WorldWideScience

Sample records for metronomic oral vinorelbine

  1. Metronomic treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with daily oral vinorelbine – a Phase I trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guetz S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sylvia Guetz,1,* Amanda Tufman,2,* Joachim von Pawel,3 Achim Rittmeyer,4 Astrid Borgmeier,2 Pierre Ferré,5 Birgit Edlich,6 Rudolf Maria Huber2 1Ev. Diakonissenkrankenhaus Leipzig, Leipzig, 2University Hospital Munich and Thoracic Oncology Centre Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich (DZL CPC-M, Munich, 3Asklepios Fachkliniken Muenchen-Gauting, Gauting, 4Lungenfachklinik Immenhausen, Immenhausen, Germany; 5Pierre Fabre Pharmaceuticals, Oncology Research and Development Center, Toulouse, France; 6Pierre Fabre Pharma GmbH, Freiburg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Micro-abstract: In a Phase I dose-finding study of metronomic daily oral vinorelbine in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, a recommended dose was established for this therapeutic approach. In addition, this trial revealed promising efficacy data and an acceptable tolerability profile. The observed vinorelbine blood concentrations suggest continuous anti-angiogenic coverage. Introduction: We present a Phase I dose-finding study investigating metronomic daily oral vinorelbine (Navelbine® Oral, NVBo in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Patients and methods: Patients with stage III/IV NSCLC received daily NVBo at fixed dose levels of 20–50 mg/d for 21 days of each 4-week cycle. Primary end point was the maximum tolerated dose. Secondary end points included tumor response, time to progression (TTP, overall survival (OS and tolerability. Results: Twenty-seven patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. Most of them were extensively pretreated. Daily NVBo was well tolerated up to 30 mg/d. At 40 mg/d, two of five patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs. Three of six patients had DLTs at the 50 mg/d level. The recommended dose was established at 30 mg/d in cycle 1, with escalation to 40 mg/d in cycle 2, if tolerated. Pharmacokinetic analyses showed continuous blood exposure over 21

  2. Dose selection trial of metronomic oral vinorelbine monotherapy in patients with metastatic cancer: a hellenic cooperative oncology group clinical translational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briasoulis, Evangelos; Vassias, Antonios; Klouvas, George; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Fountzilas, George; Syrigos, Kostantinos N; Kalofonos, Haralambos; Samantas, Epaminontas; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Kouvatseas, George; Pappas, Periklis; Biziota, Eirini; Sainis, Ioannis; Makatsoris, Thomas; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Xanthakis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Metronomic chemotherapy is considered an anti-angiogenic therapy that involves chronic administration of low-dose chemotherapy at regular short intervals. We investigated the optimal metronomic dose of oral vinorelbine when given as monotherapy in patients with metastatic cancer. Patients with recurrent metastatic breast (BC), prostate (PC) or non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and adequate organ functions were randomly assigned to 30, 40 or 50 mg vinorelbine, taken orally three times a week. Treatment continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, withdrawal of consent or maximum 24 months. Primary endpoint was time-to-treatment failure (TTF) and secondary were progression-free survival (PFS), toxicity, changes in blood concentrations of angiogenesis-associated biomarkers and pharmacokinetics. Seventy-three patients were enrolled. Four-month TTF rate did not differ between the three arms: 25.9% (11.1%-46.2% 95% Confidence Interval), 33.3% (15.6%-55.3%) and 18.2% (5.2%-40.3%) for the 30 mg, 40 mg and 50 mg arms (p-value = 0.56). Objective response was seen in 2 patients with NSCLC (treated at 30 and 50 mg respectively), one with BC (at 40 m g) and one with PC (at 50 mg) and lasted from 4 to 100 weeks, with maximum response duration achieved at 50 mg. Adverse events were mild and negligible and did not differ between the three arms. Blood levels of vinorelbine reached steady state from the second week of treatment and mean values for the 30, 40 and 50 mg were respectively 1.8 ng/ml (SD 1.10), 2.2 ng/ml (SD 1.87) and 2.6 ng/ml (SD 0.69). Low pre-treatment blood concentrations of FGF2 and IL8 predicted favorable response to therapy (p values 0.02 and 0.006, respectively), while high levels of TEK gene transcript predicted treatment resistance. Considering the antitumor activity and response duration, the negligible toxicity of the highest dose investigated and the lack of drug accumulation over time, we suggest that 50 mg given three times a week is the

  3. A phase Ia/Ib clinical trial of metronomic chemotherapy based on a mathematical model of oral vinorelbine in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma: rationale and study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elharrar, Xavier; Barbolosi, Dominique; Ciccolini, Joseph; Meille, Christophe; Faivre, Christian; Lacarelle, Bruno; André, Nicolas; Barlesi, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Metronomic oral vinorelbine is effective in metastatic NSCLC and malignant pleural mesothelioma, but all the studies published thus far were based upon a variety of empirical and possibly suboptimal schedules, with inconsistent results. Mathematical modelling showed by simulation that a new metronomic protocol could lead to a better safety and efficacy profile. This phase Ia/Ib trial was designed to confirm safety (phase Ia) and evaluate efficacy (phase Ib) of a new metronomic oral vinorelbine schedule. Patients with metastatic NSCLC or malignant pleural mesothelioma in whom standard treatments failed and who exhibited ECOG performance status 0–2 and adequate organ function will be eligible. Our mathematical PK-PD model suggested an alternative weekly D1, D2 and D4 schedule (named Vinorelbine Theoretical Protocol) with a respective dose of 60, 30 and 60 mg. Trial recruitment will be two-staged, as 12 patients are planned to participate in phase Ia to confirm safety and consolidate the calibration of the model parameters. Depending on the phase Ia results and after a favourable decision from a consultative committee, the extension phase (phase Ib) will be an efficacy study including 20 patients who will receive the Optimal Vinorelbine Theoretical Protocol. The primary endpoint is the tolerance (assessed by CTC v4.0) for the phase Ia and the objective response according to RECIST 1.1 for phase Ib. An ancillary study on circulating angiogenesis biomarkers will be a subproject of the trial. This ongoing trial is the first to prospectively test a mathematically optimized schedule in metronomic chemotherapy. As such, this trial can be considered as a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the feasibility to run a computational-driven protocol to ensure an optimal efficacy/toxicity balance in patients with cancer

  4. Intravenous or oral administration of vinorelbine in adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for resected NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Steffen Filskov; Carus, Andreas; Meldgaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cisplatin and vinorelbine given intravenously is a well-established adjuvant chemotherapy regimen after surgery for early-stage NSCLC. Vinorelbine can also be administered orally. However, the efficacy of orally administrated vinorelbine in adjuvant treatment of NSCLC is unknown. We...... University Hospital (Denmark) from 2005 to 2012 for adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery for NSCLC. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Of the 265 patients included in this study, 126 patients received i.v. and 139 received p.o. vinorelbine/cisplatin. The two groups were comparable with respect to important baseline....... In conclusion we observed that intravenous or oral administration of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin after surgery for NSCLC appear equally effective in terms of overall and disease-free survival....

  5. Mathematical modeling for Phase I cancer trials: A study of metronomic vinorelbine for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and mesothelioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlesi, Fabrice; Imbs, Diane-Charlotte; Tomasini, Pascale; Greillier, Laurent; Galloux, Melissa; Testot-Ferry, Albane; Garcia, Mélanie; Elharrar, Xavier; Pelletier, Annick; André, Nicolas; Mascaux, Céline; Lacarelle, Bruno; Cheikh, Raouf El; Serre, Raphaël; Ciccolini, Joseph; Barbolosi, Dominique

    2017-07-18

    Using mathematical modelling allows to select a treatment's regimen across infinite possibilities. Here, we report the phase I assessment of a new schedule for metronomic vinorelbine in treating refractory advanced NSCLC and mesothelioma patients. Overall, 13 patients were screened and 12 were treated (50% male, median age: 68yrs), including 9 NSCLC patients. All patients received at least one week (3 doses) of treatment. At data cut-off, the median length of treatment was 6.5 weeks (1-32+). All the patients presented with at least one adverse event (AE) and six patients with a severe AE (SAE). One partial response and 5 stable diseases were observed. The median OS was 6.4 months (95% CI, 4.8 to 12 months). The median and mean vinorelbine's AUC were 122 ng/ml*h and 159 ng/ml*h, respectively, with the higher plasmatic vinorelbine exposure associated with the best ORR (difference of AUC comparison between responders and non-responders, p-value 0.017). The mathematical modelling determined the administration of vinorelbine, 60 mg on Day 1, 30 mg on Day 2 and 60 mg on Day 4 weekly until progression, as the best schedule. Advanced NSCLC or mesothelioma patients progressing after standard treatment were eligible for the trial. NCT02555007. Responses with acceptable safety profile were observed in heavily pretreated NSCLC and mesothelioma patients using oral vinorelbine at this metronomic dosage based on a mathematic modeling. This study demonstrates the feasibility of this new type of approach, as mathematical modeling may help to rationally decide the better regimen to be clinically tested across infinite possibilities.

  6. GILT - A randomised phase III study of oral vinorelbine and cisplatin with concomitant radiotherapy followed by either consolidation therapy with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin or best supportive care alone in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Wuerzburg (Germany); Huber, Rudolf M. [University Hospital Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL CPC-M), Munich (Germany); Engel-Riedel, Walburga [University Hospital Merheim, Dept. of Pneumonology, Cologne (Germany); Andreas, Stefan [Dept. of Pneumonology, Immenhausen (Germany); Kollmeier, Jens [Helios Emil-von-Behring Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Staar, Susanne [Municipal Hospital Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Dickgreber, Nicolas [University Hospital Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Vaissiere, Nathalie; Almeida, Cecilia de [Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Boulogne (France); Edlich, Birgit [Pierre Fabre Pharma GmbH, Freiburg (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is considered standard for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Consolidation chemotherapy (CC) following CRT is intended to further improve outcomes, yet studies have shown discordant results. This phase III study assessed CRT followed by best supportive care (BSC) or consolidation with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin. Patients received two cycles of oral vinorelbine (50 mg/m{sup 2} days 1, 8 and 15) + cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} days 1-4) q4w + radiotherapy (RT; 66 Gy). Patients with at least stable disease (SD) were randomised to either two cycles oral vinorelbine (60-80 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 and 8) + cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} day 1) q3w + BSC or BSC alone. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 279 patients were enrolled for CRT and 201 patients were randomised to CC or BSC. Both CRT and CC were well tolerated, with limited radiation-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC/BSC: oesophagitis-related events 12.9 %/3.1 %/0 %; grade 3 pneumonitis 0 %/0 %/2 %) and chemotherapy-mediated grade 3/4 toxicities (CRT/CC: neutropenia 11.2 %/22.1 %; leukopenia 18.3 %/26.7 %; grade 3 nausea 5.0 %/2.3 %, grade 3 vomiting 3.2 %/3.5 %). Median PFS from randomisation was 6.4 (5.0-8.7) and 5.5 (3.8-7.4) months in the CC and BSC arms (hazard ratio, HR = 0.93 [0.69-1.26]; p = 0.63), respectively; median overall survival (OS) 20.8 (13.5-25.3) and 18.5 (13.6-24.7) months, respectively. Consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent CRT did not prolong PFS or OS. Concurrent RT with oral vinorelbine and cisplatin demonstrated a favourable safety profile and represents a suitable treatment regimen for inoperable stage III NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Simultane Radiochemotherapie (CRT) wird als Standardtherapie beim inoperablen Stadium III des nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkarzinoms (NSCLC) angesehen. Konsolidierende Chemotherapie (CC) nach der CRT zielt darauf ab, das Therapieergebnis zu verbessern, allerdings zeigen Studien

  7. Metastatic primary duodenal adeno-carcinoma responding to metronomic oral cyclophosphamide chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Bandyopadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary adenocarcinoma of duodenum is a very rare tumour with a prevalence of only 0.3 to 1% of among all the tumours of gastrointestinal tracts. Localised tumours, if resected have good prognosis but those with metastates entails a poor prognosis, where generally palliation may be the only feasible option. Low dose continous cytotoxic treatment or metronomic chemotherapy prevents neoangiogenesis and chemoresistance thereby, provides excellent symptom relief and palliation in many advanced heavily pretreated solid malignancies. It offers as an affordable, less toxic therapy with moderate to good efficacy. Here we report a case of a 52 year female who, presented with history of maleana, pallor and pedal edema for last 2 months. Her performance status was poor (KPS 40 and she had enlarged left supraclavicular lymph node, palpable liver and vague mass in paraumbilical region. Upper GI endoscopy revealed large ulceroproliferative growth in the D2 segment and HPE showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. CT scan revealed paratracheal and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and bone scan revealed vertebral metastasis. Patient received oral cyclophosphamide and hematinic and vitamin support, along with radiation to spine. There was near complete clinical response, and progression free period of about 32 weeks. Thus, single agent cyclophosphamide in the present case provided near total clinical response and prolonged period of freedom from disease progression with excellent palliation of symptoms. Hence in patient of advanced and metastatic small bowel cancer, with poor performance status metronomic therapy with single agent cyclophosphamide may provide viable option both for treatment and palliation.

  8. Bevacizumab with metronomic chemotherapy of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in recurrent cervical cancer: Four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Isono-Nakata

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Standard chemotherapy for women with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer involves a combination of paclitaxel, platinum, and bevacizumab. However, for patients who experience anaphylaxis in response to paclitaxel or platinum, have permanent peripheral neuropathy, or develop early recurrence or progressive disease during first-line chemotherapy, the development of a non-taxane non-platinum regimen is mandatory. Clinical trials using anti-angiogenic treatment demonstrated favorable outcomes in cases of highly vascularized cervical cancer. Metronomic chemotherapy has been considered an anti-angiogenic treatment, although its use in combination with bevacizumab has not been studied in cervical cancer. We treated four patients with recurrent cervical cancer with 50 mg of oral cyclophosphamide daily and 15 mg/kg of intravenous bevacizumab every 3 weeks (CFA-BEV. One patient experienced disease progression after 4 months, whereas the other three patients continued the regimen until their last follow-up at 13, 14, and 15 months, respectively. One patient suffered from grade 3 neutropenia; however, no grade 2 or higher non-hematological toxicities were observed. These cases demonstrate the use of CFA-BEV with minimal toxicity and expected anti-cancer activity and indicate that this regimen should be considered for second-line chemotherapy in advanced recurrent cervical cancer. Keywords: Cervical cancer, Metronomic chemotherapy, Bevacizumab

  9. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yen Huang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group, and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group. The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107. Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  10. Oral tegafur-uracil as metronomic therapy following intravenous FOLFOX for stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Lee, Chia-Cheng; Hsiao, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Jao, Shu-Wen; Yang, Jen-Fu; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact of metronomic therapy with oral tegafur-uracil (UFUR) following an intravenous FOLFOX regimen as surgical adjuvant chemotherapy on the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of stage III colon cancer patients. From the retrospective database of patients who underwent a surgical resection for colorectal cancer at the Tri-Service General Hospital from October 2008 through December 2014, stage III colon carcinomas treated with radical R0 resection were reviewed. One hundred thirty two patients were treated with a FOLFOX regimen (comparison group), and 113 patients were treated with the same regimen followed by additional oral UFUR (UFUR group). The clinical characteristics and mean age of the comparison and UFUR groups were similar. Furthermore, for all study patients, DFS was not significantly different between the two groups. However, 5-year OS rates were 86.8% and 68.5% in the UFUR and comparison groups, respectively (p = 0.0107). Adding UFUR to a FOLFOX regimen was found to significantly improve the OS in patients with stage III colon cancer. UFUR as a maintenance therapy following FOLFOX regimen as an alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of stage III colon cancer patients.

  11. Metronomic therapy with oral 6-mercaptopurine in elderly acute myeloid leukemia: A prospective pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in elderly patients differs biologically from that in younger patients and is known to have unfavorable chromosomal rearrangements, higher resistance, and lower tolerance to chemotherapy. In such circumstances, instead of giving full-blown chemotherapy, palliative metronomic chemotherapy (MCT could be a treatment option. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective pilot study of old AML patients (age >60 years not amenable to curative treatment. Thirty-two patients were enrolled into the study and were treated with daily oral 6-mercaptopurine 75 mg/m 2 . The following inclusion criteria were used: age >60 years, nonpromyelocytic AML, the absence of uncontrolled comorbidities, and patient not amenable to curative treatment. Overall survival (OS was calculated using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to calculate the hazards ratio of significant factors. Results: The median age of the patients was 69 years (range: 61-86 years with male: female ratio of 2.5:1. About 59.4% of patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 while rest had the status of 3. The median OS was 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4-7.6. Males had median OS of 7 months (95% CI: 5.4-8.6 versus females with OS of 3 months (95% CI: 1.5-4.4; P = 0.008. There was no survival difference on the basis of baseline hemoglobin or French-American-British class. There were no Grade 4 toxicities and no episode of febrile neutropenia. Conclusions: MCT with oral 6-mercaptopurine is an attractive treatment option in elderly AML patients who are not amenable to curative therapy with minimal toxicities.

  12. Metronomic chemotherapy using orally active carboplatin/deoxycholate complex to maintain drug concentration within a tolerable range for effective cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Foyez; Chung, Seung Woo; Alam, Farzana; Choi, Jeong Uk; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, In-San; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Dong Soo; Byun, Youngro

    2017-03-10

    Metronomic chemotherapy has translated into favorable toxicity profile and capable of delaying tumor progression. Despite its promise, conventional injectable chemotherapeutics are not meaningful to use as metronomic due to the necessity of frequent administration for personalized therapy in long-term cancer treatments. This study aims to exploit the benefits of the oral application of carboplatin as metronomic therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed an orally active carboplatin by physical complexation with a deoxycholic acid (DOCA). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed the disappearance of crystalline peaks from carboplatin by forming the complex with DOCA. In vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) study confirmed the oral absorption of carboplatin/DOCA complex. The oral bioavailability of carboplatin/DOCA complex and native carboplatin were calculated as 24.33% and 1.16%, respectively, when a single 50mg/kg oral dose was administered. Further findings of oral bioavailability during a low-dose daily administration of the complex (10mg/kg) for 3weeks were showed 19.17% at day-0, 30.27% at day-7, 26.77% at day-14, and 22.48% at day-21, demonstrating its potential for metronomic chemotherapy. The dose dependent antitumor effects of oral carboplatin were evaluated in SCC7 and A549 tumor xenograft mice. It was found that the oral carboplatin complex exhibited potent anti-tumor activity at 10mg/kg (74.09% vs. control, Peffective and safe oral formulation of carboplatin as a metronomic chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral Metronomic Topotecan Sensitizes Crizotinib Antitumor Activity in ALKF1174L Drug-Resistant Neuroblastoma Preclinical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitor crizotinib has proven to be effective in the treatment of ALK-mutated neuroblastoma, but crizotinib resistance was commonly observed in patients. We aimed to overcome crizotinib resistance by combining with the MEK inhibitor trametinib or low-dose metronomic (LDM topotecan in preclinical neuroblastoma models. METHODS: We selected a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines carrying various ALK genetic aberrations to assess the therapeutic efficacy on cell proliferation in vitro. Downstream signals of ALK activation, including phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt as well as HIF-1α expression were evaluated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Tumor growth inhibition was further assessed in NOD/SCID xenograft mouse models. RESULTS: All NBL cell lines responded to crizotinib treatment but at variable ED50 levels, ranging from 0.25 to 5.58 μM. ALK-mutated cell lines SH-SY5Y, KELLY, LAN-5, and CHLA-20 are more sensitive than ALK wild-type cell lines. In addition, we demonstrated that under hypoxic conditions, all NBL cell lines showed marked decrease of ED50s when compared to normoxia except for KELLY cells. Taking into consideration the hypoxia sensitivity to crizotinib, combined treatment with crizotinib and LDM topotecan demonstrated a synergistic effect in ALKF1174L-mutated SH-SY5Y cells. In vivo, single-agent crizotinib showed limited antitumor activity in ALKF1174L-mutated SH-SY5Y and KELLY xenograft models; however, when combined with topotecan, significantly delayed tumor development was achieved in both SH-SY5Y and KELLY tumor models. CONCLUSIONS: Oral metronomic topotecan reversed crizotinib drug resistance in the ALKF1174L-mutated neuroblastoma preclinical model.

  14. Metronomic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy drugs are usually administered at doses that are high enough to result in an obligatory break period to allow for the observation of potential side effects and institution of supportive care, if required. In recent years, efforts to administer chemotherapy on a more continuous basis, with a much shorter break period, or none at all, have received increased interest, and the practice has come to be known as metronomic chemotherapy. The basis for success with this currently investigational approach may be rooted in continuous drug exposure to susceptible cancer cells, inhibition of tumor blood vessel growth-a process known as tumor angiogenesis, and/or alterations in tumor immunology. Increased benefit also appears to occur when metronomic chemotherapy is used in combination with newer, targeted antiangiogenic agents, and therefore represents a promising approach to combination therapy, particularly as targeted oncology drugs make their way into veterinary oncology applications. There is still much to be learned in this field, especially with regard to optimization of the proper drugs, dose, schedule, and tumor applications. However, the low cost, ease of administration, and acceptable toxicity profiles potentially associated with this therapeutic strategy make metronomic chemotherapy protocols attractive and suitable to veterinary applications. Preliminary clinical trial results have now been reported in both human and veterinary medicine, including adjuvant treatment of canine splenic hemangiosarcoma and incompletely resected soft tissue sarcoma, and, further, more powerful studies are currently ongoing.

  15. Vinorelbine rescue therapy for dogs with primary urinary bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, M E; Thamm, D H; Weishaar, K; Lawrence, J A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumour activity and toxicoses of vinorelbine as a palliative rescue therapy for dogs with primary urinary bladder carcinoma. Thirteen dogs refractory to prior chemotherapeutics and one dog naïve to chemotherapeutic treatment were enrolled. Vinorelbine (15 mg m(-2) IV) was administered intravenously along with concurrent oral anti-inflammatory drugs, if tolerated. A median of six doses of vinorelbine (range: 1-16) was administered. Two dogs (14%) had partial responses, and eight (57%) experienced stable disease. Subjective improvement in clinical signs was noted in 11 dogs (78%). Adverse events were mild and primarily haematological in nature. Median time to progression was 93 days (range: 20-239 days). Median survival time for all dogs was 187 days; median survival for 13 pre-treated dogs was 207 days. Vinorelbine may have utility in the management of canine primary urinary bladder carcinoma and should be evaluated in a prospective study. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Long term outcome of high-risk neuroblastoma patients after immunotherapy with antibody ch14.18 or oral metronomic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Thorsten; Hero, Barbara; Faldum, Andreas; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schrappe, Martin; Klingebiel, Thomas; Berthold, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma patients consists of multimodal induction therapy to achieve remission followed by consolidation therapy to prevent relapses. However, the type of consolidation therapy is still discussed controversial. We applied metronomic chemotherapy in the prospective NB90 trial and monoclonal anti-GD2-antibody (MAB) ch14.18 in the NB97 trial. Here, we present the long term outcome data of the patient cohort. A total of 334 stage 4 neuroblastoma patients one year or older were included. All patients successfully completed the induction therapy. In the NB90 trial, 99 patients received at least one cycle of the oral maintenance chemotherapy (NB90 MT, 12 alternating cycles of oral melphalan/etoposide and vincristine/cyclophosphamide). In the NB97 trial, 166 patients commenced the MAB ch14.18 consolidation therapy (six cycles over 12 months). Patients who received no maintenance therapy according to the NB90 protocol or by refusal in NB97 (n = 69) served as controls. The median observation time was 11.11 years. The nine-year event-free survival rates were 41 ± 4%, 31 ± 5%, and 32 ± 6% for MAB ch14.18, NB90 MT, and no consolidation, respectively (p = 0.098). In contrast to earlier reports, MAB ch14.18 treatment improved the long-term outcome compared to no additional therapy (p = 0.038). The overall survival was better in the MAB ch14.18-treated group (9-y-OS 46 ± 4%) compared to NB90 MT (34 ± 5%, p = 0.026) and to no consolidation (35 ± 6%, p = 0.019). Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed ch14.18 consolidation to improve outcome compared to no consolidation, however, no difference between NB90 MT and MAB ch14.18-treated patients was found. Follow-up analysis of the patient cohort indicated that immunotherapy with MAB ch14.18 may prevent late relapses. Finally, metronomic oral maintenance chemotherapy also appeared effective

  17. Long term outcome of high-risk neuroblastoma patients after immunotherapy with antibody ch14.18 or oral metronomic chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrappe Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma patients consists of multimodal induction therapy to achieve remission followed by consolidation therapy to prevent relapses. However, the type of consolidation therapy is still discussed controversial. We applied metronomic chemotherapy in the prospective NB90 trial and monoclonal anti-GD2-antibody (MAB ch14.18 in the NB97 trial. Here, we present the long term outcome data of the patient cohort. Methods A total of 334 stage 4 neuroblastoma patients one year or older were included. All patients successfully completed the induction therapy. In the NB90 trial, 99 patients received at least one cycle of the oral maintenance chemotherapy (NB90 MT, 12 alternating cycles of oral melphalan/etoposide and vincristine/cyclophosphamide. In the NB97 trial, 166 patients commenced the MAB ch14.18 consolidation therapy (six cycles over 12 months. Patients who received no maintenance therapy according to the NB90 protocol or by refusal in NB97 (n = 69 served as controls. Results The median observation time was 11.11 years. The nine-year event-free survival rates were 41 ± 4%, 31 ± 5%, and 32 ± 6% for MAB ch14.18, NB90 MT, and no consolidation, respectively (p = 0.098. In contrast to earlier reports, MAB ch14.18 treatment improved the long-term outcome compared to no additional therapy (p = 0.038. The overall survival was better in the MAB ch14.18-treated group (9-y-OS 46 ± 4% compared to NB90 MT (34 ± 5%, p = 0.026 and to no consolidation (35 ± 6%, p = 0.019. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed ch14.18 consolidation to improve outcome compared to no consolidation, however, no difference between NB90 MT and MAB ch14.18-treated patients was found. Conclusions Follow-up analysis of the patient cohort indicated that immunotherapy with MAB ch14.18 may prevent late relapses. Finally, metronomic oral maintenance chemotherapy also appeared effective.

  18. Vinorelbine Potently Induces Placental Cell Death, Does Not Harm Fertility and is a Potential Treatment for Ectopic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne Hastie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic pregnancies complicate 1–2 pregnancies and are a leading cause of maternal death. An effective oral drug therapy that replaces surgery might make its treatment safer, cheaper, simpler and therefore more widely accessible. The only current medical treatment offered to women is intramuscular methotrexate, but this only reliably resolves smaller ectopic pregnancies. As such, many ectopic pregnancies require surgical excision. We show that vinorelbine, an orally available chemotherapeutic agent, potently induced placental cell death but did not harm fertility in mice. Vinorelbine was 100–1000 times more potent than methotrexate in inducing placental cell death in vitro, and more potent than combination methotrexate and gefitinib (another proposed treatment for ectopic pregnancy being evaluated in phase III trials. Mechanistically, it caused microtubule condensation, blocked mitosis and activated the apoptosis cascade in placental cells. Vinorelbine was more efficacious than methotrexate ± gefitinib in reducing the volume of placental cell tumors xenografted subcutaneously in SCID mice. Mice exposed to vinorelbine and allowed to breed, following a four week washout period, displayed normal fertility, however long-term fertility was not assessed. Human Fallopian tubes treated with vinorelbine did not exhibit up-regulation of apoptosis molecules. Our findings show that placental cells appear sensitive to vinorelbine and it has potential as a tablet-only approach to treat ectopic pregnancy. Keywords: Ectopic pregnancy, Vinorelbine, Methotrexate, Placenta, Treatment

  19. Synchronization of metronomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleone, James

    2002-10-01

    Synchronization is a common phenomenon in physical and biological systems. We examine the synchronization of two (and more) metronomes placed on a freely moving base. The small motion of the base couples the pendulums causing synchronization. The synchronization is generally in-phase, with antiphase synchronization occurring only under special conditions. The metronome system provides a mechanical realization of the popular Kuramoto model for synchronization of biological oscillators, and is excellent for classroom demonstrations and an undergraduate physics lab.

  20. The Metronome and Rote Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Charlotte

    1979-01-01

    A teaching method for enhancing rote memory ability is described. The use of a metronome was found to establish a tempo, or rhythm, which enabled children to learn multiplication tables more easily. (PHR)

  1. Venous damage prevention by defibrotide in vinorelbine-treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mare, M; Maisano, R; Caristi, N; Adamo, V; Altavilla, G; Carboni, R; Munaò, S; La Torre, F

    2003-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of venous toxicity induced by vinorelbine administration in patients who received a preventive therapy with defibrotide. From July 1996 to July 2002 we treated 203 patients with vinorelbine, 51 with vinorelbine alone and 152 with vinorelbine in combination with other drugs via peripheral vein infusion. Of the 203 patients, 123 were male and 80 female with a median age of 67 years (range 18 to 82 years), and 118 were chemotherapy-naive. Defibrotide was delivered i.v. at a dose of 400 mg in 250 ml normal saline. After infusion of 125 ml over about 15 min, vinorelbine mixed with 10 ml normal saline was delivered as quick brief repeated pulses over 5 min through the plastic tube, followed by infusion of the remaining defibrotide. The specific Rittenberg scale was used to assess venous irritation episodes. Among a total of 1336 vinorelbine infusions, with a median of five infusions per patient, the incidence of venous irritation episodes graded according to Rittenberg scale was 1.1% (15), of which 0.6% (8) were grade 2 and 0.5% (7) grade 1. Globally, 15 patients (7.3%) developed venous toxicity after a median of 3 infusions (range 1-14), but no patient had more than one event. Our findings support the use of defibrotide as an effective, safe and low-cost means for preventing vinorelbine-related venous damage.

  2. Single Molecule Nano-Metronome

    OpenAIRE

    Buranachai, Chittanon; McKinney, Sean A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2006-01-01

    We constructed a DNA-based nano-mechanical device called the nano-metronome. Our device is made by introducing complementary single stranded overhangs at the two arms of the DNA four-way junction. The ticking rates of this stochastic metronome depend on ion concentrations and can be changed by a set of DNA-based switches to deactivate/reactivate the sticky end. Since the device displays clearly distinguishable responses even with a single basepair difference, it may lead to a single molecule ...

  3. Single Molecule Nano-Metronome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranachai, Chittanon; McKinney, Sean A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a DNA-based nano-mechanical device called the nano-metronome. Our device is made by introducing complementary single stranded overhangs at the two arms of the DNA four-way junction. The ticking rates of this stochastic metronome depend on ion concentrations and can be changed by a set of DNA-based switches to deactivate/reactivate the sticky end. Since the device displays clearly distinguishable responses even with a single basepair difference, it may lead to a single molecule sensor of minute sequence differences of a target DNA. PMID:16522050

  4. Gefitinib versus vinorelbine in chemotherapy-naive elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (INVITE): a randomized, phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinò, Lucio; Cappuzzo, Federico; Zatloukal, Petr; Reck, Martin; Pesek, Milos; Thompson, Joyce C; Ford, Hugo E R; Hirsch, Fred R; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Ghiorghiu, Serban; Duffield, Emma L; Armour, Alison A; Speake, Georgina; Cullen, Michael

    2008-09-10

    This phase II, open-label, parallel-group study compared gefitinib with vinorelbine in chemotherapy-naïve elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy-naïve patients (age >or= 70 years) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d orally) or vinorelbine (30 mg/m(2) infusion on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points were overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and tolerability. Exploratory end points included epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene copy number by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Patients were randomly assigned to gefitinib (n = 97) or to vinorelbine (n = 99). Hazard ratios (HR; gefitinib v vinorelbine) were 1.19 (95% CI, 0.85 to 1.65) for PFS and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.66 to 1.47) for OS. ORR and disease control rates were 3.1% (95% CI, 0.6 to 8.8) and 43.3% (for gefitinib) and 5.1% (95% CI, 1.7 to 11.4) and 53.5% (for vinorelbine), respectively. Overall QOL improvement and PSI rates were 24.3% and 36.6% (for gefitinib) and 10.9% and 31.0% (for vinorelbine), respectively. In the 54 patients who were EGFR FISH-positive, HRs were 3.13 (95% CI, 1.45 to 6.76) for PFS and 2.88 (95% CI, 1.21 to 6.83) for OS. There were fewer treatment-related grade 3 to 5 adverse events with gefitinib (12.8%) than with vinorelbine (41.7%). There was no statistical difference between gefitinib and vinorelbine in efficacy in chemotherapy-naïve, unselected elderly patients with advanced NSCLC, but there was better tolerability with gefitinib. Individuals who were EGFR FISH-positive benefited more from vinorelbine than from gefitinib; this unexpected finding requires further study.

  5. Metronomic chemotherapy in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: A potentially feasible alternative to therapeutic nihilism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaroop Revannasiddaiah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is one of the most aggressive malignancies and prognostic outlook remains very dismal. Treatment most often is palliative in intent attempting to relieve the patients from local compressive symptoms in the neck. Radical surgery, radiotherapy (RT, and chemotherapy have not been tested in large prospective trials, and current evidence from retrospective series and small trials indicate only marginal survival benefits. Given the poor prognostic and therapeutic outlook, patients must be encouraged to be actively involved in the decision making process. We report the case of an elderly patient who had no response to palliative RT, and was treated with oral metronomic chemotherapy. The response to oral metronomic chemotherapy was dramatic, and the patient has enjoyed complete freedom from symptoms as well as radiologically exhibits a complete regression. Thus, we document the first ever use of a simple, cost-effective, and convenient oral metronomic chemotherapeutic regimen delivering a remarkable response in an elderly patient with ATC.

  6. Metronomic chemotherapy in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: a potentially feasible alternative to therapeutic nihilism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Madabhavi, Irappa; Bodh, Anita; Thakur, Priyanka; Sharma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies and prognostic outlook remains very dismal. Treatment most often is palliative in intent attempting to relieve the patients from local compressive symptoms in the neck. Radical surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy have not been tested in large prospective trials, and current evidence from retrospective series and small trials indicate only marginal survival benefits. Given the poor prognostic and therapeutic outlook, patients must be encouraged to be actively involved in the decision making process. We report the case of an elderly patient who had no response to palliative RT, and was treated with oral metronomic chemotherapy. The response to oral metronomic chemotherapy was dramatic, and the patient has enjoyed complete freedom from symptoms as well as radiologically exhibits a complete regression. Thus, we document the first ever use of a simple, cost-effective, and convenient oral metronomic chemotherapeutic regimen delivering a remarkable response in an elderly patient with ATC.

  7. Synchronization of coupled metronomes on two layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Yi-Zhen; Wang, Xin-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Coupled metronomes serve as a paradigmatic model for exploring the collective behaviors of complex dynamical systems, as well as a classical setup for classroom demonstrations of synchronization phenomena. Whereas previous studies of metronome synchronization have been concentrating on symmetric coupling schemes, here we consider the asymmetric case by adopting the scheme of layered metronomes. Specifically, we place two metronomes on each layer, and couple two layers by placing one on top of the other. By varying the initial conditions of the metronomes and adjusting the friction between the two layers, a variety of synchronous patterns are observed in experiment, including the splay synchronization (SS) state, the generalized splay synchronization (GSS) state, the anti-phase synchronization (APS) state, the in-phase delay synchronization (IPDS) state, and the in-phase synchronization (IPS) state. In particular, the IPDS state, in which the metronomes on each layer are synchronized in phase but are of a constant phase delay to metronomes on the other layer, is observed for the first time. In addition, a new technique based on audio signals is proposed for pattern detection, which is more convenient and easier to apply than the existing acquisition techniques. Furthermore, a theoretical model is developed to explain the experimental observations, and is employed to explore the dynamical properties of the patterns, including the basin distributions and the pattern transitions. Our study sheds new lights on the collective behaviors of coupled metronomes, and the developed setup can be used in the classroom for demonstration purposes.

  8. Order and disorder in coupled metronome systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Sz.; Davidova, L.; Néda, Z.

    2014-04-01

    Metronomes placed on a smoothly rotating disk are used for exemplifying order-disorder type phase-transitions. The ordered phase corresponds to spontaneously synchronized beats, while the disordered state is when the metronomes swing in unsynchronized manner. Using a given metronome ensemble, we propose several methods for switching between ordered and disordered states. The system is studied by controlled experiments and a realistic model. The model reproduces the experimental results, and allows to study large ensembles with good statistics. Finite-size effects and the increased fluctuation in the vicinity of the phase-transition point are also successfully reproduced.

  9. Intermittent Metronomic Drug Schedule Is Essential for Activating Antitumor Innate Immunity and Tumor Xenograft Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Sheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metronomic chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide (CPA is widely associated with antiangiogenesis; however, recent studies implicate other immune-based mechanisms, including antitumor innate immunity, which can induce major tumor regression in implanted brain tumor models. This study demonstrates the critical importance of drug schedule: CPA induced a potent antitumor innate immune response and tumor regression when administered intermittently on a 6-day repeating metronomic schedule but not with the same total exposure to activated CPA administered on an every 3-day schedule or using a daily oral regimen that serves as the basis for many clinical trials of metronomic chemotherapy. Notably, the more frequent metronomic CPA schedules abrogated the antitumor innate immune and therapeutic responses. Further, the innate immune response and antitumor activity both displayed an unusually steep dose-response curve and were not accompanied by antiangiogenesis. The strong recruitment of innate immune cells by the 6-day repeating CPA schedule was not sustained, and tumor regression was abolished, by a moderate (25% reduction in CPA dose. Moreover, an ~20% increase in CPA dose eliminated the partial tumor regression and weak innate immune cell recruitment seen in a subset of the every 6-day treated tumors. Thus, metronomic drug treatment must be at a sufficiently high dose but also sufficiently well spaced in time to induce strong sustained antitumor immune cell recruitment. Many current clinical metronomic chemotherapeutic protocols employ oral daily low-dose schedules that do not meet these requirements, suggesting that they may benefit from optimization designed to maximize antitumor immune responses.

  10. Cimetidine attenuates vinorelbine-induced phlebitis in mice by militating E-selectin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Ma, Lijuan; Wang, Xuebin; Cai, Heping; Huang, Jin; Liu, Jiyong; Hu, Jinhong; Su, Dingfeng

    2014-08-01

    We investigated E-selectin expression in mice and rabbits with vinorelbine-induced phlebitis and the effect of cimetidine. To find the relationship between E-selectin expression and vinorelbine-induced phlebitis. Mouse and rabbit model of vinorelbine-induced phlebitis was established by intravenous infusion of vinorelbine. Pathological observation, molecular-biological determination of E-selectin and protein function of it was evaluated. Grossly, we observed swelling, edema and cord-like vessel changes in mice receiving vinorelbine but only mild edema in mice pretreated with cimetidine. Pathological scoring yielded a total score of 37 for vinorelbine-treated mice and 17 for mice pretreated with cimetidine (P phlebitis in mice probably by suppressing increased expression of E-selectin.

  11. [Metronome therapy in patients with Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzensberger, W; Oberländer, U; Stecker, K

    1997-12-01

    We studied 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 12 patients with Parkinson-plus-syndrome, trying to improve patients' gait by application of various external rhythmic stimuli, including metronome stimulation (96 beats per minute = middle andante). The test course of the patients was 4 x 10 meters and 3 U-turns. The patients' gait quality under stimulation was compared with their free walk (velocity, number of steps, number of freezing episodes). Metronome stimulation significantly reduced the time and number of steps needed for the test course and also diminished the number of freezing episodes. March music stimulation was less effective and tactile stimulation (rhythmically tapping on the patient's shoulder) even produced negative results. The positive effect of metronome stimulation was also found, when the tests were not performed inside the hospital building, but outside in the hospital parc. Metronome stimulation was comparably effective in both patient sub-groups examined in this study (M. Parkinson, Parkinson-plus-syndrome) and seems to be an important additional help in the treatment of these patients. Electronical metronomes are not expensive, easy in handling, and portable. A theoretical explanation of metronome stimulation effectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease still needs to be elucidated.

  12. Synchronization and chaotic dynamics of coupled mechanical metronomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrichs, Henning; Mann, Andreas; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2009-12-01

    Synchronization scenarios of coupled mechanical metronomes are studied by means of numerical simulations showing the onset of synchronization for two, three, and 100 globally coupled metronomes in terms of Arnol'd tongues in parameter space and a Kuramoto transition as a function of coupling strength. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of metronomes where overturning is possible. In this case hyperchaotic dynamics associated with some diffusion process in configuration space is observed, indicating the potential complexity of metronome dynamics.

  13. Metronomic cyclophosphamide-induced long-term remission after recurrent high-grade serous ovarian cancer: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boo, Leonora Wijnandina; Vulink, Annelie Johanna Elisabeth; Bos, Monique Elisabeth Martina Maria

    2017-12-01

    Metronomic oral cyclophosphamide has gained increasing interest in recent years as a promising maintenance therapy in advanced, platinum-sensitive, high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Metronomic treatment with cyclophosphamide refers to the frequent, usually daily, administration of a low (oral) dose of cyclophosphamide with no prolonged drug-free breaks. Main advantages of this treatment are the effective reduction of tumour activity, oral administration in an outpatient setting, low cost and the low toxicity profile. Metronomic oral cyclophosphamide can benefit patients suffering from types of cancer known to be sensitive to alkylating agents, such as platinum-sensitive HGSOC. In recent years, several publications have underlined the advantage of this regimen and possible explanations were explored. We here present a patient with multiple recurrences of metastasized HGSOC, platinum-sensitive, with an on-going complete response to monotherapy with oral cyclophosphamide. This observation supports that patients with relapsing HGSOC who responded to platinum-based chemotherapy and cannot continue platinum-based chemotherapy because of toxicity, can be offered a course of metronomic cyclophosphamide. This case may serve as a reminder that old drugs can be used successfully even in the age of new upcoming therapy such as anti-angiogenic agents (VEGF inhibitors) and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors.

  14. Cisplatin and vinorelbine first-line chemotherapy in non-resectable malignant pleural mesothelioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, H.; Palshof, T.; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the activity of cisplatin and vinorelbine in previously untreated, inoperable patients having histologically verified malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), normal organ function, and performance status 0-2. Treatment was vinorelbine 25 mg m(-2) i.v. weekly and cisplatin 100...

  15. Kuramoto-type phase transition with metronomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boda, Sz; Ujvári, Sz; Tunyagi, A; Néda, Z

    2013-01-01

    Metronomes placed on the perimeter of a disc-shaped platform, which can freely rotate in a horizontal plane, are used for a simple classroom illustration of the Kuramoto-type phase transition. The rotating platform induces a global coupling between the metronomes, and the strength of this coupling can be varied by tilting the metronomes’ swinging plane relative to the radial direction on the disc. As a function of the tilting angle, a transition from spontaneously synchronized to unsynchronized states is observable. By varying the number of metronomes on the disc, finite-size effects are also exemplified. A realistic theoretical model is introduced and used to reproduce the observed results. Computer simulations of this model allow a detailed investigation of the emerging collective behaviour in this system. (paper)

  16. Metronomic Chemotherapy vs Best Supportive Care in Progressive Pediatric Solid Malignant Tumors: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Raja; Agarwala, Sandeep; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Batra, Atul; Dhawan, Deepa; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2017-09-01

    Although oral metronomic chemotherapy is often used in progressive pediatric solid malignant tumors, a literature review reveals that only small single-arm retrospective or phase 1 and 2 studies have been performed. Skepticism abounds because of the lack of level 1 evidence. To compare the effect of metronomic chemotherapy on progression-free survival (PFS) with that of placebo in pediatric patients with primary extracranial, nonhematopoietic solid malignant tumors that progress after at least 2 lines of chemotherapy. A double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was conducted from October 1, 2013, through December 31, 2015, at the cancer center at All India Institute of Medical Sciences in children aged 5 to 18 years with primary extracranial, nonhematopoietic solid malignant tumors that progressed after at least 2 lines of chemotherapy and had no further curative options. One arm received a 4-drug oral metronomic regimen of daily celecoxib and thalidomide with alternating periods of etoposide and cyclophosphamide, whereas the other arm received placebo. Disease status was assessed at baseline, 9 weeks, 18 weeks, and 27 weeks or at clinical progression. The primary end point was PFS as defined by the proportion of patients without disease progression at 6 months, and PFS duration and overall survival (OS) were secondary end points. A total of 108 of the 123 patients screened were enrolled, with 52 randomized to the placebo group (median age, 15 years; 40 male [76.9%]) and 56 to the metronomic chemotherapy group (median age, 13 years; 42 male [75.0%]). At a median follow-up of 2.9 months, 100% of the patients had disease progression by 6 months in the placebo group vs 96.4% in the metronomic chemotherapy group (P = .24). Median PFS and OS in the 2 groups was similar (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95% CI, 0.47-1.03 [P = .07] for PFS; and HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.50-1.09 [P = .13] for OS). In post hoc subgroup analysis, cohorts receiving more than

  17. Safety and efficacy of neratinib (HKI-272) plus vinorelbine in the treatment of patients with ErbB2-positive metastatic breast cancer pretreated with anti-HER2 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, A; Dirix, L; Manso Sanchez, L; Xu, B; Luu, T; Diéras, V; Hershman, D L; Agrapart, V; Ananthakrishnan, R; Staroslawska, E

    2013-01-01

    Neratinib (HKI-272) is a potent irreversible pan-ErbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor with clinical activity in patients with ErbB2/HER2-positive breast cancer. Phase I of this open-label, phase I/II study investigated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oral neratinib (160 or 240 mg/day) plus vinorelbine (25 mg/m2; days 1 and 8 of each 21-day cycle) in patients with solid tumors. Phase II assessed the safety, clinical activity, and pharmacokinetics of the combination in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer; the primary efficacy end point was objective response (OR). In phase I (n=12), neratinib (240 mg) plus vinorelbine (25 mg/m2) was established as the MTD. In phase II, 79 patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer were treated at the MTD. The most common treatment-related adverse events were diarrhea (96%), neutropenia (54%), and nausea (50%). Three patients discontinued treatment due to diarrhea. No clinically important skin side-effects were observed. The OR rate in assessable phase II patients was 41% (no prior lapatinib) and 8% (prior lapatinib). There was no evidence of pharmacokinetic interaction between neratinib and vinorelbine. Neratinib plus vinorelbine showed promising antitumor activity and no unexpected toxic effects in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00706030.

  18. A multicentre phase-II feasibility study evaluating gemcitabine /vinorelbine / prednisolone combination chemotherapy in relapsed / refractory hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmad, S.; Shah, I.; Khattak, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of Gemcitabine, Vinorelbine and Prednisolone (GVP) salvage chemotherapy in relapsed / refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL). Study Design: A phase-II non-randomized single arm study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital and Medical College Lahore, Mayo Hospital, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Allied Hospital, Punjab Medical College, Faisalabad and Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2007 to December 2007. Methodology: Fifty adult patients with relapsed/refractory HL, adequate marrow reserve, hepatorenal and pulmonary functions, with radiological measurable disease and Karnofsky performance status of 0 - 2 non-candidates for stem cell transplantation, were enrolled. Four 28 days cycles of GVP (Gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2, Vinorelbine 30 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 intravenously with oral Prednisolone 100 mg/day on day 1 - 5) were given. Response evaluation done according to Cotswolds meeting recommendations and toxicity was evaluated with NCI-CTC (National Cancer Institute - Common Terminology Criteria for adverse events v 3.0). Results: Forty patients completing 4 cycles of GVP, 14 refractory/early relapse and 26 late relapsed (one year postprimary treatment with ABVD) were available for evaluation. The overall response (CRu+PR) rate was 77.5% with better response 85% in late relapsed patients. Haematological toxicity was most common and seen in 70% of cases. Conclusion: GVP is well-tolerated regimen with high response rate and needs to be tested in late relapsed HL. (author)

  19. [Prevention of phlebitis caused by vinorelbine chemotherapy in outpatients with breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yukiko; Suzuki, Tomoko; Narahashi, Takeshi; Takizawa, Jun; Kojima, Makoto; Shimada, Retsu

    2008-09-01

    We studied the prevention of phlebitis in 10 patients who had developed the symptoms after receiving vinorelbine to treat breast cancer at our outpatient chemotherapy clinic from July 2005 to August 2006. Veins proximal to the injection site were warmed using hot compresses during the vinorelbine injection and physiological saline was increased to wash out the drug after the injection from 250 mL to 500 mL in combination to investigate whether the treatment was effective in preventing phlebitis. The severity of phlebitis was significantly decreased after the combined treatment compared with the pre-treatment level (p=0.039). The combination was effective to relieve vascular pain during the injection in all 10 patients, and the number of event occurrences was significantly decreased (pphlebitis caused by vinorelbine. The comparison of patient characteristics to find other contributing factors to phlebitis than vinorelbine revealed no association with the number of doses, diameter of the vein to be punctured, or pretreatment.

  20. Metronomic chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer Impact on VEGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezz El-Arab, L.R.; Menha Swellam, M.; El Mahdy, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anticancer chemotherapy is thought to be effective by means of direct cytotoxicity on tumor cells. Alternative mechanisms of efficacy have been ascribed to several common anticancer agents; including cyclophosphamide (CTX) and capecitabine (Cap) when given at lower doses for prolonged period (metronomic chemotherapy) postulating an antiangiogenic activity as well, Aim of work :To evaluate the action and tolerability of metronomic chemotherapy (MC) and its impact on serum vascular endothetial growth factor (VEGF) levels in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. Patients and methods: In this study we evaluated the clinical efficacy and tolerability of low dose, capecitabine (500 mg twice daily) together with oral cyclophosphamide (CTX) (a dose of 50 mg once daily) in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an angiogenic marker, was measured in the serum samples; at base line, and after 2 and 6 months of therapy. Results: Sixty patients were evaluable. One achieved complete response (CR), 12 partial responses (PR), and 21 stable diseases (SD), while 26 were with progressive disease (PD). The overall response rate was 21.7% with overall disease control (CR, PR, and SD) 56.7%. The median time to progression was 7±2.59 months and overall survival 16 ±8.02 months. Toxicity was mild, Palmar-plantar erythrodythesia was the must common side effect and was observed in 22 patients (37%), leucopenia (Gl + 2) was the most common hematological toxicity, and it was reported in 27% of the cases. The median VEGF level was significantly declined after 2 and 6 months of therapy compared to the base line among the patients with disease control (CR, PR, and SD). In multivariate logisatic regression analysis, patients with post-menopausal, positive hormonal receptors, negative HER-2/Neu, and one, metastatic site, were statistically significant and have a better disease control rate. Coclcusions: MC induced drop in VEGF, and was

  1. Experimental study on synchronization of three coupled mechanical metronomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiang; Liu, Weiqing; Yang, Hujiang; Xiao, Jinghua; Qian, Xiaolan

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a CCD acquisition system is set up to explore the dynamics of three coupled mechanical metronomes in order to compensate for the defects of visual observation. The facility is efficient to observe rich dynamics in an experiment, such as phase synchronization, partial phase synchronization and quasi-periodical oscillation, by accurately recording the trajectory of three coupled metronomes. The parameters, e.g., pendulum length and rolling friction are deemed to significantly influence the dynamics of three coupled mechanical metronomes judging from the experimental phenomena. The experimental results are confirmed by the numerical simulation based on the model with different intrinsic frequencies between three metronomes. The metronome and CCD acquisition systems are excellent demonstration apparatuses for a class and an undergraduate physics laboratory.

  2. Experimental study on synchronization of three coupled mechanical metronomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qiang; Yang Hujiang; Xiao Jinghua; Liu Weiqing; Qian Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a CCD acquisition system is set up to explore the dynamics of three coupled mechanical metronomes in order to compensate for the defects of visual observation. The facility is efficient to observe rich dynamics in an experiment, such as phase synchronization, partial phase synchronization and quasi-periodical oscillation, by accurately recording the trajectory of three coupled metronomes. The parameters, e.g., pendulum length and rolling friction are deemed to significantly influence the dynamics of three coupled mechanical metronomes judging from the experimental phenomena. The experimental results are confirmed by the numerical simulation based on the model with different intrinsic frequencies between three metronomes. The metronome and CCD acquisition systems are excellent demonstration apparatuses for a class and an undergraduate physics laboratory. (paper)

  3. Vitamin E TPGS emulsified vinorelbine bitartrate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN): Formulation development, optimization and in vitro characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Lakshmi; Rajamanickam, Vijayakumar Mahalingam; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Singh, Sanjay

    2018-04-08

    Vinorelbine bitartrate (VRL), a semi synthetic vinca alkaloid approved for breast cancer, has been proved to beneficial as first line and subsequent therapies. However, it's hydrophilic and thermo labile nature provides hindrance to oral clinical translation. The current work focused on the application of DOE a modern statistical optimization tool for the development and optimization of a solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) formulation that can encapsulate hydrophilic and thermolabile Vinorelbine bitartrate (VRL) to a maximum extent without compromising integrity and anticancer activity of the drug. SLNs were prepared by solvent diffusion technique employing Taguchi orthogonal array design with optimized formulation and process variables. The emulsifying nature and low melting point of glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) were exploited to enhance entrapment and minimizing temperature associated degradation, respectively. Moreover, two types of surfactants, Vitamin E TPGS (TPGS) and Poloxamer-188 were utilized to obtain TPGS-VRL-SLNs and PL-VRL-SLNs, respectively. The SLNs were characterized for various physicochemical properties, in-vitro drug release kinetics and anticancer activity by MTT assay on MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The SLNs were found to be spherical in shape with entrapment efficiency (EE) up to 58 %. In-vitro release studies showed biphasic release pattern following Korsemeyer peppas model with fickian release kinetics. Results of MTT assay revealed that TPGS-VRL-SLNs and PL-VRL-SLNs were 39.5 and 18.5 fold more effective, respectively, compared to the pristine VRL. DOE approach was successfully applied for the development of VRL-SLNs. Enhanced entrapment and anticancer efficacy of TPGS-VRL-SLN can be attributed to emulsifying nature of GMO and inherent cytotoxic nature of TPGS, respectively, which synergizes with VRL. Therefore, TPGS associated SLNs may be potential carrier in cancer chemotherapeutics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab Administered in a Single Infusion Bag, Followed by Vinorelbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Michael; López-Vega, José M; Petit, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: VELVET Cohort 1 demonstrated the applicability of pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and vinorelbine as an alternative first-line treatment regimen for patients with HER2-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who cannot receive docetaxel. Co-infusion of pertuzumab and tras......BACKGROUND: VELVET Cohort 1 demonstrated the applicability of pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and vinorelbine as an alternative first-line treatment regimen for patients with HER2-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who cannot receive docetaxel. Co-infusion of pertuzumab...... and trastuzumab may reduce clinic time and medical resource utilization. We report results from Cohort 2, in which pertuzumab and trastuzumab were co-infused, followed by vinorelbine. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During cycle 1, patients with HER2-positive locally advanced or MBC received loading doses of pertuzumab...... (840 mg) and trastuzumab (8 mg/kg) on consecutive days, followed by vinorelbine (25 mg/m(2)) on days two and nine. From cycle 2 onwards, patients received a co-infusion of pertuzumab (420 mg) and trastuzumab (6 mg/kg) on day one, followed by vinorelbine (30-35 mg/m(2)) on days one and eight (or days...

  5. Multigene expression profile for predicting efficacy of cisplatin and vinorelbine in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, I. K.; Christensen, I. J.; Santoni-Rugiu, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a need for biomarkers to predict efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Presented is a combined cisplatin and vinorelbine marker from a previously validated model system [1] tested in two cohorts. Methods: The profiles consist...... and vinorelbine (ACT) and 62 patients who had no adjuvant treatment (OBS) [2] and 2) 95 stage Ib-IIIb completely resected NSCLC patients who all received adjuvant cisplatin and vinorelbine [3]. Endpoint is cancer specific survival. Results: The combined cisplatin and vinorelbine profiles scored as a continuous...... of correlated in vitro cytotoxicity of cisplatin and vinorelbine and mRNA expressions. Then each profile is correlated to mRNA expression of 3500 tumors. The cohorts are 1) a publically available dataset with 133 completely resected stage Ib-II NSCLC patients, 71 of whom received adjuvant cisplatin...

  6. Vinorelbine induced perforation of a metastatic gastric lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullally, W J; O'Súilleabháin, C B; Brady, C; O'Reilly, S

    2017-08-01

    Breast carcinoma metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract is rare and more frequently associated with lobular than ductal carcinoma (Borst and Ingold, Surg 114(4):637-641 [1]). The purpose of this article is to present a case based review of a unique gastrointestinal metastasis and literature review. A 46 year old lady with metastatic invasive ductal breast cancer was admitted to A&E with sudden onset of epigastric and left shoulder pain. She completed the first cycle of capecitabine/vinorelbine 1 week previously. Clinical examination revealed a tender epigastrium with rigidity in the upper abdomen. Free air under the diaphragm and a positive Rigler's sign was radiologically identified. A laparoscopy demonstrated a fibrinous exudate in the left upper quadrant consistent with a walled off lesser curvature gastric perforation. A subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) demonstrated a healed gastric ulcer of benign appearance; however the pathology confirmed metastatic breast carcinoma. Literature review confirmed no previously reported cases of vinorelbine induced gastric perforation. Four cases of metastatic breast cancer with gastric metastasis presenting with perforation were identified; three of these cases (Fra et al., Presse Med 25(26):1215 (1996) [2], Solis-Caxaj et al., Gastroenterol Clin Biol 28(1):91-92 (2004) [3], Ghosn et al., Bull Cancer 78(11):1071-1073 (1991) [4]), were in the French medical literature, including one male patient (Fra et al., Presse Med 25(26):1215 (1996) [2]) and at least one ductal breast carcinoma (Solis-Caxaj et al., Gastroenterol Clin Biol 28(1):91-92 (2004) [3]). The fourth case (van Geel et al., Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 144(37):1761-1763 (2000) [5]), was in the Dutch medical literature and a lobular breast carcinoma. This case represents a rare complication of breast cancer chemotherapy, the subsequent significant benefit the patient received from treatment is consistent with the chemosensitivity to therapy that also resulted

  7. Vinorelbine as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A; Rabinovich, M G; Vallejo, C T; Perez, J E; Rodriguez, R; Cuevas, M A; Machiavelli, M; Lacava, J A; Langhi, M; Romero Acuña, L

    1994-02-01

    A phase II trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of vinorelbine (VNB) as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast carcinoma. Between August 1991 and February 1993, 45 patients with metastatic breast cancer were entered onto the study. Therapy consisted of VNB 30 mg/m2 diluted in 500 mL of normal saline administered as a 1-hour intravenous infusion. Injections were repeated weekly until evidence of progressive disease (PD) or severe toxicity developed. One patient was considered not assessable for response. An objective response (OR) was observed in 18 of 44 patients (41%; 95% confidence interval, 26% to 56%). Three patients (7%) had a complete response (CR) and 15 (34%) had a partial response (PR). The median time to treatment failure for the entire group was 6 months (range, 1 to 15), and the median duration of response was 9 months (range, 1 to 15). The median survival duration has not been reached yet. There were no treatment-related deaths. The dose-limiting toxicity was myelosuppression. Leukopenia occurred in 35 patients (78%) and was grade 3 or 4 in 16 (36%). Phlebitis was observed in 19 of 29 patients (66%) who did not have central implantable venous systems. Fifteen patients (33%) developed peripheral neurotoxicity. Myalgia occurred in 20 patients (44%). VNB is an active drug against metastatic breast cancer with moderate toxicity, which justifies further evaluation in association with other agents.

  8. Ifosfamide and vinorelbine as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, B A; Vallejo, C T; Romero, A O; Perez, J E; Cuevas, M A; Lacava, J A; Sabatini, C L; Dominguez, M E; Rodriguez, R; Barbieri, M R; Ortiz, E H; Salvadori, M A; Acuña, L A; Acuña, J M; Langhi, M J; Amato, S; Machiavelli, M R

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of ifosfamide (IFX) and vinorelbine (VNB) as first-line chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Between August 1993 and August 1995, 45 patients with untreated MBC received a regimen that consisted of IFX 2 g/m2 by 1-hour intravenous (i.v.) infusion on days 1 to 3, mesna 400 mg/m2 by i.v. bolus at hours 0 and 4 and 800 mg/m2 orally at hour 8 on days 1 to 3, and VNB 35 mg/m2 by 20-minute i.v. infusion on days 1 and 15. Courses were repeated every 28 days. During the first course only, half-dose VNB (17.5 mg/m2) was administered on days 8 and 22. The median age was 53 years and 30 patients (67%) were postmenopausal. Dominant sites of disease were soft tissue in nine patients, bone in seven, and visceral in 29. Objective responses (ORs) were recorded in 25 of 43 assessable patients (58%; 95% confidence interval, 43% to 73%). Complete remissions (CRs) occurred in six patients (14%) and partial remissions (PRs) in 19 (44%). No change (NC) was recorded in 10 patients (23%) and progressive disease (PD) in eight patients (19%). The median time to treatment failure was 12 months and the median survival duration 19 months. Myelosuppression was the limiting toxicity, mainly leukopenia in 32 patients (74%). In contrast, anemia and thrombocytopenia were mild. Other significant toxicities included peripheral neuropathy in nine patients (21%), constipation in 15 (35%), and myalgias in 11 (26%). IFX/VNB is an active combination against MBC with moderate toxicity and deserves further evaluation.

  9. Ifosfamide and vinorelbine as first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, C; Romero, A; Perez, J; Cuevas, M; Lacava, J; Sabatini, C; Dominguez, M; Rodriguez, R; Barbieri, M; Romero Acuña, L; Romero Acuña, J; Langhi, M; Amato, S; Salvadori, M; Ortiz, E; Machiavelli, M; Leone, B

    1996-12-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of the novel combination of ifosfamide (IFX) and vinorelbine (VNB) as first-line chemotherapy in patients with stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between March 1993 and November 1994, 44 patients (17 stage IIIB; 27 stage IV) received a regimen consisting of IFX, 2 g/m2 in a 1-h infusion, days 1-3; mesna, 400 mg/m2 in an i.v. bolus at hours 0 and 4 and 800 mg orally at hour 8, days 1-3; and VNB, 35 mg/ m2 in a 20-min infusion, days 1 and 15. During the first course only, a half dose of VNB (17.5 mg/m2) was administered on days 8 and 22. Courses were repeated every 28 days. Forty patients were fully evaluable for response, and 44 were assessable for toxicity. Objective regression was recorded in 13 of 40 patients (33%). No patient achieved a complete response. Thirteen patients presented a partial response (33%); 17 (42%) had no change; and progressive disease was observed in 10 (25%). The median duration of response was 10 months, and the median time to treatment failure for the whole group was 4 months. Median survival was 11 months. The dose-limiting toxic effect was myelosuppression. Leukopenia occurred in 25 patients (57%) and was grade 3 or 4 in 8 patients (18%). Twelve patients (27%) developed peripheral neurotoxicity, while five had mild IFX-induced CNS toxicity. Phlebitis was observed in 15 of 30 patients (50%) who did not have central implantable venous systems. The IFX-VNB combination exhibited an activity against NSCLC that was among the highest reported for non-cisplatin-containing regimens, with a toxicity profile that was easily managed.

  10. Vinorelbine as first-line or second-line therapy for advanced breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjer, Sven T; Ejlertsen, Bent; Mouridsen, Henning

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study was conducted to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of intravenous vinorelbine and on the determined dose to assess efficacy and safety in patients with metastatic breast cancer previously treated with epirubicin. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients had histologically...... proven breast cancer and had received a prior epirubicin based regimen either adjuvant or as first line therapy for advanced disease. Vinorelbine was administered intravenously day 1 and 8 in a 3 weeks' schedule. Subsequently 48 additional patients were treated at one dose-level below MTD. RESULTS: Fifty...

  11. Metronome rate and walking foot contact time in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Ruth; Plax, Michael

    2012-02-01

    It is assumed that when people walk guided by an audible constant rate, they match foot contact to the external pace. The purpose of this preliminary study was to test that assumption by examining the temporal relationship between audible signals generated by a metronome and foot contact time during gait. Ten healthy young women were tested in walking repetitions guided by metronome rates of 60, 110, and 150 beats/min. Metronome beats and foot contact times were collected in real time. The findings indicated that foot contact was not fully synchronized with the auditory signals; the shortest time interval between the metronome beat and foot contact time was at the prescribed rate of 60 beats/min., while the longest interval was at the rate of 150 beats/min. The correlation between left and right foot contact times was highest with the slowest rate and lowest with the fastest rate.

  12. Head and neck cancer: metronomic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents a critical oncologic topic. Conventional chemotherapy regimens consist of drugs administration in cycles near or at the maximum tolerated dose (MDT), followed by a long drug-free period to permit the patient to recover from acute toxicities. Despite this strategy is successful in controlling the cancer process at the beginning, a significant number of HNSCC patients tend to recurred or progress, especially those patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease. The repertoire of drugs directed against tumor cells has greatly increased and metronomic chemotherapy (MC) could be an effective treatment option. It is the purpose of this article to review the concept of MC and describe its potential use in HNSCC. We provide an update of ongoing progress and current challenges related to this issue

  13. Metronomic Cyclophosphamide and Methotrexate Chemotherapy Combined with 1E10 Anti-Idiotype Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano, J.L.; Batista, N.; Lima, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Garcia, R.; Zarza, Y.; Lopez, M.V.; Rodriguez, M.; Loys, J.L.; Montejo, N.; Santiesteban, E.; Aguirre, F.; Macias, A.; Vazquez, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of low doses of cytotoxic agents continuously for prolonged periods is an alternative for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who have developed resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The combination of metronomic chemotherapy with therapeutic vaccines might increase the efficacy of the treatment. Twenty one patients with metastatic breast cancer in progression and a Karnosky index =60%, were treated with metronomic chemotherapy (50?mg of cyclophosphamide orally daily and 2.5 mg of methotrexate orally bi-daily), in combination with five bi-weekly subcutaneous injections of 1 mg of aluminum hydroxide-precipitated 1E10 anti-idiotype MAb (1E10-Alum), followed by re immunizations every 28 days. Five patients achieved objective response, eight showed stable disease and eight had disease progression. Median time to progression was 9,8 months, while median overall survival time was 12,93 months. The median duration of the response (CR+PR+SD) was 18,43 months (12,20-24,10 months), being higher than 12 months in 76,9% of the patients. Overall toxicity was generally mild. Metronomic chemotherapy combined with 1E10-Alum vaccine immunotherapy might be a useful therapeutic option for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer due to its potential impact on survival and patient quality of live, low toxicity and advantages of the administration.

  14. Metronomic capecitabine in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma unresponsive to or ineligible for sorafenib treatment: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Sara; Granito, Alessandro; Piscaglia, Fabio; Renzulli, Matteo; Stagni, Angela; Bolondi, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, is the only systemic agent proven to be effective in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). There are no approved second line systemic therapies in patients who have had disease progression on or are not eligible to sorafenib. We describe two cases of unresectable HCC that were treated with low, "metronomic" doses of capecitabine. In the first patient, capecitabine was used after sorafenib failure. In the second case, treatment with capecitabine was attempted since the patient was considered not eligible for sorafenib due to spontaneous hepatic bleeding of a large HCC lesion. Treatment was effective and well tolerated in both patients with long-lasting objective responses. Lacking established second-line therapy, metronomic capecitabine may be a valid alternative in the treatment of HCC patients who are judged not eligible for sorafenib or those having progression disease on sorafenib.

  15. Vinorelbine and gemcitabine vs vinorelbine and carboplatin as first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC. A phase III randomised controlled trial by the Norwegian Lung Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløtten, Ø; Grønberg, B H; Bremnes, R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but earlier studies have suggested that non-platinum combinations are equally effective and better tolerated. We conducted a national, randomised study to compare...... a non-platinum with a platinum combination. METHODS: Eligible patients had stage IIIB/IV NSCLC and performance status (PS) 0-2. Patients received up to three cycles of vinorelbine 60 mg m(-2) p.o.+gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) i.v. day 1 and 8 (VG) or vinorelbine 60 mg m(-2) p.o. day 1 and 8+carboplatin...... was 65 years, 58% were men and 25% had PS 2. Median survival was VG: 6.3 months; VC: 7.0 months, P=0.802. Vinorelbine plus carboplatin patients had more grade III/IV nausea/vomiting (VG: 4%, VC: 12%, P=0.008) and grade IV neutropenia (VG: 7%, VC: 19%, P

  16. Use of a Metronome in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Elise; Cohen, Naiomi; Maniaci, Vincenzo; Pena, Barbara; Lozano, Juan Manuel; Linares, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Determine whether the use of a metronome improves chest compression rate and depth during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on a pediatric manikin. A prospective, simulation-based, crossover, randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants included pediatric residents, fellows, nurses, and medical students who were randomly assigned to perform chest compressions on a pediatric manikin with and without an audible metronome. Each participant performed 2 rounds of 2 minutes of chest compressions separated by a 15-minute break. A total of 155 participants performed 2 rounds of chest compressions (74 with the metronome on during the first round and 81 with the metronome on during the second round of CPR). There was a significant improvement in the mean percentage of compressions delivered within an adequate rate (90-100 compressions per minute) with the metronome on compared with off (72% vs 50%; mean difference [MD] 22%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 15% to 29%). No significant difference was noted in the mean percentage of compressions within acceptable depth (38-51 mm) (72% vs 70%; MD 2%; 95% CI, -2% to 6%). The metronome had a larger effect among medical students (73% vs 55%; MD 18%; 95% CI, 8% to 28%) and pediatric residents and fellows (84% vs 48%; MD 37%; 95% CI, 27% to 46%) but not among pediatric nurses (46% vs 48%; MD -3%; 95% CI, -19% to 14%). The rate of chest compressions during CPR can be optimized by the use of a metronome. These findings will help medical professionals comply with the American Heart Association guidelines. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Effects of MRI-assayed microvascular permeability on the accumulation of vinorelbine in xenograft tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raatschen, H.J.; Fu, Y.; Rogut, V.; Brasch, R.C.; Simon, G.H.; Sennino, B.; Wolf, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of MRI-assayed vascular leakiness on the delivery of macro-molecular therapeutics to tumors. Materials and Methods: MDA-MB 435 tumors, subcutaneously implanted into nude rats were treated with a single dose of bevacizumab at levels of 0.1 mg (n = 5) or 1.0 mg (n = 10) or received saline (control animals, n = 8). After 24 hours, albumin-(Gd-DTPA) 30 -enhanced MRI was performed. Just prior to MRI, the cytotoxic drug vinorelbine was administered intravenously. Upon completion of the MR experiment, tumor vinorelbine concentrations were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Vascular leakiness (K PS ) was calculated based on the MRI data using a pharmacokinetic model. Results: K PS was calculated as 3.70 ± 1.12 (control tumors), 1.95 ± 0.70 (0.1 mg group) and 0.75 ± 0.46 μl min -1 cm -3 (1.0 mg group). K PS was significantly higher in the control group compared to the 1.0 mg bevacizumab group. Vinorelbine concentrations were measured as 409.4 ± 109.7 (control tumors), 387.5 ± 47.5 (0.1 mg group) and 250.7 ± 71.9 (1.0 mg group). These differences were not significant. A moderate and significant correlation was found between K PS and Vinorelbine concentrations in tumors (r = 0.49, p PS based on dynamic MRI enhanced by albumin-(Gd-DTPA) 30 correlated significantly with vinorelbine accumulation in experimental xenograft tumors under angiogenesis inhibition. Thus, the MRI technique applied in our study could potentially help to predict accumulation of macromolecular cytotoxic drugs and to optimize individual therapeutic regimes in tumors. (orig.)

  18. A higher chest compression rate may be necessary for metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; You, Je Sung; Cho, Young Soon; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol

    2012-01-01

    Metronome guidance is a simple and economical feedback system for guiding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, a recent study showed that metronome guidance reduced the depth of chest compression. The results of previous studies suggest that a higher chest compression rate is associated with a better CPR outcome as compared with a lower chest compression rate, irrespective of metronome use. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that a lower chest compression rate promotes a reduction in chest compression depth in the recent study rather than metronome use itself. One minute of chest compression-only CPR was performed following the metronome sound played at 1 of 4 different rates: 80, 100, 120, and 140 ticks/min. Average compression depths (ACDs) and duty cycles were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance, and the values in the absence and presence of metronome guidance were compared. Both the ACD and duty cycle increased when the metronome rate increased (P = .017, metronome rates of 80 and 100 ticks/min were significantly lower than those for the procedures without metronome guidance. The ACD and duty cyle for chest compression increase as the metronome rate increases during metronome-guided CPR. A higher rate of chest compression is necessary for metronome-guided CPR to prevent suboptimal quality of chest compression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of vascular normalization in benefit from metronomic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpekris, Fotios; Baish, James W; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Jain, Rakesh K

    2017-02-21

    Metronomic dosing of chemotherapy-defined as frequent administration at lower doses-has been shown to be more efficacious than maximum tolerated dose treatment in preclinical studies, and is currently being tested in the clinic. Although multiple mechanisms of benefit from metronomic chemotherapy have been proposed, how these mechanisms are related to one another and which one is dominant for a given tumor-drug combination is not known. To this end, we have developed a mathematical model that incorporates various proposed mechanisms, and report here that improved function of tumor vessels is a key determinant of benefit from metronomic chemotherapy. In our analysis, we used multiple dosage schedules and incorporated interactions among cancer cells, stem-like cancer cells, immune cells, and the tumor vasculature. We found that metronomic chemotherapy induces functional normalization of tumor blood vessels, resulting in improved tumor perfusion. Improved perfusion alleviates hypoxia, which reprograms the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment toward immunostimulation and improves drug delivery and therapeutic outcomes. Indeed, in our model, improved vessel function enhanced the delivery of oxygen and drugs, increased the number of effector immune cells, and decreased the number of regulatory T cells, which in turn killed a larger number of cancer cells, including cancer stem-like cells. Vessel function was further improved owing to decompression of intratumoral vessels as a result of increased killing of cancer cells, setting up a positive feedback loop. Our model enables evaluation of the relative importance of these mechanisms, and suggests guidelines for the optimal use of metronomic therapy.

  20. PROGRAMMABLE METRONOME FOR PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS AND AN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Selçuk Selek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of electronics in the music industry have been increasing continuosly. Develpoments in electro music and electro music instruments make this possible. Although it is known that the majority of musicians are against the digital music and techniques, researches show that it would be very benefical for teaching and learning of playing music intruments. This study shows that, music and electronic applications can be useable with together in the same projects. With this equipment people can practice on their own percussion studies. System designed as, speed and hit force in case of faulty users can be warned by program. Warning can be reailized as a visual with LED and also can be done with sound. In this study, at the same time shows that, without using physical metronome, metronome software and designed card can use at applications is may be possible. Based on the study is a software metronome and its card which can be used for all musical intruments. Designed metronome was tested for a electronic drum with a compare circuit. PIC-C compiler was used in order to get the designed card to work compatible with PIC. The circuit designed for the metronome is integrated with compare circuit and has been tested together.

  1. Vinorelbine as neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacava, J A; Leone, B A; Machiavelli, M; Romero, A O; Perez, J E; Elem, Y L; Ferreyra, R; Focaccia, G; Suttora, G; Salvadori, M A; Cuevas, M A; Acuña, L R; Acuña, J R; Langhi, M; Amato, S; Castaldi, J; Arroyo, A; Vallejo, C T

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of vinorelbine (VNB) as single-agent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced cervical carcinoma (ACC). Between December 1993 and October 1995, 43 untreated patients with stages IIB to IVA squamous cell cervical cancer were entered onto this study. Forty-two patients are assessable for response and 43 for toxicity. The median age was 46 years (range, 28 to 65). Distribution by stages (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO]) was as follows: IIB, 18 patients; IIIA, one; IIIB, 19; and IVA, five. Therapy consisted of VNB 30 mg/m2 by 20-minute intravenous (IV) infusion repeated weekly for 12 injections and followed by radical surgery if feasible or definitive radiotherapy. Both staging and response assessment were performed by a multidisciplinary team. One patient was considered not assessable for response. A total of 493 cycles of therapy were administered and objective remissions were observed in 19 of 42 patients (45%; 95% confidence interval, 30% to 60%). Two patients (5%) had a complete response (CR) and 17 (40%) a partial response (PR); no change (NC) was observed in 16 (38%) and progressive disease (PD) in seven (17%). Six of 19 patients (32%) who achieved objective responses (ORs) underwent surgery. The median time to failure and median survival time have not been reached yet. There were no therapy-related deaths. The dose-limiting toxicity was myelosuppression. Leukopenia occurred in 35 patients (81%) and was grade 3 or 4 in seven (17%). Twelve patients (28%) developed peripheral neuropathy, while myalgias occurred in 10 (23%). Constipation was observed in nine patients (21%), one with a prolonged ileum. Phlebitis was recorded in 18 patients (41%). In contrast, emesis and mucositis were rarely observed. No patient developed alopecia grade 3. By the end of the twelfth course of treatment, the average received dose-intensity was 85.4% of that projected. VNB is an active drug against ACC with moderate

  2. A Meta-Analysis of Platinum Plus Gemcitabine or Vinorelbine for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui GAO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Platinum plus the third-generation agent doublet chemotherapy is the standard regimens and first line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of this study is to determine the benefits and harms of platinum plus gemcitabine or vinorelbine for advanced NSCLC. Methods Thedatabases PubMed, CENTRAL, EMBASE and Chinese Biomedical Literature database were retrieved by using the key words "non small cell lung cancer" or "Carcinoma, Non Small Cell Lung" so as to search the studies about the randomized controlled clinical trials (RCT that had compared the gemcitabine plus platinum versus vinorelbine plus platinum for advanced NSCLC. A meta-analysis was conducted. Results Nine randomized controlled trials, with total 2 186 patients,were included. The overall response rate and one-year survival rate of the gemcitabine group were not significantly different from that of vinorelbine regimen (RR=0.91, 95%CI: 0.81-1.03, P =0.15; RR=1.06, 95%CI: 0.96-1.18, P =0.27, respectively. The incidence rate of grade 3-4 netropenia, constipation, phlebitis and grade 1-4 neuropathy were higher in vinorelbine group, just like higher incidence rate of grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia in the gemcitabine group. Conclusion The curative effects of the gemcitabine or vinorelbine plus platinum regimens are similar. The choice of gemcitabine or vinorelbine depends on the toxicity of the drugs and patients' tolerance.

  3. Effect of metronome rates on the quality of bag-mask ventilation during metronome-guided 30:2 cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A randomized simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Ji Ung; Han, Sang Kuk; Choi, Pil Cho; Shin, Dong Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    Metronome guidance is a feasible and effective feedback technique to improve the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The rate of the metronome should be set between 100 to 120 ticks/minute and the speed of ventilation may have crucial effect on the quality of ventilation. We compared three different metronome rates (100, 110, 120 ticks/minute) to investigate its effect on the quality of ventilation during metronome-guided 30:2 CPR. This is a prospective, randomized, crossover observational study using a RespiTrainer○ r . To simulate 30 chest compressions, one investigator counted from 1 to 30 in cadence with the metronome rate (1 count for every 1 tick), and the participant performed 2 consecutive ventilations immediately following the counting of 30. Thirty physicians performed 5 sets of 2 consecutive (total 10) bag-mask ventilations for each metronome rate. Participants were instructed to squeeze the bag over 2 ticks (1.0 to 1.2 seconds depending on the rate of metronome) and deflate the bag over 2 ticks. The sequence of three different metronome rates was randomized. Mean tidal volume significantly decreased as the metronome rate was increased from 110 ticks/minute to 120 ticks/minute (343±84 mL vs. 294±90 mL, P =0.004). Peak airway pressure significantly increased as metronome rate increased from 100 ticks/minute to 110 ticks/minute (18.7 vs. 21.6 mmHg, P =0.006). In metronome-guided 30:2 CPR, a higher metronome rate may adversely affect the quality of bag-mask ventilations. In cases of cardiac arrest where adequate ventilation support is necessary, 100 ticks/minute may be better than 110 or 120 ticks/minute to deliver adequate tidal volume during audio tone guided 30:2 CPR.

  4. Baicalein attenuates vinorelbine-induced vascular endothelial cell injury and chemotherapeutic phlebitis in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Gang-Feng [Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053 (China); Shi, Wei-Wen [Zhejiang Medical Science and Education Development Center, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Yu, Chen-Huan; Jin, Xiao-Yin; Zhang, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Wen-You [Key Laboratory of Experimental Animal and Safety Evaluation, Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences, Hangzhou 310013 (China); Wang, Lu-Chen [Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053 (China); Yu, Bing, E-mail: Jellycook2002@163.com [Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053 (China)

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major strategies for cancer treatment. Several antineoplastic drugs including vinorelbine (VRB) are commonly intravenously infused and liable to cause serious phlebitis. The therapeutic drugs for preventing this complication are limited. In this study, the mechanism of baicalein (BCN) was investigated on VRB-induced phlebitis in vivo and vascular endothelial cell injury in vitro. Treatment with BCN obviously attenuated vascular endothelial cell loss, edema, inflammatory cell infiltration and blood clots, and reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and ICAM-1 in the rabbit model of phlebitis induced by intravenous injection of VRB compared with vehicle. Further tests in vitro demonstrated that BCN lessened VRB-induced endothelial cell apoptosis, decreased intracellular ROS levels, suppressed phosphorylation of p38 and eventually inhibited activation of NF-κB signaling pathway. And these effects could be reversed by p38 agonist P79350. These results suggested that BCN exerted the protective effects against VRB-induced endothelial disruption in the rabbit model of phlebitis via inhibition of intracellular ROS generation and inactivation of p38/NF-κB pathway, leading to the decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, BCN could be used as a potential agent for the treatment of phlebitis. - Highlights: • Baicalein attenuated vinorelbine-induced vascular endothelial cell apoptosis. • Baicalein inhibited vinorelbine-induced oxidative stress in HUVECs. • Baicalein inhibited activation of p38/NF-κB signaling. • Baicalein attenuated vinorelbine-induced phlebitis and inflammation in rabbits.

  5. Baicalein attenuates vinorelbine-induced vascular endothelial cell injury and chemotherapeutic phlebitis in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Gang-Feng; Shi, Wei-Wen; Yu, Chen-Huan; Jin, Xiao-Yin; Zhang, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Wen-You; Wang, Lu-Chen; Yu, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major strategies for cancer treatment. Several antineoplastic drugs including vinorelbine (VRB) are commonly intravenously infused and liable to cause serious phlebitis. The therapeutic drugs for preventing this complication are limited. In this study, the mechanism of baicalein (BCN) was investigated on VRB-induced phlebitis in vivo and vascular endothelial cell injury in vitro. Treatment with BCN obviously attenuated vascular endothelial cell loss, edema, inflammatory cell infiltration and blood clots, and reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and ICAM-1 in the rabbit model of phlebitis induced by intravenous injection of VRB compared with vehicle. Further tests in vitro demonstrated that BCN lessened VRB-induced endothelial cell apoptosis, decreased intracellular ROS levels, suppressed phosphorylation of p38 and eventually inhibited activation of NF-κB signaling pathway. And these effects could be reversed by p38 agonist P79350. These results suggested that BCN exerted the protective effects against VRB-induced endothelial disruption in the rabbit model of phlebitis via inhibition of intracellular ROS generation and inactivation of p38/NF-κB pathway, leading to the decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, BCN could be used as a potential agent for the treatment of phlebitis. - Highlights: • Baicalein attenuated vinorelbine-induced vascular endothelial cell apoptosis. • Baicalein inhibited vinorelbine-induced oxidative stress in HUVECs. • Baicalein inhibited activation of p38/NF-κB signaling. • Baicalein attenuated vinorelbine-induced phlebitis and inflammation in rabbits.

  6. Vinorelbine and paclitaxel for locoregional advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Juan E; Machiavelli, Mario R; Romero, Alberto O; Romero Acuña, Luis A; Domínguez, María E; Fasce, Hebe; Flores Acosta, Luis; Marrone, Nora; Romero Acuña, Juan M; Langhi, Mario J; Amato, Sonia; Bologna, Fabrina; Ortiz, Eduardo H; Leone, Bernardo A; Lacava, Juan A; Vallejo, Carlos T

    2002-08-01

    A phase II trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the novel combination of vinorelbine and paclitaxel as first-line chemotherapy in patients with stages IIIB and IV non-small-cell lung cancer. From January 1997 to September 1999, 34 patients (9 stage IIIB and 25 stage IV) received a regimen consisting of the following: vinorelbine 30 mg/m2 20 minutes intravenous (i.v.) infusion, days 1 and 8; and paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 3-hour i.v. (starting 1 hour after vinorelbine) on day 1. Cycles were repeated every 28 days until progression of disease or unacceptable toxicity development. The median age was 57 years (range 41-70 years); median performance status was 1. Histology was as follows: squamous cell in 24 (71%), large cell in 1 (3%), and adenocarcinoma in 9 (26%). All patients are evaluable for toxicity, whereas 30 are evaluable for response (4 patients refused treatment). Objective response was recorded in 4 of 30 patients (13%, 95% CI 1-25%). No complete response was observed. Partial response was recorded in 4 patients (13%), no change in 10 patients (34%), and progressive disease in 16 patients (53%). The median time to treatment failure was 4 months and median survival was 9 months. The limiting toxicity was myelosuppression: leukopenia in 23 patients (68%), whereas neutropenia was observed in 25 patients (78%). Peripheral neurotoxicity developed in 14 patients (41%) (without G3 or G4 episodes), and constipation (G1-G2: 10 patients), myalgia (G1-G2: 11 patients), diarrhea (G1-G2: 7 patients), and stomatitis were observed in 7 patients. Vinorelbine-paclitaxel combination showed only modest activity against locoregionally advanced or metastatic NSCLC.

  7. A Preliminary Study: Is the Metronome Harmful or Helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Patricia; Khuu, Sieu; Blom, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The metronome is a frequently used time-keeping tool in music instrument practice. However, if its speed is set beyond a comfortable level for the performer, their eye movement (EM) patterns can betray pressure that might have been placed on the visual processing system. The patterns of the eyes moving forward or back, (saccades); when the eye…

  8. Effect of interactive metronome training on children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, R J; Jacokes, L E; Cassily, J F; Greenspan, S I; Tuchman, R F; Stemmer, P J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a specific intervention, the Interactive Metronome, on selected aspects of motor and cognitive skills in a group of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study included 56 boys who were 6years to 12 years of age and diagnosed before they entered the study as having ADHD. The participants were pretested and randomly assigned to one of three matched groups. A group of 19 participants receiving 15 hr of Interactive Metronome training exercises were compared with a group receiving no intervention and a group receiving training on selected computer video games. A significant pattern of improvement across 53 of 58 variables favoring the Interactive Metronome treatment was found. Additionally, several significant differences were found among the treatment groups and between pretreatment and posttreatment factors on performance in areas of attention, motor control, language processing, reading, and parental reports of improvements in regulation of aggressive behavior. The Interactive Metronome training appears to facilitate a number of capacities, including attention, motor control, and selected academic skills, in boys with ADHD.

  9. Comfortable synchronization of cyclic drawing movements with a metronome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, Bruno H

    2011-02-01

    Continuous circle drawing is considered a paragon of emergent timing, whereas the timing of finger tapping is said to be event-based. Synchronization with a metronome, however, must to some extent be event-based for both types of movement. Because the target events in the movement trajectory are more poorly defined in circle drawing than in tapping, circle drawing shows more variable asynchronies with a metronome than does tapping. One factor that may have contributed to high variability in past studies is that circle size, drawing direction, and target point were prescribed and perhaps outside the comfort range. In the present study, participants were free to choose most comfortable settings of these parameters for two continuously drawn shapes, circles and infinity signs, while synchronizing with a regular or intermittently perturbed metronome at four different tempi. Results showed that preferred circle sizes were generally smaller than in previous studies but tended to increase as tempo decreased. Synchronization results were similar for circles and infinity signs, and similar to earlier results for circles drawn within a fixed template (Repp & Steinman, 2010). Comparison with tapping data still showed drawing to exhibit much greater variability and persistence of asynchronies as well as slower phase correction in response to phase shifts in the metronome. With comfort level ruled out as a factor, these differences can now be attributed more confidently to differences in event definition and/or movement dynamics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. High RRM1 Expression Is Associated with Adverse Outcome in Patients with Cisplatin/Vinorelbine-treated Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimling, Zarah Glad; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Bech, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: A possible predictive impact of ribonucleotide-reductase subunit-1 (RRM1) on vinorelbine efficacy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been previously reported. The present study aimed to further explore this finding in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). MATERIALS AND METH......BACKGROUND/AIM: A possible predictive impact of ribonucleotide-reductase subunit-1 (RRM1) on vinorelbine efficacy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been previously reported. The present study aimed to further explore this finding in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). MATERIALS...

  11. On the synchronization of two metronomes and their related dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, J. C.; Brennan, M. J.; Tang, B.

    2016-09-01

    Synchronization was first reported by Christiaan Huygens in 1665 when he observed anti-phase synchronization achieved by two pendulum clocks hanging on a common base. Since then researchers have tried to understand the results reported by Huygens using their own ways to reproduce his experiment and applying several methods of analysis. Each researcher has reported different results, even compared with those reported by Huygens. In this paper a simple model is proposed to study in-phase and anti-phase synchronization of two metronomes based on a normal mode analysis using van der Pol oscillators. The instantaneous frequency of the responses from both simulations and experimental data is used in the analysis. Unlike previous studies, measurements are made using videos and the time domain responses of the metronomes extracted by means of tracking software. Plots showing how the initial conditions lead to both synchronization states are also presented.

  12. Single agent vinorelbine in pediatric patients with progressive optic pathway glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellano, Andrea Maria; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio; da Silva, Nasjla Saba; Silva, Frederico Adolfo; Paiva, Priscila Mendes; Cavalheiro, Sergio; Bouffet, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The management of progressive unresectable low-grade glioma remains controversial. Treatment options have included radiotherapy, and more recently chemotherapy, usually following an initial period of observation. Within this context, we evaluated vinorelbine, a semi-synthetic vinca alkaloid that has shown evidence of activity against glioma. From July 2007 an institutional protocol with vinorelbine (30 mg/m(2) days 0, 8, 22) for a total of 18 cycles, has been conducted at IOP/GRAACC/UNIFESP for children with optic pathway glioma (OPG). The main objectives were clinical and radiological response, as well as toxicity profile. Twenty-three patients with progressive OPG with a mean age of 69 months (4-179) were enrolled. Three patients had a diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1. Twenty-two patients were assessable for response with an overall objective response rate of 63 %, with eight patients showing stable disease. The most important toxicity was hematologic (grade III/IV neutropenia) observed in four patients. Gastrointestinal toxicity (grade I/II vomiting) was observed in seven patients and only 1 patient showed grade I peripheral neuropathy. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 33 months (6.9-69) with a 3 and 5 year PFS of 64 ± 19 and 37 ± 20 %, respectively, for an overall 3 and 5 year-survival of 95 ± 10 %. This study suggests that vinorelbine may be an interesting option for pediatric low-grade gliomas, showing low toxicity profile and providing a good quality of life for patients with such chronic disease.

  13. Validating a visual version of the metronome response task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, Patrick; Seli, Paul; Smilek, Daniel

    2018-02-12

    The metronome response task (MRT)-a sustained-attention task that requires participants to produce a response in synchrony with an audible metronome-was recently developed to index response variability in the context of studies on mind wandering. In the present studies, we report on the development and validation of a visual version of the MRT (the visual metronome response task; vMRT), which uses the rhythmic presentation of visual, rather than auditory, stimuli. Participants completed the vMRT (Studies 1 and 2) and the original (auditory-based) MRT (Study 2) while also responding to intermittent thought probes asking them to report the depth of their mind wandering. The results showed that (1) individual differences in response variability during the vMRT are highly reliable; (2) prior to thought probes, response variability increases with increasing depth of mind wandering; (3) response variability is highly consistent between the vMRT and the original MRT; and (4) both response variability and depth of mind wandering increase with increasing time on task. Our results indicate that the original MRT findings are consistent across the visual and auditory modalities, and that the response variability measured in both tasks indexes a non-modality-specific tendency toward behavioral variability. The vMRT will be useful in the place of the MRT in experimental contexts in which researchers' designs require a visual-based primary task.

  14. Concurrent versus Sequential Chemoradiotherapy with Cisplatin and Vinorelbine in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Randomized Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zatloukal, P.; Petruželka, L.; Zemanová, M.; Havel, L.; Janků, F.; Judas, L.; Kubík, A.; Křepela, E.; Fiala, P.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 46, - (2004), s. 87-98 ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : concurrent chemoradiotherapy * sequential chemoradiotherapy * locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer * cisplatin * vinorelbine Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.914, year: 2004

  15. Low ERCC1 expression in malignant pleural mesotheliomas treated with cisplatin and vinorelbine predicts prolonged progression-free survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimling, Zarah Glad; Sørensen, Jens Benn; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) expression and outcome, in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), treated with cisplatin/vinorelbine combination-therapy, was retrospectively evaluated in a patient population from a previously published...

  16. Hemiparetic stepping to the beat: asymmetric response to metronome phase shift during treadmill gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Trudy A; Johannsen, Leif; Huiya Chen; Wing, Alan M

    2010-06-01

    Walking in time with a metronome is associated with improved spatiotemporal parameters in hemiparetic gait; however, the mechanism linking auditory and motor systems is poorly understood. Hemiparetic cadence control with metronome synchronization was examined to determine specific influences of metronome timing on treadmill walking. A within-participant experiment examined correction processes used to maintain heel strike synchrony with the beat by applying perturbations to the timing of a metronome. Eight chronic hemiparetic participants (mean age = 70 years; standard deviation = 12) were required to synchronize heel strikes with metronome pulses set according to each individual's comfortable speed (mean 0.4 m/s). During five 100-pulse trials, a fixed-phase baseline was followed by 4 unpredictable metronome phase shifts (20% of the interpulse interval), which amounted to 10 phase shifts on each foot. Infrared cameras recorded the motion of bilateral heel markers at 120 Hz. Relative asynchrony between heel strike responses and metronome pulses was used to index compensation for metronome phase shifts. Participants demonstrated compensation for phase shifts with convergence back to pre-phase shift asynchrony. This was significantly slower when the error occurred on the nonparetic side (requiring initial correction with the paretic limb) compared with when the error occurred on the paretic side (requiring initial nonparetic correction). Although phase correction of gait is slowed when the phase shift is delivered to the nonparetic side compared with the paretic side, phase correction is still present. This may underlie the utility of rhythmic auditory cueing in hemiparetic gait rehabilitation.

  17. Interactive Metronome Training in Children with Attention Deficit and Developmental Coordination Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosper, Sharon M.; Lee, Gregory P.; Peters, Susan Beth; Bishop, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of Interactive Metronome (Interactive Metronome, Sunrise, Florida, USA) training in a group of children with mixed attentional and motor coordination disorders to further explore which subcomponents of attentional control and motor functioning the training influences. Twelve children who had…

  18. Impact of Metronomic UFT/Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy and Antiangiogenic Drug Assessed in a New Preclinical Model of Locally Advanced Orthotopic Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence C. Tang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is an intrinsically chemotherapy refractory malignancy. Development of effective therapeutic regimens would be facilitated by improved preclinical HCC models. Currently, most models consist of subcutaneous human tumor transplants in immunodeficient mice; however, these do not reproduce the extensive liver disease associated with HCC or metastasize. To address this deficiency, we developed an orthotopic model. Human HCC cells were transfected with the gene encoding secretable β-subunit human choriogonadotropin (β-hCG, which was used as a surrogate marker of tumor burden. The HCC cells were implanted into the left liver lobe of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice, after which the efficacy of different therapies was evaluated on established, but liver-confined human Hep3B cell line HCC. Treatments included sorafenib or metronomic chemotherapy using cyclophosphamide (CTX, UFT, an oral 5-fluorouracil prodrug, or doxorubicin either alone or in various combinations, with or without an antiangiogenic agent, DC101, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antibody. Sorafenib inhibited tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner but caused severe weight loss in SCID mice, thus necessitating use of DC101 in subsequent experiments. Although less toxicity was observed using either single or doublet metronomic chemotherapy without any added antiangiogenic agent, none, provided survival benefit. In contrast, significantly improved overall survival was observed using various combinations of metronomic chemotherapy regimens such as UFT + CTX with DC101. In conclusion, using this model of liver-confined but advanced HCC suggests that the efficacy of a targeted antiangiogenic drug or metronomic chemotherapy can be mutually enhanced by concurrent combination treatment.

  19. Vinorelbine plus 3-weekly trastuzumab in metastatic breast cancer: a single-centre phase 2 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staiano Maria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After two studies reporting response rates higher than 70% in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer with weekly trastuzumab and vinorelbine, we planned a phase 2 study to test activity of the same combination, with trastuzumab given every 3 weeks. Methods Patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (3+ at immunohistochemistry or positive at fluorescence in situ hybridization, PS ≤2, normal left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and no more than one chemotherapy line for metastatic disease were eligible. Vinorelbine (30 mg/m2 was given on days 1&8 every 21 and trastuzumab (8 mg/kg day 1, then 6 mg/kg every 21 days. A single-stage phase 2 design, with p0 = 0.45, p1 = 0.65, type I and II error = 0.10, was applied; 22 objective responses were required in 39 patients. Results From Nov 2002 to May 2005, 50 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 54 years (range 31–81. Among 40 patients eligible for response assessment, there were 7 complete and 13 partial responses (overall response rate 50%; 95% exact CI 33.8–66.2; 11 patients had disease stabilization, lasting more than 6 months in 10 cases. Response rate did not vary according to patients and tumor characteristics, type and amount of previous chemotherapy. Within the whole series, median progression-free survival was 9.6 months (95% CI 7.3–12.3, median overall survival 22.7 months (95% CI 19.5-NA. Fifteen patients (30% developed brain metastases at a median time of 12 months (range 1–25. There was one toxic death due to renal failure in a patient receiving concomitant pamidronate. Twenty-three patients (46% had grade 3–4 neutropenia, 2 (4% grade 3 anemia, 4 (8% febrile neutropenia. Two patients stopped treatment because of grade 2 decline of LVEF and one patient because of grade 2 liver toxicity concomitant with a grade 1 decline of LVEF. One patient stopped trastuzumab after 50 cycles because of grade 1 decline of LVEF. Conclusion Although lower

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab Administered in a Single Infusion Bag, Followed by Vinorelbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Michael; López-Vega, José M; Petit, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    two and nine). The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR) in patients with measurable disease. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS) and safety. RESULTS: Cohort 2 enrolled 107 patients. The ORR was 63.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 53.0-73.6) in patients...... suggestive of congestive heart failure. CONCLUSION: These results support the feasibility of pertuzumab and trastuzumab co-infusion from a safety perspective and support Cohort 1 conclusions that vinorelbine offers an alternative chemotherapy companion for pertuzumab and trastuzumab. The Oncologist 2017......;22:1160-1168 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Combined treatment with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel is the standard of care for first-line HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. However, some patients cannot, or choose not to, receive docetaxel. VELVET Cohort 2 results support the results from Cohort 1 that suggest...

  1. Vinorelbine-Cyclophosphamide compared to cyclophosphamide in peripheral blood stem cell mobilization for multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Sanjay; Chen, Yunxin; Lin, Adeline; Soh, Teck Guan; Ooi, Melissa; Yap, Eng Soo; Donato, Lara Kristina Sioco; Halim, Nurul Aidah Abdul; Mah, Joanna; Lim, Karen; Poon, Li Mei; Tan, Belinda; Yelly; Lim, Hui Li; Koh, Liang Piu; Tai, Bee Choo; Chen, Zhaojin; Chng, Wee Joo; Gopalakrishnan, Satish Kumar; Tan, Lip Kun

    2018-04-23

    High dose Cyclophosphamide (Cy) and Vinorelbine Cyclophosphamide (Vino-Cy) are stem cell (SC) mobilisation options for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We present a comparison of mobilisation outcomes using these regimens. Vino-Cy patients received Vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 on day 1, cyclophosphamide 1500 mg/m 2 on day 2, and pegylated GCSF on day 4 or GCSF 10 mcg/kg/day from day 4 onwards. Cy patients were given cyclophosphamide 4000 mg/m 2 on day 1 and GCSF10 mcg/kg/day from day 5 onwards. The target CD34 + SC collection was 5 × 10 6  per kg/BW. 149 patients were included. SC collection was lower in the Vino-Cy group (8.20 × 10 6 /Kg BW) compared to the Cy group (11.43 × 10 6 /Kg BW), with adjusted geometric mean ratio of 0.59 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.86, p = 0.006). Time taken to achieve an adequate PB SC count was shorter for Vino-Cy (9 ± 1 day compared to 12 ± 2 days for Cy, adjusted absolute mean difference -3.95, 95% CI -4.85 to -3.06, P < .001). Mobilisation related toxicities (in particular, neutropaenic fever) were greater for Cy. Vino-Cy is a potential alternative to Cy given the need for effective mobilisation protocols with acceptable toxicity. Copyright © 2018 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A phase II study using vinorelbine and continuous 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Susanne; Serup-Hansen, Eva; Andersen, Lisbeth J

    2007-01-01

    Seventy patients with advanced head and neck cancer were treated with vinorelbine and continuous 5-FU administered in a central venous catheter. Over all response was 36% with 9% complete responses. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities were stomatitis (13), infection (5), pain related...... to vinorelbine infusion (4), skin toxicity (3). Thirty one patients had grade 3 or 4 leukopenia. Treatment was complicated by venous thrombosis in the central venous catheter in one case. A majority of patients experienced dose reduction of one or both drugs or treatment delays due to toxicity. Median time...... to progression was 4.7 months and overall median survival 6.6 months. We conclude that the regimen is feasible and tolerated with moderate toxicity. Response rates and time to progression are comparable to other studies with multi agent treatment...

  3. Comparing the efficacy of metronome beeps and stepping stones to adjust gait: steps to follow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Paulina J M; Roerdink, Melvyn; Peper, C E

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic metronomes and visual targets have been used in rehabilitation practice to improve pathological gait. In addition, they may be instrumental in evaluating and training instantaneous gait adjustments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two cue types in inducing gait adjustments, viz. acoustic temporal cues in the form of metronome beeps and visual spatial cues in the form of projected stepping stones. Twenty healthy elderly (aged 63.2 ± 3.6 years) were recruited to walk on an instrumented treadmill at preferred speed and cadence, paced by either metronome beeps or projected stepping stones. Gait adaptations were induced using two manipulations: by perturbing the sequence of cues and by imposing switches from one cueing type to the other. Responses to these manipulations were quantified in terms of step-length and step-time adjustments, the percentage correction achieved over subsequent steps, and the number of steps required to restore the relation between gait and the beeps or stepping stones. The results showed that perturbations in a sequence of stepping stones were overcome faster than those in a sequence of metronome beeps. In switching trials, switching from metronome beeps to stepping stones was achieved faster than vice versa, indicating that gait was influenced more strongly by the stepping stones than the metronome beeps. Together these results revealed that, in healthy elderly, the stepping stones induced gait adjustments more effectively than did the metronome beeps. Potential implications for the use of metronome beeps and stepping stones in gait rehabilitation practice are discussed.

  4. Metronome cueing of walking reduces gait variability after a cerebellar stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Lindsey Wright

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar stroke typically results in increased variability during walking. Previous research has suggested that auditory-cueing reduces excessive variability in conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and post-stroke hemiparesis. The aim of this case report was to investigate whether the use of a metronome cue during walking could reduce excessive variability in gait parameters after a cerebellar stroke. An elderly female with a history of cerebellar stroke and recurrent falling undertook 3 standard gait trials and 3 gait trials with an auditory metronome. A Vicon system was used to collect 3-D marker trajectory data. The coefficient of variation was calculated for temporal and spatial gait parameters. Standard deviations of the joint angles were calculated and used to give a measure of joint kinematic variability. Step time, stance time and double support time variability were reduced with metronome cueing. Variability in the sagittal hip, knee and ankle angles were reduced to normal values when walking to the metronome. In summary, metronome cueing resulted in a decrease in variability for step, stance and double support times and joint kinematics. Further research is needed to establish whether a metronome may be useful in gait rehabilitation after cerebellar stroke, and whether this leads to a decreased risk of falling.

  5. Metronome Cueing of Walking Reduces Gait Variability after a Cerebellar Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rachel L; Bevins, Joseph W; Pratt, David; Sackley, Catherine M; Wing, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke typically results in increased variability during walking. Previous research has suggested that auditory cueing reduces excessive variability in conditions such as Parkinson's disease and post-stroke hemiparesis. The aim of this case report was to investigate whether the use of a metronome cue during walking could reduce excessive variability in gait parameters after a cerebellar stroke. An elderly female with a history of cerebellar stroke and recurrent falling undertook three standard gait trials and three gait trials with an auditory metronome. A Vicon system was used to collect 3-D marker trajectory data. The coefficient of variation was calculated for temporal and spatial gait parameters. SDs of the joint angles were calculated and used to give a measure of joint kinematic variability. Step time, stance time, and double support time variability were reduced with metronome cueing. Variability in the sagittal hip, knee, and ankle angles were reduced to normal values when walking to the metronome. In summary, metronome cueing resulted in a decrease in variability for step, stance, and double support times and joint kinematics. Further research is needed to establish whether a metronome may be useful in gait rehabilitation after cerebellar stroke and whether this leads to a decreased risk of falling.

  6. Center of cancer systems biology second annual workshop--tumor metronomics: timing and dose level dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2013-05-15

    Metronomic chemotherapy, the delivery of doses in a low, regular manner so as to avoid toxic side effects, was introduced over 12 years ago in the face of substantial clinical and preclinical evidence supporting its tumor-suppressive capability. It constituted a marked departure from the classic maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) strategy, which, given its goal of rapid eradication, uses dosing sufficiently intense to require rest periods between cycles to limit toxicity. Even so, upfront tumor eradication is frequently not achieved with MTD, whereupon a de facto goal of longer-term tumor control is often pursued. As metronomic dosing has shown tumor control capability, even for cancers that have become resistant to the same drug delivered under MTD, the question arises whether it may be a preferable alternative dosing approach from the outset. To date, however, our knowledge of the coupled dynamics underlying metronomic dosing is neither sufficiently well developed nor widely enough disseminated to establish its actual potential. Meeting organizers thus felt the time was right, armed with new quantitative approaches, to call a workshop on "Tumor Metronomics: Timing and Dose Level Dynamics" to explore prospects for gaining a deeper, systems-level appreciation of the metronomics concept. The workshop proved to be a forum in which experts from the clinical, biologic, mathematical, and computational realms could work together to clarify the principles and underpinnings of metronomics. Among other things, the need for significant shifts in thinking regarding endpoints to be used as clinical standards of therapeutic progress was recognized. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Phase III randomized study comparing docetaxel plus trastuzumab with vinorelbine plus trastuzumab as first-line therapy of metastatic or locally advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: the HERNATA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Michael; Lidbrink, Elisabeth; Bjerre, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate docetaxel or vinorelbine, both with trastuzumab, as first-line therapy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive advanced breast cancer.......To evaluate docetaxel or vinorelbine, both with trastuzumab, as first-line therapy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive advanced breast cancer....

  8. [The effect and mechanism of vinorelbine on cisplatin resistance of human lung cancer cell line A549/DDP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chunsheng; Gao, Sen; Li, Huiqiang; Gao, Weizhen

    2014-02-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle on lung cancer treatment and Vinorelbine is an effective drug to inhibition of tumor proliferation and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of Vinorelbine on reversing the cisplatin resistance of human lung cancer A549/DDP cell line. With 1 μmol/L and 5 μmol/L Vinorelbine treatment, MTS assay was employed to determine the effect of the cisplatin sensitivity of tumor cells, flow cytometry to determine the apoptosis rate and change of Rh-123 content; Western blot to determine the expression of MDR1, Bcl-2, surviving, PTEN, caspase-3/8 and phosphorylation level of Akt (p-Akt); Real-time PCR was to determine the mRNA expression of MDR1, Bcl-2, survivin and PTEN. Finally the transcriptional activities of NF-κB, Twist and Snail were determined by reporter gene system. With 1 μmol/L and 5 μmol/L Vinorelbine treatment, the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin was increased by 1.91- and 2.54- folds respectively, flow cytometry showed that the content of Rh-123 was elevated 1.93- and 2.95- folds and apoptosis rate was increased 2.25- and 3.82- folds, Western blot showed that the expression of multidrug resistance related proteins MDR, Bcl-2 and survivin were downregulated, caspase-3/8 and PTEN was upregulated, phosphorylation of Akt was downregulated as well, real-time assay showed that the mRNA expression of MDR1 was downregulated 43.5% and 25.8%, Bcl-2 was downregulated 57.3% and 34.1%, survivin was downregulated 37.6% and 12.4%, PTEN was upregulated 183.4% and 154.2%, the transcriptional activities of NF-κB was downregulated 53.2% and 34.5%, Twist was downregulated 61.4% and 33.5%, and Snail was downregulated 57.8% and 18.7%. Vinorelbine treatment led to increase of cisplatin sensitivity of A549/DDP cells and the mechanisms included the regulation of PTEN/AKT/NF-κB signal pathway to decreased drug resistance gene expression and increased pro-apoptosis gene expression.

  9. Preliminary results of capecitabine metronomic chemotherapy in operable triple-negative breast cancer after standard adjuvant therapy - A singlearm phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawky, H.; Galal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy and toxicity of 1 year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Methods: Between June 2010 and February 2012, 19 women with pathologically proven operable TNBC, who had received standard adjuvant chemotherapy before were enrolled. Patients received 1 year of oral capecitabine metronomic therapy (650 mg/m2, twice every day), after standard adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy if indicated. The primary endpoints of this study were disease-free survival rates (DFS) and safety profile. Secondary end point was overall survival (OS). Results: The maximal follow-up was 46.6 months with a median of 30.1 months ±11.525 (95% CI; 28.5-33.5 months). The median DFS was 41.7 months ±2.7 (95% CI; 36.5-46.9). No one developed locoregional recurrence. The actuarial rate of DFS was 88.8% and 82.05% at 2 and 3 years, respectively. At the time of the analyses, no patients had died and the median OS was not reached. Treatment-related adverse events were manageable with only 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3/4 hand-foot syndrome and another 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3 diarrhea. No Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity was recorded. All patients received full doses of capecitabine throughout the study and dose reduction was not required in any of our patients. Conclusion: One year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy, is active and well-tolerated in TNBC patients previously treated with standard adjuvant chemotherapy.

  10. Preliminary results of capecitabine metronomic chemotherapy in operable triple-negative breast cancer after standard adjuvant therapy--a single-arm phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawky, Hanan; Galal, Samar

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy and toxicity of 1 year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Between June 2010 and February 2012, 19 women with pathologically proven operable TNBC, who had received standard adjuvant chemotherapy before were enrolled. Patients received 1 year of oral capecitabine metronomic therapy (650 mg/m2, twice every day), after standard adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy if indicated. The primary endpoints of this study were disease-free survival rates (DFS) and safety profile. Secondary end point was overall survival (OS). The maximal follow-up was 46.6 months with a median of 30.1 months±11.525 (95% CI; 28.5-33.5 months). The median DFS was 41.7 months±2.7 (95% CI; 36.5-46.9). No one developed locoregional recurrence. The actuarial rate of DFS was 88.8% and 82.05% at 2 and 3 years, respectively. At the time of the analyses, no patients had died and the median OS was not reached. Treatment-related adverse events were manageable with only 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3/4 hand-foot syndrome and another 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3 diarrhea. No Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity was recorded. All patients received full doses of capecitabine throughout the study and dose reduction was not required in any of our patients. One year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy, is active and well-tolerated in TNBC patients previously treated with standard adjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Next generation metronomic chemotherapy-report from the Fifth Biennial International Metronomic and Anti-angiogenic Therapy Meeting, 6-8 May 2016, Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantziarka, Pan; Hutchinson, Lisa; André, Nicolas; Benzekry, Sébastien; Bertolini, Francesco; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Chiplunkar, Shubhada; Duda, Dan G; Gota, Vikram; Gupta, Sudeep; Joshi, Amit; Kannan, Sadhana; Kerbel, Robert; Kieran, Mark; Palazzo, Antonella; Parikh, Aparna; Pasquier, Eddy; Patil, Vijay; Prabhash, Kumar; Shaked, Yuval; Sholler, Giselle Saulnier; Sterba, Jaroslav; Waxman, David J; Banavali, Shripad

    2016-01-01

    The 5 th Biennial Metronomic and Anti-angiogenic Therapy Meeting was held on 6 th - 8 th May in the Indian city of Mumbai. The meeting brought together a wide range of clinicians and researchers interested in metronomic chemotherapy, anti-angiogenics, drug repurposing and combinations thereof. Clinical experiences, including many from India, were reported and discussed in three symposia covering breast cancer, head and neck cancers and paediatrics. On the pre-clinical side research into putative mechanisms of action, and the interactions between low dose metronomic chemotherapy and angiogenesis and immune responses, were discussed in a number of presentations. Drug repurposing was discussed both in terms of clinical results, particularly with respect to angiosarcoma and high-risk neuroblastoma, and in pre-clinical settings, particularly the potential for peri-operative interventions. However, it was clear that there remain a number of key areas of challenge, particularly in terms of definitions, perceptions in the wider oncological community, mechanisms of action and predictive biomarkers. While the potential for metronomics and drug repurposing in low and middle income countries remains a key theme, it is clear that there is also considerable potential for clinically relevant improvements in patient outcomes even in high income economies.

  12. Vinorelbine-based salvage therapy in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients progressing during trastuzumab-containing regimens: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viale Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vinka-alkaloyd vinorelbine is a potentially valuable treatment in patients with HER2-positive, trastuzumab-resistant advanced breast cancer. We sought to document the clinical activity of vinorelbine-based salvage treatments in this clinical setting. Methods We analyzed a cohort of 424 consecutive women receiving trastuzumab-based therapy for HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. Of these, 299 were identified as progressing during the initial trastuzumab-based treatment, and 77 received vinorelbine-based therapy as first salvage treatment. Central review of pathological specimens revealed that 70 patients had HER2-amplification detected by FISH. For these patients we determined overall response rate (ORR = complete-CR + partial-PR and clinical benefit (CB = CR+PR+ Stable disease lasting at least 6 months, time to progression (TTP and overall survival (OS from the initiation of vinorelbine-based salvage therapy. Results In 60 patients who were evaluable for tumor response, ORR and CB rates were 28% (95% C.I. 18%-41% and 50% (95% C.I. 38%-62%, respectively. Median follow-up from the initiation of salvage therapy was 15 months (range 1–63 months. Median TTP and OS were 7.1 months (95% C.I. 6.6–7.7 months and 21 months (95% C.I. 14.3–27.7 months, respectively. No differences in clinical outcomes were observed according to whether vinorelbine was administered as a single agent or in combination with other cytostatics, or whether trastuzumab was stopped or continued beyond disease progression. Conclusion our findings suggests that vinorelbine-based combinations are active and should be further evaluated in studies conducted in trastuzumab-resistant patients, including those evaluating newer HER2-targeting agents.

  13. Baicalein attenuates vinorelbine-induced vascular endothelial cell injury and chemotherapeutic phlebitis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Gang-Feng; Shi, Wei-Wen; Yu, Chen-Huan; Jin, Xiao-Yin; Zhang, Huan-Huan; Zhang, Wen-You; Wang, Lu-Chen; Yu, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major strategies for cancer treatment. Several antineoplastic drugs including vinorelbine (VRB) are commonly intravenously infused and liable to cause serious phlebitis. The therapeutic drugs for preventing this complication are limited. In this study, the mechanism of baicalein (BCN) was investigated on VRB-induced phlebitis in vivo and vascular endothelial cell injury in vitro. Treatment with BCN obviously attenuated vascular endothelial cell loss, edema, inflammatory cell infiltration and blood clots, and reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and ICAM-1 in the rabbit model of phlebitis induced by intravenous injection of VRB compared with vehicle. Further tests in vitro demonstrated that BCN lessened VRB-induced endothelial cell apoptosis, decreased intracellular ROS levels, suppressed phosphorylation of p38 and eventually inhibited activation of NF-κB signaling pathway. And these effects could be reversed by p38 agonist P79350. These results suggested that BCN exerted the protective effects against VRB-induced endothelial disruption in the rabbit model of phlebitis via inhibition of intracellular ROS generation and inactivation of p38/NF-κB pathway, leading to the decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, BCN could be used as a potential agent for the treatment of phlebitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Methods of preventing vinorelbine-induced phlebitis: an experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Emiko; Murase, Saori; Nishikata, Mayumi; Okamura, Noboru; Matzno, Sumio; Kuwahara, Takashi; Matsuyama, Kenji

    2008-07-22

    In order to identify methods for preventing phlebitis caused by intravenous administration of vinorelbine (VNR), we established a procedure for estimating the severity of phlebitis in an animal model. Four different factors (administration rate, dilution, flushing, and infusion of fat emulsion) were evaluated for alleviation of phlebitis caused by VNR infusion. VNR was diluted with normal saline to prepare test solutions with concentrations of 0.6 mg/mL or 0.3 mg/mL for infusion into the auricular veins of rabbits. Two days after VNR infusion, the veins were subjected to histopathological examination. VNR did not cause obvious loss of venous endothelial cells, the most sensitive and common feature of phlebitis, but VNR infusion led to inflammatory cell infiltration, edema, and epidermal degeneration. Tissue damage was significantly decreased by shortening the administration time and by diluting the VNR solution for infusion from 0.6 mg/mL to 0.3 mg/mL. However, there was no effect of flushing with normal saline after VNR infusion, while treatment with fat emulsion before and after VNR infusion only had a minimal effect. Rapid infusion and dilution are effective methods of reducing phlebitis caused by the infusion of VNR, but the efficacy of flushing with normal saline or infusion of fat emulsion was not confirmed.

  15. Phase II Trial of Metronomic Chemotherapy as Salvage Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SALEM, D.A.; GADO, N.M.; ABDELAZIZ, N.N.; ESSA, A.E.; ABDELHAFEEZ, Z.M.; KAMEL, T.H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim of Work: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of metronomic chemotherapy (which is the continuous administration of chemotherapy at relatively low minimally toxic doses on a frequent schedule of administration at close regular intervals with no prolonged drug-free breaks) in metastatic breast cancer patients as salvage therapy. Patients and Methods: In this phase II study we evaluated the clinical efficacy and tolerability of low dose, oral Methotrexate (MTX) and Cyclophosphamide (CTX) in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Between January 2004 and December 2005, 42 patients received MTX 2.5 mg bid on day 1 and 2 each week and CTX 50 mg/day administered continuously. Results: Forty two patients were evaluable. The overall clinical benefit was 31% complete response, partial response and stable disease (CR+PR+SD ³24 weeks), while the overall response rate was 16.7% (none of the patients attained CR). Toxicity was generally mild. The most common non hematological toxicity was elevation in transaminases level, it was reported in 40.4% of patients and was reversible, while mild grade 1 or 2 neutropenia was the most common hematological toxicity, (28.5% of patients). Median time to response was 3±0.18 while progression free survival (PFS) among patients with clinical benefit was 10 months (95% CI 6.65-13.44). Conclusions: This phase II study shows that, the combination of continuously low dose MTX and CTX is an active minimally toxic and significantly cost effective regimen for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients.

  16. The synchronisation of lower limb responses with a variable metronome: the effect of biomechanical constraints on timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Ya; Wing, Alan M; Pratt, David

    2006-04-01

    Stepping in time with a metronome has been reported to improve pathological gait. Although there have been many studies of finger tapping synchronisation tasks with a metronome, the specific details of the influences of metronome timing on walking remain unknown. As a preliminary to studying pathological control of gait timing, we designed an experiment with four synchronisation tasks, unilateral heel tapping in sitting, bilateral heel tapping in sitting, bilateral heel tapping in standing, and stepping on the spot, in order to examine the influence of biomechanical constraints on metronome timing. These four conditions allow study of the effects of bilateral co-ordination and maintenance of balance on timing. Eight neurologically normal participants made heel tapping and stepping responses in synchrony with a metronome producing 500 ms interpulse intervals. In each trial comprising 40 intervals, one interval, selected at random between intervals 15 and 30, was lengthened or shortened, which resulted in a shift in phase of all subsequent metronome pulses. Performance measures were the speed of compensation for the phase shift, in terms of the temporal difference between the response and the metronome pulse, i.e. asynchrony, and the standard deviation of the asynchronies and interresponse intervals of steady state synchronisation. The speed of compensation decreased with increase in the demands of maintaining balance. The standard deviation varied across conditions but was not related to the compensation speed. The implications of these findings for metronome assisted gait are discussed in terms of a first-order linear correction account of synchronisation.

  17. Monocytopenia; Induction by Vinorelbine, Cisplatin and Doxorubicin in Breast, Non-Small Cell Lung and Cervix Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Taha; Taha, Nida; Islam, Azahrul; Abraham, Suraj; Mahmood, Adeel; Mustafa, Mazhar

    2016-01-01

    Background The neoplasm is still a potential threat for breast, Non-Small Cell Lung (NSCL) and cervix cancer patients. Those gradually invade into other body organs, inducing complex pathological complications. Whereas, the anticancer drugs suppress the bone marrow, resulting serious hematological toxicities. Thus, the monocytic toxicity may the chance of infections, particularly in AID’s patients. Objective We aimed this retrospective study to investigate the monocytopenia induced by vinorelbine following chemotherapy in cancer patients. Patients and method A total 60 adult cancer patients were divided into two groups; Group-1 patients received the treatment of Vinorelbine alone while group 2 patients received Vinorelbine based combination chemotherapy. Result The overall comparison of mean monocyte count (×103 per μl) with time showed a significant statistical difference (p value <0.001) for G-I and no significant difference for G-II (p value <0.08). The independent comparison of mean values for two groups at every week confirms the non-significant statistical difference during all of the five weeks (p values 0.551, 0.112, 0.559, 0.372, 0.468 respectively). In addition of that, the comparison of mean values observed before therapy with that of week 4 (after therapy) showed significant difference in G-I (p value <0.001) and non-significant in G-II (p value 0.053). Conclusion Monocytopenia is induced in both of the chemotherapy protocols allows the clinical oncologists and consultant physicians to select either of the chemotherapy protocol. The therapeutic efficacy should constitute the intervening consideration to treat the breast, cervix and NSCL (Non-Small Cell Lung’s) cancers. PMID:27833519

  18. Metronomic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting: results of two parallel feasibility trials (TraQme and TAME) in patients with HER2+ and HER2− locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, V.; Gagliato, D.M.; Leal, A.I.C.; Arai, R.J.; Longo, E.; Andrade, F.; Ricci, M.D.; Piato, J.R.; Barroso-Sousa, R.; Hoff, P.M.; Mano, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has practical and theoretical advantages over adjuvant chemotherapy strategy in breast cancer (BC) management. Moreover, metronomic delivery has a more favorable toxicity profile. The present study examined the feasibility of neoadjuvant metronomic chemotherapy in two cohorts [HER2+ (TraQme) and HER2− (TAME)] of locally advanced BC. Twenty patients were prospectively enrolled (TraQme, n=9; TAME, n=11). Both cohorts received weekly paclitaxel at 100 mg/m 2 during 8 weeks followed by weekly doxorubicin at 24 mg/m 2 for 9 weeks in combination with oral cyclophosphamide at 100 mg/day (fixed dose). The HER2+ cohort received weekly trastuzumab. The study was interrupted because of safety issues. Thirty-six percent of patients in the TAME cohort and all patients from the TraQme cohort had stage III BC. Of note, 33% from the TraQme cohort and 66% from the TAME cohort displayed hormone receptor positivity in tumor tissue. The pathological complete response rates were 55% and 18% among patients enrolled in the TraQme and TAME cohorts, respectively. Patients in the TraQme cohort had more advanced BC stages at diagnosis, higher-grade pathological classification, and more tumors lacking hormone receptor expression, compared to the TAME cohort. The toxicity profile was also different. Two patients in the TraQme cohort developed pneumonitis, and in the TAME cohort we observed more hematological toxicity and hand-foot syndrome. The neoadjuvant metronomic chemotherapy regimen evaluated in this trial was highly effective in achieving a tumor response, especially in the HER2+ cohort. Pneumonitis was a serious, unexpected adverse event observed in this group. Further larger and randomized trials are warranted to evaluate the association between metronomic chemotherapy and trastuzumab treatment

  19. Metronomic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting: results of two parallel feasibility trials (TraQme and TAME) in patients with HER2+ and HER2− locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, V.; Gagliato, D.M.; Leal, A.I.C.; Arai, R.J.; Longo, E. [Divisão de Oncologia Médica, Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, F. [Núcleo de Mastologia, Hospital Sírio Libanês, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ricci, M.D.; Piato, J.R.; Barroso-Sousa, R.; Hoff, P.M.; Mano, M.S. [Divisão de Oncologia Médica, Instituto do Câncer do Estado de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has practical and theoretical advantages over adjuvant chemotherapy strategy in breast cancer (BC) management. Moreover, metronomic delivery has a more favorable toxicity profile. The present study examined the feasibility of neoadjuvant metronomic chemotherapy in two cohorts [HER2+ (TraQme) and HER2− (TAME)] of locally advanced BC. Twenty patients were prospectively enrolled (TraQme, n=9; TAME, n=11). Both cohorts received weekly paclitaxel at 100 mg/m{sup 2} during 8 weeks followed by weekly doxorubicin at 24 mg/m{sup 2} for 9 weeks in combination with oral cyclophosphamide at 100 mg/day (fixed dose). The HER2+ cohort received weekly trastuzumab. The study was interrupted because of safety issues. Thirty-six percent of patients in the TAME cohort and all patients from the TraQme cohort had stage III BC. Of note, 33% from the TraQme cohort and 66% from the TAME cohort displayed hormone receptor positivity in tumor tissue. The pathological complete response rates were 55% and 18% among patients enrolled in the TraQme and TAME cohorts, respectively. Patients in the TraQme cohort had more advanced BC stages at diagnosis, higher-grade pathological classification, and more tumors lacking hormone receptor expression, compared to the TAME cohort. The toxicity profile was also different. Two patients in the TraQme cohort developed pneumonitis, and in the TAME cohort we observed more hematological toxicity and hand-foot syndrome. The neoadjuvant metronomic chemotherapy regimen evaluated in this trial was highly effective in achieving a tumor response, especially in the HER2+ cohort. Pneumonitis was a serious, unexpected adverse event observed in this group. Further larger and randomized trials are warranted to evaluate the association between metronomic chemotherapy and trastuzumab treatment.

  20. Effects of a metronome on the filled pauses of fluent speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenfeld, N

    1996-12-01

    Filled pauses (the "ums" and "uhs" that litter spontaneous speech) seem to be a product of the speaker paying deliberate attention to the normally automatic act of talking. This is the same sort of explanation that has been offered for stuttering. In this paper we explore whether a manipulation that has long been known to decrease stuttering, synchronizing speech to the beats of a metronome, will then also decrease filled pauses. Two experiments indicate that a metronome has a dramatic effect on the production of filled pauses. This effect is not due to any simplification or slowing of the speech and supports the view that a metronome causes speakers to attend more to how they are talking and less to what they are saying. It also lends support to the connection between stutters and filled pauses.

  1. Interactive metronome training for a 9-year-old boy with attention and motor coordination difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartscherer, Melinda L; Dole, Robin L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe a new intervention, the Interactive Metronome, for improving timing and coordination. A nine-year-old boy, with difficulties in attention and developmental delay of unspecified origin underwent a seven-week training program with the Interactive Metronome. Before, during, and after training timing, accuracy was assessed with testing procedures consistent with the Interactive Metronome training protocol. Before and after training, his gross and fine motor skills were examined with the Bruininiks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP). The child exhibited marked change in scores on both timing accuracy and several BOTMP subtests. Additionally his mother relayed anecdotal reports of changes in behavior at home. This child's participation in a new intervention for improving timing and coordination was associated with changes in timing accuracy, gross and fine motor abilities, and parent reported behaviors. These findings warrant further study.

  2. A Novel Use of a Metronome in Dispatcher-assisted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateyyah, Khalid A; Cady, Charles E; Poltrock, James T; Pirrallo, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early, high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the key to increasing the likelihood of successful resuscitation in cardiac arrest. The use of dispatch-assisted (DA) CPR can increase the likelihood of bystander CPR. We describe a case in which a metronome was introduced to guide DA-CPR. The wife of a 52-year-old male activated 9-1-1 after her husband suffered a cardiac arrest. During her 9-1-1 call she received CPR instructions and heard a metronome over the phone while following the instructions. Return of spontaneous circulation of the patient occurred during paramedic on scene care. The patient was transported to hospital and discharged 6 days later with no neurological deficit. This case supports the use of a metronome by emergency medical dispatchers during the provision of DA-CPR to improve bystander CPR.

  3. Metronome improves compression and ventilation rates during CPR on a manikin in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Karl B; Stickney, Ronald E; Gallison, Leanne; Smith, Robert E

    2010-02-01

    We hypothesized that a unique tock and voice metronome could prevent both suboptimal chest compression rates and hyperventilation. A prospective, randomized, parallel design study involving 34 pairs of paid firefighter/emergency medical technicians (EMTs) performing two-rescuer CPR using a Laerdal SkillReporter Resusci Anne manikin with and without metronome guidance was performed. Each CPR session consisted of 2 min of 30:2 CPR with an unsecured airway, then 4 min of CPR with a secured airway (continuous compressions at 100 min(-1) with 8-10 ventilations/min), repeated after the rescuers switched roles. The metronome provided "tock" prompts for compressions, transition prompts between compressions and ventilations, and a spoken "ventilate" prompt. During CPR with a bag/valve/mask the target compression rate of 90-110 min(-1) was achieved in 5/34 CPR sessions (15%) for the control group and 34/34 sessions (100%) for the metronome group (pmetronome or control group during CPR with a bag/valve/mask. During CPR with a bag/endotracheal tube, the target of both a compression rate of 90-110 min(-1) and a ventilation rate of 8-11 min(-1) was achieved in 3/34 CPR sessions (9%) for the control group and 33/34 sessions (97%) for the metronome group (pMetronome use with the secured airway scenario significantly decreased the incidence of over-ventilation (11/34 EMT pairs vs. 0/34 EMT pairs; pmetronome was effective at directing correct chest compression and ventilation rates both before and after intubation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide, cisplatin, and vinorelbine in advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, C T; Pérez, J E; Domínguez, M E; Leone, B A; Machiavelli, M R; Lacava, J A; Romero, A O; Ortiz, E H; Grasso, S; Amato, S; Rodríguez, R; Barbieri, M; Romero Acuña, J; Focaccia, G; Suttora, G; Scenna, M; Boughen, J M; Romero Acuña, L A; Langhi, M J

    2000-10-01

    A phase II trial was performed to assess the efficacy and toxicity of a combination of ifosfamide (IFX), cisplatin (CDDP), and vinorelbine (VNB) as neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for untreated advanced cervical carcinoma (ACC). Between October 1995 and February 1998, 40 patients were entered in this study. Their median age was 43 years (range: 23-74 years). International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages were: IIB, 23; IIIB, 13; and IVA, 4. Therapy consisted of: IFX 2,000 mg/m2 1-hour (H) IV infusion days 1 to 3; 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid sodium salt (mesna) 400 mg/m2 IV bolus H 0 and 4, and 800 mg/m2 by mouth H 8, days 1 to 3; VNB 25 mg/m2 20-minute IV infusion days 1 and 8; and CDDP 75 mg/m2 IV day 3. Cycles were repeated every 28 days for a total of three courses. Both staging and response (R) assessment were performed by a multidisciplinary team. An objective response (OR) was observed in 24 of 40 patients (60%; 95% confidence interval, 45-75%). Four patients achieved complete response (CR) (10%); 20 partial response (50%); 12 patients stable disease (30%); and 4 progressive disease (10%). Eight of 24 patients (33%) with OR underwent radical surgery, and histologic CRs were recorded in 2 of them. The remaining patients received definitive radiotherapy after NAC. The dose-limiting toxicity was myelosuppression. Leukopenia occurred in 32 patients (80%) and was grade III or IV in 14 patients (36%). Peripheral neuropathy occurred in 9 patients (22%), whereas myalgias occurred in 10 (25%). Constipation was observed in 9 patients (23%); emesis occurred in 35 patients (88%). There were no therapy-related deaths. These results indicate that IFX/CDDP/VNB is an active combination for ACC with moderate toxicity. Implementation of this regimen in a multimodal therapy protocol deserves further study.

  5. Vinorelbine and paclitaxel as first-line chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Acuña, L; Langhi, M; Pérez, J; Romero Acuña, J; Machiavelli, M; Lacava, J; Vallejo, C; Romero, A; Fasce, H; Ortiz, E; Grasso, S; Amato, S; Rodríguez, R; Barbieri, M; Leone, B

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of a combination of vinorelbine (VNB) and paclitaxel (PTX) as first-line chemotherapy in metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC). Between August 1995 and August 1997, 49 patients with untreated MBC received a regimen that consisted of VNB 30 mg/m2 in a 20-minute intravenous (IV) infusion on days 1 and 8 and PTX 135 mg/m2 in a 3-hour IV infusion (starting 1 hour after VNB) on day 1. Cycles were repeated every 28 days. The median age of the patients was 52 years, and 59% of patients were postmenopausal. Median performance status was 1. Dominant sites of disease were soft tissue in 6%, bone in 29%, and viscera in 65%. Objective responses were recorded in 27 of 45 assessable patients (60%; 95% confidence interval, 46% to 74%). Complete remissions occurred in three patients (7%), and partial remissions occurred in 24 patients (53%). No change was recorded in 12 patients (27%), and progressive disease occurred in six patients (13%). The median time to treatment failure was 7 months, and median survival duration was 17 months. The limiting toxicity was myelosuppression, mainly leukopenia in 49 patients (100%) (grade 1 to grade 2, four patients; grade 3, 30 patients; and grade 4, 15 patients). Neutropenia was observed in 100% of patients (grade 1 to grade 2, three patients; grade 3, 11 patients; grade 4, 35 patients). Two treatment-related deaths due to febrile neutropenia were observed in patients with massive liver involvement. Peripheral neurotoxicity developed in 33 patients (67%) (grade 1, 25 patients; grade 2, eight patients); there were no grade 3 or grade 4 episodes. The combination of VNB-PTX showed significant activity as first-line chemotherapy for patients with MBC. Myelosuppression was the dose-limiting side effect, whereas neurotoxicity was mild to moderate.

  6. Vinorelbine/carboplatin vs gemcitabine/carboplatin in advanced NSCLC shows similar efficacy, but different impact of toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, N; Sundstrøm, S H; Aasebø, U

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase III study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was conducted to compare vinorelbine/carboplatin (VC) and gemcitabine/carboplatin (GC) regarding efficacy, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and toxicity. Chemonaive patients with NSCLC stage IIIB....../IV and WHO performance status 0-2 were eligible. No upper age limit was defined. Patients received vinorelbine 25 mg m(-2) or gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) on days 1 and 8 and carboplatin AUC4 on day 1 and three courses with 3-week cycles. HRQOL questionnaires were completed at baseline, before chemotherapy...... and every 8 weeks until 49 weeks. During 14 months, 432 patients were included (VC, n=218; GC, n=214). Median survival was 7.3 vs 6.4 months, 1-year survival 28 vs 30% and 2-year survival 7 vs 7% in the VC and GC arm, respectively (P=0.89). HRQOL, represented by global QOL, nausea/vomiting, dyspnoea...

  7. Response assessment in metronomic chemotherapy: RECIST or PERCIST?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Puranik, Ameya; Banavali, Shripad; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Metronomic chemotherapy (MC) is a novel therapeutic variation for resistant cancers, wherein chemotherapeutic drugs are administrated in low doses with no prolonged drug-free break. It lessens the level of toxicity, is better tolerated and enhances the quality of life. This retrospective analysis was undertaken to evaluate whether anatomical (computed tomography [CT]) or functional (positron emission tomography [PET]) imaging be used for response assessment in patients on MC. A total of 16 males and 27 females with age range of 12-83 years on MC who underwent PET/CT were assessed by new response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST 1.1) and PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST 1.0). Concordance between RECIST 1.1 and PERCIST was seen in 32 (75%) patients. There was discordance in 11 (25%) patients. In patients with discordance, the results were confirmed by follow-up imaging. PET upstaged the disease in 81% of patients (9/11) and down-staged the disease in 19% of patients (2/11). Metabolic response accurately identified the disease status as assessed by clinical or imaging follow-up. Alteration in morphology takes time to manifest, which is demonstrated by CT or magnetic resonance; whereas in MC which brings about tumor dormancy, assessing metabolic response by PET would be more appropriate. MC is usually given in palliative setting but in few cases complete metabolic response was demonstrated in our study. In such a scenario this form of treatment has the potential to become an adjunct mode of treatment in some tumors. This needs to be evaluated with larger, homogenous patient population in a prospective mode

  8. The specific effect of metronome guidance on the quality of one-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation and rescuer fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; You, Je Sung; Cho, Young Soon; Chung, Sung Phil; Park, Incheol; Kim, Seung Ho

    2012-12-01

    Metronome guidance is a simple and economic feedback method of guiding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It has been proven for its usefulness in regulating the rate of chest compression and ventilation, but it is not yet clear how metronome use may affect compression depth or rescuer fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess the specific effect that metronome guidance has on the quality of CPR and rescuer fatigue. One-person CPRs were performed by senior medical students on Resusci Anne® manikins (Laerdal, Stavanger, Norway) with personal-computer skill-reporting systems. Half of the students performed CPR with metronome guidance and the other half without. CPR performance data, duration, and before-after trial differences in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were compared between groups. Average compression depth (ACD) of the first five cycles, compression rate, no-flow fraction, and ventilation count were significantly lower in the metronome group (p=0.028, Metronome guidance is associated with lower chest compression depth of the first five cycles, while shortening the no-flow fraction and the ventilation count in a simulated one-person CPR model. Metronome guidance does not have an obvious effect of intensifying rescuer fatigue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rhythmic Instruction from Square One: A Constructivist Teacher and Her Metronome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Beth Ann

    2012-01-01

    Adhering to a constructivist approach, this teacher focused on problem solving and group discussion as she initiated a study of traditional notation. She began with the metronome to make the steady beat less abstract for those students who still learn best through concrete operations. The students were challenged to match magnets of various…

  10. Dynamic hyperinflation after metronome-paced hyperventilation in COPD--a 2 year follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannink, J.D.C.; Lahaije, A.J.; Bischoff, E.W.M.A.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Dekhuijzen, R.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the decline in FEV(1), the behavior of dynamic hyperinflation (DH) over time is unknown in patients with COPD. Metronome-paced hyperventilation (MPH) is a simple applicable surrogate for exercise to detect DH. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in MPH-induced DH during two years follow-up

  11. The Estimation of Short Time Intervals as a Function of Age and Metronome Pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Donald W.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The time judgments of the older participants were significantly and systematically determined by a metronome rate. Results are consistent with the notion of increased field-dependence among older persons and suggest that their greater social conformity and their inability to ignore irrelevant stimuli might also be explicable. (Author)

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of metronome-paced tachypnea to detect dynamic hyperinflation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahaije, A.J.M.C.; Willems, L.M.; Hees, H.W. van; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This prospective study was carried out to investigate if metronome-paced tachypnea (MPT) can serve as an accurate diagnostic tool to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are susceptible to develop dynamic hyperinflation during exercise. Commonly, this

  13. Concentration and the second stage of labor: outcomes associated with the interactive metronome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Meghan L; Lin, Alexander; Ou-Yang, Robin; Zei, Markus; Grobman, William

    2012-11-01

    To analyze the association between concentration, as measured by the Interactive Metronome, and a prolonged second stage of labor in nulliparous patients. From September 2008 to November 2009, nulliparous women at ≥34 weeks' gestation who were planning to use an epidural were asked to perform a 1-minute Interactive Metronome clapping test. Scores and demographic information were recorded. Data were then abstracted regarding each patient's labor course. The main outcome measure was the frequency of the second stage of labor exceeding 2 hours. Only patients with epidural anesthesia who completed the second stage of labor and did not require operative delivery performed for fetal indications prior to 2 full hours of pushing were included. Of the patients whose Interactive Metronome test scores were in the last quartile, which we associated with poor concentration, 52.9% (18/34) had a second stage of labor exceeding 2 hours compared with only 31.7% (33/104) of patients whose scores placed them in the first three quartiles (p = 0.026). Nulliparous patients with poor concentration scores, as measured by the Interactive Metronome, were more likely to push greater than 2 hours in the second stage of labor. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Reading Intervention Using Interactive Metronome in Children with Language and Reading Impairment: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Michaela; Colson, Karen A.; Park, Jungjun

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the effects of Interactive Metronome (IM) when integrated with a traditional language and reading intervention on reading achievement. Forty-nine school-age children with language and reading impairments were assigned randomly to either an experimental group who received the IM treatment or to a control group who…

  15. A novel multi-drug metronomic chemotherapy significantly delays tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliamonte, Maria; Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Napolitano, Maria; Luciano, Antonio; Rea, Domenica; Barbieri, Antonio; Arra, Claudio; Maiolino, Piera; Tornesello, Marialina; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2016-02-24

    The tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment represents a major obstacle to an effective tumor-specific cellular immune response. In the present study, the counterbalance effect of a novel metronomic chemotherapy protocol on such an immunosuppressive microenvironment was evaluated in a mouse model upon sub-cutaneous ectopic implantation of B16 melanoma cells. The chemotherapy consisted of a novel multi-drug cocktail including taxanes and alkylating agents, administered in a daily metronomic fashion. The newly designed strategy was shown to be safe, well tolerated and significantly efficacious. Treated animals showed a remarkable delay in tumor growth and prolonged survival as compared to control group. Such an effect was directly correlated with CD4(+) T cell reduction and CD8(+) T cell increase. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the percentage of both CD25(+)FoxP3(+) and CD25(+)CD127(low) regulatory T cell population was found both in the spleens and in the tumor lesions. Finally, the metronomic chemotherapy induced an intrinsic CD8(+) T cell response specific to B16 naturally expressed Trp2 TAA. The novel multi-drug daily metronomic chemotherapy evaluated in the present study was very effective in counterbalancing the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Consequently, the intrinsic anti-tumor T cell immunity could exert its function, targeting specific TAA and significantly containing tumor growth. Overall, the results show that this represents a promising adjuvant approach to significantly enhance efficacy of intrinsic or vaccine-elicited tumor-specific cellular immunity.

  16. Comparing the efficacy of metronome beeps and stepping stones to adjust gait: Steps to follow!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, P.J.M.; Roerdink, M.; Peper, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic metronomes and visual targets have been used in rehabilitation practice to improve pathological gait. In addition, they may be instrumental in evaluating and training instantaneous gait adjustments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two cue types in inducing gait

  17. How to Sync to the Beat of a Persistent Fractal Metronome without Falling Off the Treadmill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Marmelat, Vivien; Beek, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    In rehabilitation, rhythmic acoustic cues are often used to improve gait. However, stride-time fluctuations become anti-persistent with such pacing, thereby deviating from the characteristic persistent long-range correlations in stride times of self-paced walking healthy adults. Recent studies therefore experimented with metronomes with persistence in interbeat intervals and successfully evoked persistent stride-time fluctuations. The objective of this study was to examine how participants couple their gait to a persistent metronome, evoking persistently longer or shorter stride times over multiple consecutive strides, without wandering off the treadmill. Twelve healthy participants walked on a treadmill in self-paced, isochronously paced and non-isochronously paced conditions, the latter with anti-persistent, uncorrelated and persistent correlations in interbeat intervals. Stride-to-stride fluctuations of stride times, stride lengths and stride speeds were assessed with detrended fluctuation analysis, in conjunction with an examination of the coupling between stride times and stride lengths. Stride-speed fluctuations were anti-persistent for all conditions. Stride-time and stride-length fluctuations were persistent for self-paced walking and anti-persistent for isochronous pacing. Both stride times and stride lengths changed from anti-persistence to persistence over the four non-isochronous metronome conditions, accompanied by an increasingly stronger coupling between these gait parameters, with peak values for the persistent metronomes. These results revealed that participants were able to follow the beat of a persistent metronome without falling off the treadmill by strongly coupling stride-length fluctuations to the stride-time fluctuations elicited by persistent metronomes, so as to prevent large positional displacements along the treadmill. For self-paced walking, in contrast, this coupling was very weak. In combination, these results challenge the premise

  18. How to Sync to the Beat of a Persistent Fractal Metronome without Falling Off the Treadmill?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvyn Roerdink

    Full Text Available In rehabilitation, rhythmic acoustic cues are often used to improve gait. However, stride-time fluctuations become anti-persistent with such pacing, thereby deviating from the characteristic persistent long-range correlations in stride times of self-paced walking healthy adults. Recent studies therefore experimented with metronomes with persistence in interbeat intervals and successfully evoked persistent stride-time fluctuations. The objective of this study was to examine how participants couple their gait to a persistent metronome, evoking persistently longer or shorter stride times over multiple consecutive strides, without wandering off the treadmill. Twelve healthy participants walked on a treadmill in self-paced, isochronously paced and non-isochronously paced conditions, the latter with anti-persistent, uncorrelated and persistent correlations in interbeat intervals. Stride-to-stride fluctuations of stride times, stride lengths and stride speeds were assessed with detrended fluctuation analysis, in conjunction with an examination of the coupling between stride times and stride lengths. Stride-speed fluctuations were anti-persistent for all conditions. Stride-time and stride-length fluctuations were persistent for self-paced walking and anti-persistent for isochronous pacing. Both stride times and stride lengths changed from anti-persistence to persistence over the four non-isochronous metronome conditions, accompanied by an increasingly stronger coupling between these gait parameters, with peak values for the persistent metronomes. These results revealed that participants were able to follow the beat of a persistent metronome without falling off the treadmill by strongly coupling stride-length fluctuations to the stride-time fluctuations elicited by persistent metronomes, so as to prevent large positional displacements along the treadmill. For self-paced walking, in contrast, this coupling was very weak. In combination, these results

  19. Stepping to phase-perturbed metronome cues: Multisensory advantage in movement synchrony but not correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L Wright

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Humans can synchronise movements with auditory beats or rhythms without apparent effort. This ability to entrain to the beat is considered automatic, such that any perturbations are corrected for, even if the perturbation was not consciously noted. Temporal correction of upper limb (e.g. finger tapping and lower limb (e.g. stepping movements to a phase perturbed auditory beat usually results in individuals being back in phase after just a few beats. When a metronome is presented in more than one sensory modality, a multisensory advantage is observed, with reduced temporal variability in finger tapping movements compared to unimodal conditions. Here, we investigate synchronisation of lower limb movements (stepping in place to auditory, visual and combined auditory-visual metronome cues. In addition, we compare movement corrections to phase advance and phase delay perturbations in the metronome for the three sensory modality conditions. We hypothesised that, as with upper limb movements, there would be a multisensory advantage, with stepping variability being lowest in the bimodal condition. As such, we further expected correction to the phase perturbation to be quickest in the bimodal condition. Our results revealed lower variability in the asynchronies between foot strikes and the metronome beats in the bimodal condition, compared to unimodal conditions. However, while participants corrected substantially quicker to perturbations in auditory compared to visual metronomes, there was no multisensory advantage in the phase correction task – correction under the bimodal condition was almost identical to the auditory-only condition. On the whole, we noted that corrections in the stepping task were smaller than those previously reported for finger tapping studies. We conclude that temporal corrections are not only affected by the reliability of the sensory information, but also the complexity of the movement itself.

  20. Comparison of spontaneous vs. metronome-guided breathing on assessment of vagal modulation using RR variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, D M; Magnano, A; Bigger, J T; Rivadeneira, H; Parides, M; Steinman, R C

    2001-03-01

    R-R interval variability (RR variability) is increasingly being used as an index of autonomic activity. High-frequency (HF) power reflects vagal modulation of the sinus node. Since vagal modulation occurs at the respiratory frequency, some investigators have suggested that HF power cannot be interpreted unless the breathing rate is controlled. We hypothesized that HF power during spontaneous breathing would not differ significantly from HF power during metronome-guided breathing. We measured HF power during spontaneous breathing in 20 healthy subjects and 19 patients with heart disease. Each subject's spontaneous breathing rate was determined, and the calculation of HF power was repeated with a metronome set to his or her average spontaneous breathing rate. There was no significant difference between the logarithm of HF power measured during spontaneous and metronome-guided breathing [4.88 +/- 0.29 vs. 5.29 +/- 0.30 ln(ms(2)), P = 0.32] in the group as a whole and when patients and healthy subjects were examined separately. We did observe a small (9.9%) decrease in HF power with increasing metronome-guided breathing rates (from 9 to 20 breaths/min). These data indicate that HF power during spontaneous and metronome-guided breathing differs at most by very small amounts. This variability is several logarithmic units less than the wide discrepancies observed between healthy subjects and cardiac patients with a heterogeneous group of cardiovascular disorders. In addition, HF power is relatively constant across the range of typical breathing rates. These data indicate that there is no need to control breathing rate to interpret HF power when RR variability (and specifically HF power) is used to identify high-risk cardiac patients.

  1. Stepping to phase-perturbed metronome cues: multisensory advantage in movement synchrony but not correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rachel L; Elliott, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Humans can synchronize movements with auditory beats or rhythms without apparent effort. This ability to entrain to the beat is considered automatic, such that any perturbations are corrected for, even if the perturbation was not consciously noted. Temporal correction of upper limb (e.g., finger tapping) and lower limb (e.g., stepping) movements to a phase perturbed auditory beat usually results in individuals being back in phase after just a few beats. When a metronome is presented in more than one sensory modality, a multisensory advantage is observed, with reduced temporal variability in finger tapping movements compared to unimodal conditions. Here, we investigate synchronization of lower limb movements (stepping in place) to auditory, visual and combined auditory-visual (AV) metronome cues. In addition, we compare movement corrections to phase advance and phase delay perturbations in the metronome for the three sensory modality conditions. We hypothesized that, as with upper limb movements, there would be a multisensory advantage, with stepping variability being lowest in the bimodal condition. As such, we further expected correction to the phase perturbation to be quickest in the bimodal condition. Our results revealed lower variability in the asynchronies between foot strikes and the metronome beats in the bimodal condition, compared to unimodal conditions. However, while participants corrected substantially quicker to perturbations in auditory compared to visual metronomes, there was no multisensory advantage in the phase correction task-correction under the bimodal condition was almost identical to the auditory-only (AO) condition. On the whole, we noted that corrections in the stepping task were smaller than those previously reported for finger tapping studies. We conclude that temporal corrections are not only affected by the reliability of the sensory information, but also the complexity of the movement itself.

  2. A metronome for pacing manual ventilation in a neonatal resuscitation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocucci, Cecilia; Madorno, Matías; Aguilar, Adriana; Acha, Leila; Szyld, Edgardo; Musante, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    During manual positive pressure ventilation (PPV), delivering a recommended respiratory rate (RR) is operator dependent. We tested the efficacy of a metronome as a standardised method to improve the accuracy of delivered RR during manual PPV in a neonatal resuscitation simulation. We conducted a blinded simulation in two consecutive stages. Using a self-inflating bag, 36 CPR trained operators provided PPV to a modified neonatal manikin via an endotracheal tube. Pressure and flow signals were captured by a respiratory function monitor. In the first standard stage, participants delivered RR as they would in delivery room. Prior to the second stage, they were asked about what their target RR had been and a metronome was set to that target. Subsequently, operators repeated PPV attempting to coordinate their delivered RR with the metronome. To evaluate accuracy we generated the variable RR Gap as the absolute difference between delivered and target RR. The primary outcome was the difference in RR Gap between stages. Mean (SD) target RR was 50 (8.7) inflations/min. During the initial stage, median (IQR) RR Gap was 11.6 (4.7-18.3) inflations/min and 20/36 participants (55.5%) had a mean delivered RR beyond the recommended range. When paced by the metronome, RR Gap was reduced to 0.2 (0.1-0.4) inflations/min and 32/36 participants (89%) fell within the recommended range. The use of a metronome improved the accuracy of delivered RR during manual PPV. Novel approaches to deliver an accurate RR during manual PPV need to be tested in more realistic scenarios. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. A metronome for controlling the mean velocity during the bench press exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moras, Gerard; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Sergio; Busquets, Albert; Tous-Fajardo, Julio; Pozzo, Marco; Mujika, Iñigo

    2009-05-01

    Lifting velocity may have a great impact on strength training-induced adaptations. The purpose of this study was to validate a method including a metronome and a measurement tape as inexpensive tools for the estimation of mean lifting velocity during the bench press exercise. Fifteen subjects participated in this study. After determining their one repetition maximum (1RM) load, we estimated the maximum metronome rhythm (R) that each subject could maintain in the concentric phase for loads of 40 and 60% of 1RM. To estimate R, the 3 repetitions with highest concentric power, as measured by means of a linear encoder, were selected, and their average duration was calculated and converted to lifting rhythm in beats per minute (bpm) for each subject. The range of motion was measured using a regular tape and kept constant during all exercises. Subjects were instructed to begin with the barbell at arm lengths and lower it in correspondence with the metronome beep. They subsequently performed 5 repetitions at 3 different rhythms relative to R (50, 70, and 90% R) for each training load (40 and 60% of 1RM). A linear encoder was attached to the bar and used as a criterion to measure the vertical displacement over time. For each rhythm, the mean velocity was calculated with the metronome (time) and the reference distance and compared with that recorded by the linear encoder. The SEM for velocity between both testing methods ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 m.s (coefficient of variation, 4.0-6.4%; Pearson's correlation, 0.8-0.95). The present results showed that the use of a metronome and a measurement tape may be a valid method to estimate the mean velocity of execution during the bench press exercise. This simple method could help coaches and athletes achieve their strength training goals, which are partly determined by lifting velocity.

  4. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikaedo Sueli M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although modest improvements in the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC can be achieved with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT, its value is disputed in the geriatric setting. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of vinorelbine/cisplatin CT for elderly NSCLC patients. Methods In this pilot phase I/II trial, all patients received CT with vinorelbine 25 mg/m2, on day 1 and 8, and cisplatin on day 1, in 28 days-cycles. After stratification for age (up to 75 years, younger patients were sequentially allocated to moderate cisplatin doses (80 mg/m2 or 90 mg/m2, and older patients were allocated to lower cisplatin doses (60 mg/m2 or 70 mg/m2. We recruited patients aged over 70 years with newly diagnosed NSCLC, clinical stage III or IV, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70%, normal serum creatinine, peripheral neuropathy ≤ grade 1, and no prior cancer therapy. Results Analysis was by intention to treat. Main toxicities (grade 3–4 was as follows: neutropenia, 20%; anemia, 11%; and thrombocytopenia, 2%; alopecia, 55%; fatigue, 11%; and peripheral neurotoxicity, 2%. No grade 3–4 emesis or renal toxicity occurred. Global median time to progression (TTP and overall survival (OS were 27.0 (95% CI: 10.1 to 43.7 weeks and 30.1 (95% CI: 24.4 to 35.8 weeks; 1- and 2-year survival rates were 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Overall response rate was 50.0% (95% CI: 35.4% to 64.5%, with 1 complete response; no difference on response rate was noticed according to cisplatin dose. Median overall survival was 30.1 weeks, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Conclusion Age does not preclude assessment on the role of cisplatin-vinorelbine CT for elderly NSCLC patients with good performance status and adequate bodily functions.

  5. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, José Rodrigues; Martins, Sandro J; Nikaedo, Sueli M; Ikari, Flora K

    2004-01-01

    Although modest improvements in the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be achieved with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT), its value is disputed in the geriatric setting. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of vinorelbine/cisplatin CT for elderly NSCLC patients. In this pilot phase I/II trial, all patients received CT with vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 , on day 1 and 8, and cisplatin on day 1, in 28 days-cycles. After stratification for age (up to 75 years), younger patients were sequentially allocated to moderate cisplatin doses (80 mg/m 2 or 90 mg/m 2 ), and older patients were allocated to lower cisplatin doses (60 mg/m 2 or 70 mg/m 2 ). We recruited patients aged over 70 years with newly diagnosed NSCLC, clinical stage III or IV, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70%, normal serum creatinine, peripheral neuropathy ≤ grade 1, and no prior cancer therapy. Analysis was by intention to treat. Main toxicities (grade 3–4) was as follows: neutropenia, 20%; anemia, 11%; and thrombocytopenia, 2%; alopecia, 55%; fatigue, 11%; and peripheral neurotoxicity, 2%. No grade 3–4 emesis or renal toxicity occurred. Global median time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 27.0 (95% CI: 10.1 to 43.7) weeks and 30.1 (95% CI: 24.4 to 35.8) weeks; 1- and 2-year survival rates were 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Overall response rate was 50.0% (95% CI: 35.4% to 64.5%), with 1 complete response; no difference on response rate was noticed according to cisplatin dose. Median overall survival was 30.1 weeks, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Age does not preclude assessment on the role of cisplatin-vinorelbine CT for elderly NSCLC patients with good performance status and adequate bodily functions

  6. Re-examining Czerny’s and Moscheles’s Metronome Marks for Beethoven’s Piano Sonatas

    OpenAIRE

    Noorduin, Marten

    2017-01-01

    Shortly after Beethoven’s death, several of his closest associates provided performance indications for editions of his works. Previous discussions of Carl Czerny’s and Ignaz Moscheles’s metronome marks for Beethoven’s piano sonatas have highlighted the importance of these indications for our understanding of the intended performance practice of these works. Nevertheless, the provenance and meaning of these metronome marks have remained unclear, which has led to some confusion in the literatu...

  7. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  8. The effects of metronome breathing on the variability of autonomic activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, D; Dicicco, G

    2000-01-01

    Many chiropractors hypothesize that spinal manipulation affects the autonomic nervous system (ANS). However, the ANS responses to chiropractic manipulative therapy are not well documented, and more research is needed to support this hypothesis. This study represents a step toward the development of a reliable method by which to document that chiropractic manipulative therapy does affect the ANS by exploring the use of paced breathing as a way to reduce the inherent variability in ANS measurements. To examine the hypothesis that the variability of ANS measurements would be reduced if breathing were paced to a metronome at 12 breaths/min. The study was performed at Parker College Research Institute. Eight normotensive subjects were recruited from the student body and staff. Respiration frequency was measured through a strain gauge. A 3-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was used to register the electric activity of the heart, and arterial tonometry monitors were used to record the left and right radial artery blood pressures. Signals were recorded on an IBM-compatible computer with a sampling frequency of 100 Hz. Normal breathing was used for the first 3 recordings, and breathing was paced to a metronome for the final 3 recordings at 12 breaths/min. Fourier analysis was performed on the beat-by-beat fluctuations of the ECG-determined R-R interval and systolic arterial pressure (SBP). Low-frequency fluctuations (LF; 0.04-0.15 Hz) reflected sympathetic activity, whereas high-frequency fluctuations (HF; 0.15-0.4 Hz) represented parasympathetic activity. Sympathovagal indices were determined from the ratio of the two bandwidths (LF/HF). The coefficient of variation (CV%) for autonomic parameters was calculated ([average/SD] x 100%) to compare breathing normally and breathing to a metronome with respect to variability. One-way analysis of variance was used to detect differences. A value of P Metronome breathing did not produce any significant changes in blood pressure for the

  9. Understanding the antiangiogenic effect of metronomic chemotherapy through a simple mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Diego S.; Mancera, Paulo F. A.; Pinho, Suani T. R.

    2016-12-01

    Despite the current and increasingly successful fight against cancer, there are some important questions concerning the efficiency of its treatment - in particular, the design of oncology chemotherapy protocols. Seeking efficiency, schedules based on more frequent, low-doses of drugs, known as metronomic chemotherapy, have been proposed as an alternative to the classical standard protocol of chemotherapy administration. The in silico approach may be very useful for providing a comparative analysis of these two kinds of protocols. In so doing, we found that metronomic schedules are more effective in eliminating tumour cells mainly due to their chemotherapeutic action on endothelial cells and that more frequent, low drug doses also entail outcomes in which the survival time of patient is increased.

  10. Metronomic capecitabine as second-line treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma after sorafenib failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Alessandro; Marinelli, Sara; Terzi, Eleonora; Piscaglia, Fabio; Renzulli, Matteo; Venerandi, Laura; Benevento, Francesca; Bolondi, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    No standard second-line treatments are available for hepatocellular carcinoma patients who fail sorafenib therapy. We assessed the safety and efficacy of metronomic capecitabine after first-line sorafenib failure. Retrospective analysis of consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma patients receiving metronomic capecitabine between January 2012 and November 2014. The primary end-point was safety, secondary end-point was efficacy, including time-to-progression and overall survival. Twenty-six patients (80% Child-Pugh A, 80% Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C) received metronomic capecitabine (500 mg/bid). Median treatment duration was 3.2 months (range 0.6-31). Fourteen (53%) patients experienced at least one adverse event. The most frequent drug-related adverse events were bilirubin elevation (23%), fatigue (15%), anaemia (11%), lymphoedema (11%), and hand-foot syndrome (7.6%). Treatment was interrupted in 19 (73%) for disease progression, in 4 (15%) for liver deterioration, and in 1 (3.8%) for adverse event. Disease control was achieved in 6 (23%) patients. Median time-to-progression was 4 months (95% confidence interval 3.2-4.7). Median overall survival was 8 months (95% confidence interval 3.7-12.3). Metronomic capecitabine was well tolerated in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who had been treated with sorafenib. Preliminary data show potential anti-tumour activity with long-lasting disease control in a subgroup of patients that warrants further evaluation in a phase III study. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metronome Cueing of Walking Reduces Gait Variability after a Cerebellar Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Rachel L.; Bevins, Joseph W.; Pratt, David; Sackley, Catherine M.; Wing, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke typically results in increased variability during walking. Previous research has suggested that auditory cueing reduces excessive variability in conditions such as Parkinson's disease and post-stroke hemiparesis. The aim of this case report was to investigate whether the use of a metronome cue during walking could reduce excessive variability in gait parameters after a cerebellar stroke. An elderly female with a history of cerebellar stroke and recurrent falling undertook th...

  12. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho,Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo,Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes,Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno,Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis,Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista,Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condit...

  13. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maria de Oliveira Botelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60 was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condition before cardiac arrest, the immediate cause, initial arrest rhythm, whether epinephrine was used, and the duration of CPR. The case group (n=51 received conventional CPR guided by a metronome set at 110 beats/min. Chi-square and likelihood ratio were used to compare ROSC rates considering p≤0.05. Results: ROSC occurred in 57.7% of the cases, though 92.8% of these patients died in the following 24 hours. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in regard to ROSC (p=0.2017 or the occurrence of death (p=0.8112. Conclusion: the outcomes of patients after cardiac arrest with and without the use of a metronome during CPR were similar and no differences were found between groups in regard to survival rates and ROSC.

  14. A retrospective outcomes study examining the effect of interactive metronome on hand function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Tracy M; Harron, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Interactive Metronome (IM, The Interactive Metronome Company, Sunrise, Florida, USA) is a computer-based modality marketed to rehabilitation professionals who want to improve outcomes in areas of coordination, motor skills, self-regulation behaviors, and cognitive skills. This retrospective study examined the efficacy of IM training on improving timing skills, hand function, and parental report of self-regulatory behaviors. Forty eight children with mixed motor and cognitive diagnoses completed an average of 14 one-hour training sessions over an average of 8.5 weeks in an outpatient setting. Each child was assessed before and after training with the Interactive Metronome Long Form Assessment, the Jebsen Taylor Test of Hand Function, and a parent questionnaire. All three measures improved with statistical significance despite participants having no direct skill training. These results suggest an intimate relationship between cognition and motor skills that has potential therapeutic value. Level 4, Retrospective Case Series. Copyright © 2015 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperthermia improves the antitumour effect of metronomic cyclophosphamide in a rat transplantable brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl Borkamo, Erling; Fluge, Oystein; Mella, Olav; Akslen, Lars A.; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: As low-dose metronomic cyclophosphamide (CTX) and hyperthermia (HT) both exert antitumour effects in part through antiangiogenic mechanisms, interactive effects of the two modalities were explored. Materials and methods: Subcutaneously implanted rat tumours (BT4An) were treated with CTX 35 mg/kg i.p. three doses a week for two weeks, local water-bath HT yielding mean tumour temperature of 43 o C for one hour at day 0, both modalities combined (CTX-HT 0 ), or saline. TUNEL assays, immunohistochemical staining of thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) and real time RT-PCR of TSP-1 mRNA were analysed the first three hours after completed treatment day 0. Results: Metronomic dosed CTX (p = 0.006) and HT (p 0 (41%) treated rats. TSP-1 protein was specifically upregulated in the vascular matrix of tumours receiving CTX (weak), HT (moderate) and CTX-HT 0 (strong). In contrast, reduced expression of TSP-1 protein was observed in tumour cells after HT alone and CTX-HT 0 . TUNEL assays indicated induction of apoptosis by HT and CTX-HT 0 90 minutes after end of the first treatment. Conclusion: A single session of local HT enhances the effects of low-dose metronomic CTX, possibly in part mediated through a differential effect on TSP-1 protein levels in tumour cells and tumour vasculature

  16. Predictive rhythmic tapping to isochronous and tempo changing metronomes in the nonhuman primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Jorge; Yc, Karyna; Ayala, Yaneri A; Dotov, Dobromir; Prado, Luis; Merchant, Hugo

    2018-04-30

    Beat entrainment is the ability to entrain one's movements to a perceived periodic stimulus, such as a metronome or a pulse in music. Humans have a capacity to predictively respond to a periodic pulse and to dynamically adjust their movement timing to match the varying music tempos. Previous studies have shown that monkeys share some of the human capabilities for rhythmic entrainment, such as tapping regularly at the period of isochronous stimuli. However, it is still unknown whether monkeys can predictively entrain to dynamic tempo changes like humans. To address this question, we trained monkeys in three tapping tasks and compared their rhythmic entrainment abilities with those of humans. We found that, when immediate feedback about the timing of each movement is provided, monkeys can predictively entrain to an isochronous beat, generating tapping movements in anticipation of the metronome pulse. This ability also generalized to a novel untrained tempo. Notably, macaques can modify their tapping tempo by predicting the beat changes of accelerating and decelerating visual metronomes in a manner similar to humans. Our findings support the notion that nonhuman primates share with humans the ability of temporal anticipation during tapping to isochronous and smoothly changing sequences of stimuli. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Predictive and tempo-flexible synchronization to a visual metronome in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeya, Ryuji; Kameda, Masashi; Patel, Aniruddh D; Tanaka, Masaki

    2017-07-21

    Predictive and tempo-flexible synchronization to an auditory beat is a fundamental component of human music. To date, only certain vocal learning species show this behaviour spontaneously. Prior research training macaques (vocal non-learners) to tap to an auditory or visual metronome found their movements to be largely reactive, not predictive. Does this reflect the lack of capacity for predictive synchronization in monkeys, or lack of motivation to exhibit this behaviour? To discriminate these possibilities, we trained monkeys to make synchronized eye movements to a visual metronome. We found that monkeys could generate predictive saccades synchronized to periodic visual stimuli when an immediate reward was given for every predictive movement. This behaviour generalized to novel tempi, and the monkeys could maintain the tempo internally. Furthermore, monkeys could flexibly switch from predictive to reactive saccades when a reward was given for each reactive response. In contrast, when humans were asked to make a sequence of reactive saccades to a visual metronome, they often unintentionally generated predictive movements. These results suggest that even vocal non-learners may have the capacity for predictive and tempo-flexible synchronization to a beat, but that only certain vocal learning species are intrinsically motivated to do it.

  18. Application of mathematical models to metronomic chemotherapy: What can be inferred from minimal parameterized models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledzewicz, Urszula; Schättler, Heinz

    2017-08-10

    Metronomic chemotherapy refers to the frequent administration of chemotherapy at relatively low, minimally toxic doses without prolonged treatment interruptions. Different from conventional or maximum-tolerated-dose chemotherapy which aims at an eradication of all malignant cells, in a metronomic dosing the goal often lies in the long-term management of the disease when eradication proves elusive. Mathematical modeling and subsequent analysis (theoretical as well as numerical) have become an increasingly more valuable tool (in silico) both for determining conditions under which specific treatment strategies should be preferred and for numerically optimizing treatment regimens. While elaborate, computationally-driven patient specific schemes that would optimize the timing and drug dose levels are still a part of the future, such procedures may become instrumental in making chemotherapy effective in situations where it currently fails. Ideally, mathematical modeling and analysis will develop into an additional decision making tool in the complicated process that is the determination of efficient chemotherapy regimens. In this article, we review some of the results that have been obtained about metronomic chemotherapy from mathematical models and what they infer about the structure of optimal treatment regimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metronome Use for Coordination of Breaths and Cardiac Compressions Delivered by Minimally-Trained Caregivers During Two-Person CPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Victor, IV; West, Sarah; Austin, Paul; Branson, Richard; Beck, George

    2005-01-01

    Astronaut crew medical officers (CMO) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) receive 40 hours of medical training over 18 months before each mission, including two-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (2CPR) as recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA). Recent studies have concluded that the use of metronomic tones improves the coordination of 2CPR by trained clinicians. 2CPR performance data for minimally-trained caregivers has been limited. The goal of this study was to determine whether use of a metronome by minimally-trained caregivers (CMO analogues) would improve 2CPR performance. 20 pairs of minimally-trained caregivers certified in 2CPR via AHA guidelines performed 2CPR for 4 minutes on an instrumented manikin using 3 interventions: 1) Standard 2CPR without a metronome [NONE], 2) Standard 2CPR plus a metronome for coordinating compression rate only [MET], 3) Standard 2CPR plus a metronome for coordinating both the compression rate and ventilation rate [BOTH]. Caregivers were evaluated for their ability to meet the AHA guideline of 32 breaths-240 compressions in 4 minutes. All (100%) caregivers using the BOTH intervention provided the required number of ventilation breaths as compared with the NONE caregivers (10%) and MET caregivers (0%). For compressions, 97.5% of the BOTH caregivers were not successful in meeting the AHA compression guideline; however, an average of 238 compressions of the desired 240 were completed. None of the caregivers were successful in meeting the compression guideline using the NONE and MET interventions. This study demonstrates that use of metronomic tones by minimally-trained caregivers for coordinating both compressions and breaths improves 2CPR performance. Meeting the breath guideline is important to minimize air entering the stomach, thus decreasing the likelihood of gastric aspiration. These results suggest that manifesting a metronome for the ISS may augment the performance of 2CPR on orbit and thus may

  20. Transcriptional profiling provides insights into metronomic cyclophosphamide-activated, innate immune-dependent regression of brain tumor xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doloff, Joshua C; Waxman, David J

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide treatment on a six-day repeating metronomic schedule induces a dramatic, innate immune cell-dependent regression of implanted gliomas. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms whereby metronomic cyclophosphamide induces innate immune cell mobilization and recruitment, or about the role of DNA damage and cell stress response pathways in eliciting the immune responses linked to tumor regression. Untreated and metronomic cyclophosphamide-treated human U251 glioblastoma xenografts were analyzed on human microarrays at two treatment time points to identify responsive tumor cell-specific factors and their upstream regulators. Mouse microarray analysis across two glioma models (human U251, rat 9L) was used to identify host factors and gene networks that contribute to the observed immune and tumor regression responses. Metronomic cyclophosphamide increased expression of tumor cell-derived DNA damage, cell stress, and cell death genes, which may facilitate innate immune activation. Increased expression of many host (mouse) immune networks was also seen in both tumor models, including complement components, toll-like receptors, interferons, and cytolysis pathways. Key upstream regulators activated by metronomic cyclophosphamide include members of the interferon, toll-like receptor, inflammatory response, and PPAR signaling pathways, whose activation may contribute to anti-tumor immunity. Many upstream regulators inhibited by metronomic cyclophosphamide, including hypoxia-inducible factors and MAP kinases, have glioma-promoting activity; their inhibition may contribute to the therapeutic effectiveness of the six-day repeating metronomic cyclophosphamide schedule. Large numbers of responsive cytokines, chemokines and immune regulatory genes linked to innate immune cell recruitment and tumor regression were identified, as were several immunosuppressive factors that may contribute to the observed escape of some tumors from metronomic CPA

  1. Systematic Studies of Modified Vocalization: The Effect of Speech Rate on Speech Production Measures during Metronome-Paced Speech in Persons Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidow, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metronome-paced speech results in the elimination, or substantial reduction, of stuttering moments. The cause of fluency during this fluency-inducing condition is unknown. Several investigations have reported changes in speech pattern characteristics from a control condition to a metronome-paced speech condition, but failure to control…

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Biodegradable Amphiphilic Star and Y-Shaped Block Copolymers as Potential Carriers for Vinorelbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Bahadori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two amphiphilic block copolymers using hydrophobic poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol (PEG were successfully synthesized. One of them is an (A-b-B4 type star polymer [(PCL-b-PEG4] and the other one is a Y-shaped PEG–(PCL2. A star-shaped polymer (PCL-b-PEG4 was prepared by ring-opening polymerization (ROP of ε-caprolactone continued by click reaction of (PCL-azide4 and PEG-alkyne. The synthesis of Y-shaped PEG–(PCL2 block copolymer was carried out via Diels-Alder click reaction of a furan protected maleimide end-functionalized PEG (PEG-MI with an anthracene end-functionalized PCL following the ROP of ε-caprolactone. The characterization of micelles is carried out using both materials in aqueous media as drug delivery vehicles, which showed satisfying results and enhanced the cytotoxic effect of the anti-cancer drug vinorelbine (VLB. However, micelles consisted of Y-shaped unimers were found to be more convenient for delivery of hydrophobic drugs such as VLB because they formed in lower concentration, carrying a higher amount of drugs and owing a monomodal distribution. We concluded that the free tails of hydrophobic chains in Y-shaped block copolymer facilitate the assembly of amphiphilic material in water to form micelles.

  3. Vinorelbine as first-line or second-line therapy for advanced breast cancer: a Phase I-II trial by the Danish Breast Cancer Co-operative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjer, S.T.; Ejlertsen, B.; Mouridsen, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study was conducted to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of intravenous vinorelbine and on the determined dose to assess efficacy and safety in patients with metastatic breast cancer previously treated with epirubicin. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients had histologically...... proven breast cancer and had received a prior epirubicin based regimen either adjuvant or as first line therapy for advanced disease. Vinorelbine was administered intravenously day 1 and 8 in a 3 weeks' schedule. Subsequently 48 additional patients were treated at one dose-level below MTD. RESULTS: Fifty...

  4. Oscillating in synchrony with a metronome: serial dependence, limit cycle dynamics, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Kjerstin; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Delignières, Didier

    2010-07-01

    We analyzed serial dependencies in periods and asynchronies collected during oscillations performed in synchrony with a metronome. Results showed that asynchronies contain 1/f fluctuations, and the series of periods contain antipersistent dependence. The analysis of the phase portrait revealed a specific asymmetry induced by synchronization. We propose a hybrid limit cycle model including a cycle-dependent stiffness parameter provided with fractal properties, and a parametric driving function based on velocity. This model accounts for most experimentally evidenced statistical features, including serial dependence and limit cycle dynamics. We discuss the results and modeling choices within the framework of event-based and emergent timing.

  5. Basics in advanced life support: a role for download audit and metronomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, David; Galloway, Robert; Chamberlain, Douglas; Pateman, Jane; Bryant, Geoffrey; Newcombe, Robert G

    2008-08-01

    An intention in 2003 to undertake a multicentre trial in the United Kingdom of compressions before and after defibrillation could not be realized because of concerns at the time in relation to informed consent. Instead, the new protocol was introduced in one ambulance service, ahead of the 2005 Guidelines, with greater emphasis on compressions. The results were monitored by analysis of electronic ECG downloads. Deficiencies in the standard of basic life support were identified but were not unique to our service. The introduction of metronomes and the provision of feedback to crews led to major improvements in performance. Our experience has implications for the emergency pre-hospital care of cardiac arrest.

  6. The efficacy and safety of Oxaliplatin-Vinorelbine as a second-line chemotherapy combination in patients with platinum-resistant pretreated epithelial ovarian cancer: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidia Mumtahana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study was to analyze the effects and tolerability of Oxaliplatin-Vinorelbine combination on Platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC patients.Methods: A single centered retrospective study comprising of 34 patients was conducted, and all 34 patients were treated with Vinorelbine 30 mg/m2 on day 1 and 8 along with Oxaliplatin 100 mg/m2 on day 1 of 3 weeks treatment cycle following progressive platinum-resistant EOC. Results: The combination showed an overall response rate (ORR of 18% (95% CI, 4.4 - 31.6 where 2 (6% patients had complete response and 4 (12% patients had partial response. Stable disease was observed in 9 (26% patients and progressive disease in 19 (56% patients. Median diseases free survival, median relapse free survival and median time to progression was 17.05 months, 4.4 months, and 1.25 months, respectively. Hematological toxicities were mild; only 1 (2.9% patient had G3 anemia and major non-hematological toxicities include nausea-vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, hepatotoxicity, fatigueness and alopecia, which are mainly limited to G1-G2 and reversible. Conclusion: The effect of this combination is moderate as a second line treatment of platinum resistant EOC; however, in comparison with other regimens of Vinorelbine and Oxaliplatin, the activity is substandard but the toxicity profile is well tolerable. Further multicenter evaluation is needed for the better understanding of the therapeutic efficacy of the combination.

  7. Determinants of dynamic hyperinflation during metronome-paced tachypnea in COPD and normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C B; Calligaro, G L; Quinn, M M; Eshaghian, P; Coskun, F; Abrazado, M; Bateman, E D; Raine, R I

    2014-01-01

    In COPD, dynamic hyperinflation (DH) occurs during exercise and during metronome-paced tachypnea (MPT). We investigated the relationship of DH with breathing pattern and ventilation (V˙E) in COPD and normal subjects (NS). In 35 subjects with moderate COPD and 17 younger healthy volunteers we measured inspiratory capacity (IC), breathing frequency (fR), expiratory time (TE), ventilation (V˙E) and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2) at baseline and after 30s of MPT at 40breaths/min with metronome-defined I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2. A reduction in IC (ΔIC) was taken to indicate DH. In COPD subjects, DH correlated with TE but not with V˙E or PETCO2, and was best predicted by total lung capacity. NS also showed DH (although less than in COPD), which correlated with PETCO2 but not with fR, TE or V˙E. We conclude that MPT evokes DH in both NS and patients with COPD. TE is the most important determinant of DH during MPT in patients with COPD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Time course and degree of hyperinflation with metronome-paced tachypnea in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, S Samuel; Abrazado, Marlon; Kleerup, Eric C; Tashkin, Donald P; Cooper, Christopher B

    2008-10-01

    In COPD patients, tachypnea should increase (dynamic) hyperinflation by shortening expiratory time. We developed a method to evaluate the time course and degree of dynamic hyperinflation during metronome-paced tachypnea. Fourteen patients with stable COPD (FEV(1) 43 +/- 13% predicted) were studied. Inspiratory capacity (IC) was measured breathing through a flow transducer. Subjects paced their respiratory rate (f(R)) at 20/min, 30/min and 40/min for 60-second periods in response to audible tones generated by a computer. IC measurements were obtained at baseline and after 30 and 60 seconds at each f(R). End-tidal carbon dioxide was monitored and f(R) was allowed to return to baseline between periods of tachypnea. Tachypnea produced reductions in IC of 200 +/- 240 ml, 380 +/- 330 ml and 540 +/- 300 ml after 30 seconds at 20/min, 30/min and 40/min, respectively. IC reduction at 60 seconds was similar to 30 seconds for each f(R). In patients with moderate-to-severe COPD, the dynamic hyperinflation induced by metronome-paced tachypnea was shown to occur rapidly and be complete by 30 seconds for a given f(R). Controlled increments in f(R) produced stepwise increases in dynamic hyperinflation. This standardized method could be a useful and easier method of assessing dynamic hyperinflation in COPD patients before and after therapeutic interventions.

  9. Bouncing Ball with a Uniformly Varying Velocity in a Metronome Synchronization Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yingyu; Gu, Li; Yang, Junkai; Wu, Xiang

    2017-09-21

    Sensorimotor synchronization (SMS), a fundamental human ability to coordinate movements with external rhythms, has long been thought to be modality specific. In the canonical metronome synchronization task that requires tapping a finger along with an isochronous sequence, a well-established finding is that synchronization is much more stable to an auditory sequence consisting of auditory tones than to a visual sequence consisting of visual flashes. However, recent studies have shown that periodically moving visual stimuli can substantially improve synchronization compared with visual flashes. In particular, synchronization of a visual bouncing ball that has a uniformly varying velocity was found to be not less stable than synchronization of auditory tones. Here, the current protocol describes the application of the bouncing ball with a uniformly varying velocity in a metronome synchronization task. The usage of the bouncing ball in sequences with different inter-onset intervals (IOI) is included. The representative results illustrate synchronization performance of the bouncing ball, as compared with the performances of auditory tones and visual flashes. Given its comparable synchronization performance to that of auditory tones, the bouncing ball is of particular importance for addressing the current research topic of whether modality-specific mechanisms underlay SMS.

  10. Synchronization with competing visual and auditory rhythms: bouncing ball meets metronome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove, Michael J; Iversen, John R; Zhang, Allen; Repp, Bruno H

    2013-07-01

    Synchronization of finger taps with periodically flashing visual stimuli is known to be much more variable than synchronization with an auditory metronome. When one of these rhythms is the synchronization target and the other serves as a distracter at various temporal offsets, strong auditory dominance is observed. However, it has recently been shown that visuomotor synchronization improves substantially with moving stimuli such as a continuously bouncing ball. The present study pitted a bouncing ball against an auditory metronome in a target-distracter synchronization paradigm, with the participants being auditory experts (musicians) and visual experts (video gamers and ball players). Synchronization was still less variable with auditory than with visual target stimuli in both groups. For musicians, auditory stimuli tended to be more distracting than visual stimuli, whereas the opposite was the case for the visual experts. Overall, there was no main effect of distracter modality. Thus, a distracting spatiotemporal visual rhythm can be as effective as a distracting auditory rhythm in its capacity to perturb synchronous movement, but its effectiveness also depends on modality-specific expertise.

  11. Mobile phone-assisted basic life support augmented with a metronome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paal, Peter; Pircher, Iris; Baur, Thomas; Gruber, Elisabeth; Strasak, Alexander M; Herff, Holger; Brugger, Hermann; Wenzel, Volker; Mitterlechner, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Basic life support (BLS) performed by lay rescuers is poor. We developed software for mobile phones augmented with a metronome to improve BLS. To assess BLS in lay rescuers with or without software assistance. Medically untrained volunteers were randomized to run through a cardiac arrest scenario with ("assisted BLS") or without ("non-assisted BLS") the aid of a BLS software program installed on a mobile phone. Sixty-four lay rescuers were enrolled in the "assisted BLS" and 77 in the "non-assisted BLS" group. The "assisted BLS" when compared to the "non-assisted BLS" group, achieved a higher overall score (19.2 ± 7.5 vs. 12.9 ± 5.7 credits; p metronome resulted in a higher overall score and a better chest compression rate when compared to "non-assisted BLS." However, in the "assisted BLS" group, time to call the dispatch center and to start chest compressions was longer. In both groups, lay persons did not ventilate satisfactorily during this cardiac arrest scenario. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metronome LKM: An open source virtual keyboard driver to measure experiment software latencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaizar, Pablo; Vadillo, Miguel A

    2017-10-01

    Experiment software is often used to measure reaction times gathered with keyboards or other input devices. In previous studies, the accuracy and precision of time stamps has been assessed through several means: (a) generating accurate square wave signals from an external device connected to the parallel port of the computer running the experiment software, (b) triggering the typematic repeat feature of some keyboards to get an evenly separated series of keypress events, or (c) using a solenoid handled by a microcontroller to press the input device (keyboard, mouse button, touch screen) that will be used in the experimental setup. Despite the advantages of these approaches in some contexts, none of them can isolate the measurement error caused by the experiment software itself. Metronome LKM provides a virtual keyboard to assess an experiment's software. Using this open source driver, researchers can generate keypress events using high-resolution timers and compare the time stamps collected by the experiment software with those gathered by Metronome LKM (with nanosecond resolution). Our software is highly configurable (in terms of keys pressed, intervals, SysRq activation) and runs on 2.6-4.8 Linux kernels.

  13. Survival data for postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy comprising cisplatin plus vinorelbine after complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Wakuda, Kazushige; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Omori, Shota; Ono, Akira; Naito, Tateaki; Murakami, Haruyasu; Kojima, Hideaki; Takahashi, Shoji; Isaka, Mitsuhiro; Endo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2017-09-01

    Despite the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant cisplatin (CDDP)-based chemotherapy for patients who have undergone surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few reports have presented survival data for Asian patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy involving a combination of CDDP and vinorelbine (VNR). This study was performed to evaluate the survival of patients with NSCLC who received postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy comprising CDDP + VNR. We retrospectively evaluated patients with NSCLC who received adjuvant chemotherapy comprising CDDP + VNR at the Shizuoka Cancer Center between February 2006 and October 2011. One hundred patients who underwent surgical resection of NSCLC were included in this study. The patients' characteristics were as follows: median age 63 years (range 36-74 years), female 34%, never-smokers 20%, and non-squamous NSCLC 73%. Pathological stages IIA, IIB, and IIIA were observed in 31, 22, and 47% of patients, respectively. The 5- and 2-year overall survival rates were 73 and 93%, respectively. The 5- and 2-year relapse-free survival rates were 53 and 62%, respectively. Univariate analysis of prognostic factors showed that patient characteristics (sex, histology, and pathological stage) and CDDP dose intensity were not significantly associated with survival. In 48 patients who developed NSCLC recurrence, the 5-year survival rate after recurrence was 29%, and the median survival time after recurrence was 37 months. Our results suggest that the prognosis after surgical resection of NSCLC and adjuvant chemotherapy comprising CDDP + VNR might be improving compared with previous survival data of adjuvant chemotherapy for NSCLC.

  14. Replication and Pedagogy in the History of Psychology V: The Metronome and Wilhelm Wundt's Search for the Components of Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Christopher; Borawski, Steven; Miller, Jonathon

    2008-01-01

    Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920) believed that consciousness was represented by the interconnection of psychical processes comprised of temporal elements and compounds. To explore these processes, Wundt used a metronome to measure the amount of information that passed into consciousness across time. The current project replicated some of his procedures,…

  15. Sensitive measurement of vinorelbine in dog plasma by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry utilizing transitions from double-charged precursor ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Makoto; Kawashiro, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    A sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for measuring vinorelbine was developed. A 100 µL aliquot of plasma was spiked with deuterium-labeled internal standard and subjected to solid-phase extraction using an Oasis HLB μ-elution plate. Two microliters of the extracted samples was directly injected into LC/MS/MS. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Capcell Pak C18 UG column (2 × 75 mm) with a gradient elution of methanol (mobile phase B) against 0.05% formic acid in aqueous 10 mm ammonium formate (mobile phase A). The LC flow rate was set to 0.28 mL/min and the gradient (solvent B concentration) was processed from 40 to 90%. In mass spectrometric detection, observation of the reaction from a double-charged precursor ion [M + 2H](2+) (m/z 390) to product ion m/z 122 provided very high sensitivity. The method was validated with a lower limit of detection of 0.2 ng/mL with 0.1 mL of plasma, and the method was used to determine the plasma pharmacokinetics of vinorelbine in dogs. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction cisplatin (CDDP) and vinorelbine (VNR) for stage III Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nihei, Keiji; Kubota, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi; Niho, Seiji; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Ogino, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction chemotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and materials: Treatment consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin 80 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks followed by HART, 3 times a day (1.5, 1.8, 1.5 Gy, 4-h interval) for a total dose of 57.6 Gy. Results: Thirty patients were eligible. Their median age was 64 years (range, 46-73 years), 24 were male, 6 were female, 8 had performance status (PS) 0, 22 had PS 1, 9 had Stage IIIA, and 21 had Stage IIIB. All but 1 patient completed the treatment. Common grade ≥3 toxicities during the treatment included neutropenia, 25; infection, 5; esophagitis, 5; and radiation pneumonitis, 3. The overall response rate was 83%. The median survival was 24 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-34 months), and the 2-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI, 32-68%). The median progression-free survival was 10 months (95% CI, 8-20 months). Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy after induction of cisplatin and vinorelbine was feasible and promising. Future investigation employing dose-intensified radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy is needed

  17. Music and metronome cues produce different effects on gait spatiotemporal measures but not gait variability in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Joanne E; Webster, Kate E; Hill, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Rhythmic auditory cues including music and metronome beats have been used, sometimes interchangeably, to improve disordered gait arising from a range of clinical conditions. There has been limited investigation into whether there are optimal cue types. Different cue types have produced inconsistent effects across groups which differed in both age and clinical condition. The possible effect of normal ageing on response to different cue types has not been reported for gait. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of both rhythmic music and metronome cues on gait spatiotemporal measures (including variability) in healthy older people. Twelve women and seven men (>65 years) walked on an instrumented walkway at comfortable pace and then in time to each of rhythmic music and metronome cues at comfortable pace stepping frequency. Music but not metronome cues produced a significant increase in group mean gait velocity of 4.6 cm/s, due mostly to a significant increase in group mean stride length of 3.1cm. Both cue types produced a significant but small increase in cadence of 1 step/min. Mean spatio-temporal variability was low at baseline and did not increase with either cue type suggesting cues did not disrupt gait timing. Study findings suggest music and metronome cues may not be used interchangeably and cue type as well as frequency should be considered when evaluating effects of rhythmic auditory cueing on gait. Further work is required to determine whether optimal cue types and frequencies to improve walking in different clinical groups can be identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Metronomic Treatment with Low-Dose Trofosfamide Leads to a Long-Term Remission in a Patient with Docetaxel-Refractory Advanced Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Greiner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic prostate cancer patients refractory to androgen withdrawal and docetaxel therapy is currently discouraging and new therapeutic approaches are vastly needed. Here, we report a long-term remission over one year in a 68-year-old patient with metastatic docetaxel-refractory prostate cancer employing low-dose trofosfamide. The patient suffered from distant failure with several bone lesions and lymph node metastases depicted by a (11 C-Choline positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT. After initiation of trofosfamide 100 mg taken orally once a day we observed a steadily decreasing PSA value from initial 46.6 down to 2.1 g/l. The Choline-PET/CT was repeated after 10 months of continuous therapy and demonstrated a partial remission of the bone lesions and a regression of all involved lymph nodes but one. Taken together we found an astonishing and durable activity of the alkylating agent trofosfamide given in a metronomic fashion. We rate the side effects as low and state an excellent therapeutic ratio of this drug in our patient.

  19. A randomized study of KRAS-guided maintenance therapy with bevacizumab, erlotinib or metronomic capecitabine after first-line induction treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagman, H; Frödin, J-E; Berglund, Å

    2016-01-01

    without progression were eligible for randomization to mt; KRAS wild-type (wt) patients were randomized to bev ± erlo (arms wt-BE, N = 36 versus wt-B, N = 35), KRAS mutated (mut) patients were randomized to bev or metronomic cap (arms mut-B, N = 34 versus mut-C, N = 33). Primary end point was progression...... to influence the outcome of treatment with erlotinib. Metronomic cap warrants further investigation in mt strategies, given our explorative results. CLINICALTRIALSGOV: NCT01229813....

  20. [Effects of a voice metronome on compression rate and depth in telephone assisted, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: an investigator-blinded, 3-armed, randomized, simulation trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tulder, Raphael; Roth, Dominik; Krammel, Mario; Laggner, Roberta; Schriefl, Christoph; Kienbacher, Calvin; Lorenzo Hartmann, Alexander; Novosad, Heinz; Constantin Chwojka, Christof; Havel, Christoph; Schreiber, Wolfgang; Herkner, Harald

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect on compression rate and depth of a conventional metronome and a voice metronome in simulated telephone-assisted, protocol-driven bystander Cardiopulmonary resucitation (CPR) compared to standard instruction. Thirty-six lay volunteers performed 10 minutes of compression-only CPR in a prospective, investigator-blinded, 3-arm study on a manikin. Participants were randomized either to standard instruction ("push down firmly, 5 cm"), a regular metronome pacing 110 beats per minute (bpm), or a voice metronome continuously prompting "deep-deepdeep- deeper" at 110 bpm. The primary outcome was deviation from the ideal chest compression target range (50 mm compression depth x 100 compressions per minute x 10 minutes = 50 m). Secondary outcomes were CPR quality measures (compression and leaning depth, rate, no-flow times) and participants' related physiological response (heart rate, blood pressure and nine hole peg test and borg scales score). We used a linear regression model to calculate effects. The mean (SD) deviation from the ideal target range (50 m) was -11 (9) m in the standard group, -20 (11) m in the conventional metronome group (adjusted difference [95%, CI], 9.0 [1.2-17.5 m], P=.03), and -18 (9) m in the voice metronome group (adjusted difference, 7.2 [-0.9-15.3] m, P=.08). Secondary outcomes (CPR quality measures and physiological response of participants to CPR performance) showed no significant differences. Compared to standard instruction, the conventional metronome showed a significant negative effect on the chest compression target range. The voice metronome showed a non-significant negative effect and therefore cannot be recommended for regular use in telephone-assisted CPR.

  1. Rhythmic synchronization tapping to an audio–visual metronome in budgerigars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Ai; Okanoya, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Toshikazu; Seki, Yoshimasa

    2011-01-01

    In all ages and countries, music and dance have constituted a central part in human culture and communication. Recently, vocal-learning animals such as parrots and elephants have been found to share rhythmic ability with humans. Thus, we investigated the rhythmic synchronization of budgerigars, a vocal-mimicking parrot species, under controlled conditions and a systematically designed experimental paradigm as a first step in understanding the evolution of musical entrainment. We trained eight budgerigars to perform isochronous tapping tasks in which they pecked a key to the rhythm of audio–visual metronome-like stimuli. The budgerigars showed evidence of entrainment to external stimuli over a wide range of tempos. They seemed to be inherently inclined to tap at fast tempos, which have a similar time scale to the rhythm of budgerigars' natural vocalizations. We suggest that vocal learning might have contributed to their performance, which resembled that of humans. PMID:22355637

  2. Stabilizing the Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling Using a Metronome to Save Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villard Sébastien J.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling (LRC is often evidenced by phase- or frequency-locking patterns. The model of the sine circle map is used here to characterize LRC. Several studies have suggested that a sound emitted by an external metronome can stabilize the LRC. Participants in our task were asked during a cycling exercise to synchronize either their respiration or their pedaling rate with an external auditory stimulus corresponding to their preferred respiratory and pedaling frequencies respectively. Our results showed a significant reduction in energy expenditure when participants breathed in sync with the auditory stimulation, but not accompanied by a change in the stabilization of LRC. A large within- as well as between-participants LRC variability, together with the spontaneous adoption of the most stable pace, contributes to explain this result.

  3. Rhythmic synchronization tapping to an audio-visual metronome in budgerigars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Ai; Okanoya, Kazuo; Hasegawa, Toshikazu; Seki, Yoshimasa

    2011-01-01

    In all ages and countries, music and dance have constituted a central part in human culture and communication. Recently, vocal-learning animals such as parrots and elephants have been found to share rhythmic ability with humans. Thus, we investigated the rhythmic synchronization of budgerigars, a vocal-mimicking parrot species, under controlled conditions and a systematically designed experimental paradigm as a first step in understanding the evolution of musical entrainment. We trained eight budgerigars to perform isochronous tapping tasks in which they pecked a key to the rhythm of audio-visual metronome-like stimuli. The budgerigars showed evidence of entrainment to external stimuli over a wide range of tempos. They seemed to be inherently inclined to tap at fast tempos, which have a similar time scale to the rhythm of budgerigars' natural vocalizations. We suggest that vocal learning might have contributed to their performance, which resembled that of humans.

  4. Metronomic chemotherapy – promising therapeutical approach for recurrent/ refractory high risk tumours in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deak, L.; Feketeova, J.; Haluskova, V.; Sencakova, I.; Jenco, I.; Oravkinova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a great progress in the treatment of pediatric malignancies, the outcome of children with high risk refractory or relapsed tumours, as are some types of brain tumours or metastatic sarcomas, remain poor. In contrast to dose – intensified chemotherapy, utilizing „maximal tolerated doses“ of chemotherapy, the metronomic chemotherapy (MC) is based on chronic administration of significantly lower doses of chemotherapy in an uninterrupted manner, for prolonged periods. Because of different mechanism of action against conventional chemotherapy and no cross- resistance, this treatment modality is effective also in refractory and recurrent tumours. The predominant mechanism of action of MC is antiangiogenic. In last decades several studies confirmed the efficacy and low toxicity of this new treatment modality. It can be delivered on outpatient basis and is well tolerated even in heavily pretreated patients. The authors present an overview of studies on MC in pediatric oncology and their own experience. (author)

  5. Metastatic melanoma patients treated with dendritic cell vaccination, Interleukin-2 and metronomic cyclophosphamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Iversen, Trine Zeeberg

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen presenting cells and have proven effective in stimulation of specific immune responses in vivo. Competing immune inhibition could limit the clinical efficacy of DC vaccination. In this phase II trial, metronomic Cyclophosphamide and a Cox-2 inhibitor...... have been added to a DC vaccine with the intend to dampen immunosuppressive mechanisms. Twenty-eight patients with progressive metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous DCs pulsed with survivin, hTERT, and p53-derived peptides (HLA-A2(+)) or tumor lysate (HLA-A2(-)). Concomitantly the patients...... were treated with IL-2, Cyclophosphamide, and Celecoxib. The treatment was safe and tolerable. Sixteen patients (57 %) achieved stable disease (SD) at 1st evaluation and 8 patients had prolonged SD (7-13.7 months). The median OS was 9.4 months. Patients with SD had an OS of 10.5 months while patients...

  6. Comparing dynamic hyperinflation and associated dyspnea induced by metronome-paced tachypnea versus incremental exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calligaro, Gregory L; Raine, Richard I; Bateman, Mary E; Bateman, Eric D; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) during exercise is associated with both dyspnea and exercise limitation in COPD. Metronome-paced tachypnoea (MPT) is a simple alternative for studying DH. We compared MPT with exercise testing (XT) as methods of provoking DH, and assessed their relationship with dyspnea. We studied 24 patients with moderate COPD (FEV1 59 ± 9% predicted) after inhalation of ipratropium/salbutamol combination or placebo in a double-blind, crossover design. Inspiratory capacity (IC) was measured at baseline and after 30 seconds of MPT with breathing frequencies (fR) of 20, 30 and 40 breaths/min and metronome-defined I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2, in random sequence, followed by incremental cycle ergometry with interval determinations of IC. DH was defined as a decline in IC from baseline (∆IC) for both methods. Dyspnea was assessed using a Borg CR-10 scale. ∆IC during MPT was greater with higher fR and I:E ratio of 1:1 versus 1:2, and less when patients were treated with bronchodilator rather than placebo (P = 0.032). DH occurred during 19 (40%) XTs, and during 35 (73%) tests using MPT. Eleven of 18 (61%) non-congruent XTs (where DH occurred on MPT but not XT) terminated before fR of 40 breaths/min was reached. Although greater during XT, the intensity of dyspnea bore no relationship to DH during either MPT and XT. MPT at 40 breaths/min and I:E of 1:1 elicits the greatest ∆IC, and is a more sensitive method for demonstrating DH. The relationship between DH and dyspnea is complex and not determined by DH alone.

  7. Death before disco: the effectiveness of a musical metronome in layperson cardiopulmonary resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, John W; Jou, Andrew C; Wang, Huaping; Bleess, Brandon B; Tham, Stephanie K

    2015-01-01

    A novel musical memory aid has been proposed for aiding laypersons in complying with the American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines of 100 compressions per minute (cpm). This study tested usefulness of such a memory aid to improve layperson long-term compliance with CPR compression rate guidelines. A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted using CPR-untrained laypersons. Subjects received either a standard CPR educational experience (AHA Heartsaver® CPR class) or an experimental CPR educational experience (AHA Heartsaver® CPR class augmented with a musical metronome). Experimental group subjects were taught to perform compressions to the cadence of a pop music song (The Bee Gees "Stayin' Alive"; Saturday Night Fever, The Original Movie Soundtrack; Polygram International Music, 1977) with a tempo of 100 beats/min. Compression rates, depth of compressions, and correct compressions were measured initially and upon retesting ≥6 weeks post-training. Control subjects had a higher mean compression rate both immediately (121 [standard deviation {SD} = 21] vs. 109 [SD = 15] cpm; 95% confidence interval [CI] of mean difference 4-19; p = 0.002) and at follow-up (120 [SD = 20] vs. 111 [SD = 13] cpm; 95% CI of mean difference 2-16; p = 0.014). Compression rates stratified to 100-120 cpm demonstrated no difference between groups initially (39% vs. 48%; p = 0.382), but more experimental subjects maintained these rates at follow-up (43% vs. 74%; p = 0.003). Subjects trained to use a musical metronome more often maintained a compression rate of 100-120 cpm at ≥6-week follow-up, suggesting the memory aid may improve long-term guideline adherence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phase I study of low-dose metronomic temozolomide for recurrent malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Eric T.; Timmons, Joshua; Callahan, Amy; O’Loughlin, Lauren; Giarusso, Bridget; Alsop, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment goal for recurrent malignant gliomas centers on disease stabilization while minimizing therapy-related side effects. Metronomic dosing of cytotoxic chemotherapy has emerged as a promising option to achieve this objective. This phase I study was performed using metronomic temozolomide (mTMZ) at 25 or 50 mg/m 2 /day continuously in 42-day cycles. Correlative studies were incorporated using arterial spin labeling MRI to assess tumor blood flow, analysis of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 activities in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as surrogates for tumor angiogenesis and invasion, as well as determination of CSF soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2Rα) levels as a marker of immune modulation. Nine subjects were enrolled and toxicity consisted of primarily grade 1 or 2 hematological and gastrointestinal side effects; only one patient had a grade 3 elevated liver enzyme level that was reversible. Tumor blood flow was variable across subjects and time, with two experiencing a transient increase before a decrease to below baseline level while one exhibited a gradual drop in blood flow over time. MMP-2 activity correlated with overall survival but not with progression free survival, while MMP-9 activity did not correlate with either outcome parameters. Baseline CSF sIL-2Rα level was inversely correlated with time from initial diagnosis to first progression, suggesting that subjects with higher sIL-2Rα may have more aggressive disease. But they lived longer when treated with mTMZ, probably due to drug-related changes in T-cell constituency. mTMZ possesses efficacy against recurrent malignant gliomas by altering blood flow, slowing invasion and modulating antitumor immune function

  9. High dose lansoprazole combined with metronomic chemotherapy: a phase I/II study in companion animals with spontaneously occurring tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnini, Enrico P; Buglioni, Sabrina; Carocci, Francesca; Francesco, Menicagli; Vincenzi, Bruno; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Fais, Stefano

    2014-08-21

    The treatment of human cancer has been seriously hampered for decades by resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. A very efficient mechanism of tumor resistance to drugs is the proton pumps-mediated acidification of tumor microenvironment. Metronomic chemotherapy has shown efficacy in adjuvant fashion as well as in the treatment of pets with advanced disease. Moreover, we have shown in veterinary clinical settings that pre-treatment with proton-pumps inhibitors (PPI) increases tumor responsiveness to chemotherapeutics. In this study pet with spontaneously occurring cancer have been recruited to be treated by a combination of metronomic chemotherapy and high dose PPIs and their responses have been matched to those of a historical control of ten patients treated with metronomic chemotherapy alone. Single arm, non randomized phase II open study, with historical control group, evaluating safety and efficacy of the combination of metronomic chemotherapy and alkalization. Twenty-four companion animals (22 dogs and 2 cats) were treated adding to their metronomic chemotherapy protocol the pump inhibitor lansoprazole at high dose, and a water alkalizer. Their responses have been evaluated by clinical and instrumental evaluation and matched to those of the control group. The protocol was overall well tolerated, with only two dogs experiencing side effects due to gastric hypochlorhydria consisting with vomiting and or diarrhea. In terms of overall response, in the alkalized cohort, 18 out of 24 had partial or complete responses (75%), two patients had a stable disease and the remaining patients experienced no response or progressive disease. On the other hand, only one patient in the control group experienced a complete response (10%) and three other experienced short lived responses. Median time to terminal event was 34 weeks for the experimental group versus 2 weeks in the controls (p= 0.042). Patient alkalization has shown to be well tolerated and to increase tumor response

  10. The effects of metronomic pendular adjustment versus tap-tempo input on the stability and accuracy of tempo perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Warren

    2005-06-01

    This study explores tempo stability and accuracy while comparing two subject-response modes: the traditional metronomic pendular adjustment task versus tap-tempo input. Experiment 1 questioned if a single correct tempo measurement consistently emerges from repeated listenings, and if subject-response mode affects tempo stability and accuracy. Experiment 2 assessed incremental improvement between two repeated sessions, and questioned the incidence of self-pacing or congruent effects of potential delays on tempo responses. While single-session studies have shown that listeners find some tempos more enjoyable, can notice discrete differences in pace, and can remember rhythmic speed over prolonged periods of time, the current study employs a multiple-session format focusing on two diametrically opposed subject-response modes. The findings show that tempo responses by listeners without formal music training were consistent across listening sessions, and that responses from tap-tempo input were significantly more stable and accurate than responses from metronomic pendular adjustment tasks.

  11. Accelerated split-course (Type B) thoracic radiation therapy plus vinorelbine/carboplatin combination chemotherapy in Stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iaffaioli, R.V.; Tortoriello, A.; Facchini, G.; Maccauro, M.; Dimitri, P.; Ravo, V.; Muto, P.; Crovella, F.

    1996-01-01

    43 patients with stage III NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) entered a phase II study aimed at evaluating the toxicity and the activity of a combined modality programme including an accelerated split-course schedule (type B) of thoracic radiation therapy and a combination chemotherapy with vinorelbine and carboplatin. An objective response was achieved in 18/42 evaluable patients (5 complete and 13 partial responses), for an overall response rate of 43% (95% confidence interval, 28-58%). Four complete responses had a duration which exceeded 16 months. Treatment was well tolerated; grade III myelotoxicity occurred in only 14% of patients and treatment was delayed in only 2 cases because of grade 3 oesophagitis. Both tolerability and efficacy data suggest that this regimen holds promise for the treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  12. Metastatic Angiosarcoma with Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome Responsive to Gemcitabine and Vinorelbine after Failure of Liposomal Doxorubicin and Paclitaxel: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Read

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kasabach-Merritt syndrome (KMS describes a consumptive coagulopathy associated with certain vascular tumors. It is thought that platelets are destroyed as they circulate through the aberrant endothelial surfaces associated with these tumors. Most published literature describes infants with kaposiform hemangioendothelioma, but a similar syndrome can complicate angiosarcoma in adults. This report describes a man with metastatic angiosarcoma arising in the scalp in whom disease progression was complicated by profound thrombocytopenia consistent with KMS. His disease and associated KMS had progressed previously through paclitaxel and then through liposomal doxorubicin. It did not respond to paclitaxel and bevacizumab, but responded almost completely to chemotherapy with gemcitabine and vinorelbine. Six months later, progression through ongoing chemotherapy then responded to chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and sirolimus.

  13. Metronome-Cued Stepping in Place after Hemiparetic Stroke: Comparison of a One- and Two-Tone Beat

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Rachel L.; Masood, Afia; Maccormac, Elinor S.; Pratt, David; Sackley, Catherine M.; Wing, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Hemiparetic gait is characterised by temporal asymmetry and variability, and these variables are improved by auditory cueing. Stepping in place incorporates aspects of gait and may be a useful tool for locomotor training. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the use of a single-tone and dual-tone metronome to cue stepping in place after hemiparetic stroke. Eight participants completed an uncued baseline stepping condition and two cued stepping conditions utilising a single-tone and ...

  14. Metronomic Small Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) Is Antiangiogenic and Potentiates the Antitumor Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitlin, Benjamin D.; Spalding, Aaron C.; Campos, Marcia S.; Ashimori, Naoki; Dong Zhihong; Wang Shaomeng; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Noer, Jacques E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of a metronomic (low-dose, high-frequency) small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) in combination with radiotherapy on microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Methods and Materials: Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to ionizing radiation and/or TW-37 and colony formation, as well as capillary sprouting in three-dimensional collagen matrices, was evaluated. Xenografts vascularized with human blood vessels were engineered by cotransplantation of human squamous cell carcinoma cells (OSCC3) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells seeded in highly porous biodegradable scaffolds into the subcutaneous space of immunodeficient mice. Mice were treated with metronomic TW-37 and/or radiation, and tumor growth was evaluated. Results: Low-dose TW-37 sensitized primary endothelial cells to radiation-induced inhibition of colony formation. Low-dose TW-37 or radiation partially inhibited endothelial cell sprout formation, and in combination, these therapies abrogated new sprouting. Combination of metronomic TW-37 and low-dose radiation inhibited tumor growth and resulted in significant increase in time to failure compared with controls, whereas single agents did not. Notably, histopathologic analysis revealed that tumors treated with TW-37 (with or without radiation) are more differentiated and showed more cohesive invasive fronts, which is consistent with less aggressive phenotype. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that metronomic TW-37 potentiates the antitumor effects of radiotherapy and suggest that patients with head and neck cancer might benefit from the combination of small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 and radiation therapy.

  15. Outcomes of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer with integration of metronomic chemotherapy: An Indian rural cancer centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paclitaxel-platinum and optimal cytoreductive surgery are the standard of care for ovarian carcinoma. Poor socioeconomic profile and therapeutic constraints in rural India poses a therapeutic challenge. Aim: To evaluate outcomes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. Objectives: To calculate disease-free survival (DFS, overall survival (OS, and factors affecting outcomes. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed as ovarian carcinoma registered between March 2009 and March 2014 were retrieved. Demographic profile, chemotherapy and response, surgery, and disease progression were collected. Patients who underwent surgery or completed three cycles of chemotherapy were selected. Kaplan-Meir survival was used to determine disease-free and OS. Log-rank test used to evaluate factors affecting outcome. Results: Median follow-up is 26 months. 93/102 patients (91% underwent cytoreductive surgery, of which 37 had primary cytoreduction (40% while 56 had interval cytoreduction. 21/93 (23%, 57/93 (61%, and 15/93 (16% patients were operated by local surgeons, surgeons of our hospital, and trained oncosurgeons, respectively. Induction paclitaxel-platinum was used in 35/63 (56% patients while 28/63 patients (44% received neoadjuvant metronomic chemotherapy. Median DFS and OS are 17 and 54 months respectively while 3 year OS of 66%. Median DFS of patients operated by oncosurgeons versus local surgeons were 22 months versus 15 months (P = 0.01, OS was 54 versus 26 months (P = 0.01.40/88 (45% patients received maintenance metronomic therapy after adjuvant chemotherapy with median of 6 months (range 2-18 months. Patients receiving metronomic maintenance had better DFS, 18 months versus 15 months (P = 0.69. Conclusion: Induction therapy in ovarian carcinoma helps in selecting patients for cytoreductive surgery. Outcomes are better if operated by trained oncosurgeons. Maintenance metronomic has potential to delay disease progression.

  16. Effects of interactive metronome training on postural stability and upper extremity function in Parkinson’s disease: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Arim; Lee, Hye-Sun; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of interactive metronome training on the postural stability and upper extremity function of an individual with Parkinson’s disease. [Subject and Methods] The participant of this case study was a 75-year-old female with Parkinson’s disease diagnosed 7 years prior. This study was a single-subject research with an A-B-A design. She received IM training during the treatment phase (B phase) for 40 minutes per session. She was assessed pretest and posttest using the Berg balance scale and Wolf motor function test, and at baseline and the treatment phase using the measured box-and-block test and a Tetrax system. [Results] After training, the patient’s static and dynamic balance, functional activity, and performance time of the upper extremity improved. Interactive metronome therapy improved the manual dexterity of both hands. Interactive metronome therapy also improved the limit of stability of the Parkinson’s disease. [Conclusion] Though a case study, the results of this study suggest that IM therapy is effective at restoring the postural stability and upper extremity function of patients with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28210066

  17. Effects of interactive metronome training on postural stability and upper extremity function in Parkinson's disease: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Arim; Lee, Hye-Sun; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of interactive metronome training on the postural stability and upper extremity function of an individual with Parkinson's disease. [Subject and Methods] The participant of this case study was a 75-year-old female with Parkinson's disease diagnosed 7 years prior. This study was a single-subject research with an A-B-A design. She received IM training during the treatment phase (B phase) for 40 minutes per session. She was assessed pretest and posttest using the Berg balance scale and Wolf motor function test, and at baseline and the treatment phase using the measured box-and-block test and a Tetrax system. [Results] After training, the patient's static and dynamic balance, functional activity, and performance time of the upper extremity improved. Interactive metronome therapy improved the manual dexterity of both hands. Interactive metronome therapy also improved the limit of stability of the Parkinson's disease. [Conclusion] Though a case study, the results of this study suggest that IM therapy is effective at restoring the postural stability and upper extremity function of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  18. Effects of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation with a metronome-guided walking pace in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-soon; Kim, Changhwan; Jin, Young-Soo; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Yang, Yun Jun; Park, Yong Bum

    2013-05-01

    Despite documented efficacy and recommendations, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been underutilized. Home-based PR was proposed as an alternative, but there were limited data. The adequate exercise intensity was also a crucial issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of home-based PR with a metronome-guided walking pace on functional exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in COPD. The subjects participated in a 12-week home-based PR program. Exercise intensity was initially determined by cardiopulmonary exercise test, and was readjusted (the interval of metronome beeps was reset) according to submaximal endurance test. Six-minute walk test, pulmonary function test, cardiopulmonary exercise test, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were done before and after the 12-week program, and at 6 months after completion of rehabilitation. Thirty-three patients participated in the program. Six-minute walking distance was significantly increased (48.8 m; P = 0.017) and the SGRQ score was also improved (-15; P metronome-guided walking pace for COPD patients. This rehabilitation program may improve functional exercise capacity and HRQOL.

  19. VEGFR2 heterogeneity and response to anti-angiogenic low dose metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patten, Steven G; Adamcic, Una; Lacombe, Kristen; Minhas, Kanwal; Skowronski, Karolina; Coomber, Brenda L

    2010-01-01

    Targeting tumor vasculature is a strategy with great promise in the treatment of many cancers. However, anti-angiogenic reagents that target VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling have met with variable results clinically. Among the possible reasons for this may be heterogeneous expression of the target protein. Double immunofluorescent staining was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded sections of treated and control SW480 (colorectal) and WM239 (melanoma) xenografts, and tissue microarrays of human colorectal carcinoma and melanoma. Xenografts were developed using RAG1 -/- mice by injection with WM239 or SW480 cells and mice were treated with 20 mg/kg/day of cyclophosphamide in their drinking water for up to 18 days. Treated and control tissues were characterized by double immunofluorescence using the mural cell marker α-SMA and CD31, while the ratio of desmin/CD31 was also determined by western blot. Hypoxia in treated and control tissues were quantified using both western blotting for HIF-1α and immunohistochemistry of CA-IX. VEGFR2 is heterogeneously expressed in tumor vasculature in both malignant melanoma and colorectal carcinoma. We observed a significant decrease in microvascular density (MVD) in response to low dose metronomic cyclophosphamide chemotherapy in both malignant melanoma (with higher proportion VEGFR2 positive blood vessels; 93%) and colorectal carcinoma (with lower proportion VEGFR2 positive blood vessels; 60%) xenografts. This reduction in MVD occurred in the absence of a significant anti-tumor effect. We also observed less hypoxia in treated melanoma xenografts, despite successful anti-angiogenic blockade, but no change in hypoxia of colorectal xenografts, suggesting that decreases in tumor hypoxia reflect a complex relationship with vascular density. Based on α-SMA staining and the ratio of desmin to CD31 expression as markers of tumor blood vessel functionality, we found evidence for increased stabilization of colorectal microvessels, but no

  20. VEGFR2 heterogeneity and response to anti-angiogenic low dose metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skowronski Karolina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting tumor vasculature is a strategy with great promise in the treatment of many cancers. However, anti-angiogenic reagents that target VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling have met with variable results clinically. Among the possible reasons for this may be heterogeneous expression of the target protein. Methods Double immunofluorescent staining was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded sections of treated and control SW480 (colorectal and WM239 (melanoma xenografts, and tissue microarrays of human colorectal carcinoma and melanoma. Xenografts were developed using RAG1-/- mice by injection with WM239 or SW480 cells and mice were treated with 20 mg/kg/day of cyclophosphamide in their drinking water for up to 18 days. Treated and control tissues were characterized by double immunofluorescence using the mural cell marker α-SMA and CD31, while the ratio of desmin/CD31 was also determined by western blot. Hypoxia in treated and control tissues were quantified using both western blotting for HIF-1α and immunohistochemistry of CA-IX. Results VEGFR2 is heterogeneously expressed in tumor vasculature in both malignant melanoma and colorectal carcinoma. We observed a significant decrease in microvascular density (MVD in response to low dose metronomic cyclophosphamide chemotherapy in both malignant melanoma (with higher proportion VEGFR2 positive blood vessels; 93% and colorectal carcinoma (with lower proportion VEGFR2 positive blood vessels; 60% xenografts. This reduction in MVD occurred in the absence of a significant anti-tumor effect. We also observed less hypoxia in treated melanoma xenografts, despite successful anti-angiogenic blockade, but no change in hypoxia of colorectal xenografts, suggesting that decreases in tumor hypoxia reflect a complex relationship with vascular density. Based on α-SMA staining and the ratio of desmin to CD31 expression as markers of tumor blood vessel functionality, we found evidence for increased

  1. Phase I Results of Vinorelbine With Concurrent Radiotherapy in Elderly Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: West Japan Thoracic Oncology Group (WJTOG3005-DI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Hideyuki, E-mail: h.harada@scchr.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Seto, Takashi [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka (Japan); Igawa, Satoshi [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Tsuya, Asuka [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Wada, Mayuko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaira, Kyoichi; Naito, Tateaki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Nishimura, Tetsuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan); Masuda, Noriyuki [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamamoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy in elderly patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were 71 years of age or older with unresectable Stage III NSCLC. Patients were treated with thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy) and concurrent vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 1 and 25 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 2) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles, followed by adjuvant vinorelbine (25 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles. Results: Four patients were enrolled at Level 1. One patient experienced Grade 3 febrile neutropenia at Level 1 and the dose was escalated to Level 2. At Level 2, 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (Grade 4 neutropenia in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in another). Three of 6 patients developed late Grade 2 or 3 pneumonitis. Therefore, the dose was de-escalated to Level 1. An additional 6 patients were enrolled at Level 1, 4 of whom experienced dose-limiting toxicities (incomplete radiotherapy because of Grade 2 pneumonitis in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in 1, Grade 3 febrile neutropenia in 1, and Grade 3 esophagitis in 1). Moreover, late Grade 3 pneumothorax and Grade 5 pneumonitis occurred in 1 and 1 patient, respectively. Overall, Grade 2, 3 and 5 pneumonitis occurred in 3, 3, and 1 among 16 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy resulted in a high incidence of severe pneumonitis when the standard dose of this agent was used for elderly patients. We therefore recommend caution in the use of this regimen and schedule for elderly patients.

  2. Short-term and practice effects of metronome pacing in Parkinson's disease patients with gait freezing while in the 'on' state: randomized single blind evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Esther; Leurgans, Sue; Goetz, Christopher G

    2004-12-01

    In a randomized single blind parallel study, we tested the efficacy of an auditory metronome on walking speed and freezing in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with freezing gait impairment during their 'on' function. No pharmacological treatment is effective in managing 'on' freezing in PD. Like visual cues that can help overcome freezing, rhythmic auditory pacing may provide cues that help normalize walking pace and overcome freezing. Non-demented PD patients with freezing during their 'on' state walked under two conditions, in randomized order: unassisted walking and walking with the use of an audiocassette with a metronome recording. The walking trials were randomized and gait variables were rated from videotapes by a blinded evaluator. Outcome measures were total walking time (total trial time-total freezing time), which was considered the time over a course of specified length, freezing time, average freeze duration and number of freezes. All outcomes were averaged across trials for each person and then compared across conditions using Signed Rank tests. Twelve non-demented PD patients with a mean age of 65.8 +/- 11.2 years, and mean PD duration of 12.4 +/- 7.3 years were included. The use of the metronome slowed ambulation and increased the total walking time (P metronome recording home and used it daily for 1 week while walking, freezing remained unimproved. Though advocated in prior publications as a walking aid for PD patients, auditory metronome pacing slows walking and is not a beneficial intervention for freezing during their 'on' periods.

  3. IMPROVED MOTOR-TIMING: EFFECTS OF SYNCHRONIZED METRO-NOME TRAINING ON GOLF SHOT ACCURACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Rönnqvist

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of synchronized metronome training (SMT on motor timing and how this training might affect golf shot accuracy. Twenty-six experienced male golfers participated (mean age 27 years; mean golf handicap 12.6 in this study. Pre- and post-test investigations of golf shots made by three different clubs were conducted by use of a golf simulator. The golfers were randomized into two groups: a SMT group and a Control group. After the pre-test, the golfers in the SMT group completed a 4-week SMT program designed to improve their motor timing, the golfers in the Control group were merely training their golf-swings during the same time period. No differences between the two groups were found from the pre-test outcomes, either for motor timing scores or for golf shot accuracy. However, the post-test results after the 4-weeks SMT showed evident motor timing improvements. Additionally, significant improvements for golf shot accuracy were found for the SMT group and with less variability in their performance. No such improvements were found for the golfers in the Control group. As with previous studies that used a SMT program, this study's results provide further evidence that motor timing can be improved by SMT and that such timing improvement also improves golf accuracy

  4. Effects of interactive metronome training on upper extremity function, ADL and QOL in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ga-Hui; Lee, Jae-Shin; Kim, Su-Kyoung; Cha, Tae-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Rhythm and timing training is stimulation that substitutes for a damaged function controls muscular movement or temporal element, which has positive impacts on the neurological aspect and movement of the brain. This study is to assess the changes caused by rhythm and timing training using an interactive metronome (IM) on upper extremity function, ADL and QOL in stroke patients. In order to assess the effects of IM training, a group experiment was conducted on 30 stroke patients. Twelve sessions of IM training were provided for the experimental group three times a week for four weeks, while the control group was trained with a Bilateral arm Self-Exercise (BSE) for the same period. Both groups were evaluated by pre- and post-tests through MFT, MAL, K-MBI and SS-QOL. There were more statistically significant differences (<0.05) in the total score of MFT and the finger control item in the IM Group than in the BSE Group. With respect to ADL, there were more statistically significant differences (<0.05) in the total score of K-MBI and the dressing item in the IM Group than in the BSE Group. The study proposes that IM training can be applied as an occupational therapy program in patients with various diseases who need to adjust the time for performing movements as well as stroke patients.

  5. Mesozoic cyclostratigraphy, the 405-kyr orbital eccentricity metronome, and the Astronomical Time Scale (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnov, L.; Ogg, J. G.

    2009-12-01

    Mesozoic cyclostratigraphy from around the world is being assessed to construct a continuous Astronomical Time Scale (ATS) based on Earth’s cyclic orbital parameters. The recognition of a prevalent sedimentary cycling with a ~400-kyr period associated with forcing by the stable 405-kyr orbital eccentricity variation is an important development. Numerous formations spanning 10 to 20 myr (and longer) intervals in the Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic clearly express this dominant cycle and provide a robust basis for 405-kyr-scale calibration of the ATS. This 405-kyr metronome will enable extension of the well-defined Cenozoic ATS for scaling of the past quarter-billion years of Earth history. This astronomical calibration has a resolution comparable to the 1% to 0.1% precision for radioisotope dating of Mesozoic ash beds, with the added benefit of providing continuous stratigraphic coverage between dated beds. Extended portions of the Mesozoic ATS have already provided new insights into long-standing geologic problems of seafloor spreading, tectonics, eustasy, and paleoclimate change. Ongoing work is focused on closing gaps in coverage and on collecting duplicate cyclostratigraphic records for the entire Mesozoic Era.

  6. Synchronized metronome training induces changes in the kinematic properties of the golf swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marius; Häger, Charlotte; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible effects of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on movement dynamics during golf-swing performance, as captured by kinematic analysis. A one-group, between-test design was applied on 13 male golfers (27.5 +/- 4.6 years old, 12.7 +/- 4.9 handicap) who completed 12 sessions of SMT over a four-week period. Pre- and post-assessments of golf swings with three different clubs (4-iron, 7-iron, and pitching wedge) were performed using a three-dimensional motion capture system. Club velocity at three different swing phases (backswing, downswing, and follow-through) was measured and cross-correlation analysis of time-series signals were made on joint couplings (wrist-elbow-shoulder) of both arms, and between joints and the club, during the full golf swing. There were significantly higher cross-correlations between joint-couplings and concomitant changes of the associated phase-shift differences, as well as reduced phase-shift variability at post-test. No significant effect of SMT was found for the club velocities. We suggest that domain-general influences of SMT on the underlying brain-based motor control strategies lead to a more coordinated movement pattern of the golf-swing performance, which may explain previous observations of significantly improved golf-shot accuracy and decreased variability after SMT.

  7. Bipedal hopping timed to a metronome to detect impairments in anticipatory motor control in people with mild multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Megan C; Chen, Alice; Downer, Matthew B; Holloway, Brett J; Wallack, Elizabeth M; Lockyer, Evan J; Buckle, Natasha C M; Abbott, Courtney L; Ploughman, Michelle

    2018-06-01

    People with mild multiple sclerosis (MS) often report subtle deficits in balance and cognition but display no measurable impairment on clinical assessments. We examined whether hopping to a metronome beat had the potential to detect anticipatory motor control deficits among people with mild MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale ≤ 3.5). Participants with MS (n = 13), matched controls (n = 9), and elderly subjects (n = 13) completed tests of cognition (Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)) and motor performance (Timed 25 Foot Walk Test (T25FWT)). Participants performed two bipedal hopping tasks: at 40 beats/min (bpm) and 60-bpm in random order. Hop characteristics (length, symmetry, variability) and delay from the metronome beat were extracted from an instrumented walkway and compared between groups. The MS group became more delayed from the metronome beat over time whereas elderly subjects tended to hop closer to the beat (F = 4.52, p = 0.02). Delay of the first hop during 60-bpm predicted cognition in people with MS (R = 0.55, β = 4.64 (SD 4.63), F = 4.85, p = 0.05) but not among control (R = 0.07, p = 0.86) or elderly subjects (R = 0.17, p = 0.57). In terms of hopping characteristics, at 60-bpm, people with MS and matched controls were significantly different from the elderly group. However, at 40-bpm, the MS group was no longer significantly different from the elderly group, even though matched controls and elderly still differed significantly. This new timed hopping test may be able to detect both physical ability, and feed-forward anticipatory control impairments in people with mild MS. Hopping at a frequency of 40-bpm seemed more challenging. Several aspects of anticipatory motor control can be measured: including reaction time to the first metronome cue and the ability to adapt and anticipate the beat over time. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metronomic capecitabine as second-line treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma after sorafenib discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisani, Franco; Brandi, Giovanni; Garuti, Francesca; Barbera, Maria Aurelia; Tortora, Raffaella; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Granito, Alessandro; Tovoli, Francesco; De Lorenzo, Stefania; Inghilesi, Andrea Lorenzo; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Bernardi, Mauro; Marra, Fabio; Sacco, Rodolfo; Di Costanzo, Giovan Giuseppe

    2018-02-01

    Metronomic capecitabine (MC) is a well-tolerated systemic treatment showing promising results in one retrospective study, as second-line therapy after sorafenib failure, in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 117 patients undergoing MC were compared to 112 patients, eligible for this treatment, but undergoing best supportive care (BSC) after sorafenib discontinuation for toxicity or HCC progression. The two groups were compared for demographic and clinical features. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to detect independent prognostic factors. To balance confounding factors between the two groups, a propensity score model based on independent prognosticators (performance status, neoplastic thrombosis, causes of sorafenib discontinuation and pre-sorafenib treatment) was performed. Patients undergoing MC showed better performance status, lower tumor burden, lower prevalence of portal vein thrombosis, and better cancer stage. Median (95% CI) post-sorafenib survival (PSS) was longer in MC than in BSC patients [9.5 (7.5-11.6) vs 5.0 (4.2-5.7) months (p < 0.001)]. Neoplastic thrombosis, cause of sorafenib discontinuation, pre-sorafenib treatment and MC were independent prognosticators. The benefit of capecitabine was confirmed in patients after matching with propensity score [PSS: 9.9 (6.8-12.9) vs. 5.8 (4.8-6.8) months, (p = 0.001)]. MC lowered the mortality risk by about 40%. MC achieved better results in patients who stopped sorafenib for adverse events than in those who progressed during it [PSS: 17.3 (10.5-24.1) vs. 7.8 (5.2-10.1) months, (p = 0.035)]. Treatment toxicity was low and easily manageable with dose modulation. MC may be an efficient and safe second-line systemic therapy for HCC patients who discontinued sorafenib for toxicity or tumor progression.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of metronome-paced tachypnea to detect dynamic hyperinflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaije, Anke J M C; Willems, Laura M; van Hees, Hieronymus W H; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; van Helvoort, Hanneke A C; Heijdra, Yvonne F

    2013-01-01

    This prospective study was carried out to investigate if metronome-paced tachypnea (MPT) can serve as an accurate diagnostic tool to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are susceptible to develop dynamic hyperinflation during exercise. Commonly, this is assessed by measuring change in inspiratory capacity (IC) during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), which, however, is complex and laborious. Fifty-three patients with COPD (FEV(1) 58 ± 22%pred) and 20 age-matched healthy subjects were characterized by lung function testing and performed CPET (reference standard) and MPT. The repeatability coefficient of IC (10·2%) was used as cut-off to classify subjects as hyperinflators during CPET. Subsequently, dynamic hyperinflation was measured after MPT. With receiver operating characteristic analysis, the optimal cut-off for MPT-induced dynamic hyperinflation was determined and sensitivity and specificity of MPT to identify hyperinflators were evaluated. With 10·2% decrease in IC as cut-off for CPET-induced dynamic hyperinflation, the optimal cut-off for MPT was 11·1% decrease in IC. Using these cut-offs, MPT had a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 85% to identify the subjects who hyperinflated during CPET. The MPT test shows good overall accuracy to identify subjects who are susceptible to develop dynamic hyperinflation during CPET. Before considering the use of MPT as a screening tool for dynamic hyperinflation in COPD, sensitivity and specificity need further evaluation. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2012 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  10. Dynamic hyperinflation after metronome-paced hyperventilation in COPD--a 2 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannink, Jorien; Lahaije, Anke; Bischoff, Erik; van Helvoort, Hanneke; Dekhuijzen, Richard; Schermer, Tjard; Heijdra, Yvonne

    2010-11-01

    In contrast to the decline in FEV(1), the behavior of dynamic hyperinflation (DH) over time is unknown in patients with COPD. Metronome-paced hyperventilation (MPH) is a simple applicable surrogate for exercise to detect DH. To evaluate changes in MPH-induced DH during two years follow-up in mild-to-severe COPD patients. Additionally, influence of smoking status on DH and the relation between DH and other lung function parameters were assessed. Patients were recruited from a randomized controlled trial conducted in general practice. Measurements of lung function and DH were performed at baseline and after 12 and 24 months. DH was assessed by MPH with breathing frequency set at twice the baseline rate. Change in inspiratory capacity after MPH was used to reflect change in end-expiratory lung volume and therefore DH, presuming constant total lung capacity. During follow-up, 68 patients completed all measurements. DH increased by 0.23±0.06L (p≤0.001). No significant changes in FEV(1) %pred were seen. Smokers had lower FEV(1) and a more rapid decline than non-smokers. DH in smokers increased more over time compared to non-smokers. The amount of DH correlated positively with resting inspiratory capacity. After two years, a significant increase in MPH-induced DH in COPD patients was demonstrated, which was not accompanied by a decline in FEV(1). It might be that DH is a sensitive measure to track consequences of changes in airflow obstruction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo, Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-11-21

    to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condition before cardiac arrest, the immediate cause, initial arrest rhythm, whether epinephrine was used, and the duration of CPR. The case group (n=51) received conventional CPR guided by a metronome set at 110 beats/min. Chi-square and likelihood ratio were used to compare ROSC rates considering p≤0.05. ROSC occurred in 57.7% of the cases, though 92.8% of these patients died in the following 24 hours. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in regard to ROSC (p=0.2017) or the occurrence of death (p=0.8112). the outcomes of patients after cardiac arrest with and without the use of a metronome during CPR were similar and no differences were found between groups in regard to survival rates and ROSC. comparar a taxa de retorno da circulação espontânea e óbito após parada cardiorrespiratória, com e sem a utilização do metrônomo durante ressuscitação cardiopulmonar. estudo caso-controle aninhado a estudo de coorte, com 285 adultos atendidos em parada cardíaca em um serviço de emergência e submetidos à ressuscitação cardiopulmonar. Os dados foram coletados por meio do In-hospital Utstein Style. O grupo controle (n=60) foi selecionado pelo pareamento dos pacientes considerando-se o estado neurológico pré-parada cardiorrespiratória, causa imediata e ritmo inicial da parada, utilização de epinefrina e duração da ressuscitação. O grupo caso (n=51) foi submetido à ressuscitação cardiopulmonar convencional com a utilização do metrônomo a 110sons/min. Para comparar

  12. A randomized phase II trial of concurrent chemo-RT of oral vinorelbine and 60 Gy or 66 Gy, in locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, O.; Knap, M.; Khalil, A.

    2015-01-01

    eligible. The two arms were well balanced. The minimum and median potential follow-up was 14.5 and 32.6 m, respectively. The median number of Nav was 18 x in arm A and 20 x in arm B. Of the patients, 10% had 20%). A late effect esophageal stricture/ulceration G3 or more occurred in 3 (5%) of the patients...

  13. Prolonged Response and Restoration of Functional Independence with Bevacizumab plus Vinorelbine as Third-Line Treatment for Breast Cancer-Related Leptomeningeal Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Le Rhun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survival of patients with leptomeningeal metastases (LM and impaired functional status is limited to several months, and rarely does neurological function improve with treatment. Case Report: A 34-year-old female with hormone-negative and HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer was diagnosed with bulky radiographic LM 45 months after initial diagnosis. She was treated with intra-CSF trastuzumab followed by intra-CSF liposomal cytarabine; however, the cancer progressed 8 months after the diagnosis of LM. At the time of the third LM progression, the patient presented with a cauda equina syndrome and cerebellar impairment resulting in an inability to walk. She was treated with CNS-directed radiotherapy (lumbosacral and cerebellar and bevacizumab plus vinorelbine. Rapid functional improvement occurred, and the patient regained the ability to walk and independently manage her daily activities. Twelve months later, she presented with rapid progression of the LM resulting in death within several weeks. Conclusion: In radiographically defined bulky LM, the combination of systemic therapy and CNS-directed radiotherapy likely is more active than intra-CSF therapy only. In lieu of the rapid and significant improvement in neurological function combined with the prolonged response, bevacizumab alone or in combination with chemotherapy and CNS-directed radiotherapy may be considered in select patients with radiographically bulky breast cancer-related LM.

  14. Short- and long-term effects of synchronized metronome training in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a two case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Maria; Domellöf, Erik; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) require individualized long-term management to maintain and improve motor functions. The objective of this study was to explore potential effects of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on movement kinematics in two children diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic CP (HCP). Both children underwent 4-weeks/12 sessions of SMT by means of the Interactive Metronome (IM). Optoelectronic registrations of goal-directed uni- and bimanual upper-limb movements were made at three occasions; pre-training, post completed training and at 6-months post completed training. Significant changes in kinematic outcomes following IM training were found for both cases. Findings included smoother and shorter movement trajectories in the bimanual condition, especially for the affected side. In the unimanual condition, Case I also showed increased smoothness of the non-affected side. The observed short- and long-term effects on the spatio-temporal organization of upper-limb movements need to be corroborated and extended by further case-control studies.

  15. Hemangiosarcoma in a Dog: Unusual Presentation and Increased Survival Using a Complementary/Holistic Approach Combined with Metronomic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Chaikin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report documents the clinical and pathologic findings in a 12-year-old terrier mix with intraocular and splenic hemangiosarcoma. Pathologic findings in both the spleen and globe were consistent with hemangiosarcoma with a low mitotic count. Initial treatment consisted of enucleation and then splenectomy followed by one cycle of conventional doxorubicin chemotherapy. Due to poor tolerance, a subsequent treatment regimen consisted of metronomic chemotherapy with chlorambucil combined with an alternative/complementary regimen of I’m-Yunity (polysaccharopeptide and Yunnan Baiyao. Follow-up thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasounds over a period of 24 months showed no evidence of pulmonary, hepatic, or right atrial metastases, during which time the patient had an excellent quality of life. However, shortly after achieving two-year survival, the patient developed new onset seizures unresponsive to anticonvulsant therapy. Therefore, a decision was made to euthanize the dog given that the most likely etiology of the seizures was a brain tumor. Overall, this is an exceptional treatment response given the poor survival statistics of hemangiosarcoma even with conventional chemotherapy. However, additional clinical pharmacology and clinical trial data are needed to further support the use of a complementary/holistic approach in combination with metronomic chemotherapy.

  16. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  17. Gemcitabine concurrent with thoracic radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine/vinorelbine in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A phase I study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagel, B.; Piroth, M.; Pinkawa, M.; Fischedik, K.; Asadpour, B.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Eble, M.J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Reinartz, P.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Stanzel, S. [Inst. for Medical Statistics, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Breuer, C.; Skobel, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every 2 weeks to a concurrent radiotherapy administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radio-/chemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: ten patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were observed and treated in accordance with a combined radio-/chemotherapy protocol. This included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}) and vinorelbine (30 mg/m{sup 2}) at days 1, 8 and 22, 29, followed by concurrent radiotherapy including [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-(FDG-PET-) based target volume definition (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy) and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every 2 weeks at days 43, 57, and 71. The initial dose was 300 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of gemcitabine was increased by 100 mg/m{sup 2} until the MTD was realized. Three patients were enrolled for each dose level. Results: dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was identified for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m{sup 2}, due to grade 2 esophagitis (next to grade 3) in all patients. 6 weeks after the completion of radio-/chemotherapy, most patients still presented treatment-induced esophagitis. In accordance with expected complications, such as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, the MTD was defined at this dose level, although no DLT grade 3 was reached. Conclusion: after induction chemotherapy, the MTD and frequency of gemcitabine in locally advanced NSCLC is 500 mg/m{sup 2} every 2 weeks during a maximum of 7 weeks of thoracic radiotherapy. (orig.)

  18. Effect of the rate of chest compression familiarised in previous training on the depth of chest compression during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomised crossover trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jinkun; Chung, Tae Nyoung; Je, Sang Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess how the quality of metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was affected by the chest compression rate familiarised by training before the performance and to determine a possible mechanism for any effect shown. Design Prospective crossover trial of a simulated, one-person, chest-compression-only CPR. Setting Participants were recruited from a medical school and two paramedic schools of South Korea. Participants 42 senior students of a medical school and two pa...

  19. Kinematic and EMG data during underwater dolphin kick change while synchronizing with or without synchronization of kick frequency with the beat of a metronome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Keisuke Kobayashi; Shimojo, Hirofumi; Takagi, Hideki; Tsubakimoto, Shozo; Sengoku, Yasuo

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the effects of synchronizing kick frequency with the beat of a metronome on kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) parameters during the underwater dolphin kick as a pilot study related to the research that entitled " Effect of increased kick frequency on propelling efficiency and muscular co-activation during underwater dolphin kick" (Yamakawa et al., 2017) [1]. Seven collegiate female swimmers participated in this experiment. The participants conducted two underwater dolphin kick trials: swimming freely at maximum effort, and swimming while synchronizing the kick frequency of maximum effort with the beat of a metronome. The kinematic parameters during the underwater dolphin kick were calculated by 2-D motion analysis, and surface electromyographic measurements were taken from six muscles (rectus abdominis, erector spinae, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius). The results revealed no significant differences in the kinematic and EMG parameters between trials of the two swimming techniques. Therefore, the action of synchronizing the kick frequency with the beat of a metronome did not affect movement or muscle activity during the underwater dolphin kick in this experiment.

  20. Kinematic and EMG data during underwater dolphin kick change while synchronizing with or without synchronization of kick frequency with the beat of a metronome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Kobayashi Yamakawa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of synchronizing kick frequency with the beat of a metronome on kinematic and electromyographic (EMG parameters during the underwater dolphin kick as a pilot study related to the research that entitled “Effect of increased kick frequency on propelling efficiency and muscular co-activation during underwater dolphin kick” (Yamakawa et al., 2017 [1]. Seven collegiate female swimmers participated in this experiment. The participants conducted two underwater dolphin kick trials: swimming freely at maximum effort, and swimming while synchronizing the kick frequency of maximum effort with the beat of a metronome. The kinematic parameters during the underwater dolphin kick were calculated by 2-D motion analysis, and surface electromyographic measurements were taken from six muscles (rectus abdominis, erector spinae, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius. The results revealed no significant differences in the kinematic and EMG parameters between trials of the two swimming techniques. Therefore, the action of synchronizing the kick frequency with the beat of a metronome did not affect movement or muscle activity during the underwater dolphin kick in this experiment.

  1. Effect of the rate of chest compression familiarised in previous training on the depth of chest compression during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jinkun; Chung, Tae Nyoung; Je, Sang Mo

    2016-02-12

    To assess how the quality of metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was affected by the chest compression rate familiarised by training before the performance and to determine a possible mechanism for any effect shown. Prospective crossover trial of a simulated, one-person, chest-compression-only CPR. Participants were recruited from a medical school and two paramedic schools of South Korea. 42 senior students of a medical school and two paramedic schools were enrolled but five dropped out due to physical restraints. Senior medical and paramedic students performed 1 min of metronome-guided CPR with chest compressions only at a speed of 120 compressions/min after training for chest compression with three different rates (100, 120 and 140 compressions/min). Friedman's test was used to compare average compression depths based on the different rates used during training. Average compression depths were significantly different according to the rate used in training (ptraining at a speed of 100 compressions/min and those at speeds of 120 and 140 compressions/min (both pCPR is affected by the relative difference between the rate of metronome guidance and the chest compression rate practised in previous training. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. In vitro evaluation of new anticancer drugs, exemplified by vinorelbine, using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay on human tumor cell lines and patient biopsy cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridborg, H; Nygren, P; Dhar, S; Csoka, K; Kristensen, J; Larsson, R

    1996-09-01

    The feasibility of combined studies on a cell-line panel and primary cultures of patient tumor cells in the preclinical evaluation of new anticancer drugs was evaluated in a study of the activity and cross-resistance pattern in vitro of the new semi-synthetic vinca alkaloid vinorelbine (Vrb). The activity of Vrb was investigated in ten cell lines representing different resistance mechanisms and in a total of 256 fresh human tumor samples, using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA). Resistance to Vrb in the cell lines was associated with expression of the multidrug resistance-mediating P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and by a recently described tubulin-associated mechanism, while the cell lines with topoisomerase II- and glutathion-associated resistance did not show decreased sensitivity to the drug. Cross-resistance to vincristine (Vcr) and other tubulin-active agents was high in cell lines as well as in patient cells. As with most commonly used anti-cancer drugs, Vrb was more active in hematological than in solid tumor samples. Among the solid tumors investigated, the highest in vitro response rates were observed in ovarian cancer (27%), sarcoma (25%), non-small cell lung cancer (21%) and bladder cancer (20%), while no response was observed in renal or colorectal cancer. Compared to Vcr, Vrb appeared to be slightly more active in solid tumors and slightly less active in hematological tumors. The results show that although Vrb displays a high degree of cross-resistance to Vcr and other tubulin-active drugs, some difference in the activity spectrum could be detected and that the drug is sensitive to multiple mechanisms of resistance. The results also suggest that leukemias, ovarian cancer, sarcoma and bladder cancer are possible further targets for Vrb. The combination of studies on a cell-line panel and patient tumor cells from a broad spectrum of diagnoses to evaluate a new drug seems feasible and may give

  3. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  4. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  5. Oral Ketamine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral Ketamine: A Four-years Experience in ... Key words: Oral Ketamine, Premedication and Oncology. .... form of a letter published in 19835. .... Acta. Anaesthesiol Scandinavica, 1998; 42: 750-758. 4. Murray P. Substitution of another opioid ...

  6. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijts, Charlotte M; Santegoets, Saskia J; Eertwegh, Alfons J van den; Pijpers, Laura S; Haanen, John B; Gruijl, Tanja D de; Verheul, Henk M; Vliet, Hans J van der

    2011-01-01

    For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part). In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus induced Treg expansion in patients with metastatic renal cell

  7. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijts Charlotte M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. Methods/design This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part. In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. Discussion This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus

  8. The corticospinal responses of metronome-paced, but not self-paced strength training are similar to motor skill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael; Rantalainen, Timo; Teo, Wei-Peng; Kidgell, Dawson

    2017-12-01

    The corticospinal responses to skill training may be different to strength training, depending on how the strength training is performed. It was hypothesised that the corticospinal responses would not be different following skill training and metronome-paced strength training (MPST), but would differ when compared with self-paced strength training (SPST). Corticospinal excitability, short-interval intra-cortical inhibition (SICI) and strength and tracking error were measured at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks. Participants (n = 44) were randomly allocated to visuomotor tracking, MPST, SPST or a control group. MPST increased strength by 7 and 18%, whilst SPST increased strength by 12 and 26% following 2 and 4 weeks of strength training. There were no changes in strength following skill training. Skill training reduced tracking error by 47 and 58% at 2 and 4 weeks. There were no changes in tracking error following SPST; however, tracking error reduced by 24% following 4 weeks of MPST. Corticospinal excitability increased by 40% following MPST and by 29% following skill training. There was no change in corticospinal excitability following 4 weeks of SPST. Importantly, the magnitude of change between skill training and MPST was not different. SICI decreased by 41 and 61% following 2 and 4 weeks of MPST, whilst SICI decreased by 41 and 33% following 2 and 4 weeks of skill training. Again, SPST had no effect on SICI at 2 and 4 weeks. There was no difference in the magnitude of SICI reduction between skill training and MPST. This study adds new knowledge regarding the corticospinal responses to skill and MPST, showing they are similar but different when compared with SPST.

  9. A healthy heart is not a metronome: An integrative review of the heart’s anatomy and heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredric Bruce Shaffer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF, very-low-frequency (VLF, low-frequency (LF, and high-frequency (HF bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges’ polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues’ neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer, Vaschillo, and Vaschillo’s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath’s coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain.

  10. A healthy heart is not a metronome: an integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Fred; McCraty, Rollin; Zerr, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges' polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues' neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.'s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath's coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain.

  11. Bevacizumab plus octreotide and metronomic capecitabine in patients with metastatic well-to-moderately differentiated neuroendocrine tumors: the xelbevoct study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berruti, Alfredo; D’Avolio, Antonio; Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Birocco, Nadia; Amoroso, Vito; Biasco, Guido; Papotti, Mauro; Dogliotti, Luigi; Fazio, Nicola; Ferrero, Anna; Brizzi, Maria Pia; Volante, Marco; Nobili, Elisabetta; Tozzi, Lucia; Bodei, Lisa; Torta, Mirella

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the activity and toxicity of the XELBEVOCT regimen in patients with metastatic well-to-moderately differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (WMD-NEN). Ancillary studies evaluated hypertension, proteinuria, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms in predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and the predictive role of serum vitamin D in progression-free survival and proteinuria onset. This prospective phase 2 study included 45 patients with WMD-NEN arising from various primary sites. The treatment regimen was octreotide long-acting release (LAR), 20 mg monthly, metronomic capecitabine, 2000 mg/daily, and intravenous bevacizumab, 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks, without interruption for 9 months. Bevacizumab was continued until disease progression. Partial response was obtained in 8 patients (17.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.4%-28.2%); tumor response was more frequent in pancreatic than in non-pancreatic malignancies. The median PFS was 14.9 months; median overall survival was not attained. Biochemical and symptomatic responses were observed in 52.9% and 82.3% of cases, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated. Grade 3 toxicities included hand and foot syndrome (11.1%), proteinuria (4.4%), and renal toxicity (2.2%). Proteinuria (all grades) was correlated with longer PFS (p = 0.017). There was an inverse relationship between proteinuria and vitamin D levels. VEGF polymorphisms were not associated with patient outcome. The XELBEVOCT regimen is active and well tolerated in patients with metastatic WMD-NEN. Proteinuria correlated with hypovitaminosis D status and was the best predictive factor of treatment efficacy. Trial registration number http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01203306?term

  12. Effects of interactive metronome therapy on cognitive functioning after blast-related brain injury: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lonnie A; Macdonald, Margaret; Stall, Christina; Pazdan, Renee

    2013-11-01

    We report preliminary findings on the efficacy of interactive metronome (IM) therapy for the remediation of cognitive difficulties in soldiers with persisting cognitive complaints following blast-related mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty-six of a planned sample of 50 active duty soldiers with persistent cognitive complaints following a documented history of blast-related TBI of mild-to-moderate severity were randomly assigned to receive either standard rehabilitation care (SRC) or SRC plus a 15-session standardized course of IM therapy. Primary outcome measures were Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) Index Scores. Secondary outcome measures included selected subtests from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning System (Trail Making Test and Color-Word Interference) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (Symbol Search, Digit-Symbol Coding, Digit Span, and Letter-Number Sequencing) as well as the Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test. Significant group differences (SRC vs. IM) were observed for RBANS Attention (p = .044), Immediate Memory (p = .019), and Delayed Memory (p = .031) indices in unadjusted analyses, with the IM group showing significantly greater improvement at Time 2 than the SRC group, with effect sizes in the medium-to-large range in the adjusted analyses for each outcome (Cohen's d = 0.511, 0.768, and 0.527, respectively). Though not all were statistically significant, effects in 21 of 26 cognitive outcome measures were consistently in favor of the IM treatment group (binomial probability = .00098). The addition of IM therapy to SRC appears to have a positive effect on neuropsychological outcomes for soldiers who have sustained mild-to-moderate TBI and have persistent cognitive complaints after the period for expected recovery has passed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl; Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom

    The aim of the study was to explore how adults with schizo- phrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  14. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom; Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how adults with schizophrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research ph...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  15. Immunological, anti-angiogenic and clinical effects of intratumoral interleukin 12 electrogene therapy combined with metronomic cyclophosphamide in dogs with spontaneous cancer: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchelero, Laetitia; Denies, Sofie; Vanderperren, Katrien; Stock, Emmelie; Van Brantegem, Leen; de Rooster, Hilde; Sanders, Niek N

    2017-08-01

    The immunological, anti-angiogenic and clinical effects of metronomic cyclophosphamide and 3 consecutive intratumoral interleukin (IL)-12 gene therapy (electrogene therapy (EGT)) treatments were evaluated in 6 dogs with spontaneous cancer. In all dogs, a decrease in peripheral leukocytes 2 days after IL-12 EGT coincided with erythema and swelling of the tumor. In the tumor, a transient increase in IL-12 levels was measured, whereas a continuous increase in interferon γ (IFNγ) and thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) were determined in contrast to a continuous decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In the serum, a transient increase in IL-12 and IL-10 levels were noted in contrast to a transient decrease in VEGF and TSP-1. The treatment resulted in a significant anti-angiogenic effect. Although all primary tumors continued to progress in time, this progression was slower than before treatment according to the contrast-enhanced ultrasound data. Besides the encouraging immunostimulatory and anti-angiogenic effects observed in all dogs we also noticed in 4 out of 6 dogs clinically relevant improvements in quality of life and weight. These results hold great promise for combinatorial strategies of IL-12 EGT and metronomic chemotherapy with conventional antitumor (immuno)therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  17. Efficacy of metronome sound guidance via a phone speaker during dispatcher-assisted compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation by an untrained layperson: a randomised controlled simulation study using a manikin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang O; Hong, Chong Kun; Shin, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Jun Ho; Hwang, Seong Youn

    2013-08-01

    Untrained laypersons should perform compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (COCPR) under a dispatcher's guidance, but the quality of the chest compressions may be suboptimal. We hypothesised that providing metronome sounds via a phone speaker may improve the quality of chest compressions during dispatcher-assisted COCPR (DA-COCPR). Untrained laypersons were allocated to either the metronome sound-guided group (MG), who performed DA-COCPR with metronome sounds (110 ticks/min), or the control group (CG), who performed conventional DA-COCPR. The participants of each group performed DA-COCPR for 4 min using a manikin with Skill-Reporter, and the data regarding chest compression quality were collected. The data from 33 cases of DA-COCPR in the MG and 34 cases in the CG were compared. The MG showed a faster compression rate than the CG (111.9 vs 96.7/min; p=0.018). A significantly higher proportion of subjects in the MG performed the DA-COCPR with an accurate chest compression rate (100-120/min) compared with the subjects in the CG (32/33 (97.0%) vs 5/34 (14.7%); pMetronome sound guidance during DA-COCPR for the untrained bystanders improved the chest compression rates, but was associated more with shallow compressions than the conventional DA-COCPR in a manikin model.

  18. Oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, S J

    1990-01-01

    In the U.S. oral cancer accounts for 2.1% of all cancers and 1% of cancer deaths. Two to three times as many males as females are affected. Blacks have more intra-oral cancer than whites, and their incidence and mortality rates have increased in recent years. The etiologic process very likely involves several factors. The major etiologic agents are tobacco (all types) and alcoholic beverages. Herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus, and Candida have been implicated. Host factors include poor state of dentition, nutritional aberrations, cirrhosis of liver, lichen planus, and immunologic impairmant. Cellular changes include amplification of some oncogenes, alterations in antigen expression, production of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and disturbance of keratin and involucrin production. Experimentally, cancer is readily produced on the hamster cheek pouch and rat oral mucosa. Unlike oral cancer in humans, most experimental lesions are exophytic, and they rarely metastasize.

  19. Oral sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-05

    The Gay and Lesbian Medical Association urges HIV prevention specialists to regard male-to-male oral-genital sex as a low-risk activity and concentrate instead on the danger of unprotected anal intercourse. According to the association, the confusion and mixed messages surrounding oral sex are harming efforts to encourage gay men to make rational choices about truly risky behavior. The recommendations appear in the association's position paper issued March 19, 1996.

  20. Oral Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease the risk of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer are diseases in ... and treatment of oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Lip and Oral ...

  1. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  3. Effects of interactive metronome training on timing, attention, working memory, and processing speed in children with ADHD: a case study of two children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun-Yi; Choi, Yu-Jin

    2017-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to present the effects of Interactive metronome (IM) on timing for children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of the present study were 2 children diagnosed with ADHD. Pre- and post-intervention tests were completed by the researcher using Long Form Assessment (LFA) test of IM and K-WPPSI-IV. The subjects were provided with IM for 40 minutes at a time, 2 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. [Results] The timing decreased after IM intervention. The subjects showed improvement in attention span after IM intervention. Working memory index as well as processing speed index were increased after intervention, as shown by the Korean-Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-IV (K-WPPSI-IV). [Conclusion] IM was effective in improving timing, attention, working memory and processing speed in children with ADHD.

  4. Induction of a shorter compression phase is correlated with a deeper chest compression during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Bae, Jinkun; Kim, Eui Chung; Cho, Yun Kyung; You, Je Sung; Choi, Sung Wook; Kim, Ok Jun

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that there may be an interaction between duty cycle and other factors related to the quality of chest compression. Duty cycle represents the fraction of compression phase. We aimed to investigate the effect of shorter compression phase on average chest compression depth during metronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Senior medical students performed 12 sets of chest compressions following the guiding sounds, with three down-stroke patterns (normal, fast and very fast) and four rates (80, 100, 120 and 140 compressions/min) in random sequence. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare the average chest compression depth and duty cycle among the trials. The average chest compression depth increased and the duty cycle decreased in a linear fashion as the down-stroke pattern shifted from normal to very fast (pmetronome-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  5. Association Between Proton Pump Inhibitors and Metronomic Capecitabine as Salvage Treatment for Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Tumors: A Randomized Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Paolo; Milano, Annalisa; D'Antonio, Chiara; Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Fais, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The acidification of extracellular compartment represents a conceivable mechanism of drug resistance in malignant cells. In addition, it has been reported to drive proliferation and promote invasion and metastasis. Experimental evidence has shown that proton pump inhibitors can counteract tumor acidification and restore sensitivity to anticancer drugs. Moreover, early clinical data have supported the role of proton pump inhibitors in anticancer treatments. Metronomic capecitabine has demonstrated beneficial effects as salvage chemotherapy for heavily pretreated or frail patients with gastrointestinal cancer. The present study (EudraCT Number: 2013-001096-20) was aimed at investigating the activity and safety of high-dose rabeprazole in combination with metronomic capecitabine in patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer refractory to standard treatment. A total of 66 patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive capecitabine 1500 mg/daily, continuously with or without rabeprazole 1.5 mg/kg twice a day, 3 days a week until disease progression, undue toxicity, or withdrawal of informed consent. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival. The secondary endpoints are clinical benefit, which reflects the proportion of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease, and overall survival. Progression-free and overall survival will be evaluated using a log-rank test to determine the effect of rabeprazole independently at the 2-sided α-level of 0.05. Other assessments will include the frequency and severity of adverse events and changes in laboratory parameters to measure the safety, and the pharmacokinetics of capecitabine. The results are expected in 2016. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  7. Oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. One Hundred Metronomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Edward T.

    1979-01-01

    In a personal statement on the need to establish definitions and aesthetic standards for avant-garde art forms, the author examines such questions as the artist's autonomy, standards of craftsmanship, the relationship of art to reality, and the role of critics. (SJL)

  9. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  10. Phase I Study of Concurrent High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin and Vinorelbine for Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Ikuo, E-mail: isekine@ncc.go.jp [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kubota, Kaoru; Tamura, Tomohide [Division of Internal Medicine and Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose in concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with chemotherapy for unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Eligible patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC, age {>=}20 years, performance status 0-1, percent of volume of normal lung receiving 20 GY or more (V{sub 20}) {<=}30% received three to four cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1) and vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1 and 8) repeated every 4 weeks. The doses of 3D-CRT were 66 Gy, 72 Gy, and 78 Gy at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. Results: Of the 17, 16, and 24 patients assessed for eligibility, 13 (76%), 12 (75%), and 6 (25%) were enrolled at dose levels 1 to 3, respectively. The main reasons for exclusion were V{sub 20} >30% (n = 10) and overdose to the esophagus (n = 8) and brachial plexus (n = 2). There were 26 men and 5 women, with a median age of 60 years (range, 41-75). The full planned dose of radiotherapy could be administered to all the patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were noted in 24 (77%) and 5 (16%) of the 31 patients, respectively. Grade 4 infection, Grade 3 esophagitis, and Grade 3 pulmonary toxicity were noted in 1 patient, 2 patients, and 1 patient, respectively. The dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 17% of the patients at each dose level. The median survival and 3-year and 4-year survival rates were 41.9 months, 72.3%, and 49.2%, respectively. Conclusions: 72 Gy was the maximum dose that could be achieved in most patients, given the predetermined normal tissue constraints.

  11. A randomized phase II trial of concurrent chemoradiation with two doses of radiotherapy, 60Gy and 66Gy, concomitant with a fixed dose of oral vinorelbine in locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Olfred; Knap, Marianne M; Khalil, Azza

    2017-01-01

    was local progression free interval. A scheduled FDG-PET-CT-scan was performed 9months after randomization. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT 00887783). RESULTS: Both arms were well tolerated. The local progression free interval at 9months was 54% in the 60Gy arm and 59% in the 66Gy arm...

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ...

  13. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain

  14. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Janardhanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  15. Oral dirofilariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Mahija; Rakesh, S; Savithri, Vindhya

    2014-01-01

    Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  16. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  17. A comparative study of sorafenib and metronomic chemotherapy for Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer-stage C hepatocellular carcinoma with poor liver function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims Metronomic chemotherapy (MET is frequently administered in comparatively low doses as a continuous chemotherapeutic agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and overall survival (OS of MET compared to sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT. Methods A total of 54 patients with advanced HCC and PVTT who had undergone MET were analyzed between 2005 and 2013. A total of 53 patients who had undergone sorafenib therapy were analyzed as the control group. The primary endpoint of this study was OS. Results The median number of MET cycles was two (1-15. The OS values for the MET group and sorafenib group were 158 days (132-184 and 117 days (92-142, respectively (P=0.029. The Cox proportional-hazard model showed that a higher risk of death was correlated with higher serum alpha fetoprotein level (≥400 mg/dL, hazard ratio [HR]=1.680, P=0.014 and Child-Pugh class B (HR=1.856, P=0.008. Conclusions MET was associated with more favorable outcomes in terms of overall survival than was sorafenib in patients with advanced HCC with PVTT, especially in patients with poor liver function. Therefore, MET can be considered as a treatment option in patients with advanced HCC with PVTT and poor liver function.

  18. Activation of the Prefrontal Cortex While Performing a Task at Preferred Slow Pace and Metronome Slow Pace: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Shimoda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals have a preferred pace at which they perform voluntary repetitive movements. Previous studies have reported that greater activation of the prefrontal cortex was observed during self-initiated movements than during externally triggered movements. The purpose of the present study is to compare the activation of the prefrontal cortex induced when the subjects performed a peg-board task at their preferred slow pace (PSP, the self-initiated condition with that induced when they performed the same task at metronome slow pace (MSP, the externally triggered condition using functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Healthy subjects performed the task while sitting in a chair. By assessing the activated channels individually, we confirmed that all of the prefrontal regions of interest were activated by both tasks. In the second-level analyses, we found that the activation detected in the frontopolar cortex (FPPFC; Brodmann area 10 was higher during the PSP task than during the MSP task. The FPPFC is known to be at the top of prefrontal hierarchy, and specifically involved in evaluating self-generated information. In addition, the FPPFC plays a role in coordinating lateral prefrontal cortex. In the present study, the subjects evaluated and managed the internally generated PSP by coordinating the activity of other lower level prefrontal regions.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of instantaneous heart rate and chest wall plethysmography in short-term, metronome guided heart rate variability studies: suitability for assessment of autonomic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perring, S; Jones, E

    2003-08-01

    Instantaneous heart rate and chest wall motion were measured using a 3-lead ECG and an air pressure chest wall plethysmography system. Chest wall plethysmography traces were found to accurately represent the breathing pattern as measured by spirometry (average correlation coefficient 0.944); though no attempt was made to calibrate plethysmography voltage output to tidal volume. Simultaneous measurements of heart rate and chest wall motion were made for short periods under metronome guided breathing at 6 breaths per minute. The average peak to trough heart rate change per breath cycle (AVEMAX) and maximum correlation between heart rate and breathing cycle (HRBRCORR) were measured. Studies of 44 normal volunteers indicated clear inverse correlation of heart rate variability parameters with age (AVEMAX R = -0.502, P < 0.001) but no significant change in HRBRCORR with age (R = -0.115). Comparison of normal volunteers with diabetics with no history of symptoms associated with autonomic failure indicated significant lower heart rate variability in diabetics (P = 0.005 for AVEMAX) and significantly worse correlation between heart rate and breathing (P < 0.001 for HRBRCORR). Simultaneous measurement of heart rate and breathing offers the possibility of more sensitive diagnosis of autonomic failure in a simple bedside test and gives further insight into the nature of cardio-ventilatory coupling.

  20. Activation of the prefrontal cortex while performing a task at preferred slow pace and metronome slow pace: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Kaori; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Katsuyama, Shiori; Tozato, Fusae

    2014-01-01

    Individuals have a preferred pace at which they perform voluntary repetitive movements. Previous studies have reported that greater activation of the prefrontal cortex was observed during self-initiated movements than during externally triggered movements. The purpose of the present study is to compare the activation of the prefrontal cortex induced when the subjects performed a peg-board task at their preferred slow pace (PSP, the self-initiated condition) with that induced when they performed the same task at metronome slow pace (MSP, the externally triggered condition) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Healthy subjects performed the task while sitting in a chair. By assessing the activated channels individually, we confirmed that all of the prefrontal regions of interest were activated by both tasks. In the second-level analyses, we found that the activation detected in the frontopolar cortex (FPPFC; Brodmann area 10) was higher during the PSP task than during the MSP task. The FPPFC is known to be at the top of prefrontal hierarchy, and specifically involved in evaluating self-generated information. In addition, the FPPFC plays a role in coordinating lateral prefrontal cortex. In the present study, the subjects evaluated and managed the internally generated PSP by coordinating the activity of other lower level prefrontal regions.

  1. Beta-band oscillations during passive listening to metronome sounds reflect improved timing representation after short-term musical training in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takako; Ross, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    Sub-second time intervals in musical rhythms provide predictive cues about future events to performers and listeners through an internalized representation of timing. While the acuity of automatic, sub-second timing as well as cognitively controlled, supra-second timing declines with ageing, musical experts are less affected. This study investigated the influence of piano training on temporal processing abilities in older adults using behavioural and neuronal correlates. We hypothesized that neuroplastic changes in beta networks, caused by training in sensorimotor coordination with timing processing, can be assessed even in the absence of movement. Behavioural performance of internal timing stability was assessed with synchronization-continuation finger-tapping paradigms. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded from older adults before and after one month of one-on-one training. For neural measures of automatic timing processing, we focused on beta oscillations (13-30 Hz) during passive listening to metronome beats. Periodic beta-band modulations in older adults before training were similar to previous findings in young listeners at a beat interval of 800 ms. After training, behavioural performance for continuation tapping was improved and accompanied by an increased range of beat-induced beta modulation, compared to participants who did not receive training. Beta changes were observed in the caudate, auditory, sensorimotor and premotor cortices, parietal lobe, cerebellum and medial prefrontal cortex, suggesting that increased resources are involved in timing processing and goal-oriented monitoring as well as reward-based sensorimotor learning. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Metastasizing, Luciferase Transduced MAT-Lu Rat Prostate Cancer Models: Follow up of Bolus and Metronomic Therapy with Doxorubicin as Model Drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantscheff, Peter; Esser, Norbert; Geipel, Andreas; Woias, Peter; Ziroli, Vittorio; Goldschmidtboing, Frank; Massing, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The most fatal outcomes of prostate carcinoma (PCa) result from hormone-refractory variants of the tumor, especially from metastatic spread rather than from primary tumor burden. The goal of the study was to establish and apply rat MAT-Lu prostate cancer tumor models for improved non-invasive live follow up of tumor growth and metastasis by in vivo bioluminescence. We established luciferase transduced MAT-Lu rat PCa cells and studied tumor growth and metastatic processes in an ectopic as well as orthotopic setting. An intravenous bolus treatment with doxorubicin was used to demonstrate the basic applicability of in vivo imaging to follow up therapeutic intervention in these models. In vitro analysis of tissue homogenates confirmed major metastatic spread of subcutaneous tumors into the lung. Our sensitive method, however, for the first time detects metastasis also in lymph node (11/24), spleen (3/24), kidney (4/24), liver (5/24), and bone tissue (femur or spinal cord - 5/20 and 12/20, respectively). Preliminary data of orthotopic implantation (three animals) showed metastatic invasion to investigated organs in all animals but with varying preference (e.g., to lymph nodes). Intravenous bolus treatment of MAT-Lu PCa with doxorubicin reduced subcutaneous tumor growth by about 50% and the number of animals affected by metastatic lesions in lymph nodes (0/4), lung (3/6) or lumbar spine (0/2), as determined by in vivo imaging and in vitro analysis. Additionally, the possible applicability of the luciferase transduced MAT-Lu model(s) to study basic principles of metronomic therapies via jugular vein catheter, using newly established active microport pumping systems, is presented

  3. Metastasizing, Luciferase Transduced MAT-Lu Rat Prostate Cancer Models: Follow up of Bolus and Metronomic Therapy with Doxorubicin as Model Drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantscheff, Peter, E-mail: jantscheff@tumorbio.uni-freiburg.de [Tumour Biology Center, Clinical Research, Department Lipids & Liposomes, Breisacher Str.117, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Esser, Norbert [ProQinase GmbH, Breisacher Str. 117, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Geipel, Andreas; Woias, Peter [Laboratory for Design of Microsystems, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), Georges-Köhler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Ziroli, Vittorio [Tumour Biology Center, Clinical Research, Department Lipids & Liposomes, Breisacher Str.117, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Goldschmidtboing, Frank [Laboratory for Design of Microsystems, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), Georges-Köhler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Massing, Ulrich [Tumour Biology Center, Clinical Research, Department Lipids & Liposomes, Breisacher Str.117, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-06-17

    The most fatal outcomes of prostate carcinoma (PCa) result from hormone-refractory variants of the tumor, especially from metastatic spread rather than from primary tumor burden. The goal of the study was to establish and apply rat MAT-Lu prostate cancer tumor models for improved non-invasive live follow up of tumor growth and metastasis by in vivo bioluminescence. We established luciferase transduced MAT-Lu rat PCa cells and studied tumor growth and metastatic processes in an ectopic as well as orthotopic setting. An intravenous bolus treatment with doxorubicin was used to demonstrate the basic applicability of in vivo imaging to follow up therapeutic intervention in these models. In vitro analysis of tissue homogenates confirmed major metastatic spread of subcutaneous tumors into the lung. Our sensitive method, however, for the first time detects metastasis also in lymph node (11/24), spleen (3/24), kidney (4/24), liver (5/24), and bone tissue (femur or spinal cord - 5/20 and 12/20, respectively). Preliminary data of orthotopic implantation (three animals) showed metastatic invasion to investigated organs in all animals but with varying preference (e.g., to lymph nodes). Intravenous bolus treatment of MAT-Lu PCa with doxorubicin reduced subcutaneous tumor growth by about 50% and the number of animals affected by metastatic lesions in lymph nodes (0/4), lung (3/6) or lumbar spine (0/2), as determined by in vivo imaging and in vitro analysis. Additionally, the possible applicability of the luciferase transduced MAT-Lu model(s) to study basic principles of metronomic therapies via jugular vein catheter, using newly established active microport pumping systems, is presented.

  4. Metastasizing, Luciferase Transduced MAT‑Lu Rat Prostate Cancer Models: Follow up of Bolus and Metronomic Therapy with Doxorubicin as Model Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Woias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The most fatal outcomes of prostate carcinoma (PCa result from hormone-refractory variants of the tumor, especially from metastatic spread rather than from primary tumor burden. The goal of the study was to establish and apply rat MAT-Lu prostate cancer tumor models for improved non-invasive live follow up of tumor growth and metastasis by in vivo bioluminescence. We established luciferase transduced MAT-Lu rat PCa cells and studied tumor growth and metastatic processes in an ectopic as well as orthotopic setting. An intravenous bolus treatment with doxorubicin was used to demonstrate the basic applicability of in vivo imaging to follow up therapeutic intervention in these models. In vitro analysis of tissue homogenates confirmed major metastatic spread of subcutaneous tumors into the lung. Our sensitive method, however, for the first time detects metastasis also in lymph node (11/24, spleen (3/24, kidney (4/24, liver (5/24, and bone tissue (femur or spinal cord - 5/20 and 12/20, respectively. Preliminary data of orthotopic implantation (three animals showed metastatic invasion to investigated organs in all animals but with varying preference (e.g., to lymph nodes. Intravenous bolus treatment of MAT-Lu PCa with doxorubicin reduced subcutaneous tumor growth by about 50% and the number of animals affected by metastatic lesions in lymph nodes (0/4, lung (3/6 or lumbar spine (0/2, as determined by in vivo imaging and in vitro analysis. Additionally, the possible applicability of the luciferase transduced MAT-Lu model(s to study basic principles of metronomic therapies via jugular vein catheter, using newly established active microport pumping systems, is presented.

  5. Retrospective analysis of 119 Chinese noninflammatory locally advanced breast cancer cases treated with intravenous combination of vinorelbine and epirubicin as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a median follow-up of 63.4 months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ou; Shao, ZhiMin; Shen, ZhenZhou; Shen, KunWei; Chen, CanMing; Wu, JiaYi; Chen, ShuJie; Chen, XiaoSong; Liu, GuangYu; Hu, Zhen; Lu, JingSong; Wu, Jiong

    2009-01-01

    This study is a retrospective evaluation of the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC) with a vinorelbine (V) and epirubicin (E) intravenous combination regimen and is aimed at identification of predictive markers for the long-term outcome in noninflammatory locally advanced breast cancer (NLABC). One-hundred-and-nineteen patients with NLABC were identified from September 2001 to May 2006. Analysis was performed in March 2008, with a median follow-up of 63.4 months (range, 9-76 months). All patients were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer using 14 G core needle biopsy and treated with three cycles of VE before surgery. Local-regional radiotherapy was offered to all patients after the completion of chemotherapy followed by hormonal therapy according to hormone receptor status. Tissue sections cut from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks from biopsy specimens and postoperative tumor tissues were stained for the presence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), HER-2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor-2), and MIB-1(Ki-67). Patients characteristics were median age 52 years (range: 25-70 years); clinical TNM stage, stage IIB (n = 32), stage IIIA (n = 56), stage IIIB (n = 22) and stage IIIC (n = 9). All patients were evaluable for response: clinically complete response was documented in 27 patients (22.7%); 78 (65.6%) obtained partial response; stable disease was observed in 13 (10.9%); 1 patient (0.8%) had progressive disease. Pathological complete response was found in 22 cases (18.5%). Seventy-five patients were alive with no recurrence after a median follow-up of 63.4 months, the 5-year rates for disease-free survival and overall survival were 58.7% and 71.3%, respectively, after the start of NC. On multivariate analysis, the independent variables associated with increased risk of relapse and death were high pre-Ki-67(p = 0.012, p = 0.017, respectively), high post-Ki-67 expression (p = 0.045, p = 0.001, respectively), and non-pCR (p = 0

  6. Dual-layer surface coating of PLGA-based nanoparticles provides slow-release drug delivery to achieve metronomic therapy in a paclitaxel-resistant murine ovarian cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozgar, Zohreh; Wang, Lei; Brandstoetter, Tania; Wallis, Samuel S; Wilson, Erin M; Goldberg, Michael S

    2014-11-10

    Development of drug resistance is a central challenge to the treatment of ovarian cancer. Metronomic chemotherapy decreases the extent of drug-free periods, thereby hindering development of drug resistance. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy allows for treatment of tumors confined within the peritoneum, but achieving sustained tumor-localized chemotherapy remains difficult. We hypothesized that modulating the surface properties of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-based nanoparticles could enhance their drug retention ability and extend their release profile, thereby enabling metronomic, localized chemotherapy in vivo. Paclitaxel was encapsulated in particles coated with a layer of polydopamine and a subsequent layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). These particles achieved a 3.8-fold higher loading content compared to that of nanoparticles formulated from linear PLGA-PEG copolymers. In vitro release kinetic studies and in vivo drug distribution profiles demonstrate sustained release of paclitaxel. Although free drug conferred no survival advantage, low-dose intraperitoneal administration of paclitaxel-laden surface-coated nanoparticles to drug-resistant ovarian tumor-bearing mice resulted in significant survival benefits in the absence of any apparent systemic toxicity.

  7. Oral contraceptives induced hepatotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    B. Akshaya Srikanth; V. Manisree

    2013-01-01

    Oral Contraceptives are the pharmacological agents used to prevent pregnancy. These are divided as the combined and progestogen methods and are administered orally, transdermally, systemically and via vaginal route. All these methods contain both oestrogen and progestogen. Vigorous usage of oral contraceptives and anabolic steroids as associated with cholestasis, vascular lesions and hepatic neoplasm. Benign hepatic neoplasms are clearly associated with oral contraceptives. In this article we...

  8. Oral vaccination of fish

    OpenAIRE

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen breakdown in the harsh gastric environment, but also to the high tolerogenic gut environment and to inadequate vaccine design. In this review we discuss current approaches used to develop oral vaccines fo...

  9. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk it. Perform an oral cancer ... oral cancer self-exam each month. An oral examination is performed using a bright light and a ...

  11. Essentials of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  12. Screening for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitender, Solanki; Sarika, Gupta; Varada, Hiremath R; Omprakash, Yadav; Mohsin, Khan

    2016-11-01

    Oral cancer is considered as a serious health problem resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Early detection and prevention play a key role in controlling the burden of oral cancer worldwide. The five-year survival rate of oral cancer still remains low and delayed diagnosis is considered as one of the major reasons. This increases the demand for oral screening. Currently, screening of oral cancer is largely based on visual examination. Various evidence strongly suggest the validity of visual inspection in reducing mortality in patients at risk for oral cancer. Simple visual examination is accompanied with adjunctive techniques for subjective interpretation of dysplastic changes. These include toluidine blue staining, brush biopsy, chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence. This review highlights the efficacy of various diagnostic methods in screening of oral cancer. © 2016 Old City Publishing, Inc.

  13. Oral biopsy: Oral pathologist′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  14. Oral manifestations of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, S; O'Shea, F; Galvin, S; Wynne, B

    2018-02-01

    Mucosal involvement is commonly seen in patients with lupus; however, oral examination is often forgotten. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within oral lupoid plaques has been described, emphasizing the importance of identifying and treating oral lupus. We undertook a retrospective single-centre study looking at oral findings in patients attending our multidisciplinary lupus clinic between January 2015 and April 2016. A total of 42 patients were included. The majority of patients were female (88%) and had a diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus (62%). Half of the patients had positive oral findings, 26% had no oral examination documented, and 24% had documented normal oral examinations. Our findings suggest that oral pathology is common in this cohort of patients. Regular oral examination is warranted to identify oral lupus and provide treatment. Associated diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome may also be identified. Patients should be encouraged to see their general dental practitioners on a regular basis for mucosal review. Any persistent ulcer that fails to respond to treatment or hard lump needs urgent histopathological evaluation to exclude malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  16. Oral microbiota and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the...

  17. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

  19. Oral microbiota and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka H. Meurman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion.

  20. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  1. Oral candidosis in relation to oral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Chandran, R; Altini, M; Lemmer, J

    2014-09-01

    Symptomatic oral infection with Candida albicans is characterized by invasion of the oral epithelium by virulent hyphae that cause tissue damage releasing the inflammatory mediators that initiate and sustain local inflammation. Candida albicans triggers pattern-recognition receptors of keratinocytes, macrophages, monocytes and dendritic cells, stimulating the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23. These cytokines induce the differentiation of Th17 cells and the generation of IL-17- and/or IL-22-mediated antifungal protective immuno-inflammatory responses in infected mucosa. Some immune cells including NKT cells, γδ T cells and lymphoid cells that are innate to the oral mucosa have the capacity to produce large quantities of IL-17 in response to C. albicans, sufficient to mediate effective protective immunity against C. albicans. On the other hand, molecular structures of commensal C. albicans blastoconidia, although detected by pattern-recognition receptors, are avirulent, do not invade the oral epithelium, do not elicit inflammatory responses in a healthy host, but induce regulatory immune responses that maintain tissue tolerance to the commensal fungi. The type, specificity and sensitivity of the protective immune response towards C. albicans is determined by the outcome of the integrated interactions between the intracellular signalling pathways of specific combinations of activated pattern-recognition receptors (TLR2, TLR4, Dectin-1 and Dectin-2). IL-17-mediated protective immune response is essential for oral mucosal immunity to C. albicans infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Addition of rapamycin and hydroxychloroquine to metronomic chemotherapy as a second line treatment results in high salvage rates for refractory metastatic solid tumors: a pilot safety and effectiveness analysis in a small patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Ko, Hui-Ling; Yang, Kai-Lin; Lee, Cheng-Yen; Chi, Mau-Shin; Kao, Shang-Jyh

    2015-06-30

    Autophagy is an important oncotarget that can be modulated during anti-cancer therapy. Enhancing autophagy using chemotherapy and rapamycin (Rapa) treatment and then inhibiting it using hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) could synergistically improve therapy outcome in cancer patients. It is still unclear whether addition of Rapa and HCQ to chemotherapy could be used for reversing drug resistance. Twenty-five stage IV cancer patients were identified. They had no clinical response to first-line metronomic chemotherapy; the patients were salvaged by adding an autophagy inducer (Rapa, 2 mg/day) and an autophagosome inhibitor (HCQ, 400 mg/day) to their current metronomic chemotherapy for at least 3 months. Patients included 4 prostate, 4 bladder, 4 lung, 4 breast, 2 colon, and 3 head and neck cancer patients as well as 4 sarcoma patients. Chemotherapy was administered for a total of 137 months. The median duration of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 months (95% confidence interval, 3-7 months). The overall response rate to this treatment was of 40%, with an 84% disease control rate. The most frequent and clinically significant toxicities were myelotoxicities. Grade ≥3 leucopenia occurred in 6 patients (24%), grade ≥3 thrombocytopenia in 8 (32%), and anemia in 3 (12%). None of them developed febrile neutropenia. Non-hematologic toxicities were fatigue (total 32%, with 1 patient developing grade 3 fatigue), diarrhea (total 20%, 1 patient developed grade 3 fatigue), reversible grade 3 cardiotoxicity (1 patient), and grade V liver toxicity from hepatitis B reactivation (1 patient). Our results of Rapa, HCQ and chemotherapy triplet combination suggest autophagy is a promising oncotarget and warrants further investigation in phase II studies.

  3. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  4. Oral cavity and jaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solntsev, A.M.; Koval', G.Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Radioanatome of oral cavity and jaw is described. Diseases of the teeth, jaw, large salivary glands, temporo-mandibular articulation are considered. Roentgenograms of oral cacity and jaw of healthy people are presented and analyzed as well as roentgenograms in the above-mentioned diseases

  5. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  6. Brachytherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Ajimu, Akira; Morikawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Shintarou; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Ikenaga, Kouji; Sakamoto, Ichirou.

    1988-01-01

    13 cases with oral cancer were treated using brachytherapy at the Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University Hospital from September 1985 to February 1988. Among 11 cases of tongue cancer, T1 and T2 cases were well controlled by radiation therapy using 226 Ra needles. Cancer of oral floor and buccal mucosa were controlled by the use of 192 Au grains. (author)

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  8. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Newsletters AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands. We ...

  9. What Is an Oral Piercing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is an Oral Piercing? Article Chapters What Is an Oral Piercing? print full article print this chapter email this article Oral piercing can cause pain, swelling, infection, drooling, taste loss, ...

  10. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth ... involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  12. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  13. Prevention of gingival trauma : Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdos, N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining healthy teeth and soft oral tissues for life is important. Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings can damage the soft oral tissues. This thesis investigates the safety of manual toothbrushes, interdental brushes and rubber bristles interdental cleaners by analysing the gingival abrasion

  14. Cromolyn Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor.Cromolyn oral inhalation helps to prevent asthma attacks (sudden episodes of shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing) but will not stop an asthma attack that has already started. Your doctor will prescribe ...

  15. Intravenous versus oral etoposide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Abir Salwa; Grönberg, Malin; Langer, Seppo W.

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently...... administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS......) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS...

  16. Fostering oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Previous research revealed significant differences in the effectiveness of various feedback sources for encouraging students’ oral presentation performance. While former studies emphasised the superiority of teacher feedback, it remains unclear whether the quality of feedback actually differs

  17. Oral Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get involved Understanding Dental Research People Resources About Understanding Events Get involved Dental Research Resources Contact Sitemap The Oral Cancer Foundation admin 2017-11-12T16:49:25+ ...

  18. Maintaining women's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  19. ON ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a rise in the incidence of oral cancer in the Rostov Region since the 1990s. The study has indicated that this rise is associated with regional population growth due to the forced migrants after the collapse of the USSR. Financial problems, unbalanced nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and depression in this group of patients have contributed to the higher incidence of precancers and cancers.

  20. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  1. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  2. Determinants of Oral Health: Does Oral Health Literacy Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad Mehdi; Yazdani, Reza; Virtanen, Jorma; Pakdaman, Afsaneh; Murtomaa, Heikki

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate oral health literacy, independent of other oral health determinants, as a risk indicator for self-reported oral health. Methods. A cross-sectional population-based survey conducted in Tehran, Iran. Multiple logistic regression analysis served to estimate the predictive effect of oral health literacy on self-reported oral health status (good versus poor) controlling for socioeconomic and demographic factors and tooth-brushing behavior. Results. In all, among 1031 partici...

  3. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takuji; Tanaka, Mayu; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important adv...

  4. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y.; Hayes, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through c...

  5. Ethnicity and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Bedi, R

    2000-09-01

    Oral squamous-cell carcinoma, the main type of oral cancer, is among the ten most common cancers in the world. The aims of this paper were first, to consider whether there was evidence of marked ethnic variations in the incidence, management, and survival of oral cancer, and then, to review possible explanations for these variations. Evidence from the literature suggests that there is marked, inter-country variation in both the incidence and mortality from oral cancer. There is also growing evidence of intracountry ethnic differences, mostly reported in the UK and USA. These variations among ethnic groups have been attributed mainly to specific risk factors, such as alcohol and tobacco (smoking and smokeless), but dietary factors and the existence of genetic predispositions may also play a part. Variations in access to care services are also an apparent factor. The extent of ethnic differences in oral cancer is masked by the scarcity of information available. Where such data are accessible, there are clear disparities in both incidence and mortality of oral cancer between ethnic groups.

  6. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  8. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work......Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...

  9. ORAL MYIASIS CONVERTING TO ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral Myiasis, a condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots is a rare pathology in humans. It is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, severe halitosis. It is seen frequently in tropical countries and hot climatic regions. The reported cases in literature of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer are few. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the maggots but a systemic treatment with Ivermectin, a semi - synthetic macrolide antibiotic, has been used successfully for treatment for oral m yiasis. We present a case of 55 yr old male alcoholic patient with oral myiasis with extensive proliferative growth of oral cavity. Our patient was managed with manual debridement and administration of systemic ivermect in along with antibiotic coverage. Incisional biopsy of the proliferative lesion showed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thus our patient showed presence of oral myiasis in association with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Foster, Jamie S.; Palmer, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  11. [Oral health in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, Duska; Brkanić, Tatjana; Stojić, Sinisa

    2002-01-01

    Good oral health care during pregnancy is essential but often overlooked factor of dental growth as well as of other structures of oral cavity. Pregnancy is the time when conscious approach to preventive oral care should increase. Preventive measures during pregnancy mean usage of fluorides, special dietary measures and increased oral hygiene habits. Preventive measures in pregnant women have one goal: providing conditions for development of fetal teeth as well as preventing tooth decay in pregnant women. The optimal period for introducing preventive measures is the first trimester of pregnancy. Because of hormonal alterations there is an increased incidence of dental diseases: gingivitis and low salivary pH (inflammation and bleeding gums). Eating habits of pregnant women may lead to frequent snacking on candy or other decay-promoting foods, thereby increasing the risk of caries. However, very poor oral health, possible dental complications and their consequences to the health as well as emotional status represent very strong reasons for activation of dental health care in this period.

  12. The Oral Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweiler, Nicole B; Netuschil, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiota represents an important part of the human microbiota, and includes several hundred to several thousand diverse species. It is a normal part of the oral cavity and has an important function to protect against colonization of extrinsic bacteria which could affect systemic health. On the other hand, the most common oral diseases caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are based on microorganisms. While (medical) research focused on the planktonic phase of bacteria over the last 100 years, it is nowadays generally known, that oral microorganisms are organised as biofilms. On any non-shedding surfaces of the oral cavity dental plaque starts to form, which meets all criteria for a microbial biofilm and is subject to the so-called succession. When the sensitive ecosystem turns out of balance - either by overload or weak immune system - it becomes a challenge for local or systemic health. Therefore, the most common strategy and the golden standard for the prevention of caries, gingivitis and periodontitis is the mechanical removal of this biofilms from teeth, restorations or dental prosthesis by regular toothbrushing.

  13. Oral health during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Douglass, Alan B; Douglass, Joanna M; Silk, Laura

    2008-04-15

    Oral health care in pregnancy is often avoided and misunderstood by physicians, dentists, and patients. Evidence-based practice guidelines are still being developed. Research suggests that some prenatal oral conditions may have adverse consequences for the child. Periodontitis is associated with preterm birth and low birth weight, and high levels of cariogenic bacteria in mothers can lead to increased dental caries in the infant. Other oral lesions, such as gingivitis and pregnancy tumors, are benign and require only reassurance and monitoring. Every pregnant woman should be screened for oral risks, counseled on proper oral hygiene, and referred for dental treatment when necessary. Dental procedures such as diagnostic radiography, periodontal treatment, restorations, and extractions are safe and are best performed during the second trimester. Xylitol and chlorhexidine may be used as adjuvant therapy for high-risk mothers in the early postpartum period to reduce transmission of cariogenic bacteria to their infants. Appropriate dental care and prevention during pregnancy may reduce poor prenatal outcomes and decrease infant caries.

  14. Canine oral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged.

  15. Oral pregnancy tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh M Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma is one of the inflammatory hyperplasias seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection and in reality arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females, possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic lesion manifesting as small, red erythematous growth on a pedunculated or sometimes sessile base, which is usually hemorrhagic. Although excisional surgery is the treatment of choice , some other treatment protocols such as the use of Nd:YAG laser, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, cryosurgery, intralesional injection of ethanol or corticosteroids, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy have been proposed. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman with large oral pyogenic granuloma.

  16. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...... ressourceanvendelse er muligt at skabe en betydeligt forbedret mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre Key words: Geriatric dentistry, nursing home, community health services, prevention, situated learning...

  17. Oral lichen planus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, S.; Katpar, S.; Ali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous dermatological disorder, with intraoral manifestation. Skin lesions prevail with oral mucosal lesions. Prevalence of lichen planus, as an oral pre-malignant lesion, is 1-2 % population. Lateral border, dorsal tongue, gingiva, hard palate and vermilion border are common sites and lesions appear as reticular, plaque-like and papular intraoral types. Skin presents with pururitic, polygonal papules. Atrophic and erosive are the known intraoral pre-malignant types. A case report is presented, which responded well to steroid therapy. (author)

  18. Inequalities in oral health and oral health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a critical review of the problem of inequalities in oral health and discusses strategies for disease prevention and oral health promotion. It shows that oral health is not merely a result of individual biological, psychological, and behavioral factors; rather, it is the sum of collective social conditions created when people interact with the social environment. Oral health status is directly related to socioeconomic position across the socioeconomic gradient in almost all...

  19. Probiotics as oral health biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Tabrizian, Maryam; Prakash, Satya

    2012-09-01

    Oral health is affected by its resident microorganisms. Three prominent oral disorders are dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, with the oral microbiota playing a key role in the initiation/progression of all three. Understanding the microbiota and the diseases they may cause is critical to the development of new therapeutics. This review is focused on probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of oral diseases. This review describes the oral ecosystem and its correlation with oral health/disease. The pathogenesis and current prevention/treatment strategies of periodontal diseases (PD) and dental caries (DC) are depicted. An introduction of probiotics is followed by an analysis of their role in PD and DC, and their potential role(s) in oral health. Finally, a discussion ensues on the future research directions and limitations of probiotics for oral health. An effective oral probiotic formulation should contribute to the prevention/treatment of microbial diseases of the oral cavity. Understanding the oral microbiota's role in oral disease is important for the development of a therapeutic to prevent/treat dental diseases. However, investigations into clinical efficacy, delivery/dose optimization, mechanism(s) of action and other related parameters are yet to be fully explored. Keeping this in mind, investigations into oral probiotic therapies are proving promising.

  20. Oral hygiene practices and risk of oral leukoplakia | Macigo | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the influence of oral hygiene habits and practices on the risk of developing oral leukoplakia. Design: Case control study. Setting: Githongo sublocation in Meru District. Subjects: Eighty five cases and 141 controls identified in a house-to-house screening. Results: The relative risk (RR) of oral ...

  1. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Washio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  2. Oral Hygiene and Oral Flora Evaluation in Psychiatric Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: The oral hygiene of most patients was insufficient. The presence of Gram‑negative Bacilli growth in the oral flora can be explained by poor hand hygiene. These findings suggest that it is useful to educate individuals about oral hygiene and hand hygiene and to inform the staff and families about this issue.

  3. The New Orality: Oral Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Montgomery, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Considers the characteristics of orality and literacy developed in the work of scholars such as Walter Ong to consider computer-mediated communication (CMC) as the potential site of a "new orality" which is neither purely oral or literate. Notes that the medium of CMC is writing, which has traditionally represented the…

  4. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  5. Final Results of the Randomized Phase II NorCap-CA223 Trial Comparing First-Line All-Oral Versus Taxane-Based Chemotherapy for HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinieri, Saverio; Chan, Arlene; Altundag, Kadri; Vandebroek, An; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole; Barnadas, Agusti; Dodyk, Patricia; Lazzarelli, Silvia; Botha, Michiel; Rauch, Daniel; Villanova, Gustavo; Coskun, Ugur

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 3 first-line chemotherapy combination regimens for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer (mBC). In this open-label, 3-arm, randomized phase II trial, patients were randomized to all-oral NORCAP (vinorelbine/capecitabine), GEMPAC (gemcitabine/paclitaxel), or GEMDOC (gemcitabine/docetaxel) as first-line chemotherapy for HER2-negative mBC. Stratification factors were center, previous (neo)adjuvant anthracycline, and age. The primary end point was disease control rate (DCR; complete or partial response, or stable disease for ≥3 months). The DCR was 73% (95% confidence interval [CI], 59-85) with NORCAP (36 of 49 patients), 78% (95% CI, 64-88) with GEMPAC (39 of 50 patients), and 80% (95% CI, 66-90) with GEMDOC (40 of 50 patients). Objective response rates were 33% (16 of 49 patients), 24% (12 of 50 patients), and 50% (25 of 50 patients), respectively; median progression-free survival was 7.6, 9.0, and 11.4 months, respectively. Median overall survival was 30 to 31 months with all regimens. The most common Grade ≥3 adverse event with each regimen was neutropenia (24 patients [50%], 23 patients [46%], and 43 patients [86%], respectively). The most common nonhematological Grade ≥3 adverse event was fatigue. Grade 2 alopecia occurred in 36 patients (72%) who received GEMPAC and 38 patients (76%) who received GEMDOC, but only 4 patients (8%) who received NORCAP. There was no evidence of a detrimental effect of NORCAP on quality of life. All-oral NORCAP is an active first-line chemotherapy regimen and might be offered as an alternative to first-line taxane-based therapy for HER2-negative mBC, particularly if patients wish to avoid alopecia or frequent intravenous administrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging in oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Supreeta; Chaukar, Devendra; Pai, Prathamesh

    2012-01-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist

  7. IDEA: Stimulating Oral Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Jacob J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents daily activities that facilitate complete sentence response, promote oral production, and aid the learning of vocabulary in foreign-language classes. Because speech is the primary form of communication in the foreign-language classroom, it is important to stimulate students to converse as soon as possible. (Author/CK)

  8. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  9. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  10. History of oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  11. Oral Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Daniela I; Setterfield, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a relatively common autoimmune T-cell-mediated disease of unknown aetiology affecting the mucous membranes, skin and nails. Its prevalence varies between 0.5 and 2.2% of the population in epidemiological studies with a peak incidence in the 30-60 years range and with a female predominance of 2:1. Mucosal lichen planus tends to follow a chronic course with acute exacerbations. Spontaneous remission of oral lichen planus (OLP) is uncommon, and indeed mucosal LP may become worse with time. In contrast, cutaneous lichen planus may follow a milder clinical course though some variants may be severe such as those affecting the palms and soles and the scalp and the genital tract in females (vulvovaginal gingival LP) where scarring leads to significant complications. It is important to identify those cases that may be drug induced or be associated with a contact allergic or irritant reaction (lichenoid reaction) or the rarer oral presentation of discoid lupus erythematosus. There is a very small risk of malignancy (approximately 1:200 patients/year) associated with oral lichen planus; thus patients should be informed that long term monitoring via their general dental practitioner is appropriate. This review will focus on the clinical presentation and management of oral lichen planus.

  12. Oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šehalić Meliha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 29 - year Lichen planus is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune skin disease, that is often manifested, except on the skin, in the oral cavity in a variety of clinical forms. The prevalence of the disease in the general population is about 1-2%. Etiopathogenesis is not still well understood. Histopathology, in addition to the basic methods, anamnesis and physical examination, is vital for proper diagnosis of oral lichen planus (OLP. Very diverse and loaded histological findings are common for all forms of oral lichen planus. We reported the case of oral lichen planus in a 49 years old male patient, who presented to the Dentistry clinic of Medical faculty of Priština with burning and itching symptoms and changes in the buccal mucosa. Histopathological analysis of biopsy tissue conformed clinical diagnosis of lichen planus. Due to the possibility for malignant transformation of lesions, the long-term follow-up of patients with this disease is of great importance.

  13. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral ... Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral ...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  17. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We ... surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral ...

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ... tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to ...

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ... and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ... and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic ...

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to ... in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to ...

  3. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the expert for diagnosing and surgically treating ... late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral ...

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ...

  6. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and ... education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and ...

  7. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  8. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, Rute; Sim?es-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, M?rio-Jorge; Azevedo, ?lvaro; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with n...

  9. Oral Lichen Planus in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan Das, Usha; JP, Beena

    2009-01-01

    Oral lichen planus which is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases in adults, it has been rarely described in children. There are very reports in the literature regarding oral lichen planus in children, here we report a case of intraoral lesions of lichen planus. Lichen planus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperkeratotic or erosive lesions of the oral mucosa in children.

  10. Oral Biopsy: A Dental Gawk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sir,. Dermatologists are often confronted with neoplasms and diseases of the oral cavity. Although many may be reluctant to perform oral surgical procedures, a biopsy is often needed to establish a definitive diagnosis, and biopsy of the oral cavity is a safe and useful technique that can be easily employed by dermatologists.

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans ... diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ...

  12. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ... OMS is in the best position to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk ...

  13. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  14. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral......In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...

  15. Effect of Fixed Metallic Oral Appliances on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnazzawi, Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    There is a substantial proportion of the population using fixed metallic oral appliances, such as crowns and bridges, which are composed of various dental alloys. These restorations may be associated with a number of effects on oral health with variable degrees of severity, to review potential effects of using fixed metallic oral appliances, fabricated from various alloys. The MEDLINE/PubMed database was searched using certain combinations of keywords related to the topic. The search revealed that burning mouth syndrome, oral pigmentation, hypersensitivity and lichenoid reactions, and genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are the major potential oral health changes associated with fixed prosthodontic appliances. Certain oral disorders are associated with the use of fixed metallic oral appliances. Patch test is the most reliable method that can be applied for identifying metal allergy, and the simultaneous use of different alloys in the mouth is discouraged.

  16. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  17. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  18. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  19. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  20. Per-oral cholangioscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Monga, Amitabh; Ramchandani, Mohan; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2011-01-01

    Direct endoscopic views of bile duct have been described in literature since the 1970s. Since then rapid strides have been made with the advent of technologically advanced systems with better image quality and maneuverability. The single operator semi-disposable per-oral cholangioscope and other novel methods such as the cholangioscopy access balloon are likely to revolutionize this field. Even though cholangioscopy is currently used primarily for characterization of indeterminate strictures ...

  1. Challenges in Comparative Oral Epic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Miles Foley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Originally written in 2001 and subsequently published in China, this collaborative essay explores five questions central to comparative oral epic with regard to Mongolian, South Slavic, ancient Greek, and Old English traditions: “What is a poem in oral epic tradition?” “What is a typical scene or theme in oral epic tradition?” “What is a poetic line in oral epic tradition?” “What is a formula in an oral epic tradition?” “What is the register in oral epic poetry?” Now available for the first time in English, this essay reflects a foundational stage of what has become a productive and long-term collaboration between the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Institute of Ethnic Literature of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

  2. Fractal analysis in oral leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Bhai Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fractal analysis (FA quantifies complex geometric structures by generating a fractal dimension (FD, which can measure the complexity of mucosa. FA is a quantitative tool used to measure the complexity of self-similar or semi-self-similar structures. Aim and Objective: The study was done to perform the FA of oral mucosa with keratotic changes, as it is also made up of self-similar tissues, and thus, its FD can be calculated. Results: In oral leukoplakia, keratinization increases the complexity of mucosa, which denotes fractal geometry. We evaluated and compared pretreated and post-treated oral leukoplakia in 50 patients with clinically proven oral leukoplakia and analyzed the normal oral mucosa and lesional or keratinized mucosa in oral leukoplakia patients through FA using box counting method. Conclusion: FA using the fractal geometry is an efficient, noninvasive prediction tool for early detection of oral leukoplakia and other premalignant conditions in patients.

  3. Oral cancer screening practices of oral health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Haresaku, Satoru; McGrath, Roisin; Bailey, Denise; Mccullough, Michael; Musolino, Ross; Kim, Boaz; Chinnassamy, Alagesan; Morgan, Michael

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate oral cancer-related screening practices of Oral Health Professionals (OHPs - dentists, dental hygienists, dental therapists, and oral health therapists) practising in Victoria, Australia. A 36-item survey was distributed to 3343 OHPs. Items included socio-demographic and work-related characteristics; self-assessed knowledge of oral cancer; perceived level of confidence in discussing oral health behaviors with patients; oral cancer screening practices; and self-evaluated need for additional training on screening procedures for oral cancer. A total of 380 OHPs responded this survey, achieving an overall response rate of 9.4%. Forty-five were excluded from further analysis. Of these 335 OHP, 72% were dentists; (n = 241); either GDP or Dental Specialists; 13.7% (n = 46) were dental hygienists; 12.2% (n = 41) were oral health therapists, and the remaining 2.1% (n = 7) were dental therapists. While the majority (95.2%) agreed that oral cancer screening should be routinely performed, in actual practice around half (51.4%) screened all their patients. Another 12.8% "Very rarely" conducted screening examinations. The probability of routinely conducting an oral cancer screening was explored utilising Logistic Regression Analysis. Four variables remained statistically significant (p oral cancer screening rose with increasing levels of OHPs' confidence in oral cancer-related knowledge (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.09-1.67) and with higher levels of confidence in discussing oral hygiene practices with patients (OR = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.03-1.52). Results also showed that dental specialists were less likely to perform oral cancer screening examinations compared with other OHPs (OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.07-0.52) and the likelihood of performing an oral cancer screening decreased when the "patient complained of a problem" (OR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.10-0.44). Only half the study sample performed oral cancer screening examinations for all of their patients

  4. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  5. Irradiation mucositis and oral flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    1989-01-01

    This study, which is motivated by the substantial morbidity of local signs of mucositis and generalized symptoms that result from mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation, has the following objectives: To investigate if it is possible to prevent irradiation mucositis via oral flora elimination, and, if it is true that flora plays a role in irradiation mucositis, what fraction of the oral flora may be involved; to evaluate oral Gram-negative bacillary carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate Gram-negative bacilli from the oral cavity; to evaluate oral yeast carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate yeasts stomatitis and the 'selectivity' of elimination of flora. Two methods are described for monitoring alterations of mucositis of the oral cavity and changes in oral flora. Chlorhexidine has been tested as the commonly used prophylaxis. The effect of chlorhexidine 0.1% rinses on oral flora and mucositis has been studied in a prospective placebo controlled double blind randomized programme. The results of the influence of saliva on the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine and the results of selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated patients who have head and neck cancer are reported. Salivary inactivation of the topical antimicrobials used for selective elimination of oral flora has been studied and the results are reported. Finally, the objectives that have been achieved (or not) are delineated. The significance of the results of the study are discussed in terms of published information and further lines of research are suggested. (author). 559 refs.; 29 figs.; 20 tabs

  6. Metronomic Adjuvant Chemotherapy Improves Treatment Outcome in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients With Postradiation Persistently Detectable Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twu, Chih-Wen [Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wen-Yi [Section of Basic Medicine, Department of Nursing, Hung Kuang University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chien-Chih [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liang, Kai-Li; Jiang, Rong-San [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ching-Te [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital–Chiayi Branch, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Ting [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Martin De Porres Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Lin, Po-Ju; Liu, Yi-Chun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jin-Ching, E-mail: jclin@vghtc.gov.tw [Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with persistently detectable plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA (pEBV DNA) after curative radiation therapy plus induction/concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 625 NPC patients with available pEBV DNA levels before and after treatment. Eighty-five patients with persistently detectable pEBV DNA after 1 week of completing radiation therapy were eligible for this retrospective study. Of the 85 patients, 33 were administered adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of oral tegafur-uracil (2 capsules twice daily) for 12 months with (n=4) or without (n=29) preceding intravenous chemotherapy of mitomycin-C, epirubicin, and cisplatin. The remaining 52 patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy served as the control group. Results: Baseline patient characteristics at diagnosis (age, sex, pathologic type, performance status, T classification, N classification, and overall stage), as well as previous treatment modality, were comparable in both arms. After a median follow-up of 70 months for surviving patients, 45.5% (15 of 33 patients) with adjuvant chemotherapy and 71.2% (37 of 52 patients) without adjuvant chemotherapy experienced tumor relapses (P=.0323). There were a significant reduction in distant failure (P=.0034) but not in local or regional recurrence. The 5-year overall survival rate was 71.6% for patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and 28.7% for patients without adjuvant chemotherapy (hazard ratio 0.27; 95% confidence interval 0.17-0.55; P<.0001). Conclusions: Our retrospective data showed that adjuvant chemotherapy can reduce distant failure and improve overall survival in NPC patients with persistently detectable pEBV DNA after curative radiation therapy plus induction/concurrent chemotherapy.

  7. Metronomic Adjuvant Chemotherapy Improves Treatment Outcome in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients With Postradiation Persistently Detectable Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twu, Chih-Wen; Wang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Chien-Chih; Liang, Kai-Li; Jiang, Rong-San; Wu, Ching-Te; Shih, Yi-Ting; Lin, Po-Ju; Liu, Yi-Chun; Lin, Jin-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of adjuvant chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with persistently detectable plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA (pEBV DNA) after curative radiation therapy plus induction/concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 625 NPC patients with available pEBV DNA levels before and after treatment. Eighty-five patients with persistently detectable pEBV DNA after 1 week of completing radiation therapy were eligible for this retrospective study. Of the 85 patients, 33 were administered adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of oral tegafur-uracil (2 capsules twice daily) for 12 months with (n=4) or without (n=29) preceding intravenous chemotherapy of mitomycin-C, epirubicin, and cisplatin. The remaining 52 patients who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy served as the control group. Results: Baseline patient characteristics at diagnosis (age, sex, pathologic type, performance status, T classification, N classification, and overall stage), as well as previous treatment modality, were comparable in both arms. After a median follow-up of 70 months for surviving patients, 45.5% (15 of 33 patients) with adjuvant chemotherapy and 71.2% (37 of 52 patients) without adjuvant chemotherapy experienced tumor relapses (P=.0323). There were a significant reduction in distant failure (P=.0034) but not in local or regional recurrence. The 5-year overall survival rate was 71.6% for patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and 28.7% for patients without adjuvant chemotherapy (hazard ratio 0.27; 95% confidence interval 0.17-0.55; P<.0001). Conclusions: Our retrospective data showed that adjuvant chemotherapy can reduce distant failure and improve overall survival in NPC patients with persistently detectable pEBV DNA after curative radiation therapy plus induction/concurrent chemotherapy

  8. [New oral anticoagulant drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovits, Alejandro; Aizman, Andrés; Zúñiga, Pamela; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego

    2011-10-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TED) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The hallmark of oral long-term anticoagulant therapy has been the use of vitamin K antagonists, whose anticoagulant effect is exerted inhibiting vitamin K epoxide reductase. Warfarin and acenocoumarol are the most commonly used. In the last five years several new drugs for long term anticoagulation have been developed, which can inhibit single clotting factors with the purpose of improving drug therapeutic range and, ideally, minimizing bleeding risks. This review addresses the state of the art on the clinical use of inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin.

  9. Oral complications in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications

  10. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  11. Oral cancer: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanuthai, K; Rojanawatsirivej, S; Thosaporn, W; Kintarak, S; Subarnbhesaj, A; Darling, M; Kryshtalskyj, E; Chiang, C-P; Shin, H-I; Choi, S-Y; Lee, S-S; Aminishakib, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as between Asian and non-Asian oral cancer patients.

  12. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  13. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  14. Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge, Anticoagulation Control, and Demographic Characteristics of Patients Attending an Anticoagulation Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Evaluation.

  15. ORAL ALLERGY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as a set of clinical manifestations caused by IgE-mediated allergic  reactions  that  occur  at  oral  and  pharyngeal  mucosae  in  the  patients  with  pollen  sensitization  after ingestion of certain fruits, vegetables, nuts and spices. OAS arises from cross-reactivity between specific pollen and food allergens, due to similarity of a configuration and amino acid sequence of allergenic molecules. OAS is considered as class II food allergy, being caused by thermo- and chemolabile allergens, and it is rarely combined with generalized manifestations of food allergy. Prevalence and spectrum of the causal allergens depend on a kind of pollen sensitization. In Moscow region, as well as in Northern Europe, allergic sensitization most commonly occurs to the pollen of leaf trees, whereas OAS is mostly connected with ingestion of fruits from Rosaceae family and nuts. Since last years, a newly developed technique of component-resolved molecular diagnosis (CR diagnostics allows of more precise detection of OAS-causing allergen molecules. These data are of extreme importance for administration of adequate nutritional therapy and prediction of SIT efficiency. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 1, pp 17-28

  16. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral Delivery of Insulin. K Gowthamarajan Giriraj T Kulkarni. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 38-46 ...

  18. Can the oral microflora affect oral ulcerative mucositis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: Oral mucositis is one of the most prevalent toxicities after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucositis is initiated by the chemotherapy or radiotherapy preceding the transplantation. It is commonly accepted that microorganisms play a role in the process of oral mucositis.

  19. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  20. Oral health in frail elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ageing points towards increasing health problems and rising costs for the society. One of these health problems is the deteriorating oral health in care dependent elderly. The latter is related to the high need for care on many levels in these elderly. The lack of attention for oral care can be

  1. Oral health problems and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ki Kim

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying.

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ... be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ...

  3. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ... will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the cancer is often discovered late in its development. Your family dentist or OMS is in the best position to detect oral cancer during your routine dental examinations. Don't risk it. Perform an oral cancer self-exam each month. Perform a Self-Exam Monthly ...

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. ... Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. ...

  6. BETTER ORAL HEALTH TO ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Murtomaa

    2016-12-01

    The behavioral science experts are of opinion that only comprehensive and integrated common-risk-factor-based health promotion activities can enhance oral health and its equity as a part of general health. Are health professionals ready to assume their responsibility for promoting better oral health?

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ... more. TMJ and Facial Pain TMJ and Facial ... Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can ...

  8. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: statement on oral pathology and oral medicine in the European Dental Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, C; Reibel, J; Hadler-Olsen, E S

    2010-01-01

    source in revisions of dental curricula throughout Europe converging towards a European Dental Curriculum. In order to render the best conditions for future curriculum revisions providing the best quality dentist we feel obliged to analyse and comment the outlines of oral pathology and oral medicine...

  9. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  10. The Oral Paradigm and Snapchat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Soffer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this short essay, I argue that the ephemeral nature of emerging instant-messaging applications, such as Snapchat, applies an oral paradigm. While online discourse of computer-mediated communication shares many qualities with oral communication, the case of ephemeral applications is unique, as the oral features are already integrated in the application technology design and as orality is often implemented on highly visual products. Snapchat applies technology that fades visual contents as if they were spoken words fading in the air after utterance. Moreover, Snapchat’s promise to delete all messages from its database after they are viewed echoes a key characteristic of primary oral culture: that is, the inability (and in our case, the obligation not to store knowledge. In this, Snapchat demonstrates counter-logic to the contemporary grammar of new media, which is based on information aggregation.

  11. Direct oral anticoagulants: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Moreno, Ana Isabel; Martín Díaz, Rosa María; García Navarro, María José

    2017-12-30

    Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. In 2008, dabigatran was the first direct oral anticoagulant approved by the European Medicine Agency. Subsequently, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban were also authorised. This article reviews the evidence related to the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  13. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J

    2008-01-01

    At a workshop coordinated by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Cancer and Precancer in the United Kingdom issues related to potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity were discussed by an expert group. The consensus views of the Working Group are presented in a series of papers....... In this report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine...... use. Although most oral pathologists possibly recognize and accept the criteria for grading epithelial dysplasia, firstly based on architectural features and then of cytology, there is great variability in their interpretation of the presence, degree and significance of the individual criteria...

  14. Oral Pathology in Forensic Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2018-01-01

    Forensic odontology is the subdiscipline of dentistry which analyses dental evidence in the interest of justice. Oral pathology is the subdiscipline of dentistry that deals with the pathology affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. This subdiscipline is utilized for identification through oral and maxillofacial pathologies with associated syndromes, enamel rod patterns, sex determination using exfoliative cytology, identification from occlusal morphology of teeth, and deoxyribonucleic acid profiling from teeth. This subdiscipline is also utilized for age estimation studies which include Gustafson's method, incremental lines of Retzius, perikymata, natal line formation in teeth, neonatal line, racemization of collagen in dentin, cemental incremental lines, thickness of the cementum, and translucency of dentin. Even though the expertise of an oral pathologist is not taken in forensic investigations, this paper aims to discuss the role of oral pathology in forensic investigation.

  15. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jayasri Krupaa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment.

  16. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  17. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ...

  18. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Gum Disease and Cardiovascular Health ... your desktop! more... Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health Article Chapters Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral ...

  19. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome.

  20. Need for Oral Health Policy in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implementation of National Oral Health Policy in India in order to expand the oral health care to ... Professional dental organizations can also support government programs to .... who can play effective role in providing oral health care services.

  1. Oral candidiasis following steroid therapy for oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, D R; Bowers, L M; Stout, T L; Stewart, C M; Berg, K M; Sankar, V; DeRossi, S S; Thoppay, J R; Brennan, M T

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this multicentre study was to determine the incidence of oral candidiasis in patients treated with topical steroids for oral lichen planus (OLP) and to determine whether the application of a concurrent antifungal therapy prevented the development of an oral candidiasis in these patients. Records of 315 patients with OLP seen at four Oral Medicine practices treated for at least 2 weeks with steroids with and without the use of an antifungal regimen were retrospectively reviewed. The overall incidence of oral fungal infection in those treated with steroid therapy for OLP was 13.6%. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of oral candidiasis development in those treated with an antifungal regimen vs those not treated prophylactically (14.3% vs 12.6%) (P = 0.68). Despite the use of various regimens, none of the preventive antifungal strategies used in this study resulted in a significant difference in the rate of development of an oral candidiasis in patients with OLP treated with steroids. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi; Amin Salehi-Abargouei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID), and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, ...

  3. The oral microbiome - an update for oral healthcare professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilian, M; Chapple, I L C; Hannig, M

    2016-01-01

    disease-promoting bacteria to manifest and cause conditions such as caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. For practitioners and patients alike, promoting a balanced microbiome is therefore important to effectively maintain or restore oral health. This article aims to give an update on our current...... and health. The mouth houses the second most diverse microbial community in the body, harbouring over 700 species of bacteria that colonise the hard surfaces of teeth and the soft tissues of the oral mucosa. Through recent advances in technology, we have started to unravel the complexities of the oral...

  4. Oral cancer: A multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, Somsri; Thosaporn, Watcharaporn; Kintarak, Sompid; Subarnbhesaj, Ajiravudh; Darling, Mark; Kryshtalskyj, Eugene; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Shin, Hong-In; Choi, So-Young; Lee, Sang-shin; Shakib, Pouyan-Amini

    2018-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of the oral cancer patients. Material and Methods Biopsy records of the participating institutions were reviewed for oral cancer cases diagnosed from 2005 to 2014. Demographic data and site of the lesions were collected. Sites of the lesion were subdivided into lip, tongue, floor of the mouth, gingiva, alveolar mucosa, palate, buccal/labial mucosa, maxilla and mandible. Oral cancer was subdivided into 7 categories: epithelial tumors, salivary gland tumors, hematologic tumors, bone tumors, mesenchymal tumors, odontogenic tumors, and others. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17.0. Results Of the 474,851 accessioned cases, 6,151 cases (1.30%) were diagnosed in the category of oral cancer. The mean age of the patients was 58.37±15.77 years. A total of 4,238 cases (68.90%) were diagnosed in males, whereas 1911 cases (31.07%) were diagnosed in females. The male-to-female ratio was 2.22:1. The sites of predilection for oral cancer were tongue, labial/buccal mucosa, gingiva, palate, and alveolar mucosa, respectively. The three most common oral cancer in the descending order of frequency were squamous cell carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Conclusions Although the prevalence of oral cancer is not high compared to other entities, oral cancer pose significant mortality and morbidity in the patients, especially when discovered late in the course of the disease. This study highlights some anatomical locations where oral cancers are frequently encountered. As a result, clinicians should pay attention to not only teeth, but oral mucosa especially in the high prevalence area as well since early detection of precancerous lesions or cancers in the early stage increase the chance of patient being cured and greatly reduce the mortality and morbidity. This study also shows some differences between pediatric and elderly oral cancer patients as well as

  5. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Roen; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine if patients with oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis and concomitant contact allergy have more frequent and severe xerostomia, lower unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva and citric-acid-stimulated parotid saliva flow rates, and higher...... of xerostomia, clinical examination, sialometry, mucosal biopsy and contact allergy testing. RESULTS: Nineteen patients had oral lichen planus, 19 patients had oral lichenoid lesions and 11 patients had generalised stomatitis. 38.8% had contact allergy. Xerostomia was significantly more common and severe...... in the chewing stimulated saliva samples from patients when compared to healthy controls. The differences were not significant and they were irrespective of the presence of contact allergy. CONCLUSION: Xerostomia is prevalent in patients with oral lichen planus, lichenoid lesions and generalised stomatitis...

  6. Amiloidosis bucal Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.La amiloidosis es una enfermedad compleja, rara, de difícil diagnóstico, que ocurre debido al depósito de sustancia amiloidea en medio extracelular. Al ser diagnosticada en la cavidad bucal, el paciente debe tener supervisión médica para evaluar las posibles complicaciones sistémicas de la enfermedad. El objetivo del presente estudio fue presentar un caso de amiloidosis bucal en un paciente del género femenino de 72 años de edad. Basados en las señales clínicas observadas, la hipótesis diagnóstica fue de un fibroma traumático. Después de la realización de una biopsia y del examen histopatológico, el diagnóstico fue de amiloidosis

  7. Criteria for Evaluating Oral History Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsino, Frank J.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for establishing criteria for evaluating oral history interviews. Presents seven evaluation categories relating to oral history tapes and three categories relating to typescripts. (CK)

  8. Genetic etiology of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Johar; Sabiha, Bibi; Jan, Hanif Ullah; Haider, Syed Adnan; Khan, Abid Ali; Ali, Saima S

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. It accounts for 2.5% of all new cancer cases and 1.9% of all cancer deaths annually. More than 90% of oral cancers (occurring in the mouth, lip, and tongue) are oral squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate of oral cancer varies widely throughout the world, with an evident prevalence in South Asian countries. This high incidence occurs in correlation with oral cancer-associated behaviors such as alcohol, tobacco use. Researchers have reported that these behaviors lead to genetic variations in tumor suppressor genes (APC, p53), proto-oncogenes (Myc), oncogene (Ras) and genes controlling normal cellular processes (EIF3E, GSTM1). Processes such as segregation of chromosomes, genomic copy number, loss of heterozygosity, telomere stabilities, regulations of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA damage repairs and defects in notch signaling pathways are involved in causing oral cancer. In order to develop preventive and therapeutic options, it is necessary to comprehend the basic molecular mechanisms forcing oral tumorigenesis. This review examines, in detail, the mechanisms of genetic alteration which are considered to be responsible for the initiation of oral cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ORAL HYGIENE PRACTICES AND RISK OF ORAL LEUKOPLAKIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL ... Faculty of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 19676 - 00202, Nairobi, ... Poor oral hygiene is a product of plaque and ..... University of Nairobi and Kenya Medical Research.

  10. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Key words: Bacteria types, oral and dental illnesses, psychiatric patients. Date of Acceptance: .... patients, and difficulties such as insufficient sedation.[7]. This study .... Despite the general notion that stress triggers bruxism ...

  11. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhia, Bhavin B; Dudhia, Sonal B; Patel, Purv S; Jani, Yesha V

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL). Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma. PMID:26980966

  12. Recurrent oral angioleiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V G Mahima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioleiomyomas are vascular variant of leiomyomas which are benign tumors of smooth muscle. They are exceedingly rare in the oral cavity. Malignant transformation of these tumors has also been reported occasionally which warrants knowledge of this soft tissue tumor. A 57 year old male patient reported with a 15 day history of an asymptomatic growth that had started insidiously in his lower left back tooth region. Clinical examination revealed a solitary, oval, sessile growth in the mandibular left retro molar region. Excisional biopsy was suggestive of Angioleiomyoma. A recurrence of the same was noted two months later which was also histopathologically reported as Angioleiomyoma. The same was confirmed using special stains. This case reports an unusual presentation of Angioleiomyoma with regards to both recurrence as well as rapid growth. It is important to be well aware of this uncommon entity as these tumors often can mimic or transform into malignancy. Precise clinicopathological examinations are therefore invaluable in establishing an accurate diagnosis and delivering suitable treatment.

  13. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  14. Oral sensations and secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Running, Cordelia A

    2018-04-10

    Sensations experienced in the mouth influence food choices, both immediately and in the long term. Such sensations are themselves influenced by experience with flavors, the chemical environment of the mouth, genetics of receptors for flavors, and individual behavior in the chewing of food. Gustation, the sense of taste, yields information about nutrients, influences palatability, and feeds into the human body's preparation to receive those nutrients. Olfaction, the sense of smell, contributes enormously to defining and identifying food flavors (and is experienced even after placing food inside the mouth). Another vital component of food flavor is texture, which contributes to palatability, especially if a food's texture violates a person's expectations. Next, chemesthesis is the sense of chemically induced irritancy and temperature, for example spiciness and stinging. All of these sensations are potentially modified by saliva, the chemical and physical media of the mouth. As a person experiences the culmination of these oral sensations, modified through an individual's own unique saliva, the flavors in turn influence both what and how a person eats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  16. Loggerhead oral cavity morphometry study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard external morphometrics and internal oral cavity morphometrics data were collected on wild and captive reared loggerhead sea turtles in size classes ranging...

  17. Oral candidosis in lichen planus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Kieffer-Kristensen, L; Reibel, J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, but other Candida species cause candidosis. Candida species display significant differences in their susceptibility to antimycotic drugs. Patients with symptomatic or erythematous oral lichen planus (OLP) commonly have...

  18. Hydroxyurea-induced oral ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Maha; Almazrooa, Soulafa; Azher, Fatima; Alsayes, Fatin

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite that is widely used in the treatment of many benign and malignant conditions. This drug is usually well tolerated but has a number of side effects that vary in incidence. In cases of clinically significant adverse events, hydroxyurea is usually discontinued either temporarily or permanently, depending on treatment need versus harm caused by side effects. Here, we report a case of oral ulceration associated with hydroxyurea treatment in a patient who had chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient rapidly developed an oral ulcer 12 days after administration of the drug. Hydroxyurea was discontinued, and the oral lesion appreciably decreased in size and severity. Physicians and dentists should be aware of the association between hydroxyurea and oral lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral health. Click here to find ... the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As a result, OMSs are uniqely qualified to ...

  20. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  2. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable chronic diseases, which is the combined action of genetic factors, environmental factors and lifestyle. Specific conditions occur in the oral cavity in the course of diabetes that cause changes in all oral tissues with different symptoms and signs. Increased salivary glucose level is followed by increased accumulation of dental plaque and decreased resistance to noxious agents. The most common oral manifestations in diabetic patients include higher prevalence of periodontal desease, burning mouth syndrome, disruption in salivary flow, opportunistic infections, higher prevalence of denture stomatitis, oral lichen planus, fissured tongue, angular cheilitis etc. Dental interventions in patients with well-controlled diabetes are not different from those applied to nondiabetic patients. Regular monitoring of these patients is required because of the complications that can occur.

  3. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. ... and maxillofacial surgeon. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons: The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery Contact Us ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Oral, Head ...

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral ... of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to find out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery ...

  6. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Neck Pathology Download Download the ebook for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the ... well be the key to complete recovery. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  7. Oncofetal fibronectins in oral carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandel, U; Gaggero, B; Reibel, J

    1994-01-01

    -B-containing isoform and the oncofetal FN isoform derived by O-glycosylation, in oral squamous cell carcinomas, premalignant lesions, and normal oral mucosa. A selective expression of the ED-B-containing isoform was demonstrated in close relation to the invading carcinoma (38/38), whereas there was virtually...... no staining in submucosa underlying premalignant lesions (1/11) and normal epithelium (0/5). The ED-B-containing FN showed close co-distribution and staining pattern with the oncofetal isoform derived by O-glycosylation. These results demonstrate that accumulation of FN adjacent to oral carcinomas includes...... in breast and oral tumors. Another oncofetal FN isoform containing the ED-B sequence is derived by alternative splicing, and FN containing ED-B has been found to be a stromal marker of malignancies in various tissues. Here we report a comparative study by immunohistology of the distribution of the ED...

  8. Oral contraceptives and neuroactive steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Andrea J; Biggio, Giovanni; Concas, Alessandra

    2006-08-01

    A deregulation in the peripheral and brain concentrations of neuroactive steroids has been found in certain pathological conditions characterized by emotional or affective disturbances, including major depression and anxiety disorders. In this article we summarize data pertaining to the modulatory effects of oral contraceptive treatment on neuroactive steroids in women and rats. Given that the neuroactive steroids concentrations are reduced by oral contraceptives, together with the evidence that a subset of women taking oral contraceptives experience negative mood symptoms, we propose the use of this pharmacological treatment as a putative model to study the role of neuroactive steroids in the etiopathology of mood disorders. Moreover, since neuroactive steroids are potent modulators of GABA(A) receptor function and plasticity, the treatment with oral contraceptives might also represent a useful experimental model to further investigate the physiological role of these steroids in the modulation of GABAergic transmission.

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or become infected. It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out ... and surgically treating cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to ...

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ... or pharyngeal cancer this year. Here’s what you need to know. Click here to find out more. ...

  11. Oral Insulin - Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    attempts have explored the following options, either singly, or together: • Protecting ... derivative of insulin has been seen to maintain its biological activity and also have .... that in the short future any oral preparation that can achieve consistent ...

  12. Oral phenoxymethylpenicillin treatment during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Olsen, Jørn

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the human teratogenic potential of oral penicillin V: phenoxymethylpenicillin treatment during pregnancy in the large population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980–1996. The dataset included 22......, i.e. in the critical period for most major congenital abnormalities in case-matched control pairs. Thus, treatment with oral phenoxymethylpenicillin during pregnancy presents very little if any teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  13. Peran 'Oral Splint' pada Bruxisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Tanzil

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral splints have been frequently used in the treatment of bruxism to protect teeth and periodontium from damage, but the mechanism of action and efficacy of oral splints remain controversial. It has been suggested that they can be used to treat bruxism, based on the assumption that the device can eliminate or remove occlusal interference. Currently there are no reliable data to support the assumption of occlusion as an etiologic factor for bruxism, because several other factors have a role in bruxism, such as psychiatric, neurological and systemic disorders. In this paper, the mechanism of action and efficacy of oral splints in bruxism are discussed. Conclusions: although oral splint may be beneficial in protecting the dentition, the efficacy of this device in reducing bruxism is still not confirmed. There are several aspects that would support the broad usage of oral splints in the treatment of bruxism, but there are also limitations associated with each of these aspects. In conclusion, oral splints can be considered as useful adjuncts in the management of sleep bruxism but not as a definitive treatment.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i1.82

  14. 31 CFR 103.83 - Oral communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral communications. 103.83 Section... AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Administrative Rulings § 103.83 Oral communications... response to oral requests. Oral opinions or advice by Treasury, the Customs Service, the Internal Revenue...

  15. Effect of different oral hygiene measures on oral malodor in children aged 7-15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Piyusha S; Pujar, Pallavi; Subbareddy, V V

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of various oral hygiene measures individually and in combination in reducing oral malodor. A total number of 120 children diagnosed as having oral malodor (oral malodor scores 2 and above) were included in the study. Children were then grouped under four oral hygiene categories (tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, mouth rinsing, and a combination group). There were 30 children in each group. The children were asked to perform oral hygiene methods individually and in combination. The children were then reassessed for oral malodor 2 h later. The results were analyzed and compared. Both individual oral hygiene measure or in combination of tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, and mouth rinsing; all were effective in reducing oral malodor. Significant reduction (P oral malodor was seen when all three oral hygiene measures performed together. Oral malodor was significantly reduced after performing oral hygiene measures individually, but reduced more when used in combination.

  16. Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance among pregnant women in Benin-City, Nigeria. ... Results: The majority of the respondents (81.7%) rated their oral health as excellent/good using the global oral health rating scale. Seventy one percent of the respondents did not change their oral self-care ...

  17. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or

  18. Oral Cryotherapy for Preventing Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; McCabe, Martin G; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2016-10-01

    In patients receiving treatment for cancer, does oral cryotherapy prevent oral mucositis? Oral cryotherapy is effective for the prevention of oral mucositis in adults receiving fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for solid cancers, and for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in adults receiving high-dose melphalan-based chemotherapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  19. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takuji; Ishigamori, Rikako

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for...

  20. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  1. Changes in Abundance of Oral Microbiota Associated with Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Brian L.; Kuczynski, Justin; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Huey, Bing; Corby, Patricia M.; Queiroz, Erica L. S.; Nightingale, Kira; Kerr, A. Ross; DeLacure, Mark D.; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Olshen, Adam B.; Albertson, Donna G.

    2014-01-01

    Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus) and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia) was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth) from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence. PMID:24887397

  2. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  3. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina,1 Shyam B Verma,2 Fareedi Mukram Ali,3 Kishor Patil4 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Nirvana Skin Clinic, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 3Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India; 4Departments of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India Abstract: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. Keywords: betel nut, betel quid, oral disease, squamous cell carcinoma, tobacco, fibrosis

  4. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information...... been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health...... programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers...

  5. The eye as metronome of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkin, Virginia; Beizai, Pouneh; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2002-01-01

    Vision is much more than just resolving small objects. In fact, the eye sends visual information to the brain that is not consciously perceived. One such pathway entails visual information to the hypothalamus. The retinohypothalamic tract (RHT) mediates light entrainment of circadian rhythms. Retinofugal fibers project to several nuclei of the hypothalamus. These and further projections to the pineal via the sympathetic system provide the anatomical substrate for the neuro-endocrine control of diurnal and longer rhythms. Without the influence of light and dark, many rhythms desynchronize and exhibit free-running periods of approximately 24.2-24.9 hours in humans. This review will demonstrate the mechanism by which the RHT synchronizes circadian rhythms and the importance of preserving light perception in those persons with impending visual loss.

  6. Oral medicine and the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCreary, Christine

    2011-03-15

    A focus often exists in dental practice on the maintenance and management of the dentition and the periodontium, however, conditions of the oral mucosa and orofacial pain can cause significant problems for older patients. Oral mucosal conditions are more prevalent in older patients and many orofacial pain disorders, such as burning mouth syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia, are more common in patients over the age of 50 years. Although these conditions may not be routinely managed in general practice, identification of these patients in primary care and appropriate referral will lead to more prompt and effective treatment. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Dental practitioners need to be able to identify what is considered to be within the normal physiological limits of the ageing oral tissue and hence what is abnormal and requires further investigation to facilitate appropriate referral.

  7. Gastrophysics of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-01-01

    Gastrophysics is the science that pertains to the physical and physico-chemical description of the empirical world of gastronomy, with focus on sensory perception in the oral cavity and how it is related to the materials properties of food and cooking processes. Flavor (taste and smell), mouthfeel, chemesthesis, and astringency are all related to the chemical properties and the texture of the food and how the food is transformed in the oral cavity. The present topical review will primarily focus attention on the somatosensory perception of food (mouthfeel or texture) and how it interacts with basic tastes (sour, bitter, sweet, salty, and umami) and chemesthetic action. Issues regarding diet, nutrition, and health will be put into an evolutionary perspective, and some mention will be made of umami and its importance for (oral) health.

  8. Oral clonidine for proctalgia fugax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, R

    1987-08-01

    A report is made of the successful use of oral clonidine for proctalgia fugax by the author on himself. The author, a 30 year old otherwise healthy man, has been having attacks of proctalgia fugax for several years. He had hitherto left the condition untreated. Last year, in a severe attack, he tried oral clonidine 150 micrograms twice a day and found it to be dramatically effective. He was completely relieved in three days and tapered off the drug thereafter. A further attack of proctalgia fugax after a month was again treated successfully with oral clonidine. The presumed aetiology of proctalgia fugax is discussed and the possible mechanism of action of clonidine in this condition is outlined. Further trials of clonidine appear to be worthwhile for this condition which has been described as incurable.

  9. Combined oral contraceptives: venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bastos, Marcos; Stegeman, Bernardine H; Rosendaal, Frits R; Van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Stijnen, Theo; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2014-03-03

    Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use has been associated with venous thrombosis (VT) (i.e., deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). The VT risk has been evaluated for many estrogen doses and progestagen types contained in COC but no comprehensive comparison involving commonly used COC is available. To provide a comprehensive overview of the risk of venous thrombosis in women using different combined oral contraceptives. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier and ScienceDirect) were searched in 22 April 2013 for eligible studies, without language restrictions. We selected studies including healthy women taking COC with VT as outcome. The primary outcome of interest was a fatal or non-fatal first event of venous thrombosis with the main focus on deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Publications with at least 10 events in total were eligible. The network meta-analysis was performed using an extension of frequentist random effects models for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. Unadjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were reported.Two independent reviewers extracted data from selected studies. 3110 publications were retrieved through a search strategy; 25 publications reporting on 26 studies were included. Incidence of venous thrombosis in non-users from two included cohorts was 0.19 and 0.37 per 1 000 person years, in line with previously reported incidences of 0,16 per 1 000 person years. Use of combined oral contraceptives increased the risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use (relative risk 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3). The relative risk of venous thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with 30-35 μg ethinylestradiol and gestodene, desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or drospirenone were similar and about 50-80% higher than for combined oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. A dose related effect of ethinylestradiol was observed for gestodene

  10. Oral complications of HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair C. Leao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS.

  11. Oral History: Methodology for Dialogue

    OpenAIRE

    DAVID, Priscila [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    A história oral, como metodologia qualitativa de pesquisa, traz outras dimensões ao debate historiográfico. Por meio dela o historiador consegue visualizar diversos pontos de vista de um determinado fato histórico. Neste aspecto, cabe ressaltar que sua utilização depende da compreensão de que o diálogo entre pesquisador e entrevistado apresenta especificidades. Utilizar-se da história oral requer a compreensão de que a pesquisa somente é possível mediante a vontade do pesquisador, o qual deli...

  12. Dispensacion de anticonceptivos hormonales orales

    OpenAIRE

    Molinero Crespo, Ana María; Diego Martinez , Cristina de; Méndez Mora-Figueroa, Pilar; Esteso, Pilar; García Valiente, Paloma; González, Ana; Peiró Martínez, Alicia; Pérez Martín, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    El 80% de las mujeres españolas en edad fértil utilizan métodos anticonceptivos. Los anticonceptivos orales hormonales son los que obtienen mayor grado de satisfacción entre las usuarias siendo el segundo método utilizado. Método Estudio observacional descriptivo en 7 farmacias de la Comunidad de Madrid. Durante seis meses (enero-junio de 2009) se realizó una entrevista en el mostrador a las usuarias de métodos anticonceptivos hormonales orales para conocer qué tipo de paciente los dema...

  13. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oral clonidine for proctalgia fugax.

    OpenAIRE

    Swain, R

    1987-01-01

    A report is made of the successful use of oral clonidine for proctalgia fugax by the author on himself. The author, a 30 year old otherwise healthy man, has been having attacks of proctalgia fugax for several years. He had hitherto left the condition untreated. Last year, in a severe attack, he tried oral clonidine 150 micrograms twice a day and found it to be dramatically effective. He was completely relieved in three days and tapered off the drug thereafter. A further attack of proctalgia f...

  15. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  16. Oral Health and Experiences of Oral Care in Radiotherapy Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In spite of careful planning and modern techniques, radiotherapy inevitably involves side-effects due to exposure of surrounding normal tissues. Patients treated for head and neck cancer who experience oral symptoms do not always consider these symptoms to be related to their disease or its treatment.

  17. Oral history, trauma and September 11, comparative oral history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, S.; Pierre, P.

    2013-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the study of the trauma of september 11 can gain from other studies of disaster, Oral history is an excellent tool to study these trauma's, since traumatized stories are fragmented and layered. Listening will bring about a confrontation with the creaton of

  18. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  19. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID, and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, and Iran to reach the related articles published up to 2016. The English and Persian articles with cross-sectional, clinical trial, prospective, and case-control designs were selected. The Persian studies were then translated into English. The animal studies were not investigated. Results: The findings showed that nutrition and diet were associated with oral health. However, the majority of studies focused on evaluation of the relation between nutrition and dental caries. Further, a few studies were conducted on the association between nutrition and other oral problems such as periodontal disease or oral cancer. Moreover, the limited nutritional or dietary factors were investigated in the literature. Conclusions: Nutrition and diet are related to oral health and prevention of oral disease. Further studies are therefore recommended to evaluate the association between nutrition and oral health with considering various dietary or nutritional factors and different types of oral problems in Iran.

  20. Characteristics of Oral Problems and Effects of Oral Care in Terminally Ill Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Nobuhisa

    2017-06-01

    Various distresses appear in the terminal stage of cancer. Oral problems including dry mouth, stomatitis and candidiasis are one of the important problems which should be resolved. The purpose of this study was to investigate oral problems in this stage and improvement of dry mouth by oral care. The study subjects were consecutive terminally ill cancer patients admitted over the past 2 years. Patients were divided based on the status of oral food intake into good oral food intake group (≥30%) and poor oral food intake group. The following 3 items were retrospectively investigated: 1) The incidences of these oral problems, 2) Severity of dry mouth and complication with other oral problems, 3) Improvement of dry mouth using standard oral care by nursing staff and specialist oral care including dentists as needed. There were 115 and 158 patients in good and poor oral intake groups, respectively. 1) The incidences of dry mouth, stomatitis, and candidiasis were significantly higher in poor oral intake group ( p oral intake groups, respectively ( p oral intake group ( p = 0.0002). 3) The rate of dry mouth improvement by oral care was 100% in Grade-1, 86% in Grade-2 and 81% in Grade-3. Oral problems occur in many of terminally ill cancer patients. Accurate diagnosis of oral problems and corresponding appropriate interventions are important for improving quality of end-of-life care.

  1. Oral Communication across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2011-01-01

    Proficiency in oral communication is necessary in school and in society. To do well in the different curriculum areas, pupils must speak with clarity and understanding. For example, in a discussion group in the social studies involving the topic "the pros and cons of raising taxes," pupils need to express knowledgeable ideas with appropriate voice…

  2. What dentition assures oral function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Walls, Angus W G

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between dentition and oral function. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A search of the English literature was undertaken using PubMed and appropriate keywords. Citations were identified and hand sorted to confirm their validity against our inclusion criteria. Four spec...

  3. War, Journalism, and Oral History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Describes a project where students conducted oral history with either a war correspondent or a U.S. combat veteran for the course "War and the News Media: From Vietnam through Desert Storm and Beyond." Discusses how the students prepared for the interviews and the evaluation of their projects. (CMK)

  4. Oral Hygiene. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on oral hygiene is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  5. Oral vaccination: where we are?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, Dmytro S; Lyubomska, Oksana V; Jirathitikal, Vichai; Bourinbaiar, Aldar S

    2007-07-01

    As early as 900 years ago, the Bedouins of the Negev desert were reported to kill a rabid dog, roast its liver and feed it to a dog-bitten person for three to five days according to the size and number of bites [1] . In sixteenth century China, physicians routinely prescribed pills made from the fleas collected from sick cows, which purportedly prevented smallpox. One may dismiss the wisdom of the Bedouins or Chinese but the Nobel laureate, Charles Richet, demonstrated in 1900 that feeding raw meat can cure tuberculous dogs - an approach he termed zomotherapy. Despite historical clues indicating the feasibility of oral vaccination, this particular field is notoriously infamous for the abundance of dead-end leads. Today, most commercial vaccines are delivered by injection, which has the principal limitation that recipients do not like needles. In the last few years, there has been a sharp increase in interest in needle-free vaccine delivery; new data emerges almost daily in the literature. So far, there are very few licensed oral vaccines, but many more vaccine candidates are in development. Vaccines delivered orally have the potential to take immunization to a fundamentally new level. In this review, the authors summarize the recent progress in the area of oral vaccines.

  6. Resúmenes Presentaciones Orales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor Gabriel Vargas Arana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se pueden encontrar los resúmenes de las presentaciones orales del III Congreso Latinoamericano de Plantas Medicinales, desarrollado del 12 al 14 de agosto de 2015 en la ciudad de Iquitos, Perú.

  7. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street ... and in ever-larger doses. The use of methamphetamine is on the rise in the United States, ...

  8. Correlates of oral contraception continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewer, P A; Gibbs, J O

    1971-05-01

    A sample of 139 predominantly black, young, low-income patients who had accepted oral contraception at a publicly supported family planning clinic has been analyzed for correlates of oral contraception continuation. Interviews were conducted 10-12 months after the clinic visit; at this time 38% of the patients continued taking oral contraceptives. It was found that patients with the highest continuation rates were 18-24 years old, in the 2-3 parity group, living with their husbands, had low-parity mothers, and were able to fill prescriptions in less time with more convenient methods of transportation. Discontinuers tended to have high-parity mothers, live with parents or head their own households, and to be in the 13-17 or 25-45 year old age groups. Fear of long-term use of oral contraceptives and perceived side effects appeared to be implicated in discontinuation. The rate of discontinuation may be associated with irregular coital experience and less consistent exposure to pregnancy.

  9. Ecstasy (MDMA) and oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Dun, S.N.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), more commonly known as 'ecstasy' or XTC, is frequently used by young adults in the major cities. Therefore, it is likely that dentists might be confronted with individuals who use ecstasy. This review describes systemic and oral effects of ecstasy.

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lump in the neck Your mouth is one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. Should you discover something, make an appointment for a prompt examination. Early treatment may well be the key to complete ... Oral and maxillofacial ...

  11. Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Hannah; Arachchillage, Deepa R. J.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Middeldorp, Saskia; Kadir, Rezan A.

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) provide an effective, safe, and convenient therapeutic alternative to warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), and are now established for a wide range of indications. The use of DOACs in women merits special consideration due to two main situations: first,

  12. African Journal of Oral Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    b) Letters relating to materials previously published in AJOH or to topical issues relevant to the practice of dentistry. c) Update articles surveying the present state of knowledge in selected fields of Dentistry and oral health. d) Critical or analytical reviews in the area of theory, policy, or research in Dentistry. e) Reviews of ...

  13. Oral Assessment in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an oral assessment technique that has been used for over 20 years at the Centre of Maritime Studies and Engineering in the Faroe Islands. The technique has proven less laborious for the examiners and the students agree that this technique not only assesses their surface...

  14. Orality, Literacy, and Star Wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelock, Eric A.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the educational system should encourage "down to earth" language by including oral recitation in the curricula, particularly recitation of popular poetry with accompaniment. Using the shuttle disaster as a striking example, claims that the modern media overuses conceptual language to disguise the hard meaning of what is being…

  15. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lining of the uterus. Progestin-only oral contraceptives are a very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent ... them late and had sex without a backup method of birth control.If you want to become ... Progestin-only contraceptives should not delay your ability ...

  16. Integrative review on oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Kelle Batista Moura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar estudos nacional e internacional sobre o câncer bucal. Método: Trata-se de uma revisão integrativa da literatura. Foram selecionados 28 artigos que atenderam aos critérios de inclusão da pesquisa. Os dados foram processados no software IRAMUTEC e analisados pela classificação hierárquica descendente com base no dendograma. Resultados: Foram apresentados em 05 classes, a saber: 1-A prevenção e o tratamento das morbidades orais. 2- A reabilitação do paciente com câncer de boca. 3-Qualidade de vida dos pacientes em terapia para câncer bucal. 4- A equipe profissional multidisciplinar de saúde nos cuidados de prevenção do câncer oral. 5- O rastreio do câncer oral para diminuição da prevalência. Conclusão: O câncer oral é um grave problema de saúde pública no Brasil e no mundo.  Há necessidade de maiores investimentos nas pesquisas relacionadas com o câncer bucal e implementação das políticas públicas para o rastreio do câncer oral e diminuição da prevalência.

  17. Partial oral treatment of endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Høst, Nis Baun; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for the treatment of left-sided infective endocarditis (IE) recommend 4 to 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Conversion from intravenous to oral antibiotics in clinically stabilized patients could reduce the side effects associated with intravenous treatment and shorten the length...

  18. Poetry as an oral outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Arden Brill

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The text is inspired by some of Freud’s observations, regarding, among other things, the pleasure the child takes from playing with words as preliminary degree of wit. As zealous follower, Brill extends and intensifies the importance of Freud’s thought trying to establish a link, or at least a point of contact between the poetry in a generic sense and the various forms of oral gratification. This gives rise to unusual associations that are for the contemporary reader slightly comical: if poetry can be seen as an expression of the mysteries of oral Erotica, the relationship between poet and gourmet can only be the closest. To define and limit the scopes of fulfillment that is realized in oral poetry, Brill passes rapidly through the various forms this satisfaction takes in neurotics, in psychotics, in the child, in the primitive. The conclusions, unfortunately, are very general: many poets do not go beyond the oral stage and give clear signs of a fixation of libidinal development at this level.

  19. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine : guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kragelund, C.; Reibel, J.; Hietanen, J.; Hadler-Olsen, E.; Johannessen, A. C.; Kenrad, B.; Nylander, K.; Puranen, M.; Salo, T.; Syrjanen, S.; Soland, T. M.; van der Waal, I.; van der Wal, J. E.; Warfvinge, G.

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must

  20. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kragelund, C.; Reibel, J.; Hietanen, J.; Hadler-Olsen, E.; Johannessen, A.C.; Kenrad, B.; Nylander, K.; Puranen, M.; Salo, T.; Syrjänen, S.; Søland, T.M.; van der Waal, I.; van der Wal, J.E.; Warfvinge, G.

    2012-01-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must

  1. Oral Health and Older Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-27

    This podcast discusses the importance of older adults maintaing good oral health habits. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 10/27/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/27/2008.

  2. Gaelic Singing and Oral Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Mark; MacDonald, Iona; Byrne, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    A recent report by UNESCO placed Scots Gaelic on a list of 2500 endangered languages highlighting the perilous state of a key cornerstone of Scottish culture. Scottish Gaelic song, poems and stories have been carried through oral transmission for many centuries reflecting the power of indigenous peoples to preserve cultural heritage from…

  3. Oral Lactobacilli and Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caufield, P.W.; Schön, C.N.; Saraithong, P.; Li, Y.; Argimón, S.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacilli have been associated with dental caries for over a century. Here, we review the pertinent literature along with findings from our own study to formulate a working hypothesis about the natural history and role of lactobacilli. Unlike most indigenous microbes that stably colonize a host, lactobacilli appear to be planktonic, opportunistic settlers that can gather and multiply only in certain restrictive niches of the host, at least within the oral cavity. We postulate that the following essential requirements are necessary for sustained colonization of lactobacilli in humans: 1) a stagnant, retentive niche that is mostly anaerobic; 2) a low pH milieu; and 3) ready access to carbohydrates. Three sites on the human body meet these specifications: caries lesions, the stomach, and the vagina. Only a handful of Lactobacillus species is found in caries lesions, but they are largely absent in caries-free children. Lactobacilli present in caries lesions represent both a major contributor to caries progression and a major reservoir to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We extend the assertion from other investigators that lactobacilli found in the GI tract originate in the oral cavity by proposing that lactobacilli in the oral cavity arise from caries lesions. This, in turn, leads us to reflect on the health implications of the lactobacilli in the mouth and downstream GI and to ponder whether these or any of the Lactobacillus species are truly indigenous to the human GI tract or the oral cavity. PMID:25758458

  4. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    changing burden of chronic diseases in old age. Chronic disease and most oral diseases share common risk factors. Globally, poor oral health amongst older people has been particularly evident in high levels of tooth loss, dental caries experience, and the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, xerostomia...... and oral precancer/cancer. The negative impact of poor oral conditions on the quality of life of older adults is an important public health issue, which must be addressed by policy-makers. The means for strengthening oral health programme implementation are available; the major challenge is therefore...... to translate knowledge into action programmes for the oral health of older people. The World Health Organization recommends that countries adopt certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly. National health authorities should develop policies and measurable goals and targets for oral health...

  5. [Oral films as perspective dosage form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicová, Veronika; Gajdziok, Jan

    Oral films, namely buccal mucoadhesive films and orodispersible films represent innovative formulations for administration of a wide range of drugs. Oral films show many advantageous properties and are intended for systemic drug delivery or for local treatment of the oral mucosa. In both cases, the film represents a thin layer, which could be intended to adhere to the oral mucosa by means of mucoadhesion; or to rapid dissolution and subsequent swallowing without the need of liquid intake, in the case of orodispersible films. Main constitutive excipients are film-forming polymers, which must in the case of mucoadhesive forms remain on the mucosa within the required time interval. Oral films are currently available on the pharmaceutical market and could compete with conventional oral dosage forms in the future. oral cavity oral films buccal mucoadhesive films orodispersible films film-forming polymers.

  6. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chronic pain, loss of function, irreparable facial and oral disfigurement following surgery and even death. More than 8,000 people die each year from oral and pharyngeal diseases. If you use tobacco, it ...

  7. Stress Related Oral Disorders - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Nagabhushana

    2004-01-01

    However, relatively few studies have been carried out on the relationship of emotional factors to diseases of the oral mucosa. So, here is an article which tries to briefly review the psychosomatic (stress related disorders related to the oral cavity.

  8. Leukemic Oral Manifestations and their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisconi, Carolina Favaro; Caldas, Rogerio Jardim; Oliveira Martins, Lazara Joyce; Fischer Rubira, Cassia Maria; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common neoplastic disease of the white blood cells which is important as a pediatric malignancy. Oral manifestations occur frequently in leukemic patients and may present as initial evidence of the disease or its relapse. The symptoms include gingival enlargement and bleeding, oral ulceration, petechia, mucosal pallor, noma, trismus and oral infections. Oral lesions arise in both acute and chronic forms of all types of leukemia. These oral manifestations either may be the result of direct infiltration of leukemic cells (primary) or secondary to underlying thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or impaired granulocyte function. Despite the fact that leukemia has long been known to be associated with oral lesions, the available literature on this topic consists mostly of case reports, without data summarizing the main oral changes for each type of leukemia. Therefore, the present review aimed at describing oral manifestations of all leukemia types and their dental management. This might be useful in early diagnosis, improving patient outcomes.

  9. Disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis based on oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Preto Webber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a deep mycosis with primary lung manifestations that may present cutaneous and oral lesions. Oral lesions mimic other infectious diseases or even squamous cell carcinoma, clinically and microscopically. Sometimes, the dentist is the first to detect the disease, because lung lesions are asymptomatic, or even misdiagnosed. An unusual case of PCM with 5 months of evolution presenting pulmonary, oral, and cutaneous lesions that was diagnosed by the dentist based on oral lesions is presented and discussed.

  10. Current stress and poor oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiliou, A.; Shankardass, K.; Nisenbaum, R.; Qui?onez, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Methods Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25?64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and ...

  11. Effects of nutrition on oral health

    OpenAIRE

    G A Agbelusi

    2010-01-01

    Nutrition represents a summation of intake, absorption, storage and utilization of foods by the tissues. Oral tissues are one of the most sensitive indicators of nutritional state of the body. Nutritional deficiencies are associated with changes in the integrity (health and appearance) of the oral structures/ tissues and these changes are frequently the first clinical signs of deficiency. Nutrition affects oral health and oral health affects nutrition. The effects of malnutrition can be s...

  12. Primary Oral Tuberculosis - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Praveen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is most common disease in developing countries because of lack of public health awareness, poverty, nutritional deficiencies, absence of medical facilities. Primary oral lesions in tuberculosis are still exceedingly rare. Oral involvement may be primary or secondary to systemic involvement. Involvement of oral cavity is rare accounting for 0.2-1.5% of cases. A rare case report of primary oral tuberculosis is presented.

  13. Molecular concept in human oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in...

  14. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relati...

  15. Oral Communicative Competence of Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Isabel Cantón; Barrioluengo, Elena Pérez

    2017-01-01

    Oral communicative competence enables speakers of a language to interact effectively with each other. Oral communicative competence includes a wide semantic field since the oral expression is a way of expression for the thought and it provides feedback and develops by means of the linguistic function (Vygotsky, 1992; Piaget, 1983a, 1983b; Pinker,…

  16. Extra-oral halitosis : an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.

    Halitosis can be subdivided into intra-oral and extra-oral halitosis, depending on the place where it originates. Most reports now agree that the most frequent sources of halitosis exist within the oral cavity and include bacterial reservoirs such as the dorsum of the tongue, saliva and periodontal

  17. Oral Biofilm Architecture on Natural Teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M. Barbara M.; Degener, John E.; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmuer, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and

  18. Prevention of gingivitis: Oral hygiene and dentifrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sälzer, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    At the basis of Oral Health lies daily oral hygiene self-care with the result, if correctly performed, of plaque and gingivitis reduction. Epidemiological studies indicate that the level of oral hygiene in the general population has increased over the last decades. However, there still appears to be

  19. Relationship of oral hygiene status and practices with oral lesions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The oral health of HIV positive patients may be compromised because of their depressed immunity and may increase their risk of developing some oral lesions. This study was carried out to assess the relationship of the oral hygiene status and practices with oral lesions in HIV positive patients at a dedicated HIV ...

  20. The relationship between oral hygiene and oral colonisation with Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzurovic, Selma; Babajic, Emina; Masic, Tarik; Smajic, Rubina; Selmanagic, Aida

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine relationship between oral hygiene and colonisation of Candia species in oral cavity. Maintenance oral hygiene is reducing pathological agents in the mouth and preventing violation of oral health. Study included 140 patients. For oral hygiene assessement were used the dental plaque index, oral hygiene index and dental calculus index. Ph test strips were used to determine pH of saliva. For isolation of Candida species oral swabs were taken to all patients. It was found out that pH of oral cavity does not varies notably, no matter of oral hygiene level. Candida species were identified in 28.6% respondents. The most present were Candida albicans, in 85% cases. The presence of plaque, tartar and high index oral hygiene (IOH) in patients with Candida is statistically significant. It was found that 83.4% of patients with Candida poorly maintained oral hygiene. Poor oral hygiene is associated with a significantly higher score in the presence of tartar, plaque and high IOH. In total patient's population 67% has amalgam fillings. Presence of amalgam fillings in patients with identified Candida was statistically significant. This study indicates low level of oral hygiene. Correlation between presence of Candida species and poor oral hygiene was proved. Also Candida was more present among patients with amalgam fillings. Improvement of oral hygiene is necessery for oral health and health in general, as well.

  1. To assess the self-reported oral health practices, behaviour and oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... in order to improve referral of pregnant women, oral health awareness and dental service utilization among pregnant women in the region. Keywords: oral health practices, oral health status, pregnant women, traditional birth attendant clinics, Nigerian rural community. 17. African Journal of Oral Health.

  2. Assessment of relationship between oral health behavior, oral hygiene and gingival status of dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsheen Lalani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Thus, it is concluded that there is a significant relationship between the oral health behavior, oral hygiene, and gingival status of dental students. Dental students with better self-reported oral health behavior had lower plaque and gingival scores indicating a better attitude toward oral health.

  3. The health production function of oral health services systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, R.S.; Petersen, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Attitudes, dental status, socioeconomic factors, oral health care, production of oral health, health status, quality of life......Attitudes, dental status, socioeconomic factors, oral health care, production of oral health, health status, quality of life...

  4. Utilisation of oral health services, oral health needs and oral health status in a peri-urban informal settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, M S; Viljoen, E; Rudolph, M J

    1999-04-01

    Interviews were conducted with 294 black residents (155 females and 138 males) of a peri-urban informal settlement in Gauteng to ascertain utilisation of oral health services, oral health needs and oral health status. Only 37 per cent of the sample had consulted a dentist or medical practitioner, usually for extractions. Teenagers and employed persons were significantly less likely to utilise dentists than the older age groups and unemployed persons. Forty per cent were currently experiencing oral health problems such as a sore mouth, tooth decay and bleeding/painful gums. Two hundred and twelve (73 per cent) interviewees wanted dental treatment or advice. Residents who rated their oral health status as fair or poor appeared to have the greatest need for oral health services. The use of interviews appears to be a cost-effective method of determining oral morbidity.

  5. Oral Microbiome: A New Biomarker Reservoir for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Yenkai; Totsika, Makrina; Morrison, Mark; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2017-01-01

    Current biomarkers (DNA, RNA and protein) for oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers demonstrate biological variations between individuals, rendering them impractical for clinical translation. Whilst these biomarkers originate from the host, there is not much information in the literature about the influence of oral microbiota on cancer pathogenesis, especially in oral cancers. Oral microbiotas are known to participate in disease initiation and progression not only limited to the oral cavity, ...

  6. Risk factors & screening modalities for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Dentists are at the forefront for screening oral cancer. In addition to the well known carcinogenic potential of tobacco and alcohol, betel nut chewing and human papilloma virus are important risk factors in the development of oral cancer. To aid in screening and decreasing morbidity and mortality from oral cancer, a variety of techniques have been developed. These techniques show promise but they require additional investigations to determine their usefulness in oral cancer detection. Dentists need to be well educated and vigilant when dealing with all patients they encounter. Early detection, diagnosis and treatment are critical for the effective management of oral cancers.

  7. Podoplanin expression in oral potentially malignant disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A G, Deepa; Janardanan-Nair, Bindu; B R, Varun

    2017-12-01

    Podoplanin is a type I transmembrane sialomucin-like glycoprotein that is specifically expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells. Studies have shown that assessment of podoplanin expression in the epithelial cells can be used to predict the malignant transformation of potentially malignant disorders and the metastatic tendency of primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of our study was to compare the expression of podoplanin in oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis and oral squamous cell carcinoma with that in normal buccal mucosa by immunohistochemical methods. Immunohistochemical expression of podoplanin was analyzed in 20 cases each of oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, oral squamous cell carcinoma and normal buccal mucosa, with monoclonal antibody D2-40. The expression of podoplanin was graded from grade 0-4. There was a statistically significant upregulation of the grades of podoplanin expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma(100%), oral submucous fibrosis (90%) and oral leukoplakia (65%) when compared to that in normal mucosa(35%). Podoplanin expression increased with decrease in grades of differentiation in oral squamous cell carcinoma . Podoplanin expression in the samples of oral submucous fibrosis was higher than that in oral leukoplakia. Evaluation of podoplanin expression in the epithelial cells of oral dysplastic lesions may provide valuable information to predict their risk of malignant transformation. Key words: Immunohistochemistry, Oral leukoplakia, Oral submucous fibrosis, Podoplanin, Squamous cell carcinoma.

  8. Oral health promotion at worksites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1989-01-01

    Many workplace-based health promotion programmes have been reported but only a few include or focus specifically on oral health. Although certain obstacles to oral health promotion in the workplace exist from the management side, from the dental profession and from the employees, these seem...... to be of a scale that can easily be overcome: moreover, numerous potential benefits exist. From the employer's point of view, the main arguments in favour are reduced health care costs, increased productivity and reduced absenteeism. The benefits to the dental profession are possible increases in utilization...... of services and less restraint from fee payment structures and physical environments. The immediate benefit to the employees is easy access to dental services. In addition, work-related dental hazards can be compensated for or prevented and screening activities can be more easily organized. The literature...

  9. Medieval orality, mothers, and bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Scott C

    2004-01-01

    The role of women in the Middle Ages was vilification, veneration, and exclusion. Due to the high rates of maternal and infant mortality bonding shifted from the mother-child dyad to one in which the Church, Holy Family, and king acted as pseudo-parents. In art this is suggested by the virtual absence of eye contact between the Virgin and Christ-child. Frustration of early oral needs consequent to lack of adequate mother-child bonding prompted a reactive emphasis on orality in art and legend. A decrease in infant mortality and a reciprocal improvement in mother child bonding contributed to cultural shifts in how self-realization would be accomplished during the Renaissance and in the later emergence of secular humanism.

  10. Life after oral English certification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimova, Slobodanka

    2017-01-01

    , this study discusses the consequences resulting from score and feedback interpretations and uses as part of the validation process of TOEPAS (Test of Oral English Proficiency for Academic Staff), which is a performance-based test used for oral English certification of lecturers at the University......Internationalization of higher education has resulted in rapid developments of English-medium instruction (EMI) courses in non-Anglophone countries in Europe and Asia. Due to the growing concerns about lecturers' ability to teach in English, several European universities have implemented policies...... for internal assessment of lecturers' English proficiency to ensure the quality of teaching in EMI programs. However, research on the measured construct and the reliability and the validity of these assessments remains scarce. Based on interviews with tested university lecturers and formative feedback analysis...

  11. Socioeconomic and psychosocial correlates of oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Jason M; Mejía, Gloria C; Jamieson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    It has been proposed that psychosocial variables are important determinants of oral health outcomes. In addition, the effect of socioeconomic factors in oral health has been argued to work through the shaping of psychosocial stressors and resources. This study therefore aimed to examine the role of psychosocial factors in oral health after controlling for selected socioeconomic and behavioural factors. Logistic and generalised linear regression analyses were conducted on self-rated oral health, untreated decayed teeth and number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) from dentate participants in a national survey of adult oral health (n = 5364) conducted in 2004-2006 in Australia. After controlling for all other variables, more frequent dental visiting and toothbrushing were associated with poorer self-rated oral health, more untreated decay and higher DMFT. Pervasive socioeconomic inequalities were demonstrated, with higher income, having a tertiary degree, higher self-perceived social standing and not being employed all significantly associated with oral health after controlling for the other variables. The only psychosocial variables related to self-rated oral health were the stressors perceived stress and perceived constraints. Psychosocial resources were not statistically associated with self-rated oral health and no psychosocial variables were significantly associated with either untreated decayed teeth or DMFT after controlling for the other variables. Although the role of behavioural and socioeconomic variables as determinants of oral health was supported, the role of psychosocial variables in oral health outcomes received mixed support. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  12. Summer Oral Expression English Course

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    An English Oral Expression course will take place between 15 August and 30 September 2011. Schedule: to be determined (2 sessions of 2 hours per week). Please note that this course is for learners who have a good knowledge of English (CERN level 7 upwards). If you are interested in following this course, please enrol here. Or contact: Kerstin FUHRMEISTER (70896) Tessa OSBORNE (72957)  

  13. Oral fluconazole in tinea versicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankara Rao I

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available 25 patients with extensive tinea versicolor were treated with single oral dose of 400 mg of fluconazole. 25 patients returned for follow-up. Follow-up at 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 8 weeks showed 100% clinical cure rate and 92% mycological cure rate. No significant side effects were noticed. The majority of patients found the treatment effective, safe and convenient.

  14. Oral Chromium Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Brocato, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen when inhaled. However, inhalational exposure to Cr(VI) affects only a small portion of the population, mainly by occupational exposures. In contrast, oral exposure to Cr(VI) is widespread and affects many people throughout the globe. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a 2-year study demonstrating that ingested Cr(VI) was carcinogenic in rats and mice. The effects of Cr(VI) oral exposure is mitigated by reduction in the gut, however a portion evades the reductive detoxification and reaches target tissues. Once Cr(VI) enters the cell, it ultimately gets reduced to Cr(III), which mediates its toxicity via induction of oxidative stress during the reduction while Cr intermediates react with protein and DNA. Cr(III) can form adducts with DNA that may lead to mutations. This review will discuss the potential adverse effects of oral exposure to Cr(VI) by presenting up-to-date human and animal studies, examining the underlying mechanisms that mediate Cr(VI) toxicity, as well as highlighting opportunities for future research. PMID:26231506

  15. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral health and obesity indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östberg Anna-Lena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In western Sweden, the aim was to study the associations between oral health variables and total and central adiposity, respectively, and to investigate the influence of socio-economic factors (SES, lifestyle, dental anxiety and co-morbidity. Methods The subjects constituted a randomised sample from the 1992 data collection in the Prospective Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden (n = 999, 38- > =78 yrs. The study comprised a clinical and radiographic examination, together with a self-administered questionnaire. Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI > =30 kg/m2, waist-hip ratio (WHR > =0.80, and waist circumference >0.88 m. Associations were estimated using logistic regression including adjustments for possible confounders. Results The mean BMI value was 25.96 kg/m2, the mean WHR 0.83, and the mean waist circumference 0.83 m. The number of teeth, the number of restored teeth, xerostomia, dental visiting habits and self-perceived health were associated with both total and central adiposity, independent of age and SES. For instance, there were statistically significant associations between a small number of teeth ( Conclusions Associations were found between oral health and obesity. The choice of obesity measure in oral health studies should be carefully considered.

  17. Current stress and poor oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, A; Shankardass, K; Nisenbaum, R; Quiñonez, C

    2016-09-02

    Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25-64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and access to dental insurance were examined as effect modifiers. A positive relationship between current stress and poor oral health was observed for both outcomes (oral pain coefficient 0.32, 95 % CI 0.26-0.38; general oral health coefficient 0.28, 95 % CI 0.19-0.36). Effects on oral pain were stronger for the uninsured, while effects on general oral health were stronger with decreasing socioeconomic position. Our findings suggest that individuals with greater perceived stress also report poorer oral health, and that this relationship is modified by dental insurance and socioeconomic position. These findings warrant a greater focus on the role of psychological stress in the development of oral disease, including how perceived stress contributes to health inequities in self-reported oral health status. Patients experiencing stressful lives may differentially require closer monitoring and more vigilant maintenance of their oral health, above and beyond that which is needed to achieve a state of health in the oral environment of less stressed individuals. There may be health promoting effects of addressing psychosocial concerns related to dental care - particularly for the poor and uninsured.

  18. [Oral medicine 9. Lichen planus and lichenoid lesions of the oral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, E H; Schepman, K P; de Visscher, J G A M

    2013-09-01

    The general dentist is sometimes confronted with white lesions of the oral mucosa. Oral lichen planus is the most common oral white lesion. The diagnosis can usually be made on the basis of the clinical aspect, but is sometimes made more difficult by certain abnormalities in the oral mucosa which clinically resemble oral lichen planus or by abnormalities which cannot be distinguished from oral lichen planus but have a different origin. Those lesions are classified as oral lichenoid lesions. Malignant deterioration has been described in allforms of oral lichen planus lesions and oral lichenoid lesions. There is no known method to predict or prevent malignant transformation. Nor are there any studies examining the efficacy of frequent follow-up visits. It seems sensible, in keeping with the tendency in recent literature, to schedule annual check-ups for patients to be on the safe side. These follow-up visits may reasonably be performed in a general dental practice.

  19. Evaluation of mast cells, eosinophils, blood capillaries in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D Santhosh; Sivapathasundharam, B; Saraswathi, T R; SriRam, G

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are granule containing secretory cells present in oral mucosal and connective tissue environment. Oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions are commonly occurring oral diseases and have some similarity clinically and histologically. Both are characterized by an extensive sub epithelial infiltrate of T cells, together with mast cells, eosinophils and blood capillaries. In this study mast cell and eosinophil densities along with number of blood capillaries were studied to find out if they could aid in histopathological distinction between oral lichen planus and lichenoid mucositis. To enumerate mast cells and compare the status of Mast Cells (Intact or Degranulated) in Lichen planus, Lichenoid mucositis and normal buccal mucosa in tissue sections stained with Toluidine Blue, and also to enumerate Eosinophils and blood capillaries in tissue sections stained with H and E. The study group included 30 cases each of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid mucositis. 10 cases of clinically normal oral buccal mucosa formed the control group. All the sections were stained with Toluidine blue and H and E separately. Histopathological analysis was done using binocular light microscope equipped with square ocular grid to standardize the field of evaluation. The result of the study showed. · Significant increase in number of mast cells in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid mucositis compared to normal buccal mucosa. · Significant increase of intact mast cells suepithelially within the inflammatory cell infiltrate in oral lichen planus compared to oral lichenoid mucositis. · Significant increase of degranulated mast cells in oral lichenoid mucositis to oral lichen planus, and increase in number of eosinophil densities in oral lichenoid mucositis compared to oral lichen planus. · Significant increase in number of capillaries in oral lichenoid mucositis compared to oral lichen planus. The findings of increased number of intact mast cells sub epithelially in oral

  20. An oral hygiene protocol improves oral health for patients in inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joanne; Scholten, Ingrid

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether a simple oral hygiene protocol improves the oral health of inpatients in stroke rehabilitation. Poor oral health can lead to serious complications, such as pneumonia. The comorbidities associated with stroke, such as dysphagia, hemiparesis and cognitive impairment, can further impede independent oral care. International stroke guidelines recommend routine oral care but stop short of detailing specific regimes. The oral health assessment tool (OHAT) was conducted by speech-language pathologists with 100 patients with and without dysphagia in three metropolitan inpatient stroke rehabilitation facilities. A simple nurse-led oral hygiene regime was then implemented with all participants, which included twice daily tooth brushing and mouth rinsing after lunch, and oral health was measured again one week later. Initially, dysphagia was negatively associated with OHAT scores, and independence for oral hygiene was positively associated with oral health. After one week of a simple oral hygiene regime, the OHAT scores available for 89 participants indicated an improvement on average for all participants. In particular, 59% of participants with dysphagia had an improvement of 1 or more points. None of the participants developed pneumonia. A simple, inexpensive oral hygiene regime resulted in positive outcomes for patients with and without dysphagia in inpatient stroke rehabilitation settings. Oral health assessments and oral hygiene regimes that are simple to implement by the interdisciplinary team can be incorporated into standard stroke care with positive effect. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.