WorldWideScience

Sample records for methyl group-induced hydrogen

  1. IR-UV double resonance spectroscopic investigation of phenylacetylene-alcohol complexes. Alkyl group induced hydrogen bond switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant Chandra; Patwari, G Naresh

    2008-06-12

    The electronic transitions of phenylacetylene complexes with water and trifluoroethanol are shifted to the blue, while the corresponding transitions for methanol and ethanol complexes are shifted to the red relative to the phenylacetylene monomer. Fluorescence dip infrared (FDIR) spectra in the O-H stretching region indicate that, in all the cases, phenylacetylene is acting as a hydrogen bond acceptor to the alcohols. The FDIR spectrum in the acetylenic C-H stretching region shows Fermi resonance bands for the bare phenylacetylene, which act as a sensitive tool to probe the intermolecular structures. The FDIR spectra reveal that water and trifluoroethanol interact with the pi electron density of the acetylene C-C triple bond, while methanol and ethanol interact with the pi electron density of the benzene ring. It can be inferred that the hydrogen bonding acceptor site on phenylacetylene switches from the acetylene pi to the benzene pi with lowering in the partial charge on the hydrogen atom of the OH group. The most significant finding is that the intermolecular structures of water and methanol complexes are notably distinct, which, to the best of our knowledge, this is first such observation in the case of complexes of substituted benzenes.

  2. Theoretical study of catalytic hydrogenation of oxirane and its methyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C3H6O) is its methyl derivative. Theoretical studies on catalytic hydrogenation of both compounds, in presence of aluminium chloride (AlCl3) catalyst, are carried out. The products of reactions are ethanol and propan-1-ol from oxirane and ...

  3. 2-Methyl-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium hydrogen phthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuanQi Yu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C8H9N2+·C8H5O4−, contains two independent ion pairs. In each 2-methyl-1H-benzimidazolium ion, an intramolecular O—H...O bond forms an S(7 graph-set motif. In the crystal, the components are linked by N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [210]. Further stabilization is provided by weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  4. TDDFT study on intramolecular hydrogen bond of photoexcited methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Peng; Tian, Dongxu

    2014-01-01

    The equilibrium geometries, IR-spectra and transition mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen-bonded methyl salicylate in excited state were studied using DFT and TDDFT with 6-31++G (d, p) basis set. The length of hydrogen bond OH⋯OC is decreased from 1.73 Å in the ground state to 1.41 and 1.69 Å in the excited S1 and S3 states. The increase of bond length for HO and CO group also indicates that in excited state the hydrogen bond OH⋯OC is strengthened. IR spectra show HO and CO stretching bands are strongly redshifted by 1387 and 67 cm(-1) in the excited S1 and S3 states comparing to the ground state. The excitation energy and the absorption spectrum show the S3 state is the main excited state of the low-lying excited states. By analyzing the frontier molecular orbitals, the transition from the ground state to the excited S1 and S3 states was predicted to be the π→π∗ mode. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Migratory Insertion of Hydrogen Isocyanide in the Pentacyano(methyl)cobaltate(III) Anion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Pauli; Harris, Pernille Hanne; Larsen, Sine

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of the pentacyano(iminiumacetyl)cobaltate(III) anion and its N-methyl and N,N-dimethyl derivatives is reported. The iminiumacetyl group is formed by migratory insertion of cis hydrogen isocyanide in the pentacyano(methyl)cobaltate(III) anion. The new compounds have been spectrosco......The preparation of the pentacyano(iminiumacetyl)cobaltate(III) anion and its N-methyl and N,N-dimethyl derivatives is reported. The iminiumacetyl group is formed by migratory insertion of cis hydrogen isocyanide in the pentacyano(methyl)cobaltate(III) anion. The new compounds have been...

  6. Optimization of Hydrogen Peroxide Detection for a Methyl Mercaptan Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Gang Sun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several kinds of modified carbon screen printed electrodes (CSPEs for amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 are presented in order to propose a methyl mercaptan (MM biosensor. Unmodified, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPC, Prussian blue (PB, and Os-wired HRP modified CSPE sensors were fabricated and tested to detect H2O2, applying a potential of +0.6 V, +0.6 V, +0.4 V, −0.2 V and −0.1 V (versus Ag/AgCl, respectively. The limits of detection of these electrodes for H2O2 were 3.1 μM, 1.3 μM, 71 nM, 1.3 μM, 13.7 nM, respectively. The results demonstrated that the Os-wired HRP modified CSPEs gives the lowest limit of detection (LOD for H2O2 at a working potential as low as −0.1 V. Os-wired HRP is the optimum choice for establishment of a MM biosensor and gives a detection limit of 0.5 μM.

  7. Photocatalytic methanol assisted production of hydrogen with simultaneous degradation of methyl orange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobral Romao, J.I.; Salata, Rafal; Park, Sun-Young; Mul, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Platinized TiO2 prepared by photodeposition was evaluated for activity in the simultaneous conversion of methyl orange (MO), and methanol assisted formation of hydrogen. Low concentrations of MO were found ineffective for generation of hydrogen in measurable quantities upon illumination of Pt/TiO2

  8. Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes of Phenylacetylene with Water, Methanol, Ammonia, and Methylamine. The Origin of Methyl Group-Induced Hydrogen Bond Switching

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Robert; Hobza, Pavel; Patwari, G. N.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 24 (2009), s. 6620-6625 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant - others:DST(IN) SR/S1/PC/23/2008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : infrared spectra * ab initio CCSD(T) calculations * phenylacetylene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2009

  9. Influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonds on the binding potential of methylated β-cyclodextrin derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Wenz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Various heptasubstituted derivatives of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD bearing 1, 2 and 3 methyl substituents per glucose unit were synthesized by regioselective methods. Binding free energies and binding enthalpies of these hosts towards 4-tert-butylbenzoate and adamantane-1-carboxylate were determined by isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC. It was found that methyl substituents at the secondary positions of β-CD lead to a tremendous reduction of the binding potential, while methylation at the primary positions significantly improved binding. Stabilizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the glucose units were made responsible for the high binding potentials of those β-CD derivatives that possess secondary hydroxy groups.

  10. Stereoselective semi-hydrogenation and deuteration of a diacetylenic precursor of leukotriene B4 methyl ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontikis, R.; Le Merrer, Y.; Depezay, J.-C.; Petillot, Y.; Rousseau, B.; Beaucourt, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    [6,7,14,15- 2 H4]-Leukotriene B4 methyl ester was prepared by reduction with deuterium gas of a suitable precursor (deuterium incorporation > 90%). Several catalytic semi-hydrogenations were affected in order to determine the best conditions for the labeling step. (author)

  11. Hydrogen-Atom Attack on Methyl Viologen in Aqueous Solution Studied by Pulse Radiolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solar, S.; Solar, W.; Getoff, N.

    1984-01-01

    Using hydrogen at high pressures of up to 150 bar (0.12 mol dm–3 H2) as an OH scavenger in aqueous MV2+ solutions (pH 1) it is possible to differentiate between two kinds of transient formed simultaneously by H-atom attack on methyl viologen. One of them is assigned to an H adduct on the N atom, ...

  12. Effects of partial hydrogenation, epoxidation, and hydroxylation on the fuel properties of fatty acid methyl esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadumesthrige, Kapila; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K.Y. Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Drive, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    The properties of biodiesel depend on the chemical structure of individual fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). In this work the chemical structure of fatty acid chains was modified by catalytic hydrogenation, epoxidation and hydroxylation under controlled conditions. Hydrolysis of ester functionality or oxidation of fatty acid chain was not observed during these reactions. The properties of hydrogenated FAME strongly depend on the hydrogenation time. The total saturated fatty acid (SFA) percentage increased from 29.3% to 76.2% after 2 h of hydrogenation. This hydrogenated FAME showed higher oxidation stability and higher cetane number but poor cold flow properties. Formation of trans FAME was observed during hydrogenation. Both hydroxylation and epoxidation resulted in a decrease of unsaturated fatty acid methyl ester (UFA) fraction. The percentages of total unsaturated FAME decreased 39% in the epoxidation reaction and 44% in the hydroxylation reaction. The addition of hydroxyl groups to the unsaturated regions of the fatty acid chain yields biodiesel with better cold flow properties, increased lubricity and slightly increased oxidative stability. However, epoxy FAME shows some interesting properties such as higher oxidation stability, higher cetane number and acceptable cold flow properties, which met the limits of ASTM D6751 biodiesel specifications. (author)

  13. Crystal structure of 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium hydrogen oxalate dihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamadou Birame Diop

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title molecular salt, C4H7N2+·HC2O4−·2H2O, were isolated from the reaction of 2-methyl-1H-imidazole and oxalic acid in a 1:1 molar ratio in water. In the crystal, the cations and anions are positioned alternately along an infinite [010] ribbon and linked together through bifurcated N—H...(O,O hydrogen bonds. The water molecules of crystallization link the chains into (10-1 bilayers, with the methyl groups of the cations organized in an isotactic manner.

  14. Comprehensive physicochemical studies of a new hybrid material: 2-Amino-4-methyl-3-nitropyridinium hydrogen oxalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryndal, I.; Kucharska, E.; Wandas, M.; Lorenc, J.; Hermanowicz, K.; Mączka, M.; Lis, T.; Marchewka, M.; Hanuza, J.

    2014-01-01

    A new organic-organic salt, 2-amino-4-methyl-3-nitropyridinium hydrogen oxalate (AMNPO), and its deuterium analogue have been synthesized and characterized by means of FT-IR, FT-Raman, DSC and single crystal X-ray studies. The DSC measurements and temperature dependence of the IR and Raman spectra in the range 4-295 K show that it undergoes a reversible phase transition at ∼240 K. At room temperature it crystallizes in noncentrosymmetric space group P21. The unit-cell is built of the 2-amino-4-methyl-3-nitropyridinium cations and oxalate monoanions which are connected via the Nsbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The geometrical and hydrogen bond parameters are similar for non-deuterated (at 120 and 293 K) and deuterated compounds (at 90 K). The phase transition is probably a consequence of order-disorder transition inside of hydrogen network. The 6-311G(2d,2p) basis set with B3LYP functional have been used to discuss the structure and vibrational spectra of the studied compound.

  15. Calorimetric investigations of hydrogen bonding in binary mixtures containing pyridine and its methyl-substituted derivatives. II. The dilute solutions of methanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczak, Wojciech; Heintz, Andreas; Bucek, Monika

    2004-01-01

    Enthalpies of solution of methanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol (tert-butanol) in pyridine and its methyl derivatives were investigated in the range of mole fractions of alcohol x≤0.02 at temperature 298.15 K by a titration calorimeter. Dissolution of methanol is an exothermic process, with heat effects very close to those for water reported in part I of this study. The negative enthalpy of solution increases in the following order: pyridine < 3-methylpyridine < 4-methylpyridine < 2-methylpyridine < 2,6-dimethylpyridine < 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine. Positive enthalpies of solution of 2-methyl-2-propanol increase as follows: 2-methylpyridine < 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine < 4-methylpyridine < 2,6-dimethylpyridine < 3-methylpyridine < pyridine. The propensity of pyridine derivatives to hydrogen bonding is enhanced by the ortho effect. Methyl groups are probably too small to prevent the nitrogen atom in the pyridine ring from hydrogen bonding. However, spacious hydrocarbon group in 2-methyl-2-propanol molecule makes the bonding difficult for 2,6-dimethylpyridine and 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine, thus the number of O-H···N bonds is smaller than that in the solutions of methanol or water. The two latter seem to be very close to each other

  16. Crystal structure of di­methyl­ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemi(oxalic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Waly; Gueye, Ndongo; Crochet, Aurélien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Cattey, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of the title salt, Me2NH2 +·HC2O4 −·0.5H2C2O4, were isolated as a side product from the reaction involving Me2NH, H2C2O4 and Sn(n-Bu)3Cl in a 1:2 ratio in methanol or by the reaction of the (Me2NH2)2C2O4 salt and Sn(CH3)3Cl in a 2:1 ratio in ethanol. The asymmetric unit comprises a di­methyl­ammonium cation (Me2NH2 +), an hydrogenoxalate anion (HC2O4 −), and half a mol­ecule of oxalic acid (H2C2O4) situated about an inversion center. From a supra­molecular point of view, the three components inter­act together via hydrogen bonding. The Me2NH2 + cations and the HC2O4 − anions are in close proximity through bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds, while the HC2O4 − anions are organized into infinite chains via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, propagating along the a-axis direction. In addition, the oxalic acid (H2C2O4) mol­ecules play the role of connectors between these chains. Both the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of each diacid are involved in four inter­molecular inter­actions with two Me2NH2 + and two HC2O4 − ions of four distinct polymeric chains, via two N—H⋯O and two O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, respectively. The resulting mol­ecular assembly can be viewed as a two-dimensional bilayer-like arrangement lying parallel to (010), and reinforced by a C—H⋯O hydrogen bond. PMID:25995858

  17. Stereoselective semi-hydrogenation and deuteration of a diacetylenic precursor of leukotriene B sub 4 methyl ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontikis, R.; Le Merrer, Y.; Depezay, J.-C. (U.D.C. CNRS-INSERM (URA 400), 75, Paris (France). Lab. de Chimie et Biochimie Pharamacologiques et Toxicologiques); Petillot, Y.; Rousseau, B.; Beaucourt, J.P. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service des Molecules Marquees)

    1990-10-01

    (6,7,14,15-{sup 2}H4)-Leukotriene B4 methyl ester was prepared by reduction with deuterium gas of a suitable precursor (deuterium incorporation > 90%). Several catalytic semi-hydrogenations were affected in order to determine the best conditions for the labeling step. (author).

  18. On the transferability of atomic contributions to the optical rotatory power of hydrogen peroxide, methyl hydroperoxide and dimethyl peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez, Marina; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    for the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon atoms as well as for the methyl group at the level of time-dependent density functional theory with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional employing a large Gaussian basis set. We find that the atomic or group contributions are not transferable among these three molecules....

  19. (Di­methyl­phosphor­yl)methanaminium hydrogen oxalate–oxalic acid (2/1)

    OpenAIRE

    Bialek, Sebastian; Clemens, Rebecca; Reiss, Guido J.

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of (di­methyl­phosphor­yl)methanamine (dpma) with oxalic acid in ethanol yielded the title solvated salt, C3H11NOP+·C2HO4 −·0.5C2H2O4. Its asymmetric unit consists of one dpmaH+ cation, one hydrogen oxalate anion and a half-mol­ecule of oxalic acid located around a twofold rotation axis. The H atom of the hydrogen oxalate anion is statistically disordered over two positions that are trans to each other. The hydrogen oxalate monoanion is not planar (bend angle ∼16°) whereas the ox...

  20. Miscibility and Hydrogen Bonding in Blends of Poly(4-vinylphenol/Poly(vinyl methyl ketone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Bourara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The miscibility and phase behavior of poly(4-vinylphenol (PVPh with poly(vinyl methyl ketone (PVMK was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was shown that all blends of PVPh/PVMK are totally miscible. A DSC study showed the apparition of a single glass transition (Tg over their entire composition range. When the amount of PVPh exceeds 50% in blends, the obtained Tgs are found to be significantly higher than those observed for each individual component of the mixture, indicating that these blends are capable of forming interpolymer complexes. FTIR analysis revealed the existence of preferential specific interactions via hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which intensified when the amount of PVPh was increased in blends. Furthermore, the quantitative FTIR study carried out for PVPh/PVMK blends was also performed for the vinylphenol (VPh and vinyl methyl ketone (VMK functional groups. These results were also established by scanning electron microscopy study (SEM.

  1. Methylation reactions, the redox balance and atherothrombosis: the search for a link with hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoli, Roberta; Di Minno, Alessandro; Spadarella, Gaia; Franchini, Massimo; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Cirino, Giuseppe; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    It is now clear that homocysteine (Hcy) is irreversibly degraded to hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), an endogenous gasotransmitter that causes in vivo platelet activation via upregulation of phospholipase A2 and downstream boost of the arachidonate cascade. This mechanism involves a transsulfuration pathway. Based on these new data, clinical and experimental models on the relationships between Hcy and folate pathways in vascular disease and information on the Hcy controversy have been reanalyzed in the present review. Most interventional trials focused on Hcy lowering by folate administration did not exclude patients routinely taking the arachidonate inhibitor aspirin. This may have influenced the results of some of these trials. It is also clear that nutritional intake of folate affects several enzymatic reactions of the methionine-Hcy cycle and associated one-carbon metabolism and, thereby, both methylation reactions and redox balance. Hence, it is conceivable that the abnormally high Hcy levels seen in pathologic states reflect a poorly elucidated perturbation of such reactions and of such balance. While it is unknown whether there is an interplay between H2S, methylation reactions, and redox balance, measuring the sole reduction of blood Hcy that follows folate administration may well be an oversimplified approach to a complex biologic perturbation. The need to investigate this complex framework is thoroughly discussed in this article. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Methyl group dynamics in paracetamol and acetanilide: probing the static properties of intermolecular hydrogen bonds formed by peptide groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. R.; Prager, M.; Grimm, H.; Neumann, M. A.; Kearley, G. J.; Wilson, C. C.

    1999-06-01

    Measurements of tunnelling and librational excitations for the methyl group in paracetamol and tunnelling excitations for the methyl group in acetanilide are reported. In both cases, results are compared with molecular mechanics calculations, based on the measured low temperature crystal structures, which follow an established recipe. Agreement between calculated and measured methyl group observables is not as good as expected and this is attributed to the presence of comprehensive hydrogen bond networks formed by the peptide groups. Good agreement is obtained with a periodic quantum chemistry calculation which uses density functional methods, these calculations confirming the validity of the one-dimensional rotational model used and the crystal structures. A correction to the Coulomb contribution to the rotational potential in the established recipe using semi-emipircal quantum chemistry methods, which accommodates the modified charge distribution due to the hydrogen bonds, is investigated.

  3. 2,4-Diamino-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-1-ium hydrogen oxalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohari M. Yamin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C4H8N5+·C2HO4−, was obtained from the reaction of oxalic acid and 2,4-diamino-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazine. The protonated triazine ring is essentially planar with a maximum deviation of 0.035 (1 Å, but the hydrogen oxalate anion is less planar, with a maximum deviation of 0.131 (1 Å for both carbonyl O atoms. In the crystal, the ions are linked by intermolecular N—H...O, N—H...N, O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network. Weak π–π [centroid–centroid distance = 3.763 Å] and C—O...π interactions [O...centroid = 3.5300 (16 Å, C—O...centroid = 132.19 (10°] are also present.

  4. New insights into the dual fluorescence of methyl salicylate: effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding and solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Panwang; Hoffmann, Mark R; Han, Keli; He, Guozhong

    2015-02-12

    In this paper, we propose a new and complete mechanism for dual fluorescence of methyl salicylate (MS) under different conditions using a combined experimental (i.e., steady-state absorption and emission spectra and time-resolved fluorescence spectra) and theoretical (i.e., time-dependent density function theory) study. First, our theoretical study indicates that the barrier height for excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction of ketoB depends on the solvent polarity. In nonpolar solvents, the ESIPT reaction of ketoB is barrierless; the barrier height will increase with increasing solvent polarity. Second, we found that, in alcoholic solvents, intermolecular hydrogen bonding plays a more important role. The ketoB form of MS can form two hydrogen bonds with alcoholic solvents; one will facilitate ESIPT and produce the emission band in the blue region; the other one precludes ESIPT and produces the emission band in the near-UV region. Our proposed new mechanism can well explain previous results as well as our new experimental results.

  5. Discrimination of the oral microbiota associated with high hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Toru; Suzuki, Nao; Nakano, Yoshio; Yasui, Masaki; Yoneda, Masahiro; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Hirofuji, Takao; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH) are frequently detected in large amounts in malodorous mouth air. We investigated the bacterial composition of saliva of 30 subjects with severe oral malodor exhibiting extreme CH(3)SH/H(2)S ratios (high H(2)S but low CH(3)SH concentrations, n 5 14; high CH(3)SH but low H2S concentrations, n 5 16) and 13 subjects without malodor, using barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic community analysis with the UniFrac distance metric revealed a distinct bacterial community structure in each malodor group. The H2S group showed higher proportions of the genera Neisseria, Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas and SR1 than the other two groups, whereas the CH(3)SH group had higher proportions of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella,Atopobium, Megasphaera, and Selenomonas. Our results suggested that distinct bacterial populations in the oral microbiota are involved in production of high levels of H2S and CH3SH in the oral cavity.

  6. Spectroscopic study of uracil, 1-methyluracil and 1-methyl-4-thiouracil: Hydrogen bond interactions in crystals and ab-initio molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brela, Mateusz Z.; Boczar, Marek; Malec, Leszek M.; Wójcik, Marek J.; Nakajima, Takahito

    2018-05-01

    Hydrogen bond networks in uracil, 1-methyluracil and 1-methyl-4-thiouracil were studied by ab initio molecular dynamics as well as analysis of the orbital interactions. The power spectra calculated by ab initio molecular dynamics for atoms involved in hydrogen bonds were analyzed. We calculated spectra by using anharmonic approximation based on the autocorrelation function of the atom positions obtained from the Born-Oppenheimer simulations. Our results show the differences between hydrogen bond networks in uracil and its methylated derivatives. The studied methylated derivatives, 1-methyluracil as well as 1-methyl-4-thiouracil, form dimeric structures in the crystal phase, while uracil does not form that kind of structures. The presence of sulfur atom instead oxygen atom reflects weakness of the hydrogen bonds that build dimers.

  7. Temperature effect on the photoinduced reduction of methyl viologen with several sensitizers and the evolution of hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenadovic, M.T.; Micic, O.I.; Rajh, T.; Savic, D.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiation by visible light of an aqueous solution containing a photosensitizer, methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid leads to the formation of the reduced form of methyl viologen (MV/sup +/). The quantum yield for the formation of MV/sup +/ depends strongly on the time during which the formation is observed owing to the reaction of MV/sup +/ with oxidative products and its reduction to MV/sup 0/. Proflavin, acridine yellow and ruthenium(II)tris(2,2-bipyridyl) were used as photosensitizers and showed the same ability to promote hydrogen evolution. When CdS was used as a sensitizer a factor of 10 less hydrogen was obtained than when the dyes were used. The redox catalysts platinum, Pt-TiO/sub 2/-RuO/sub 2/ and Pt-CdS in colloidal systems showed approximately the same activity towards the reduction of water. The reduction of MV/sup 2 +/ and the evolution of hydrogen were enhanced at higher temperatures (70/sup 0/C). The optimum conditions for water reduction on redox catalysts in colloidal system under continuous illumination are analysed.

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis hydrogen sulfide enhances methyl mercaptan-induced pathogenicity in mouse abscess formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Suguru; Shioya, Koki; Hiraoka, B Yukihiro; Suzuki, Nao; Hoshino, Tomonori; Fujiwara, Taku; Yoshinari, Nobuo; Ansai, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Akihiro

    2018-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis produces hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from l-cysteine. However, the role of H2S produced by P. gingivalis in periodontal inflammation is unclear. In this study, we identified the enzyme that catalyses H2S production from l-cysteine and analysed the role of H2S using a mouse abscess model. The enzyme identified was identical to methionine γ-lyase (PG0343), which produces methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) from l-methionine. Therefore, we analysed H2S and CH3SH production by P. gingivalis W83 and a PG0343-deletion mutant (ΔPG0343) with/without l-cysteine and/or l-methionine. The results indicated that CH3SH is produced constitutively irrespective of the presence of l-methionine, while H2S was greatly increased by both P. gingivalis W83 and ΔPG0343 in the presence of l-cysteine. In contrast, CH3SH production by ΔPG0343 was absent irrespective of the presence of l-methionine, and H2S production was eliminated in the absence of l-cysteine. Thus, CH3SH and H2S production involves different substrates, l-methionine or l-cysteine, respectively. Based on these characteristics, we analysed the roles of CH3SH and H2S in abscess formation in mice by P. gingivalis W83 and ΔPG0343. Abscess formation by P. gingivalis W83, but not ΔPG0343, differed significantly in the presence and absence of l-cysteine. In addition, the presence of l-methionine did not affect the size of abscesses generated by P. gingivalis W83 and ΔPG0343. Therefore, we conclude that H2S produced by P. gingivalis does not induce inflammation; however, H2S enhances inflammation caused by CH3SH. Thus, these results suggest the H2S produced by P. gingivalis plays a supportive role in inflammation caused by methionine γ-lyase.

  9. (Di­methyl­phosphor­yl)methanaminium hydrogen oxalate–oxalic acid (2/1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialek, Sebastian; Clemens, Rebecca; Reiss, Guido J.

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of (di­methyl­phosphor­yl)methanamine (dpma) with oxalic acid in ethanol yielded the title solvated salt, C3H11NOP+·C2HO4 −·0.5C2H2O4. Its asymmetric unit consists of one dpmaH+ cation, one hydrogen oxalate anion and a half-mol­ecule of oxalic acid located around a twofold rotation axis. The H atom of the hydrogen oxalate anion is statistically disordered over two positions that are trans to each other. The hydrogen oxalate monoanion is not planar (bend angle ∼16°) whereas the oxalic acid molecule shows a significantly smaller bend angle (∼7°). In the crystal, the components are connected by strong O—H⋯O and much weaker N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of layers extending parallel to (001). The structure was refined from a racemically twinned crystal with twin components in an approximate 1:1 ratio. PMID:24765013

  10. Micro-reactor for heterogeneous catalysis. Application: hydrogen production from methyl-cyclohexane; Microreacteur pour la catalyse heterogene. Application: production d'hydrogene a partir du methylcyclohexane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roumanie, M.; Pijolat, C. [Ecole des Mines de Saint Etienne, Centre SPIN (DMICC/LPMG/URA/CNRS-D2021), 42 - Saint Etienne (France); Meille, V.; Bellefon, C. de [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS/CPE), Lab. de Genie des Procedes Catalytiques, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Pouteau, P.; Delattre, C. [CEA Grenoble, Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique (LETI), 38 (France)

    2004-07-01

    First developed by the pharmaceutical industry to find new drugs (combinatorial analysis), the lab on chip is also extremely interesting for the catalysis field. This major interest comes from the miniaturize size and the high surface on volume ratio which lead to improve mass and heat transfer but also the safety in regards of industrial application. The use of micro-technology and the miniaturization of various systems such as micro-fuel cell is also a current field of activity. So for the future research the production of hydrogen is a point to develop in order to supply a micro-fuel cell. The aim of this work is to study and to realize an autonomous catalytic micro-reactor for hydrogen production from methyl-cyclohexane. For this reaction of dehydrogenation, the common catalyst is platinum supported on alumina. Consequently, the general objectives of this work are: 1)to develop a micro-reactor with its heaters, sensors...2)to deposit catalysts in the micro-reactor 3)to study the catalytic conversion of this system.

  11. Theoretical investigation of the hydrogen shift reactions in peroxy radicals derived from the atmospheric decomposition of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (MBO331)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian; Jørgensen, Solvejg; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2015-01-01

    The hydroxy peroxy radical derived from the oxidation of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (MBO331), can undergo four different hydrogen shift (H-shift) reactions. We have compared optimized geometries, barrier heights and reaction rate constants obtained with five different DFT functionals (BLYP, B3LYP, BHand...

  12. Methyl and p-Bromobenzyl Esters of Hydrogenated Kaurenoic Acid for Controlling Anthracnose in Common Bean Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Suellen F; Oliveira, Denilson F; Heleno, Vladimir C G; Soares, Ana Carolina F; Midiwo, Jacob O; Souza, Elaine A

    2017-03-01

    Kaurenoic acid derivatives were prepared and submitted to in vitro assays with the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, which causes anthracnose disease in the common bean. The most active substances were found to be methyl and p-bromobenzylesters, 7 and 9, respectively, of the hydrogenated kaurenoic acid, which presented a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.097 and 0.131 mM, respectively, while the commercial fungicide methyl thiophanate (MT) presented a MIC of 0.143 mM. Substances 7 (1.401 mM) and 9 (1.886 mM) reduced the severity of anthracnose in common bean to values statistically comparable to MT (2.044 mM). According to an in silico study, both compounds 7 and 9 are inhibitors of the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) enzyme produced by other organisms, the amino acid sequence of which could be detected in fungal genomes. These substances appeared to act against C. lindemuthianum by inhibiting its KSI. Therefore, substances 7 and 9 are promising for the development of new fungicides.

  13. Dielectric and conformational studies of hydrogen bonded 2-ethoxyethanol and ethyl methyl ketone system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattebahadur, Kanchan. L.; Deshmukh, S. D.; Mohod, A. G.; Undre, P. B.; Patil, S. S.; Khirade, P. W.

    2018-05-01

    The Dielectric constant, density and refractive index of binary mixture of 2-ethoxy ethanol (2-EE) with ethyl methyl ketone (EMK) including those of the pure liquids were measured for 11 concentrations at 25°C temperature. The experimental data is used to calculate the Excess molar volume, Excess dielectric constant, Kirkwood correlation factor and Bruggemann factor. The excess parameters results were fitted to the Redlich-Kister type polynomial equation to derive its fitting coefficient. The Kirkwood correlation factor of the mixture has been discussed to yield information about solute solvent interaction. The Bruggeman plot shows a deviation from linearity. The FT-IR spectra of pure and their binary mixtures are also studied.

  14. Crystal structure of di?methyl?ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemi(oxalic acid)

    OpenAIRE

    Diallo, Waly; Gueye, Ndongo; Crochet, Aur?lien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Cattey, H?l?ne

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of the title salt, Me2NH2 +?HC2O4 ??0.5H2C2O4, were isolated as a side product from the reaction involving Me2NH, H2C2O4 and Sn(n-Bu)3Cl in a 1:2 ratio in methanol or by the reaction of the (Me2NH2)2C2O4 salt and Sn(CH3)3Cl in a 2:1 ratio in ethanol. The asymmetric unit comprises a di?methyl?ammonium cation (Me2NH2 +), an hydrogenoxalate anion (HC2O4 ?), and half a mol?ecule of oxalic acid (H2C2O4) situated about an inversion center. From a supra?molecular point of view, the t...

  15. Lithography exposure characteristics of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) for carbon, helium and hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttaraksa, Nitipon; Norarat, Rattanaporn; Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo; Singkarat, Somsorn; Whitlow, Harry J.

    2012-02-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) is a common polymer used as a lithographic resist for all forms of particle (photon, ion and electron) beam writing. Faithful lithographic reproduction requires that the exposure dose, Θ, lies in the window Θ0⩽ΘChiang Mai and Jyväskylä to determine the exposure characteristics in terms of fluence for 2 MeV protons, 3 MeV 4He and 6 MeV 12C ions, respectively. After exposure the samples were developed in 7:3 by volume propan-2-ol:de-ionised water mixture. At low fluences, where the fluence is below the clearing fluence, the exposed regions were characterised by rough regions, particularly for He with holes around the ion tracks. As the fluence (dose) increases so that the dose exceeds the clearing dose, the PMMA is uniformly removed with sharp vertical walls. When Θ exceeds the cross-linking onset fluence, the bottom of the exposed regions show undissolved PMMA.

  16. Separation of fatty acid methyl esters by GC-online hydrogenation × GC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonte, Pierluigi; Fardin-Kia, Ali Reza; Rader, Jeanne I

    2013-02-05

    The separation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) provided by a 200 m × 0.25 mm SLB-IL111 capillary column is enhanced by adding a second dimension of separation ((2)D) in a GC × GC design. Rather than employing two GC columns of different polarities or using different elution temperatures, the separation in the two-dimensional space is achieved by altering the chemical structure of selected analytes between the two dimensions of separation. A capillary tube coated with palladium is added between the first dimension of separation ((1)D) column and the cryogenic modulator, providing the reduction of unsaturated FAMEs to their fully saturated forms. The (2)D separation is achieved using a 2.5 m × 0.10 mm SLB-IL111 capillary column and separates FAMEs based solely on their carbon skeleton. The two-dimensional separation can be easily interpreted based on the principle that all the saturated FAMEs lie on a straight diagonal line bisecting the separation plane, while the FAMEs with the same carbon skeleton but differing in the number, geometric configuration or position of double bonds lie on lines parallel to the (1)D time axis. This technique allows the separation of trans fatty acids (FAs) and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) in a single experiment and eliminates the overlap between PUFAs with different chain lengths. To our knowledge, this the first example of GC × GC in which a chemical change is instituted between the two dimensions to alter the relative retentions of components and identify unsaturated FAMEs.

  17. Kinetics of exchange between zero-, one-, and two-hydrogen-bonded states of methyl and ethyl acetate in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntonov, Lev; Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Gai, Feng

    2015-03-26

    It has recently been shown that the ester carbonyl stretching vibration can be used as a sensitive probe of local electrostatic field in molecular systems. To further characterize this vibrational probe and extend its potential applications, we studied the kinetics of chemical exchange between differently hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) ester carbonyl groups of methyl acetate (MA) and ethyl acetate (EA) in methanol. We found that, while both MA and EA can form zero, one, or two H-bonds with the solvent, the population of the 2hb state in MA is significantly smaller than that in EA. Using a combination of linear and nonlinear infrared measurements and numerical simulations, we further determined the rate constants for the exchange between these differently H-bonded states. We found that for MA the chemical exchange reaction between the two dominant states (i.e., 0hb and 1hb states) has a relaxation rate constant of 0.14 ps(-1), whereas for EA the three-state chemical exchange reaction occurs in a predominantly sequential manner with the following relaxation rate constants: 0.11 ps(-1) for exchange between 0hb and 1hb states and 0.12 ps(-1) for exchange between 1hb and 2hb states.

  18. The role of hydrogen bonds in the crystals of 2-amino-4-methyl-5-nitropyridinium trifluoroacetate monohydrate and 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate - X-ray and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryndal, I; Marchewka, M; Wandas, M; Sąsiadek, W; Lorenc, J; Lis, T; Dymińska, L; Kucharska, E; Hanuza, J

    2014-04-05

    Two new organic-organic salts, 2-amino-4-methyl-5-nitropyridinium trifluoroacetate monohydrate (AMNP-TFA), and 2-amino-4-methyl-5-nitropyridinium 4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate (AMNP-HBS), were obtained and characterized by means of FT-IR, FT-Raman and single crystal X-ray crystallography. In the former crystal, the cations, anions and water molecules are linked into layers by three types of hydrogen bonds, NPH⋯O, NAH⋯O and OH⋯O. These layers are connected by weaker CH⋯O hydrogen bonds. In the latter crystal, the cations and anions form one-dimensional structure through a number of hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the OH, NH(+) and NH2 groups as donors. In this case the NPH⋯O and NAH⋯O hydrogen bonds are formed. The combination of interactions between cations and anions results in the formation of columns. Additionally, there are π-π stacking interactions between the columns. The obtained X-ray structural data are related to the vibrational spectra of the studied crystals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis of Fischer carbene complexes of iridium by C-H bond activation of methyl and cyclic ethers: Evidence for reversible {alpha}-hydrogen migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecke, H.F.; Arndtsen, B.A.; Burger, P.; Bergman, R.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-03-13

    We report here a mild and versatile route to Fischer carbene complexes of iridium via the activation of C-H bonds of methyl and cyclic ethers, along with our preliminary studies of this rare family of carbene complexes. Theoretical studies suggest that {alpha}-hydrogen migrations can be kinetically favorable if a coordinatively unsaturated species can be accessed. Thus, the lability of the triflate ligand presumably facilitates this process. Further evidence for the rapidity, as well as reversibility, of this rearrangement was obtained by NMR analysis. 20 refs.

  20. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  1. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  2. Reduction of Line Edge Roughness of Polystyrene-block-Poly(methyl methacrylate) Copolymer Nanopatterns By Introducing Hydrogen Bonding at the Junction Point of Two Block Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Seong; Lee, Jaeyong; Kwak, Jongheon; Moon, Hong Chul; Kim, Jin Kon

    2017-09-20

    To apply well-defined block copolymer nanopatterns to next-generation lithography or high-density storage devices, small line edge roughness (LER) of nanopatterns should be realized. Although polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer (PS-b-PMMA) has been widely used to fabricate nanopatterns because of easy perpendicular orientation of the block copolymer nanodomains and effective removal of PMMA block by dry etching, the fabricated nanopatterns show poorer line edge roughness (LER) due to relatively small Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ) between PS and PMMA chains. Here, we synthesized PS-b-PMMA with urea (U) and N-(4-aminomethyl-benzyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-benzamide (BA) moieties at junction of PS and PMMA chains (PS-U-BA-PMMA) to improve the LER. The U-BA moieties serves as favorable interaction (hydrogen bonding) sites. The LER of PS line patterns obtained from PS-U-BA-PMMA was reduced ∼25% compared with that obtained from neat PS-b-PMMA without BA and U moieties. This is attributed to narrower interfacial width induced by hydrogen bonding between two blocks, which is confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. This result implies that the introduction of hydrogen bonding into block copolymer interfaces offers an opportunity to fabricate well-defined nanopatterns with improved LER by block copolymer self-assembly, which could be a promising alternative to next-generation extreme ultraviolet lithography.

  3. Vapour pressures of 1-methyl derivatives of benzimidazole, pyrazole and indole. The energy of the intermolecular hydrogen bond N-H⋯N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Ana R.R.P.; Monte, Manuel J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Vapour pressures of 1-methyl derivatives of benzimidazole, pyrazole and indole. • Enthalpies, entropies and Gibbs free energies of sublimation/vaporisation were derived. • Temperatures and enthalpies of fusion were determined. • Energy of the intermolecular hydrogen bond N-H⋯N was estimated. - Abstract: The vapour pressures of the liquid phase of 1-methylpyrazole, 1-methylbenzimidazole and 1-methylindole were measured over the temperature ranges (253.9 to 293.3) K, (303.2 to 372.5) K, and (268.6 to 341.9) K, respectively, using a static method. The vapour pressures of the crystalline phase of the two latter compounds were also measured at temperatures between (301.2 to 328.9) K and (267.6 to 275.5) K, respectively. The results obtained enabled the determination of the standard molar enthalpies and entropies of sublimation and of vaporisation at the mean temperatures of the measurements and at T = 298.15 K. The temperatures and molar enthalpies of fusion were determined using differential scanning calorimetry. The enthalpies of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H⋯N in the crystalline phase of benzimidazole and pyrazole were determined and compared with the result previously determined for the energy of the intermolecular hydrogen bond in crystalline imidazole

  4. Structural and Kinetic Evidence for an Extended Hydrogen-Bonding Network in Catalysis of Methyl Group Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doukov, T.; Hemmi, H.; Drennan, C.; Ragsdale, S.

    2007-01-01

    The methyltetrahydrofolate (CH 3 -H 4 folate) corrinoid-ironsulfur protein (CFeSP) methyltransferase (MeTr) catalyzes transfer of the methyl group of CH3-H4folate to cob(I)amide. This key step in anaerobic CO and CO 2 fixation is similar to the first half-reaction in the mechanisms of other cobalamin-dependent methyltransferases. Methyl transfer requires electrophilic activation of the methyl group of CH 3 -H 4 folate, which includes proton transfer to the N5 group of the pterin ring and poises the methyl group for reaction with the Co(I) nucleophile. The structure of the binary CH 3 -H 4 folate/MeTr complex (revealed here) lacks any obvious proton donor near the N5 group. Instead, an Asn residue and water molecules are found within H-bonding distance of N5. Structural and kinetic experiments described here are consistent with the involvement of an extended H-bonding network in proton transfer to N5 of the folate that includes an Asn (Asn-199 in MeTr), a conserved Asp (Asp-160), and a water molecule. This situation is reminiscent of purine nucleoside phosphorylase, which involves protonation of the purine N7 in the transition state and is accomplished by an extended H-bond network that includes water molecules, a Glu residue, and an Asn residue (Kicska, G. A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., Shi, W., Fedorov, A., Lewandowicz, A., Cahill, S. M., Almo, S. C., and Schramm, V. L. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 14489-14498). In MeTr, the Asn residue swings from a distant position to within H-bonding distance of the N5 atom upon CH 3 -H 4 folate binding. An N199A variant exhibits only ∼20-fold weakened affinity for CH 3 -H 4 folate but a much more marked 20,000-40,000-fold effect on catalysis, suggesting that Asn-199 plays an important role in stabilizing a transition state or high energy intermediate for methyl transfer

  5. Continuous hydrogenation of ethyl levulinate to γ-valerolactone and 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran over alumina doped Cu/SiO2 catalyst: the potential of commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Junlin; Zhu, Junhua; Xu, Xuan; Wang, Wanmin; Li, Jiwen; Zhao, Yan; Tang, Kangjian; Song, Qi; Qi, Xiaolan; Kong, Dejin; Tang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) and its esters to produce γ-valerolactone (GVL) and 2-methyl tetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) is a key step for the utilization of cellulose derived LA. Aiming to develop a commercially feasible base metal catalyst for the production of GVL from LA, with satisfactory activity, selectivity, and stability, Al2O3 doped Cu/SiO2 and Cu/SiO2 catalysts were fabricated by co-precipitation routes in parallel. The diverse physio-chemical properties of these two catalysts were characterized by XRD, TEM, dissociative N2O chemisorptions, and Py-IR methods. The catalytic properties of these two catalysts were systematically assessed in the continuous hydrogenation of ethyl levulinate (EL) in a fixed-bed reactor. The effect of acidic property of the SiO2 substrate on the catalytic properties was investigated. To justify the potential of its commercialization, significant attention was paid on the initial activity, proper operation window, by-products control, selectivity, and stability of the catalyst. The effect of reaction conditions, such as temperature and pressure, on the performance of the catalyst was also thoroughly studied. The development of alumina doped Cu/SiO2 catalyst strengthened the value-chain from cellulose to industrially important chemicals via LA and GVL. PMID:27377401

  6. Electrostatic settling of catalyst particles in hydrogenation of methyl benzoate. Denkai chinkoho ni yoru ansokukosan mechiru suisoka hannoeki kara no shokubai ryushi bunri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K. (Japan Energy Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Central Research Lab.)

    1994-03-01

    As benzyl alcohol (BA), which is one of the simplest alcohol having aromatic ring, has been used widely for the fields related to soap, perfume and chemicals industry, its usage has not always been so much because of its expensiveness. Authors developed previously a new process technique to produce cheaper and higher purity BA not through chlorination process using toluene as its raw materials. The BA can be obtained by hydrogenating methyl benzoate (MB) at a dispersion babble tower using cupper-chromium type powder catalyst in mixed solvent of methanol and toluene. The catalyst becomes much fine particles after the reaction. In this study, it is examined to separate MB hydrogenation reaction solution obtained by electrostatic settling into solid and liquid phases as an aim to improve the BA production process. Rate of electrostatic settling does not depend upon solid concentration, slurry forming conditions, electrode materials, specific resistance of slurry layer and others, but is in proportion to electric field intensity. Furthermore, process of the electrostatic settling is expressed by an equation. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate catalyzed in-situ transesterification of Nannochloropsis to fatty acid methyl esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yingqiang; Cooke, Peter; Reddy, Harvind K.; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Zheling; Deng, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • [Bmim][HSO_4] catalyzed in-situ transesterification of wet algae. • [Bmim][HSO_4] served as both effective solvent and excellent acid catalyst. • Proposed a mechanism for [Bmim][HSO_4] catalyzed in-situ transesterification. • Identified cell walls and lipid droplets in algae using confocal imaging tests. • Obtained crude biodiesel yield about 95% in 30 min at 200 °C. - Abstract: 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([Bmim][HSO_4]) is used as a solvent and an acid catalyst for in-situ extractive transesterification of wet Nannochloropsis with methanol. The reaction is supposed to be a five-step process: (1) wet algae cell wall dissolves in ionic liquid at reaction temperatures; (2) hydrogen ions and sulfate ions release from the ionization of HSO_4"−. The hydrogen ions (H"+) act as catalysts for accelerating the reactive extraction of triglyceride from wet Nannochloropsis; (3) hydrogen ions and methanol molecules transfer from bulk to active site of cells without passing through cell wall that is dissolved by ionic liquid; (4) in-situ transesterification of lipid (mainly triglycerides) with methanol; and (5) products transfer from inside of algae cells to outside of cells. The crude biodiesel yield of [Bmim][HSO_4] catalyzed in-situ transesterification is about 95.28% at reaction temperature of 200 °C, reaction time of 30 min, mass ratio of [Bmim][HSO_4] to wet Nannochloropsis of 0.9:1, and a mass ratio of methanol to wet algae of 3:1. It decreases to 81.23% after [Bmim][HSO_4] is recycled for 4 times, which indicates that [Bmim][HSO_4] catalyzed in-situ transesterification is an economic approach for biodiesel production from wet algae.

  8. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-amyl methyl ether by purge and trap-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry: method evaluation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Stephan, Manuel; Jochmann, Maik A; Krajenke, Karen; Haas, Joe; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2010-01-01

    In order to monitor the behaviour of contaminants in the aqueous environment effective enrichment techniques often have to be employed due to their low concentrations. In this work a robust and sensitive purge and trap-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of fuel oxygenates in water is presented. The method evaluation included the determination of method detection limits, accuracy and reproducibility of deltaD and delta(13)C values. Lowest concentrations at which reliable delta(13)C values could be determined were 5 microg L(-1) and 28 microg L(-1) for TAME and MTBE, respectively. Stable deltaD values for MTBE and TAME could be achieved for concentrations as low as 25 and 50 microg L(-1). Good long-term reproducibility of delta(13)C and deltaD values was obtained for all target compounds. But deltaD values varying more than 5 per thousand were observed using different thermal conversion tubes. Thus, a correction of deltaD values in the analysis of groundwater samples was necessary to guarantee comparability of the results. The applicability of this method was shown by the analysis of groundwater samples from a gasoline contaminated site. By two dimensional isotope analysis two locations within this site were identified at which anaerobic and aerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether occurred.

  9. Measurement of formic acid, acetic acid and hydroxyacetaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, and methyl peroxide in air by chemical ionization mass spectrometry: airborne method development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadaway, Victoria; Heikes, Brian G.; McNeill, Ashley S.; Silwal, Indira K. C.; O'Sullivan, Daniel W.

    2018-04-01

    A chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) method utilizing a reagent gas mixture of O2, CO2, and CH3I in N2 is described and optimized for quantitative gas-phase measurements of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl peroxide (CH3OOH), formic acid (HCOOH), and the sum of acetic acid (CH3COOH) and hydroxyacetaldehyde (HOCH2CHO; also known as glycolaldehyde). The instrumentation and methodology were designed for airborne in situ field measurements. The CIMS quantification of formic acid, acetic acid, and hydroxyacetaldehyde used I- cluster formation to produce and detect the ion clusters I-(HCOOH), I-(CH3COOH), and I-(HOCH2CHO), respectively. The CIMS also produced and detected I- clusters with hydrogen peroxide and methyl peroxide, I-(H2O2) and I-(CH3OOH), though the sensitivity was lower than with the O2- (CO2) and O2- ion clusters, respectively. For that reason, while the I- peroxide clusters are presented, the focus is on the organic acids. Acetic acid and hydroxyacetaldehyde were found to yield equivalent CIMS responses. They are exact isobaric compounds and indistinguishable in the CIMS used. Consequently, their combined signal is referred to as the acetic acid equivalent sum. Within the resolution of the quadrupole used in the CIMS (1 m/z), ethanol and 1- and 2-propanol were potential isobaric interferences to the measurement of formic acid and the acetic acid equivalent sum, respectively. The CIMS response to ethanol was 3.3 % that of formic acid and the response to either 1- or 2-propanol was 1 % of the acetic acid response; therefore, the alcohols were not considered to be significant interferences to formic acid or the acetic acid equivalent sum. The multi-reagent ion system was successfully deployed during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) in 2014. The combination of FRAPPÉ and laboratory calibrations allowed for the post-mission quantification of formic acid and the acetic acid equivalent sum observed during the Deep

  10. Hydrogen abstraction from n-butanol by the methyl radical: high level ab initio study of abstraction pathways and the importance of low energy rotational conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsikadakos, D; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P; Hunt, P A

    2012-07-21

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions by the methyl radical from n-butanol have been investigated at the ROCBS-QB3 level of theory. Reaction energies and product geometries for the most stable conformer of n-butanol (ROH) have been computed, the reaction energies order α channel more stable than the β-channel? Why do the two C(γ)-H H-abstraction TS differ in energy? The method and basis set dependence of the TS barriers is investigated. The Boltzmann probability distribution for the n-butanol conformers suggests that low energy conformers are present in approximately equal proportions to the most stable conformer at combustion temperatures where ĊH(3) radicals are present. Thus, the relative significance of the various H-abstraction channels has been assessed for a selection of higher energy conformers (ROH'). Key results include finding that higher energy n-butanol conformers (E(ROH') > E(ROH)) can generate lower energy product radicals, E(ROH') < E(ROH). Moreover, higher energy conformers can also have a globally competitive TS energy for H-abstraction.

  11. Contribution of NAD 2D-NMR in liquid crystals to the determination of hydrogen isotope profile of methyl groups in miliacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdagué, Philippe; Lesot, Philippe; Jacob, Jérémy; Terwilliger, Valery J.; Le Milbeau, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD or (D/H) value) of molecular biomarkers preserved in sedimentary archives is increasingly used to provide clues about the evolution of past climatic conditions. The rationale is that intact biomarkers retain isotopic information related to the climatic conditions that prevailed at the time of their synthesis. Some of these biomarkers may be degraded during diagenesis, however. The extent to which these degradations alter the original δD value of the source biomarker is presently debated and the capacity to resolve this question by determination of compound-specific δD values alone is limited. The ;bulk; or ;global; δD value of any molecule is in fact a composite of δD values at each site within this molecule (δDi or (D/H)i with i = number of hydrogen/deuterium atoms in the considered molecule). Determination of this site-specific δDi value in biomarkers could not only yield outstanding paleoenvironmental information but also help forecast the impacts of diagenesis and define essential steps in biosynthetic pathways. This task is analytically challenging. Here, we examined the capabilities of natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) using homopolypeptide liquid crystals as an NMR solvent to: (i) analyze the NAD spectra of biomakers; (ii) determine the site-specific distribution of hydrogen in the nine methyl groups (δDMei with i = 23-31) of miliacin, a pentacyclic triterpene of the amyrin family and key biomarker for broomcorn millet in sedimentary archives. Relative (D/H)Mei values were established by anisotropic NAD 2D-NMR. Then absolute δDMei values were obtained by determining δDMei value of the methoxy group of miliacin using two independent approaches: isotropic NAD NMR (SNIF-NMR™) and GC-irMS. The resulting isotope profile for miliacin shows, for the first time, large variations in δDMei values that can directly be explained by biosynthetic processes. This approach has also the potential to permit

  12. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS ON THE EFFECT OF HYDROGEN INDUCTION ON PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION BEHAVIOUR OF A SINGLE CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH PALM OIL METHYL ESTER AND ITS BLEND WITH DIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOOPATHI D.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Internal combustion engines are an integral part of our daily lives, especially in the agricultural and transportation sector. With depleting fossil fuel and increasing environmental pollution, the researchers are foraying into alternate sources for fuelling the internal combustion engine. Vegetable oils derived from plant seeds is one such solution, but using them in unmodified diesel engine leads to reduced thermal efficiency and increased smoke emissions. Hydrogen if induced in small quantities in the air intake manifold can enhance the engine performance running on biodiesel. In this work, experiments were performed to evaluate the engine performance when hydrogen was inducted in small quantities and blends of esterified palm oil and diesel was injected as pilot fuel in the conventional manner. Tests were performed on a single cylinder, 4 - stroke, water cooled, direct injection diesel engine running at constant speed of 1500 rpm under variable load conditions and varying hydrogen flow. At full load for 75D25POME (a blend of 75% diesel and 25% palm oil methyl ester by volume, the results indicated an increase in brake thermal efficiency from 29.75% with zero hydrogen flow to a maximum of 30.17% at 5lpm hydrogen flow rate. HC emission reduced from 34 to 31.5 ppm, by volume at maximum load. Whereas, CO emission reduced from 0.09 to 0.045 % by volume at maximum load. Due to higher combustion rates with hydrogen induction, NOx emission increased from 756 to 926 ppm, at maximum load.

  13. The combined removal of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide via an electro-reactor process using a low concentration of continuously regenerable Ag(II) active catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthuraman, Govindan; Chung, Sang Joon; Moon, Il Shik

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Simultaneous removal of H 2 S and CH 3 SH was achieved at electro-reactor. → Active catalyst Ag(II) perpetually regenerated in HNO 3 medium by electrochemical cell. → CH 3 SH destruction follows two reaction pathways. → H 2 S induced destruction of CH 3 SH has identified. → Low concentration of active Ag(II) (12.5 x 10 -4 mol L -1 ) is enough for complete destruction. - Abstract: In this study, an electrocatalytic wet scrubbing process was developed for the simultaneous removal of synthetic odorous gases namely, methyl mercaptan (CH 3 SH) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). The initial process consists of the absorption of CH 3 SH and H 2 S gases by an absorbing solution, followed by their mediated electrochemical oxidation using a low concentration of active Ag(II) in 6 M HNO 3 . Experiments were conducted under different reaction conditions, such as CH 3 SH and H 2 S loadings, active Ag(II) concentrations and molar flow rates. The cyclic voltammetry for the oxidation of CH 3 SH corroborated the electro-reactor results, in that the silver in the 6 M HNO 3 reaction solution significantly influences the oxidation of CH 3 SH. At a low active Ag(II) concentration of 0.0012 M, the CH 3 SH removal experiments demonstrated that the CH 3 SH degradation was steady, with 100% removal at a CH 3 SH loading of 5 g m -3 h -1 . The electro-reactor and cyclic voltammetry results indicated that the removal of H 2 S (100%) follows a mediated electrocatalytic oxidation reaction. The simultaneous removal of 100% of the CH 3 SH and H 2 S was achieved, even with a very low active Ag(II) concentration (0.0012 M), as a result of the high efficiency of the Ag(II). The parallel cyclic voltammetry results demonstrated that a process of simultaneous destruction of both CH 3 SH and H 2 S follows an H 2 S influenced mediated electrocatalytic oxidation. The use of a very low concentration of the Ag(II) mediator during the electro-reactor process is promising for the complete

  14. EPR study of gamma irradiated N-methyl taurine (C 3H 9NO 3S) and sodium hydrogen sulphate monohydrate (NaHSO 3·H 2O) single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, İlkay; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2011-03-01

    EPR study of gamma irradiated C 3H 9NO 3S and NaHSO 3.H 2O single crystals have been carried out at room temperature. There is one site for the radicals in C 3H 9NO 3S and two magnetically distinct sites for the radicals in NaHSO 3. The observed lines in the EPR spectra have been attributed to the species of SO3- and RH radicals for N-methyl taurine, and to the SO3- and OH radicals for sodium hydrogen sulfate monohydrate single crystals. The principal values of the g for SO3-, the hyperfine values of RH and OH proton splitting have been calculated and discussed.

  15. Electrocatalytic activity of a mononuclear yttrium(III)–methyl orange complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles for adsorption/desorption of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaie, Fahimeh [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadzadeh, Hassan, E-mail: hadad@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behnamfar, Mohammad Taghi [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rudbari, Hadi Amiri [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Isfahan, Isfahan, 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    A new mononuclear yttrium(III) complex, [Y(MO){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (where MO{sup –} is methyl orange anion (4-[(4-dimethylamino)phenyldiazenyl]benzenesulfonate)), was synthesized in an aqueous solution. The complex was characterized by elemental analysis, UV/Vis, FT-IR, and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The yttrium oxysulfate nanoparticles (Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) were then prepared by calcination of [Y(MO){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by FT-IR, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The hydrogen adsorption/desorption (H{sub ads}/H{sub des}) behavior of the Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles was studied at a carbon paste electrode (CPE) in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The recorded voltammograms exhibited a pair of peaks corresponding to the adsorption/desorption of hydrogen for the Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles. The results show a reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption reaction for both compounds. The voltammograms of the nanoparticles indicate an excellent cycling stability for the adsorption/desorption of hydrogen. In addition, the linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) technique was used to investigate the electrocatalytic activity of both compounds for the hydrogen adsorption reaction. The linear voltammograms of both compounds demonstrate the excellent electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen adsorption reaction. - Highlights: • Preparation of a new Y(III) complex and Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Investigation of the H{sub ads}/H{sub des} reaction for both compounds by voltammetry. • Observation of two peaks corresponding to the H{sub ads}/H{sub des} in both compounds. • An excellent cycling stability for the nanoparticles in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  16. Maternal melatonin or N-acetylcysteine therapy regulates hydrogen sulfide-generating pathway and renal transcriptome to prevent prenatal NG-Nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced fetal programming of hypertension in adult male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Lee, Chien-Te; Chan, Julie Y H; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2016-11-01

    Pregnancy is a critical time for fetal programming of hypertension. Nitric oxide deficiency during pregnancy causes hypertension in adult offspring. We examined whether maternal melatonin or N-acetylcysteine therapy can prevent N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester-induced fetal programming of hypertension in adult offspring. Next, we aimed to identify potential gatekeeper pathways that contribute to N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester -induced programmed hypertension using the next generation RNA sequencing technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 4 groups: control, N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester, N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester +melatonin, and N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester+N-acetylcysteine. Pregnant rats received N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester administration at 60 mg/kg/d subcutaneously during pregnancy alone, with additional 0.01% melatonin in drinking water, or with additional 1% N-acetylcysteine in drinking water during the entire pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring (n=8/group) were killed at 12 weeks of age. N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester exposure during pregnancy induced programmed hypertension in adult male offspring, which was prevented by maternal melatonin or N-acetylcysteine therapy. Protective effects of melatonin and N-acetylcysteine against N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester-induced programmed hypertension were associated with an increase in hydrogen sulfide-generating enzymes and hydrogen sulfide synthesis in the kidneys. Nitric oxide inhibition by N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester in pregnancy caused >2000 renal transcripts to be modified during nephrogenesis stage in 1-day-old offspring kidney. Among them, genes belong to the renin-angiotensin system, and arachidonic acid metabolism pathways were potentially involved in the N G -nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester-induced programmed hypertension. However, melatonin and N-acetylcysteine reprogrammed the renin-angiotensin system and arachidonic acid pathway

  17. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a Grignard reagent to methyl iodide, and for reduction of methyl iodide with tributyltin hydride or with gaseous hydrogen iodide. Very small KIE's were found for electron transfer to methyl iodide from magnesium in ether or from sodium in ammonia. The reason may be that these reactions are transport...

  18. Effect of α-Methyl versus α-Hydrogen Substitution on Brain Availability and Tumor Imaging Properties of Heptanoic [F-18]Fluoroalkyl Amino Acids for Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Ahlem; Alyami, Wadha; Li, Aixiao; Yuan, Liya; Rich, Keith; McConathy, Jonathan

    2016-04-14

    Two [(18)F]fluoroalkyl substituted amino acids differing only by the presence or absence of a methyl group on the α-carbon, (S)-2-amino-7-[(18)F]fluoro-2-methylheptanoic acid ((S)-[(18)F]FAMHep, (S)-[(18)F]14) and (S)-2-amino-7-[(18)F]fluoroheptanoic acid ((S)-[(18)F]FAHep, (S)-[(18)F]15), were developed for brain tumor imaging and compared to the well-established system L amino acid tracer, O-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine ([(18)F]FET), in the delayed brain tumor (DBT) mouse model of high-grade glioma. Cell uptake, biodistribution, and PET/CT imaging studies showed differences in amino acid transport of these tracer by DBT cells. Recognition of (S)-[(18)F]15 but not (S)-[(18)F]14 by system L amino acid transporters led to approximately 8-10-fold higher uptake of the α-hydrogen substituted analogue (S)-[(18)F]15 in normal brain. (S)-[(18)F]15 had imaging properties similar to those of (S)-[(18)F]FET in the DBT tumor model while (S)-[(18)F]14 afforded higher tumor to brain ratios due to much lower uptake by normal brain. These results have important implications for the future development of α-alkyl and α,α-dialkyl substituted amino acids for brain tumor imaging.

  19. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  20. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  1. Hydrogen production by several cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dhruv; Kumar, H.D. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Dept. of Botany)

    1992-11-01

    Twenty species belonging to eleven genera of nitrogen-fixing and non-nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria were screened for production of hydrogen. Only one species each of Nostoc and Anabaena showed light-and nitrogenase-dependent aerobic hydrogen production. The highest rate of aerobic hydrogen production was recorded in Anabaena sp. strain CA. When incubated anaerobically under 99% Ar + 1% CO[sub 2], all the tested strains produced hydrogen. Nickel supplementation completely abolished hydrogen production both under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, except in Anabaena sp. strain CA, where only the rate of production was decreased. Species of Plectonema, Oscillatoria and Spirulina showed methyl viologen-dependent (hydrogenase-dependent) hydrogen production. Other physiological activities were also studied with a view to selecting a suitable organism for large-scale production of hydrogen. (author)

  2. Novel developments in hydrogen storage, hydrogen activation and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroodian, Amir

    2010-12-03

    This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Recently, metal-free hydrogen activation using phosphorous compounds has been reported in science magazine. We have investigated the interaction between hydrogen and phosphorous compounds in presence of strong Lewis acids (chapter one). A new generation of metal-free hydrogen activation, using amines and strong Lewis acids with sterically demanding nature, was already developed in our group. Shortage of high storage capacity using large substitution to improve sterical effect led us to explore the amine borane derivatives, which are explained in chapter two. Due to the high storage capacity of hydrogen in aminoborane derivatives, we have explored these materials to extend hydrogen release. These compounds store hydrogen as proton and hydride on adjacent atoms or ions. These investigations resulted in developing hydrogen storage based on ionic liquids containing methyl guanidinium cation. Then we have continued to develop ionic liquids based on methyl guanidinium cation with different anions, such as tetrafluoro borate (chapter three). We have replaced these anions with transition metal anions to investigate hydrogen bonding and catalytic activity of ionic liquids. This chapter illustrates the world of ionic liquid as a green solvent for organic, inorganic and catalytic reactions and combines the concept of catalysts and solvents based on ionic liquids. The catalytic activity is investigated particularly with respect to the interaction with CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  3. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  4. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  5. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  6. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  7. Dissociation dynamics of methylal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaud, P; Frey, H -M; Gerber, T; Mischler, B; Radi, P P; Tzannis, A -P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The dissociation of methylal is investigated using mass spectrometry, combined with a pyrolytic radical source and femtosecond pump probe experiments. Based on preliminary results two reaction paths of methylal dissociation are proposed and discussed. (author) 4 fig., 3 refs.

  8. Experimental vapor pressures (from 1 Pa to 100 kPa) of six saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAMEs): Methyl hexanoate, methyl octanoate, methyl decanoate, methyl dodecanoate, methyl tetradecanoate and methyl hexadecanoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahraoui, Lakhdar; Khimeche, Kamel; Dahmani, Abdallah; Mokbel, Ilham; Jose, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • Vapor-liquid equilibria, Enthalpy of Vaporization, saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of six saturated Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAMEs), methyl hexanoate (or methyl caproate), methyl octanoate (or methyl caprylate), Methyl decanoate (or methyl caprate), methyl dodecanoate (or methyl laurate), methyl tetradecanoate (or methyl myristate), and methyl hexadecanoate (or methyl palmitate) were measured from 1 Pa to 100 kPa and at temperature range between 262 and 453 K using a static apparatus. The experimental data (P-T) were compared with the available literature data.

  9. Effect of Promotion Metals on the Activity of MoS2/ZrO2 Catalyst in the Parallel Hydrodesulfurization of 1-Benzothiophene and Hydrogenation of 1-Methyl-Cyclohex-1-ene.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Gulková, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 1 (2016), s. 313-324 ISSN 1878-5190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/0902 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : hydrodesulfurization * hydrogenation * support effect Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry , Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.264, year: 2016

  10. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  11. Synthesis of [methyl-[sup 14]C]-N-methylputrescine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secor, H.V.; Izac, R.R.; Hassam, S.B.; Frisch, A.F. (Philip Morris Research Center, Richmond, VA (United States))

    1994-05-01

    [Methyl-[sup 14]C]-N-methylputrescine was prepared from [[sup 14]C]methylamine hydrochloride in five steps. Reaction of benzaldehyde and [[sup 14]C]methylamine (10 mCi) followed by catalytic hydrogenation yielded [methyl-[sup 14]C]-N-methylbenzylamine. The key step in this process is the alkylation of [methyl-[sup 14]C]-N-methylbenzylamine in aqueous medium with 4-bromobutyronitrile. The radiochemical purity of the final product after two successive catalytic hydrogenations was in excess of 97%. The radiochemical yields in two successive runs were 26 and 38%, based on starting [[sup 14]C]methylamine, with specific activities of 22 and 23 mCi/mmol, respectively. This sequence provides a convenient and efficient regioselective radiosynthesis of [methyl-[sup 14]C]-N-methylputrescine. (author).

  12. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  13. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  14. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  15. Effect of hydrogen coverage on hydrogenation of o-cresol on Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Liu, Zhimin; Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C.; Wang, Sanwu

    2018-06-01

    The conversion of phenolics over metal catalysts is an important process for upgrading biofuels. With density functional calculations, hydrogenation of o-cresol on the hydrogen-covered Pt(111) surface was investigated. The results show that the coverage of hydrogen plays a significant role in the reaction rate while it does not affect the reaction selectivity. The reaction barriers of the hydrogenation process leading to the formation of both 2-methyl-cyclohexanone (the intermediate product) and 2-methyl-cyclohexanol (the final product) at high H coverages (∼1 ML) are found to be smaller by 0.14-0.69 eV than those at lower H coverages (∼1/25 ML). After both hydrogen and cresol are adsorbed on Pt(111) from their initial gas phase state, the reaction energy of each hydrogenation step on the surface is also dependent on the hydrogen coverage. On the H-covered Pt(111) surface, most steps of hydrogenation involve exothermic reactions when the hydrogen coverage is high while they are endothermic reactions at low hydrogen coverages. The differences in reaction rate and reaction energy between high and low H coverages can be understood with the coverage-dependent bonding strength and configurations.

  16. Competing intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds and extended intermolecular network in 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(2-methyl-4-oxopentan-2-yl) thiourea analyzed by experimental and theoretical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Aamer, E-mail: aamersaeed@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khurshid, Asma [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Jasinski, Jerry P. [Department of Chemistry, Keene State College, 229 Main Street Keene, NH 03435-2001 (United States); Pozzi, C. Gustavo; Fantoni, Adolfo C. [Instituto de Física La Plata, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 49 y 115, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Erben, Mauricio F., E-mail: erben@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CEQUINOR (UNLP, CONICET-CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 962, (1900) La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-03-18

    Highlights: • Two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible in the title molecule. • Crystal structures and vibrational properties were determined. • The C=O and C=S double bonds of the acyl-thiourea group are mutually oriented in opposite directions. • A strong hyperconjugative lpO1 → σ{sup ∗}(N2-H) remote interaction was detected. • Topological analysis reveals a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing. - Abstract: The synthesis of a novel 1-acyl-thiourea species (C{sub 14}H{sub 17}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}SCl), has been tailored in such a way that two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible. The X-ray structure analysis as well as the vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) data reveal that the S conformation is preferred, with the C=O and C=S bonds of the acyl-thiourea group pointing in opposite directions. The preference for the intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bond within the -C(O)NHC(S)NH- core is confirmed. The Natural Bond Orbital and the Atom in Molecule approaches demonstrate that a strong hyperconjugative lpO → σ{sup ∗}(N-H) remote interaction between the acyl and the thioamide N-H groups is responsible for the stabilization of the S conformation. Intermolecular interactions have been characterized in the periodic system electron density and the topological analysis reveals the presence of an extended intermolecular network in the crystal, including a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing.

  17. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  18. (E-2-Methyl-6-{[(5-methylpyridin-2-ylimino]methyl}phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Azharul Arafath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C14H14N2O, the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 5.54 (9°. The conformation is reinforced by an intramolecular O—H...N hydrogen bond, which closes an S(6 ring. The pyridine N atom and methyl group lie to opposite sides of the molecule. In the crystal, the molecules are linked into a zigzag chain propagating in [0-11] by weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  19. Whole-genome methylation caller designed for methyl- DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    etchie

    2013-02-20

    Feb 20, 2013 ... Our method uses a single-CpG-resolution, whole-genome methylation ... Key words: Methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation, next-generation sequencing, ...... methylation is prevalent in embryonic stem cells andmaybe mediated.

  20. Methylation pathways in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T.W. III.

    1982-01-01

    Research on the biochemical causes of human psychosis concentrates on investigating whether schizophremia is linked to abnormalities in the metabolism of methyl carbon groups in the body. The metabolism of C-14 labeled methyl groups in methionine is studied in animals, normal subjects and patient volunteers

  1. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  2. Methyl 4-(butyrylamino-5-methyl-2-nitrobenzoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yao

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C13H16N2O5, is useful as an intermediate in the field of agrochemicals. Intramolecular C—H...O hydrogen bonds result in the formation of one six- and one five-membered nearly planar ring; the six-membered ring is also nearly coplanar with the adjacent benzene ring. In the crystal structure, intermolecular C—H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules.

  3. Methyl-Analyzer--whole genome DNA methylation profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yurong; Ge, Yongchao; Haghighi, Fatemeh G

    2011-08-15

    Methyl-Analyzer is a python package that analyzes genome-wide DNA methylation data produced by the Methyl-MAPS (methylation mapping analysis by paired-end sequencing) method. Methyl-MAPS is an enzymatic-based method that uses both methylation-sensitive and -dependent enzymes covering >80% of CpG dinucleotides within mammalian genomes. It combines enzymatic-based approaches with high-throughput next-generation sequencing technology to provide whole genome DNA methylation profiles. Methyl-Analyzer processes and integrates sequencing reads from methylated and unmethylated compartments and estimates CpG methylation probabilities at single base resolution. Methyl-Analyzer is available at http://github.com/epigenomics/methylmaps. Sample dataset is available for download at http://epigenomicspub.columbia.edu/methylanalyzer_data.html. fgh3@columbia.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Hydrogenation of o-cresol on platinum catalyst: Catalytic experiments and first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaping [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States); Liu, Zhimin [School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Xue, Wenhua [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States); Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C. [School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of o-cresol over Pt results in formation of two products. • Dissociation of hydrogen from the −OH group involves a low activation energy. • Following hydrogenation of the aromatic ring forms 2-methyl-cyclohexanone. • Further hydrogenation produces the final product, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol. - Abstract: Catalytic experiments were performed for the hydrogenation of o-cresol in n-dodecane over a platinum catalyst. Batch reactions analyzed with an in-situ ATR IR probe suggest that the hydrogenation results in the formation of the final product, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol, with 2-methyl-cyclohexanone as the intermediate product. Ab initio density-functional theory was employed to investigate the atomic-scale mechanism of o-cresol hydrogenation on the Pt(111) surface. The formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone was found to involve two steps. The first step is a hydrogen abstraction, that is, the H atom in the hydroxyl group migrates to the Pt surface. The second step is hydrogenation, that is, the pre-existing H atoms on Pt react with the carbon atoms in the aromatic ring. On the other hand, 2-methyl-cyclohexanonol may be produced through two paths, with activation energies slightly greater than that for the formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone. One path involves direct hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. Another path involves three steps, with the partial hydrogenation of the ring as the first step, hydrogen abstraction of the −OH group as the second, and hydrogenation of remaining C atoms and the O atom the last.

  5. 2-(5-Fluoro-3-isopropylsulfanyl-7-methyl-1-benzofuran-2-ylacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Dae Choi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C14H15FO3S, was prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of ethyl 2-(5-fluoro-3-isopropylsulfanyl-7-methyl-1-benzofuran-2-ylacetate. In the crystal, molecules are linked via pairs of O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers. These dimers are connected by weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  6. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  7. One-pot process combining transesterification and selective hydrogenation for biodiesel production from starting material of high degree of unsaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ru; Su, Mengxing; Li, Min; Zhang, Jianchun; Hao, Xinmin; Zhang, Hua

    2010-08-01

    A one-pot process combining transesterification and selective hydrogenation was established to produce biodiesel from hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) seed oil which is eliminated as a potential feedstock by a specification of iodine value (IV; 120 g I(2)/100g maximum) contained in EN 14214. A series of alkaline earth metal oxides and alkaline earth metal supported copper oxide were prepared and tested as catalysts. SrO supported 10 wt.% CuO showed the superior catalytic activity for transesterification with a biodiesel yield of 96% and hydrogenation with a reduced iodine value of 113 and also exhibited a promising selectivity for eliminating methyl linolenate and increasing methyl oleate without rising methyl stearate in the selective hydrogenation. The fuel properties of the selective hydrogenated methyl esters are within biodiesel specifications. Furthermore, cetane numbers and iodine values were well correlated with the compositions of the hydrogenated methyl esters according to degrees of unsaturation. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 8-Methoxypsoralen-nucleic acid photoreaction. Effect of methyl substitution on pyrone vs. furan photoaddition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanne, D.; Rapoport, H.; Hearst, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    We have synthesized a series of 8-[3H]methoxypsoralens in which methyl and hydrogen are systematically varied at the 4- and 5'-positions. Analysis of the products resulting from the photoaddition of these four psoralens with the nucleic acid poly(dA-dT) reveals that the product distribution depends on the presence or absence of a 4-methyl substituent. Compounds with the 4-methyl group show an overwhelming preference (approximately 98%) for addition to the furan double bond, while compounds without the 4-methyl show a substantial amount (approximately 18%) of addition to the pyrone double bond

  9. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  10. Study of radiation formation of methyl-iodide Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartonicek, B.; Schweiner, Z.; Bednar, J.; Hladky, E.

    1975-01-01

    Purified methane, ethylene, iodine, methyl iodide, ethyl iodide and hydrogen iodide were irradiated and/or pyrolyzed in Pyrex ampoules by 60 Co-γ-radiation at temperatures between 150 and 450 deg C. The results on radiolysis and pyrolysis were as follows: 1., The most thermally stable product is hydrogen iodide in which already at 450 deg C essen-tially all originally present iodine appears. 2., The radiolytic formation of methyl iodide and hydrogen iodide is positively influenced by the rise in temperature, This and the absolute values of yields indicate a chain mechanism of radiolytic (and pyrolytic) decomposition of the mixture. 3., The ratio of equilibrium concentrations [HI]/[CH 3 I] increases with increasing temperature of pyrolysis showing that HI is the end product of the thermal chain reaction. Methyl iodide is likely to contribute (by its thermal decomposition) to the initiation and propagation of this chain reaction. 4., The negligible temperature dependence of G(H 2 ) and the absence of molecular hydrogen among the products of pyrolytic decomposition of methane-iodine mixtures shows, that (up to 450 deg C) H atoms do not play any role in the thermal chain decomposition of these mixtures. (K.A.)

  11. Identification of Differentially Methylated Sites with Weak Methylation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Tran

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA methylation is an epigenetic alteration crucial for regulating stress responses. Identifying large-scale DNA methylation at single nucleotide resolution is made possible by whole genome bisulfite sequencing. An essential task following the generation of bisulfite sequencing data is to detect differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs among treatments. Most statistical methods for DMC detection do not consider the dependency of methylation patterns across the genome, thus possibly inflating type I error. Furthermore, small sample sizes and weak methylation effects among different phenotype categories make it difficult for these statistical methods to accurately detect DMCs. To address these issues, the wavelet-based functional mixed model (WFMM was introduced to detect DMCs. To further examine the performance of WFMM in detecting weak differential methylation events, we used both simulated and empirical data and compare WFMM performance to a popular DMC detection tool methylKit. Analyses of simulated data that replicated the effects of the herbicide glyphosate on DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana show that WFMM results in higher sensitivity and specificity in detecting DMCs compared to methylKit, especially when the methylation differences among phenotype groups are small. Moreover, the performance of WFMM is robust with respect to small sample sizes, making it particularly attractive considering the current high costs of bisulfite sequencing. Analysis of empirical Arabidopsis thaliana data under varying glyphosate dosages, and the analysis of monozygotic (MZ twins who have different pain sensitivities—both datasets have weak methylation effects of <1%—show that WFMM can identify more relevant DMCs related to the phenotype of interest than methylKit. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs are genomic regions with different DNA methylation status across biological samples. DMRs and DMCs are essentially the same

  12. DNA methylation in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pokrywka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of overweight and obese people is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the developed and developing countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and in consequence for premature death. The development of obesity results from the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors, which include sedentary life style and abnormal eating habits. In the past few years a number of events accompanying obesity, affecting expression of genes which are not directly connected with the DNA base sequence (e.g. epigenetic changes, have been described. Epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, as well as non-coding micro-RNA (miRNA synthesis. In this review, the known changes in the profile of DNA methylation as a factor affecting obesity and its complications are described.

  13. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  14. Reaction pathways of the dissociation of methylal: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H -M; Beaud, P; Gerber, T; Mischler, B; Radi, P P; Tzannis, A -P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Schemata for modelling combustion processes do not yet include reaction rates for oxygenated fuels like methylal (DMM) which is considered as an additive or replacement for diesel due to its low sooting propensity. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of the possible reaction pathways for different dissociation steps of methylal are presented. Cleavage of a hydrogen bond to the methoxy group or the central carbon atom were simulated at the BLYP/6-311++G{sup **} level of theory. The results are compared to the experiment when dissociating and/or ionising DMM with femtosecond pulses. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 ref.

  15. Which hydrogen atom of toluene protonates PAH molecules in (+)-mode APPI MS analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Ghosh, Manik Kumer; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Cheol Ho; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-03-01

    A previous study (Ahmed, A. et al., Anal. Chem. 84, 1146-1151( 2012) reported that toluene used as a solvent was the proton source for polyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs) that were subjected to (+)-mode atmospheric-pressure photoionization. In the current study, the exact position of the hydrogen atom in the toluene molecule (either a methyl hydrogen or an aromatic ring hydrogen) involved in the formation of protonated PAH ions was investigated. Experimental analyses of benzene and anisole demonstrated that although the aromatic hydrogen atom of toluene did not contribute to the formation of protonated anthracene, it did contribute to the formation of protonated acridine. Thermochemical data and quantum mechanical calculations showed that the protonation of anthracene by an aromatic ring hydrogen atom of toluene is endothermic, while protonation by a methyl hydrogen atom is exothermic. However, protonation of acridine by either an aromatic ring hydrogen or a methyl hydrogen atom of toluene is exothermic. The different behavior of acridine and anthracene was attributed to differences in gas-phase basicity. It was concluded that both types of hydrogen in toluene can be used for protonation of PAH compounds, but a methyl hydrogen atom is preferred, especially for non-basic compounds.

  16. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  17. Synthesis of racemic [methyl-d3]-labeled cis- and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravard, A.; Crooks, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for the synthesis of the racemic [methyl-d 3 ] forms of the nicotine metabolites cis-3'-hydroxycotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine. The key intermediate was [methyl-d 3 ]-N-methylhydroxylamine, obtained from a selective hydrogenation of d 3 -nitro-methane. This intermediate was converted to [methyl-d 3 ]-α-3-pyridyl-N-methylnitrone, which was condensed with methyl acrylate to give a mixture of isomeric isoxazolidines. The hydrogenolysis of this mixture afforded a 70:30 mixture of [methyl-d 3 ] cis- and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, from which the pure cis-isomer could be isolated by recrystallization from acetone. [Methyl-d 3 ]-trans-3'-hydroxycotinine could be prepared in high yield from the cis-isomer via chiral inversion utilizing a Mitsunobu reaction, or by chromatographic separation from a mixture of the cis- and trans-3'-benzoyloxycotinine, followed by O-debenzoylation in methanolic NaOH. (author)

  18. Methylated β-Cyclodextrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönbeck, Jens Christian Sidney; Westh, Peter; Madsen, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    The complexation of 6 bile salts with various methylated β-cyclodextrins was studied to elucidate how the degree and pattern of substitution affects the binding. The structures of the CDs were determined by mass spectrometry and NMR techniques, and the structures of the inclusion complexes were...

  19. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, K.J.; Adler, J.; Selman, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with [ 3 H-methyl]-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile [ 3 H]methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the [ 3 H]methyl group

  20. Methylation of food commodities during fumigation with methyl bromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starratt, A.N.; Bond, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    Sites of methylation in several commodities (wheat, oatmeal, peanuts, almonds, apples, oranges, maize, alfalfa and potatoes) during fumigation with 14 C-methyl bromide were studied. Differences were observed in levels of the major volatiles: methanol, dimethyl sulphide and methyl mercaptan, products of O- and S-methylation, resulting from treatment of the fumigated materials with 1N sodium hydroxide. In studies of maize and wheat, histidine was the amino acid which underwent the highest level of N-methylation. (author). 24 refs, 3 tabs

  1. Bis(2-methyl-4-nitroanilinium tetrachloridomercurate(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lemmerer

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C7H9N2O22[HgCl4], self-assembles into cationic organic bilayers containing the 2-methyl-4-nitroanilinium cations, sandwiched between anionic inorganic layers built up by the distorted tetrahedral [HgCl4]2− groups. The organic sheets are interlinked through weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds, while they interact with the anionic part via strong charge-assisted N+—H...Cl—Hg hydrogen bonds. The [HgCl4]2− anions are bisected by a mirror plane passing through the metal and two of the chloride ions.

  2. 4-Methyl-N-(1-methyl-1H-indazol-5-yl)benzene­sulfonamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicha, Hakima; Oulemda, Bassou; Rakib, El Mostapha; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, C15H15N3O2S, the fused ring system is close to planar, the largest deviation from the mean plane being 0.030 (2) Å, and makes a dihedral angle of 48.84 (9)° with the benzene ring belonging to the methyl­benzene­sulfonamide moiety. In the crystal, mol­ecules are ­connected through N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds and weak C—H⋯O contacts, forming a two-dimensional network parallel to (001). PMID:24427093

  3. 2-Bromo-2-methyl-N-p-tolylpropanamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Moreno-Fuquen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecule, C11H14BrNO, there is twist between the mean plane of the amide group and the benzene ring [C(=O—N—C...;C torsion angle = −31.2 (5°]. In the crystal, intermolecular N—H...O and weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds link molecules into chains along [100]. The methyl group H atoms are disordered over two sets of sites with equal occupancy.

  4. Chemoselective hydrogenation of arenes by PVP supported Rh nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Poreddy, Raju; Philippot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized Rh nanoparticles (RhNPs/PVP) of ca. 2.2 nm in size were prepared by the hydrogenation of the organometallic complex [Rh(η3-C3H5)3] in the presence of PVP and evaluated as a catalyst in the hydrogenation of a series of arene substrates as well as levulinic acid...... for the hydrogenation of levulinic acid and methyl levulinate in water leading to quantitative formation of the fuel additive γ-valerolactone under moderate reaction conditions compared to previously reported catalytic systems....... and methyl levulinate. The catalyst showed excellent activity and selectivity towards aromatic ring hydrogenation compared to other reported transition metal-based catalysts under mild reaction conditions (room temperature and 1 bar H2). Furthermore, it was shown to be a highly promising catalyst...

  5. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  6. tert-Butyl 2-methyl-2-(4-nitrobenzoylpropanoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsey M. Crosse

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C15H19NO5, is bent with a dihedral angle of 61.8 (2° between the mean planes of the benzene ring and a group encompassing the ester functionality (O=C—O—C. The dihedral angle of 0.8 (2° between the mean planes of the nitro group and the benzene ring indicates near coplanarity. In the crystal, each molecule is linked to four adjacent molecules by weak C—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions. Both benzene H atoms ortho to the ketone O atom form C—H...O hydrogen bonds with the keto O atoms of two neighboring molecules (of the keto and ester groups, respectively, and the two other interactions involve the H atoms from a methyl group of the dimethyl residue, displaying C—H...O interactions with the O atoms of the nitro groups. These four interactions for each molecule lead to the formation of two-dimensional sheets with a hydrophilic interior, held together by weak hydrogen-bonded interactions, and a hydrophobic exterior composed of protruding methyl groups which interstack with the methyl groups in adjacent sheets.

  7. The autoradiolytic and the γ-induced demethylation of solid thymine-(methyl-14C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwitz, O.

    1980-01-01

    The autoradiolytic and the γ-induced demethylation of solid thymine were measured qualitatively and quantitatively for the first time with specially purified thymine-(methyl- 14 C). Analogous experiments with thymine-(methyl- 3 H) and radio-gaschromatographic analysis provided proof for the formation of molecular hydrogen and methane. Ethane was not detected. The results are discussed in connection with e.s.r.-spectroscopic studies. (author)

  8. Double electrolyte sensor for monitoring hydrogen permeation rate in steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Y.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihua College, Huaihua 418008 (China); Yu, G., E-mail: yuganghnu@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Ou, A.L.; Hu, L.; Xu, W.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Designed an amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes. {yields} Explained the principle of determining hydrogen permeation rate. {yields} Verified good stability, reproducibility and correctness of the developed sensor. {yields} Field on-line monitoring the susceptivity of hydrogen induced cracks. - Abstract: An amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes composed of a gelatiniform electrolyte and KOH solution has been developed to determine the permeation rate of hydrogen atoms in steel equipment owing to hydrogen corrosion. The gelatiniform electrolyte was made of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS), carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and 0.2 mol dm{sup -3} KOH solution. The results show that the gelatiniform electrolyte containing 50 wt.% polymers has suitable viscosity and high electrical conductivity. The consistent permeation curves were detected by the sensor of the double electrolyte and single liquid KOH electrolyte, respectively. The developed sensor has good stability and reproducibility at room temperature.

  9. Double electrolyte sensor for monitoring hydrogen permeation rate in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Y.J.; Yu, G.; Ou, A.L.; Hu, L.; Xu, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Designed an amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes. → Explained the principle of determining hydrogen permeation rate. → Verified good stability, reproducibility and correctness of the developed sensor. → Field on-line monitoring the susceptivity of hydrogen induced cracks. - Abstract: An amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes composed of a gelatiniform electrolyte and KOH solution has been developed to determine the permeation rate of hydrogen atoms in steel equipment owing to hydrogen corrosion. The gelatiniform electrolyte was made of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS), carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and 0.2 mol dm -3 KOH solution. The results show that the gelatiniform electrolyte containing 50 wt.% polymers has suitable viscosity and high electrical conductivity. The consistent permeation curves were detected by the sensor of the double electrolyte and single liquid KOH electrolyte, respectively. The developed sensor has good stability and reproducibility at room temperature.

  10. methyl methylsulfanyl(phenylamino)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BCSE

    allows formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the N-H and one of the oxygen ... in the range of δH 3.64-3.71 ppm and the NH proton as a broad singlet in ... process, probably because of the excessively high activation energy.

  11. Methylation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Santella

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The development of HCC is a complex, multistep, multistage process. The molecular pathogenesis of HCC appears to involve multiple genetic aberrations in the molecular control of hepatocyte proliferation, differentiation and death and the maintenance of genomic integrity. This process is influenced by the cumulative activation and inactivation of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and other genes. p53, a tumor suppressor gene, is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. There is also a striking sequence specific binding and induction of mutations by AFB1 at codon 249 of p53 in HCC.

    Epigenetic alterations are also involved in cancer development and progression. Methylation of promoter CpG islands is associated with inhibition of transcriptional initiation and permanent silencing of downstream genes.

    It is now known that most important tumor suppressor genes are inactivated, not only by mutations and deletions but also by promoter methylation. Several studies indicated that p16, p15, RASSF1A, MGMT, and GSTP1 promoter hypermethylation are prevalent in HCC. In addition, geographic variation in the methylation status of tumor DNA indicates that environmental factors may influence the frequent and concordant degree of hypermethylation in multiple genes in HCC and that epigeneticenvironmental interactions may be involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. We have found significant relationships between promoter methylation and AFB1-DNA adducts confirming the impact of environmental exposures on gene methylation.

    DNA isolated from serum or plasma of cancer patients frequently contains the same genetic and

  12. Synthesis of DL-adrenaline (methyl C{sup 14}) (1961); Synthese de la DL-adrenaline (methyle {sup 14}C) (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichat, L; Audinot, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The sodium derivative of 5-3-4 dibenzyl oxyphenyl 2-oxazolidinone reacted with methyl iodide {sup 14}C, in stoichiometric quantity, gives rise to the corresponding N-methyl {sup 14}C derivative. The oxazolidinone ring is opened by concentrated hydrochloric acid and the benzyl groups removed by catalytic hydrogenolysis. Adrenaline methyl {sup 14}C is then purified on Dowex 50 X-12 exchange resin. Overall-yield is 45 per cent based upon methyl iodide {sup 14}C. (author) [French] Le derive sode de la (dibenzyloxy-3-4-phenyl)-5 oxazolidinone-2 traite par l'iodure de methyle {sup 14}C, en proportion stoechiometrique, fournit le derive N-methyle {sup 14}C correspondant. Apres ouverture du cycle oxazolidinone par HCL concentre et debenzylation par hydrogenation catalytique, on purifie l'adrenaline (methyle {sup 14}C) par chromatographie sur resine echangeuse Dowex 50 X-12. Le rendement est de 45 pour cent par rapport a l'iodure de methyle {sup 14}C. (auteurs)

  13. Synthesis of DL-adrenaline (methyl C{sup 14}) (1961); Synthese de la DL-adrenaline (methyle {sup 14}C) (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichat, L.; Audinot, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The sodium derivative of 5-3-4 dibenzyl oxyphenyl 2-oxazolidinone reacted with methyl iodide {sup 14}C, in stoichiometric quantity, gives rise to the corresponding N-methyl {sup 14}C derivative. The oxazolidinone ring is opened by concentrated hydrochloric acid and the benzyl groups removed by catalytic hydrogenolysis. Adrenaline methyl {sup 14}C is then purified on Dowex 50 X-12 exchange resin. Overall-yield is 45 per cent based upon methyl iodide {sup 14}C. (author) [French] Le derive sode de la (dibenzyloxy-3-4-phenyl)-5 oxazolidinone-2 traite par l'iodure de methyle {sup 14}C, en proportion stoechiometrique, fournit le derive N-methyle {sup 14}C correspondant. Apres ouverture du cycle oxazolidinone par HCL concentre et debenzylation par hydrogenation catalytique, on purifie l'adrenaline (methyle {sup 14}C) par chromatographie sur resine echangeuse Dowex 50 X-12. Le rendement est de 45 pour cent par rapport a l'iodure de methyle {sup 14}C. (auteurs)

  14. N- and O-methylation of sphingomyelin markedly affects its membrane properties and interactions with cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorkbom, A.; Rog, T.; Kankaanpaa, P.

    2011-01-01

    -phase instability (T(m), was lowered by similar to 7 degrees C). Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations showed that fluid phase bilayers with methylated SM analogs were more expanded but thinner compared to PSM bilayers. It was further revealed that 3-OH methylation dramatically attenuated hydrogen bonding also...... containing PSM. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed further that cholesterol's bilayer location was deeper in PSM bilayers as compared to the location in bilayers made from methylated SM analogs. This study shows that the interfacial properties of SMs are very important for interlipid interactions...

  15. Stereoselective Hydrogenation and Ozonolysis of Iridoids. Conversion into Carbocyclic Nucleoside Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franzyk, Henrik; Stermitz, Frank R.

    1999-01-01

    Stereoselective hydrogenation of the iridoids geniposide (9) and aucubin (19) was achieved by using the 1-methyl-1-methoxyethyl ether (MIP) as protecting group for the allylic alcohol, as it enhanced the stereoselectivity and prevented undesired hydrogenolysis. Ozonolysis of the hydrogenation...

  16. DNA methylation and memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jeremy J; Sweatt, J David

    2010-11-01

    Memory formation and storage require long-lasting changes in memory-related neuronal circuits. Recent evidence indicates that DNA methylation may serve as a contributing mechanism in memory formation and storage. These emerging findings suggest a role for an epigenetic mechanism in learning and long-term memory maintenance and raise apparent conundrums and questions. For example, it is unclear how DNA methylation might be reversed during the formation of a memory, how changes in DNA methylation alter neuronal function to promote memory formation, and how DNA methylation patterns differ between neuronal structures to enable both consolidation and storage of memories. Here we evaluate the existing evidence supporting a role for DNA methylation in memory, discuss how DNA methylation may affect genetic and neuronal function to contribute to behavior, propose several future directions for the emerging subfield of neuroepigenetics, and begin to address some of the broader implications of this work.

  17. Destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrisse, H; Dufour, L

    1929-01-21

    Oils of high boiling point, e.g. gas oil, lamp oil, schist oil, brown coal tar etc., are converted into motor benzine by heating them at 200 to 500/sup 0/C under pressure of 5 to 40 kilograms/cm/sup 2/ in the presence of ferrous chloride and gases such as hydrogen, or water gas, the desulfurization of the oils proceeding simultaneously. One kilogram of lamp oil and 100 g. ferrous chloride are heated in an autoclave in the presence of water gas under a pressure of 18 kg/cm/sup 2/ to 380 to 400/sup 0/C. The gaseous products are allowed to escape intermittently and are replaced by fresh water gas. A product distilling between 35 and 270/sup 0/C is obtained.

  18. 4-Methyl-N-(2-methylbenzoylbenzenesulfonamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thimme Gowda

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C15H15NO3S, the conformation of the N—H bond in the C—SO2—NH—C(O segment is anti to the C=O bond. Further, the conformation of the C=O bond is syn to the ortho-methyl group in the benzoyl ring. The dihedral angle between the sulfonyl benzene ring and the —SO2—NH—C—O segment is 87.1 (1° and that between the sulfonyl and the benzoyl benzene rings is 58.2 (1°. In the crystal structure, molecules are linked by pairs of N—H...O(S hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers.

  19. 3,4-O-Isopropylidene-2-C-methyl-d-galactonolactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available X-ray crystallography unequivocally confirmed the stereochemistry of the 2-C-methyl group in the title molecule, C10H16O6, in which the 1,5-lactone ring exists in a boat conformation. The use of d-galactose in the synthesis determined the absolute stereochemistry. The crystal exists as O—H...O hydrogen-bonded layers in the ab plane, with each molecule acting as a donor and acceptor for two hydrogen bonds.

  20. Whole-genome methylation caller designed for methyl- DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    etchie

    2013-02-20

    Feb 20, 2013 ... Key words: Methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation, next-generation sequencing, Hidden ... its response to environmental cues. .... have a great potential to become the most cost-effective ... hg18 reference genome (set to 0 if not present in retrieved reads). ..... DNA methylation patterns and epigenetic memory.

  1. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99 Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  2. DNA methylation in metabolic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barres, Romain; Zierath, Juleen R

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification that controls gene expression in physiologic and pathologic states. Metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity are associated with profound alterations in gene expression that are caused by genetic and environmental factors. Recent reports...... have provided evidence that environmental factors at all ages could modify DNA methylation in somatic tissues, which suggests that DNA methylation is a more dynamic process than previously appreciated. Because of the importance of lifestyle factors in metabolic disorders, DNA methylation provides...... a mechanism by which environmental factors, including diet and exercise, can modify genetic predisposition to disease. This article considers the current evidence that defines a role for DNA methylation in metabolic disorders....

  3. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  4. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  5. Methylation-Specific PCR Unraveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Derks

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylation‐specific PCR (MSP is a simple, quick and cost‐effective method to analyze the DNA methylation status of virtually any group of CpG sites within a CpG island. The technique comprises two parts: (1 sodium bisulfite conversion of unmethylated cytosine's to uracil under conditions whereby methylated cytosines remains unchanged and (2 detection of the bisulfite induced sequence differences by PCR using specific primer sets for both unmethylated and methylated DNA. This review discusses the critical parameters of MSP and presents an overview of the available MSP variants and the (clinical applications.

  6. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  7. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  8. Energetics and Vibrational Analysis of Methyl Salicylate Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Richard D.; Dai, Yafei; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2009-08-01

    Energetics and vibrational analysis study of six isomers of methyl salicylate in their singlet ground state and first excited triple state is put forward in this work at the density functional theory level and large basis sets. The ketoB isomer is the lowest energy isomer, followed by its rotamer ketoA. For both ketoB and ketoA their enolized tautomers are found to be stable as well as their open forms that lack the internal hydrogen bond. The calculated vibrational spectra are in excellent agreement with IR experiments of methyl salicylate in the vapor phase. It is demonstrated that solvent effects have a weak influence on the stability of these isomers. The ionization reaction from ketoB to ketoA shows a high barrier of 0.67 eV ensuring that thermal and chemical equilibria yield systems containing mostly the ketoB isomer at normal conditions.

  9. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available .J. Cartera,*, L.A. Cornishb aAdvanced Engineering & Testing Services, MATTEK, CSIR, Private Bag X28, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa bSchool of Process and Materials Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, P.O. WITS 2050, South Africa... are contrasted, and an unusual case study of hydrogen embrittlement of an alloy steel is presented. 7 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Hydrogen; Hydrogen-assisted cracking; Hydrogen damage; Hydrogen embrittlement 1. Introduction Hydrogen suC128...

  10. Physicochemical properties of the liquid mixture between stearate methyl / acid methyl sulfur stearate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Alfonso Torres Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The need of new alternatives for advance of the domestic oil-chemical industry, based local natural resources, make use of palm oil (Elaeis guineensis, as a source for obtaining alkyl esters, an excellent alternative development to be explored initially by the research groups at universities or institutions of scientifc innovation and development. The sulfonation process for the manufacture of surfactant were conducted in a falling flm reactor by the absorption and chemical reaction with SO3 gas on methyl esters derived from hydrogenated palm stearin. Identifying the properties of the reactants, products, and its mix is very important for the characterized by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. It presents the properties of these inputs as a result of a series of experiments, which varies the mole ratio of the mixture of reactants and products, the process temperature and the percentage of sulfonate agent in the gas fow.

  11. X-ray investigations of sulfur-containing fungicides. IV. 4'-[[Benzoyl(4-chlorophenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide and 4'-[[benzoyl(4-methoxyphenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, W M

    2001-09-01

    The conformations of the two approximately isomorphous structures 4'-[[benzoyl(4-chlorophenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide, C(22)H(18)ClN(3)O(4)S, and 4'-[[benzoyl(4-methoxyphenylhydrazono)methyl]sulfonyl]acetanilide, C(23)H(21)N(3)O(5)S, are stabilized by resonance-assisted intramolecular hydrogen bonds linking the hydrazone moieties and sulfonyl groups. The stronger bond is observed in the former compound. The difference in electronic properties between the Cl atom and the methoxy group is too small to significantly alter the non-bonding interactions of the sulfonyl and beta-carbonyl groups.

  12. Naturally occurring methyl salicylate glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ping; Liu, Zizhen; Xie, Meng; Jiang, Rui; Liu, Weirui; Wang, Xiaohong; Meng, Shen; She, Gaimei

    2014-01-01

    As an important part of non steroids anti-inflammation drug (NSAIDs), salicylate has developed from natural substance salicylic acid to natrium salicylicum, to aspirin. Now, methyl salicylate glycoside, a new derivative of salicylic acid, is modified with a -COOH group integrated one methyl radical into formic ether, and a -OH linked with a monosaccharide, a disaccharide or a trisaccharide unit by glycosidic linkage. It has the similar pharmacological activities, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic and antithrombotic as the previous salicylates' without resulting in serious side effects, particularly the gastrointestinal toxicity. Owing to the superiority of those significant bioactivities, methyl salicylate glycosides have became a hot research area in NSAIDs for several years. This paper compiles all 9 naturally occurring methyl salicylate glycosides, their distribution of the resource and pharmacological mechanism, which could contribute to the new drug discovery.

  13. Process for the production of methyl methacrylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eastham, G.R.; Johnson, D.W.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Fraaije, Marco; Winter, Remko

    2015-01-01

    A process of producing methyl methacrylate or derivatives thereof is described. The process includes the steps of; (i) converting 2-butanone to methyl propionate using a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase, and (ii) treating the methyl propionate produced to obtain methyl methacrylate or derivatives

  14. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  15. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is mobile and can easily move through the material). Hydrogen diffuses ... The determination of the relationship of light-enhanced hydrogen motion to ... term is negligible, and using the thermodynamic relation given below f(c) = kBT .... device-applications problematic but the normal state can be recovered by a thermal an-.

  16. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  17. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  18. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  19. Nuclear electrolytic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnstaple, A.G.; Petrella, A.J.

    1982-05-01

    An extensive study of hydrogen supply has recently been carried out by Ontario Hydro which indicates that electrolytic hydrogen produced from nuclear electricity could offer the lowest cost option for any future large scale hydrogen supply in the Province of Ontario, Canada. This paper provides a synopsis of the Ontario Hydro study, a brief overview of the economic factors supporting the study conclusion and discussion of a number of issues concerning the supply of electrolytic hydrogen by electric power utilities

  20. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  1. Hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzl, H.; Springer, T.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the alloys of metal crystals with hydrogen. The system niobium-hydrogen and its properties are especially dealt with: diffusion and heat of solution of hydrogen in the host crystal, phase diagram, coherent and incoherent phase separation, application of metal-hydrogen systems in technology. Furthermore, examples from research work in IFF (Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung) of the Nuclear Research Plant, Juelich, in the field of metal-H systems are given in summary form. (GSC) [de

  2. Methyl 4-[N-(5-bromopyrimidin-2-ylcarbamoyl]benzoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ling Hu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C13H10BrN3O3, the pyrimidine and benzene rings are twisted with an interplanar angle of 58.4 (1°. The secondary amide group adopts a cis conformation with an H—N—C—O torsion angle of 14.8 (1°. In the crystal, molecules are connected into inversion dimers via pairs of N—H...N hydrogen bonds, generating an R22(8 motif. The dimers are further connected through a C—Br...O interaction [3.136 (1 Å and 169.31 (1°] into a chain along [110]. Weak C—H...N hydrogen bonds between the methyl benzoate groups and pyrimidine rings are also observed in the crystal structure.

  3. Hydrogenation of passivated contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William; Yuan, Hao-Chih; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Pauls; Page, Matthew R.

    2018-03-06

    Methods of hydrogenation of passivated contacts using materials having hydrogen impurities are provided. An example method includes applying, to a passivated contact, a layer of a material, the material containing hydrogen impurities. The method further includes subsequently annealing the material and subsequently removing the material from the passivated contact.

  4. Metal and hydrogen catalysis in isotopic hydrogen exchange in some biologically important heterocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Joly, H.A.; Jones, J.R.; Onyido, I.

    1989-01-01

    This study reports on the catalytic roles of metal and hydrogen ions in tritium exchange in some heterocyclic substrates which occur as residues in many biologically important molecules. We have found that detritiation of 1-methyl[2- 3 H]imidazole is inhibited by a number of metal ions. As well, inhibition of exchange rates was noted with Ag(I) and Cu(II) for [2- 3 H]thiazole and 1-methyl[8- 3 H]inosine, with Ag(I) for [2- 3 H]benzothiazole, and with Cu(II) for 1-methyl[8- 3 H]guanosine. A complete mechanistic description, which includes the various metal ion-coordinated species generated under the experimental conditions, is presented. The results demonstrate the reactivity order: protonated >> metal-coordinated >> neutral substrates. The differential catalytic effects of metal and hydrogen ions in these processes are discussed in terms of the extent of charge developed on the ligating heteroatom in the reaction intermediate. (author). 13 refs.; 1 fig

  5. CH3SH adsorption properties and mechanism of deodorant filter made of iron hydroxide on porous iron frame; Tetsu takotaisei dasshu filter no methyl mercaptan jokyo seino to jokyo kiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, T. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-10

    It is suggested that methyl mercaptan is decomposed to methyl sulfide and hydrogen by reaction with the a-iron hydroxide, and then the methyl sulfide combines with sulfur crystal and the hydrogen changes into water by the chemical reaction with the {alpha}-iron hydroxide. A deodorant filter was made by treating porous metallic iron with an aqueous solution of L-ascorbic acid, iron (II) sulfate and calcium hydroxide aqueous solution to deposit the iron ascorbate and the {alpha}-iron hydroxide on it. Then the deodorant filter was exposed to the hydrogen sulfide to yield the sulfur crystals on the surface of the deodorant filter. The methyl mercaptan removal capacity of the deodorant filter was studied with repetition of removal tests. Results show that the methyl mercaptan removal capacity of the deodorant filter is a little smaller than that of conventional granular activated carbon. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Hydrogen charging/discharging system with liquid organic compounds: a lacunar oxide catalyst to hydrogenate the unsaturated organic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalowiecki-Duhamel, L.; Carpentier, J.; Payen, E.; Heurtaux, F.

    2006-01-01

    Lacunar mixed oxides based on cerium nickel and aluminium or zirconium CeM 0.5 Ni x O y s (M = Zr or Al), able to store high quantities of hydrogen, have been analysed in the hydrogenation of toluene into methyl-cyclohexane (MCH). When these solids present very good toluene hydrogenation activity and selectivity towards MCH in presence of H 2 , in absence of gaseous hydrogen, the reactive hydrogen species stored in the solid can hydrogenate toluene into MCH. The hydrogenation activity under helium + toluene flow decreases as a function of time and becomes nil. The integration of the curve obtained allows to determine the extractable hydrogen content of the solid used, and a value of 1.2 wt % is obtained at 80 C on a CeAl 0.5 Ni 3 O y compound pre-treated in H 2 at 300 C. To optimise the system, different parameters have been analysed, such as the catalyst formulation, the metal content, the pre-reducing conditions as well as the reaction conditions under helium + toluene. (authors)

  7. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  8. Solar Hydrogen Reaching Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongé Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly vast research efforts are devoted to the development of materials and processes for solar hydrogen production by light-driven dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen. Storage of solar energy in chemical bonds resolves the issues associated with the intermittent nature of sunlight, by decoupling energy generation and consumption. This paper investigates recent advances and prospects in solar hydrogen processes that are reaching market readiness. Future energy scenarios involving solar hydrogen are proposed and a case is made for systems producing hydrogen from water vapor present in air, supported by advanced modeling.

  9. Canada's hydrogen energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Canada produces the most hydrogen per capita of any Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country. The majority of this hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming for industrial use (predominantly oil upgrading and fertilizer production). Canada also has a world leading hydrogen and fuel cell sector. This sector is seeking new methods for making hydrogen for its future energy needs. The paper will discuss Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell sector in the context of its capabilities, its demonstration and commercialization activities and its stature on the world stage. (author)

  10. Rotational Spectrum of the Methyl Salicylate-Water Complex: the Missing Conformer and the Tunneling Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Supriya; Thomas, Javix; Xu, Yunjie; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Methyl salicylate is a naturally occurring organic ester produced by wintergreen and other plants. It is also found in many over-the-counter remedies, such as muscle ache creams. The rotational spectrum of the methyl salicylate monomer was reported previously, where the most stable, dominant conformer was identified. The methyl salicylate-water complex was first studied using fluorescence-detected infrared spectroscopy; only one monohydrate conformer was found in that work. In the present study, we employed both broadband chirped and cavity based Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy to examine the competition between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions and possible large amplitude motions associated with the methyl group and the water subunit. In contrast to the previous infrared study, two monohydrate conformers were identified, with carbonyl O or hydroxyl O as the hydrogen bond acceptors. Detailed analyses of the observed hyperfine structures will be presented, as well as our efforts to extend the study to larger methyl salicylate hydration clusters. S. Melandri, B. M. Giuliano, A. Maris, L. B. Favero, P. Ottaviani, B. Velino, W. Caminati, J. Phys. Chem. A. 2007, 111, 9076. A. Mitsuzuka, A. Fujii, T. Ebata, N. Mikami, J. Phys. Chem. A 1998, 102, 9779.

  11. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  12. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors

  14. Hydrogen and its challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schal, M.

    2008-01-01

    The future of hydrogen as a universal fuel is in jeopardy unless we are able to produce it through an environment-friendly way and at a competitive cost. Today almost all the hydrogen used in the world is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. This process releases 8 tonnes of CO 2 per tonne of hydrogen produced. Other means of producing hydrogen are the hydrolysis, the very high temperature hydrolysis, and the direct chemical dissociation of water, these processes are greener than steam reforming but less efficient. About one hundred buses in the world operate on fuel cells fed by hydrogen, but it appears that the first industrial use of hydrogen at great scale will be for the local generation of electricity. Globally the annual budget for research concerning hydrogen is 4.4 milliard (10 9 ) euros worldwide. (A.C.)

  15. Study of α-monosubstituted methyl acetates by C-13 and H-1 Nuclear Magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    The substituents effects on the methylene and carbonyl carbons chemical shifts of some α-monosubstituted methyl acetates Z-CH 2 -COOMe(Z=H,Cl,Br,I,OME,SMe,NMe 2 and Me) is studied. Some data of Carbon 13 NMr in the light of the substituents empirical and electronic effects are shown. Solvent and concentration effects on the hydrogen-1 chemical shifts of methyl acetate, bromoacetate and Iodoacetate were interpreted in the light of the Cα-C(O)-bond rotational isomerism. (M.J.C.) [pt

  16. Hydrogen - From hydrogen to energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    More than a century ago, Jules Verne wrote in 'The Mysterious Island' that water would one day be employed as fuel: 'Hydrogen and oxygen, which constitute it, used singly or together, will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light'. Today, the 'water motor' is not entirely the dream of a writer. Fiction is about to become fact thanks to hydrogen, which can be produced from water and when burned in air itself produces water. Hydrogen is now at the heart of international research. So why do we have such great expectations of hydrogen? 'Hydrogen as an energy system is now a major challenge, both scientifically and from an environmental and economic point of view'. Dominated as it is by fossil fuels (oil, gas and coal), our current energy system has left a dual threat hovering over our environment, exposing the planet to the exhaustion of its natural reserves and contributing to the greenhouse effect. If we want sustainable development for future generations, it is becoming necessary to diversify our methods of producing energy. Hydrogen is not, of course, a source of energy, because first it has to be produced. But it has the twofold advantage of being both inexhaustible and non-polluting. So in the future, it should have a very important role to play. (author)

  17. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  18. Quantum molecular dynamics of methyl rotors in peptide links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del-Mar, Jon

    2002-01-01

    A particles wavefunction extends beyond the classically accessible regions of the potential energy surface. Quantum mechanical tunnelling is the result of this partial delocalisation, which enables the surpassing of classically inaccessible potential barriers. A particles mass is an important aspect, reflecting the tunnelling probability; a consequence of this is that a proton is ideally suited to this behaviour. Symmetrical molecular rotors such as Ch 3 provide a clear example of quantum mechanical tunnelling, seen in their motional spectrum. The advantage of the methyl rotor is that it's found in a wide range of organic compounds, giving a wide range in hindering potentials. It is effectively a proton rotor, and is easily observed using techniques such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). Both NMR and INS techniques are sensitive to molecular motion, and as they measure the tunnel frequencies in different energy windows, are complementary. Of central importance to many biological processes and structures is the peptide unit, -CONH-. Of particular significance are the intermolecular networks that are often formed by the NHO hydrogen bonds, the peptide links. The molecules were chosen for the research in this thesis to form a tractable model for polypeptides and alpha-helix proteins. Methyl rotor tunnelling frequencies have been used, which are very sensitive to the potential energy surface, as a probe of the electronic and molecular structure associated with the peptide links. Quantum chemistry calculations were then utilized to connect experiments to theory to learn about the hydrogen bond. (author)

  19. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  20. Canadian hydrogen safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIntyre, I.; Tchouvelev, A.V.; Hay, D.R.; Wong, J.; Grant, J.; Benard, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes and Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates trade through fair insurance policies and rates, effective and efficient regulatory approval procedures and accommodation of the interests of the general public. The Program integrates a consistent quantitative risk assessment methodology with experimental (destructive and non-destructive) failure rates and consequence-of-release data for key hydrogen components and systems into risk assessment of commercial application scenarios. Its current and past six projects include Intelligent Virtual Hydrogen Filling Station (IVHFS), Hydrogen clearance distances, comparative quantitative risk comparison of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) refuelling options; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling validation, calibration and enhancement; enhancement of frequency and probability analysis, and Consequence analysis of key component failures of hydrogen systems; and fuel cell oxidant outlet hydrogen sensor project. The Program projects are tightly linked with the content of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety. (author)

  1. High density hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    The interest in the properties of very dense hydrogen is prompted by its abundance in Saturn and Jupiter and its importance in laser fusion studies. Furthermore, it has been proposed that the metallic form of hydrogen may be a superconductor at relatively high temperatures and/or exist in a metastable phase at ambient pressure. For ten years or more, laboratories have been developing the techniques to study hydrogen in the megabar region (1 megabar = 100 GPa). Three major approaches to study dense hydrogen experimentally have been used, static presses, shockwave compression, and magnetic compression. Static tchniques have crossed the megabar threshold in stiff materials but have not yet been convincingly successful in very compressible hydrogen. Single and double shockwave techniques have improved the precision of the pressure, volume, temperature Equation of State (EOS) of molecular hydrogen (deuterium) up to near 1 Mbar. Multiple shockwave and magnetic techniques have compressed hydrogen to several megabars and densities in the range of the metallic phase. The net result is that hydrogen becomes conducting at a pressure between 2 and 4 megabars. Hence, the possibility of making a significant amount of hydrogen into a metal in a static press remains a formidable challenge. The success of such experiments will hopefully answer the questions about hydrogen's metallic vs. conducting molecular phase, superconductivity, and metastability. 4 figures, 15 references

  2. The energy carrier hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen to be used as a clean fuel for the production of heat and power, as well as for the propulsion of aeroplanes and vehicles, is described, in particular for Germany. First, attention is paid to the application of hydrogen as a basic material for the (petro)chemical industry, as an indirect energy source for (petro)chemical processes, and as a direct energy source for several purposes. Than the importance of hydrogen as an energy carrier in a large-scale application of renewable energy sources is discussed. Next an overview is given of new and old hydrogen production techniques from fossil fuels, biomass, or the electrolysis of water. Energetic applications of hydrogen in the transportation sector and the production of electric power and heat are mentioned. Brief descriptions are given of techniques to store hydrogen safely. Finally attention is paid to hydrogen research in Germany. Two hydrogen projects, in which Germany participates, are briefly dealt with: the Euro-Quebec project (production of hydrogen by means of hydropower), and the HYSOLAR project (hydrogen production by means of solar energy). 18 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  3. Thermodynamic study of phase transitions in methyl esters of ortho- meta- and para-aminobenzoic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Ana R.R.P.; Monte, Manuel J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vapor pressures of liquid and crystalline phases of methyl esters of the aminobenzoic acids were measured. ► Accurate values of enthalpies of sublimation, vaporization, and fusion were derived. ► The enthalpy of intermolecular NH–O hydrogen bonds in methyl p-aminobenzoate was determined. ► The volatility of the methyl benzoates was compared with the volatility of the parent acids. - Abstract: A static method based on capacitance gauges was used to measure the vapor pressures of the condensed phases of the methyl esters of the three aminobenzoic acids. For methyl o-aminobenzoate the vapor pressures of the liquid phase were measured in the range (285.4 to 369.5) K. For the meta and para isomers vapor pressures of both crystalline and liquid phases were measured in the ranges (308.9 to 376.6) K, and (332.9 to 428.0) K, respectively. Vapor pressures of the latter compound were also measured using the Knudsen effusion method in the temperature range (319.1 to 341.2) K. From the dependence of the vapor pressures on the temperature, the standard molar enthalpies and entropies of sublimation and of vaporization were derived. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the temperatures and molar enthalpies of fusion of the three isomers. The results enabled the estimation of the enthalpy of the intermolecular (N−H … O) hydrogen bond in the crystalline methyl p-aminobenzoate. A correlation relating the temperature of fusion and the enthalpy and Gibbs energy of sublimation of benzene, methyl benzoates and benzoic acids was derived.

  4. Hydrogen energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okken, P.A.

    1992-10-01

    For the Energy and Material consumption Scenarios (EMS), by which emission reduction of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases can be calculated, calculations are executed by means of the MARKAL model (MARket ALlocation, a process-oriented dynamic linear programming model to minimize the costs of the energy system) for the Netherlands energy economy in the period 2000-2040, using a variable CO 2 emission limit. The results of these calculations are published in a separate report (ECN-C--92-066). The use of hydrogen can play an important part in the above-mentioned period. An overview of several options to produce or use hydrogen is given and added to the MARKAL model. In this report techno-economical data and estimates were compiled for several H 2 -application options, which subsequently also are added to the MARKAL model. After a brief chapter on hydrogen and the impact on the reduction of CO 2 emission attention is paid to stationary and mobile applications. The stationary options concern the mixing of natural gas with 10% hydrogen, a 100% substitution of natural gas by hydrogen, the use of a direct steam generator (combustion of hydrogen by means of pure oxygen, followed by steam injection to produce steam), and the use of fuel cells. The mobile options concern the use of hydrogen in the transportation sector. In brief, attention is paid to a hydrogen passenger car with an Otto engine, and a hydrogen passenger car with a fuel cell, a hybrid (metal)-hydride car, a hydrogen truck, a truck with a methanol fuel cell, a hydrogen bus, an inland canal boat with a hydrogen fuel cell, and finally a hydrogen airplane. 2 figs., 15 tabs., 1 app., 26 refs

  5. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs., E-mail: tazsolt@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Cormos, C. C., E-mail: cormos@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Agachi, P. S. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos, Postal code: 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  6. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO 2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint

  7. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  8. Theoretical investigation of the photophysics of methyl salicylate isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Richard D.; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2011-10-01

    The photophysics of methyl salicylate (MS) isomers has been studied using time-dependent density functional theory and large basis sets. First electronic singlet and triplet excited states energies, structure, and vibrational analysis were calculated for the ketoB, enol, and ketoA isomers. It is demonstrated that the photochemical pathway involving excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) from the ketoB to the enol tautomer agrees well with the dual fluorescence in near-UV (from ketoB) and blue (from enol) wavelengths obtained from experiments. Our calculation confirms the existence of a double minimum in the excited state pathway along the O-H-O coordinate corresponding to two preferred energy regions: (1) the hydrogen belongs to the OH moiety and the structure of methyl salicylate is ketoB; (2) the hydrogen flips to the closest carboxyl entailing electronic rearrangement and tautomerization to the enol structure. This double well in the excited state is highly asymmetric. The Franck-Condon vibrational overlap is calculated and accounts for the broadening of the two bands. It is suggested that forward and backward ESIPT through the barrier separating the two minima is temperature-dependent and affects the intensity of the fluorescence as seen in experiments. When the enol fluoresces and returns to its ground state, a barrier-less back proton transfer repopulates the ground state of methyl salicylate ketoB. It is also demonstrated that the rotamer ketoA is not stable in an excited state close to the desired emission wavelength. This observation eliminates the conjecture that the near-UV emission of the dual fluorescence originates from the ketoA rotamer. New experimental results for pure MS in the liquid state are reported and theoretical results compared to them.

  9. Hydrogen gains further momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2017-01-01

    As first industrial production projects should become a reality in the next few years, hydrogen as a source of energy will find important applications with mobility, which momentum is rapid and irresistible. Next steps will be the (large capacity) storage of hydrogen associated to power-to-gas systems and the generalization of renewable energies. This document presents 5 articles, which themes are: Description and explanation of the process of hydrogen production; Presentation of the H2V project for the construction, in Normandy, of the first operational industrial hydrogen production plant using electric power 100 pc generated by renewable energies; The conversion of electric power from renewable energies through hydrogen storage and fuel cells for buildings applications (Sylfen project); The development of a reversible fuel cell at Mines-Paris Tech University, that will be adapted to the storage of renewable electric power; Hydrogen as a lever for the development of zero-emission vehicles, from trucks to cars and bicycles

  10. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    . A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling......This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up...

  11. Histone Lysine Methylation and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hoon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylation of several lysine residues of histones is a crucial mechanism for relatively long-term regulation of genomic activity. Recent molecular biological studies have demonstrated that the function of histone methylation is more diverse and complex than previously thought. Moreover, studies using newly available genomics techniques, such as exome sequencing, have identified an increasing number of histone lysine methylation-related genes as intellectual disability-associated genes, which highlights the importance of accurate control of histone methylation during neurogenesis. However, given the functional diversity and complexity of histone methylation within the cell, the study of the molecular basis of histone methylation-related neurodevelopmental disorders is currently still in its infancy. Here, we review the latest studies that revealed the pathological implications of alterations in histone methylation status in the context of various neurodevelopmental disorders and propose possible therapeutic application of epigenetic compounds regulating histone methylation status for the treatment of these diseases.

  12. miRNAting control of DNA methylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    miRNAting control of DNA methylation. ASHWANI ... function and biological process ... Enrichment analysis of the genes methylated by DRM2 for molecular function and biological ... 39(3), June 2014, 365–380, © Indian Academy of Sciences.

  13. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation The NREL technology validation team works on validating hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles; hydrogen fueling infrastructure; hydrogen system components; and fuel cell use in early market applications such as

  14. Bacterial production of methyl ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, Harry R.; Goh, Ee-Been

    2017-01-31

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for increasing production of methyl ketones in a genetically modified host cell that overproduces .beta.-ketoacyl-CoAs through a re-engineered .beta.-oxidation pathway and overexpresses FadM.

  15. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  16. Hydrogen storage container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Feng, Zhili; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-07

    An apparatus and system is described for storing high-pressure fluids such as hydrogen. An inner tank and pre-stressed concrete pressure vessel share the structural and/or pressure load on the inner tank. The system and apparatus provide a high performance and low cost container while mitigating hydrogen embrittlement of the metal tank. System is useful for distributing hydrogen to a power grid or to a vehicle refueling station.

  17. Hydrogen meter prooftesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Mettler, G.W.

    1976-04-01

    Two diffusion type hydrogen meters have been tested on the Prototype Applications Loop (PAL). The ANL designed unit was used to monitor hydrogen in sodium during FFTF startup and over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations resulting from chemical additions to the sodium and cover gas. A commercially available meter was added and its performance compared with the ANL unit. Details of the test work are described

  18. Photochemical hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Both technical and economic factors affect the cost of producing hydrogen by photochemical processes. Technical factors include the efficiency and the capital and operating costs of the renewable hydrogen conversion system; economic factors include discount rates, economic life, credit for co-product oxygen, and the value of the energy produced. This paper presents technical and economic data for a system that generates on-peak electric power form photochemically produced hydrogen

  19. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Francesch, Judit

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional, or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of bat...

  20. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics

  1. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L., E-mail: umbertofulco@gmail.com; Albuquerque, E. L. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Freire, V. N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Caetano, E. W. S. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  2. Effect of intermolecular cohesion on coal liquefaction. 3. Reactivity of oxygen methylated coal; Sekitan teibunshika hanno ni okeru bunshikan gyoshuryoku no koka. 3. O-methyl ka tan no hanno tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, M.; Nagaishi, H.; Yoshida, T. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    The reactivity of oxygen methylated coal was studied to control hydrogen bond in bituminous coal liquefaction and intermolecular cohesion such as van der Waals force. In experiment, crushed and dried Illinois coal of 100mesh or less was used as specimen, and oxygen methylated coal was prepared by Liotta`s method using tetrabutylammonium halide. Coal liquefaction was conducted in an electromagnetic agitation autoclave using tetralin solvent under initial hydrogen pressure of 100kg/cm{sup 2} while heating. The molecular weight distribution of the products obtained was measured by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis. The experimental results are as follows. The effect of intermolecular cohesion in bituminous coal on the reactivity is mainly derived from decomposing reaction from preasphaltene to oil. Yields of oil fraction by methylation increase corresponding to release of intermolecular cohesion. Since the thermal release is promoted with temperature rise, the difference in yield due to different treatments decreases. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  4. Hydrogen gas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    A differential thermocouple hydrogen gas detector has one thermocouple junction coated with an activated palladium or palladium-silver alloy catalytic material to allow heated hydrogen gas to react with the catalyst and raise the temperature of that junction. The other juction is covered with inert glass or epoxy resin, and does not experience a rise in temperature in the presence of hydrogen gas. A coil heater may be mounted around the thermocouple junctions to heat the hydrogen, or the gas may be passed through a heated block prior to exposing it to the thermocouples

  5. Sustainable hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  6. Purification of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, U.

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for purifying a hydrogen sulfide gas stream containing carbon dioxide, comprising (a) passing the gas stream through a bed of solid hydrated lime to form calcium hydrosulfide and calcium carbonate and (b) regenerating hydrogen sulfide from said calcium hydrosulfide by reacting the calcium hydrosulfide with additional carbon dioxide. The process is especially applicable for use in a heavy water recovery process wherein deuterium is concentrated from a feed water containing carbon dioxide by absorption and stripping using hydrogen sulfide as a circulating medium, and the hydrogen sulfide absorbs a small quantity of carbon dioxide along with deuterium in each circulation

  7. New hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the overall hydrogen system. There are separate sections for production, distribution, transport, storage; and applications of hydrogen. The most important methods for hydrogen production are steam reformation of natural gas and electrolysis of water. Of the renewable energy options, production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from wind turbines or by gasification of biomass were found to be the most economic for Finland. Direct use of this electricity or the production of liquid fuels from biomass will be competing alternatives. When hydrogen is produced in the solar belt or where there is cheap hydropower it must be transported over long distances. The overall energy consumed for the transport is from 25 to 40 % of the initial available energy. Hydrogen storage can be divided into stationary and mobile types. The most economic, stationary, large scale hydrogen storage for both long and short periods is underground storage. When suitable sites are not available, then pressure vessels are the best for short period and liquid H 2 for long period. Vehicle storage of hydrogen is by either metal hydrides or liquid H 2 . Hydrogen is a very versatile energy carrier. It can be used to produce heat directly in catalytic burners without flame, to produce electricity in fuel cells with high efficiency for use in vehicles or for peak power shaving, as a fuel component with conventional fuels to reduce emissions, as a way to store energy and as a chemical reagent in reactions

  8. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, G.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Brighigna, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen fueled vehicles may just be the answer to the air pollution problem in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives. This paper examines the feasibility of hydrogen as an automotive fuel by analyzing the following aspects: the chemical-physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems; current production technologies and commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. With reference to recent trial results being obtained in the USA, an assessment is also made of the feasibility of the use of methane-hydrogen mixtures as automotive fuels. The paper concludes with a review of progress being made by ENEA (the Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) in the development of fuel storage and electronic fuel injection systems for hydrogen powered vehicles

  9. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, D.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Sglavo, V.; ENEA, Rome

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the technical/economic feasibility of the use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel is made based on analyses of the following: the chemical- physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems - with water vapour injection, cryogenic injection, and the low or high pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the combustion chamber; the current commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. The paper concludes that, considering current costs for hydrogen fuel production, distribution and use, at present, the employment of hydrogen fuelled vehicles is feasible only in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives

  10. Palladium Nanoparticle Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pavlovsky

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An innovative hydrogen sensor based on palladium (Pd nanoparticle networks is described in the article. Made by Applied Nanotech Inc. sensor has a fast response time, in the range of seconds, which is increased at 80 °C due to higher hydrogen diffusion rates into the palladium lattice. The low detection limit of the sensor is 10 ppm of H2, and the high limit is 40,000 ppm. This is 100% of a lowest flammability level of hydrogen. This range of sensitivities complies with the requirements that one would expect for a reliable hydrogen sensor.

  11. Atomic hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massip de Turville, C.M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods are discussed of generating heat in an atomic hydrogen reactor which involve; the production of atomic hydrogen by an electrical discharge, the capture of nascent neutrons from atomic hydrogen in a number of surrounding steel alloy tubes having a high manganese content to produce 56 Mn, the irradiation of atomic hydrogen by the high energy antineutrinos from the beta decay of 56 Mn to yield nascent neutrons, and the removal of the heat generated by the capture of nascent neutrons by 55 Mn and the beta decay of 56 Mn. (U.K.)

  12. Methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) reveals that ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... Key words: Salt stress, alkali stress, Gossypium hirsutum L., DNA methylation, methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP). INTRODUCTION. DNA methylation is one of the key epigenetic mecha- nisms among eukaryotes that can modulate gene expression without the changes of DNA sequence.

  13. miRNAting control of DNA methylation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA methylation is a type of epigenetic modification where a methyl group is added to the cytosine or adenine residue of a given DNA sequence. It has been observed that DNA methylation is achieved by some collaborative agglomeration of certain proteins and non-coding RNAs. The assembly of IDN2 and its ...

  14. Methyl 4′,5-dichloro-2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethylbiphenyl-3-carboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Adeel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C16H14Cl2O3, the dihedral angle between the mean planes of the two benzene rings is 55.30 (5°. The methyl ester group lies within the ring plane due to an intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond [maximum deviation from the C8O2 mean plane is 0.0383 (13 Å]. In the crystal, molecules are held together by rather weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  15. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T [Ann Arbor, MI; Li, Yingwel [Ann Arbor, MI; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  16. Methylation of ribonucleic acid by the carcinogens dimethyl sulphate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Comparisons of chemical analyses at the nucleoside and base levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, P. D.; Shah, S. A.

    1972-01-01

    1. The following methods for hydrolysis of methyl-14C-labelled RNA, and for chromatographic isolation and determination of the products, were investigated: enzymic digestion to nucleosides at pH6 or 8; alkaline hydrolysis and conversion into nucleosides; hydrolysis by acid to pyrimidine nucleotides and purine bases, or completely to bases; chromatography on Dowex 50 (NH4+ form) at pH6 or 8.9, or on Dowex 50 (H+ form), or on Sephadex G-10. 2. The suitability of the various methods for determination of methylation products was assessed. The principal product, 7-methylguanosine, was unstable under the conditions used for determinations of nucleosides. 3- and 7-Methyladenine and 3- and 7-methylguanine are best determined as bases; 1-methyladenine and 3-methylcytosine can be isolated as either nucleosides or bases; O6-methylguanine is unstable under the acid hydrolysis conditions used and can be determined as the nucleoside; 3-methyluracil was detected, but may be derived from methylation of the ionized form of uracil. 3. Differences between the patterns of methylation of RNA and homopolyribonucleotides by the N-methyl-N-nitroso compounds and dimethyl sulphate were found: the nitroso compounds were able to methylate O-6 of guanine, were relatively more reactive at N-7 of adenine and probably at N-3 of guanine, but less reactive at N-1 of adenine, N-3 of cytosine and probably at N-3 of uridine. They probably reacted more with the ribose–phosphate chain, but no products from this were identified. 4. The possible influences of these differences on biological action of the methylating agents is discussed. Nitroso compounds may differ principally in their ability to induce miscoding in the Watson–Crick sense by reaction at O-6 of guanine. Both types of agent may induce miscoding to a lesser extent through methylation at N-3 of guanine; both can methylate N atoms, presumably preventing Watson–Crick hydrogen-bonding. N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea can degrade RNA, possibly

  17. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S. G.; Roberts, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst

  18. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  19. Identification of endometrial cancer methylation features using combined methylation analysis methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Trimarchi

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic mark that is frequently altered in tumors. DNA methylation features are attractive biomarkers for disease states given the stability of DNA methylation in living cells and in biologic specimens typically available for analysis. Widespread accumulation of methylation in regulatory elements in some cancers (specifically the CpG island methylator phenotype, CIMP can play an important role in tumorigenesis. High resolution assessment of CIMP for the entire genome, however, remains cost prohibitive and requires quantities of DNA not available for many tissue samples of interest. Genome-wide scans of methylation have been undertaken for large numbers of tumors, and higher resolution analyses for a limited number of cancer specimens. Methods for analyzing such large datasets and integrating findings from different studies continue to evolve. An approach for comparison of findings from a genome-wide assessment of the methylated component of tumor DNA and more widely applied methylation scans was developed.Methylomes for 76 primary endometrial cancer and 12 normal endometrial samples were generated using methylated fragment capture and second generation sequencing, MethylCap-seq. Publically available Infinium HumanMethylation 450 data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA were compared to MethylCap-seq data.Analysis of methylation in promoter CpG islands (CGIs identified a subset of tumors with a methylator phenotype. We used a two-stage approach to develop a 13-region methylation signature associated with a "hypermethylator state." High level methylation for the 13-region methylation signatures was associated with mismatch repair deficiency, high mutation rate, and low somatic copy number alteration in the TCGA test set. In addition, the signature devised showed good agreement with previously described methylation clusters devised by TCGA.We identified a methylation signature for a "hypermethylator phenotype" in

  20. Electronic dipole moment and tunneling state of hydrogen atom in hydrogen-bond materials revealed by neutron and X-ray structure analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Noda, Yukio; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    The isolated hydrogen-bonded materials, 5-methyl-9-hydroxyphenalenone (MeHPLN) and 5-bromo-9-hydroxyphenalenone (Br-HPLN), were studied by means of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. It was found that the position of the nucleus of the hydrogen atom in the hydrogen-bond region does not agree with the center of mass of the electron cloud of the hydrogen atom. This leads to a local electronic dipole moment in the hydrogen-bond region. Using the experimentally obtained dipole moment, phase transition temperatures for MeHPLN and BrHPLN were calculated based on a tunneling model. Result shows good agreement with the ones obtained by a dielectric measurement. (author)

  1. 1H NMR studies of substrate hydrogen exchange reactions catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaki, N.; Nakayama, T.; Sawada, S.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange reactions of various L-amino acids catalyzed by L-methionine gamma-lyase (EC 4.4.1.11) have been studied. The enzyme catalyzes the rapid exchange of the alpha- and beta-hydrogens of L-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine with deuterium from the solvent. The rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange was about 40 times faster than that of the enzymatic elimination reaction of the sulfur-containing amino acids. The enzyme also catalyzes the exchange reaction of alpha- and beta-hydrogens of the straight-chain L-amino acids which are not susceptible to elimination. The exchange rates of the alpha-hydrogen and the total beta-hydrogens of L-alanine and L-alpha-aminobutyrate with deuterium followed first-order kinetics. For L-norvaline, L-norleucine, S-methyl-L-cysteine, and L-methionine, the rate of alpha-hydrogen exchange followed first-order kinetics, but the rate of total beta-hydrogen exchange decreased due to a primary isotope effect at the alpha-position. L-Phenylalanine and L-tryptophan slowly underwent alpha-hydrogen exchange. The pro-R hydrogen of glycine was deuterated stereospecifically

  2. Hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the hydrogen and fuel cells. It presents the hydrogen technology from the production to the distribution and storage, the issues as motor fuel and fuel cells, the challenge for vehicles applications and the Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  3. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH 1 ) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon

  4. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  5. Dark hydrogen fermentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The production of hydrogen is a ubiquitous, natural phenomenon under anoxic or anaerobic conditions. A wide variety of bacteria, in swamps, sewage, hot springs, the rumen of cattle etc. is able to convert organic matter to hydrogen, CO2 and metabolites like acetic acid, lactate, ethanol and alanine.

  6. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  7. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  8. Hydrogen pellet injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Masahiro.

    1992-01-01

    In a hydrogen pellet injection device, a nozzle block having a hydrogen gas supply channel is disposed at the inner side of a main cryogenic housing, and an electric resistor is attached to the block. Further, a nozzle block and a hydrogen gas introduction pipe are attached by way of a thermal insulating spacer. Electric current is supplied to the resistor to positively heat the nozzle block and melt remaining solid hydrogen in the hydrogen gas supply channel. Further, the effect of temperature elevation due to the resistor is prevented from reaching the side of the hydrogen gas introduction pipe by the thermal insulation spacer. That is, the temperature of the nozzle block is directly and positively elevated, to melt the solid hydrogen rapidly. Preparation operation from the injection of the hydrogen pellet to the next injection can be completed in a shorter period of time compared with a conventional case thereby enabling to make the test more efficient. Further, only the temperature of the nozzle block is elevated with no effect of temperature elevation due to the resistor to other components by the thermal insulation flange. (N.H.)

  9. Hydrogen from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Vrije, de G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is generally regarded as the energy carrier of the future. The development of a process for hydrogen production from biomass complies with the policy of the Dutch government to obtain more renewable energy from biomass. This report describes the progress of the BWP II project, phase 2 of

  10. MethylMix 2.0: an R package for identifying DNA methylation genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedoz, Pierre-Louis; Prunello, Marcos; Brennan, Kevin; Gevaert, Olivier

    2018-04-14

    DNA methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene transcription, and its role in carcinogenesis has been extensively studied. Hyper and hypomethylation of genes is a major mechanism of gene expression deregulation in a wide range of diseases. At the same time, high-throughput DNA methylation assays have been developed generating vast amounts of genome wide DNA methylation measurements. We developed MethylMix, an algorithm implemented in R to identify disease specific hyper and hypomethylated genes. Here we present a new version of MethylMix that automates the construction of DNA-methylation and gene expression datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). More precisely, MethylMix 2.0 incorporates two major updates: the automated downloading of DNA methylation and gene expression datasets from TCGA and the automated preprocessing of such datasets: value imputation, batch correction and CpG sites clustering within each gene. The resulting datasets can subsequently be analyzed with MethylMix to identify transcriptionally predictive methylation states. We show that the Differential Methylation Values created by MethylMix can be used for cancer subtyping. olivier.gevaert@stanford.edu. https://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/manuals/MethylMix/man/MethylMix.pdf. MethylMix 2.0 was implemented as an R package and is available in bioconductor.

  11. 2-[3-Furyl(hydroxy)methyl]-2,3-dimethylcyclohexanone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Esther; Mendoza, Virgilio; Guzmán, José Agustín; Maldonado Graniel, Luis Angel; Hernández-Ortega, Simón

    2002-06-01

    Contribution No. 1750 of the Instituto de Quimica, UNAM, Mexico. In the molecule of the title compound, C(13)H(18)O(3), there is a syn relationship between the two vicinal methyl groups. The six-membered ring adopts a chair conformation, with one equatorial and two axial groups, and the furyl group is almost parallel to the ketone group. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds [O[bond]H...O[double bond]C 2.814 (3) A] form chains along [100].

  12. Methyl 2-(4a,8-Dimethyl-7-oxodecahydronaphthalen-2-ylacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Tebbaa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C16H24O3, was isolated from the aerial part of Inula Viscosa (L Aiton [or Dittrichia Viscosa (L Greuter]. The molecule contains two fused (trans six-membered rings which both exibit a chair conformation. In the crystal, molecules are linked into chains along [100] by weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the methyl and carbonyl groups.

  13. Measures for removing hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baukal, W.; Koehling, A.; Langer, G.; Poeschel, E.

    1984-01-01

    Basis for the investigation is a 1300-MW-PWR. The evolution of hydrogen was studied in design-basis and three hypothetical accident scenarios, the loss-of-coolant accident, the failure of emergency cooling system and core meltdown. It was shown that in the case of release rates of 4m 3 H 2 /h, the known post-accident hydrogen removal systems can be used and at medium rates up to 80 m 3 H 2 /h recombines of nuclear and non-nuclear industries are suitable under certain conditions. In the case of larger release rates it appears useful to apply a small recombiner of the type of the post-accident hydrogen removal system combined with an other hydrogen countermeasures. Recommendations are being made for the installation of an accident-proof hydrogen measuring system. (DG) [de

  14. Liquid hydrogen properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. I.; Han, K. Y.; Park, J.H.

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the input data, whose characteristic is thermodynamic and transport, in the form of equation for the thermo-hydraulic calculations using hydrogen as a working substance. The considered data in this report are particularly focused on the properties of para-hydrogen and of equilibrium-hydrogen around the working temperature range of the HANARO-CNS. The discussed properties of hydrogen are, in turn, the pressure of saturated vapors, the density, the heat of vaporization, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and heat capacity. Several equations to fit the above-mentioned experimental data allow calculating the various properties of liquid hydrogen with high accuracy at all considered temperatures

  15. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  16. Hydrogen production methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.

    1982-07-01

    Old, present and new proceses for producing hydrogen are assessed critically. The emphasis throughout is placed on those processes which could be commercially viable before the turn of the century for large-scale hydrogen manufacture. Electrolysis of water is the only industrial process not dependent on fossil resources for large-scale hydrogen production and is likely to remain so for the next two or three decades. While many new processes, including those utilizing sunlight directly or indirectly, are presently not considered to be commercially viable for large-scale hydrogen production, research and development effort is needed to enhance our understanding of the nature of these processes. Water vapour electrolysis is compared with thermochemical processes: the former has the potential for displacing all other processes for producing hydrogen and oxygen from water

  17. Hydrogen storage using borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard BONNETOT; Laetitia LAVERSENNE

    2006-01-01

    The possibilities of hydrogen storage using borohydrides are presented and discussed specially in regard of the recoverable hydrogen amount and related to the recovering conditions. A rapid analysis of storage possibilities is proposed taking in account the two main ways for hydrogen evolution: the dehydrogenation obtained through thermal decomposition or the hydrolysis of solids or solutions. The recoverable hydrogen is related to the dehydrogenation conditions and the real hydrogen useful percentage is determined for each case of use. The high temperature required for dehydrogenation even when using catalyzed compounds lead to poor outlooks for this storage way. The hydrolysis conditions direct the chemical yield of the water consuming, and this must be related to the experimental conditions which rule the storage capacity of the 'fuel' derived from the borohydride. (authors)

  18. Avocado and olive oil methyl esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knothe, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel, the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils, animal fats or other triacylglycerol-containing materials and an alternative to conventional petroleum-based diesel fuel, has been derived from a variety of feedstocks. Numerous feedstocks have been investigated as potential biodiesel sources, including commodity oils, however, the methyl esters of avocado and olive oil would likely be suitable as biodiesel fuel. In order to expand the database and comprehensive evaluation of the properties of vegetable oil esters, in this work the fuel-related properties of avocado and olive oil methyl esters, which exhibit similar fatty acid profiles including high oleic acid content, are determined. The cetane numbers of avocado oil methyl esters and olive oil methyl esters are relatively high, determined as 59.2 and 62.5, respectively, due to their elevated content of methyl oleate. Other properties are well within the ranges specified in biodiesel standards. The cloud points of both esters are slightly above 0 °C due to their content of saturated esters, especially methyl palmitate. Overall, avocado and olive oil yield methyl esters with fuel properties comparable to methyl esters from other commodity vegetable oils. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra of avocado and olive oil methyl esters are reported. -- Highlights: • Methyl esters of avocado and olive oil meet biodiesel fuel standards. • Provides comparison for methyl esters of other vegetable oils with high oleic content. • Discusses and compares present results with prior literature

  19. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene methylation need to be standardised, simplified and evaluated in external quality assurance programmes. It is concluded that methylated genes have the potential to provide a new generation of cancer biomarkers.

  20. Methyl mercury in terrestrial compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeppler, M.; Burow, M.; Padberg, S.; May, K.

    1993-09-01

    On the basis of the analytical methodology available at present the state of the art for the determination of total mercury and of various organometallic compounds of mercury in air, precipitation, limnic systems, soils, plants and biota is reviewed. This is followed by the presentation and discussion of examples for the data obtained hitherto for trace and ultratrace levels of total mercury and mainly methyl mercury in terrestrial and limnic environments as well as in biota. The data discussed stem predominantly from the past decade in which, due to significant methodological progress, many new aspects were elucidated. They include the most important results in this area achieved by the Research Centre (KFA) Juelich within the project 'Origin and Fate of Methyl Mercury' (contracts EV4V-0138-D and STEP-CT90-0057) supported by the Commission of the European Communities, Brussels. (orig.) [de

  1. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of methyl-substituted phenols: correlations of kinetic parameters with molecular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoth, F E; Politzer, P; Concha, M C; Murray, J S; Jakowski, J; Simons, Jack

    2006-07-27

    The hydrodeoxygenation of methyl-substituted phenols was carried out in a flow microreactor at 300 degrees C and 2.85 MPa hydrogen pressure over a sulfided CoMo/Al(2)O(3) catalyst. The primary reaction products were methyl-substituted benzene, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, and H(2)O. Analysis of the results suggests that two independent reaction paths are operative, one leading to aromatics and the other to partially or completely hydrogenated cyclohexanes. The reaction data were analyzed using Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics to extract the values of the reactant-to-catalyst adsorption constant and of the rate constants characterizing the two reaction paths. The adsorption constant was found to be the same for both reactions, suggesting that a single catalytic site center is operative in both reactions. Ab initio electronic structure calculations were used to evaluate the electrostatic potentials and valence orbital ionization potentials for all of the substituted phenol reactants. Correlations were observed between (a) the adsorption constant and the two reaction rate constants measured for various methyl-substitutions and (b) certain moments of the electrostatic potentials and certain orbitals' ionization potentials of the isolated phenol molecules. On the basis of these correlations to intrinsic reactant-molecule properties, a reaction mechanism is proposed for each pathway, and it is suggested that the dependencies of adsorption and reaction rates upon methyl-group substitution are a result of the substituents' effects on the electrostatic potential and orbitals rather than geometric (steric) effects.

  2. Possible Involvement of Hydrosulfide in B12-Dependent Methyl Group Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Toohey

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from several fields of investigation lead to the hypothesis that the sulfur atom is involved in vitamin B12-dependent methyl group transfer. To compile the evidence, it is necessary to briefly review the following fields: methylation, the new field of sulfane sulfur/hydrogen sulfide (S°/H2S, hydrosulfide derivatives of cobalamins, autoxidation of hydrosulfide radical, radical S-adenosylmethionine methyl transfer (RSMT, and methionine synthase (MS. Then, new reaction mechanisms for B12-dependent methyl group transfer are proposed; the mechanisms are facile and overcome difficulties that existed in previously-accepted mechanisms. Finally, the theory is applied to the effect of S°/H2S in nerve tissue involving the “hypomethylation theory” that was proposed 50 years ago to explain the neuropathology resulting from deficiency of vitamin B12 or folic acid. The conclusions are consistent with emerging evidence that sulfane sulfur/hydrogen sulfide may be beneficial in treating Alzheimer’s disease.

  3. C-C bond formation and related reactions at the CNC backbone in (smif)FeX (smif = 1,3-di-(2-pyridyl)-2-azaallyl): dimerizations, 3 + 2 cyclization, and nucleophilic attack; transfer hydrogenations and alkyne trimerization (X = N(TMS)2, dpma = (di-(2-pyridyl-methyl)-amide)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Brenda A; Williams, Valerie A; Wolczanski, Peter T; Bart, Suzanne C; Meyer, Karsten; Cundari, Thomas R; Lobkovsky, Emil B

    2013-03-18

    Molecular orbital analysis depicts the CNC(nb) backbone of the smif (1,3-di-(2-pyridyl)-2-azaallyl) ligand as having singlet diradical and/or ionic character where electrophilic or nucleophilic attack is plausible. Reversible dimerization of (smif)Fe{N(SiMe3)2} (1) to [{(Me3Si)2N}Fe]2(μ-κ(3),κ(3)-N,py2-smif,smif) (2) may be construed as diradical coupling. A proton transfer within the backbone-methylated, and o-pyridine-methylated smif of putative ((b)Me2(o)Me2smif)FeN(SiMe3)2 (8) provides a route to [{(Me3Si)2N}Fe]2(μ-κ(4),κ(4)-N,py2,C-((b)Me,(b)CH2,(o)Me2(smif)H))2 (9). A 3 + 2 cyclization of ditolyl-acetylene occurs with 1, leading to the dimer [{2,5-di(pyridin-2-yl)-3,4-di-(p-tolyl-2,5-dihydropyrrol-1-ide)}FeN(SiMe3)2]2 (11), and the collateral discovery of alkyne cyclotrimerization led to a brief study that identified Fe(N(SiMe3)2(THF) as an effective catalyst. Nucleophilic attack by (smif)2Fe (13) on (t)BuNCO and (2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3)NCO afforded (RNHCO-smif)2Fe (14a, R = (t)Bu; 14b, 2,6-(i)PrC6H3). Calculations suggested that (dpma)2Fe (15) would favorably lose dihydrogen to afford (smif)2Fe (13). H2-transfer to alkynes, olefins, imines, PhN═NPh, and ketones was explored, but only stoichiometric reactions were affected. Some physical properties of the compounds were examined, and X-ray structural studies on several dinuclear species were conducted.

  4. Hydrogen molecules and hydrogen-related defects in crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, N.; Sasaki, S.; Murakami, K.; Ishioka, K.; Nakamura, K. G.; Kitajima, M.; Fujimura, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Haneda, H.

    1997-09-01

    We have found that hydrogen exists in molecular form in crystalline silicon treated with hydrogen atoms in the downstream of a hydrogen plasma. The vibrational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 4158 cm-1 for silicon samples hydrogenated between 180 and 500 °C. The assignment of the Raman line is confirmed by its isotope shift to 2990 cm-1 for silicon treated with deuterium atoms. The Raman intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 400 °C. The vibrational Raman line of the hydrogen molecules is broad and asymmetric. It consists of at least two components, possibly arising from hydrogen molecules in different occupation sites in crystalline silicon. The rotational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 590 cm-1. The Raman band of Si-H stretching is observed for hydrogenation temperatures between 100 and 500 °C and the intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 250 °C.

  5. Thermophysical study of methyl levulinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomba, Laura; Lafuente, Carlos; García-Mardones, Mónica; Gascón, Ignacio; Giner, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We have carried out a thermophysical characterization of methyl levulinate. • The study has been performed over a temperature range from (278.15 to 328.15) K. • pρT behavior has been studied over a temperature range from (333.15 to 453.15) K. • TRIDEN equation has been used to correlate pρT data. • Results have been compared with of ethyl and butyl levulinate and levulinic acid. -- Abstract: Several thermophysical properties (density, speed of sound, refractive index, surface tension, static permittivity and dynamic viscosity) of methyl levulinate have been measured under atmospheric pressure at temperatures from (278.15 to 338.15) K, while the vapor pressure was determined over a temperature range from (333.15 to 453.15) K. Furthermore, pρT behavior has been also investigated using a high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter over a temperature range from (283.15 to 338.15) K and a pressure range from (0.1 to 60.0) MPa. All these values obtained for methyl levulinate have been compared with other members of the levulinate family and also with levulinic acid

  6. Base Flip in DNA Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulationsof Differently-Oxidized Forms of Methyl-Cytosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bagherpoor Helabad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Distortions in the DNA sequence, such as damage or mispairs, are specifically recognized and processed by DNA repair enzymes. Many repair proteins and, in particular, glycosylases flip the target base out of the DNA helix into the enzyme’s active site. Our molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with intact and damaged (oxidized methyl-cytosine show that the probability of being flipped is similar for damaged and intact methyl-cytosine. However, the accessibility of the different 5-methyl groups allows direct discrimination of the oxidized forms. Hydrogen-bonded patterns that vary between methyl-cytosine forms carrying a carbonyl oxygen atom are likely to be detected by the repair enzymes and may thus help target site recognition.

  7. On the Role of Surface Modifications of Palladium Catalysts in the Selective Hydrogenation of Acetylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Summing Me up: DFT calculations have shown that alloying, subsurface carbon, and hydride formation, all increase the selectivity of Pd catalysts for acetylene hydrogenation by weakening the surface–adsorbate bond. A simple descriptor—the adsorption energy of a methyl group—has been used to quanti...

  8. The hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigg, A.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  9. The hydrogen highway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, A. [Fuel Cells Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  10. A green hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, W.W. II [Clark Communications, Beverly Hills, CA (United States). Green Hydrogen Scientific Advisory Committee; Rifkin, J. [The Foundation on Economic Trends (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This paper is the result of over a dozen scholars and practitioners who strongly felt that a hydrogen economy and hence the future is closer than some American politicians and bureaucrats state. Moreover, when seen internationally, there is strong evidence, the most recent and obvious ones are the proliferation of hybrid vehicles, that for any nation-state to be energy independent it must seek a renewable or green hydrogen future in the near term. The State of California has once again taken the lead in this effort for both an energy-independent future and one linked strongly to the hydrogen economy. Then why a hydrogen economy in the first instance? The fact is that hydrogen most likely will not be used for refueling of vehicles in the near term. The number of vehicles to make hydrogen commercially viable will not be in the mass market by almost all estimates until 2010. However, it is less than a decade away. The time frame is NOT 30-40 years as some argue. The hydrogen economy needs trained people, new ventures and public-private partnerships now. The paper points out how the concerns of today, including higher costs and technologies under development, can be turned into opportunities for both the public and private sectors. It was not too long ago that the size of a mobile phone was that of a briefcase, and then almost 10 years ago, the size of a shoe box. Today, they are not only the size of a man's wallet but also often given away free to consumers who subscribe or contract for wireless services. While hydrogen may not follow this technological commercialization exactly, it certainly will be on a parallel path. International events and local or regional security dictate that the time for a hydrogen must be close at hand. (author)

  11. A green hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Woodrow W.; Rifkin, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the result of over a dozen scholars and practitioners who strongly felt that a hydrogen economy and hence the future is closer than some American politicians and bureaucrats state. Moreover, when seen internationally, there is strong evidence, the most recent and obvious ones are the proliferation of hybrid vehicles, that for any nation-state to be energy independent it must seek a renewable or green hydrogen future in the near term. The State of California has once again taken the lead in this effort for both an energy-independent future and one linked strongly to the hydrogen economy. Then why a hydrogen economy in the first instance? The fact is that hydrogen most likely will not be used for refueling of vehicles in the near term. The number of vehicles to make hydrogen commercially viable will not be in the mass market by almost all estimates until 2010. However, it is less than a decade away. The time frame is NOT 30-40 years as some argue. The hydrogen economy needs trained people, new ventures and public-private partnerships now. The paper points out how the concerns of today, including higher costs and technologies under development, can be turned into opportunities for both the public and private sectors. It was not too long ago that the size of a mobile phone was that of a briefcase, and then almost 10 years ago, the size of a shoe box. Today, they are not only the size of a man's wallet but also often given away free to consumers who subscribe or contract for wireless services. While hydrogen may not follow this technological commercialization exactly, it certainly will be on a parallel path. International events and local or regional security dictate that the time for a hydrogen must be close at hand

  12. The Italian hydrogen programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaele Vellone

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen could become an important option in the new millennium. It provides the potential for a sustainable energy system as it can be used to meet most energy needs without harming the environment. In fact, hydrogen has the potential for contributing to the reduction of climate-changing emissions and other air pollutants as it exhibits clean combustion with no carbon or sulphur oxide emissions and very low nitrogen oxide emissions. Furthermore, it is capable of direct conversion to electricity in systems such as fuel cells without generating pollution. However, widespread use of hydrogen is not feasible today because of economic and technological barriers. In Italy, there is an ongoing national programme to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier. This programme aims to promote, in an organic frame, a series of actions regarding the whole hydrogen cycle. It foresees the development of technologies in the areas of production, storage, transport and utilisation. Research addresses the development of technologies for separation and sequestration of CO 2 , The programme is shared by public organisations (research institutions and universities) and national industry (oil companies, electric and gas utilities and research institutions). Hydrogen can be used as a fuel, with significant advantages, both for electric energy generation/ co-generation (thermo-dynamic cycles and fuel cells) and transportation (internal combustion engine and fuel cells). One focus of research will be the development of fuel cell technologies. Fuel cells possess all necessary characteristics to be a key technology in a future economy based on hydrogen. During the initial phase of the project, hydrogen will be derived from fossil sources (natural gas), and in the second phase it will be generated from renewable electricity or nuclear energy. The presentation will provide a review of the hydrogen programme and highlight future goals. (author)

  13. Transient shielded liquid hydrogen containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, A.P.; Herring, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen in the liquid phase has been limited in duration due to the thermal performance constraints of conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers available. Conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers lose hydrogen because of their relatively high heat leak and variations in usage pattern of hydrogen due to shutdowns. Local regulations also discourage venting of hydrogen. Long term storage of Liquid Hydrogen without product loss was usually accomplished using Liquid Nitrogen sacrificial shields. This paper reports on a new low heat leak container developed and patented that will extend the storage time of liquid hydrogen by five hundred percent. The principle of operation of the Transient Shields which makes the extraordinary performance of this container feasible is described in this paper. Also covered are the impact of this new container on present applications of hydrogen and the new opportunities afforded to Liquid hydrogen in the world hydrogen market

  14. Cost estimation of hydrogen and DME produced by nuclear heat utilization system. Joint research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2003-09-01

    Research of hydrogen energy has been performed in order to spread use of the hydrogen energy in 2020 or 2030. It will take, however, many years for the hydrogen energy to be used very easily like gasoline, diesel oil and city gas in all of countries. During the periods, low CO 2 release liquid fuels would be used together with hydrogen. Recently, di-methyl-either (DME) has been noticed as one of the substitute liquid fuels of petroleum. Such liquid fuels can be produced from the mixed gas such as hydrogen and carbon oxide which are produced by steam reforming hydrogen generation system by the use of nuclear heat. Therefore, the system would be one of the candidates of future system of nuclear heat utilization. In the present study, we focused on the production of hydrogen and DME. Economic evaluation was estimated for hydrogen and DME production in commercial and nuclear heat utilization plant. At first, heat and mass balance of each process in commercial plant of hydrogen production was estimated and commercial prices of each process were derived. Then, price was estimated when nuclear heat was used instead of required heat of commercial plant. Results showed that the production prices produced by nuclear heat were cheaper by 10% for hydrogen and 3% for DME. With the consideration of reduction effect of CO 2 release, utilization of nuclear heat would be more effective. (author)

  15. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  16. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...... that the particles do not disintegrate is explained by a sintering process at the working temperatures. Exposure to air does not impair the sorption ability; on the contrary, it appears that surface oxidation plays an important role in the reaction. Some handling problems, e.g. the reaction of the hydride with water...

  17. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M; Lien, S; Weaver, P F

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  18. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M.; Lien, S.; Weaver, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  19. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  20. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  1. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure , particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  2. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  3. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  4. Biological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  5. Evolution of DNA Methylation across Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewick, Adam J; Vogel, Kevin J; Moore, Allen J; Schmitz, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation contributes to gene and transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes, and therefore has been hypothesized to facilitate the evolution of plastic traits such as sociality in insects. However, DNA methylation is sparsely studied in insects. Therefore, we documented patterns of DNA methylation across a wide diversity of insects. We predicted that underlying enzymatic machinery is concordant with patterns of DNA methylation. Finally, given the suggestion that DNA methylation facilitated social evolution in Hymenoptera, we tested the hypothesis that the DNA methylation system will be associated with presence/absence of sociality among other insect orders. We found DNA methylation to be widespread, detected in all orders examined except Diptera (flies). Whole genome bisulfite sequencing showed that orders differed in levels of DNA methylation. Hymenopteran (ants, bees, wasps and sawflies) had some of the lowest levels, including several potential losses. Blattodea (cockroaches and termites) show all possible patterns, including a potential loss of DNA methylation in a eusocial species whereas solitary species had the highest levels. Species with DNA methylation do not always possess the typical enzymatic machinery. We identified a gene duplication event in the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) that is shared by some Hymenoptera, and paralogs have experienced divergent, nonneutral evolution. This diversity and nonneutral evolution of underlying machinery suggests alternative DNA methylation pathways may exist. Phylogenetically corrected comparisons revealed no evidence that supports evolutionary association between sociality and DNA methylation. Future functional studies will be required to advance our understanding of DNA methylation in insects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Systemic effects of chronically administered methyl prednisolonate and methyl 17-deoxyprednisolonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejniczak, E; Lee, H J

    1984-06-01

    The systemic activities of methyl prednisolonate and methyl 17-deoxyprednisolonate (1) were studied in rats. Methyl 17-deoxyprednisolonate produced significant changes in the amount of sodium ion (decreased) and potassium ion (increased) in urine; however, methyl prednisolonate had no effect on electrolyte balance. Both methyl prednisolonate and methyl 17-deoxyprednisolonate had no effect on liver glycogen content, plasma corticosterone level and relative adrenal weight. In contrast, the parent compound prednisolone caused a significant decrease in liver glycogen content, plasma corticosterone level and relative adrenal weight.

  7. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  8. Production of hydrogen from organic waste via hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, M.; Davis, B.R.; Roy, A.; Daugulis, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an integrated process is proposed that converts organic waste to hydrogen via hydrogen sulphide. The designed bioreactor has achieved high volumetric productivities comparable to methanogenic bioreactors. Proposed process has advantages of bio-methane production and is more resilient to process upset. Thermochemical conversion of hydrogen sulphide to hydrogen is exothermic and also requires smaller plant infrastructure

  9. Contrasting the surface ocean distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide; implications for boundary layer physics, chemistry and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, C J, E-mail: carl.j.palmer@gmail.co [Department of Oceanography, University of Cape Town, 7701 (South Africa)

    2010-08-15

    Bromoform and methyl iodide are both methane-like hydrocarbons with a halogen atom replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms. Both of these compounds occur naturally in the environment as a result of their production from seaweed and kelp. They are of interest to climate science as a result of their catalytic destruction of boundary layer ozone (a potent greenhouse gas) and, specifically for methyl iodide, the proposed role in the formation of new cloud condensation nuclei with implications for climate. In this paper, the currently available data on the distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide are analysed and contrasted to show that the concentrations of bromoform and methyl iodide do not correlate, that, in contrast to bromoform, the parameterization of sea surface methyl iodide concentrations demands only the sea surface temperature, and that the pelagic distribution of methyl iodide appears to follow the solar zenith angle. These three observations together suggest that, while the pelagic source of bromoform is mostly biogenic, the source of methyl iodide is photochemical. This has implications for the understanding of planetary boundary layer chemistry and potential organohalogen mediated feedbacks to climate.

  10. Contrasting the surface ocean distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide; implications for boundary layer physics, chemistry and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, C J

    2010-01-01

    Bromoform and methyl iodide are both methane-like hydrocarbons with a halogen atom replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms. Both of these compounds occur naturally in the environment as a result of their production from seaweed and kelp. They are of interest to climate science as a result of their catalytic destruction of boundary layer ozone (a potent greenhouse gas) and, specifically for methyl iodide, the proposed role in the formation of new cloud condensation nuclei with implications for climate. In this paper, the currently available data on the distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide are analysed and contrasted to show that the concentrations of bromoform and methyl iodide do not correlate, that, in contrast to bromoform, the parameterization of sea surface methyl iodide concentrations demands only the sea surface temperature, and that the pelagic distribution of methyl iodide appears to follow the solar zenith angle. These three observations together suggest that, while the pelagic source of bromoform is mostly biogenic, the source of methyl iodide is photochemical. This has implications for the understanding of planetary boundary layer chemistry and potential organohalogen mediated feedbacks to climate.

  11. Hydrogen by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen production by water electrolysis (aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide) is shortly presented with theoretical aspects (thermodynamics and kinetics), and components of the electrolytic cell (structural materials, cathodes, anodes, diaphragms), and examples of industrial processes. (A.B.). 4 figs

  12. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    concepts transferred from the gaseous state. Separation of a ... molecular mass to that calculated by colligative methods. It is important in ... namics is vital in the design and optimization of the materials for hydrogen ... vehicular applications.

  13. Hydrogen storage compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  14. Hydrogen Fire Spectroscopy Issues

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The detection of hydrogen fires is important to the aerospace community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has devoted significant effort to...

  15. Canadian hydrogen strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlie, M.; Scepanovic, V.; Dube, J.; Hammerli, M.; Taylor, J.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' In May of 2004, industry and government embarked on a process to create a strategic plan for development of the 'hydrogen economy' in Canada. The process was undertaken to determine how the development and commercialization of hydrogen technologies could be accelerated to yield a 'visible' reduction in greenhouse gases within the timeframe of Kyoto, while establishing a direction that addresses the necessity of far greater reductions in the future. Starting with a meeting of twenty seven experts drawn from the hydrogen technology, energy and transportation industries and government, a vision and mission for the planning process was developed. Two months later a second meeting was held with a broader group of stakeholders to develop hydrogen transition strategies that could achieve the mission, and from identifying the barriers and enablers for these strategies, an action plan was created. This paper reviews the results from this consultation process and discusses next steps. (author)

  16. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  17. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  18. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Exposure of many metals to gaseous hydrogen causes losses in elongation, reduction of area, and fracture toughness, and causes increases in slow crack growth rate or fatigue life compared with values obtained in air or vacuum. Hydrogen pressure, temperature, and purity significantly influence deleterious effects. The strength and structural characteristics of the metal influence the degradation of its properties by hydrogen. Several theories have been proposed to explain the loss of properties in hydrogen, but none has gained wide acceptance. The embrittlement mechanism and the role of diffusion are, therefore, open questions and need more quantitative experimental data both to test the proposed theories and to allow the development of realistic preventive measures. (U.S.)

  19. Hydrogen perspectives in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furutani, H.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen energy is considered to present a potential effective options for achieving the greenhouse gas minimization. The MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry) of Japanese Government is promoting the WE-NET (World Energy Network System) Project which envisions (1) construction of a global energy network for effective supply, transportation, storage and utilization of renewable energy using hydrogen as an energy carrier as a long-term options of sustainable energy economy, and (2) promotion of market entry of hydrogen energy in near and/or mid future even before construction of a WE-NET system. In this paper, I would like to report how far the hydrogen energy technology development addressed under Phase I has progressed, and describe the outline of the Phase II Plan. (author)

  20. Hydrogen permeability through metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tsvetkov, I.V.; Marenkov, E.D.; Yarko, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of hydrogen permeability through one-layer and multi-layer membranes are considered. The effect of surface roughness, crystal defects, cracks and pores is described. Mathematical description of the processes is given [ru

  1. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  2. Hydrogenizing oils, asphalts, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1925-03-14

    The hydrogenation of carbonaceous solids in presence of combined sulfur, e.g., sulfides as described in the parent specification is applied to the treatment of rock oils, shale oils, resins, ozokerite, asphalt, and the like, or fractions, residues, or acid sludge or other conversion products thereof, alone or mixed. Preferably the hydrogen or other reducing gas is in excess and under pressure, and is either circuited or led through a series of treatment vessels, hydrogen being added for that used. In an example, residues from American crude oil are passed continuously with hydrogen at 200 atmospheres and 450 to 500/sup 0/C over pressed precipitated cobalt sulfide, the issuing gases being cooled to condense the light oil produced.

  3. 2-Acetyl-amino-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-(tri-methyl-silyl)-2-de-oxy-α-d-gluco-pyran-ose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhao-Dong; Cui, Yan-Li; Mao, Jian-Wei

    2013-06-01

    The title compound, C20H47NO6Si4, was synthesized by per-O-tri-methyl-silylation of N-acetyl-d-glucosa-mine using chloro-tri-methyl-silane in the presence of hexa-methyl-disiloxane. The tri-methyl-silyl group and acetamido group are located on the same side of the pyran ring, showing an α-configuration glycoside. One of the tri-methyl-silyl groups is disordered over two orientations, with site-occupancy factors of 0.625 (9) and 0.375 (9). In the crystal, N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules into supra-molecular chains along the a-axis direction.

  4. Electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide coadsorbed with amorphous solid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, C. C.; Faradzhev, N. S.; Madey, T. E.; Fairbrother, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    The electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide (MeI) adsorbed on and suspended within amorphous solid water (ice) were studied using a combination of postirradiation temperature programmed desorption and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. For MeI adsorbed on top of amorphous solid water (ice), electron beam irradiation is responsible for both structural and chemical transformations within the overlayer. Electron stimulated reactions of MeI result principally in the formation of methyl radicals and solvated iodide anions. The cross section for electron stimulated decomposition of MeI is comparable to the gas phase value and is only weakly dependent upon the local environment. For both adsorbed MeI and suspended MeI, reactions of methyl radicals within MeI clusters lead to the formation of ethane, ethyl iodide, and diiodomethane. In contrast, reactions between the products of methyl iodide and water dissociation are responsible for the formation of methanol and carbon dioxide. Methane, formed as a result of reactions between methyl radicals and either parent MeI molecules or hydrogen atoms, is also observed. The product distribution is found to depend on the film's initial chemical composition as well as the electron fluence. Results from this study highlight the similarities in the carbon-containing products formed when monohalomethanes coadsorbed with amorphous solid water are irradiated by either electrons or photons

  5. Discovery of extremely halophilic, methyl-reducing euryarchaea provides insights into the evolutionary origin of methanogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Makarova, Kira S.; Abbas, Ben; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N.; Galinski, Erwin A.; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María Carmen; Merkel, Alexander Y.; Wolf, Yuri I.; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2017-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea are major players in the global carbon cycle and in the biotechnology of anaerobic digestion. The phylum Euryarchaeota includes diverse groups of methanogens that are interspersed with non-methanogenic lineages. So far methanogens inhabiting hypersaline environments have been identified only within the order Methanosarcinales. We report the discovery of a deep phylogenetic lineage of extremophilic methanogens in hypersaline lakes, and present analysis of two nearly complete genomes from this group. Within the phylum Euryarchaeota, these isolates form a separate, class-level lineage “Methanonatronarchaeia” that is most closely related to the class Halobacteria. Similar to the Halobacteria, “Methanonatronarchaeia” are extremely halophilic and do not accumulate organic osmoprotectants. The high intracellular concentration of potassium implies that “Methanonatronarchaeia” employ the “salt-in” osmoprotection strategy. These methanogens are heterotrophic methyl-reducers that utilize C1-methylated compounds as electron acceptors and formate or hydrogen as electron donors. The genomes contain an incomplete and apparently inactivated set of genes encoding the upper branch of methyl group oxidation to CO2 as well as membrane-bound heterosulfide reductase and cytochromes. These features differentiates “Methanonatronarchaeia” from all known methyl-reducing methanogens. The discovery of extremely halophilic, methyl-reducing methanogens related to haloarchaea provides insights into the origin of methanogenesis and shows that the strategies employed by methanogens to thrive in salt-saturating conditions are not limited to the classical methylotrophic pathway. PMID:28555626

  6. The hydrogen issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  7. Methylation patterns in marginal zone lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Alberto J; Bertoni, Francesco

    Promoter DNA methylation is a major regulator of gene expression and transcription. The identification of methylation changes is important for understanding disease pathogenesis, for identifying prognostic markers and can drive novel therapeutic approaches. In this review we summarize the current knowledge regarding DNA methylation in MALT lymphoma, splenic marginal zone lymphoma, nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Despite important differences in the study design for different publications and the existence of a sole large and genome-wide methylation study for splenic marginal zone lymphoma, it is clear that DNA methylation plays an important role in marginal zone lymphomas, in which it contributes to the inactivation of tumor suppressors but also to the expression of genes sustaining tumor cell survival and proliferation. Existing preclinical data provide the rationale to target the methylation machinery in these disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Wp specific methylation of highly proliferated LCLs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Shim, Sung-Mi; Nam, Hye-Young; Kim, Joon-Woo; Han, Bok-Ghee; Lee, Suman

    2007-01-01

    The epigenetic regulation of viral genes may be important for the life cycle of EBV. We determined the methylation status of three viral promoters (Wp, Cp, Qp) from EBV B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by pyrosequencing. Our pyrosequencing data showed that the CpG region of Wp was methylated, but the others were not. Interestingly, Wp methylation was increased with proliferation of LCLs. Wp methylation was as high as 74.9% in late-passage LCLs, but 25.6% in early-passage LCLs. From two Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, Wp specific hypermethylation was also found (>80%). Interestingly, the expression of EBNA2 gene which located directly next to Wp was associated with its methylation. Our data suggested that Wp specific methylation may be important for the indicator of the proliferation status of LCLs, and the epigenetic viral gene regulation of EBNA2 gene by Wp should be further defined possibly with other biological processes

  9. Nuclear power and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Robert.

    1982-06-01

    Ontario has been using CANDU reactors to produce electricity since 1962. The province does not have an electricity shortage, but it does have a shortage of liquid fuels. The government of Ontario is encouraging research into the production of hydrogen using electricity generated by a dedicated nuclear plant, and the safe and economical use of hydrogen both in the production of synthetic petroleum fuels and as a fuel in its own right

  10. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  11. A Rechargeable Hydrogen Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christudas Dargily, Neethu; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Devendrachari, Mruthunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Gautam, Manu; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-04-27

    We utilize proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen storage molecules to unlock a rechargeable battery chemistry based on the cleanest chemical energy carrier molecule, hydrogen. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and spectroelectrochemical analyses evidence the participation of protons during charge-discharge chemistry and extended cycling. In an era of anthropogenic global climate change and paramount pollution, a battery concept based on a virtually nonpolluting energy carrier molecule demonstrates distinct progress in the sustainable energy landscape.

  12. Hydrogen recovery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  13. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Jay P.; Kramer, Robert; Pourpoint, Timothee L.; Ramachandran, P.V.; Varma, Arvind; Zheng, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  14. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  15. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  16. Diffusion of hydrogen in yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyov, V.V.; Ryabchikov, L.N.

    1966-01-01

    In this work the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in yttrium were determined from the rate at which the hydrogen was released from yttrium samples under a vacuum at temperatures of 450 to 850 0 C and from the quantity of hydrogen retained by yttrium at hydrogen pressures below 5 x 10 - 4 mm Hg in the same temperature range

  17. Synthesis and characterization of poly(styrene-co-methyl methacrylate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustinho, Tiago R.; Abarca, Silvia A.C.; Machado, Ricardo A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Polystyrene (PS) is nowadays commonly used due its advantages over competitors. PS presents a lower cost when compared with Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) and with Polyethylene Tere-phthalate (PET), and can be easier processed than polypropylene (PP). At expandable form (EPS), can be used as projective equipment, thermal insulation, floating boards, refrigerators, isothermal, and low cost applications such as packaging and disposable material. Searching for more resistant materials and with a low cost, researches with copolymers materials are being developed. In this study, copolymerization reactions were carried out by suspension polymerization using monomers styrene and methyl methacrylate (MMA) with styrene. Styrene was in the highest percentage in relation to the MMA. The MMA was selected because is a monomer that presents a higher resistance than PS. The copolymerization was confirmed by performing infrared spectroscopy (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance of hydrogen (RMN 1 H), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). (author)

  18. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  19. Hydrogen and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, D.J.

    1976-12-01

    This study examines the influence that the market demand for hydrogen might have on the development of world nuclear capacity over the next few decades. In a nuclear economy, hydrogen appears to be the preferred energy carrier over electricity for most purposes, due to its ready substitution and usage for all energy needs, as well as its low transmission costs. The economic factors upon which any transition to hydrogen fuelling will be largely based are seen to be strongly dependent on the form of future energy demand, the energy resource base, and on the status of technology. Accordingly, the world energy economy is examined to identify the factors which might affect the future demand price structure for energy, and a survey of current estimates of world energy resources, particularly oil, gas, nuclear, and solar, is presented. Current and projected technologies for production and utilization of hydrogen are reviewed, together with rudimentary cost estimates. The relative economics are seen to favour production of hydrogen from fossil fuels far into the foreseeable future, and a clear case emerges for high temperature nuclear reactors in such process heat applications. An expanding industrial market for hydrogen, and near term uses in steelmaking and aircraft fuelling are foreseen, which would justify an important development effort towards nuclear penetration of that market. (author)

  20. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  1. Metallic hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.J.; Hawke, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical studies predict that molecular hydrogen can be converted to the metallic phase at very high density and pressure. These conditions were achieved by subjecting liquid hydrogen to isentropic compression in a magnetic-flux compression device. Hydrogen became electrically conducting at a density of about 1.06 g/cm 3 and a calculated pressure of about 2 Mbar. In the experimental device, a cylindrical liner, on implosion by high explosive, compresses a magnetic flux which in turn isentropically compresses a hydrogen sample; coaxial conical anvils prevent escape of the sample during compression. One anvil contains a coaxial cable that uses alumina ceramic as an insulator; this probe allows continuous measurement of the electrical conductivity of the hydrogen. A flash x-ray radiograph exposed during the experiment records the location of the sample-tube boundaries and permits calculation of the sample density. The theoretical underpinnings of the metallic transition of hydrogen are briefly summarized, and the experimental apparatus and technique, analytical methods, and results are described. 9 figures

  2. Hydrogen isotope technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen pumping speeds on panels of molecular sieve types 5A and Na-Y were compared for a variety of sieve (and chevron) temperatures between 10 and 30 K. Although pumping speeds declined with time, probably because of the slow diffusion of hydrogen from the surface of the sieve crystals into the internal regions, the different sieve materials and operating conditions could be compared using time-averaged pump speeds. The (average) pumping speeds declined with increasing temperature. Under some conditions, the Na-Y sieve performed much better than the 5A sieve. Studies of the effect of small concentrations (approx. 4%) of hydrogen on helium pumping indicate that compound cryopumps in fusion reactors will not have to provide complete screening of hydrogen from helium panels. The concentrations of hydrogen did not lower effective helium pumping speeds or shorten the helium operating period between instabilities. Studies of tritium recovery from blankets of liquid lithium focused on design and construction of a flowing-lithium test system and on ultimate removal of tritium from yttrium sorbents. At 505 0 C, tritium release from yttrium behaves as a diffusion-controlled process, but the release rates are very low. Apparently, higher temperatures will be required for effective sorbent regeneration. An innovative technique for separating hydrogen isotopes by using bipolar electrolysis with permeable electrodes was analyzed to determine its potential usefulness in multistage separation

  3. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby

    2010-01-01

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  4. Structure, bioactivity, and synthesis of methylated flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lingrong; Jiang, Yueming; Yang, Jiali; Zhao, Yupeng; Tian, Miaomiao; Yang, Bao

    2017-06-01

    Methylated flavonoids are an important type of natural flavonoid derivative with potentially multiple health benefits; among other things, they have improved bioavailability compared with flavonoid precursors. Flavonoids have been documented to have broad bioactivities, such as anticancer, immunomodulation, and antioxidant activities, that can be elevated, to a certain extent, by methylation. Understanding the structure, bioactivity, and bioavailability of methylated flavonoids, therefore, is an interesting topic with broad potential applications. Though methylated flavonoids are widely present in plants, their levels are usually low. Because developing efficient techniques to produce these chemicals would likely be beneficial, we provide an overview of their chemical and biological synthesis. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Colorectal Cancer "Methylator Phenotype": Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Anacleto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that human colorectal tumors can be classified into two groups: one in which methylation is rare, and another with methylation of several loci associated with a "CpG island methylated phenotype (CIMP," characterized by preferential proximal location in the colon, but otherwise poorly defined. There is considerable overlap between this putative methylator phenotype and the well-known mutator phenotype associated with microsatellite instability (MSI. We have examined hypermethylation of the promoter region of five genes (DAPK, MGMT, hMLH1, p16INK4a, and p14ARF in 106 primary colorectal cancers. A graph depicting the frequency of methylated loci in the series of tumors showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing distribution quite different from the previously claimed discontinuity. We observed a significant association between the presence of three or more methylated loci and the proximal location of the tumors. However, if we remove from analysis the tumors with hMLH1 methylation or those with MSI, the significance vanishes, suggesting that the association between multiple methylations and proximal location was indirect due to the correlation with MSI. Thus, our data do not support the independent existence of the so-called methylator phenotype and suggest that it rather may represent a statistical artifact caused by confounding of associations.

  6. Hydrogen Storage In Nanostructured Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storag...

  7. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  8. Methylation diet and methyl group genetics in risk for adenomatous polyp occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Lucock

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: A methylation diet influences methyl group synthesis in the regulation of blood homocysteine level, and is modulated by genetic interactions. Methylation-related nutrients also interact with key genes to modify risk of AP, a precursor of colorectal cancer. Independent of diet, two methylation-related genes (A2756G-MS and A66G-MSR were directly associated with AP occurrence.

  9. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  10. Crystal structure of 3-methyl-2,6-bis(4-methyl-1,3-thiazol-5-ylpiperidin-4-one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Manimaran

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C14H17N3OS2, the central piperidinone ring adopts a chair conformation and the thiazole rings are inclined to its mean plane by 80.16 (12 and 67.15 (12°. The O atom and methyl group C atom deviate significantly from the mean plane of the central piperidinone ring, by 0.8138 (2 and 0.3175 (2 Å, respectively. The dihedral angle between the thiazole rings is 51.88 (13°. In the crystal, molecules are linked via C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming zigzag C(10 chains running parallel to [001].

  11. Rapid Enzymatic Method for Pectin Methyl Esters Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Łękawska-Andrinopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectin is a natural polysaccharide used in food and pharma industries. Pectin degree of methylation is an important parameter having significant influence on pectin applications. A rapid, fully automated, kinetic flow method for determination of pectin methyl esters has been developed. The method is based on a lab-made analyzer using the reverse flow-injection/stopped flow principle. Methanol is released from pectin by pectin methylesterase in the first mixing coil. Enzyme working solution is injected further downstream and it is mixed with pectin/pectin methylesterase stream in the second mixing coil. Methanol is oxidized by alcohol oxidase releasing formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide. This reaction is coupled to horse radish peroxidase catalyzed reaction, which gives the colored product 4-N-(p-benzoquinoneimine-antipyrine. Reaction rate is proportional to methanol concentration and it is followed using Ocean Optics USB 2000+ spectrophotometer. The analyzer is fully regulated by a lab written LabVIEW program. The detection limit was 1.47 mM with an analysis rate of 7 samples h−1. A paired t-test with results from manual method showed that the automated method results are equivalent to the manual method at the 95% confidence interval. The developed method is rapid and sustainable and it is the first application of flow analysis in pectin analysis.

  12. Hydrogen-Bonding Surfaces for Ice Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Hadley, Kevin R.; McDougall, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Ice formation on aircraft, either on the ground or in-flight, is a major safety issue. While ground icing events occur predominantly during the winter months, in-flight icing can happen anytime during the year. The latter is more problematic since it could result in increased drag and loss of lift. Under a Phase I ARMD NARI Seedling Activity, coated aluminum surfaces possessing hydrogen-bonding groups were under investigation for mitigating ice formation. Hydroxyl and methyl terminated dimethylethoxysilanes were prepared via known chemistries and characterized by spectroscopic methods. These materials were subsequently used to coat aluminum surfaces. Surface compositions were based on pure hydroxyl and methyl terminated species as well as mixtures of the two. Coated surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry. Receding water contact angle data suggested several potential surfaces that may exhibit reduced ice adhesion. Qualitative icing experiments performed under representative environmental temperatures using supercooled distilled water delivered via spray coating were inconclusive. Molecular modeling studies suggested that chain mobility affected the interface between ice and the surface more than terminal group chemical composition. Chain mobility resulted from the creation of "pockets" of increased free volume for longer chains to occupy.

  13. Hydrogen, energy of the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleau, Th.

    2007-01-01

    A cheap, non-polluting energy with no greenhouse gas emissions and unlimited resources? This is towards this fantastic future that this book brings us, analyzing the complex but promising question of hydrogen. The scientific and technical aspects of production, transport, storage and distribution raised by hydrogen are thoroughly reviewed. Content: I) Energy, which solutions?: 1 - hydrogen, a future; 2 - hydrogen, a foreseeable solution?; II) Hydrogen, an energy vector: 3 - characteristics of hydrogen (physical data, quality and drawbacks); 4 - hydrogen production (from fossil fuels, from water, from biomass, bio-hydrogen generation); 5 - transport, storage and distribution of hydrogen; 6 - hydrogen cost (production, storage, transport and distribution costs); III) Fuel cells and ITER, utopias?: 7 - molecular hydrogen uses (thermal engines and fuel cells); 8 - hydrogen and fusion (hydrogen isotopes, thermonuclear reaction, ITER project, fusion and wastes); IV) Hydrogen acceptability: 9 - risk acceptability; 10 - standards and regulations; 11 - national, European and international policies about hydrogen; 12 - big demonstration projects in France and in the rest of the world; conclusion. (J.S.)

  14. A genome-wide methylation study on obesity Differential variability and differential methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Barnes, Vernon A.; De Miguel, Carmen; Pollock, Jennifer; Ownby, Dennis; Shi, Huidong; Zhu, Haidong; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Besides differential methylation, DNA methylation variation has recently been proposed and demonstrated to be a potential contributing factor to cancer risk. Here we aim to examine whether differential variability in methylation is also an important feature of obesity, a typical non-malignant common

  15. 21 CFR 177.2000 - Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... methacrylate polymers. 177.2000 Section 177.2000 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.2000 Vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate/methyl methacrylate polymers. The vinylidene chloride/methyl acrylate...

  16. Future hydrogen markets for large-scale hydrogen production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    The cost of delivered hydrogen includes production, storage, and distribution. For equal production costs, large users (>10 6 m 3 /day) will favor high-volume centralized hydrogen production technologies to avoid collection costs for hydrogen from widely distributed sources. Potential hydrogen markets were examined to identify and characterize those markets that will favor large-scale hydrogen production technologies. The two high-volume centralized hydrogen production technologies are nuclear energy and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. The potential markets for these technologies are: (1) production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet) including liquid fuels with no net greenhouse gas emissions and (2) peak electricity production. The development of high-volume centralized hydrogen production technologies requires an understanding of the markets to (1) define hydrogen production requirements (purity, pressure, volumes, need for co-product oxygen, etc.); (2) define and develop technologies to use the hydrogen, and (3) create the industrial partnerships to commercialize such technologies. (author)

  17. Ionization of Interstellar Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1996-09-01

    Interstellar hydrogen can penetrate through the heliopause, enter the heliosphere, and may become ionized by photoionization and by charge exchange with solar wind protons. A fluid model is introduced to study the flow of interstellar hydrogen in the heliosphere. The flow is governed by moment equations obtained from integration of the Boltzmann equation over the velocity space. Under the assumption that the flow is steady axisymmetric and the pressure is isotropic, we develop a method of solution for this fluid model. This model and the method of solution can be used to study the flow of neutral hydrogen with various forms of ionization rate β and boundary conditions for the flow on the upwind side. We study the solution of a special case in which the ionization rate β is inversely proportional to R2 and the interstellar hydrogen flow is uniform at infinity on the upwind side. We solve the moment equations directly for the normalized density NH/NN∞, bulk velocity VH/VN∞, and temperature TH/TN∞ of interstellar hydrogen as functions of r/λ and z/λ, where λ is the ionization scale length. The solution is compared with the kinetic theory solution of Lallement et al. The fluid solution is much less time-consuming than the kinetic theory solutions. Since the ionization rate for production of pickup protons is directly proportional to the local density of neutral hydrogen, the high-resolution solution of interstellar neutral hydrogen obtained here will be used to study the global distribution of pickup protons.

  18. Hydrogen concentration control utilizing a hydrogen permeable membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keating, S.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The concentration of hydrogen in a fluid mixture is controlled to a desired concentration by flowing the fluid through one chamber of a diffusion cell separated into two chambers by a hydrogen permeable membrane. A gradient of hydrogen partial pressure is maintained across the membrane to cause diffusion of hydrogen through the membrane to maintain the concentration of hydrogen in the fluid mixture at the predetermined level. The invention has particular utility for the purpose of injecting into and/or separating hydrogen from the reactor coolant of a nuclear reactor system

  19. Hydrogen molecules and hydrogen-related defects in crystalline silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Fukata, N.; Sasak, S.; Murakami, K.; Ishioka, K.; Nakamura, K. G.; Kitajima, M.; Fujimura, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Haneda, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have found that hydrogen exists in molecular form in crystalline silicon treated with hydrogen atoms in the downstream of a hydrogen plasma. The vibrational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 4158cm-1 for silicon samples hydrogenated between 180 and 500 °C. The assignment of the Raman line is confirmed by its isotope shift to 2990cm-1 for silicon treated with deuterium atoms. The Raman intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 400 °C. The vibrational Raman line of the hydro...

  20. Aberrant TET1 Methylation Closely Associated with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Norihisa; Shinjo, Keiko; An, Byonggu; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yamao, Kenji; Ohka, Fumiharu; Katsushima, Keisuke; Hatanaka, Akira; Tojo, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromu; Ueda, Minoru; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-08-01

    Inactivation of methylcytosine dioxygenase, ten-eleven translocation (TET) is known to be associated with aberrant DNA methylation in cancers. Tumors with a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), a distinct subgroup with extensive DNA methylation, show characteristic features in the case of colorectal cancer. The relationship between TET inactivation and CIMP in colorectal cancers is not well understood. The expression level of TET family genes was compared between CIMP-positive (CIMP-P) and CIMP-negative (CIMP-N) colorectal cancers. Furthermore, DNA methylation profiling, including assessment of the TET1 gene, was assessed in colorectal cancers, as well as colon polyps. The TET1 was silenced by DNA methylation in a subset of colorectal cancers as well as cell lines, expression of which was reactivated by demethylating agent. TET1 methylation was more frequent in CIMP-P (23/55, 42%) than CIMP-N (2/113, 2%, P CIMP-P, 16/40, 40%; CIMP-N, 2/24, 8%; P = 0.002), suggesting that TET1 methylation is an early event in CIMP tumorigenesis. TET1 methylation was significantly associated with BRAF mutation but not with hMLH1 methylation in the CIMP-P colorectal cancers. Colorectal cancers with TET1 methylation have a significantly greater number of DNA methylated genes and less pathological metastasis compared to those without TET1 methylation (P = 0.007 and 0.045, respectively). Our data suggest that TET1 methylation may contribute to the establishment of a unique pathway in respect to CIMP-mediated tumorigenesis, which may be incidental to hMLH1 methylation. In addition, our findings provide evidence that TET1 methylation may be a good biomarker for the prediction of metastasis in colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century

  2. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  3. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  4. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. David Swank

    2007-01-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500 C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed

  5. Microfabricated hydrogen sensitive membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, A.; Kraetz, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern (Germany); Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S.; Hessel, V. [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Faqir, N. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Bart, H.J.

    2009-01-15

    Thin, defect-free palladium, palladium/copper and palladium/silver hydrogen absorbing membranes were microfabricated. A dual sputtering technique was used to deposit the palladium alloy membranes of only 1 {mu}m thickness on a nonporous silicon substrate. Advanced silicon etching (ASE) was applied on the backside to create a mechanically stable support structure for the thin films. Performance evaluation was carried out for different gases in a temperature range of 20 C to 298 C at a constant differential pressure of 110 kPa at the two sides of the membrane. The composite membranes show an excellent permeation rate of hydrogen, which appears to be 0.05 Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} and 0.01.10{sup -3} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 20 C for the microfabricated 23 % silver and the 53 % copper composite membranes, respectively. The selectivity to hydrogen over a gas mixture containing, in addition to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen was measured. The mass spectrometer did not detect any CO{sub 2} or CO, showing that the membrane is completely hydrogen selective. The microfabricated membranes exhibit both high mechanical strength (they easily withstand pressures up to 4 bar) and high thermal stability (up to 650 C). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Possibilities of hydrogen removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.; Koehling, A.; Nikodem, H.

    1982-12-01

    In the event of hypothetical severe accidents in light-water reactors, considerable amounts of hydrogen may be produced and released into the containment. Combustion of the hydrogen may jeopardize the integrity of the containment. The study reported here aimed to identify methods to mitigate the hydrogen problem. These methods should either prevent hydrogen combustion, or limit its effects. The following methods have been investigated: pre-inerting; chemical oxygen absorption; removal of oxygen by combustion; post-inerting with N 2 , CO 2 , or halon; aqueous foam; water fog; deliberate ignition; containment purging; and containment venting. The present state of the art in both nuclear and non-nuclear facilities, has been identified. The assessment of the methods was based on accident scenarios assuming significant release of hydrogen and the spectrum of requirements derived from these scenarios was used to determine the advantages and drawbacks of the various methods, assuming their application in a pressurized-water reactor of German design. (orig.) [de

  7. Saga of hydrogen civilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veziroglu, T.N. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States). Clean Energy Research Institute

    2008-09-30

    In the 1960s, air pollution in cities became an important issue hurting the health of people. The author became interested in environmental issues in general and air pollution in particular. He started studying possible vehicle fuels, with a view of determining the fuel which would cause little or no pollution. He particularly studied methanol, ethanol, ammonia and hydrogen as well as the gasohols (i.e., the mixtures of gasoline and methanol and/or ethanol). His investigation of fuels for transportation lasted five years (1967-1972). The result was that hydrogen is the cleanest fuel, and it is also the most efficient one. It would not produce CO (carbon monoxide), CO{sub 2} (carbon dioxide), SO{sub x}, hydrocarbons, soot and particulates. If hydrogen was burned in oxygen, it would not produce NO{sub x} either. If it burned in air, there would then be some NO{sub x} produced. Since the author has always believed that engineers and scientists should strive to find solutions to the problems facing humankind and the world, he established the Clean Energy Research Institute (CERI) at the University of Miami in 1973. The mission of the Institute was to find a solution or solutions to the energy problem, so the world economy can function properly and provide humankind with high living standards. To find clean forms of energy was also the mission of the Institute, so that they would not produce pollution and damage the health of flora, fauna and humans, as well as the environment of the planet Earth as a whole. CERI looked at all of the possible primary energy sources, including solar, wind, currents, waves, tides, geothermal, nuclear breeders and thermonuclear. Although they are much cleaner and would last much longer than fossil fuels, these sources were not practical for use. They were not storable or transportable by themselves, except nuclear. They could not be used as a fuel for transportation by themselves, except nuclear for marine transportation. In order to solve

  8. The Synthesis of Methyl Salicylate: Amine Diazotization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanger, Murray; McKee, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Notes that this experiment takes safety and noncarcinogenic reactants into account. Demonstrates the use of diazonium salts for the replacement of an aromatic amine group by a phenolic hydroxyl. Involves two pleasant-smelling organic compounds, methyl anthranilate (grape) and methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen). (MVL)

  9. Evidence Suggesting Absence of Mitochondrial DNA Methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechta, Mie; Ingerslev, Lars R; Fabre, Odile

    2017-01-01

    , 16S, ND5 and CYTB, suggesting that mtDNA supercoiled structure blocks the access to bisulfite conversion. Here, we identified an artifact of mtDNA bisulfite sequencing that can lead to an overestimation of mtDNA methylation levels. Our study supports that cytosine methylation is virtually absent...

  10. DNA Methylation Modulates Nociceptive Sensitization after Incision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Sun

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling DNA accessibility and gene expression. Blockade of DNA methylation can significantly affect pain behaviors implicated in neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the role of DNA methylation with regard to postoperative pain has not yet been explored. In this study we sought to investigate the role of DNA methylation in modulating incisional pain and identify possible targets under DNA methylation and contributing to incisional pain. DNA methyltranferase (DNMT inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine significantly reduced incision-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal sensitivity. Aza-2'-deoxycytidine also reduced hindpaw swelling after incision, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. Global DNA methylation and DNMT3b expression were increased in skin after incision, but none of DNMT1, DNMT3a or DNMT3b was altered in spinal cord or DRG. The expression of proopiomelanocortin Pomc encoding β-endorphin and Oprm1 encoding the mu-opioid receptor were upregulated peripherally after incision; moreover, Oprm1 expression was further increased under DNMT inhibitor treatment. Finally, local peripheral injection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone significantly exacerbated incision-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results suggest that DNA methylation is functionally relevant to incisional nociceptive sensitization, and that mu-opioid receptor signaling might be one methylation regulated pathway controlling sensitization after incision.

  11. Methyl 3-(Quinolin-2-ylindolizine-1-carboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumaissa Belguedj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel compound, methyl 3-(quinolin-2-ylindolizine-1-carboxylate (2 has been synthesized by cycloaddition reaction of 1-(quinolin-2-ylmethylpyridinium ylide (1 with methyl propiolate in presence of sodium hydride in THF. The structure of this compound was established by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and MS data

  12. Adenine N6-methylation in diverse fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    A DNA modification - methylation of cytosines and adenines - has important roles in diverse processes such as regulation of gene expression and genome stability, yet until recently adenine methylation had been considered to be only a hallmark of prokaryotes. A new study identifies abundant

  13. Effect of pressure on the solution structure and hydrogen bond properties of aqueous N-methylacetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Rahul; Paul, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups. ► High pressure reduces association propensity causing dispersion of these moieties. ► Orientational polarization of vicinal water molecules near O and H atoms of NMA. ► NMA prefers to be a H-bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water. ► Energy of these hydrogen bonds reduces slightly at high pressure. -- Abstract: Effects of high pressure on hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions are investigated by employing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of aqueous N-methylacetamide (NMA) solutions. Such systems are of interest mainly because high pressure causes protein denaturation and NMA is a computationally effective model to understand the atomic-level picture of pressure-induced structural transitions of protein. Simulations are performed for five different pressure values ranging from 1 atm to 8000 atm. We find that NMA molecules are associated mostly through their hydrophobic methyl groups and high pressure reduces this association propensity, causing dispersion of these moieties. At high pressure, structural void decreases and the packing efficiency of water molecules around NMA molecules increases. Hydrogen bond properties calculations show favorable NMA–NMA hydrogen bonds as compared to those of NMA–water hydrogen bonds and preference of NMA to be a hydrogen bond acceptor rather than a donor in interaction with water.

  14. Structure and spectroscopic properties of N,S-coordinating 2-methyl-sulfanyl-N-[(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)methyl-idene]aniline methanol monosolvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, D Douglas; Ang, M Trisha C; McDonald, Robert; Bierenstiel, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The reaction of pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde and 2-(methyl-sulfan-yl)aniline in refluxing methanol gave an olive-green residue in which yellow crystals of the title compound, C12H12N2S·CH3OH, were grown from slow evaporation of methanol at 263 K. In the crystal, hydrogen-bonding inter-actions link the aniline mol-ecule and a nearby methanol solvent mol-ecule. These units are linked by a pair of weak C-H⋯Omethanol interactions, forming inversion dimers consisting of two main molecules and two solvent molecules.

  15. Hydrogen in energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    This publication proposes a rather brief overview of challenges related to the use of hydrogen as an energy vector in the fields of transports and of energy storage to valorise renewable energies. Processes (steam reforming of natural gas or bio-gas, alkaline or membrane electrolysis, biological production), installation types (centralised or decentralised), raw materials and/or energy (natural gas, water, bio-gas, electricity, light), and their respective industrial maturity are indicated. The role of hydrogen to de-carbonate different types of transports is described (complementary energy for internal combustion as well as electrical vehicles) as well as its role in the valorisation and integration of renewable energies. The main challenges faced by the hydrogen sector are identified and discussed, and actions undertaken by the ADEME are indicated

  16. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A; Khamis, Abdullah M.; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Ba Alawi, Wail; Bhuyan, Md Shariful I; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Harbers, Matthias; Forrest, Alistair RR; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect

  17. DMPD: TLR ignores methylated RNA? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16111629 TLR ignores methylated RNA? Ishii KJ, Akira S. Immunity. 2005 Aug;23(2):11...1-3. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show TLR ignores methylated RNA? PubmedID 16111629 Title TLR ignores methylated

  18. Modeling spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lövkvist, Cecilia Elisabet

    into how epigenetic marks are distributed in the human genome. In the first part of the thesis, we investigate DNA methylation and maintenance of methylation patterns throughout cell division. We argue that collaborative models, those where the methylation of CpG sites depends on the methylation status...... into the game more explicitly in another type of model that speaks out the duality of the two aspects. Using statistical analysis of experimental data, this thesis further explores a link between DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy. By comparing the patterns on promoters to regions with similar Cp...... division. The patterns of epigentic marks depend on enzymes that ensure their maintenance and introduction. Using theoretical models, this thesis proposes new mechanisms for how enzymes operate to maintain patterns of epigenetic marks. Through analysis of experimental data this work gives new insight...

  19. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ( 3 H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented

  20. Radiation effects on DNA methylation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, J.; Kurishita, A.; Miyamura, Y.; Ono, T.; Tawa, R.; Sakurai, H.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation on DNA methylation in liver, brain and spleen were examined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total methylated cytosine level in the genome was reduced within 8 hours after 3.8 Gy of irradiation in liver of adult mice. But no appreciable effect was observed in brain and spleen. When mice were irradiated at newborn, liver DNA revealed no change in methylated cytosine level. Even though slight effects of radiation were detected in he methylation of the c-myc and c-fos genes, they were only temporary and no long-term effects were observed. These data suggest that the effect of radiation on DNA methylation in vivo is not prevailing a DNA damage, but rather influenced much through biological parameters. (author)

  1. Methylation analysis of polysaccharides: Technical advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Ian M; Carnachan, Susan M; Bell, Tracey J; Hinkley, Simon F R

    2018-05-15

    Glycosyl linkage (methylation) analysis is used widely for the structural determination of oligo- and poly-saccharides. The procedure involves derivatisation of the individual component sugars of a polysaccharide to partially methylated alditol acetates which are analysed and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linkage positions for each component sugar can be determined by correctly identifying the partially methylated alditol acetates. Although the methods are well established, there are many technical aspects to this procedure and both careful attention to detail and considerable experience are required to achieve a successful methylation analysis and to correctly interpret the data generated. The aim of this article is to provide the technical details and critical procedural steps necessary for a successful methylation analysis and to assist researchers (a) with interpreting data correctly and (b) in providing the comprehensive data required for reviewers to fully assess the work. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. DNA sequence explains seemingly disordered methylation levels in partially methylated domains of Mammalian genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimos Gaidatzis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available For the most part metazoan genomes are highly methylated and harbor only small regions with low or absent methylation. In contrast, partially methylated domains (PMDs, recently discovered in a variety of cell lines and tissues, do not fit this paradigm as they show partial methylation for large portions (20%-40% of the genome. While in PMDs methylation levels are reduced on average, we found that at single CpG resolution, they show extensive variability along the genome outside of CpG islands and DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS. Methylation levels range from 0% to 100% in a roughly uniform fashion with only little similarity between neighboring CpGs. A comparison of various PMD-containing methylomes showed that these seemingly disordered states of methylation are strongly conserved across cell types for virtually every PMD. Comparative sequence analysis suggests that DNA sequence is a major determinant of these methylation states. This is further substantiated by a purely sequence based model which can predict 31% (R(2 of the variation in methylation. The model revealed CpG density as the main driving feature promoting methylation, opposite to what has been shown for CpG islands, followed by various dinucleotides immediately flanking the CpG and a minor contribution from sequence preferences reflecting nucleosome positioning. Taken together we provide a reinterpretation for the nucleotide-specific methylation levels observed in PMDs, demonstrate their conservation across tissues and suggest that they are mainly determined by specific DNA sequence features.

  3. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  4. Hydrogen: Fueling the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisch, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    As our dependence on foreign oil increases and concerns about global climate change rise, the need to develop sustainable energy technologies is becoming increasingly significant. Worldwide energy consumption is expected to double by the year 2050, as will carbon emissions along with it. This increase in emissions is a product of an ever-increasing demand for energy, and a corresponding rise in the combustion of carbon containing fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Undisputable scientific evidence indicates significant changes in the global climate have occurred in recent years. Impacts of climate change and the resulting atmospheric warming are extensive, and know no political or geographic boundaries. These far-reaching effects will be manifested as environmental, economic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical issues. Offsetting the projected increase in fossil energy use with renewable energy production will require large increases in renewable energy systems, as well as the ability to store and transport clean domestic fuels. Storage and transport of electricity generated from intermittent resources such as wind and solar is central to the widespread use of renewable energy technologies. Hydrogen created from water electrolysis is an option for energy storage and transport, and represents a pollution-free source of fuel when generated using renewable electricity. The conversion of chemical to electrical energy using fuel cells provides a high efficiency, carbon-free power source. Hydrogen serves to blur the line between stationary and mobile power applications, as it can be used as both a transportation fuel and for stationary electricity generation, with the possibility of a distributed generation energy infrastructure. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies will be presented as possible pollution-free solutions to present and future energy concerns. Recent hydrogen-related research at SLAC in hydrogen production, fuel cell catalysis, and hydrogen

  5. Detection of DNA methylation changes in micropropagated banana plants using methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraza-Echeverria, S; Herrera-Valencia, V A.; Kay, A -J.

    2001-07-01

    The extent of DNA methylation polymorphisms was evaluated in micropropagated banana (Musa AAA cv. 'Grand Naine') derived from either the vegetative apex of the sucker or the floral apex of the male inflorescence using the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) technique. In all, 465 fragments, each representing a recognition site cleaved by either or both of the isoschizomers were amplified using eight combinations of primers. A total of 107 sites (23%) were found to be methylated at cytosine in the genome of micropropagated banana plants. In plants micropropagated from the male inflorescence explant 14 (3%) DNA methylation events were polymorphic, while plants micropropagated from the sucker explant produced 8 (1.7%) polymorphisms. No DNA methylation polymorphisms were detected in conventionally propagated banana plants. These results demonstrated the usefulness of MSAP to detect DNA methylation events in micropropagated banana plants and indicate that DNA methylation polymorphisms are associated with micropropagation.

  6. The origin and fate of 4-methyl steroid hydrocarbons. I. Diagenesis of 4-methyl sterenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, George A.; Lamb, Neil A.; Maxwell, James R.

    1986-03-01

    Treatment of 4-methylcholest-4-ene under mild acid conditions at low temperatures gives chemical evidence for certain features seen in the distributions of sedimentary 4-methyl steroid hydrocarbons, and further indicates that many low temperature diagenetic reactions of steroids are explicable in terms of acid catalysed rearrangements. Specifically, the results provide: (i) Indirect evidence that the 4-ene skeleton is a key intermediate in the dehydration of 4-methyl stanols in sediments. (ii) An explanation for the distribution of 4-methyl sterenes and A-nor sterenes in the lacustrine Messel shale (Eocene). (iii) An explanation for the presence of 4β-methyl steranes in relatively immature sedimentary rocks, despite the precursor stanols having the 4α-methyl configuration. With increasing maturity in the Paris Basin shales (Lower Toarcian), the less stable 4β-methyl steranes decrease gradually in abundance relative to their 4α-methyl counterparts, at a rate fairly similar to the change in pristane stereochemistry.

  7. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  8. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-12

    A container is described for storage, shipping and and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same. The container is compact, safe against fracture or accident, and is reusable. It consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and is retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  9. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular materials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date text covering topics in utilizing hydrogen bonding for constructing functional architectures and supramolecular materials. The first chapter addresses the control of photo-induced electron and energy transfer. The second chapter summarizes the formation of nano-porous materials. The following two chapters introduce self-assembled gels, many of which exhibit unique functions. Other chapters cover the advances in supramolecular liquid crystals and the versatility of hydrogen bonding in tuning/improving the properties and performance of materials. This book is designed

  10. Electrocatalysts for hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Losiewicz, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    This special topic volume deals with the development of novel solid state electrocatalysts of a high performance to enhance the rates of the hydrogen or oxygen evolution. It contains a description of various types of metals, alloys and composites which have been obtained using electrodeposition in aqueous solutions that has been identified to be a technologically feasible and economically superior technique for the production of the porous electrodes. The goal was to produce papers that would be useful to both the novice and the expert in hydrogen technologies. This volume is intended to be us

  11. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast...... at temperatures around 600 K and above, but the reversed reaction showed somewhat slower kinetics around 600 K. At higher temperatures the opposite was found. The enthalpy and entropy change by the hydrogenation, derived from pressure-concentration isotherms, agree fairly well with those reported earlier....

  12. Hydrogen production from hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Docekal, J

    1986-01-01

    Hydrogen is an important feed stock for chemical and petroleum industries, in addition to being considered as the energy carrier of the future. At the present time the feed stock hydrogen is mainly manufactured from hydrocarbons using steam reforming. In steam reforming two processes are employed, the conventional process and PSA (pressure swing adsorption) process. These two processes are described and compared. The results show that the total costs and the maintenance costs are lower for the PSA process, the capital outlay is lower for the conventional process, and the operating costs are similar for the two processes.

  13. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A container is described for storage, shipping and and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same. The container is compact, safe against fracture or accident, and is reusable. It consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and is retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates

  14. Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2008-04-01

    Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

  15. Isomerization and dissociation in competition: the two-component dissociation rates of methyl acetate ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazyar, Oleg A.; Mayer, Paul M.; Baer, Tomas

    1997-11-01

    Threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) spectroscopy has been used to investigate the unimolecular chemistry of metastable methyl acetate ions, CH3COOCH3.+. The rate of molecular ion fragmentation with the loss of CH3O. and CH2OH radicals as a function of ion internal energy was obtained from the coincidence data and used in conjunction with Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Markus and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to model the dissociation/isomerization mechanism of the methyl acetate ion (A). The data were found to be consistent with the mechanism involving a hydrogen-bridged complex CH3CO[middle dot][middle dot][middle dot]H[middle dot][middle dot][middle dot]OCH2.+(E) as the direct precursor of the observed fragments CH3CO+ and CH2OH.. The two-component decay rates were modeled with a three-well-two-product potential energy surface including the distonic ion CH3C(OH)OCH2.+(B) and enol isomer CH2C(OH)OCH3.+(C), which are formed from the methyl acetate ion by two consecutive [1,4]-hydrogen shifts. The 0 K heats of formation of isomers B and C as well as transition states TSAB, TSBC, and TSBE (relative to isomer A) were calculated from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Markus (RRKM) theory.

  16. A novel bi-enzyme electrochemical biosensor for selective and sensitive determination of methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Umasankar, Yogeswaran; Ramasamy, Ramaraja P

    2016-07-15

    An amperometric sensor based on a bi-enzyme modified electrode was fabricated to detect methyl salicylate, a volatile organic compound released by pathogen-infected plants via systemic response. The detection is based on cascadic conversion reactions that result in an amperometric electrochemical signal. The bi-enzyme electrode is made of alcohol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase enzymes immobilized on to a carbon nanotube matrix through a molecular tethering method. Methyl salicylate undergoes hydrolysis to form methanol, which is consumed by alcohol oxidase to form formaldehyde while simultaneously reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide will be further reduced to water by horseradish peroxidase, which results in an amperometric signal via direct electron transfer. The bi-enzyme biosensor was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and constant potential amperometry using hydrolyzed methyl salicylate as the analyte. The sensitivity of the bi-enzyme biosensor as determined by cyclic voltammetry and constant potential amperometry were 112.37 and 282.82μAcm(-2)mM(-1) respectively, and the corresponding limits of detection were 22.95 and 0.98μM respectively. Constant potential amperometry was also used to evaluate durability, repeatability and interference from other compounds. Wintergreen oil was used for real sample study to establish the application of the bi-enzyme sensor for selective determination of plant pathogen infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystal structure of methyl (Z-2-[(Z-3-methyl-2-({(E-1-[(R*-4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-yl]ethylidene}hydrazinylidene-4-oxothiazolidin-5-ylidene]acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Fawzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The new title 4-thiazolidinone derivative, C16H21N3O3S, was obtained from the cyclization reaction of 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD. The cyclohexylidene ring has an envelope conformation with the stereogenic centre C atom as the flap. Its mean plane makes a dihedral angle of 56.23 (9° with the thiazolidine ring mean plane. In the crystal, molecules are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds forming chains propagating in the [001] direction. Within the chains there are offset π–π interactions between the thiazolidine rings of inversion-related molecules [centroid–centroid distance = 3.703 (1 Å]. The chains are linked by further C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming slabs parallel to the ac plane.

  18. Hydrodehalogenation of alkyl iodides with base-mediated hydrogenation and catalytic transfer hydrogenation: application to the asymmetric synthesis of N-protected α-methylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pijus K; Birtwistle, J Sanderson; McMurray, John S

    2014-09-05

    We report a very mild synthesis of N-protected α-methylamines from the corresponding amino acids. Carboxyl groups of amino acids are reduced to iodomethyl groups via hydroxymethyl intermediates. Reductive deiodination to methyl groups is achieved by hydrogenation or catalytic transfer hydrogenation under alkaline conditions. Basic hydrodehalogenation is selective for the iodomethyl group over hydrogenolysis-labile protecting groups, such as benzyloxycarbonyl, benzyl ester, benzyl ether, and 9-fluorenyloxymethyl, thus allowing the conversion of virtually any protected amino acid into the corresponding N-protected α-methylamine.

  19. Polymerase recognition of 2-thio-iso-guanine·5-methyl-4-pyrimidinone (iGs·P)--A new DD/AA base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kye; Switzer, Christopher

    2016-02-15

    Polymerase specificity is reported for a previously unknown base pair with a non-standard DD/AA hydrogen bonding pattern: 2-thio-iso-guanine·5-methyl-4-pyrimidinone. Our findings suggest that atomic substitution may provide a solution for low fidelity previously associated with enzymatic copying of iso-guanine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrogen isotope effect through Pd in hydrogen transport pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    This investigation concerns hydrogen system with hydrogen transport pipes for transportation, purification, isotope separation and storage of hydrogen and its isotopes. A principle of the hydrogen transport pipe (heat pipe having hydrogen transport function) was proposed. It is comprised of the heat pipe and palladium alloy tubes as inlet, outlet, and the separation membrane of hydrogen. The operation was as follows: (1) gas was introduced into the heat pipe through the membrane in the evaporator; (2) the introduced gas was transported toward the condenser by the vapor flow; (3) the transported gas was swept and compressed to the end of the condenser by the vapor pressure; and (4) the compressed gas was exhausted from the heat pipe through the membrane in the condenser. The characteristics of the hydrogen transport pipe were examined for various working conditions. Basic performance concerning transportation, evacuation and compression was experimentally verified. Isotopic dihydrogen gases (H 2 and D 2 ) were used as feed gas for examining the intrinsic performance of the isotope separation by the hydrogen transport pipe. A simulated experiment for hydrogen isotope separation was carried out using a hydrogen-helium gas mixture. The hydrogen transport pipe has a potential for isotope separation and purification of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium in fusion reactor technology. (author)

  1. Hot Hydrogen Heat Source Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to develop a  hot hydrogen heat source that would produce  a high temperature hydrogen flow which would be comparable to that produced...

  2. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  3. Oxidation resistant organic hydrogen getters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepodd, Timothy J [Livermore, CA; Buffleben, George M [Tracy, CA

    2008-09-09

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably Pt. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently removing hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  4. Small hydrogen liquefier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airoldi, V.J.T.; Corat, E.J.; Minucci, M.A.S.; Leite, V.S.F.O.

    1986-09-01

    In this work the deign and construction of a small hydrogen liquefier (two liters per hour maximum production) is described. The isenthalpic expansion process is used, because its construction is simple and it is generally cheaper to operate. A comparison with other liquefier processes, and considerations about their basic theory are also presented. (author) [pt

  5. Hydrogen inventory in gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazayev, S.N.; Prokofiev, Yu.G.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations of hydrogen inventory in gallium (99.9%) were carried out after saturation both from molecular phase and from glow discharge plasma at room temperature, 370 and 520 K. Saturation took place during 3000 s under hydrogen pressure of 20 Pa, and ion flux was about 1x10 15 ions/cm 2 s with an energy about 400 eV during discharge. Hydrogen concentration in Ga at room temperature and that for 370 K by the saturation from gaseous phase was (2-3)x10 14 cm -3 Pa -1/2 . Hydrogen concentration at temperature 520 K increased by five times. Inventory at room temperature for irradiation from discharge was 7x10 16 cm -3 at the dose about 3x10 18 ions/cm 2 . It was more than inventory at temperature 520 K by four times and more than maximum inventory from gaseous phase at 520 K by a factor of 10. Inventory increased when temperature decreased. Diffusion coefficient D=0.003 exp(-2300/RT) cm 2 /s, was estimated from temperature dependence. ((orig.))

  6. Hydrogen fuel - Universal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, A. G.; Burg, J. A.

    The technology for the production, storage, transmission, and consumption of hydrogen as a fuel is surveyed, with the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen examined as they affect its use as a fuel. Sources of hydrogen production are described including synthesis from coal or natural gas, biomass conversion, thermochemical decomposition of water, and electrolysis of water, of these only electrolysis is considered economicially and technologically feasible in the near future. Methods of production of the large quantities of electricity required for the electrolysis of sea water are explored: fossil fuels, hydroelectric plants, nuclear fission, solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, tidal power, wave motion, electrochemical concentration cells, and finally ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The wind power and OTEC are considered in detail as the most feasible approaches. Techniques for transmission (by railcar or pipeline), storage (as liquid in underwater or underground tanks, as granular metal hydride, or as cryogenic liquid), and consumption (in fuel cells in conventional power plants, for home usage, for industrial furnaces, and for cars and aircraft) are analyzed. The safety problems of hydrogen as a universal fuel are discussed, noting that they are no greater than those for conventional fuels.

  7. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  8. Oils; destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1928-03-01

    Coals, oil-shales, or other carbonaceous solids are dissolved in or extracted by solvents at temperatures over 200/sup 0/C, and under pressure, preferably over 30 atmospheres, in presence of halogens, hydrogen halides, or compounds setting free the halogen or halide under the conditions.

  9. Low Trans Hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although hydrogenation has been the technology of choice for fat formulation for many years recent concerns over the health and nutrition of trans fatty acids have had a profound effect on the edible oil industry. Since Jan. 1, 2006, TFA has been required on nutrition labels along with saturated an...

  10. Destructive hydrogenation. [British patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1929-07-15

    Liquid or readily liquefiable products are obtained from solid distillable carbonaceous materials such as coals, oil shales or other bituminous substances by subjecting the said initial materials to destructive hydrogenation under mild conditions so that the formation of benzine is substantially avoided, and then subjecting the treated material to extraction by solvents. By hydrogenating under mild conditions the heavy oils which prevent the asphaltic substances from being precipitated are preserved, and the separation of the liquid products from the solid residue is facilitated. Solid paraffins and high boiling point constituents suitable for the production of lubricating oils may be removed before or after the extraction process. The extraction is preferably carried out under pressure with solvents which do not precipitate asphaltic substances. Brown coal containing 11 per cent ash is passed at 450/sup 0/C, and 200 atmospheres pressure in counter current to hydrogen; 40 per cent of the coal is converted into liquid products which are condensed out of the hydrogen stream; the pasty residue, on extraction with benzene, yields 45 per cent of high molecular weight products suitable for the production of lubricating oil.

  11. Interstellar hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the first extensive study of the existence and effects of interstellar hydrogen bonding. The reactions that occur on the surface of the interstellar dust grains are the dominant processes by which interstellar molecules are formed. Water molecules constitute about 70% of the interstellar ice. These water molecules serve as the platform for hydrogen bonding. High level quantum chemical simulations for the hydrogen bond interaction between 20 interstellar molecules (known and possible) and water are carried out using different ab-intio methods. It is evident that if the formation of these species is mainly governed by the ice phase reactions, there is a direct correlation between the binding energies of these complexes and the gas phase abundances of these interstellar molecules. Interstellar hydrogen bonding may cause lower gas abundance of the complex organic molecules (COMs) at the low temperature. From these results, ketenes whose less stable isomers that are more strongly bonded to the surface of the interstellar dust grains have been observed are proposed as suitable candidates for astronomical observations.

  12. Trends in Hydrogen Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoevenaars, A.J.; Weeda, M. [ECN Hydrogen and Clean Fossil Fuels, Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    This report intends to provide an update of the latest developments that have recently occurred within car industry within the field of Hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) to date, October 2009. In attempts to provide a clear and logical overview, the report starts with an overview of the OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturers) that are actually active within the Hydrogen vehicle business, and provides an overview of the intensity of FCV activity per OEM. This overview shows that there is a pool of distinctively most active OEMs, and that others have tried to create exposure for themselves, but have not seriously been involved in in-house technology development in support of FCV manufacturing. Furthermore, some manufacturers chose a different path when it comes to using hydrogen for vehicle propulsion and use Hydrogen gas as a fuel for a conventional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE). In the field of FCVs, Most FCV activities are displayed by Honda, Daimler, Opel/GM, Hyundai/Kia, Toyota, Nissan and Ford. Volkswagen has given less priority to FCV development and has not been profiling itself as a very Hydrogen-prone OEM. Mazda and BMW chose to put their efforts in the development of Hydrogen fuelled ICE vehicles. Also Ford has put efforts in Hydrogen fuelled ICE vehicles. After the active OEMs are mapped, an overview is given on how active they have been in terms of cars produced. It appeared difficult to come up with reliable estimations on the basis of numbers available for public. The sum of vehicles produced by all OEMs together was estimated on about 515 vehicles. This estimation however was much lower than the figures published by Fuel Cell Today (FCT). FCT projects accumulated vehicles shipped in 2009 around 1100 units, the double of the numbers found for this study. Communication with FCT learned us that FCT has access to confidential information from the OEMs. Especially the Asian OEMs do not provide transparency when it comes to FCVs shipped, however

  13. Trends in Hydrogen Vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoevenaars, A.J.; Weeda, M.

    2009-09-01

    This report intends to provide an update of the latest developments that have recently occurred within car industry within the field of Hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) to date, October 2009. In attempts to provide a clear and logical overview, the report starts with an overview of the OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturers) that are actually active within the Hydrogen vehicle business, and provides an overview of the intensity of FCV activity per OEM. This overview shows that there is a pool of distinctively most active OEMs, and that others have tried to create exposure for themselves, but have not seriously been involved in in-house technology development in support of FCV manufacturing. Furthermore, some manufacturers chose a different path when it comes to using hydrogen for vehicle propulsion and use Hydrogen gas as a fuel for a conventional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE). In the field of FCVs, Most FCV activities are displayed by Honda, Daimler, Opel/GM, Hyundai/Kia, Toyota, Nissan and Ford. Volkswagen has given less priority to FCV development and has not been profiling itself as a very Hydrogen-prone OEM. Mazda and BMW chose to put their efforts in the development of Hydrogen fuelled ICE vehicles. Also Ford has put efforts in Hydrogen fuelled ICE vehicles. After the active OEMs are mapped, an overview is given on how active they have been in terms of cars produced. It appeared difficult to come up with reliable estimations on the basis of numbers available for public. The sum of vehicles produced by all OEMs together was estimated on about 515 vehicles. This estimation however was much lower than the figures published by Fuel Cell Today (FCT). FCT projects accumulated vehicles shipped in 2009 around 1100 units, the double of the numbers found for this study. Communication with FCT learned us that FCT has access to confidential information from the OEMs. Especially the Asian OEMs do not provide transparency when it comes to FCVs shipped, however

  14. 1-Methyl-1H-2,1-benzothiazin-4(3H-one 2,2-dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nadeem Arshad

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, C9H9NO3S, there is distorted tetrahedral geometry around the S atom. The sulfonyl group is almost normal to the benzene ring, while the carbonyl O atom and methyl C atom are on opposite sides of this ring. The heterocyclic ring adopts a half-boat conformation with the S atom out of the plane. The molecules are dimerized by hydrogen bonding involving the benzene ring and the sulfonyl group. These dimers are linked to each other in the same way. There is an intramolecular hydrogen bond between a methyl C—H group and a sulfonyl O atom, and a π–π interaction between the aromatic rings of two dimers at a centroid-to-centroid distance of 3.6373 (13 Å.

  15. Hydrogen effects in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on stainless steels have been reviewed and are summarized in this paper. Discussion covers hydrogen solution and transport in stainless steels as well as the effects of hydrogen on deformation and fracture under various loading conditions. Damage is caused also by helium that arises from decay of the hydrogen isotope tritium. Austenitic, ferritic, martensite, and precipitation-hardenable stainless steels are included in the discussion. 200 references

  16. Hydrogen Fire Spectroscopy Issues Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hydrogen fires is important to the aerospace community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has devoted significant effort to the development, testing, and installation of hydrogen fire detectors based on ultraviolet, near-infrared, mid-infrared, andor far-infrared flame emission bands. Yet, there is no intensity calibrated hydrogen-air flame spectrum over this range in the literature and consequently, it can be difficult to compare the merits of different radiation-based hydrogen fire detectors.

  17. Global DNA methylation analysis using methyl-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Mahmoud W; Peng, Mingsheng; Rothstein, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a crucial epigenetic process which helps control gene transcription activity in eukaryotes. Information regarding the methylation status of a regulatory sequence of a particular gene provides important knowledge of this transcriptional control. DNA methylation can be detected using several methods, including sodium bisulfite sequencing and restriction digestion using methylation-sensitive endonucleases. Methyl-Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP) is a technique used to study the global DNA methylation status of an organism and hence to distinguish between two individuals based on the DNA methylation status determined by the differential digestion pattern. Therefore, this technique is a useful method for DNA methylation mapping and positional cloning of differentially methylated genes. In this technique, genomic DNA is first digested with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme such as HpaII, and then the DNA fragments are ligated to adaptors in order to facilitate their amplification. Digestion using a methylation-insensitive isoschizomer of HpaII, MspI is used in a parallel digestion reaction as a loading control in the experiment. Subsequently, these fragments are selectively amplified by fluorescently labeled primers. PCR products from different individuals are compared, and once an interesting polymorphic locus is recognized, the desired DNA fragment can be isolated from a denaturing polyacrylamide gel, sequenced and identified based on DNA sequence similarity to other sequences available in the database. We will use analysis of met1, ddm1, and atmbd9 mutants and wild-type plants treated with a cytidine analogue, 5-azaC, or zebularine to demonstrate how to assess the genetic modulation of DNA methylation in Arabidopsis. It should be noted that despite the fact that MSAP is a reliable technique used to fish for polymorphic methylated loci, its power is limited to the restriction recognition sites of the enzymes used in the genomic

  18. DNA methylation analysis reveals distinct methylation signatures in pediatric germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amatruda, James F; Frazier, A Lindsay; Poynter, Jenny N; Ross, Julie A; Christensen, Brock; Fustino, Nicholas J; Chen, Kenneth S; Hooten, Anthony J; Nelson, Heather; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a prominent feature of many cancers, and may be especially relevant in germ cell tumors (GCTs) due to the extensive epigenetic reprogramming that occurs in the germ line during normal development. We used the Illumina GoldenGate Cancer Methylation Panel to compare DNA methylation in the three main histologic subtypes of pediatric GCTs (germinoma, teratoma and yolk sac tumor (YST); N = 51) and used recursively partitioned mixture models (RPMM) to test associations between methylation pattern and tumor and demographic characteristics. We identified genes and pathways that were differentially methylated using generalized linear models and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. We also measured global DNA methylation at LINE1 elements and evaluated methylation at selected imprinted loci using pyrosequencing. Methylation patterns differed by tumor histology, with 18/19 YSTs forming a distinct methylation class. Four pathways showed significant enrichment for YSTs, including a human embryonic stem cell pluripotency pathway. We identified 190 CpG loci with significant methylation differences in mature and immature teratomas (q < 0.05), including a number of CpGs in stem cell and pluripotency-related pathways. Both YST and germinoma showed significantly lower methylation at LINE1 elements compared with normal adjacent tissue while there was no difference between teratoma (mature and immature) and normal tissue. DNA methylation at imprinted loci differed significantly by tumor histology and location. Understanding methylation patterns may identify the developmental stage at which the GCT arose and the at-risk period when environmental exposures could be most harmful. Further, identification of relevant genetic pathways could lead to the development of new targets for therapy

  19. Hydrogen and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, N J.D.

    1976-03-01

    There is much debate about the form and availability of energy supplies in the future. It is assumed that nuclear fuel is the only source of controlled energy. Energy inputs from the sun, the wind, the waves, the tides, and other sources not available in the form of fuels are not excluded. In this situation it has been argued that because the cost of transporting energy as a liquid or gaseous fuel is lower than the cost of transmitting energy as electricity it would be more effective to transmit and distribute energy from nuclear fuel in the form of a chemical fuel such as hydrogen. This argument has been critized by Hampson et al., (EAPA 1: 2200) who calculate that the reduced costs of transmission only outweigh the costs of production over distances so large that there appears no realistic application. These calculations neglect the time variation of electricity supply which is fundamental to the planning of an electricity supply system; they also do not appear to do justice to the relationship between the costs of hydrogen and electricity production in an integrated system. These points are included in the analysis presented here by means of the observation that hydrogen generated by nuclear plants with high capital cost and low running cost will be burned by the supply system itself in low-capital-cost plants, suitable for chemical fuels, in order to meet peak demands on the system. This establishes a relationship between the long-run marginal costs of electricity at various times of the day and the long-run marginal cost of hydrogen. These costs are then used to show that, in certain favorable, but common, circumstances, electrolytic hydrogen is the lower-cost source of energy. (from Introduction)

  20. Hydrogen from nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.I.

    2006-01-01

    A few years ago, one frequently heard the view that LNG would cap the price of natural gas in North America at around 5 or 6 US$/GJ just as soon as sufficient terminal capacity could be installed. Recent experience with international LNG prices suggests that this is unlikely. While oil and gas prices have proven almost impossible to predict it seems likely that the price of gas will in future broadly track its energy equivalent in oil. Consequently, planning for natural gas at 10 $/GJ would seem prudent. Using steam-methane reforming, this produces hydrogen at 1500 $/t. If CO 2 has to be sequestered, adding another 500 $/t H 2 is a likely additional cost. So is water electrolysis now competitive? Electrolysis would deliver hydrogen at 2000$/t if electricity costs 3.7 US cents/kWh. This is lower than the Alberta Pool average supply price but very close to AECL's estimated cost for power from a new reactor. However, electricity prices in deregulated markets vary hugely and there would be large leverage on the hydrogen price in delivering a mix of electricity (when the Pool price is high) and hydrogen (when it is low). The key to that possibility - as well as other issues of interruptibility - is low-cost cavern storage, similar to that used for natural gas. One long-standing example for hydrogen storage exists in the UK. The nuclear-electrolysis route offers long-term price stability. It also has co-product possibilities if a use can be found for oxygen (equivalent to about 300 $/t H 2 ) and to produce heavy water (provided the scale is at least 100 MW)

  1. Saga of hydrogen civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veziroglu, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text': Fossil fuels (i.e., petroleum, natural gas and coal), which meet most of the world's energy demand today, are being depleted quickly. Also, their combustion products are causing global problems such as the greenhouse effect, ozone layer depletion, acid rains and pollution, all of which are posing great danger for our environment and eventually for the life on our planet. Many engineers and scientists agree that the solution to these global problems would be to replace the existing fossil fuel system by the hydrogen energy system. Hydrogen is a very efficient and clean fuel. Its combustion will produce no greenhouse gases, no ozone layer depleting chemicals, and little or no acid rain ingredients and pollution. Hydrogen, produced from renewable energy (e.g., solar) sources, would result in a permanent energy system which we would never have to change. However, there are other energy systems proposed for the post-petroleum era, such as a synthetic fossil fuel system. In this system, synthetic gasoline and synthetic natural gas will be produced using abundant deposits of coal. In a way, this will ensure the continuation of the present fossil fuel system. The two possible energy systems for the post-fossil fuel era (i.e., the solar-hydrogen energy system and the synthetic fossil fuel system) are compared with the present fossil fuel system by taking into consideration production costs, environmental damages and utilization efficiencies. The results indicate that the solar-hydrogen energy system is the best energy system to ascertain a sustainable future, and it should replace the fossil fuel system before the end of the 21st century. (author)

  2. Saga of hydrogen civilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veziroglu, T.N. [Clean Energy Research Inst., Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida (United States)

    2009-07-01

    'Full text': Fossil fuels (i.e., petroleum, natural gas and coal), which meet most of the world's energy demand today, are being depleted quickly. Also, their combustion products are causing global problems such as the greenhouse effect, ozone layer depletion, acid rains and pollution, all of which are posing great danger for our environment and eventually for the life on our planet. Many engineers and scientists agree that the solution to these global problems would be to replace the existing fossil fuel system by the hydrogen energy system. Hydrogen is a very efficient and clean fuel. Its combustion will produce no greenhouse gases, no ozone layer depleting chemicals, and little or no acid rain ingredients and pollution. Hydrogen, produced from renewable energy (e.g., solar) sources, would result in a permanent energy system which we would never have to change. However, there are other energy systems proposed for the post-petroleum era, such as a synthetic fossil fuel system. In this system, synthetic gasoline and synthetic natural gas will be produced using abundant deposits of coal. In a way, this will ensure the continuation of the present fossil fuel system. The two possible energy systems for the post-fossil fuel era (i.e., the solar-hydrogen energy system and the synthetic fossil fuel system) are compared with the present fossil fuel system by taking into consideration production costs, environmental damages and utilization efficiencies. The results indicate that the solar-hydrogen energy system is the best energy system to ascertain a sustainable future, and it should replace the fossil fuel system before the end of the 21st century. (author)

  3. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.

  4. Relation between Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrodesulfurization Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Šaric, Manuel; Moses, Poul Georg; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A relation between hydrogen evolution and hydrodesulfurization catalysis was found by density functional theory calculations. The hydrogen evolution reaction and the hydrogenation reaction in hydrodesulfurization share hydrogen as a surface intermediate and, thus, have a common elementary step...

  5. Hydrogen energy system in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweig, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Results of experiences on the use of hydrogen as a clean burning fuel in California and results of the South Coast Air Quality Management district tests using hydrogen as a clean burning environmentally safe fuel are given. The results of Solar Hydrogen Projects in California and recent medical data documentation of human lung damage of patients living in air polluted urban areas are summarized

  6. Hydrogen storage in planetary physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltensperger, W.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen in contact with most substances undergoes first order phase transitions with increasing pressure during which hydrides are formed. This applies to the core of hydrogen rich planets. It is speculated that a partial hydrogen storage in the early history of the earth could have lead to the formation of continents. Primordial carbon hydrides are synthesized during this process. (Author) [pt

  7. Hydrogen Special. Facts, developments, opinions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisschemoeller, M.; Van de Kerkhof, M.; Stam, T.; Cuppen, E.; Bakker, S.; Florisson, O.; Mallant, R.; Ros, J.; Naghelhout, D.; De Witte, N.; Van Delft, J.; Huurman, J.; Susebeek, J.; De Wit, H.; Hogenhuis, C.; Maatman, D.; Vaessen, M.; Vergragt, P.J.; Bout, P.; Molag, M.; Hemmes, K.; Taanman, M.; Dame, E.; Van Soest, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    In a large number of short articles several aspects of hydrogen are discussed: (dis)advantages; production; transport; distribution; storage; use in fuel cells, vehicles and houses; market; financing of the hydrogen-based economy; hydrogen transition and developing countries; education and training; developments in the USA and the European Union [nl

  8. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN MOLYBDENUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd El Keriem, M.S.; van der Werf, D.P.; Pleiter, F

    1993-01-01

    Vacancy-hydrogen interaction in molybdenum was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. The complex InV2 turned out to trap up to two hydrogen atoms: trapping of a single hydrogen atom gives rise to a decrease of the quadrupole

  9. New efficient hydrogen process production from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunel, Jean Michel [Unite URMITE, UMR 6236 CNRS, Faculte de Medecine et de Pharmacie, Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille 05 (France)

    2010-04-15

    While the source of hydrogen constitutes a significant scientific challenge, addressing issues of hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery is equally important. None of the current hydrogen storage options, liquefied or high pressure H{sub 2} gas, metal hydrides, etc.. satisfy criteria of size, costs, kinetics, and safety for use in transportation. In this context, we have discovered a methodology for the production of hydrogen on demand, in high yield, under kinetic control, from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives and methanol as co-reagent under mild conditions catalyzed by a cheap ammonium fluoride salt. Finally, the silicon by-products can be efficiently recycle leading to an environmentally friendly source of energy. (author)

  10. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S.G.; Roberts, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    A process is described for exchanging isotopes (particularly tritium) between water and gaseous hydrogen. Isotope depleted gaseous hydrogen and water containing a hydrogen isotope are introduced into the vapour phase in a first reaction area. The steam and gaseous hydrogen are brought into contact with a supported metal catalyst in this area in a parallel flow at a temperature range of around 225 and 300 0 C. An effluent flow comprising a mixture of isotope enriched gaseous hydrogen and depleted steam is evacuated from this area and the steam condensed into liquid water [fr

  11. Formation of molecular complexes of salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in a mixture of supercritical carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.; Odintsova, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    The solvate structures formed by salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, and methyl salicylate in supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide with a polar cosolvent (methanol, 0.03 mole fractions) at a density of 0.7 g/cm3 and a temperature of 318 K were studied by the molecular dynamics method. Salicylic and acetylsalicylic acids were found to form highly stable hydrogen-bonded complexes with methanol via the hydrogen atom of the carboxyl group. For methyl salicylate in which the carboxyl hydrogen is substituted by a methyl radical, the formation of stable hydrogen bonds with methanol was not revealed. The contribution of other functional groups of the solute to the interactions with the cosolvent was much smaller. An analysis of correlations between the obtained data and the literature data on the cosolvent effect on the solubility of the compounds in SC CO2 showed that the dissolving ability of SC CO2 with respect to a polar organic substance in the presence of a cosolvent increased only when stable hydrogen-bonded complexes are formed between this substance and the cosolvent.

  12. Influence Of Initiator Types And Emulsion Polymerization Techniques To Particle Size Of Copolymerization Styrene-Butyl Acrylate-Methyl Methacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariyanti Sarwono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of initiator types and emulsion polymerization techniques to particle size of copolymerization styrene-butyl acrylate-methyl methacrylate. Copoly(styrene/butyl acrylic/methyl methacrylic was prepared by emulsion polymerization method. This paper describes effect of insiator types i.e. ammonium persulfate (APS, hydrogen peroxide, ters-butyl peroxide (TBHP, initiator redox (H2O2/ascorbic acid and polymerization techniques i.e. batch and semicontinue to particle size distribution of copoly(styrene/butyl acrylic/methyl methacrylic. Initiator TBHP and H2O2 could not initiate copolymerization properly, but initiator APS and redox initiate copolymerization with batch and semi continue techniques could well perform. The higher concentration of APS, the greater particle size of the copolymer, but the copolymer is polymodal. Initiator redox (H2O2/ascorbic acid produced greater particle size than initiator redox (ascorbic acid/ H2O2.

  13. Dibromidobis(N,N,N′,N′-tetra­methyl­thio­urea-κS)cadmium(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Sidra; Sadaf, Sana; Fettouhi, Mohammed; Fazal, Atif; Ahmad, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, [CdBr2(C5H12N2S)2], the CdII atom lies on a twofold rotation axis. It exhibits a distorted tetra­hedral coordination environment defined by two S atoms of two tetra­methyl­thio­urea (tmtu) ligands and two bromide ions. The crystal structure is consolidated by C—H⋯N and C—H⋯S hydrogen bonds. PMID:21588180

  14. Removal of methyl violet dye by adsorption onto N-benzyltriazole derivatized dextran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Eunae; Tahir, Muhammad Nazir; Kim, Hwanhee

    2015-01-01

    In this work, N-benzyltriazole derivatized dextran was evaluated for its potential as a novel carbohydrate-based adsorbent for the removal of methyl violet dye from water. The modified dextran was synthesized by a click reaction of pentynyl dextran and benzyl azide, and the structure...... was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Dextran was substituted with a triazole-linked benzyl group. For decolorization of the dye effluent, adsorption is a very effective treatment; here, the driving force is based on hydrogen bonding, pi...... stacking, and electrostatic interaction between the methyl violet dye and the N-benzyltriazole derivatized dextran. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the required contact time and the effects of pH, initial dye concentrations, and temperature. The experimental data were analyzed...

  15. Synthesis and investigation of solvent effects on the ultraviolet absorption spectra of 5-substituted-4-methyl-3-cyano-6-hydroxy-2-pyridones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATASA V. VALENTIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A number of 5-substituted-4-methyl-3-cyano-6-hydroxy-2-pyridones from cyanoacetamide and the corresponding alkyl ethyl acetoacetates were synthesized according to modified literature procedures. The alkyl ethyl acetoacetates were obtained by the reaction of C-alkylation of ethyl acetoacetate. An investigation of the reaction conditions for the synthesis of 4-methyl-3-cyano-6-hydroxy-2-pyridone from cyanoacetamide and ethyl acetoacetate in eight different solvents was also performed. The ultraviolet absorption spectra of synthesized pyridones were measured in nine different solvents in the range 200–400 nm. The effects of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the absorption spectra are interpreted by means of linear solvation energy relationships using a general equation of the form n = n0 + sp* + aa + bb, where p* is a measure of the solvent polarity, a is the scale of the solvent hydrogen bond donor acidities and b is the scale of the solvent hydrogen bond acceptor basicities.

  16. Evaluating genome-wide DNA methylation changes in mice by Methylation Specific Digital Karyotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruoka Shuichiro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of genome-wide DNA methylation changes has become more accessible with the development of various array-based technologies though when studying species other than human the choice of applications are limited and not always within reach. In this study, we adapted and tested the applicability of Methylation Specific Digital Karyotyping (MSDK, a non-array based method, for the prospective analysis of epigenetic changes after perinatal nutritional modifications in a mouse model of allergic airway disease. MSDK is a sequenced based method that allows a comprehensive and unbiased methylation profiling. The method generates 21 base pairs long sequence tags derived from specific locations in the genome. The resulting tag frequencies determine in a quantitative manner the methylation level of the corresponding loci. Results Genomic DNA from whole lung was isolated and subjected to MSDK analysis using the methylation-sensitive enzyme Not I as the mapping enzyme and Nla III as the fragmenting enzyme. In a pair wise comparison of the generated mouse MSDK libraries we identified 158 loci that are significantly differentially methylated (P-value = 0.05 after perinatal dietary changes in our mouse model. Quantitative methylation specific PCR and sequence analysis of bisulfate modified genomic DNA confirmed changes in methylation at specific loci. Differences in genomic MSDK tag counts for a selected set of genes, correlated well with changes in transcription levels as measured by real-time PCR. Furthermore serial analysis of gene expression profiling demonstrated a dramatic difference in expressed transcripts in mice exposed to perinatal nutritional changes. Conclusion The genome-wide methylation survey applied in this study allowed for an unbiased methylation profiling revealing subtle changes in DNA methylation in mice maternally exposed to dietary changes in methyl-donor content. The MSDK method is applicable for mouse models

  17. Homogalacturonan methyl-esterification and plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian; Mouille, Grégory; Pelloux, Jérome

    2009-09-01

    The ability of a plant cell to expand is largely defined by the physical constraints imposed by its cell wall. Accordingly, cell wall properties have to be regulated during development. The pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan is a major component of the plant primary walls. Biosynthesis and in muro modification of homogalacturonan have recently emerged as key determinants of plant development, controlling cell adhesion, organ development, and phyllotactic patterning. This review will focus on recent findings regarding impact of homogalacturonan content and methyl-esterification status of this polymer on plant life. De-methyl-esterification of homogalacturonan occurs through the action of the ubiquitous enzyme 'pectin methyl-esterase'. We here describe various strategies developed by the plant to finely tune the methyl-esterification status of homogalacturonan along key events of the plant lifecycle.

  18. Annotating the genome by DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar, Howard; Razin, Aharon

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a prominent role in setting up and stabilizing the molecular design of gene regulation and by understanding this process one gains profound insight into the underlying biology of mammals. In this article, we trace the discoveries that provided the foundations of this field, starting with the mapping of methyl groups in the genome and the experiments that helped clarify how methylation patterns are maintained through cell division. We then address the basic relationship between methyl groups and gene repression, as well as the molecular rules involved in controlling this process during development in vivo. Finally, we describe ongoing work aimed at defining the role of this modification in disease and deciphering how it may serve as a mechanism for sensing the environment.

  19. Methylation of hemoglobin to enhance flocculant performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    An inexpensive bioflocculant, bovine hemoglobin (Hb), has been covalently modified through methylation of the side chain carboxyl groups of aspartic and glutamic acid residues to improve its flocculation activity. Potentiometric titration of the recovered products showed approximately 28% degree of ...

  20. Europe - the first hydrogen economy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.

    1999-01-01

    An examination of the state of research relating to hydrogen production and utilization indicates that interest in hydrogen from major companies in Europe has increased by several orders of magnitude in recent years. Of the three major areas where a hydrogen economy could be expected to start, namely, Japan, the United States and Europe, the latter may have advantages in diversity of resources, attitudes towards environmental issues and specific fiscal and regulatory structures. Examples of ongoing research and development projects in Europe include Norway's hydrogen combustion turbine to run on hydrogen from decarbonised natural gas, a project in the Netherlands involving mixing hydrogen and methane in the natural gas grid and a variety of projects involving liquid hydrogen refuelling, hydrogen aircraft, hydrogen fuelling stations and fuel cell vehicle development. There are also ongoing projects in carbon sequestration and hydrogen production for power generation and vehicle use. The author's main contention is that the combination of natural surroundings, environmental problems and attitudes, and business and government frameworks strongly suggest that Europe may be the first to have a hydrogen-based economy. 8 refs

  1. Computational and Empirical Trans-hydrogen Bond Deuterium Isotope Shifts Suggest that N1-N3 A:U Hydrogen Bonds of RNA are Shorter than those of A:T Hydrogen Bonds of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Ick; Manalo, Marlon N.; Perez, Lisa M.; LiWang, Andy

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations of isolated Watson-Crick A:U and A:T base pairs predict that adenine 13 C2 trans-hydrogen bond deuterium isotope shifts due to isotopic substitution at the pyrimidine H3, 2h Δ 13 C2, are sensitive to the hydrogen-bond distance between the N1 of adenine and the N3 of uracil or thymine, which supports the notion that 2h Δ 13 C2 is sensitive to hydrogen-bond strength. Calculated 2h Δ 13 C2 values at a given N1-N3 distance are the same for isolated A:U and A:T base pairs. Replacing uridine residues in RNA with 5-methyl uridine and substituting deoxythymidines in DNA with deoxyuridines do not statistically shift empirical 2h Δ 13 C2 values. Thus, we show experimentally and computationally that the C7 methyl group of thymine has no measurable affect on 2h Δ 13 C2 values. Furthermore, 2h Δ 13 C2 values of modified and unmodified RNA are more negative than those of modified and unmodified DNA, which supports our hypothesis that RNA hydrogen bonds are stronger than those of DNA. It is also shown here that 2h Δ 13 C2 is context dependent and that this dependence is similar for RNA and DNA

  2. Hydrogen damage in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen damage has been studied in a wide variety of stainless steels. Both internal and external hydrogen damage were evaluated by ductility or J-integral under rising tensile loads and by fractography. Analysis of the data has emphasized the potential effects of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen damage. Strain-induced martensite was neither necessary nor sufficient for hydrogen damage in the alloys studied. Neither ductility loss nor fracture-mode change correlated generally with martensite formation. Alloy composition, particularly nickel and nitrogen contents, was the primary factor in resistance to hydrogen damage. Thermomechanical processing, however, could alter the degree of hydrogen damage in an alloy and was critical for optimizing resistance to hydrogen damage. 10 figures, 10 tables

  3. Analysis of DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana based on methylation-sensitive AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M T; Ruiz-García, L; Martínez-Zapater, J M

    2002-12-01

    AFLP analysis using restriction enzyme isoschizomers that differ in their sensitivity to methylation of their recognition sites has been used to analyse the methylation state of anonymous CCGG sequences in Arabidopsis thaliana. The technique was modified to improve the quality of fingerprints and to visualise larger numbers of scorable fragments. Sequencing of amplified fragments indicated that detection was generally associated with non-methylation of the cytosine to which the isoschizomer is sensitive. Comparison of EcoRI/ HpaII and EcoRI/ MspI patterns in different ecotypes revealed that 35-43% of CCGG sites were differentially digested by the isoschizomers. Interestingly, the pattern of digestion among different plants belonging to the same ecotype is highly conserved, with the rate of intra-ecotype methylation-sensitive polymorphisms being less than 1%. However, pairwise comparisons of methylation patterns between samples belonging to different ecotypes revealed differences in up to 34% of the methylation-sensitive polymorphisms. The lack of correlation between inter-ecotype similarity matrices based on methylation-insensitive or methylation-sensitive polymorphisms suggests that whatever the mechanisms regulating methylation may be, they are not related to nucleotide sequence variation.

  4. Recognition of methylated DNA through methyl-CpG binding domain proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Xueqing; Ma, Wen; Solov'yov, Ilia

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key regulatory control route in epigenetics, involving gene silencing and chromosome inactivation. It has been recognized that methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins play an important role in interpreting the genetic information encoded by methylated DNA (mDNA). Although...... the function of MBD proteins has attracted considerable attention and is well characterized, the mechanism underlying mDNA recognition by MBD proteins is still poorly understood. In this article, we demonstrate that the methyl-CpG dinucleotides are recognized at the MBD-mDNA interface by two MBD arginines...

  5. Maternal intake of methyl-group donors affects DNA methylation of metabolic genes in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Sara; Ghosh, Manosij; Duca, Radu Corneliu; Bekaert, Bram; Freson, Kathleen; Huybrechts, Inge; Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Devlieger, Roland; Godderis, Lode

    2017-01-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and infant nutrition in the early postnatal period (lactation) are critically involved in the development and health of the newborn infant. The Maternal Nutrition and Offspring's Epigenome (MANOE) study was set up to assess the effect of maternal methyl-group donor intake (choline, betaine, folate, methionine) on infant DNA methylation. Maternal intake of dietary methyl-group donors was assessed using a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Before and during pregnancy, we evaluated maternal methyl-group donor intake through diet and supplementation (folic acid) in relation to gene-specific ( IGF2 DMR, DNMT1 , LEP , RXRA ) buccal epithelial cell DNA methylation in 6 months old infants ( n  = 114) via pyrosequencing. In the early postnatal period, we determined the effect of maternal choline intake during lactation (in mothers who breast-fed for at least 3 months) on gene-specific buccal DNA methylation ( n  = 65). Maternal dietary and supplemental intake of methyl-group donors (folate, betaine, folic acid), only in the periconception period, was associated with buccal cell DNA methylation in genes related to growth ( IGF2 DMR), metabolism ( RXRA ), and appetite control ( LEP ). A negative association was found between maternal folate and folic acid intake before pregnancy and infant LEP (slope = -1.233, 95% CI -2.342; -0.125, p  = 0.0298) and IGF2 DMR methylation (slope = -0.706, 95% CI -1.242; -0.107, p  = 0.0101), respectively. Positive associations were observed for maternal betaine (slope = 0.875, 95% CI 0.118; 1.633, p  = 0.0241) and folate (slope = 0.685, 95% CI 0.245; 1.125, p  = 0.0027) intake before pregnancy and RXRA methylation. Buccal DNMT1 methylation in the infant was negatively associated with maternal methyl-group donor intake in the first and second trimester of pregnancy and negatively in the third trimester. We found no clear association between maternal choline intake

  6. Methyl Iodide Decomposition at BWR Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Mike; Bell, Merl

    2012-09-01

    Based on favourable results from short-term testing of methanol addition to an operating BWR plant, AREVA has performed numerous studies in support of necessary Engineering and Plant Safety Evaluations prior to extended injection of methanol. The current paper presents data from a study intended to provide further understanding of the decomposition of methyl iodide as it affects the assessment of methyl iodide formation with the application of methanol at BWR Plants. This paper describes the results of the decomposition testing under UV-C light at laboratory conditions and its effect on the subject methyl iodide production evaluation. The study as to the formation and decomposition of methyl iodide as it is effected by methanol addition is one phase of a larger AREVA effort to provide a generic plant Safety Evaluation prior to long-term methanol injection to an operating BWR. Other testing phases have investigated the compatibility of methanol with fuel construction materials, plant structural materials, plant consumable materials (i.e. elastomers and coatings), and ion exchange resins. Methyl iodide is known to be very unstable, typically preserved with copper metal or other stabilizing materials when produced and stored. It is even more unstable when exposed to light, heat, radiation, and water. Additionally, it is known that methyl iodide will decompose radiolytically, and that this effect may be simulated using ultra-violet radiation (UV-C) [2]. In the tests described in this paper, the use of a UV-C light source provides activation energy for the formation of methyl iodide. Thus is similar to the effect expected from Cherenkov radiation present in a reactor core after shutdown. Based on the testing described in this paper, it is concluded that injection of methanol at concentrations below 2.5 ppm in BWR applications to mitigate IGSCC of internals is inconsequential to the accident conditions postulated in the FSAR as they are related to methyl iodide formation

  7. Whole genome DNA methylation: beyond genes silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Tirado-Magallanes, Roberto; Rebbani, Khadija; Lim, Ricky; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Benoukraf, Touati

    2016-01-01

    The combination of DNA bisulfite treatment with high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled investigation of genome-wide DNA methylation at near base pair level resolution, far beyond that of the kilobase-long canonical CpG islands that initially revealed the biological relevance of this covalent DNA modification. The latest high-resolution studies have revealed a role for very punctual DNA methylation in chromatin plasticity, gene regulation and splicing. Here, we aim to outline the ...

  8. Can hydrogen bonds improve the hole-mobility in amorphous organic semiconductors? Experimental and theoretical insights

    KAUST Repository

    Mimaite, Viktorija; Grazulevicius, Juozas Vidas; Laurinaviciute, Rasa; Volyniuk, Dmytro; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Sini, Gjergji

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Five hole-transporting triphenylamine derivatives containing methoxy and methyl groups are synthesized and investigated. The hole-mobility increases in the presence of methyl and methoxy substituents, exceeding 10-2 cm2 V-1 s-1 in the case of methyl groups. Quantum mechanical calculations on these compounds indicate very different dipole moments and intermolecular interaction strengths, with intriguing correlations with the trend in hole-mobility. Temperature dependent hole-mobility measurements indicate disorder dominated hole transport. The values of the energetic disorder parameter (σ) decrease upon methyl and methoxy substitutions despite the increase in dipole moments. This trend is discussed as a function of the interaction energy between adjacent molecules, the dipole moment, the molecular polarizability, and the conformational degree of freedom. Our results indicate that the global decrease of σ upon methyl and methoxy substitutions is dominated by the larger decrease in the geometrical randomness component of the energetic disorder. A direct correlation is established between the decrease in geometrical randomness and the increase in intermolecular interaction energies, mainly stemming from the additional C-H⋯π, O, N hydrogen bonds induced by methyl and methoxy groups.

  9. Pionic hydrogen and friends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotta, D., E-mail: d.gotta@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); Amaro, F. D. [Coimbra University, Department of Physics (Portugal); Anagnostopoulos, D. F. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (Greece); Bühler, P. [Stefan Meyer Institut, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria); Gorke, H. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); Covita, D. S. [Coimbra University, Department of Physics (Portugal); Fuhrmann, H.; Gruber, A. [Stefan Meyer Institut, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria); Hennebach, M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); Hirtl, A.; Ishiwatari, T. [Stefan Meyer Institut, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria); Indelicato, P. [LKB, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS (France); Jensen, T. S. [Ringkjøbing Gymnasium (Denmark); Bigot, E.-O. Le [LKB, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS (France); Markushin, V. E. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) (Switzerland); Marton, J. [Stefan Meyer Institut, Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria); Nekipelov, M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); Pomerantsev, V. N.; Popov, V. P. [Skobeltsyn Institut of Nuclear Physics, Lomonossov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Santos, J. M. F. dos [Coimbra University, Department of Physics (Portugal); and others

    2015-08-15

    Pion-nucleon scattering lengths are directly related to the ground-state level shift and broadening in pionic hydrogen as well as to the pionic deuterium level shift. The level broadening in deuterium measures the strength of pion threshold-production in proton-proton reactions. However, collisional processes during the atomic de-excitation cascade considerably complicate the analysis of X-ray line shapes in order to extract the hadronic broadening. Therefore, additionally the purely electromagnetic twin system muonic hydrogen was studied. Results of these experiments performed at PSI by using a high-resolution crystal spectrometer are discussed in the context with a new analysis approach for the hadronic broadening.

  10. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Wang, Tao [Columbia, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  11. Hydrogenation of shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedwell, A J; Clark, E D; Miebach, F W

    1935-09-28

    A process for the distillation, cracking, and hydrogenation of shale or other carbonaceous material consists in first distilling the material to produce hydrocarbon oils. Steam is introduced and is passed downwardly with hydrocarbon vapors from the upper portion of the retort where the temperature is maintained between 400/sup 0/C and 450/sup 0/C over the spent carbonaceous materials. The material is drawn off at the bottom of the retort which is maintained at a temperature ranging from 600/sup 0/C to 800/sup 0/C whereby the hydrocarbon vapors are cracked in the pressure of nascent hydrogen obtained by the action of the introduced steam on the spent material. The cracked gases and undecomposed steam are passed through a catalyst tower containing iron-magnesium oxides resulting in the formation of light volatile oils.

  12. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A container for the storage, shipping and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same which has compactness, which is safe against fracture or accident, and which is reusable is described. The container consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example, of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and will be retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates

  13. Hydrogenating oils. [British patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-08-31

    A safety fuel boiling within the limits 130/sup 0/ to 260/sup 0/C, is obtained by treating hydrocarbon mixtures boiling below 260/sup 0/C, and for the most part above 130/sup 0/C according to the process described in the parent Specification. A fraction boiling from 140/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/ C, which has been distilled off from the liquefaction product obtained by the destructive hydrogenation of coal soaked with ferrous sulphate, is passed at 485/sup 0/C under a partial pressure of 1.5 atmos. and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atmos. over a catalyst consisting of nickel and tungsten sulphides. The gasification is only 2 to 5 percent and from the reaction product a fraction of the same boiling range as the initial material is distilled off with a yield of 85 percent and an octane number of 97.

  14. Catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    A method is described for enhancing the rate of exchange of hydrogen atoms in organic compounds or moieties with deuterium or tritium atoms. It comprises reacting the organic compound or moiety and a compound which is the source of deuterium or tritium in the presence of a catalyst consisting of a non-metallic, metallic or organometallic halide of Lewis acid character and which is reactive towards water, hydrogen halides or similar protonic acids. The catalyst is a halide or organometallic halide of: (i) zinc or another element of Group IIb; (ii) boron, aluminium or another element of Group III; (iii) tin, lead, antimony or another element of Groups IV to VI; or (iv) a transition metal, lanthanide or stable actinide; or a halohalide. (author)

  15. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1989-07-01

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  16. Cocrystals of 6-methyl-2-thiouracil: presence of the acceptor-donor-acceptor/donor-acceptor-donor synthon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hützler, Wilhelm Maximilian; Egert, Ernst

    2015-03-01

    The results of seven cocrystallization experiments of the antithyroid drug 6-methyl-2-thiouracil (MTU), C(5)H(6)N(2)OS, with 2,4-diaminopyrimidine, 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine and 6-amino-3H-isocytosine (viz. 2,6-diamino-3H-pyrimidin-4-one) are reported. MTU features an ADA (A = acceptor and D = donor) hydrogen-bonding site, while the three coformers show complementary DAD hydrogen-bonding sites and therefore should be capable of forming an ADA/DAD N-H...O/N-H...N/N-H...S synthon with MTU. The experiments yielded one cocrystal and six cocrystal solvates, namely 6-methyl-2-thiouracil-2,4-diaminopyrimidine-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-one (1/1/2), C(5)H(6)N(2)OS·C(4)H(6)N(4)·2C(5)H(9)NO, (I), 6-methyl-2-thiouracil-2,4-diaminopyrimidine (1/1), C(5)H(6)N(2)OS·C(4)H(6)N(4), (II), 6-methyl-2-thiouracil-2,4-diaminopyrimidine-N,N-dimethylacetamide (2/1/2), 2C(5)H(6)N(2)OS·C(4)H(6)N(4)·2C(4)H(9)NO, (III), 6-methyl-2-thiouracil-2,4-diaminopyrimidine-N,N-dimethylformamide (2/1/2), C(5)H(6)N(2)OS·0.5C(4)H(6)N(4)·C(3)H(7)NO, (IV), 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidinium 6-methyl-2-thiouracilate-6-methyl-2-thiouracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1/2), C(4)H(8)N(5)(+)·C(5)H(5)N(2)OS(-)·C(5)H(6)N(2)OS·2C(3)H(7)NO, (V), 6-methyl-2-thiouracil-6-amino-3H-isocytosine-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1/1), C(5)H(6)N(2)OS·C(4)H(6)N(4)O·C(3)H(7)NO, (VI), and 6-methyl-2-thiouracil-6-amino-3H-isocytosine-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1/1), C(5)H(6)N(2)OS·C(4)H(6)N(4)O·C(2)H(6)OS, (VII). Whereas in cocrystal (I) an R(2)(2)(8) interaction similar to the Watson-Crick adenine/uracil base pair is formed and a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network is observed, the cocrystals (II)-(VII) contain the triply hydrogen-bonded ADA/DAD N-H...O/N-H...N/N-H...S synthon and show a one-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network. Although 2,4-diaminopyrimidine possesses only one DAD hydrogen-bonding site, it is, due to orientational disorder, triply connected to two MTU molecules in (III) and (IV).

  17. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Leland

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data. PMID:26791986

  18. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  19. Methylated spirit burns: an ongoing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansbeken, J R H; Vloemans, A F P M; Tempelman, F R H; Breederveld, R S

    2012-09-01

    Despite many educational campaigns we still see burns caused by methylated spirit every year. We undertook a retrospective study to analyse the impact of this problem. We retrospectively collected data of all patients with burns caused by methylated spirit over twelve years from 1996 to 2008. Our main endpoints were: incidence, age, mechanism of injury, total body surface area (TBSA) burned, burn depth, need for surgery and length of hospital stay. Ninety-seven patients with methylated spirit burns were included. During the study period there was no decrease in the number of patients annually admitted to the burn unit with methylated spirit burns. 28% of the patients (n=27) were younger than eighteen years old, 15% (n=15) were ten years old or younger. The most common cause of burns was carelessness in activities involving barbecues, campfires and fondues. Mean TBSA burned was 16% (SD 12.4). 70% (n=68) had full thickness burns. 66% (n=64) needed grafting. Mean length of hospital stay was 23 days (SD 24.7). The use of methylated spirit is an ongoing problem, which continues to cause severe burns in adults and children. Therefore methylated spirit should be banned in households. We suggest sale only in specialised shops, clear labelling and mandatory warnings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA Methylation Biomarkers: Cancer and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mikeska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are naturally-occurring characteristics by which a particular pathological process or disease can be identified or monitored. They can reflect past environmental exposures, predict disease onset or course, or determine a patient’s response to therapy. Epigenetic changes are such characteristics, with most epigenetic biomarkers discovered to date based on the epigenetic mark of DNA methylation. Many tissue types are suitable for the discovery of DNA methylation biomarkers including cell-based samples such as blood and tumor material and cell-free DNA samples such as plasma. DNA methylation biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic and predictive power are already in clinical trials or in a clinical setting for cancer. Outside cancer, strong evidence that complex disease originates in early life is opening up exciting new avenues for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers for adverse early life environment and for estimation of future disease risk. However, there are a number of limitations to overcome before such biomarkers reach the clinic. Nevertheless, DNA methylation biomarkers have great potential to contribute to personalized medicine throughout life. We review the current state of play for DNA methylation biomarkers, discuss the barriers that must be crossed on the way to implementation in a clinical setting, and predict their future use for human disease.

  1. Hydrogenated TiO{sub 2} nanobelts as highly efficient photocatalytic organic dye degradation and hydrogen evolution photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); State key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Leng, Yanhua [State key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Cui, Hongzhi, E-mail: cuihongzhi1965@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Liu, Hong, E-mail: hongliu@sdu.edu.cn [State key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A facile synthesis of hydrogenated TiO{sub 2} nanobelts is reported. • Utilizing UV and visible light in photocatalytic degradation and H{sub 2} production. • The improved photocatalytic property is owe to Ti{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanobelts have gained increasing interest because of its outstanding properties and promising applications in a wide range of fields. Here we report the facile synthesis of hydrogenated TiO{sub 2} (H-TiO{sub 2}) nanobelts, which exhibit excellent UV and visible photocatalytic decomposing of methyl orange (MO) and water splitting for hydrogen production. The improved photocatalytic property can be attributed to the Ti{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies in TiO{sub 2} nanobelts created by hydrogenation. Ti{sup 3+} ions and oxygen vacancies can enhance visible light absorption, promote charge carrier trapping, and hinder the photogenerated electron–hole recombination. This work offers a simple strategy for the fabrication of a wide solar spectrum of active photocatalysts, which possesses significant potential for more efficient photodegradation, photocatalytic water splitting, and enhanced solar cells using sunlight as light source.

  2. MAHRES: Spanish hydrogen geography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordallo, C.R.; Moreno, E.; Brey, R.; Guerrero, F.M.; Carazo, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    Nowadays, it is common to hear about the hydrogen potential as an energetic vector or the renewable character of fuel cells; thus, the conjunction between both of them as a way to produce electricity, decreasing pollutant emission, is often discussed. However, that renewable character is only guaranteed in the case that the hydrogen used comes from some renewable energy source. Because of that, and due to the Spanish great potential related to natural usable resources like water, sun, wind or biomass, for instance, it seems attractive to make a meticulous study (supported by the statistical Multicriteria Decision Making Method) in order to quantify that potential and place it in defined geographical areas. Moreover, the growth of the electricity demand is always significant, and in this way the energy consumption in Spain is estimated to grow up to 3'4 % above the average during the next ten years. On the other hand, it must be taken into account that the contribution of the oil production will not be enough in the future. The study being carried out will try to elaborate 'The Spanish Renewable Hydrogen Map', that would contemplate, not only the current situation but also predictable scenarios and their implementation. (author)

  3. Hydrogen and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Miller, A.I.; Hancox, W.T.; Pendergast, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The current world-wide emphasis on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions provides an opportunity to revisit how energy is produced and used, consistent with the need for human and economic growth. Both the scale of the problem and the efforts needed for its resolution are extremely large. We argue that GHG reduction strategies must include a greater penetration of electricity into areas, such as transportation, that have been the almost exclusive domain of fossil fuels. An opportunity for electricity to displace fossil fuel use is through electrolytic production of hydrogen. Nuclear power is the only large-scale commercially proven non-carbon electricity generation source, and it must play a key role. As a non-carbon power source, it can also provide the high-capacity base needed to stabilize electricity grids so that they can accommodate other non-carbon sources, namely low-capacity factor renewables such as wind and solar. Electricity can be used directly to power standalone hydrogen production facilities. In the special case of CANDU reactors, the hydrogen streams can be preprocessed to recover the trace concentrations of deuterium that can be re-oxidized to heavy water. World-wide experience shows that nuclear power can achieve high standards of public safety, environmental protection and commercially competitive economics, and must . be an integral part of future energy systems. (author)

  4. Hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The report briefly describes the results of the single projects promoted by the German Council of Research (DFG). The subjects deal with diffusion, effusion, permeation and solubility of hydrogen in metals. They are interesting for many disciplines: metallurgy, physical metallurgy, metal physics, materials testing, welding engineering, chemistry, nuclear physics and solid-state physics. The research projects deal with the following interrelated subjects: solubility of H 2 in steel and effects on embrittlement, influence of H 2 on the fatigue strength of steel as well as the effect of H 2 on welded joints. The studies in solid-state research can be divided into methodological and physico-chemical studies. The methodological studies mainly comprise investigations on the analytical determination of H 2 by means of nuclear-physical reactions (e.g. the 15 N method) and the application of the Moessbauer spectroscopy. Physico-chemical problems are mainly dealt with in studies on interfacial reactions in connection with the absorption of hydrogen and on the diffusion of H 2 in different alloy systems. The properties of materials used for hydrogen storage were the subject of several research projects. 20 contributions were separately recorded for the data bank 'Energy'. (MM) [de

  5. Hydrogen energy stations: along the roadside to the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.W.; Rifkin, J.; O'Connor, T.; Swisher, J.; Lipman, T.; Rambach, G.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen has become more than an international topic of discussion within government and among industry. With the public announcements from the European Union and American governments and an Executive Order from the Governor of California, hydrogen has become a ''paradigm change'' targeted toward changing decades of economic and societal behaviours. The public demand for clean and green energy as well as being ''independent'' or not located in political or societal conflict areas, has become paramount. The key issues are the commitment of governments through public policies along with corporations. Above all, secondly, the advancement of hydrogen is regional as it depends upon infrastructure and fuel resources. Hence, the hydrogen economy, to which the hydrogen highway is the main component, will be regional and creative. New jobs, businesses and opportunities are already emerging. And finally, the costs for the hydrogen economy are critical. The debate as to hydrogen being 5 years away from being commercial and available in the marketplace versus needing more research and development contradicts the historical development and deployment of any new technology be it bio-science, flat panel displays, computers or mobile phones. The market drivers are government regulations and standards soon thereafter matched by market forces and mass production. Hydrogen is no different. What this paper does is describes is how the hydrogen highway is the backbone to the hydrogen economy by becoming, with the next five years, both regional and commercial through supplying stationary power to communities. Soon thereafter, within five to ten years, these same hydrogen stations will be serving hundreds and then thousands of hydrogen fuel powered vehicles. Hydrogen is the fuel for distributed energy generation and hence positively impacts the future of public and private power generators. The paradigm has already changed. (author)

  6. Methyl 3′,4′,5′-trimethoxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Nummelin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C17H18O5, the dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 31.23 (16°. In the crystal, the molecules are packed in an antiparallel fashion in layers along the a axis. In each layer, very weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds occur between the methoxy and methyl ester groups. Weak C—H...π interactions between the 4′- and 5′-methoxy groups and neighbouring benzene rings [methoxy-C–ring centroid distances = 4.075 and 3.486 Å, respectively] connect the layers.

  7. Dibromido(6-methyl-2,2′-bipyridine-κ2N,N′zinc(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Amani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [ZnBr2(C11H10N2], the ZnII atom is four-coordinated in a distorted tetrahedral configuration by two N atoms from a 6-methyl-2,2′-bipyridine ligand and two terminal Br atoms. Weak intermolecular C—H...Br hydrogen bonds and π–π stacking interactions between the pyridine rings [centroid–centroid distances = 3.763 (5 and 3.835 (6 Å] contribute to crystal-packing effects.

  8. Molecular and crystal structure of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-oxo-1-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuleshova, L.N.; Khrustalev, V.N.; Struchkov, Yu.T.; Soldatenkov, A.T.; Bekro, I.A.; Mamyrbekova, Zh.A.; Soldatova, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    The molecular and crystal structure of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-oxo-1-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine was determined. The crystal is orthorhombic: sp. gr. Pca21; a=15.764, b=5.635, and c=25.536 A; and Z=8. The structure was solved by direct methods; R1=0.051, for 2643 unique refections. Symmetry-independent molecules are related by a pseudocenter of symmetry. The piperidine cycle has an asymmetric half-chair conformation. The orientation of substituents is determined. In the crystal, intermolecular OH...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules into chains parallel to the Y-axis

  9. Crystal structure of (±-1-({[4-(allyloxyphenyl]sulfanyl}methyl-2-(diphenylthiophosphorylferrocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audric Michelot

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Fe(C5H5(C27H24OPS2], is built up from a ferrocene moiety substituted in the 1- and 2-positions by {[4-(allyloxyphenyl]sulfanyl}methyl and diphenylthiophosphoryl groups, respectively. The two S atoms lie on opposite sides of the cyclopentadienyl ring plane to which they are attached. In the crystal, C—H...S hydrogen bonds link the molecules into a ribbon running parallel to the (-110 plane. C—H...π interactions link the ribbons to form a three-dimensional network.

  10. The formation of nitrogeneous compounds in the γ-radiolyses of liquid nitrogen solutions of hydrogen, methane, and ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horigome, Keiichi; Hirokami, Shun-ichi; Sato, Shin

    1978-01-01

    The γ-radiolyses of liquid nitrogen solutions of hydrogen, methane, and ethane have been reinvestigated. A complete survey of nitrogen-containing products has been attempted. The nitrogeneous compounds observed were ammonia (0.7) and hydrogen azide (0.02) in the case of hydrogen, ammonia (0.3), hydrogen cyanide (0.1), methyl azide (0.01), and a polymer in the case of methane, and ammonia (0.3), hydrogen cyanide (0.05), acetonitrile (0.04), ethyl azide (0.01), and a polymer in the case of ethane. The values in parentheses are the G-values obtained at optimum conditions. The hydrolysis of the polymer obtained with methane gave formaldehyde in amounts which correspond to the fact that the G-value of the nitrogen atoms which were converted into the polymer is about 1.0. In order to explain these results, possible reaction mechanisms are discussed. (auth.)

  11. Use of nuclear magnetic resonance of hydrogen in the characterization of saturated hydrocarbonic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Neto, A.; Soares, V.L.P.; Costa Neto, C.

    1979-01-01

    Alkanes and cycloalkanes are characterized by a methyl-methylene-methine groups proportion, the percentual absorption in prefixed regions and the pattern of the spectrum of nuclear magnetic resonance of hydrogen. The GPI is calculated from the contribution of the areas corresponding to prefixed regions of the hydrogen magnetic resonance spectra (60 Mc). These regions are (for the saturated hydrocarbons): 0,5-1,05ppm (X), 1,05ppm (Y) and 1,50-2,00ppm (Z). The validity of the index was verified for the homologous series of linear hydrocarbons and methyl-, dimethyl-, ethyl-, cyclopentyl- and cyclohexyl-branched hydrocarbons. Its application to shale oil chemistry (xistoquimica) is discussed. (author) [pt

  12. BIG hydrogen: hydrogen technology in the oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The BIG Hydrogen workshop was held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on February 13, 2006. About 60 representatives of industry, academia and government attended this one-day technical meeting on hydrogen production for the oil and gas industry. The following themes were identified from the presentations and discussion: the need to find a BIG hydrogen replacement for Steam Methane Reformer (SMR) because of uncertainty regarding cost and availability of natural gas, although given the maturity of SMR process (reliability, known capital cost) how high will H2 prices have to rise?; need for a national strategy to link the near-term and the longer-term hydrogen production requirements, which can take hydrogen from chemical feedstock to energy carrier; and in the near-term Canada should get involved in demonstrations and build expertise in large hydrogen systems including production and carbon capture and sequestration

  13. Hydrogen Village : creating hydrogen and fuel cell communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Hydrogen Village (H2V) is a collaborative public-private partnership administered through Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada and funded by the Governments of Canada and Ontario. This end user-driven, market development program accelerates the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell (FC) technologies throughout the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The program targets 3 specific aspects of market development, notably deployment of near market technologies in community based stationary and mobile applications; development of a coordinated hydrogen delivery and equipment service infrastructure; and societal factors involving corporate policy and public education. This presentation focused on lessons learned through outreach programs and the deployment of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) heat and power generation; indoor and outdoor fuel cell back up power systems; fuel cell-powered forklifts, delivery vehicles, and utility vehicles; hydrogen internal combustion engine powered shuttle buses, sedans, parade float; hydrogen production/refueling stations in the downtown core; and temporary fuel cell power systems

  14. Dibutylammonium bis(hydrogen methylphosphonato-κOtriphenylstannate(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tidiane Diop

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title organotin salt, (C8H20N[Sn(C6H53(CH4O3P2], contains two dibutylammonium cations and two stannate(IV anions consisting each of two monodentately bonding methyl hydrogenphosphate groups attached to an Sn(C6H5 unit. The overall coordination environment of the two SnIV atoms is trigonal–bipyramidal defined by three phenyl C atoms in equatorial positions and two methyl hydrogenphosphate O atoms at the apical sites. In the crystal, the stannate(IV anions are linked to each other via pairs of short O—H...O hydrogen bonds, leading to an infinite chain extending parallel to the b-axis direction. Neighbouring chains are linked by N—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the butylammonium cations, giving a two-dimensional structure parallel to the ab plane. The crystal under investigation was found to be twinned by reticular merohedry with twin fractions of 0.5342 (7:0.4658 (7.

  15. Cathodic hydrogen charging of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagopoulos, C.N.; Georgiou, E.P.; Chaliampalias, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Incorporation of hydrogen into zinc and formation of zinc hydrides. •Investigation of surface residual stresses due to hydrogen diffusion. •Effect of hydrogen diffusion and hydride formation on mechanical properties of Zn. •Hydrogen embrittlement phenomena in zinc. -- Abstract: The effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on the structural and mechanical characteristics of zinc was investigated. Hardening of the surface layers of zinc, due to hydrogen incorporation and possible formation of ZnH 2 , was observed. In addition, the residual stresses brought about by the incorporation of hydrogen atoms into the metallic matrix, were calculated by analyzing the obtained X-ray diffraction patterns. Tensile testing of the as-received and hydrogen charged specimens revealed that the ductility of zinc decreased significantly with increasing hydrogen charging time, for a constant value of charging current density, and with increasing charging current density, for a constant value of charging time. However, the ultimate tensile strength of this material was slightly affected by the hydrogen charging procedure. The cathodically charged zinc exhibited brittle transgranular fracture at the surface layers and ductile intergranular fracture at the deeper layers of the material

  16. Reactions of guanine with methyl chloride and methyl bromide: O6-methylation versus charge transfer complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.; Suhai, S.

    Density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31+G* and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels was employed to study O6-methylation of guanine due to its reactions with methyl chloride and methyl bromide and to obtain explanation as to why the methyl halides cause genotoxicity and possess mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. Geometries of the various isolated species involved in the reactions, reactant complexes (RCs), and product complexes (PCs) were optimized in gas phase. Transition states connecting the reactant complexes with the product complexes were also optimized in gas phase at the same levels of theory. The reactant complexes, product complexes, and transition states were solvated in aqueous media using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) of the self-consistent reaction field theory. Zero-point energy (ZPE) correction to total energy and the corresponding thermal energy correction to enthalpy were made in each case. The reactant complexes of the keto form of guanine with methyl chloride and methyl bromide in water are appreciably more stable than the corresponding complexes involving the enol form of guanine. The nature of binding in the product complexes was found to be of the charge transfer type (O6mG+ · X-, X dbond Cl, Br). Binding of HCl, HBr, and H2O molecules to the PCs obtained with the keto form of guanine did not alter the positions of the halide anions in the PCs, and the charge transfer character of the PCs was also not modified due to this binding. Further, the complexes obtained due to the binding of HCl, HBr, and H2O molecules to the PCs had greater stability than the isolated PCs. The reaction barriers involved in the formation of PCs were found to be quite high (?50 kcal/mol). Mechanisms of genotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis caused by the methyl halides appear to involve charge transfer-type complex formation. Thus the mechanisms of these processes involving the methyl halides appear to be quite different from those that involve the

  17. Global DNA methylation of ischemic stroke subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Soriano-Tárraga

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS, a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder, is among the leading causes of mortality and long-term disability in the western world. Epidemiological data provides evidence for a genetic component to the disease, but its epigenetic involvement is still largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, change over time and may be associated with aging processes and with modulation of the risk of various pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. We analyzed 2 independent cohorts of IS patients. Global DNA methylation was measured by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA of DNA blood samples. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the methylation differences between the 3 most common IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA, small-artery disease (SAD, and cardio-aortic embolism (CE. A total of 485 IS patients from 2 independent hospital cohorts (n = 281 and n = 204 were included, distributed across 3 IS subtypes: LAA (78/281, 59/204, SAD (97/281, 53/204, and CE (106/281, 89/204. In univariate analyses, no statistical differences in LUMA levels were observed between the 3 etiologies in either cohort. Multivariate analysis, adjusted by age, sex, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, confirmed the lack of differences in methylation levels between the analyzed IS subtypes in both cohorts. Despite differences in pathogenesis, our results showed no global methylation differences between LAA, SAD, and CE subtypes of IS. Further work is required to establish whether the epigenetic mechanism of methylation might play a role in this complex disease.

  18. Solar hydrogen production: renewable hydrogen production by dry fuel reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, Jamie; Miyamoto, Henry K.

    2006-09-01

    SHEC LABS - Solar Hydrogen Energy Corporation constructed a pilot-plant to demonstrate a Dry Fuel Reforming (DFR) system that is heated primarily by sunlight focusing-mirrors. The pilot-plant consists of: 1) a solar mirror array and solar concentrator and shutter system; and 2) two thermo-catalytic reactors to convert Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Water into Hydrogen. Results from the pilot study show that solar Hydrogen generation is feasible and cost-competitive with traditional Hydrogen production. More than 95% of Hydrogen commercially produced today is by the Steam Methane Reformation (SMR) of natural gas, a process that liberates Carbon Dioxide to the atmosphere. The SMR process provides a net energy loss of 30 to 35% when converting from Methane to Hydrogen. Solar Hydrogen production provides a 14% net energy gain when converting Methane into Hydrogen since the energy used to drive the process is from the sun. The environmental benefits of generating Hydrogen using renewable energy include significant greenhouse gas and criteria air contaminant reductions.

  19. 2-Acetyl­amino-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-(tri­methyl­silyl)-2-de­oxy-α-d-gluco­pyran­ose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhao-Dong; Cui, Yan-Li; Mao, Jian-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C20H47NO6Si4, was synthesized by per-O-tri­methyl­silylation of N-acetyl-d-glucosa­mine using chloro­tri­methyl­silane in the presence of hexa­methyl­disiloxane. The tri­methyl­silyl group and acetamido group are located on the same side of the pyran ring, showing an α-configuration glycoside. One of the tri­methyl­silyl groups is disordered over two orientations, with site-occupancy factors of 0.625 (9) and 0.375 (9). In the crystal, N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into supra­molecular chains along the a-axis direction. PMID:23795087

  20. Inductive effect of methyl group in a series of methylated indoles: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vol. 125, No. 4, July 2013, pp. 905–912. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Inductive effect of methyl group in a series of methylated indoles: A graph theoretical analysis in the light of density functional theory and correlation with experimental charge transfer transition energies. AMIT S TIWARYa,∗ and ASOK K MUKHERJEEb.

  1. Evidence for methyl group transfer between the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins in Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedale, W.A.; Nettleton, D.O.; Sopata, C.S.; Thoelke, M.S.; Ordal, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present evidence for methyl (as methyl or methoxy) transfer from the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins H1 and possibly H3 of Bacillus subtilis to the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein H2. This methyl transfer, which has been observed in vitro was strongly stimulated by the chemoattractant aspartate and thus may plan an important role in the sensory processing system of this organism. Although radiolabeling of H1 and H3 began at once after the addition of [ 3 H] methionine, radiolabeling of H2 showed a lag. Furthermore, the addition of excess nonradioactive methionine caused immediate exponential delabeling of H1 and H3 while labeling of H2 continued to increase. Methylation of H2 required the chemotactic methyltransferase, probably to first methylate H1 and H3. Aspartate caused increased labeling of H2 and strongly decreased labeling of H1 and H3 after the addition of nonradioactive methionine. Without the addition of nonradioactive methionine, aspartate caused demethylation of H1 and to a lesser extent H3, with an approximately equal increase of methylation of H2

  2. Methyl esters from vegetable oils with hydroxy fatty acids: Comparison of lesquerella and castor methyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The search for alternative feedstocks for biodiesel as partial replacement for petrodiesel has recently extended to castor oil. In this work, the castor oil methyl esters were prepared and their properties determined in comparison to the methyl esters of lesquerella oil, which in turn is seen as alt...

  3. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, Claudio Lenz

    1997-01-01

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 10 12 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 10 18 . While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen

  4. Hydrogen application dynamics and networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E. [Air Liquide Large Industries, Champigny-sur-Marne (France)

    2010-12-30

    The Chemical Industry consumes large volumes of hydrogen as raw material for the manufacture of numerous products (e.g. polyamides and polyurethanes account for 60% of hydrogen demand). The hydrogen demand was in the recent past and will continue to be driven by the polyurethane family. China will host about 60% of new hydrogen needs over the period 2010-2015 becoming the first hydrogen market next year and reaching 25% of market share by 2015 (vs. only 4% in 2001). Air Liquide supplies large volumes of Hydrogen (and other Industrial Gases) to customers by on-site plants and through pipeline networks which offer significant benefits such as higher safety, reliability and flexibility of supply. Thanks to its long term strategy and heavy investment in large units and pipeline networks, Air Liquide is the Industrial Gas leader in most of the world class Petrochemical basins (Rotterdam, Antwerp, US Gulf Coast, Yosu, Caojing,..) (orig.)

  5. Hydrogen-enriched fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roser, R. [NRG Technologies, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    1998-08-01

    NRG Technologies, Inc. is attempting to develop hardware and infrastructure that will allow mixtures of hydrogen and conventional fuels to become viable alternatives to conventional fuels alone. This commercialization can be successful if the authors are able to achieve exhaust emission levels of less than 0.03 g/kw-hr NOx and CO; and 0.15 g/kw-hr NMHC at full engine power without the use of exhaust catalysts. The major barriers to achieving these goals are that the lean burn regimes required to meet exhaust emissions goals reduce engine output substantially and tend to exhibit higher-than-normal total hydrocarbon emissions. Also, hydrogen addition to conventional fuels increases fuel cost, and reduces both vehicle range and engine output power. Maintaining low emissions during transient driving cycles has not been demonstrated. A three year test plan has been developed to perform the investigations into the issues described above. During this initial year of funding research has progressed in the following areas: (a) a cost effective single-cylinder research platform was constructed; (b) exhaust gas speciation was performed to characterize the nature of hydrocarbon emissions from hydrogen-enriched natural gas fuels; (c) three H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} fuel compositions were analyzed using spark timing and equivalence ratio sweeping procedures and finally; (d) a full size pick-up truck platform was converted to run on HCNG fuels. The testing performed in year one of the three year plan represents a baseline from which to assess options for overcoming the stated barriers to success.

  6. Hydrogen production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this first Gedepeon workshop on hydrogen production processes are: to stimulate the information exchange about research programs and research advances in the domain of hydrogen production processes, to indicate the domains of interest of these processes and the potentialities linked with the coupling of a nuclear reactor, to establish the actions of common interest for the CEA, the CNRS, and eventually EDF, that can be funded in the framework of the Gedepeon research group. This document gathers the slides of the 17 presentations given at this workshop and dealing with: the H 2 question and the international research programs (Lucchese P.); the CEA's research program (Lucchese P., Anzieu P.); processes based on the iodine/sulfur cycle: efficiency of a facility - flow-sheets, efficiencies, hard points (Borgard J.M.), R and D about the I/S cycle: Bunsen reaction (Colette S.), R and D about the I/S cycle: the HI/I 2 /H 2 O system (Doizi D.), demonstration loop/chemical engineering (Duhamet J.), materials and corrosion (Terlain A.); other processes under study: the Westinghouse cycle (Eysseric C.), other processes under study at the CEA (UT3, plasma,...) (Lemort F.), database about thermochemical cycles (Abanades S.), Zn/ZnO cycle (Broust F.), H 2 production by cracking, high temperature reforming with carbon trapping (Flamant G.), membrane technology (De Lamare J.); high-temperature electrolysis: SOFC used as electrolyzers (Grastien R.); generic aspects linked with hydrogen production: technical-economical evaluation of processes (Werkoff F.), thermodynamic tools (Neveu P.), the reactor-process coupling (Aujollet P.). (J.S.)

  7. Hydrogen arcjet technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankovic, John M.; Hamley, John A.; Haag, Thomas W.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Curran, Francis M.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1960's, a substantial research effort was centered on the development of arcjets for space propulsion applications. The majority of the work was at the 30 kW power level with some work at 1-2 kW. At the end of the research effort, the hydrogen arcjet had demonstrated over 700 hours of life in a continuous endurance test at 30 kW, at a specific impulse over 1000 s, and at an efficiency of 0.41. Another high power design demonstrated 500 h life with an efficiency of over 0.50 at the same specific impulse and power levels. At lower power levels, a life of 150 hours was demonstrated at 2 kW with an efficiency of 0.31 and a specific impulse of 935 s. Lack of a space power source hindered arcjet acceptance and research ceased. Over three decades after the first research began, renewed interest exists for hydrogen arcjets. The new approach includes concurrent development of the power processing technology with the arcjet thruster. Performance data were recently obtained over a power range of 0.3-30 kW. The 2 kW performance has been repeated; however, the present high power performance is lower than that obtained in the 1960's at 30 kW, and lifetimes of present thrusters have not yet been demonstrated. Laboratory power processing units have been developed and operated with hydrogen arcjets for the 0.1 kW to 5 kW power range. A 10 kW power processing unit is under development and has been operated at design power into a resistive load.

  8. Cost estimation of hydrogen and DME produced by nuclear heat utilization system II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2004-09-01

    Utilization and production of hydrogen has been studied in order to spread utilization of the hydrogen energy in 2020 or 2030. It will take, however, many years for the hydrogen energy to be used very easily like gasoline, diesel oil and city gas in the world. During the periods, low CO 2 release liquid fuels would be used together with hydrogen. Recently, di-methyl-ether (DME). has been noticed as one of the substitute liquid fuels of petroleum. Such liquid fuels can be produced from the mixed gas such as hydrogen and carbon oxide which are produced from natural gas by steam reforming. Therefore, the system would become one of the candidates of future system of nuclear heat utilization. Following the study in 2002, we performed economic evaluation of the hydrogen and DME production by nuclear heat utilization plant where heat generated by HTGR is completely consumed for the production. The results show that hydrogen price produced by nuclear was about 17% cheaper than the commercial price by increase in recovery rate of high purity hydrogen with increased in PSA process. Price of DME in indirect method produced by nuclear heat was also about 17% cheaper than the commercial price by producing high purity hydrogen in the DME producing process. As for the DME, since price of DME produced near oil land in petroleum exporting countries is cheaper than production in Japan, production of DME by nuclear heat in Japan has disadvantage economically in this time. Trial study to estimate DME price produced by direct method was performed. From the present estimation, utilization of nuclear heat for the production of hydrogen would be more effective with coupled consideration of reduction effect of CO 2 release. (author)

  9. Biodiesel of distilled hydrogenated fat and biodiesel of distilled residual oil: fuel consumption in agricultural tractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camara, Felipe Thomaz da; Lopes, Afonso; Silva, Rouverson Pereira da; Oliveira, Melina Cais Jejcic; Furlani, Carlos Eduardo Angeli [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil); Dabdoub, Miguel Joaquim [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Great part of the world-wide oil production is used in fry process; however, after using, such product becomes an undesirable residue, and the usual methods of discarding of these residues, generally contaminate the environment, mainly the rivers. In function of this, using oil and residual fat for manufacturing biodiesel, besides preventing ambient contamination, turning up an undesirable residue in to fuel. The present work had as objective to evaluate the fuel consumption of a Valtra BM100 4x2 TDA tractor functioning with methylic biodiesel from distilled hydrogenated fat and methylic biodiesel from distilled residual oil, in seven blends into diesel. The work was conducted at the Department of Agricultural Engineering, at UNESP - Jaboticabal, in an entirely randomized block statistical design, factorial array of 2 x 7, with three repetitions. The factors combinations were two types of methylic distilled biodiesel (residual oil and hydrogenated fat) and seven blends (B{sub 0}, B{sub 5}, B{sub 1}5, B{sub 2}5, B{sub 5}0, B{sub 7}5 and B{sub 1}00). The results had evidenced that additioning 15% of biodiesel into diesel, the specific consumption was similar, and biodiesel of residual oil provided less consumption than biodiesel from hydrogenated fat. (author)

  10. The Hawaii hydrogen plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, P.K.; McKinley, K.R.; Antal, M.J. Jr.; Kinoshita, C.M.; Neill, D.R.; Phillips, V.D.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Koehler, R.L.; Huang, N.

    1990-01-01

    Hawaii is the most energy-vulnerable state in the Union. Over the last 16 years the State has undertaken programs to reduce its energy needs and to provide alternatives to current usage tapping its abundant renewable energy resources. This paper describes the long-range research and development plans in Renewable Hydrogen for the State of Hawaii with special attention to the contributions of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Current activities in production, storage, and utilization are detailed, and projections through the year 2000 are offered

  11. Hydrogen storage development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A summary of the hydride development efforts for the current program year (FY98) are presented here. The Mg-Al-Zn alloy system was studied at low Zn levels (2--4 wt%) and midrange Al contents (40--60 wt%). Higher plateau pressures were found with Al and Zn alloying in Mg and, furthermore, it was found that the hydrogen desorption kinetics were significantly improved with small additions of Zn. Results are also shown here for a detailed study of the low temperature properties of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and a comparison made between conventional melt cast alloy and the vapor process material.

  12. Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, A.B.; Varela Gasque, Ana Sofia; Dionigi, F.

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is growing in significance as society begins to rely more on renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Thus, research on designing new, inexpensive, and abundant HER catalysts is important. Here, we describe how a simple experiment...... catalysts based on this. Suited for upper-level high school and first-year university students, this exercise involves using a basic two-cell electrochemical setup to test multiple electrode materials as catalysts at one applied potential, and then constructing a volcano curve with the resulting currents...

  13. Tetraphenylphosphonium hydrogen oxalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. W. Dean

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C24H20P+·C2HO4−, two symmetry-independent ion pairs are present. The cations aggregate into puckered sheets via zigzag infinite chains of sixfold phenyl embraces and parallel fourfold phenyl embraces, while the anions form hydrogen-bonded chains between the sheets of cations. In the two independent oxalate anions, the angles between the normals to the two least-squares carboxylate COO planes are unusually large, viz. 72.5 (1 and 82.1 (1°.

  14. Promotion Effect of Alkali Metal Hydroxides on Polymer-Stabilized Pd Nanoparticles for Selective Hydrogenation of C–C Triple Bonds in Alkynols

    OpenAIRE

    Nikoshvili, Linda Zh.; Bykov, Alexey V.; Khudyakova, Tatiana E.; Lagrange, Thomas; Héroguel, Florent; Luterbacher, Jeremy S.; Matveeva, Valentina G.; Sulman, Esther M.; Dyson, Paul J.; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2017-01-01

    Postimpregnation of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) stabilized within hyper-cross-linked polystyrene with sodium or potassium hydroxides of optimal concentration was found to significantly increase the catalytic activity for the partial hydrogenation of the C–C triple bond in 2-methyl-3-butyn-2-ol at ambient hydrogen pressure. The alkali metal hydroxide accelerates the transformation of the residual Pd(II) salt into Pd(0) NPs and diminishes the reaction induction period. In addition, the selectivity t...

  15. National Hydrogen Roadmap Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-04-01

    This document summarizes the presentations and suggestions put forth by officials, industry experts and policymakers in their efforts to come together to develop a roadmap for America''s clean energy future and outline the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision. The National Hydrogen Roadmap Workshop was held April 2-3, 2002. These proceedings were compiled into a formal report, The National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap, which is also available online.

  16. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  17. Modeling of the oxidation of methyl esters—Validation for methyl hexanoate, methyl heptanoate, and methyl decanoate in a jet-stirred reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaude, Pierre Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Bax, Sarah; Biet, Joffrey; Warth, Valérie; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of the oxidation of methyl esters was investigated and the specific chemistry, which is due to the presence of the ester group in this class of molecules, is described. New reactions and rate parameters were defined and included in the software EXGAS for the automatic generation of kinetic mechanisms. Models generated with EXGAS were successfully validated against data from the literature (oxidation of methyl hexanoate and methyl heptanoate in a jet-stirred reactor) and a new set of experimental results for methyl decanoate. The oxidation of this last species was investigated in a jet-stirred reactor at temperatures from 500 to 1100 K, including the negative temperature coefficient region, under stoichiometric conditions, at a pressure of 1.06 bar and for a residence time of 1.5 s: more than 30 reaction products, including olefins, unsaturated esters, and cyclic ethers, were quantified and successfully simulated. Flow rate analysis showed that reactions pathways for the oxidation of methyl esters in the low-temperature range are similar to that of alkanes. PMID:23710076

  18. Modeling of the oxidation of methyl esters-Validation for methyl hexanoate, methyl heptanoate, and methyl decanoate in a jet-stirred reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaude, Pierre Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Bax, Sarah; Biet, Joffrey; Warth, Valérie; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2010-11-01

    The modeling of the oxidation of methyl esters was investigated and the specific chemistry, which is due to the presence of the ester group in this class of molecules, is described. New reactions and rate parameters were defined and included in the software EXGAS for the automatic generation of kinetic mechanisms. Models generated with EXGAS were successfully validated against data from the literature (oxidation of methyl hexanoate and methyl heptanoate in a jet-stirred reactor) and a new set of experimental results for methyl decanoate. The oxidation of this last species was investigated in a jet-stirred reactor at temperatures from 500 to 1100 K, including the negative temperature coefficient region, under stoichiometric conditions, at a pressure of 1.06 bar and for a residence time of 1.5 s: more than 30 reaction products, including olefins, unsaturated esters, and cyclic ethers, were quantified and successfully simulated. Flow rate analysis showed that reactions pathways for the oxidation of methyl esters in the low-temperature range are similar to that of alkanes.

  19. Histone Lysine Methylation in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-dong Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN belongs to debilitating microvascular complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of end-stage renal diseases worldwide. Furthermore, outcomes from the DCCT/EDIC study showed that DN often persists and progresses despite intensive glucose control in many diabetes patients, possibly as a result of prior episode of hyperglycemia, which is called “metabolic memory.” The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of DN remain poorly understood. Activation of multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors can lead to aberrant expression of DN-related pathologic genes in target renal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms in chromatin such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and methylation can influence the pathophysiology of DN and metabolic memory. Exciting researches from cell culture and experimental animals have shown that key histone methylation patterns and the related histone methyltransferases and histone demethylases can play important roles in the regulation of inflammatory and profibrotic genes in renal cells under diabetic conditions. Because histone methylation is dynamic and potentially reversible, it can provide a window of opportunity for the development of much-needed novel therapeutic potential for DN in the future. In this minireview, we discuss recent advances in the field of histone methylation and its roles in the pathogenesis and progression of DN.

  20. Prognostic DNA Methylation Markers for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri H. Strand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm and the third most common cause of cancer-related death amongst men in the Western world. PC is a clinically highly heterogeneous disease, and distinction between aggressive and indolent disease is a major challenge for the management of PC. Currently, no biomarkers or prognostic tools are able to accurately predict tumor progression at the time of diagnosis. Thus, improved biomarkers for PC prognosis are urgently needed. This review focuses on the prognostic potential of DNA methylation biomarkers for PC. Epigenetic changes are hallmarks of PC and associated with malignant initiation as well as tumor progression. Moreover, DNA methylation is the most frequently studied epigenetic alteration in PC, and the prognostic potential of DNA methylation markers for PC has been demonstrated in multiple studies. The most promising methylation marker candidates identified so far include PITX2, C1orf114 (CCDC181 and the GABRE~miR-452~miR-224 locus, in addition to the three-gene signature AOX1/C1orf114/HAPLN3. Several other biomarker candidates have also been investigated, but with less stringent clinical validation and/or conflicting evidence regarding their possible prognostic value available at this time. Here, we review the current evidence for the prognostic potential of DNA methylation markers in PC.

  1. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Nils; Duffy, M.J; Napieralski, R.

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that meas......Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested...... that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2...... for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene...

  2. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Michael J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  3. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  4. Future outlook of hydrogen market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozmen, S.; Leprince, P.

    1976-01-01

    Up to now, hydrogen has been produced from hydrocarbons for chemical uses. In the future, it will have to find a new market for itself which will depend on the development of nuclear power plants. Through the use of electric or thermal energy available during off-peak hours, water decomposition by electrolytic or thermal methods (redox cycle) could produce hydrogen, a storable and transportable gas. In addition to hydrogen consumption for chemical uses (methanol and ammonia manufacturing, petroleum fraction processing, metallurgy, etc.) plans are being drawn up to use hydrogen as a vehicle for energy [fr

  5. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Ming [Augusta, GA

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  6. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Leon; Wade, Dave

    2003-07-01

    During the past decade the interest in hydrogen as transportation fuel has greatly escalated. This heighten interest is partly related to concerns surrounding local and regional air pollution from the combustion of fossil fuels along with carbon dioxide emissions adding to the enhanced greenhouse effect. More recently there has been a great sensitivity to the vulnerability of our oil supply. Thus, energy security and environmental concerns have driven the interest in hydrogen as the clean and secure alternative to fossil fuels. Remarkable advances in fuel-cell technology have made hydrogen fueled transportation a near-term possibility. However, copious quantities of hydrogen must be generated in a manner independent of fossil fuels if environmental benefits and energy security are to be achieved. The renewable technologies, wind, solar, and geothermal, although important contributors, simply do not comprise the energy density required to deliver enough hydrogen to displace much of the fossil transportation fuels. Nuclear energy is the only primary energy source that can generate enough hydrogen in an energy secure and environmentally benign fashion. Methods of production of hydrogen from nuclear energy, the relative cost of hydrogen, and possible transition schemes to a nuclear-hydrogen economy will be presented.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielkopf, J.

    1991-01-01

    Low energy collisions involving neutral excited states of hydrogen are being studied with vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy. Atomic hydrogen is generated by focusing an energetic pulse of ArF, KrF, or YAG laser light into a cell of molecular hydrogen, where a plasma is created near the focal point. The H 2 molecules in and near this region are dissociated, and the cooling atomic hydrogen gas is examined with laser and dispersive optical spectroscopy. In related experiments, we are also investigating neutral H + O and H + metal - atom collisions in these laser-generated plasmas

  8. Global status of hydrogen research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakeman, J.B.; Browning, D.J.

    2001-07-01

    This report surveys the global status of hydrogen research and identifies technological barriers to the implementation of a global hydrogen economy. It is concluded that there will be a 30 year transition phase to the full implementation of the hydrogen economy. In this period, hydrogen will be largely produced by the reformation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane. It will be necessary to ensure that any carbonaceous oxides (and other unwanted species) formed as by-products will be trapped and not released into the atmosphere. Following the transition phase, hydrogen should be largely produced from renewable energy sources using some form of water cracking, largely electrolysis. Target performances and costs are identified for key technologies. The status of hydrogen research in the UK is reviews and it is concluded that the UK does not have a strategy for the adoption of the hydrogen economy, nor does it have a coherent and co-ordinated research and development strategy addressing barriers to the hydrogen economy. Despite this fact, because of the long transition phase, it is still possible for the UK to formulate a coherent strategy and make a significant contribution to the global implementation of the hydrogen economy, as there are still unresolved technology issues. The report concludes with a number of recommendations. (Author)

  9. Dynamic Alu Methylation during Normal Development, Aging, and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanting Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation primarily occurs on CpG dinucleotides and plays an important role in transcriptional regulations during tissue development and cell differentiation. Over 25% of CpG dinucleotides in the human genome reside within Alu elements, the most abundant human repeats. The methylation of Alu elements is an important mechanism to suppress Alu transcription and subsequent retrotransposition. Decades of studies revealed that Alu methylation is highly dynamic during early development and aging. Recently, many environmental factors were shown to have a great impact on Alu methylation. In addition, aberrant Alu methylation has been documented to be an early event in many tumors and Alu methylation levels have been associated with tumor aggressiveness. The assessment of the Alu methylation has become an important approach for early diagnosis and/or prognosis of cancer. This review focuses on the dynamic Alu methylation during development, aging, and tumor genesis. The cause and consequence of Alu methylation changes will be discussed.

  10. Developmental differences in posttranslational calmodulin methylation in pea plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sukheung; Roberts, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    A calmodulin-N-methyltransferase was used to analyze the degree of lysine-115 methylation of pea calmodulin. Calmodulin was isolated from segments of developing roots of young etiolated and green pea plants and was tested for its ability to be methylated by the calmodulin methyltransferase in the presence of 3 H-methyl-S-adenosylmethionine. Calmodulin methylation levels were lower in apical root segments and in the young lateral roots compared with the mature, differentiated root tissues. The methylation of these calmodulin samples occurs specifically at lysine 115 since site-directed mutants of calmodulin with substitutions at this position were not methylated and competitively inhibited methylation. The present findings, combined with previous data showing differences in NAD kinase activation by methylated and unmethylated calmodulins, raise the possibility that posttranslational methylation could affect calmodulin action

  11. Extremophile mediated hydrogen production for hydrogenation of substrates in aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjom, Mouzhgun

    medium containing cultures of T. neapolitana and no external H2 was added, hydrogenation was observed confirming the possibility of developing an integrated BioCat/ChemCat system. The 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of Methyl succinic acid, the hydrogenated product of the olefin. The concept was extended to Glycerol, a by-product of biodiesel that was catalytically upgraded to mixed alcohols in an aqueous medium. The next logical step is to evaluate these results in a continuous flow mode. The demonstrated results have implications in the development of next-generation hydrogenation reaction systems that would lead to the production of biofuels and other chemicals, depending on the substrate used.

  12. The preference of tryptophan for membrane interfaces: insights from N-methylation of tryptophans in gramicidin channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyan; Greathouse, Denise V; Andersen, Olaf S; Koeppe, Roger E

    2008-08-08

    To better understand the structural and functional roles of tryptophan at the membrane/water interface in membrane proteins, we examined the structural and functional consequences of Trp --> 1-methyl-tryptophan substitutions in membrane-spanning gramicidin A channels. Gramicidin A channels are miniproteins that are anchored to the interface by four Trps near the C terminus of each subunit in a membrane-spanning dimer. We masked the hydrogen bonding ability of individual or multiple Trps by 1-methylation of the indole ring and examined the structural and functional changes using circular dichroism spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, solid state (2)H NMR spectroscopy, and single channel analysis. N-Methylation causes distinct changes in the subunit conformational preference, channel-forming propensity, single channel conductance and lifetime, and average indole ring orientations within the membrane-spanning channels. The extent of the local ring dynamic wobble does not increase, and may decrease slightly, when the indole NH is replaced by the non-hydrogen-bonding and more bulky and hydrophobic N-CH(3) group. The changes in conformational preference, which are associated with a shift in the distribution of the aromatic residues across the bilayer, are similar to those observed previously with Trp --> Phe substitutions. We conclude that indole N-H hydrogen bonding is of major importance for the folding of gramicidin channels. The changes in ion permeability, however, are quite different for Trp --> Phe and Trp --> 1-methyl-tryptophan substitutions, indicating that the indole dipole moment and perhaps also ring size and are important for ion permeation through these channels.

  13. Solar Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval, C. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States); Sutin, N. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Turner, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This panel addressed different methods for the photoassisted dissociation of water into its component parts, hydrogen and oxygen. Systems considered include PV-electrolysis, photoelectrochemical cells, and transition-metal based microheterogeneous and homogeneous systems. While none of the systems for water splitting appear economically viable at the present time, the panel identified areas of basic research that could increase the overall efficiency and decrease the costs. Common to all the areas considered was the underlying belief that the water-to-hydrogen half reaction is reasonably well characterized, while the four-electron oxidation of water-to-oxygen is less well understood and represents a significant energy loss. For electrolysis, research in electrocatalysis to reduce overvoltage losses was identified as a key area for increased efficiency. Non-noble metal catalysts and less expensive components would reduce capital costs. While potentially offering higher efficiencies and lower costs, photoelectrochemical-based direct conversion systems undergo corrosion reactions and often have poor energetics for the water reaction. Research is needed to understand the factors that control the interfacial energetics and the photoinduced corrosion. Multi-photon devices were identified as promising systems for high efficiency conversion.

  14. Hydrogen and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomsons, E.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005 the Latvian transport consumed 43 PJ, which makes up 23% of the total priMary resources used in the country. On the world scale this latter figure was 17.6% in 2003. On the 1st October of 2005 in Latvia 808.6 thous. of cars, 119.9 thous. of lorries, 10,7 thous. of buses and 27.1 thous. of motorcycles were registred. The annual growth in the number of light motor cars in the last years was 5.5% on the average. In 2005 the Latvian transport consumed 335 thous. tons of petrol and 542 thous. tons of diesel fuel, which makes up 87.4% of the total resources used (in terms of the combustion heat). In the period of 2002-2005 the annual growth of energy resources consumed by transport was 4.87% on the average. According to forecasts, in 2015 the transports of our country will spend 1.64 times more energy resources as compared with 2005. If the transport of 2015 uses hydrogen, then for Latvia 270 thous. tons of this product will be needed. To obtain 270 thous. tons of hydrogen from water using the up-to-date equipment for electrolysis a considerable amount of electric energy is required. Such amount can be produced by generating stations of the total capacity of 1680 MWe(net). This figure is close to that for the total installed capacity of electric energy production already existing in Latvia. (Author)

  15. Hydrogen energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morovic, T.; Pilhar, R.; Witt, B.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of different energy systems from the economic point of view has to be based on data showing all relevant costs incurred and benefits drawn by the society from the use of such energy systems, i.e. internal costs and benefits visible to the energy consumer as prices paid for power supplied, as well as external costs and benefits. External costs or benefits of energy systems cover among other items employment or wage standard effects, energy-induced environmental impacts, public expenditure for pollution abatement and mitigation of risks and effects of accidents, and the user costs connected with the exploitation of reserves, which are not rated high enough to really reflect and demonstrate the factor of depletion of non-renewable energy sources, as e.g. fossil reserves. Damage to the natural and social environment induced by anthropogenous air pollutants up to about 90% counts among external costs of energy conversion and utilisation. Such damage is considered to be the main factor of external energy costs, while the external benefits of energy systems currently are rated to be relatively unsignificant. This means that an internalisation of external costs would drive up current prices of non-renewable energy sources, which in turn would boost up the economics of renewable energy sources, and the hydrogen produced with their energy. Other advantages attributed to most of the renewable energy sources and to hydrogen energy systems are better environmental compatibility, and no user costs. (orig.) [de

  16. Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

    2012-07-24

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

  17. Handheld hydrogen - a new concept for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink

    2005-01-01

    A method of hydrogen storage using metal ammine complexes in combination with an ammonia decomposition catalyst is presented. This dense hydrogen storage material has high degree of safety compared to all the other available alternatives. This technology reduces the safety hazards of using liquid...

  18. Muonium/muonic hydrogen formation in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The muonium/muonic hydrogen atom formation in ± –H collisions is investigated, using a two-state approximation in a time dependent formalism. It is found that muonium cross-section results are similar to the cross-section results obtained for positronium formation in + –H collision. Muonic hydrogen atom formation ...

  19. Hydrogen vacancies facilitate hydrogen transport kinetics in sodium hydride nanocrystallites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Eijt, S.W.H.

    2008-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory, of the vacancy-mediated hydrogen migration energy in bulk NaH and near the NaH(001) surface. The estimated rate of the vacancy mediated hydrogen transport, obtained within a hopping diffusion model, is consistent with the reaction

  20. Methylated liquor treatment process in caffeine production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junbo; Yang, Mingyang; Huang, Wenjia; Cui, Shenglu; Gao, Liping

    2018-02-01

    The caffeine production process produces a large amount of sodium methyl sulphate in the methylated mother liquor. In order to recycle this part of ingredient, we use the mother liquid of Shijiazhuang Xin Nuowei Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. as the object of study, the use of “nanofiltration (NF) - Dish Type Reverse Osmosis (DTRO) “combination of membrane technology for desalination and concentration. The experimental results show that the concentration of sodium sulfate in the nanofiltration solution is 0.37 g • L -1, the rejection rate is 98%, and the concentration of sodium methyl sulfate in DTRO concentrated solution is 453.80 g • L -1, which meets the requirements of the enterprise.

  1. Histone H4 Lysine 20 methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine; Schotta, Gunnar; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2013-01-01

    of histones have emerged as key regulators of genomic integrity. Intense research during the past few years has revealed histone H4 lysine 20 methylation (H4K20me) as critically important for the biological processes that ensure genome integrity, such as DNA damage repair, DNA replication and chromatin...... compaction. The distinct H4K20 methylation states are mediated by SET8/PR-Set7 that catalyses monomethylation of H4K20, whereas SUV4-20H1 and SUV4-20H2 enzymes mediate further H4K20 methylation to H4K20me2 and H4K20me3. Disruption of these H4K20-specific histone methyltransferases leads to genomic...

  2. Information Thermodynamics of Cytosine DNA Methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robersy Sanchez

    Full Text Available Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM is a stable epigenetic modification to the genome and a widespread regulatory process in living organisms that involves multicomponent molecular machines. Genome-wide cytosine methylation patterning participates in the epigenetic reprogramming of a cell, suggesting that the biological information contained within methylation positions may be amenable to decoding. Adaptation to a new cellular or organismal environment also implies the potential for genome-wide redistribution of CDM changes that will ensure the stability of DNA molecules. This raises the question of whether or not we would be able to sort out the regulatory methylation signals from the CDM background ("noise" induced by thermal fluctuations. Here, we propose a novel statistical and information thermodynamic description of the CDM changes to address the last question. The physical basis of our statistical mechanical model was evaluated in two respects: 1 the adherence to Landauer's principle, according to which molecular machines must dissipate a minimum energy ε = kBT ln2 at each logic operation, where kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the absolute temperature and 2 whether or not the binary stretch of methylation marks on the DNA molecule comprise a language of sorts, properly constrained by thermodynamic principles. The study was performed for genome-wide methylation data from 152 ecotypes and 40 trans-generational variations of Arabidopsis thaliana and 93 human tissues. The DNA persistence length, a basic mechanical property altered by CDM, was estimated with values from 39 to 66.9 nm. Classical methylome analysis can be retrieved by applying information thermodynamic modelling, which is able to discriminate signal from noise. Our finding suggests that the CDM signal comprises a language scheme properly constrained by molecular thermodynamic principles, which is part of an epigenomic communication system that obeys the same thermodynamic

  3. DNA methylation and healthy human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meaghan J; Goodman, Sarah J; Kobor, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    The process of aging results in a host of changes at the cellular and molecular levels, which include senescence, telomere shortening, and changes in gene expression. Epigenetic patterns also change over the lifespan, suggesting that epigenetic changes may constitute an important component of the aging process. The epigenetic mark that has been most highly studied is DNA methylation, the presence of methyl groups at CpG dinucleotides. These dinucleotides are often located near gene promoters and associate with gene expression levels. Early studies indicated that global levels of DNA methylation increase over the first few years of life and then decrease beginning in late adulthood. Recently, with the advent of microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies, increases in variability of DNA methylation with age have been observed, and a number of site-specific patterns have been identified. It has also been shown that certain CpG sites are highly associated with age, to the extent that prediction models using a small number of these sites can accurately predict the chronological age of the donor. Together, these observations point to the existence of two phenomena that both contribute to age-related DNA methylation changes: epigenetic drift and the epigenetic clock. In this review, we focus on healthy human aging throughout the lifetime and discuss the dynamics of DNA methylation as well as how interactions between the genome, environment, and the epigenome influence aging rates. We also discuss the impact of determining 'epigenetic age' for human health and outline some important caveats to existing and future studies. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Norwegian hydrogen guide 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen technologies are maturing at rapid speed, something we experience in Norway and around the globe every day as demonstration projects for vehicles and infrastructure expand at a rate unthinkable of only a few years ago. An example of this evolution happened in Norway in 2009 when two hydrogen filling stations were opened on May the 11th, making it possible to arrange the highly successful Viking Rally from Oslo to Stavanger with more than 40 competing teams. The Viking Rally demonstrated for the public that battery and hydrogen-electric vehicles are technologies that exist today and provide a real alternative for zero emission mobility in the future. The driving range of the generation of vehicles put into demonstration today is more than 450 km on a full hydrogen tank, comparable to conventional vehicles. As the car industry develops the next generation of vehicles for serial production within the next 4-5 years, we will see vehicles that are more robust, more reliable and cost effective. Also on the hydrogen production and distribution side progress is being made, and since renewable hydrogen from biomass and electrolysis is capable of making mobility basically emission free, hydrogen can be a key component in combating climate change and reducing local emissions. The research Council of Norway has for many years supported the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, and The Research Council firmly believes that hydrogen and fuel cell technologies play a crucial role in the energy system of the future. Hydrogen is a flexible transportation fuel, and offers possibilities for storing and balancing intermittent electricity in the energy system. Norwegian companies, research organisations and universities have during the last decade developed strong capabilities in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, capabilities it is important to further develop so that Norwegian actors can supply high class hydrogen and fuel cell technologies to global markets

  5. Metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, H.F.; Badcock, C.C.; Quinzio, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    Metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen (Ni/H 2 ) batteries has been shown to increase battery energy density and improve battery heat management capabilities. However the properties of metal hydrides in a Ni/H 2 battery environment, which contains water vapor and oxygen in addition to the hydrogen, have not been well characterized. This work evaluates the use of hydrides in Ni/H 2 batteries by fundamental characterization of metal hydride properties in a Ni/H 2 cell environment. Hydrogen sorption properties of various hydrides have been measured in a Ni/H 2 cell environment. Results of detailed thermodynamic and kinetic studies of hydrogen sorption in LaNi 5 in a Ni/H 2 cell environment are presented. Long-term cycling studies indicate that degradation of the hydride can be minimized by cycling between certain pressure limits. A model describing the mechanism of hydride degradation is presented

  6. Hydrogen embrittlement due to hydrogen-inclusion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.Y.; Li, J.C.M.

    1976-01-01

    Plastic flow around inclusions creates elastic misfit which attracts hydrogen towards the regions of positive dilatation. Upon decohesion of the inclusion-matrix interface, the excess hydrogen escapes into the void and can produce sufficient pressure to cause void growth by plastic deformation. This mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement can be used to understand the increase of ductility with temperature, the decrease of ductility with hydrogen content, and the increase of ductility with the ultimate strength of the matrix. An examination of the effect of the shape of spheroid inclusion reveals that rods are more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than disks. The size of the inclusion is unimportant while the volume fraction of inclusions plays the usual role

  7. The study of hydrogen removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasufuku, Katsumi; Fukuhara, Masashi; Izaki, Takashi; Nakase, Takeshi

    1979-01-01

    Two methods of hydrogen removal from the helium coolant for high temperature helium gas-cooled nuclear reactor plants were investigated; the one is the process absorbing hydrogen with titanium sponges and the other is the water removal with zeolite, after hydrogen is converted to water utilizing copper oxide (CuO). The special feature of these two hydrogen removal methods is to treat the very low hydrogen concentration in helium about 0.06 mm Hg (2 Vpm, 41 ata). As for the titanium sponge method, a preliminary experimental facility was constructed to test the temperature dependences of the quantity of equilibrium absorption of hydrogen and the diffusion velocity inside titanium sponge by the batch type constant volume process. The temperature of titanium sponge was 800 deg C, the vacuum was from 2 to 3 x 10 -7 mm Hg and hydrogen partial pressure was from 1.0 to 10 -4 mm Hg in the experiment. The measured hydrogen absorption rate and the diffusion velocity data are presented, and the experimental conditions were evaluated. After the preliminary experiment, a mini-loop was constructed to confirm the temperature and velocity dependences of overall capacity factor, and the overall capacity factor and the regenerating characteristics of titanium sponge were tested. These experimental data are shown, and were evaluated. Concerning the hydrogen removal method utilizing CuO, the experiment was carried out under the following test conditions: the temperature from 400 to 265 deg C, the linear velocity from 50.3 to 16.7 cm/sec and the hydrogen concentration from 12.0 to 1.93 mm/Hg. The hydrogen removal rate and capacity were obtained in this experiment, and the data are presented and explained. (Nakai, Y.)

  8. A novel method to quantify local CpG methylation density by regional methylation elongation assay on microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Yingjuan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation based techniques are important tools in both clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. But most of these methods only analyze a few CpG sites in a target region. Indeed, difference of site-specific methylation may also lead to a change of methylation density in many cases, and it has been found that the density of methylation is more important than methylation of single CpG site for gene silencing. Results We have developed a novel approach for quantitative analysis of CpG methylation density on the basis of microarray-based hybridization and incorporation of Cy5-dCTP into the Cy3 labeled target DNA by using Taq DNA Polymerase on microarray. The quantification is achieved by measuring Cy5/Cy3 signal ratio which is proportional to methylation density. This methylation-sensitive technique, termed RMEAM (regional methylation elongation assay on microarray, provides several advantages over existing methods used for methylation analysis. It can determine an exact methylation density of the given region, and has potential of high throughput. We demonstrate a use of this method in determining the methylation density of the promoter region of the tumor-related gene MLH1, TERT and MGMT in colorectal carcinoma patients. Conclusion This technique allows for quantitative analysis of regional methylation density, which is the representative of all allelic methylation patterns in the sample. The results show that this technique has the characteristics of simplicity, rapidness, specificity and high-throughput.

  9. Analysis of hydrogen content and distribution in hydrogen storage alloys using neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Hiroki; Hatakeyama, Keisuke; Satake, Yuichi; Esaka, Takao; Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Kanda, Keiji

    2000-01-01

    Small amounts of hydrogen in hydrogen storage alloys, such as Mg 2 Ni, were detected using neutron radiography (NRG). Hydrogen concentrations in a hydrogenated solid solution were determined by this technique. Furthermore, we were able to obtain NRG images for an initial stage of hydrogen absorption in the hydrogen storage alloys. NRG would be a new measurement method to clarify the behavior of hydrogen in hydrogen storage alloys. (author)

  10. Measurement of dissolved hydrogen and hydrogen gas transfer in a hydrogen-producing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizas, I.; Bagley, D.M. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a simple method to measure dissolved hydrogen concentrations in the laboratory using standard equipment and a series of hydrogen gas transfer tests. The method was validated by measuring hydrogen gas transfer parameters for an anaerobic reactor system that was purged with 10 per cent carbon dioxide and 90 per cent nitrogen using a coarse bubble diffuser stone. Liquid samples from the reactor were injected into vials and hydrogen was allowed to partition between the liquid and gaseous phases. The concentration of dissolved hydrogen was determined by comparing the headspace injections onto a gas chromatograph and a standard curve. The detection limit was 1.0 x 10{sup -5} mol/L of dissolved hydrogen. The gas transfer rate for hydrogen in basal medium and anaerobic digester sludge was used to validate the method. Results were compared with gas transfer models. In addition to monitoring dissolved hydrogen in reactor systems, this method can help improve hydrogen production potential. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  11. Analysis of DNA Cytosine Methylation Patterns Using Methylation-Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, María Ángeles; de María, Nuria; Sáez-Laguna, Enrique; Vélez, María Dolores; Cervera, María Teresa; Cabezas, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Different molecular techniques have been developed to study either the global level of methylated cytosines or methylation at specific gene sequences. One of them is the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism technique (MSAP) which is a modification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). It has been used to study methylation of anonymous CCGG sequences in different fungi, plants, and animal species. The main variation of this technique resides on the use of isoschizomers with different methylation sensitivity (such as HpaII and MspI) as a frequent-cutter restriction enzyme. For each sample, MSAP analysis is performed using both EcoRI/HpaII- and EcoRI/MspI-digested samples. A comparative analysis between EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI fragment patterns allows the identification of two types of polymorphisms: (1) methylation-insensitive polymorphisms that show common EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI patterns but are detected as polymorphic amplified fragments among samples and (2) methylation-sensitive polymorphisms which are associated with the amplified fragments that differ in their presence or absence or in their intensity between EcoRI/HpaII and EcoRI/MspI patterns. This chapter describes a detailed protocol of this technique and discusses the modifications that can be applied to adjust the technology to different species of interest.

  12. Trans-methylation reactions in plants: focus on the activated methyl cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahikainen, Moona; Alegre, Sara; Trotta, Andrea; Pascual, Jesús; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2018-02-01

    Trans-methylation reactions are vital in basic metabolism, epigenetic regulation, RNA metabolism, and posttranslational control of protein function and therefore fundamental in determining the physiological processes in all living organisms. The plant kingdom is additionally characterized by the production of secondary metabolites that undergo specific hydroxylation, oxidation and methylation reactions to obtain a wide array of different chemical structures. Increasing research efforts have started to reveal the enzymatic pathways underlying the biosynthesis of complex metabolites in plants. Further engineering of these enzymatic machineries offers significant possibilities in the development of bio-based technologies, but necessitates deep understanding of their potential metabolic and regulatory interactions. Trans-methylation reactions are tightly coupled with the so-called activated methyl cycle (AMC), an essential metabolic circuit that maintains the trans-methylation capacity in all living cells. Tight regulation of the AMC is crucial in ensuring accurate trans-methylation reactions in different subcellular compartments, cell types, developmental stages and environmental conditions. This review addresses the organization and posttranslational regulation of the AMC and elaborates its critical role in determining metabolic regulation through modulation of methyl utilization in stress-exposed plants. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  13. Origin and fate of 4-methyl steroid hydrocarbons. I. Diagenesis of 4-methyl sterenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, G.A.; Lamb, N.A.; Maxwell, J.R.

    1986-03-01

    Treatment of 4-methylcholest-4-ene under mild acid conditions at low temperatures gives chemical evidence for certain features seen in the distributions of sedimentary 4-methyl steroid hydrocarbons, and further indicates that many low temperature diagenetic reactions of steroids are explicable in terms of acid catalyzed rearrangements. Specifically, the results provide: (i) Indirect evidence that the 4-ene skeleton is a key intermediate in the dehydration of 4-methyl stanols in sediments. (ii) An explanation for the distribution of 4-methyl sterenes and A-nor sterenes in the lacustrine Messel shale (Eocene). (iii) An explanation for the presence of 4..beta..-methyl steranes in relatively immature sedimentary rocks, despite the precursor stanols having the 4..cap alpha..-methyl configuration. With increasing maturity in the Paris Basin shales (Lower Toarcian), the less stable 4..beta..-methyl steranes decrease gradually in abundance relative to their 4..cap alpha..-methyl counterparts, at a rate fairly similar to the change in pristane stereochemistry.

  14. Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions of N-Methyl α-Bromoacetanilides with Benzylamines in Dimethyl Sulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikary, Keshab Kumar; Lee, Hai Whang

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the reactions of N-methyl-Y-α-bromoacetanilides with substituted X-benzylamines have been carried out in dimethyl sulfoxide at 25.0 .deg. C. The Hammett plots for substituent X variations in the nucleophiles (log k N vs σ X ) are slightly biphasic concave upwards/downwards, while the Bronsted plots (log k N vs pK a ) are biphasic concave downwards with breakpoints at X = H. The Hammett plots for substituent Y variations in the substrates (log k N vs σ Y ) are biphasic concave upwards/downwards with breakpoints at Y = H. The cross-interaction constant ρ XY values are all negative: ρ XY = -0.32 for X = Y = electron-donating: -0.22 for X = electron-withdrawing and Y = electron-donating: -1.80 for X = electron-donating and Y = electronwithdrawing: -1.43 for X = Y = electron-withdrawing substituents. Deuterated kinetic isotope effects are primary normal (k H /k D > 1) for Y = electron-donating, while secondary inverse (k H /k D < 1) for Y = electronwithdrawing substituent. The proposed mechanisms of the benzylaminolyses of N-methyl-Y-α-bromoacetanilides are a concerted mechanism with a five membered ring TS involving hydrogen bonding between hydrogen (deuterium) atom in N-H(D) and oxygen atom in C = O for Y = electron-donating, while a concerted mechanism with an enolate-like TS in which the nucleophile attacks the α-carbon for Y = electronwithdrawing substituents

  15. Cord blood buffy coat DNA methylation is comparable to whole cord blood methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, John; Schmidt, Rebecca J; Benke, Kelly S; Newschaffer, Craig; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Croen, Lisa A; Iosif, Ana-Maria; LaSalle, Janine M; Fallin, M Daniele; Bakulski, Kelly M

    2018-01-01

    Cord blood DNA methylation is associated with numerous health outcomes and environmental exposures. Whole cord blood DNA reflects all nucleated blood cell types, while centrifuging whole blood separates red blood cells, generating a white blood cell buffy coat. Both sample types are used in DNA methylation studies. Cell types have unique methylation patterns and processing can impact cell distributions, which may influence comparability. We evaluated differences in cell composition and DNA methylation between cord blood buffy coat and whole cord blood samples. Cord blood DNA methylation was measured with the Infinium EPIC BeadChip (Illumina) in eight individuals, each contributing buffy coat and whole blood samples. We analyzed principal components (PC) of methylation, performed hierarchical clustering, and computed correlations of mean-centered methylation between pairs. We conducted moderated t-tests on single sites and estimated cell composition. DNA methylation PCs were associated with individual (P PC1 = 1.4 × 10 -9 ; P PC2 = 2.9 × 10 -5 ; P PC3 = 3.8 × 10 -5 ; P PC4 = 4.2 × 10 -6 ; P PC5 = 9.9 × 10 -13 , P PC6 = 1.3 × 10 -11 ) and not with sample type (P PC1-6 >0.7). Samples hierarchically clustered by individual. Pearson correlations of mean-centered methylation between paired samples ranged from r = 0.66 to r = 0.87. No individual site significantly differed between buffy coat and whole cord blood when adjusting for multiple comparisons (five sites had unadjusted Pcoat and whole cord blood are much lower than inter-individual variation, demonstrating that both sample preparation types can be analytically combined and compared.

  16. Maternal Methyl-Group Donor Intake and Global DNA (HydroxyMethylation before and during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pauwels

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It is still unclear to which extent methyl-group intake during pregnancy can affect maternal global DNA (hydroxylmethylation. Pregnancy methylation profiling and its link with methyl-group intake in a healthy population could enhance our understanding of the development of pregnancy related disorders. One hundred forty-eight women were enrolled in the MANOE (MAternal Nutrition and Offspring’s Epigenome study. Thiry-four women were enrolled before pregnancy and 116 during the first trimester of pregnancy. Global DNA (hydroxymethylation in blood using LC-MS/MS and dietary methyl-group intake (methionine, folate, betaine, and choline using a food-frequency questionnaire were estimated pre-pregnancy, during each trimester, and at delivery. Global DNA (hydroxymethylation levels were highest pre-pregnancy and at weeks 18–22 of pregnancy. We observed a positive relation between folic acid and global DNA methylation (p = 0.04 and hydroxymethylation (p = 0.04. A high intake of methionine pre-pregnancy and in the first trimester showed lower (hydroxymethylation percentage in weeks 11–13 and weeks 18–22, respectively. Choline and betaine intake in the first weeks was negatively associated with hydroxymethylation. Women with a high intake of these three methyl groups in the second and third trimester showed higher hyrdoxymethylation/methylation levels in the third trimester. To conclude, a time trend in DNA (hydroxymethylation was found and women with higher methyl-group intake showed higher methylation in the third trimester, and not in earlier phases of pregnancy.

  17. Experimental and chemical kinetic modeling study of small methyl esters oxidation: Methyl (E)-2-butenoate and methyl butanoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gail, S.; Sarathy, S.M.; Thomson, M.J. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada); Dievart, P.; Dagaut, P. [CNRS, 1C, Ave de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2008-12-15

    This study examines the effect of unsaturation on the combustion of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). New experimental results were obtained for the oxidation of methyl (E)-2-butenoate (MC, unsaturated C{sub 4} FAME) and methyl butanoate (MB, saturated C{sub 4} FAME) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) at atmospheric pressure under dilute conditions over the temperature range 850-1400 K, and two equivalence ratios ({phi}=0.375,0.75) with a residence time of 0.07 s. The results consist of concentration profiles of the reactants, stable intermediates, and final products, measured by probe sampling followed by on-line and off-line gas chromatography analyses. The oxidation of MC and MB in the JSR and under counterflow diffusion flame conditions was modeled using a new detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism (301 species and 1516 reactions) derived from previous schemes proposed in the literature. The laminar counterflow flame and JSR (for {phi}=1.13) experimental results used were from a previous study on the comparison of the combustion of both compounds. Sensitivity analyses and reaction path analyses, based on rates of reaction, were used to interpret the results. The data and the model show that MC has reaction pathways analogous to that of MB under the present conditions. The model of MC oxidation provides a better understanding of the effect of the ester function on combustion, and the effect of unsaturation on the combustion of fatty acid methyl ester compounds typically found in biodiesel. (author)

  18. Hydrogen in portable devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garche, J. [ZSW - Electrochemical Energy storage and energy Conversion Division, Baden Wuerttemberg (Germany); Stimmer, U. [Technische Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany); Friedrich, A.K. [ZAE Bayern (Germany); Fiedenhans' l, R. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Res. Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2004-10-01

    Fuel cells were originally intended for use in power plants and vehicles. More recently, developers realised the possibility for building much smaller units and for lower prices per kilowatt than their larger relatives. This has led to a strong interest in developing small fuel cells. Small fuel cells could replace batteries in portable electronic equipment and internal combustion engines in portable generators. The upper limit for portable generators is about 5kW, mainly because of the weight of the fuel cell. The main applications for low-power fuel cells are mobile phones, personal digital assistants, laptop and notebook computers, cameras, medical equipment, military applications and other portable electronic devices. In comparison to batteries, fuel cells can supply much more power per unit volume or weight, though they have lower output voltages and are slower to respond to transients. Fuel cell types that are suitable for portable applications include: proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) using pure hydrogen, PEMFCs using hydrogen-rich gases from hydrocarbon or alcohol reforming, direct methanol fuel cells and, high-temperature fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) using hydrocarbons directly. Fuel cells for portable devices is becoming a niche, high-value market area which has good opportunities for a fast introduction of fuel cell technology and for the first consumer products in the electronic market can be expected within the coming year and is believed to grow rapidly thereafter. Danish industry is involved in the development of SOFC, PEMFC and DMFC fuel cells and the industry has in particular a strong position in system components and complete systems. An important area for Danish industry is system integration, where fuel cells and hydrogen technologies are implemented in electrical powered products. This is an area that is particular suited for small and medium sized enterprises and for

  19. Hydrogen in portable devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garche, J.; Stimmer, U.; Friedrich, A.K.; Fiedenhans'l, R.

    2004-01-01

    Fuel cells were originally intended for use in power plants and vehicles. More recently, developers realised the possibility for building much smaller units and for lower prices per kilowatt than their larger relatives. This has led to a strong interest in developing small fuel cells. Small fuel cells could replace batteries in portable electronic equipment and internal combustion engines in portable generators. The upper limit for portable generators is about 5kW, mainly because of the weight of the fuel cell. The main applications for low-power fuel cells are mobile phones, personal digital assistants, laptop and notebook computers, cameras, medical equipment, military applications and other portable electronic devices. In comparison to batteries, fuel cells can supply much more power per unit volume or weight, though they have lower output voltages and are slower to respond to transients. Fuel cell types that are suitable for portable applications include: proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) using pure hydrogen, PEMFCs using hydrogen-rich gases from hydrocarbon or alcohol reforming, direct methanol fuel cells and, high-temperature fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) using hydrocarbons directly. Fuel cells for portable devices is becoming a niche, high-value market area which has good opportunities for a fast introduction of fuel cell technology and for the first consumer products in the electronic market can be expected within the coming year and is believed to grow rapidly thereafter. Danish industry is involved in the development of SOFC, PEMFC and DMFC fuel cells and the industry has in particular a strong position in system components and complete systems. An important area for Danish industry is system integration, where fuel cells and hydrogen technologies are implemented in electrical powered products. This is an area that is particular suited for small and medium sized enterprises and for

  20. Solar and Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadirgan, F.; Beyhan, S.; Oezenler, S.

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that the only sustainable and environmentally friendly energy is the solar energy and hydrogen energy, which can meet the increasing energy demand in the future. Solar Energy may be used either for solar thermal or for solar electricity conversion. Solar thermal collectors represent a wide-spread type of system for the conversion of solar energy. Radiation, convection and conduction are strongly coupled energy transport mechanisms in solar collector systems. The economic viability of lower temperature applications of solar energy may be improved by increasing the quantity of usable energy delivered per unit area of collector. This can be achieved by the use of selective black coatings which have a high degree of solar absorption, maintaining high energy input to the solar system while simultaneously suppressing the emission of thermal infrared radiation. Photovoltaic solar cells and modules are produced for: (1) large scale power generation, most commonly when modules are incorporated as part of a building (building integrated photovoltaic s) but also in centralised power stations, (2) supplying power to villages and towns in developing countries that are not connected to the supply grid, e.g. for lighting and water pumping systems, (3) supplying power in remote locations, e.g. for communications or weather monitoring equipment, (4) supplying power for satellites and space vehicles, (5) supplying power for consumer products, e.g. calculators, clocks, toys and night lights. In hydrogen energy systems, Proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cells are promising candidates for applications ranging from portable power sources (battery replacement applications) to power sources for future electric vehicles because of their safety, elimination of fuel processor system, thus, simple device fabrication and low cost. Although major steps forward have been achieved in terms of PEMFC design since the onset of research in this area, further

  1. Hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    cum laude graduation (with distinction) To replace fossil fuels, society is currently considering alternative clean fuels for transportation. Hydrogen could be such a fuel. In theory, large amounts of renewable hydrogen can be produced from organic contaminants in wastewater. During his PhD research

  2. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  3. O hydrogen bonds in alkaloids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An overview of general classification scheme, medicinal importance and crystal structure analysis with emphasis on the role of hydrogen bonding in some alkaloids is presented in this paper. The article is based on a general kind of survey while crystallographic analysis and role of hydrogen bonding are limited to only ...

  4. Distance criterion for hydrogen bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Distance criterion for hydrogen bond. In a D-H ...A contact, the D...A distance must be less than the sum of van der Waals Radii of the D and A atoms, for it to be a hydrogen bond.

  5. Experiments with cold hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonas, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous investigations of atomic processes in Waseous phase on the surface with participation of ''cold'' hydrogen atoms, made during the last years, are considered. The term ''cold atom'' means the range of relative collision energies E<10 MeV (respectively 'ultracold ' atoms at E< or approximately 1 MeV) which corresponds to the range of temperatures in tens (units) of K degrees. Three main ranges of investigations where extensive experimental programs are realized are considered: study of collisional processes with hydrogen atom participation, hydrogen atoms being of astrophysical interest; study of elastic atom-molecular scattering at superlow energies and studies on the problem of condensed hydrogen. Hydrogen atoms production is realized at dissociation in non-electrode high-frequency or superhigh-frequency discharge. A method of hydrogen quantum generator and of its modifications appeared to be rather an effective means to study collisional changes of spin state of hydrogen atoms. First important results on storage and stabilization of the gas of polarized hydrogen atoms are received

  6. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  7. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanostruc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirscher, M.; Becher, M.; Haluska, M.; Quintel, A.; Skakalova, V.; Choi, M.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Roth, S.; Stepanek, I.; Bernier, P.; Leonhardt, A.; Fink, J.

    2002-01-01

    The paper gives a critical review of the literature on hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures. Furthermore, the hydrogen storage of graphite, graphite nanofibers (GNFs), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The samples were ball milled

  8. Hydrogen Production by Thermophilic Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Willquist, K.; Zeidan, A.A.; Vrije, de T.; Mars, A.E.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the many ways hydrogen can be produced, this chapter focuses on biological hydrogen production by thermophilic bacteria and archaea in dark fermentations. The thermophiles are held as promising candidates for a cost-effective fermentation process, because of their relatively high yields and broad

  9. Competition and the hydrogen market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues of competition in the hydrogen market. The major drivers for the hydrogen-based economy are industrial growth, environmental and health benefits from improved air quality and reduced greenhouse gases as well as diversification of energy supply and security

  10. Performance of Existing Hydrogen Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Samuel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Christopher D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-01

    In this presentation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory presented aggregated analysis results on the performance of existing hydrogen stations, including performance, operation, utilization, maintenance, safety, hydrogen quality, and cost. The U.S. Department of Energy funds technology validation work at NREL through its National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC).

  11. Hydrogen - A new green energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnu, Franck

    2013-01-01

    A set of articles proposes an overview of the role hydrogen might have as energy in the energy transition policy, a review of different areas of research related to the hydrogen sector, and presentations of some remarkable innovations in different specific fields. Hydrogen might be an asset in energy transition because production modes (like electrolysis) result in an almost carbon-free or at least low-carbon hydrogen production. Challenges and perspectives are evoked: energy storage for intermittent energies (the MYRTE platform), the use of a hydrogen-natural mix (GRHYD program), the development of fuel cells for transport applications, and co-generation (Japan is the leader). Different French research organisations are working on different aspects and areas: the H2E program by Air Liquide, fuel cell technologies by GDF Suez, power electrolyzers and cells by Areva. Some aspects and research areas are more specifically detailed: high temperature electrolysis (higher efficiencies, synthesis of methane from hydrogen), fuel cells (using less platinum, and using ceramics for high temperatures), the perspective of solid storage solutions (hydrogen bottles in composite materials, development of 'hydrogen sponges', search for new hydrides). Innovations concern a project car, storage and production (Greenergy Box), the McPhy Energy storage system, an electric bicycle with fuel cell, easy to transport storage means by Air Liquide and Composites Aquitaine, development of energy autonomy, fuel cells for cars, electrolyzers using the Proton Exchange Membrane or PEM technology

  12. Development of hydrogen storage technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of hydrogen to deliver energy for cars, portable devices and buildings is seen as one of the key steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. South Africa’s national hydrogen strategy, HySA, aims to develop and guide innovation along the value...

  13. Hydrogen manufacturing using plasma reformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A.; Hochgreb, S.; O`Brien, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Manufacturing of hydrogen from hydrocarbon fuels is needed for a variety of applications. These applications include fuel cells used in stationary electric power production and in vehicular propulsion. Hydrogen can also be used for various combustion engine systems. There is a wide range of requirements on the capacity of the hydrogen manufacturing system, the purity of the hydrogen fuel, and capability for rapid response. The overall objectives of a hydrogen manufacturing facility are to operate with high availability at the lowest possible cost and to have minimal adverse environmental impact. Plasma technology has potential to significantly alleviate shortcomings of conventional means of manufacturing hydrogen. These shortcomings include cost and deterioration of catalysts; limitations on hydrogen production from heavy hydrocarbons; limitations on rapid response; and size and weight requirements. In addition, use of plasma technology could provide for a greater variety of operating modes; in particular the possibility of virtual elimination of CO{sub 2} production by pyrolytic operation. This mode of hydrogen production may be of increasing importance due to recent additional evidence of global warming.

  14. Methyl methacrylate oligomerically-modified clay and its poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaoxia; Jiang, David D.; Wilkie, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    A methyl methacrylate oligomerically-modified clay was used to prepare poly(methyl methacrylate) clay nanocomposites by melt blending and the effect of the clay loading level on the modified clay and corresponding nanocomposite was studied. These nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and cone calorimetry. The results show a mixed intercalated/delaminated morphology with good nanodispersion. The compatibility between the methylacrylate-subsituted clay and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are greatly improved compared to other oligomerically-modified clays

  15. Study of Hydrogen As An Aircraft Fuel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ciaravino, J

    2003-01-01

    .... The biggest obstacle to using hydrogen is its very low density, a property that even combined with hydrogen's high heat of combustion still results in very large fuel tanks. Liquid hydrogen (LH2...

  16. High capacity hydrogen storage nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2017-12-12

    A novel hydrogen absorption material is provided comprising a mixture of a lithium hydride with a fullerene. The subsequent reaction product provides for a hydrogen storage material which reversibly stores and releases hydrogen at temperatures of about 270.degree. C.

  17. The hydrogen mine introduction initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betournay, M.C.; Howell, B. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories

    2009-07-01

    In an effort to address air quality concerns in underground mines, the mining industry is considering the use fuel cells instead of diesel to power mine production vehicles. The immediate issues and opportunities associated with fuel cells use include a reduction in harmful greenhouse gas emissions; reduction in ventilation operating costs; reduction in energy consumption; improved health benefits; automation; and high productivity. The objective of the hydrogen mine introduction initiative (HMII) is to develop and test the range of fundamental and needed operational technology, specifications and best practices for underground hydrogen power applications. Although proof of concept studies have shown high potential for fuel cell use, safety considerations must be addressed, including hydrogen behaviour in confined conditions. This presentation highlighted the issues to meet operational requirements, notably hydrogen production; delivery and storage; mine regulations; and hydrogen behaviour underground. tabs., figs.

  18. Methanol from biomass and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    For Hawaii in the near term, the only liquid fuels indigenous sources will be those that can be made from biomass, and of these, methanol is the most promising. In addition, hydrogen produced by electrolysis can be used to markedly increase the yield of biomass methanol. This paper calculates cost of producing methanol by an integrated system including a geothermal electricity facility plus a plant producing methanol by gasifying biomass and adding hydrogen produced by electrolysis. Other studies cover methanol from biomass without added hydrogen and methanol from biomass by steam and carbon dioxide reforming. Methanol is made in a two-step process: the first is the gasification of biomass by partial oxidation with pure oxygen to produce carbon oxides and hydrogen, and the second is the reaction of gases to form methanol. Geothermal steam is used to generate the electricity used for the electrolysis to produce the added hydrogen

  19. Hydrogen production from solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstadt, M. M.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Three alternatives for hydrogen production from solar energy have been analyzed on both efficiency and economic grounds. The analysis shows that the alternative using solar energy followed by thermochemical decomposition of water to produce hydrogen is the optimum one. The other schemes considered were the direct conversion of solar energy to electricity by silicon cells and water electrolysis, and the use of solar energy to power a vapor cycle followed by electrical generation and electrolysis. The capital cost of hydrogen via the thermochemical alternative was estimated at $575/kW of hydrogen output or $3.15/million Btu. Although this cost appears high when compared with hydrogen from other primary energy sources or from fossil fuel, environmental and social costs which favor solar energy may prove this scheme feasible in the future.

  20. Behaviour of hydrogen in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Y.C.; Tang, C.H.; Chuang, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polycrystalline niobium was charged electrolytically with hydrogen at room temperature. The behaviour of hydrogen in niobium has been investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, and ion microprobe analysis. It is shown that, when the hydrogen content in niobium is low, hydride tends to form at the grain boundary. As the hydrogen content is increased, precipitation of hydrides with domain structure takes place in the grain. The habit plane of the hydride formed in the vicinity of the grain boundary has been determined by Laue X-ray back reflection technique to be (130)c and (111)c. The structure of the hydride formed on the surface of niobium after 6 h hydrogen charging at room temperature (c.d. 0.2 A/cm 2 ) has been established to be identical to that of NbHsub(0.89). (orig.) [de