fine grain particles with small mean pore diameters. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Dissolution of methane bubbles with hydrate armoring in deep ocean conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Margarita; Socolofsky, Scott

    2017-11-01

    The deep ocean is a storehouse of natural gas. Methane bubble moving upwards from marine sediments may become trapped in gas hydrates. It is uncertain precisely how hydrate armoring affects dissolution, or mass transfer from the bubble to the surrounding water column. The Texas A&M Oilspill Calculator was used to simulate a series of gas bubble dissolution experiments conducted in the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel. Several variations of the mass transfer coefficient were calculated based on gas or hydrate phase solubility and clean or dirty bubble correlations. Results suggest the mass transfer coefficient may be most closely modeled with gas phase solubility and dirty bubble correlation equations. Further investigation of hydrate bubble dissolution behavior will refine current numeric models which aid in understanding gas flux to the atmosphere and plumes such as oil spills. Research funded in part by the Texas A&M University 2017 Undergraduate Summer Research Grant and a Grant from the Methane Gas Hydrates Program of the US DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory.

  17. Proceedings of the 6. international conference on gas hydrates : ICGH 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englezos, P. (ed.) [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Ripmeester, J. (ed.) [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Dallimore, S.R. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada; Servio, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Austvik, T. [Statoil, Trondheim (Norway); Collett, T.S. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Mehta, A. [Shell E and P Asia Pacific, Sarawak (Malaysia); Paull, C.K. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., CA (United States); Sloan, E.D.Jr. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Uchida, T. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)] (comps.)

    2008-07-01

    This international conference provided a forum to highlight gas hydrate research that is underway at academic institutions as well as government and industrial laboratories around the world. The gas or clathrate hydrate research community includes chemical, petroleum and mechanical engineers, geologists, geophysicists, marine biologists, chemists and physicists. The conference was attended by more than 500 delegates who presented their professional knowledge in all areas of the gas hydrates field, emphasizing new aspects. The topics of discussion included resource delineation, reservoir simulation modeling and production technology. Environmental considerations involving natural gas hydrates and global climate change were also highlighted along with carbon dioxide disposal in aquifers and deep oceans. Issues facing oil and gas operations were also discussed, with reference to flow assurance in pipelines, safety issues, permafrost and marine geohazards. Novel technologies involving hydrogen storage, carbon dioxide capture and sequestration were also highlighted along with basic science and engineering aspects of gas hydrate systems. All 417 presentations from the conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  18. Proceedings of the 6. international conference on gas hydrates : ICGH 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englezos, P.; Ripmeester, J.; Dallimore, S.R.; Collett, T.S.; Mehta, A.; Paull, C.K.; Sloan, E.D.Jr.; Uchida, T.

    2008-01-01

    This international conference provided a forum to highlight gas hydrate research that is underway at academic institutions as well as government and industrial laboratories around the world. The gas or clathrate hydrate research community includes chemical, petroleum and mechanical engineers, geologists, geophysicists, marine biologists, chemists and physicists. The conference was attended by more than 500 delegates who presented their professional knowledge in all areas of the gas hydrates field, emphasizing new aspects. The topics of discussion included resource delineation, reservoir simulation modeling and production technology. Environmental considerations involving natural gas hydrates and global climate change were also highlighted along with carbon dioxide disposal in aquifers and deep oceans. Issues facing oil and gas operations were also discussed, with reference to flow assurance in pipelines, safety issues, permafrost and marine geohazards. Novel technologies involving hydrogen storage, carbon dioxide capture and sequestration were also highlighted along with basic science and engineering aspects of gas hydrate systems. All 417 presentations from the conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  19. The development and application of New Zealand obsidian hydration dating, 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, P.J.; Barker, P.; Irwin, G.J.; Jones, M.; Stevenson, C.; Sutton, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    This article is to inform readers of the continuing development of New Zealand obsidian hydration dating, which has been funded by the Foundation of Research, Science and Technology. This research seeks to date Aotearoa/New Zealand's past on the basis of refinement and strategic application of obsidian hydration dating (OHD), which was successfully developed during 1993-94. It has four objectives. These are: to improve the accuracy and precision of hydration rim measurement using a non-destructive technique; to control and reduce other sources of dating error; to evaluate recently published alternative models of initial Maori colonization and dispersal along the east coast, North Cape to the Bluff; and, to carry out a high resolution dating of the archaeological evidence of pre-European Maori settlement and fortification in the Hauraki Gulf. The rationale of each of these objectives, and the methods used, are outlined. (author). 47 refs., 1 appendix

  20. Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Overview of scientific and technical program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R.B.; Collett, T.S.; Boswell, R.; Anderson, B.J.; Digert, S.A.; Pospisil, G.; Baker, R.; Weeks, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well was drilled within the Alaska North Slope (ANS) Milne Point Unit (MPU) from February 3 to 19, 2007. The well was conducted as part of a Cooperative Research Agreement (CRA) project co-sponsored since 2001 by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help determine whether ANS gas hydrate can become a technically and commercially viable gas resource. Early in the effort, regional reservoir characterization and reservoir simulation modeling studies indicated that up to 0.34 trillion cubic meters (tcm; 12 trillion cubic feet, tcf) gas may be technically recoverable from 0.92 tcm (33 tcf) gas-in-place within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation near industry infrastructure within ANS MPU, Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), and Kuparuk River Unit (KRU) areas. To further constrain these estimates and to enable the selection of a test site for further data acquisition, the USGS reprocessed and interpreted MPU 3D seismic data provided by BPXA to delineate 14 prospects containing significant highly-saturated gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The "Mount Elbert" site was selected to drill a stratigraphic test well to acquire a full suite of wireline log, core, and formation pressure test data. Drilling results and data interpretation confirmed pre-drill predictions and thus increased confidence in both the prospect interpretation methods and in the wider ANS gas hydrate resource estimates. The interpreted data from the Mount Elbert well provide insight into and reduce uncertainty of key gas hydrate-bearing reservoir properties, enable further refinement and validation of the numerical simulation of the production potential of both MPU and broader ANS gas hydrate resources, and help determine viability of potential field sites for future extended term production testing. Drilling and data acquisition operations demonstrated that gas hydrate

  1. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  2. Hydration dynamics of hyaluronan and dextran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Johannes; Bernecker, Anja; Bakker, Huib J; Bonn, Mischa; Richter, Ralf P

    2012-07-03

    Hyaluronan is a polysaccharide, which is ubiquitous in vertebrates and has been reported to be strongly hydrated in a biological environment. We study the hydration of hyaluronan in solution using the rotational dynamics of water as a probe. We measure these dynamics with polarization-resolved femtosecond-infrared and terahertz time-domain spectroscopies. Both experiments reveal that a subensemble of water molecules is slowed down in aqueous solutions of hyaluronan amounting to ∼15 water molecules per disaccharide unit. This quantity is consistent with what would be expected for the first hydration shell. Comparison of these results to the water dynamics in aqueous dextran solution, a structurally similar polysaccharide, yields remarkably similar results. This suggests that the observed interaction with water is a common feature for hydrophilic polysaccharides and is not specific to hyaluronan. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multicavity SCRF calculation of ion hydration energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercksen, B.H.F.; Karelson, M.; Tamm, T.

    1994-01-01

    The hydration energies of the proton, hydroxyl ion, and several inorganic ions were calculated using the multicavity self-consistent reaction field (MCa SCRF) method developed for the quantum-mechanical modeling of rotationally or flexible systems in dielectric media. The ionic complexes H 3 O + (H2O) 4 , OH - (H2O) 4 , NH + 4 (H2O) 4 , and Hal - (H2O) 4 , where Hal = F, Cl, or Br, have been studied. Each complex was divided between five spheres, corresponding to the central ion and four water molecules in their first coordination sphere, respectively. Each cavity was surrounded by a polarizable medium with the dielectric permittivity of water at room temperature (80). The ionic hydration energies of ions were divided into specific and nonspecific parts. After accounting for the cavity-formation energy using scaled particle theory, good agreement between the total calculated and experimental hydration energies was obtained for all ions studied

  4. Thermal expansion properties of calcium aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Woong

    1986-01-01

    In order to eliminate the effect of impurities and aggregates on the thermomechanical properties of the various calcium aluminate hydrates, and to prepare clinkers in which all calcium aluminates are mixed homogeneously, chemically pure CaO and Al 2 O 3 were weighed, blended and heated in various conditions. After quantitative X-ray diffractometry(QXRD), the synthesized clinker was hydrated and cured under the conditions of 30 deg C, W/C=0.5, relative humidity> 90% respectively during 24 hours. And then differential thermal analysis(DTA), thermogravimetry(TG), micro calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis(TMA) and scanning electron microanalysis(SEM) were applied to examine the thermal properties of samples containing, calcium aluminate hydrates in various quantity. (Author)

  5. THz characterization of hydrated and anhydrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2011-06-01

    The characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of materials is of great importance to science and industry. Water content poses difficulties for successful identification of the material structure by THz radiation. However, biological tissues and hydrated forms of nonorganic substances still may be investigated by THz radiation. This paper outlines the range of possibilities of the above characterization, as well as provides analysis of the physical mechanism that allows or prevents penetration of THz waves through the substance. THz-TDS is used to measure the parameters of the characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of organic and nonorganic samples. Mathematical methods (such as prediction models of time-series analysis) are used to help identifying the absorption coefficient and other parameters of interest. The discovered dependencies allow designing techniques for material identification/characterization (e.g. of drugs, explosives, etc. that may have water content). The results are provided.

  6. Relaxation mechanism of the hydrated electron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H; Williams, Holly L; Shreve, Alexander T; Neumark, Daniel M

    2013-12-20

    The relaxation dynamics of the photoexcited hydrated electron have been subject to conflicting interpretations. Here, we report time-resolved photoelectron spectra of hydrated electrons in a liquid microjet with the aim of clarifying ambiguities from previous experiments. A sequence of three ultrashort laser pulses (~100 femtosecond duration) successively created hydrated electrons by charge-transfer-to-solvent excitation of dissolved anions, electronically excited these electrons via the s→p transition, and then ejected them into vacuum. Two distinct transient signals were observed. One was assigned to the initially excited p-state with a lifetime of ~75 femtoseconds, and the other, with a lifetime of ~400 femtoseconds, was attributed to s-state electrons just after internal conversion in a nonequilibrated solvent environment. These assignments support the nonadiabatic relaxation model.

  7. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  8. Irrigation port hydration in phacoemulsification surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisaharu Suzuki,1 Yoichiro Masuda,2 Yuki Hamajima,1 Hiroshi Takahashi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University, Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: In most cases, hydration is performed by water injection into the stromal tissue with a needle. The technique is simple, however it is sometimes troublesome.Purpose: We describe a simple technique for hydrating the corneal stroma in cataract surgery using an irrigation port.Patients and methods: The technique began by pushing the irrigation port against the corneal stroma for a few seconds during phacoemulsification, which generated edema in the corneal incision that subsequently prevented leakage. This procedure is called the hydration using irrigation port (HYUIP technique. A total of 60 eyes were randomized and placed in two groups, 30 eyes underwent surgeries using the HYUIP technique (HYUIP group and 30 eyes underwent surgeries without the HYUIP technique (control. The three points evaluated during each surgery included 1 the occurrence of anterior chamber collapse during the pulling out of the I/A tip after inserting the intraocular lens, 2 the need for conventional hydration, and 3 watertight completion at the end stage of surgery.Results: The anterior chamber collapse and the need for conventional hydration were significantly smaller in the HYUIP group compared to the control group. Regarding the self-sealing completion, no significant difference was observed between the two groups.Conclusion: The HYUIP technique is an effective method for creating self-sealing wound. In addition, this technique helps to prevent anterior chamber collapse. Keywords: cataract surgery, hydration, irrigation and aspiration, phacoemulsification, wound, self-sealing 

  9. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Altavilla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration knowledge. Fluid balance and urine hydration markers were studied during training. Swimmers showed a limited nutrition knowledge (33.26 % ± SD 12.59 and meagre hydration knowledge (28.61 % ± SD 28.59. Females showed lower scores than male swimmers in nutrition and hydration knowledge. Based on urine specific gravity, swimmers started the training close to the euhydrated threshold (1.019 g/mL ± SD 0.008. Although urine specific gravity and urine colour were reduced after the training, t