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Sample records for methods epid 573b

  1. An EPID-based method for comprehensive verification of gantry, EPID and the MLC carriage positional accuracy in Varian linacs during arc treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; McGarry, Conor K; Barnes, Michael P; Sabet, Mahsheed; Ebert, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    In modern radiotherapy, it is crucial to monitor the performance of all linac components including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method has been introduced in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems during arc treatments with the aim of ensuring the accuracy of linac mechanical performance. The Varian EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in MLC carriages as a result of linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of EPID images of a simple phantom comprised of 5 ball-bearings during arc delivery. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Twelve Varian linacs of different models were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. All machines showed less than 1 mm gantry sag. Changes in SDD values were within 1.7 mm except for three linacs of one centre which were within 9 mm. Values of EPID skewness and tilt were negligible in all tested linacs. The maximum sag in MLC leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. The EPID sag showed a considerable improvement in TrueBeam linacs. The methodology and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour of linac components with gantry rotation. It is reproducible and accurate and can be easily performed as a routine test in clinics

  2. Dosimetry in radiotherapy using a-Si EPIDs: Systems, methods, and applications focusing on 3D patient dose estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2013-06-01

    An overview is provided of the use of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetric purposes in radiation therapy, focusing on 3D patient dose estimation. EPIDs were originally developed to provide on-treatment radiological imaging to assist with patient setup, but there has also been a natural interest in using them as dosimeters since they use the megavoltage therapy beam to form images. The current generation of clinically available EPID technology, amorphous-silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers, possess many characteristics that make them much better suited to dosimetric applications than earlier EPID technologies. Features such as linearity with dose/dose rate, high spatial resolution, realtime capability, minimal optical glare, and digital operation combine with the convenience of a compact, retractable detector system directly mounted on the linear accelerator to provide a system that is well-suited to dosimetric applications. This review will discuss clinically available a-Si EPID systems, highlighting dosimetric characteristics and remaining limitations. Methods for using EPIDs in dosimetry applications will be discussed. Dosimetric applications using a-Si EPIDs to estimate three-dimensional dose in the patient during treatment will be overviewed. Clinics throughout the world are implementing increasingly complex treatments such as dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, as well as specialized treatment techniques using large doses per fraction and short treatment courses (ie. hypofractionation and stereotactic radiosurgery). These factors drive the continued strong interest in using EPIDs as dosimeters for patient treatment verification.

  3. A simple method to back-project isocenter dose of radiotherapy treatments using EPID transit dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, T.B.; Cerbaro, B.Q.; Rosa, L.A.R. da, E-mail: thiago.fisimed@gmail.com, E-mail: tbsilveira@inca.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work was to implement a simple algorithm to evaluate isocenter dose in a phantom using the back-projected transmitted dose acquired using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) available in a Varian Trilogy accelerator with two nominal 6 and 10 MV photon beams. This algorithm was developed in MATLAB language, to calibrate EPID measured dose in absolute dose, using a deconvolution process, and to incorporate all scattering and attenuation contributions due to photon interactions with phantom. Modeling process was simplified by using empirical curve adjustments to describe the contribution of scattering and attenuation effects. The implemented algorithm and method were validated employing 19 patient treatment plans with 104 clinical irradiation fields projected on the phantom used. Results for EPID absolute dose calibration by deconvolution have showed percent deviations lower than 1%. Final method validation presented average percent deviations between isocenter doses calculated by back-projection and isocenter doses determined with ionization chamber of 1,86% (SD of 1,00%) and -0,94% (SD of 0,61%) for 6 and 10 MV, respectively. Normalized field by field analysis showed deviations smaller than 2% for 89% of all data for 6 MV beams and 94% for 10 MV beams. It was concluded that the proposed algorithm possesses sufficient accuracy to be used for in vivo dosimetry, being sensitive to detect dose delivery errors bigger than 3-4% for conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques. (author)

  4. An in vivo dose verification method for SBRT–VMAT delivery using the EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, P. M., E-mail: peter.mccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Van Uytven, E.; Van Beek, T.; Asuni, G. [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); McCurdy, B. M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Radiation treatments have become increasingly more complex with the development of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). SBRT involves the delivery of substantially larger doses over fewer fractions than conventional therapy. SBRT–VMAT treatments will strongly benefit from in vivo patient dose verification, as any errors in delivery can be more detrimental to the radiobiology of the patient as compared to conventional therapy. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are available on most commercial linear accelerators (Linacs) and their documented use for dosimetry makes them valuable tools for patient dose verification. In this work, the authors customize and validate a physics-based model which utilizes on-treatment EPID images to reconstruct the 3D dose delivered to the patient during SBRT–VMAT delivery. Methods: The SBRT Linac head, including jaws, multileaf collimators, and flattening filter, were modeled using Monte Carlo methods and verified with measured data. The simulation provides energy spectrum data that are used by their “forward” model to then accurately predict fluence generated by a SBRT beam at a plane above the patient. This fluence is then transported through the patient and then the dose to the phosphor layer in the EPID is calculated. Their “inverse” model back-projects the EPID measured focal fluence to a plane upstream of the patient and recombines it with the extra-focal fluence predicted by the forward model. This estimate of total delivered fluence is then forward projected onto the patient’s density matrix and a collapsed cone convolution algorithm calculates the dose delivered to the patient. The model was tested by reconstructing the dose for two prostate, three lung, and two spine SBRT–VMAT treatment fractions delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. It was further validated against actual patient data for a lung and spine SBRT–VMAT plan. The

  5. Evaluation of two methods of predicting MLC leaf positions using EPID measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Dance, David R.; Fielding, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    In intensity modulated radiation treatments (IMRT), the position of the field edges and the modulation within the beam are often achieved with a multileaf collimator (MLC). During the MLC calibration process, due to the finite accuracy of leaf position measurements, a systematic error may be introduced to leaf positions. Thereafter leaf positions of the MLC depend on the systematic error introduced on each leaf during MLC calibration and on the accuracy of the leaf position control system (random errors). This study presents and evaluates two methods to predict the systematic errors on the leaf positions introduced during the MLC calibration. The two presented methods are based on a series of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements. A comparison with film measurements showed that the EPID could be used to measure leaf positions without introducing any bias. The first method, referred to as the 'central leaf method', is based on the method currently used at this center for MLC leaf calibration. It mimics the manner in which leaf calibration parameters are specified in the MLC control system and consequently is also used by other centers. The second method, a new method proposed by the authors and referred to as the ''individual leaf method,'' involves the measurement of two positions for each leaf (-5 and +15 cm) and the interpolation and extrapolation from these two points to any other given position. The central leaf method and the individual leaf method predicted leaf positions at prescribed positions of -11, 0, 5, and 10 cm within 2.3 and 1.0 mm, respectively, with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.3 and 0.2 mm, respectively. The individual leaf method provided a better prediction of the leaf positions than the central leaf method. Reproducibility tests for leaf positions of -5 and +15 cm were performed. The reproducibility was within 0.4 mm on the same day and 0.4 mm six weeks later (1 SD). Measurements at gantry angles of 0 deg., 90 deg., and 270 deg

  6. Computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor on EPID cine images without implanted markers in stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F; Higashida, Y; Onizuka, Y; Terashima, H; Egashira, Y; Shioyama, Y; Nomoto, S; Honda, H; Nakamura, K; Yoshidome, S; Anai, S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for estimation of the location of a lung tumor in cine images on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) without implanted markers during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Each tumor region was segmented in the first EPID cine image, i.e., reference portal image, based on a multiple-gray level thresholding technique and a region growing technique, and then the image including the tumor region was cropped as a 'tumor template' image. The tumor location was determined as the position in which the tumor template image took the maximum cross-correlation value within each consecutive portal image, which was acquired in cine mode on the EPID in treatment. EPID images with 512 x 384 pixels (pixel size: 0.56 mm) were acquired at a sampling rate of 0.5 frame s -1 by using energies of 4, 6 or 10 MV on linear accelerators. We applied our proposed method to EPID cine images (226 frames) of 12 clinical cases (ages: 51-83, mean: 72) with a non-small cell lung cancer. As a result, the average location error between tumor points obtained by our method and the manual method was 1.47 ± 0.60 mm. This preliminary study suggests that our method based on the tumor template matching technique might be feasible for tracking the location of a lung tumor without implanted markers in SBRT.

  7. Amorphous silicon EPID calibration for dosimetric applications: comparison of a method based on Monte Carlo prediction of response with existing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, L; Fielding, A L; Dance, D R; Seco, J; Evans, P M

    2007-01-01

    For EPID dosimetry, the calibration should ensure that all pixels have a similar response to a given irradiation. A calibration method (MC), using an analytical fit of a Monte Carlo simulated flood field EPID image to correct for the flood field image pixel intensity shape, was proposed. It was compared with the standard flood field calibration (FF), with the use of a water slab placed in the beam to flatten the flood field (WS) and with a multiple field calibration where the EPID was irradiated with a fixed 10 x 10 field for 16 different positions (MF). The EPID was used in its normal configuration (clinical setup) and with an additional 3 mm copper slab (modified setup). Beam asymmetry measured with a diode array was taken into account in MC and WS methods. For both setups, the MC method provided pixel sensitivity values within 3% of those obtained with the MF and WS methods (mean difference 2 ) and IMRT fields to within 3% of that obtained with WS and MF calibrations while differences with images calibrated with the FF method for fields larger than 10 x 10 cm 2 were up to 8%. MC, WS and MF methods all provided a major improvement on the FF method. Advantages and drawbacks of each method were reviewed

  8. A method for evaluating treatment quality using in vivo EPID dosimetry and statistical process control in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Greer, Peter B; Simpson, John; Zwan, Benjamin J; Middleton, Richard H

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Due to increasing complexity, modern radiotherapy techniques require comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programmes, that to date generally focus on the pre-treatment stage. The purpose of this paper is to provide a method for an individual patient treatment QA evaluation and identification of a "quality gap" for continuous quality improvement. Design/methodology/approach A statistical process control (SPC) was applied to evaluate treatment delivery using in vivo electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. A moving range control chart was constructed to monitor the individual patient treatment performance based on a control limit generated from initial data of 90 intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and ten volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient deliveries. A process capability index was used to evaluate the continuing treatment quality based on three quality classes: treatment type-specific, treatment linac-specific, and body site-specific. Findings The determined control limits were 62.5 and 70.0 per cent of the χ pass-rate for IMRT and VMAT deliveries, respectively. In total, 14 patients were selected for a pilot study the results of which showed that about 1 per cent of all treatments contained errors relating to unexpected anatomical changes between treatment fractions. Both rectum and pelvis cancer treatments demonstrated process capability indices were less than 1, indicating the potential for quality improvement and hence may benefit from further assessment. Research limitations/implications The study relied on the application of in vivo EPID dosimetry for patients treated at the specific centre. Sampling patients for generating the control limits were limited to 100 patients. Whilst the quantitative results are specific to the clinical techniques and equipment used, the described method is generally applicable to IMRT and VMAT treatment QA. Whilst more work is required to determine the level of clinical significance, the

  9. Amorphous silicon EPID calibration for dosimetric applications: comparison of a method based on Monte Carlo prediction of response with existing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, L [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Fielding, A L [School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Dance, D R [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Seco, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Evans, P M [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-21

    For EPID dosimetry, the calibration should ensure that all pixels have a similar response to a given irradiation. A calibration method (MC), using an analytical fit of a Monte Carlo simulated flood field EPID image to correct for the flood field image pixel intensity shape, was proposed. It was compared with the standard flood field calibration (FF), with the use of a water slab placed in the beam to flatten the flood field (WS) and with a multiple field calibration where the EPID was irradiated with a fixed 10 x 10 field for 16 different positions (MF). The EPID was used in its normal configuration (clinical setup) and with an additional 3 mm copper slab (modified setup). Beam asymmetry measured with a diode array was taken into account in MC and WS methods. For both setups, the MC method provided pixel sensitivity values within 3% of those obtained with the MF and WS methods (mean difference <1%, standard deviation <2%). The difference of pixel sensitivity between MC and FF methods was up to 12.2% (clinical setup) and 11.8% (modified setup). MC calibration provided images of open fields (5 x 5 to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}) and IMRT fields to within 3% of that obtained with WS and MF calibrations while differences with images calibrated with the FF method for fields larger than 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} were up to 8%. MC, WS and MF methods all provided a major improvement on the FF method. Advantages and drawbacks of each method were reviewed.

  10. A novel method for sub-arc VMAT dose delivery verification based on portal dosimetry with an EPID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Ruud A M; Dirkx, Maarten L P; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2017-11-01

    The EPID-based sub-arc verification of VMAT dose delivery requires synchronization of the acquired electronic portal images (EPIs) with the VMAT delivery, that is, establishment of the start- and stop-MU of the acquired images. To realize this, published synchronization methods propose the use of logging features of the linac or dedicated hardware solutions. In this study, we developed a novel, software-based synchronization method that only uses information inherently available in the acquired images. The EPIs are continuously acquired during pretreatment VMAT delivery and converted into Portal Dose Images (PDIs). Sub-arcs of approximately 10 MU are then defined by combining groups of sequentially acquired PDIs. The start- and stop-MUs of measured sub-arcs are established in a synchronization procedure, using only dosimetric information in measured and predicted PDIs. Sub-arc verification of a VMAT dose delivery is based on comparison of measured sub-arc PDIs with synchronized, predicted sub-arc PDIs, using γ-analyses. To assess the accuracy of this new method, measured and predicted PDIs were compared for 20 clinically applied VMAT prostate cancer plans. The sensitivity of the method for detection of delivery errors was investigated using VMAT deliveries with intentionally inserted, small perturbations (25 error scenarios; leaf gap deviations ≤ 1.5 mm, leaf motion stops during ≤ 15 MU, linac output error ≤ 2%). For the 20 plans, the average failed pixel rates (FPR) for full-arc and sub-arc dose QA were 0.36% ± 0.26% (1 SD) and 0.64% ± 0.88%, based on 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm γ-analyses, respectively. Small systematic perturbations of up to 1% output error and 1 mm leaf offset were detected using full-arc QA. Sub-arc QA was able to detect positioning errors in three leaves only during approximately 20 MU and small dose delivery errors during approximately 40 MU. In an ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for the combined full-arc/sub-arc approach was

  11. A quantitative method to the analysis of MLC leaf position and speed based on EPID and EBT3 film for dynamic IMRT treatment with different types of MLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghui; Chen, Lixin; Zhu, Jinhan; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiaowei

    2017-07-01

    A quantitative method based on the electronic portal imaging system (EPID) and film was developed for MLC position and speed testing; this method was used for three MLC types (Millennium, MLCi, and Agility MLC). To determine the leaf position, a picket fence designed by the dynamic (DMLC) model was used. The full-width half-maximum (FWHM) values of each gap measured by EPID and EBT3 were converted to the gap width using the FWHM versus nominal gap width relationship. The algorithm developed for the picket fence analysis was able to quantify the gap width, the distance between gaps, and each individual leaf position. To determine the leaf speed, a 0.5 × 20 cm 2 MLC-defined sliding gap was applied across a 14 × 20 cm 2 symmetry field. The linacs ran at a fixed-dose rate. The use of different monitor units (MUs) for this test led to different leaf speeds. The effect of leaf transmission was considered in a speed accuracy analysis. The difference between the EPID and film results for the MLC position is less than 0.1 mm. For the three MLC types, twice the standard deviation (2 SD) is provided; 0.2, 0.4, and 0.4 mm for gap widths of three MLC types, and 0.1, 0.2, and 0.2 mm for distances between gaps. The individual leaf positions deviate from the preset positions within 0.1 mm. The variations in the speed profiles for the EPID and EBT3 results are consistent, but the EPID results are slightly better than the film results. Different speeds were measured for each MLC type. For all three MLC types, speed errors increase with increasing speed. The analysis speeds deviate from the preset speeds within approximately 0.01 cm s -1 . This quantitative analysis of MLC position and speed provides an intuitive evaluation for MLC quality assurance (QA). © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Detection and correction for EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery using cine EPID imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J; McCowan, Peter M; McCurdy, Boyd M C; Greer, Peter B

    2012-02-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been studied and used for pretreatment and in-vivo dosimetry applications for many years. The application of EPIDs for dosimetry in arc treatments requires accurate characterization of the mechanical sag of the EPID and gantry during rotation. Several studies have investigated the effects of gravity on the sag of these systems but each have limitations. In this study, an easy experiment setup and accurate algorithm have been introduced to characterize and correct for the effect of EPID and gantry sag during arc delivery. Three metallic ball bearings were used as markers in the beam: two of them fixed to the gantry head and the third positioned at the isocenter. EPID images were acquired during a 360° gantry rotation in cine imaging mode. The markers were tracked in EPID images and a robust in-house developed MATLAB code was used to analyse the images and find the EPID sag in three directions as well as the EPID + gantry sag by comparison to the reference gantry zero image. The algorithm results were then tested against independent methods. The method was applied to compare the effect in clockwise and counter clockwise gantry rotations and different source-to-detector distances (SDDs). The results were monitored for one linear accelerator over a course of 15 months and six other linear-accelerators from two treatment centers were also investigated using this method. The generalized shift patterns were derived from the data and used in an image registration algorithm to correct for the effect of the mechanical sag in the system. The Gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) technique was used to investigate the improvement in alignment of cine EPID images of a fixed field, by comparing both individual images and the sum of images in a series with the reference gantry zero image. The mechanical sag during gantry rotation was dependent on the gantry angle and was larger in the in-plane direction, although the patterns were not

  13. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP1-01: An Efficient Method of 3D Patient Dose Reconstruction Based On EPID Measurements for Pre-Treatment Patient Specific QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, R; Lee, C [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Zwan, B; Hindmarsh, J; Seymour, E; Kandasamy, K; Arthur, G [Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate an efficient and clinically relevant patient specific QA method by reconstructing 3D patient dose from 2D EPID images for IMRT plans. Also to determine the usefulness of 2D QA metrics when assessing 3D patient dose deviations. Methods: Using the method developed by King et al (Med Phys 39(5),2839–2847), EPID images of IMRT fields were acquired in air and converted to dose at 10 cm depth (SAD setup) in a flat virtual water phantom. Each EPID measured dose map was then divided by the corresponding treatment planning system (TPS) dose map calculated with an identical setup, to derive a 2D “error matrix”. For each field, the error matrix was used to adjust the doses along the respective ray lines in the original patient 3D dose. All field doses were combined to derive a reconstructed 3D patient dose for quantitative analysis. A software tool was developed to efficiently implement the entire process and was tested with a variety of IMRT plans for 2D (virtual flat phantom) and 3D (in-patient) QA analysis. Results: The method was tested on 60 IMRT plans. The mean (± standard deviation) 2D gamma (2%,2mm) pass rate (2D-GPR) was 97.4±3.0% and the mean 2D gamma index (2D-GI) was 0.35±0.06. The 3D PTV mean dose deviation was 1.8±0.8%. The analysis showed very weak correlations between both the 2D-GPR and 2D-GI when compared with PTV mean dose deviations (R2=0.3561 and 0.3632 respectively). Conclusion: Our method efficiently calculates 3D patient dose from 2D EPID images, utilising all of the advantages of an EPID-based dosimetry system. In this study, the 2D QA metrics did not predict the 3D patient dose deviation. This tool allows reporting of the 3D volumetric dose parameters thus providing more clinically relevant patient specific QA.

  14. SU-F-T-240: EPID-Based Quality Assurance for Dosimetric Credentialing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miri, N [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel dosimetric audit method for clinical trials using EPID measurements at each center and a standardized EPID to dose conversion algorithm. The aim of this work is to investigate the applicability of the EPID method to different linear accelerator, EPID and treatment planning system (TPS) combinations. Methods: Combination of delivery and planning systems were three Varian linacs including one Pinnacle and two Eclipse TPS and, two ELEKTA linacs including one Pinnacle and one Monaco TPS. All Varian linacs had the same EPID structure and similarly for the ELEKTA linacs. Initially, dose response of the EPIDs was investigated by acquiring integrated pixel value (IPV) of the central area of 10 cm2 images versus MUs, 5-400 MU. Then, the EPID to dose conversion was investigated for different system combinations. Square field size images, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 15, 20, 25 cm2 acquired by all systems were converted to dose at isocenter of a virtual flat phantom then the dose was compared to the corresponding TPS dose. Results: All EPIDs showed a relatively linear behavior versus MU except at low MUs which showed irregularities probably due to initial inaccuracies of irradiation. Furthermore, for all the EPID models, the model predicted TPS dose with a mean dose difference percentage of 1.3. However the model showed a few inaccuracies for ELEKTA EPID images at field sizes larger than 20 cm2. Conclusion: The EPIDs demonstrated similar behavior versus MU and the model was relatively accurate for all the systems. Therefore, the model could be employed as a global dosimetric method to audit clinical trials. Funding has been provided from Department of Radiation Oncology, TROG Cancer Research and the University of Newcastle. Narges Miri is a recipient of a University of Newcastle postgraduate scholarship.

  15. Characterization of a novel EPID designed for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Samuel J.; McNamara, Aimee L.; Deshpande, Shrikant; Holloway, Lois; Greer, Peter B.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Vial, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Standard amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) are x-ray imagers used frequently in radiotherapy that indirectly detect incident x-rays using a metal plate and phosphor screen. These detectors may also be used as two-dimensional dosimeters; however, they have a well-characterized nonwater-equivalent dosimetric response. Plastic scintillating (PS) fibers, on the other hand, have been shown to respond in a water-equivalent manner to x-rays in the energy range typically encountered during radiotherapy. In this study, the authors report on the first experimental measurements taken with a novel prototype PS a-Si EPID developed for the purpose of performing simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy. This prototype employs an array of PS fibers in place of the standard metal plate and phosphor screen. The imaging performance and dosimetric response of the prototype EPID were evaluated experimentally and compared to that of the standard EPID.Methods: Clinical 6 MV photon beams were used to first measure the detector sensitivity, linearity of dose response, and pixel noise characteristics of the prototype and standard EPIDs. Second, the dosimetric response of each EPID was evaluated relative to a reference water-equivalent dosimeter by measuring the off-axis and field size response in a nontransit configuration, along with the off-axis, field size, and transmission response in a transit configuration using solid water blocks. Finally, the imaging performance of the prototype and standard EPIDs was evaluated quantitatively by using an image quality phantom to measure the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution of images acquired with each detector, and qualitatively by using an anthropomorphic phantom to acquire images representative of human anatomy.Results: The prototype EPID's sensitivity was 0.37 times that of the standard EPID. Both EPIDs exhibited responses that were linear with delivered dose over a range of 1

  16. Development of a daily dosimetric control for radiation therapy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboori, Mohammadsaeed

    2015-01-01

    Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) can be used to perform dose measurements during radiation therapy treatments if dedicated calibration and correction procedures are applied. The purpose of this study was to provide a new calibration and correction model for an amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPID for use in transit dose verification of step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A model was created in a commercial treatment planning system to calculate the nominal two-dimensional (2D) dose map of each radiation field at the EPID level. The EPID system was calibrated and correction factors were determined using a reference set-up, which consisted a patient phantom and an EPID phantom. The advantage of this method is that for the calibration, the actual beam spectrum is used to mimic a patient measurement. As proof-of-principle, the method was tested for the verification of two 7-field IMRT treatment plans with tumor sites in the head-and-neck and pelvic region. Predicted and measured EPID responses were successfully compared to the nominal data from treatment planning using dose difference maps and gamma analyses. Based on our result it can be concluded that this new method of 2D EPID dosimetry is a potential tool for simple patient treatment fraction dose verification.

  17. Clinical validation of an in-house EPID dosimetry system for IMRT QA at the Prince of Wales Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, M.; Vial, P.; Metcalfe, P.; Downes, S.

    2013-06-01

    In this study a simple method using standard flood-field corrected Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) images for routine Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Quality Assurance (QA) was investigated. The EPID QA system was designed and tested on a Siemens Oncor Impression linear accelerator with an OptiVue 1000ST EPID panel (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, USA) and an Elekta Axesse linear accelerator with an iViewGT EPID (Elekta AB, Sweden) for 6 and 10 MV IMRT fields with Step-and-Shoot and dynamic-MLC delivery. Two different planning systems were used for patient IMRT field generation for comparison with the measured EPID fluences. All measured IMRT plans had >95% agreement to the planning fluences (using 3 cGy / 3 mm Gamma Criteria) and were comparable to the pass-rates calculated using a 2-D diode array dosimeter.

  18. Clinical validation of an in-house EPID dosimetry system for IMRT QA at the Prince of Wales Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, M; Downes, S; Vial, P; Metcalfe, P

    2013-01-01

    In this study a simple method using standard flood-field corrected Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) images for routine Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Quality Assurance (QA) was investigated. The EPID QA system was designed and tested on a Siemens Oncor Impression linear accelerator with an OptiVue 1000ST EPID panel (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, USA) and an Elekta Axesse linear accelerator with an iViewGT EPID (Elekta AB, Sweden) for 6 and 10 MV IMRT fields with Step-and-Shoot and dynamic-MLC delivery. Two different planning systems were used for patient IMRT field generation for comparison with the measured EPID fluences. All measured IMRT plans had >95% agreement to the planning fluences (using 3 cGy / 3 mm Gamma Criteria) and were comparable to the pass-rates calculated using a 2-D diode array dosimeter.

  19. Quality control of portal imaging with PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesznyak, Csilla; Kiraly, Reka; Polgar, Istvan; Zarand, Pal; Mayer, Arpad; Fekete, Gabor; Mozes, Arpad; Kiss, Balazs

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of different electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and portal images with the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered . Material and methods: characteristic properties of images of different file formats were measured on Siemens OptiVue500aSi registered , Siemens BeamView Plus registered , Elekta iView registered , and Varian PortalVision trademark and analyzed with the epidSoft registered 2.0 program in four radiation therapy centers. The portal images were taken with Kodak X-OMAT V registered and the Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack registered films and evaluated with the same program. Results: the optimal exposition both for EPIDs and portal films of different kind was determined. For double exposition, the 2+1 MU values can be recommended in the case of Siemens OptiVue500aSi registered , Elekta iView registered and Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack registered films, while for Siemens BeamView Plus registered , Varian PortalVision trademark and Kodak X-OMAT V registered film 7+7 MU is recommended. Conclusion: the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM registered can be used not only for amorphous silicon EPIDs but also for images taken with a video-based system or by using an ionization chamber matrix or for portal film. For analysis of QC tests, a standardized format (used at the acceptance test) should be applied, as the results are dependent on the file format used. (orig.)

  20. Monte Carlo modelling of a-Si EPID response: The effect of spectral variations with field size and position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Fielding, Andrew; Dance, David R.

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on predicting the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) image of intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields in the absence of attenuation material in the beam with Monte Carlo methods. As IMRT treatments consist of a series of segments of various sizes that are not always delivered on the central axis, large spectral variations may be observed between the segments. The effect of these spectral variations on the EPID response was studied with fields of various sizes and off-axis positions. A detailed description of the EPID was implemented in a Monte Carlo model. The EPID model was validated by comparing the EPID output factors for field sizes between 1x1 and 26x26 cm 2 at the isocenter. The Monte Carlo simulations agreed with the measurements to within 1.5%. The Monte Carlo model succeeded in predicting the EPID response at the center of the fields of various sizes and offsets to within 1% of the measurements. Large variations (up to 29%) of the EPID response were observed between the various offsets. The EPID response increased with field size and with field offset for most cases. The Monte Carlo model was then used to predict the image of a simple test IMRT field delivered on the beam axis and with an offset. A variation of EPID response up to 28% was found between the on- and off-axis delivery. Finally, two clinical IMRT fields were simulated and compared to the measurements. For all IMRT fields, simulations and measurements agreed within 3%--0.2 cm for 98% of the pixels. The spectral variations were quantified by extracting from the spectra at the center of the fields the total photon yield (Y total ), the photon yield below 1 MeV (Y low ), and the percentage of photons below 1 MeV (P low ). For the studied cases, a correlation was shown between the EPID response variation and Y total , Y low , and P low

  1. Using an EPID for patient-specific VMAT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtiari, M.; Kumaraswamy, L.; Bailey, D. W.; Boer, S. de; Malhotra, H. K.; Podgorsak, M. B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) method was developed to verify gantry-specific individual multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures (control points) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: VMAT treatment plans were generated in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). DICOM images from a Varian EPID (aS1000) acquired in continuous acquisition mode were used for pretreatment QA. Each cine image file contains the grayscale image of the MLC aperture related to its specific control point and the corresponding gantry angle information. The TPS MLC file of this RapidArc plan contains the leaf positions for all 177 control points (gantry angles). In-house software was developed that interpolates the measured images based on the gantry angle and overlays them with the MLC pattern for all control points. The 38% isointensity line was used to define the edge of the MLC leaves on the portal images. The software generates graphs and tables that provide analysis for the number of mismatched leaf positions for a chosen distance to agreement at each control point and the frequency in which each particular leaf mismatches for the entire arc. Results: Seven patients plans were analyzed using this method. The leaves with the highest mismatched rate were found to be treatment plan dependent. Conclusions: This in-house software can be used to automatically verify the MLC leaf positions for all control points of VMAT plans using cine images acquired by an EPID.

  2. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a markerless tracking algorithm to track the tumor boundary in megavoltage (MV)-electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: A level set method (LSM)-based algorithm is developed to track tumor boundary in EPID image sequences. Given an EPID image sequence, an initial curve is manually specified in the first frame. Driven by a region-scalable energy fitting function, the initial curve automatically evolves toward the tumor boundary and stops on the desired boundary while the energy function reaches its minimum. For the subsequent frames, the tracking algorithm updates the initial curve by using the tracking result in the previous frame and reuses the LSM to detect the tumor boundary in the subsequent frame so that the tracking processing can be continued without user intervention. The tracking algorithm is tested on three image datasets, including a 4-D phantom EPID image sequence, four digitally deformable phantom image sequences with different noise levels, and four clinical EPID image sequences acquired in lung cancer treatment. The tracking accuracy is evaluated based on two metrics: centroid localization error (CLE) and volume overlap index (VOI) between the tracking result and the ground truth. Results: For the 4-D phantom image sequence, the CLE is 0.23 ± 0.20 mm, and VOI is 95.6% ± 0.2%. For the digital phantom image sequences, the total CLE and VOI are 0.11 ± 0.08 mm and 96.7% ± 0.7%, respectively. In addition, for the clinical EPID image sequences, the proposed algorithm achieves 0.32 ± 0.77 mm in the CLE and 72.1% ± 5.5% in the VOI. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed method both in tumor localization and boundary tracking in EPID images. In addition, compared with two existing tracking algorithms, the proposed method achieves a higher accuracy in tumor localization. Conclusions: In this paper, the authors presented a feasibility study of tracking

  3. SU-F-T-261: Reconstruction of Initial Photon Fluence Based On EPID Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, T; Engenhart-Cabillic, R [Philipp University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Czarnecki, D; Maeder, U; Zink, K [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen - University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany); Kussaether, R [MedCom GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Poppe, B [University Hospital for Medical Radiation Physics, Pius-Hospital, Medical Campus, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying an algorithm to reconstruct relative initial photon fluence for clinical use. Clinical EPID and CT images were acquired to reconstruct an external photon radiation treatment field. The reconstructed initial photon fluence could be used to verify the treatment or calculate the applied dose to the patient. Methods: The acquired EPID images were corrected for scatter caused by the patient and the EPID with an iterative reconstruction algorithm. The transmitted photon fluence behind the patient was calculated subsequently. Based on the transmitted fluence the initial photon fluence was calculated using a back-projection algorithm which takes the patient geometry and its energy dependent linear attenuation into account. This attenuation was gained from the acquired cone-beam CT or the planning CT by calculating a water-equivalent radiological thickness for each irradiation direction. To verify the algorithm an inhomogeneous phantom consisting of three inhomogeneities was irradiated by a static 6 MV photon field and compared to a reference flood field image. Results: The mean deviation between the reconstructed relative photon fluence for the inhomogeneous phantom and the flood field EPID image was 3% rising up to 7% for off-axis fluence. This was probably caused by the used clinical EPID calibration, which flattens the inhomogeneous fluence profile of the beam. Conclusion: In this clinical experiment the algorithm achieved good results in the center of the field while it showed high deviation of the lateral fluence. This could be reduced by optimizing the EPID calibration, considering the off-axis differential energy response. In further progress this and other aspects of the EPID, eg. field size dependency, CT and dose calibration have to be studied to realize a clinical acceptable accuracy of 2%.

  4. SU-F-T-476: Performance of the AS1200 EPID for Periodic Photon Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarco, J; Fraass, B; Yang, W; McKenzie Boehnke, E [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moran, J [University Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Barnes, M [Calvary Mater Hospital Newcastle, Warratah, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric performance of a new amorphous silicon flat-panel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) suitable for high-intensity, flattening-filter-free delivery mode. Methods: An EPID-based QA suite was created with automation to periodically monitor photon central-axis output and two-dimensional beam profile constancy as a function of gantry angle and dose-rate. A Varian TrueBeamTM linear accelerator installed with Developer Mode was used to customize and deliver XML script routines for the QA suite using the dosimetry mode image acquisition for an aS1200 EPID. Automatic post-processing software was developed to analyze the resulting DICOM images. Results: The EPID was used to monitor photon beam output constancy (central-axis), flatness, and symmetry over a period of 10 months for four photon beam energies (6x, 15x, 6xFFF, and 10xFFF). EPID results were consistent to those measured with a standard daily QA check device. At the four cardinal gantry angles, the standard deviation of the EPID central-axis output was <0.5%. Likewise, EPID measurements were independent for the wide range of dose rates (including up to 2400 mu/min for 10xFFF) studied with a standard deviation of <0.8% relative to the nominal dose rate for each energy. Also, profile constancy and field size measurements showed good agreement with the reference acquisition of 0° gantry angle and nominal dose rate. XML script files were also tested for MU linearity and picket-fence delivery. Using Developer Mode, the test suite was delivered in <60 minutes for all 4 photon energies with 4 dose rates per energy and 5 picket-fence acquisitions. Conclusion: Dosimetry image acquisition using a new EPID was found to be accurate for standard and high-intensity photon beams over a broad range of dose rates over 10 months. Developer Mode provided an efficient platform to customize the EPID acquisitions by using custom script files which significantly reduced the time. This work was funded

  5. A comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of gantry, EPID and the MLC assembly in Elekta linacs during gantry rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, P; Riis, H L; Zimmermann, S J; Ebert, M A

    2015-07-01

    In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linear accelerator (linac) components, including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt and the sag in leaf bank assembly owing to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with 5 ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of the image data. Nine Elekta AB (Stockholm, Sweden) linacs of different models and number of years in service were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 2 mm for all tested linacs. Some machines showed >1-mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 1.3 cm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in multileaf collimator leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. A meaningful correlation was found between the age of the linacs and their mechanical performance. Conclusions and Advances in knowledge: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour of Elekta linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Elekta machines.

  6. Time dependent pre-treatment EPID dosimetry for standard and FFF VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Mark; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Scheib, Stefan G; Baltes, Christof; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-08-21

    Methods to calibrate Megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetry have been previously documented for dynamic treatments such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using flattened beams and typically using integrated fields. While these methods verify the accumulated field shape and dose, the dose rate and differential fields remain unverified. The aim of this work is to provide an accurate calibration model for time dependent pre-treatment dose verification using amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for both flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) beams. A general calibration model was created using a Varian TrueBeam accelerator, equipped with an aS1000 EPID, for each photon spectrum 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MV-FFF, 10 MV-FFF. As planned VMAT treatments use control points (CPs) for optimization, measured images are separated into corresponding time intervals for direct comparison with predictions. The accuracy of the calibration model was determined for a range of treatment conditions. Measured and predicted CP dose images were compared using a time dependent gamma evaluation using criteria (3%, 3 mm, 0.5 sec). Time dependent pre-treatment dose verification is possible without an additional measurement device or phantom, using the on-board EPID. Sufficient data is present in trajectory log files and EPID frame headers to reliably synchronize and resample portal images. For the VMAT plans tested, significantly more deviation is observed when analysed in a time dependent manner for FFF and non-FFF plans than when analysed using only the integrated field. We show EPID-based pre-treatment dose verification can be performed on a CP basis for VMAT plans. This model can measure pre-treatment doses for both flattened and unflattened beams in a time dependent manner which highlights deviations that are missed in integrated field verifications.

  7. WE-DE-BRA-06: Evaluation of the Imaging Performance of a Novel Water-Equivalent EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, SJ [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); The Ingham Institute, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Cheng, J; Atakaramians, S; Kuncic, Z [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); The Ingham Institute, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool & Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Lu, M [Perkin-Elmer Medical Imaging, Santa Clara, California (United States); Meikle, S [Faculty of Health Sciences and Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the megavoltage imaging performance of a novel, water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device (EPID) developed for simultaneous imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy. Methods: A novel EPID prototype based on active matrix flat panel imager technology has been developed by our group and previously reported to exhibit a water-equivalent dose response. It was constructed by replacing all components above the photodiode detector in a standard clinical EPID (including the copper plate and phosphor screen) with a 15 × 15 cm{sup 2} array of plastic scintillator fibers. Individual fibers measured 0.5 × 0.5 × 30 mm{sup 3}. Spatial resolution was evaluated experimentally relative to that of a standard EPID with the thin slit technique to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) for 6 MV x-ray beams. Monte Carlo (MC) EPID models were used to benchmark simulated MTFs against the measurements. The zero spatial frequency detective quantum efficiency (DQE(0)) was simulated for both EPID configurations and a preliminary optimization of the prototype was performed by evaluating DQE(0) as a function of fiber length up to 50 mm. Results: The MC-simulated DQE(0) for the prototype EPID configuration was ∼7 times greater than that of the standard EPID. The prototype’s DQE(0) also increased approximately linearly with fiber length, from ∼1% at 5 mm length to ∼11% at 50 mm length. The standard EPID MTF was greater than the prototype EPID’s for all spatial frequencies, reflecting the trade off between x-ray detection efficiency and spatial resolution with thick scintillators. Conclusion: This study offers promising evidence that a water-equivalent EPID previously demonstrated for radiotherapy dosimetry may also be used for radiotherapy imaging applications. Future studies on optimising the detector design will be performed to develop a next-generation prototype that offers improved megavoltage imaging performance, with the aim to at

  8. WE-DE-BRA-06: Evaluation of the Imaging Performance of a Novel Water-Equivalent EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, SJ; Cheng, J; Atakaramians, S; Kuncic, Z; Vial, P; Lu, M; Meikle, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the megavoltage imaging performance of a novel, water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device (EPID) developed for simultaneous imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy. Methods: A novel EPID prototype based on active matrix flat panel imager technology has been developed by our group and previously reported to exhibit a water-equivalent dose response. It was constructed by replacing all components above the photodiode detector in a standard clinical EPID (including the copper plate and phosphor screen) with a 15 × 15 cm 2 array of plastic scintillator fibers. Individual fibers measured 0.5 × 0.5 × 30 mm 3 . Spatial resolution was evaluated experimentally relative to that of a standard EPID with the thin slit technique to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) for 6 MV x-ray beams. Monte Carlo (MC) EPID models were used to benchmark simulated MTFs against the measurements. The zero spatial frequency detective quantum efficiency (DQE(0)) was simulated for both EPID configurations and a preliminary optimization of the prototype was performed by evaluating DQE(0) as a function of fiber length up to 50 mm. Results: The MC-simulated DQE(0) for the prototype EPID configuration was ∼7 times greater than that of the standard EPID. The prototype’s DQE(0) also increased approximately linearly with fiber length, from ∼1% at 5 mm length to ∼11% at 50 mm length. The standard EPID MTF was greater than the prototype EPID’s for all spatial frequencies, reflecting the trade off between x-ray detection efficiency and spatial resolution with thick scintillators. Conclusion: This study offers promising evidence that a water-equivalent EPID previously demonstrated for radiotherapy dosimetry may also be used for radiotherapy imaging applications. Future studies on optimising the detector design will be performed to develop a next-generation prototype that offers improved megavoltage imaging performance, with the aim to at least

  9. Quality control of portal imaging with PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesznyak, Csilla; Kiraly, Reka; Polgar, Istvan; Zarand, Pal; Mayer, Arpad [Inst. of Oncoradiology, Uzsoki Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Fekete, Gabor [Dept. of Oncotherapy, Univ. of Szeged (Hungary); Mozes, Arpad [Oncology Center, Kalman Pandy County Hospital, Gyula (Hungary); Kiss, Balazs [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Markusovszky County Hospital, Szombathely (Hungary)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of different electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and portal images with the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered}. Material and methods: characteristic properties of images of different file formats were measured on Siemens OptiVue500aSi {sup registered}, Siemens BeamView Plus {sup registered}, Elekta iView {sup registered}, and Varian PortalVision trademark and analyzed with the epidSoft {sup registered} 2.0 program in four radiation therapy centers. The portal images were taken with Kodak X-OMAT V {sup registered} and the Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack {sup registered} films and evaluated with the same program. Results: the optimal exposition both for EPIDs and portal films of different kind was determined. For double exposition, the 2+1 MU values can be recommended in the case of Siemens OptiVue500aSi {sup registered}, Elekta iView {sup registered} and Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack {sup registered} films, while for Siemens BeamView Plus {sup registered}, Varian PortalVision trademark and Kodak X-OMAT V {sup registered} film 7+7 MU is recommended. Conclusion: the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM {sup registered} can be used not only for amorphous silicon EPIDs but also for images taken with a video-based system or by using an ionization chamber matrix or for portal film. For analysis of QC tests, a standardized format (used at the acceptance test) should be applied, as the results are dependent on the file format used. (orig.)

  10. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an 192 Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an 192 Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been developed. The

  11. SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annamalai, Gopiraj; Watanabe, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a simple method for estimating the mid-plane dose (MPD) of a patient using Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID). Methods: A Varian TrueBeam with aSi100 EPID was used in this study. The EPID images were acquired for a 30 cm × 30 cm homogeneous slab phantom and a 30 cm diameter 20 cm thick cylindrical phantom in the continuous dosimetry mode. The acquired EPID images in XIM format were imported into in-house MATLAB program for the data analysis. First, the dosimetric characteristics of EPID were studied for dose-response linearity, dose-rate dependence, and field size dependence. Next, the average pixels values of the EPID images were correlated with the MPD measured by an ionisation chamber for various thicknesses of the slab phantom (8 cm – 30 cm) and for various square field sizes (3×3 cm 2 – 25×25 cm 2 at the isocenter). Look-up tables called as GPR tables were then generated for both SSD and SAD setup by taking the ratio of MPD measured by the ionisation chamber and the corresponding EPID pixel values. The accuracy of the GPR tables was evaluated by varying the field size, phantom thickness, and wedge angles with the slab and cylindrical phantoms. Results: The dose response of EPID was linear from 20 MU to 300 MU. The EPID response for different dose rates from 40 MU/min to 600 MU/min was within ±1%. The difference in the doses from the GPR tables and the doses measured by the ionization chambers were within 2% for slab phantoms, and 3% for the cylindrical phantom for various field sizes, phantom thickness, and wedge angles. Conclusion: GPR tables are a ready reckoner for in-vivo dosimetry and it can be used to quickly estimate the MPD value from the EPID images with an accuracy of ±3% for common clinical treatment. project work funded by Union for International cancer control(UICC) under ICRETT fellowship

  12. SU-F-T-259: GPR Tables for the Estimation of Mid-Plane Dose Using EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annamalai, Gopiraj [Government Arignar Anna Memorial Cancer Hospital & Research Institute, Kanchipuram, TAMILNADU (India); Watanabe, Yoichi [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a simple method for estimating the mid-plane dose (MPD) of a patient using Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID). Methods: A Varian TrueBeam with aSi100 EPID was used in this study. The EPID images were acquired for a 30 cm × 30 cm homogeneous slab phantom and a 30 cm diameter 20 cm thick cylindrical phantom in the continuous dosimetry mode. The acquired EPID images in XIM format were imported into in-house MATLAB program for the data analysis. First, the dosimetric characteristics of EPID were studied for dose-response linearity, dose-rate dependence, and field size dependence. Next, the average pixels values of the EPID images were correlated with the MPD measured by an ionisation chamber for various thicknesses of the slab phantom (8 cm – 30 cm) and for various square field sizes (3×3 cm{sup 2} – 25×25 cm{sup 2} at the isocenter). Look-up tables called as GPR tables were then generated for both SSD and SAD setup by taking the ratio of MPD measured by the ionisation chamber and the corresponding EPID pixel values. The accuracy of the GPR tables was evaluated by varying the field size, phantom thickness, and wedge angles with the slab and cylindrical phantoms. Results: The dose response of EPID was linear from 20 MU to 300 MU. The EPID response for different dose rates from 40 MU/min to 600 MU/min was within ±1%. The difference in the doses from the GPR tables and the doses measured by the ionization chambers were within 2% for slab phantoms, and 3% for the cylindrical phantom for various field sizes, phantom thickness, and wedge angles. Conclusion: GPR tables are a ready reckoner for in-vivo dosimetry and it can be used to quickly estimate the MPD value from the EPID images with an accuracy of ±3% for common clinical treatment. project work funded by Union for International cancer control(UICC) under ICRETT fellowship.

  13. Cine EPID evaluation of two non-commercial techniques for DIBH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Christopher; Urribarri, Jaime; Cail, Daniel; Rottmann, Joerg; Mishra, Pankaj; Lingos, Tatiana; Niedermayr, Thomas; Berbeco, Ross, E-mail: rberbeco@lroc.harvard.edu [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of two noncommercial techniques for deep inspiration breathhold (DIBH) treatment of left-sided breast cancer (LSBC) usingcine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Methods: 23 875 EPID images of 65 patients treated for LSBC at two different cancer treatment centers were retrieved. At the Milford Regional Cancer Center, DIBH stability was maintained by visual alignment of inroom lasers and patient skin tattoos (TAT). At the South Shore Hospital, a distance-measuring laser device (RTSSD) was implemented. For both centers,cine EPID images were acquired at least once per week during beam-on. Chest wall position relative to image boundary was measured and tracked over the course of treatment for every patient and treatment fraction for which data were acquired. Results: Median intrabeam chest motion was 0.31 mm for the TAT method and 0.37 mm for the RTSSD method. The maximum excursions exceeded our treatment protocol threshold of 3 mm in 0.3% of cases (TAT) and 1.2% of cases (RTSSD). The authors did not observe a clinically significant difference between the two datasets. Conclusions: Both noncommercial techniques for monitoring the DIBH location provided DIBH stability within the predetermined treatment protocol parameters (<3 mm). The intreatment imaging offered by the EPID operating incine mode facilitates retrospective analysis and validation of both techniques.

  14. Cine EPID evaluation of two non-commercial techniques for DIBH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Christopher; Urribarri, Jaime; Cail, Daniel; Rottmann, Joerg; Mishra, Pankaj; Lingos, Tatiana; Niedermayr, Thomas; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of two noncommercial techniques for deep inspiration breathhold (DIBH) treatment of left-sided breast cancer (LSBC) usingcine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Methods: 23 875 EPID images of 65 patients treated for LSBC at two different cancer treatment centers were retrieved. At the Milford Regional Cancer Center, DIBH stability was maintained by visual alignment of inroom lasers and patient skin tattoos (TAT). At the South Shore Hospital, a distance-measuring laser device (RTSSD) was implemented. For both centers,cine EPID images were acquired at least once per week during beam-on. Chest wall position relative to image boundary was measured and tracked over the course of treatment for every patient and treatment fraction for which data were acquired. Results: Median intrabeam chest motion was 0.31 mm for the TAT method and 0.37 mm for the RTSSD method. The maximum excursions exceeded our treatment protocol threshold of 3 mm in 0.3% of cases (TAT) and 1.2% of cases (RTSSD). The authors did not observe a clinically significant difference between the two datasets. Conclusions: Both noncommercial techniques for monitoring the DIBH location provided DIBH stability within the predetermined treatment protocol parameters (<3 mm). The intreatment imaging offered by the EPID operating incine mode facilitates retrospective analysis and validation of both techniques

  15. SU-E-T-05: A 2D EPID Transit Dosimetry Model Based On An Empirical Quadratic Formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Y; Metwaly, M; Glegg, M; Baggarley, S; Elliott, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a 2D electronic portal imaging device (EPID) transit dosimetry model, based on an empirical quadratic formalism, that can predict either EPID or in-phantom dose distribution for comparisons with EPID captured image or treatment planning system (TPS) dose respectively. Methods: A quadratic equation can be used to relate the reduction in intensity of an exit beam to the equivalent path length of the attenuator. The calibration involved deriving coefficients from a set of dose planes measured for homogeneous phantoms with known thicknesses under reference conditions. In this study, calibration dose planes were measured with EPID and ionisation chamber (IC) in water for the same reference beam (6MV, 100mu, 20×20cm 2 ) and set of thicknesses (0–30cm). Since the same calibration conditions were used, the EPID and IC measurements can be related through the quadratic equation. Consequently, EPID transit dose can be predicted from TPS exported dose planes and in-phantom dose can be predicted using EPID distribution captured during treatment as an input. The model was tested with 4 open fields, 6 wedge fields, and 7 IMRT fields on homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons were done using 2D absolute gamma (3%/3mm) and results were validated against measurements with a commercial 2D array device. Results: The gamma pass rates for comparisons between EPID measured and predicted ranged from 93.6% to 100.0% for all fields and phantoms tested. Results from this study agreed with 2D array measurements to within 3.1%. Meanwhile, comparisons in-phantom between TPS computed and predicted ranged from 91.6% to 100.0%. Validation with 2D array device was not possible for inphantom comparisons. Conclusion: A 2D EPID transit dosimetry model for treatment verification was described and proven to be accurate. The model has the advantage of being generic and allows comparisons at the EPID plane as well as multiple planes in-phantom

  16. Use of local noise power spectrum and wavelet analysis in quantitative image quality assurance for EPIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case and Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Yan, Guanghua; Bassett, Philip; Samant, Sanjiv, E-mail: samant@ufl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida 32608 (United States); Gopal, Arun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of local noise power spectrum (NPS) to characterize image noise and wavelet analysis to isolate defective pixels and inter-subpanel flat-fielding artifacts for quantitative quality assurance (QA) of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Methods: A total of 93 image sets including custom-made bar-pattern images and open exposure images were collected from four iViewGT a-Si EPID systems over three years. Global quantitative metrics such as modulation transform function (MTF), NPS, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were computed for each image set. Local NPS was also calculated for individual subpanels by sampling region of interests within each subpanel of the EPID. The 1D NPS, obtained by radially averaging the 2D NPS, was fitted to a power-law function. The r-square value of the linear regression analysis was used as a singular metric to characterize the noise properties of individual subpanels of the EPID. The sensitivity of the local NPS was first compared with the global quantitative metrics using historical image sets. It was then compared with two commonly used commercial QA systems with images collected after applying two different EPID calibration methods (single-level gain and multilevel gain). To detect isolated defective pixels and inter-subpanel flat-fielding artifacts, Haar wavelet transform was applied on the images. Results: Global quantitative metrics including MTF, NPS, and DQE showed little change over the period of data collection. On the contrary, a strong correlation between the local NPS (r-square values) and the variation of the EPID noise condition was observed. The local NPS analysis indicated image quality improvement with the r-square values increased from 0.80 ± 0.03 (before calibration) to 0.85 ± 0.03 (after single-level gain calibration) and to 0.96 ± 0.03 (after multilevel gain calibration), while the commercial QA systems failed to distinguish the image quality improvement between the two

  17. SU-F-T-562: Validation of EPID-Based Dosimetry for FSRS Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y; Saleh, Z; Obcemea, C; Chan, M; Tang, X; Lim, S; Lovelock, D; Ballangrud, A; Mueller, B; Zinovoy, M; Gelblum, D; Mychalczak, B; Both, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The prevailing approach to frameless SRS (fSRS) small field dosimetry is Gafchromic film. Though providing continuous information, its intrinsic uncertainties in fabrication, response, scan, and calibration often make film dosimetry subject to different interpretations. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using EPID portal dosimetry as a viable alternative to film for small field dosimetry. Methods: Plans prescribed a dose of 21 Gy were created on a flat solid water phantom with Eclipse V11 and iPlan for small static square fields (1.0 to 3.0 cm). In addition, two clinical test plans were computed by employing iPlan on a CIRS Kesler head phantom for target dimensions of 1.2cm and 2.0cm. Corresponding portal dosimetry plans were computed using the Eclipse TPS and delivered on a Varian TrueBeam machine. EBT-XD film dosimetry was performed as a reference. The isocenter doses were measured using EPID, OSLD, stereotactic diode, and CC01 ion chamber. Results: EPID doses at the center of the square field were higher than Eclipse TPS predicted portal doses, with the mean difference being 2.42±0.65%. Doses measured by EBT-XD film, OSLD, stereotactic diode, and CC01 ion chamber revealed smaller differences (except OSLDs), with mean differences being 0.36±3.11%, 4.12±4.13%, 1.7±2.76%, 1.45±2.37% for Eclipse and −1.36±0.85%, 2.38±4.2%, −0.03±0.50%, −0.27±0.78% for iPlan. The profiles measured by EPID and EBT-XD film resembled TPS (Eclipse and iPlan) predicted ones within 3.0%. For the two clinical test plans, the EPID mean doses at the center of field were 2.66±0.68% and 2.33±0.32% higher than TPS predicted doses. Conclusion: We found that results obtained with EPID portal dosimetry were slightly higher (∼2%) than those obtained with EBT-XD film, diode, and CC01 ion chamber with the exception of OSLDs, but well within IROC tolerance (5.0%). Therefore, EPID has the potential to become a viable real-time alternative method to film dosimetry.

  18. SU-F-T-562: Validation of EPID-Based Dosimetry for FSRS Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y; Saleh, Z; Obcemea, C; Chan, M; Tang, X; Lim, S; Lovelock, D; Ballangrud, A; Mueller, B; Zinovoy, M; Gelblum, D; Mychalczak, B; Both, S [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The prevailing approach to frameless SRS (fSRS) small field dosimetry is Gafchromic film. Though providing continuous information, its intrinsic uncertainties in fabrication, response, scan, and calibration often make film dosimetry subject to different interpretations. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using EPID portal dosimetry as a viable alternative to film for small field dosimetry. Methods: Plans prescribed a dose of 21 Gy were created on a flat solid water phantom with Eclipse V11 and iPlan for small static square fields (1.0 to 3.0 cm). In addition, two clinical test plans were computed by employing iPlan on a CIRS Kesler head phantom for target dimensions of 1.2cm and 2.0cm. Corresponding portal dosimetry plans were computed using the Eclipse TPS and delivered on a Varian TrueBeam machine. EBT-XD film dosimetry was performed as a reference. The isocenter doses were measured using EPID, OSLD, stereotactic diode, and CC01 ion chamber. Results: EPID doses at the center of the square field were higher than Eclipse TPS predicted portal doses, with the mean difference being 2.42±0.65%. Doses measured by EBT-XD film, OSLD, stereotactic diode, and CC01 ion chamber revealed smaller differences (except OSLDs), with mean differences being 0.36±3.11%, 4.12±4.13%, 1.7±2.76%, 1.45±2.37% for Eclipse and −1.36±0.85%, 2.38±4.2%, −0.03±0.50%, −0.27±0.78% for iPlan. The profiles measured by EPID and EBT-XD film resembled TPS (Eclipse and iPlan) predicted ones within 3.0%. For the two clinical test plans, the EPID mean doses at the center of field were 2.66±0.68% and 2.33±0.32% higher than TPS predicted doses. Conclusion: We found that results obtained with EPID portal dosimetry were slightly higher (∼2%) than those obtained with EBT-XD film, diode, and CC01 ion chamber with the exception of OSLDs, but well within IROC tolerance (5.0%). Therefore, EPID has the potential to become a viable real-time alternative method to film dosimetry.

  19. Epid cine acquisition mode for in vivo dosimetry in dynamic arc radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Mameli, Alessandra; Placidi, Elisa; Greco, Francesca; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Ramella, Sara; D'Angelillo, Rolando; Cellini, Francesco; Trodella, Lucio; Cilla, Savino; Grimaldi, Luca; D'Onofrio, Guido; Azario, Luigi; Piermattei, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the cine acquisition mode of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been calibrated and tested to determine the in vivo dose for dynamic conformal arc radiation therapy (DCAT). The EPID cine acquisition mode, that allows a frame acquisition rate of one image every 1.66 s, was studied with a monitor unit rate equal to 100 UM/min. In these conditions good signal stability, ±1% (2SD) evaluated during three months, signal reproducibility within ±0.8% (2SD) and linearity with dose and dose rate within ±1% (2SD) were obtained. The transit signal, S t , (due to the transmitted beam below the phantom) measured by the EPID cine acquisition mode was used to determine, (i) a set of correlation functions, F(w,L), defined as the ratio between S t and the dose at half thickness, D m , measured in solid water phantoms of different thicknesses, w and with square fields of side L, (ii) a set of factors, f(d,L), that take into account the different X-ray scatter contribution from the phantom to the S t signal as a function of the variation, d, of the air gap between the phantom and the EPID. The reconstruction of the isocenter dose, D iso , for DCAT was obtained convolving the transit signal values, obtained at different gantry angles, with the respective reconstruction factors determined by a house-made software. The method was tested with cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms and the results show that the reconstructed D iso values can be obtained with an accuracy within ±2.5% in cylindrical phantom and within ±3.4% for anthropomorphic phantom. In conclusion, the transit dosimetry by EPID was assessed to be adequate to perform DCAT in vivo dosimetry, that is not realizable with the other traditional techniques. Moreover, the method proposed here could be implemented to supply in vivo dose values in real time

  20. First Experience With Real-Time EPID-Based Delivery Verification During IMRT and VMAT Sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, Henry C.; Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Van Uytven, Eric; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Beek, Timothy van; Bhatia, Shashank; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Gantry-mounted megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have become ubiquitous on linear accelerators. WatchDog is a novel application of EPIDs, in which the image frames acquired during treatment are used to monitor treatment delivery in real time. We report on the preliminary use of WatchDog in a prospective study of cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and identify the challenges of clinical adoption. Methods and Materials: At the time of submission, 28 cancer patients (head and neck, pelvis, and prostate) undergoing fractionated external beam radiation therapy (24 IMRT, 4 VMAT) had ≥1 treatment fraction verified in real time (131 fractions or 881 fields). EPID images acquired continuously during treatment were synchronized and compared with model-generated transit EPID images within a frame time (∼0.1 s). A χ comparison was performed to cumulative frames to gauge the overall delivery quality, and the resulting pass rates were reported graphically during treatment delivery. Every frame acquired (500-1500 per fraction) was saved for postprocessing and analysis. Results: The system reported the mean ± standard deviation in real time χ 91.1% ± 11.5% (83.6% ± 13.2%) for cumulative frame χ analysis with 4%, 4 mm (3%, 3 mm) criteria, global over the integrated image. Conclusions: A real-time EPID-based radiation delivery verification system for IMRT and VMAT has been demonstrated that aims to prevent major mistreatments in radiation therapy.

  1. On the use of EPID-based implanted marker tracking for 4D radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P.J.; Todor, A.D.; Vedam, S.S.; Bartee, C.L.; Siebers, J.V.; Kini, V.R.; Mohan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) radiotherapy delivery to dynamically moving tumors requires a real-time signal of the tumor position as a function of time so that the radiation beam can continuously track the tumor during the respiration cycle. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based marker-tracking system that can be used for real-time tumor targeting, or 4D radiotherapy. Three gold cylinders, 3 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter, were implanted in a dynamic lung phantom. The phantom range of motion was 4 cm with a 3-s 'breathing' period. EPID image acquisition parameters were modified, allowing image acquisition in 0.1 s. Images of the stationary and moving phantom were acquired. Software was developed to segment automatically the marker positions from the EPID images. Images acquired in 0.1 s displayed higher noise and a lower signal-noise ratio than those obtained using regular (>1 s) acquisition settings. However, the markers were still clearly visible on the 0.1-s images. The motion of the phantom blurred the images of the markers and further reduced the signal-noise ratio, though they could still be successfully segmented from the images in 10-30 ms of computation time. The positions of gold markers placed in the lung phantom were detected successfully, even for phantom velocities substantially higher than those observed for typical lung tumors. This study shows that using EPID-based marker tracking for 4D radiotherapy is feasible, however, changes in linear accelerator technology and EPID-based image acquisition as well as patient studies are required before this method can be implemented clinically

  2. First Experience With Real-Time EPID-Based Delivery Verification During IMRT and VMAT Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, Henry C., E-mail: henry.woodruff@newcastle.edu.au [Faculty of Science and Information Technology, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Fuangrod, Todsaporn [Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Van Uytven, Eric; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Beek, Timothy van [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Bhatia, Shashank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [Faculty of Science and Information Technology, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: Gantry-mounted megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have become ubiquitous on linear accelerators. WatchDog is a novel application of EPIDs, in which the image frames acquired during treatment are used to monitor treatment delivery in real time. We report on the preliminary use of WatchDog in a prospective study of cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and identify the challenges of clinical adoption. Methods and Materials: At the time of submission, 28 cancer patients (head and neck, pelvis, and prostate) undergoing fractionated external beam radiation therapy (24 IMRT, 4 VMAT) had ≥1 treatment fraction verified in real time (131 fractions or 881 fields). EPID images acquired continuously during treatment were synchronized and compared with model-generated transit EPID images within a frame time (∼0.1 s). A χ comparison was performed to cumulative frames to gauge the overall delivery quality, and the resulting pass rates were reported graphically during treatment delivery. Every frame acquired (500-1500 per fraction) was saved for postprocessing and analysis. Results: The system reported the mean ± standard deviation in real time χ 91.1% ± 11.5% (83.6% ± 13.2%) for cumulative frame χ analysis with 4%, 4 mm (3%, 3 mm) criteria, global over the integrated image. Conclusions: A real-time EPID-based radiation delivery verification system for IMRT and VMAT has been demonstrated that aims to prevent major mistreatments in radiation therapy.

  3. Virtual EPID standard phantom audit (VESPA) for remote IMRT and VMAT credentialing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Narges; Lehmann, Joerg; Legge, Kimberley; Vial, Philip; Greer, Peter B.

    2017-06-01

    A virtual EPID standard phantom audit (VESPA) has been implemented for remote auditing in support of facility credentialing for clinical trials using IMRT and VMAT. VESPA is based on published methods and a clinically established IMRT QA procedure, here extended to multi-vendor equipment. Facilities are provided with comprehensive instructions and CT datasets to create treatment plans. They deliver the treatment directly to their EPID without any phantom or couch in the beam. In addition, they deliver a set of simple calibration fields per instructions. Collected EPID images are uploaded electronically. In the analysis, the dose is projected back into a virtual cylindrical phantom. 3D gamma analysis is performed. 2D dose planes and linear dose profiles are provided and can be considered when needed for clarification. In addition, using a virtual flat-phantom, 2D field-by-field or arc-by-arc gamma analyses are performed. Pilot facilities covering a range of planning and delivery systems have performed data acquisition and upload successfully. Advantages of VESPA are (1) fast turnaround mainly driven by the facility’s capability of providing the requested EPID images, (2) the possibility for facilities performing the audit in parallel, as there is no need to wait for a phantom, (3) simple and efficient credentialing for international facilities, (4) a large set of data points, and (5) a reduced impact on resources and environment as there is no need to transport heavy phantoms or audit staff. Limitations of the current implementation of VESPA for trials credentialing are that it does not provide absolute dosimetry, therefore a Level I audit is still required, and that it relies on correctly delivered open calibration fields, which are used for system calibration. The implemented EPID based IMRT and VMAT audit system promises to dramatically improve credentialing efficiency for clinical trials and wider applications.

  4. Normalize the response of EPID in pursuit of linear accelerator dosimetry standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Goddu, S Murty; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Caruthers, Douglas; Wen, Jie; Noel, Camille; Mutic, Sasa; Sun, Baozhou

    2018-01-01

    Normalize the response of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is the first step toward an EPID-based standardization of Linear Accelerator (linac) dosimetry quality assurance. In this study, we described an approach to generate two-dimensional (2D) pixel sensitivity maps (PSM) for EPIDs response normalization utilizing an alternative beam and dark-field (ABDF) image acquisition technique and large overlapping field irradiations. The automated image acquisition was performed by XML-controlled machine operation and the PSM was generated based on a recursive calculation algorithm for Varian linacs equipped with aS1000 and aS1200 imager panels. Cross-comparisons of normalized beam profiles and 1.5%/1.5 mm 1D Gamma analysis was adopted to quantify the improvement of beam profile matching before and after PSM corrections. PSMs were derived for both photon (6, 10, 15 MV) and electron (6, 20 MeV) beams via proposed method. The PSM-corrected images reproduced a horn-shaped profile for photon beams and a relative uniform profiles for electrons. For dosimetrically matched linacs equipped with aS1000 panels, PSM-corrected images showed increased 1D-Gamma passing rates for all energies, with an average 10.5% improvement for crossline and 37% for inline beam profiles. Similar improvements in the phantom study were observed with a maximum improvement of 32% for 15 MV and 22% for 20 MeV. The PSM value showed no significant change for all energies over a 3-month period. In conclusion, the proposed approach correct EPID response for both aS1000 and aS1200 panels. This strategy enables the possibility to standardize linac dosimetry QA and to benchmark linac performance utilizing EPID as the common detector. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. A comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of gantry, EPID and the MLC assembly in Elekta linacs during gantry rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowshanfarzad, P; Lynggaard Riis, Hans; Zimmermann, S J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linear accelerator (linac) components, including gantry, collimation system and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested...... collimator leaf bank assemblies was around 1 mm. A meaningful correlation was found between the age of the linacs and their mechanical performance. Conclusions and Advances in knowledge: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behaviour...

  6. SU-D-201-06: Remote Dosmetric Auditing of VMAT Deliveries for Clinical Trials Using EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legge, K; Miri, N [University of Newcastle (Australia); Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital (Australia); Greer, P [University of Newcastle (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for remote dosimetric auditing the delivery of VMAT using EPID which allows for simple, inexpensive and time efficient dosimetric credentialing for clinical trials. Methods: Remote centers are provided with CT datasets and planning guidelines to produce VMAT plans for a head and neck and a post-prostatectomy treatment. Plans are transferred in the planning system to two virtual water equivalent phantoms, one flat and one cylindrical. Cine images are acquired during VMAT delivery to the EPID in air with gantry angle recorded in image headers. Centers also deliver provided calibration plans to enable EPID signal to dose conversion, determination of the central axis, and correction of EPID sag prior to analysis. EPID images and planned doses are sent to the central site. EPID cine images are converted to dose in the virtual phantoms using an established backprojection method (King et al., Med.Phys. 2012) with EPID backscatter correction. Individual arcs (with gantry angles collapsed to zero) are evaluated at 10 cm depth in the flat phantom using 2D gamma, and total doses are evaluated in the cylindrical phantom using 3D gamma. Results are reported for criteria of 3%,3mm, 3%,2mm and 2%,2mm for all points greater than 10% of global maximum. Results: The pilot study for Varian centers has commenced, and three centers have been audited for head and neck plans and two for post-prostatectomy plans to date. The mean pass rate for arc-by-arc 2D analysis at 3%,3mm is 99.5% and for 3D analysis is 95.8%. A method for Elekta linacs using an inclinometer for gantry angle information is under development. Conclusion: Preliminary results for this new method are promising. The method takes advantage of EPID equipment available at most centers and clinically established software to provide a feasible, low cost solution to credentialing centers for clinical trials. Funding has been provided from Calvary Mater Newcastle Department of Radiation Oncology, TROG

  7. Dose-response characteristics of an amorphous silicon EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Peter; Hefner, Alfred; Georg, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for the purpose of patient setup verification. Nowadays, they are increasingly used as dosimeters (e.g., for IMRT verification and linac-specific QA). A prerequisite for any clinical dosimetric application is a detailed understanding of the detector's dose-response behavior. The aim of this study is to investigate the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon EPID (Elekta IVIEWGT) with respect to three photon beam qualities: 6, 10, and 25 MV. The EPID showed an excellent temporal stability on short term as well as on long term scales. The stability throughout the day was strongly influenced by warming up, which took several hours and affected EPID response by 2.5%. Ghosting effects increased the sensitivity of the EPID. They became more pronounced with decreasing time intervals between two exposures as well as with increasing dose. Due to ghosting, changes in pixel sensitivity amounted up to 16% (locally) for the 25 MV photon beam. It was observed that the response characteristics of our EPID depended on dose as well as on dose rate. Doubling the dose rate increased the EPID sensitivity by 1.5%. This behavior was successfully attributed to a dose per frame effect, i.e., a nonlinear relationship between the EPID signal and the dose which was delivered to the panel between two successive readouts. The sensitivity was found to vary up to 10% in the range of 1 to 1000 monitor units. This variation was governed by two independent effects. For low doses, the EPID signal was reduced due to the linac's changing dose rate during startup. Furthermore, the detector reading was influenced by intrabeam variations of EPID sensitivity, namely, an increase of detector response during uniform exposure. For the beam qualities which were used, the response characteristics of the EPID did not depend on energy. Differences in relative dose-response curves resulted from energy dependent temporal output

  8. Impact of daily anatomical changes on EPID-based in vivo dosimetry of VMAT treatments of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozendaal, Roel A.; Mijnheer, Ben J.; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Mans, Anton; Herk, Marcel van

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Target dose verification for VMAT treatments of head-and-neck (H&N) cancer using 3D in vivo EPID dosimetry is expected to be affected by daily anatomical changes. By including these anatomical changes through cone-beam CT (CBCT) information, the magnitude of this effect is investigated. Materials and methods: For 20 VMAT-treated H&N cancer patients, all plan-CTs (pCTs), 633 CBCTs and 1266 EPID movies were used to compare four dose distributions per fraction: treatment planning system (TPS) calculated dose and EPID reconstructed in vivo dose, both determined using the pCT and using the CBCT. D2, D50 and D98 of the planning target volume (PTV) were determined per dose distribution. Results: When including daily anatomical information, D2, D50 and D98 of the PTV change on average by 0.0 ± 0.4% according to TPS calculations; the standard deviation of the difference between EPID and TPS target dose changes from 2.5% (pCT) to 2.1% (CBCT). Small time trends are seen for both TPS and EPID dose distributions when using the pCT, which disappear when including CBCT information. Conclusions: Daily anatomical changes hardly influence the target dose distribution for H&N VMAT treatments according to TPS recalculations. Including CBCT information in EPID dose reconstructions slightly improves the agreement with TPS calculations

  9. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  10. MO-AB-BRA-03: Development of Novel Real Time in Vivo EPID Treatment Verification for Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, G; Podesta, M [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Reniers, B [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Research Group NuTeC, CMK, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw H, Diepenbeek B-3590 (Belgium); Verhaegen, F [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments are employed worldwide to treat a wide variety of cancers. However, in vivo dose verification remains a challenge with no commercial dosimetry system available to verify the treatment dose delivered to the patient. We propose a novel dosimetry system that couples an independent Monte Carlo (MC) simulation platform and an amorphous silicon Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to provide real time treatment verification. Methods: MC calculations predict the EPID response to the photon fluence emitted by the HDR source by simulating the patient, the source dwell positions and times, and treatment complexities such as tissue compositions/densities and different applicators. Simulated results are then compared against EPID measurements acquired with ∼0.14s time resolution which allows dose measurements for each dwell position. The EPID has been calibrated using an Ir-192 HDR source and experiments were performed using different phantoms, including tissue equivalent materials (PMMA, lung and bone). A source positioning accuracy of 0.2 mm, without including the afterloader uncertainty, was ensured using a robotic arm moving the source. Results: An EPID can acquire 3D Cartesian source positions and its response varies significantly due to differences in the material composition/density of the irradiated object, allowing detection of changes in patient geometry. The panel time resolution allows dose rate and dwell time measurements. Moreover, predicted EPID images obtained from clinical treatment plans provide anatomical information that can be related to the patient anatomy, mostly bone and air cavities, localizing the source inside of the patient using its anatomy as reference. Conclusion: Results obtained show the feasibility of the proposed dose verification system that is capable to verify all the brachytherapy treatment steps in real time providing data about treatment delivery quality and also applicator

  11. Quality control program of multi-leaf collimation based EPID for teams with Rapidarc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.; Gimeno Olmos, J.; Lliso Valverde, F.; Carmona Mesenguer, V.; Garcia Martinez, M. T.; Palomo Llinares, R.; Ballester Pallares, F.; Perez Calatayud, J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to show a collection of different recommendations on the control of quality of collimation multi-leaf system and present the selection of tests based on the electronic imaging device (EPID) portal that have decided to establish in our Center, where in addition to the requirements of quality assurance generic for collimation multi-leaf system quality control methods have been included for RapidArc. (Author)

  12. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn [Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Woodruff, Henry C.; O’Connor, Daryl J. [Faculty of Science and IT, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Uytven, Eric van; McCurdy, Boyd M. C. [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Kuncic, Zdenka [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [Faculty of Science and IT, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, the University of Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Locked Bag 7, Hunter region Mail Centre, Newcastle, NSW 2310 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient.Methods: The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance.Results: The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s).Conclusions: A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy.

  13. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C.; O’Connor, Daryl J.; Uytven, Eric van; McCurdy, Boyd M. C.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Greer, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient.Methods: The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance.Results: The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s).Conclusions: A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy

  14. SU-G-TeP4-07: Automatic EPID-Based 2D Measurement of MLC Leaf Offset as a Quality Control Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, T; Moran, J [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Schultz, B [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Barnes, M [Calvary Mater Hospital Newcastle, Warratah, NSW (Australia); Perez, M [North Sydney Cancer Center, Sydney (Australia); Farrey, K [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Popple, R [University Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The MLC dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) and transmission are measured parameters which impact the dosimetric accuracy of IMRT and VMAT plans. This investigation aims to develop an efficient and accurate routine constancy check of the physical DLG in two dimensions. Methods: The manufacturer’s recommended DLG measurement method was modified by using 5 fields instead of 11 and by utilizing the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID). Validations were accomplished using an ion chamber (IC) in solid water and a 2D IC array. EPID data was collected for 6 months on multiple TrueBeam linacs using both Millennium and HD MLCs at 5 different clinics in an international consortium. Matlab code was written to automatically analyze the images and calculate the 2D results. Sensitivity was investigated by introducing deliberate leaf position errors. MLC calibration and initialization history was recorded to allow quantification of their impact. Results were analyzed using statistical process control (SPC). Results: The EPID method took approximately 5 minutes. Due to detector response, the EPID measured DLG and transmission differed from the IC values but were reproducible and consistent with changes measured using the ICs. For the Millennium MLC, the EPID measured DLG and transmission were both consistently lower than IC results. The EPID method was implemented as leaf offset and transmission constancy tests (LOC and TC). Based on 6 months of measurements, the initial leaf-specific action thresholds for changes from baseline were set to 0.1 mm. Upper and lower control limits for variation were developed for each machine. Conclusion: Leaf offset and transmission constancy tests were implemented on Varian HD and Millennium MLCs using an EPID and found to be efficient and accurate. The test is effective for monitoring MLC performance using dynamic delivery and performing process control on the DLG in 2D, thus enhancing dosimetric accuracy. This work was supported by a grant

  15. Dosimetric characterization of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and development of a portal dosimetry simple model; Caracterizacion dosimetrica de un dispositivo electronico de imagen portal (EPID) y desarrollo de un modelo simple de dosimetria portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripol ValentIn, O.; GarcIa Romero, A.; Hernandez Vitoria, A.; Jimenez Albericio, J.; Cortes Rodicio, J.; Millan Cebrian, E.; Ruiz Manzano, P.; Canellas Anoz, M.

    2010-07-01

    The use of the Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPID) for the quality control of linear accelerators of electrons is increasingly extended in practice. In this work the dosimetric characteristics of an EPID OptiVue{sup TM}1000 ST were studied and a friendly and simple method for the absorbed dose calibration was suggested. This method is based on a simple mathematical model, including: an absorbed dose transformation coefficient and image lag and field shape corrections. Software tools were developed in order to process the information and the results were validated by comparing them with the measured data with ionization chambers. The studied device showed suitable characteristics for its use for EPID dosimetry and the calculated results fitted satisfactorily with the dose planes obtained with the ionization chambers. Keeping in mind the model limitations, we concluded that it is possible to start the use of the EPID for the accelerator quality control and improvements for the current model should be studied, as well as other suitable applications: e.g. the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatment verification procedures. (Author).

  16. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C; van Uytven, Eric; McCurdy, Boyd M C; Kuncic, Zdenka; O'Connor, Daryl J; Greer, Peter B

    2013-09-01

    To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient. The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance. The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s). A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy.

  17. An EPID response calculation algorithm using spatial beam characteristics of primary, head scattered and MLC transmitted radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, Florin; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an independent algorithm for the prediction of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) response. The algorithm uses a set of images [open beam, closed multileaf collimator (MLC), various fence and modified sweeping gap patterns] to separately characterize the primary and head-scatter contributions to EPID response. It also characterizes the relevant dosimetric properties of the MLC: Transmission, dosimetric gap, MLC scatter [P. Zygmansky et al., J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 8(4) (2007)], inter-leaf leakage, and tongue and groove [F. Lorenz et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 52, 5985-5999 (2007)]. The primary radiation is modeled with a single Gaussian distribution defined at the target position, while the head-scatter radiation is modeled with a triple Gaussian distribution defined downstream of the target. The distances between the target and the head-scatter source, jaws, and MLC are model parameters. The scatter associated with the EPID is implicit in the model. Open beam images are predicted to within 1% of the maximum value across the image. Other MLC test patterns and intensity-modulated radiation therapy fluences are predicted to within 1.5% of the maximum value. The presented method was applied to the Varian aS500 EPID but is designed to work with any planar detector with sufficient spatial resolution

  18. MO-D-213-08: Remote Dosimetric Credentialing for Clinical Trials with the Virtual EPID Standard Phantom Audit (VESPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J; Miri, N; Vial, P; Hatton, J; Zwan, B; Sloan, K; Craig, A; Beenstock, V; Molloy, T; Greer, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Report on implementation of a Virtual EPID Standard Phantom Audit (VESPA) for IMRT to support credentialing of facilities for clinical trials. Data is acquired by local facility staff and transferred electronically. Analysis is performed centrally. Methods: VESPA is based on published methods and a clinically established IMRT QA procedure, here extended to multi-vendor equipment. Facilities, provided with web-based comprehensive instructions and CT datasets, create IMRT treatment plans. They deliver the treatments directly to their EPID without phantom or couch in the beam. They also deliver a set of simple calibration fields. Collected EPID images are uploaded electronically. In the analysis, the dose is projected back into a virtual phantom and 3D gamma analysis is performed. 2D dose planes and linear dose profiles can be analysed when needed for clarification. Results: Pilot facilities covering a range of planning and delivery systems have performed data acquisition and upload successfully. Analysis showed agreement comparable to local experience with the method. Advantages of VESPA are (1) fast turnaround mainly driven by the facility’s capability to provide the requested EPID images, (2) the possibility for facilities performing the audit in parallel, as there is no need to wait for a phantom, (3) simple and efficient credentialing for international facilities, (4) a large set of data points, and (5) a reduced impact on resources and environment as there is no need to transport heavy phantoms or audit staff. Limitations of the current implementation of VESPA for trials credentialing are that it does not provide absolute dosimetry, therefore a Level 1 audit still required, and that it relies on correctly delivered open calibration fields, which are used for system calibration. Conclusion: The implemented EPID based IMRT audit system promises to dramatically improve credentialing efficiency for clinical trials and wider applications. VESPA for VMAT

  19. MO-D-213-08: Remote Dosimetric Credentialing for Clinical Trials with the Virtual EPID Standard Phantom Audit (VESPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Miri, N [University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Hatton, J [Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG), Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Zwan, B; Sloan, K [Gosford Hospital, Gosford, NSW (Australia); Craig, A; Beenstock, V [Canterbury Regional Cancer and Haematology Service, Christchurch (New Zealand); Molloy, T [Orange Hospital, Orange, NSW (Australia); Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Report on implementation of a Virtual EPID Standard Phantom Audit (VESPA) for IMRT to support credentialing of facilities for clinical trials. Data is acquired by local facility staff and transferred electronically. Analysis is performed centrally. Methods: VESPA is based on published methods and a clinically established IMRT QA procedure, here extended to multi-vendor equipment. Facilities, provided with web-based comprehensive instructions and CT datasets, create IMRT treatment plans. They deliver the treatments directly to their EPID without phantom or couch in the beam. They also deliver a set of simple calibration fields. Collected EPID images are uploaded electronically. In the analysis, the dose is projected back into a virtual phantom and 3D gamma analysis is performed. 2D dose planes and linear dose profiles can be analysed when needed for clarification. Results: Pilot facilities covering a range of planning and delivery systems have performed data acquisition and upload successfully. Analysis showed agreement comparable to local experience with the method. Advantages of VESPA are (1) fast turnaround mainly driven by the facility’s capability to provide the requested EPID images, (2) the possibility for facilities performing the audit in parallel, as there is no need to wait for a phantom, (3) simple and efficient credentialing for international facilities, (4) a large set of data points, and (5) a reduced impact on resources and environment as there is no need to transport heavy phantoms or audit staff. Limitations of the current implementation of VESPA for trials credentialing are that it does not provide absolute dosimetry, therefore a Level 1 audit still required, and that it relies on correctly delivered open calibration fields, which are used for system calibration. Conclusion: The implemented EPID based IMRT audit system promises to dramatically improve credentialing efficiency for clinical trials and wider applications. VESPA for VMAT

  20. Verification of PTV margins for IMRT prostate cancer using EPID; Verificacao das margens de PTV para IMRT de cancer de prostata utilizando EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidens, Matheus; Santos, Romulo R.; Estacio, Daniela R. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital Sao Lucas. Servico de Fisica Medica; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: matheus_leidens@hotmail.com [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Faculdade de Fisica

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this work is to present the results of a strategy to define the PTV margins for patients with prostate cancer treated with IMRT technique, due to geometrical uncertainties associated with the planned placement. 341 images of 31 patients in supine position, before applying the fractions, were obtained using an EPID attached to a linear accelerator, where only setup errors were studied. The displacements were analyzed in relation to the AP (antero-posterior), SI (superior-inferior) and LR (left-right) directions. The distribution pattern of systematic displacement deviation values were 0.12 cm, 0.06 cm, 0.02 cm and the standard deviation of the distribution of random deviations was 0.62 cm, 0.53 cm, and 0.24 cm in the AP, SI and LR directions, respectively. Data evaluation, according to Stroom and Heijmen’s method, suggests that PTV margins should be 0.66 cm in the AP direction, 0.49 cm in the SI direction and 0.20 cm in the LR direction. These data show a high reproducibility in the positioning of patients, given by a method for the correction of planned relative to the bony anatomy checked with the EPID position. (author)

  1. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polak, Wojciech [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Radiotherapy Section, Queen Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust, Portsmouth PO6 3LY (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, Jim [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH, United Kingdom and Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Jones, Matt [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. Methods: This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Results: Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. Conclusions: The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be

  2. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, Wojciech; O’Doherty, Jim; Jones, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. Methods: This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Results: Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. Conclusions: The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be

  3. Automated x-ray/light field congruence using the LINAC EPID panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Wojciech; O'Doherty, Jim; Jones, Matt

    2013-03-01

    X-ray/light field alignment is a test described in many guidelines for the routine quality control of clinical linear accelerators (LINAC). Currently, the gold standard method for measuring alignment is through utilization of radiographic film. However, many modern LINACs are equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) that may be used to perform this test and thus subsequently reducing overall cost, processing, and analysis time, removing operator dependency and the requirement to sustain the departmental film processor. This work describes a novel method of utilizing the EPID together with a custom inhouse designed jig and automatic image processing software allowing measurement of the light field size, x-ray field size, and congruence between them. The authors present results of testing the method for aS1000 and aS500 Varian EPID detectors for six LINACs at a range of energies (6, 10, and 15 MV) in comparison with the results obtained from the use of radiographic film. Reproducibility of the software in fully automatic operation under a range of operating conditions for a single image showed a congruence of 0.01 cm with a coefficient of variation of 0. Slight variation in congruence repeatability was noted through semiautomatic processing by four independent operators due to manual marking of positions on the jig. Testing of the methodology using the automatic method shows a high precision of 0.02 mm compared to a maximum of 0.06 mm determined by film processing. Intraindividual examination of operator measurements of congruence was shown to vary as much as 0.75 mm. Similar congruence measurements of 0.02 mm were also determined for a lower resolution EPID (aS500 model), after rescaling of the image to the aS1000 image size. The designed methodology was proven to be time efficient, cost effective, and at least as accurate as using the gold standard radiographic film. Additionally, congruence testing can be easily performed for all four cardinal

  4. Development of a software of VMAT delivery using EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Jameson, Michael; Holloway, Lois; Goozee, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is more complex than standard IMRT, requiring new methodology to evaluate delivery accuracy. Here, we present the development of methodology and a software tool to perform control point based verification of VMAT delivery using an EPID. Individual segment dose comparison allows the verification of VMAT deli very accuracy for individual control-points. An in-house software tool was developed to predict the individual segment dose as measured by EPID for Pinnacle (Philips) generated VMAT plans. The VMAT plans were delivered using an Elekta-synergy accelerator and the segment doses were measured using EPID. A normalised dose comparison of measured and predicted doses was performed using gamma analysis with 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm DTA. The sensitivity of the proposed methodology in detecting delivery errors was studied by delivering a standard intensity pattern with a preset dose error of 4 and 5% in two of its eight control-points. Four clinical plans were also tested using this methodology. The developed software accurately predicts the EPID dose by considering all possible leaf trajectories in VMAT delivery. The mean gamma value and percentage of pixels exceeding the gamma tolerance for a segment with and without delivery errors are shown in Table. From the tabulated values it is evident that the proposed methodology is sensitive in detecting delivery errors above 3% tolerance level. The clinical plans were successfully validated showing a maximum 2.5% of pixels exceeding gamma tolerance. Methodology and a software were successfully developed to perform control-point validation of VMAT delivery using an EPID. Set error in Delivery (%) Mean gamma value% of pixels exceeding Gamma tolerance 0 0.40 1.240.5417.050.6221.8.

  5. Dosimetric pre-treatment verification of IMRT using an EPID; clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijtveld, Mathilda van; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In our clinic a QA program for IMRT verification, fully based on dosimetric measurements with electronic portal imaging devices (EPID), has been running for over 3 years. The program includes a pre-treatment dosimetric check of all IMRT fields. During a complete treatment simulation at the linac, a portal dose image (PDI) is acquired with the EPID for each patient field and compared with a predicted PDI. In this paper, the results of this pre-treatment procedure are analysed, and intercepted errors are reported. An automated image analysis procedure is proposed to limit the number of fields that need human intervention in PDI comparison. Materials and methods: Most of our analyses are performed using the γ index with 3% local dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement as reference values. Scalar parameters are derived from the γ values to summarize the agreement between measured and predicted 2D PDIs. Areas with all pixels having γ values larger than one are evaluated, making decisions based on clinically relevant criteria more straightforward. Results: In 270 patients, the pre-treatment checks revealed four clinically relevant errors. Calculation of statistics for a group of 75 patients showed that the patient-averaged mean γ value inside the field was 0.43 ± 0.13 (1 SD) and only 6.1 ± 6.8% of pixels had a γ value larger than one. With the proposed automated image analysis scheme, visual inspection of images can be avoided in 2/3 of the cases. Conclusion: EPIDs may be used for high accuracy and high resolution routine verification of IMRT fields to intercept clinically relevant dosimetric errors prior to the start of treatment. For the majority of fields, PDI comparison can fully rely on an automated procedure, avoiding excessive workload

  6. MLC quality assurance using EPID: A fitting technique with subpixel precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Li, Harold; Low, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been shown to be a good alternative to radiographic film for routine quality assurance (QA) of multileaf collimator (MLC) positioning accuracy. In this work, we present a method of acquiring an EPID image of a traditional strip-test image using analytical fits of the interleaf and leaf abutment image signatures. After exposure, the EPID image pixel values are divided by an open field image to remove EPID response and radiation field variations. Profiles acquired in the direction orthogonal to the leaf motion exhibit small peaks caused by interleaf leakage. Gaussian profiles are fitted to the interleaf leakage peaks, the results of which are, using multiobjective optimization, used to calculate the image rotational angle with respect to the collimator axis of rotation. The relative angle is used to rotate the image to align the MLC leaf travel to the image pixel axes. The leaf abutments also present peaks that are fitted by heuristic functions, in this case modified Lorentzian functions. The parameters of the Lorentzian functions are used to parameterize the leaf gap width and positions. By imaging a set of MLC fields with varying gaps forming symmetric and asymmetric abutments, calibration curves with regard to relative peak height (RPH) versus nominal gap width are obtained. Based on this calibration data, the individual leaf positions are calculated to compare with the nominal programmed positions. The results demonstrate that the collimator rotation angle can be determined as accurate as 0.01 deg. . A change in MLC gap width of 0.2 mm leads to a change in RPH of about 10%. For asymmetrically produced gaps, a 0.2 mm MLC leaf gap width change causes 0.2 pixel peak position change. Subpixel resolution is obtained by using a parameterized fit of the relatively large abutment peaks. By contrast, for symmetrical gap changes, the peak position remains unchanged with a standard deviation of 0

  7. An assessment of a 3D EPID-based dosimetry system using conventional two- and three-dimensional detectors for VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, S; Dvorak, P; Spevacek, V; Pilarova, K; Bray-Parry, M; Gesner, J; Richmond, A

    2018-01-01

    To provide a 3D dosimetric evaluation of a commercial portal dosimetry system using 2D/3D detectors under ideal conditions using VMAT. A 2D ion chamber array, radiochromic film and gel dosimeter were utilised to provide a dosimetric evaluation of transit phantom and pre-treatment 'fluence' EPID back-projected dose distributions for a standard VMAT plan. In-house 2D and 3D gamma methods compared pass statistics relative to each dosimeter and TPS dose distributions. Fluence mode and transit EPID dose distributions back-projected onto phantom geometry produced 2D gamma pass rates in excess of 97% relative to other tested detectors and exported TPS dose planes when a 3%, 3 mm global gamma criterion was applied. Use of a gel dosimeter within a glass vial allowed comparison of measured 3D dose distributions versus EPID 3D dose and TPS calculated distributions. 3D gamma comparisons between modalities at 3%, 3 mm gave pass rates in excess of 92%. Use of fluence mode was indicative of transit results under ideal conditions with slightly reduced dose definition. 3D EPID back projected dose distributions were validated against detectors in both 2D and 3D. Cross validation of transit dose delivered to a patient is limited due to reasons of practicality and the tests presented are recommended as a guideline for 3D EPID dosimetry commissioning; allowing direct comparison between detector, TPS, fluence and transit modes. The results indicate achievable gamma scores for a complex VMAT plan in a homogenous phantom geometry and contributes to growing experience of 3D EPID dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MO-FG-202-01: A Fast Yet Sensitive EPID-Based Real-Time Treatment Verification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M; Nourzadeh, H; Neal, B; Siebers, J; Watkins, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create a real-time EPID-based treatment verification system which robustly detects treatment delivery and patient attenuation variations. Methods: Treatment plan DICOM files sent to the record-and-verify system are captured and utilized to predict EPID images for each planned control point using a modified GPU-based digitally reconstructed radiograph algorithm which accounts for the patient attenuation, source energy fluence, source size effects, and MLC attenuation. The DICOM and predicted images are utilized by our C++ treatment verification software which compares EPID acquired 1024×768 resolution frames acquired at ∼8.5hz from Varian Truebeam™ system. To maximize detection sensitivity, image comparisons determine (1) if radiation exists outside of the desired treatment field; (2) if radiation is lacking inside the treatment field; (3) if translations, rotations, and magnifications of the image are within tolerance. Acquisition was tested with known test fields and prior patient fields. Error detection was tested in real-time and utilizing images acquired during treatment with another system. Results: The computational time of the prediction algorithms, for a patient plan with 350 control points and 60×60×42cm^3 CT volume, is 2–3minutes on CPU and <27 seconds on GPU for 1024×768 images. The verification software requires a maximum of ∼9ms and ∼19ms for 512×384 and 1024×768 resolution images, respectively, to perform image analysis and dosimetric validations. Typical variations in geometric parameters between reference and the measured images are 0.32°for gantry rotation, 1.006 for scaling factor, and 0.67mm for translation. For excess out-of-field/missing in-field fluence, with masks extending 1mm (at isocenter) from the detected aperture edge, the average total in-field area missing EPID fluence was 1.5mm2 the out-of-field excess EPID fluence was 8mm^2, both below error tolerances. Conclusion: A real-time verification software, with

  9. SU-G-TeP2-01: Can EPID Based Measurement Replace Traditional Daily Output QA On Megavoltage Linac?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Z; Tang, X; Song, Y; Obcemea, C; Beeban, N; Chan, M; Li, X; Tang, G; Lim, S; Lovelock, D; LoSasso, T; Mechalakos, J; Both, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the long term stability and viability of using EPID-based daily output QA via in-house and vendor driven protocol, to replace conventional QA tools and improve QA efficiency. Methods: Two Varian TrueBeam machines (TB1&TB2) equipped with electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) were employed in this study. Both machines were calibrated per TG-51 and used clinically since Oct 2014. Daily output measurement for 6/15 MV beams were obtained using SunNuclear DailyQA3 device as part of morning QA. In addition, in-house protocol was implemented for EPID output measurement (10×10 cm fields, 100 MU, 100cm SID, output defined over an ROI of 2×2 cm around central axis). Moreover, the Varian Machine Performance Check (MPC) was used on both machines to measure machine output. The EPID and DailyQA3 based measurements of the relative machine output were compared and cross-correlated with monthly machine output as measured by an A12 Exradin 0.65cc Ion Chamber (IC) serving as ground truth. The results were correlated using Pearson test. Results: The correlations among DailyQA3, in-house EPID and Varian MPC output measurements, with the IC for 6/15 MV were similar for TB1 (0.83–0.95) and TB2 (0.55–0.67). The machine output for the 6/15MV beams on both machines showed a similar trend, namely an increase over time as indicated by all measurements, requiring a machine recalibration after 6 months. This drift is due to a known issue with pressurized monitor chamber which tends to leak over time. MPC failed occasionally but passed when repeated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the use of EPID for daily output measurements has the potential to become a viable and efficient tool for daily routine LINAC QA, thus eliminating weather (T,P) and human setup variability and increasing efficiency of the QA process.

  10. SU-G-TeP2-01: Can EPID Based Measurement Replace Traditional Daily Output QA On Megavoltage Linac?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Z; Tang, X; Song, Y; Obcemea, C; Beeban, N; Chan, M; Li, X; Tang, G; Lim, S; Lovelock, D; LoSasso, T; Mechalakos, J; Both, S [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the long term stability and viability of using EPID-based daily output QA via in-house and vendor driven protocol, to replace conventional QA tools and improve QA efficiency. Methods: Two Varian TrueBeam machines (TB1&TB2) equipped with electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) were employed in this study. Both machines were calibrated per TG-51 and used clinically since Oct 2014. Daily output measurement for 6/15 MV beams were obtained using SunNuclear DailyQA3 device as part of morning QA. In addition, in-house protocol was implemented for EPID output measurement (10×10 cm fields, 100 MU, 100cm SID, output defined over an ROI of 2×2 cm around central axis). Moreover, the Varian Machine Performance Check (MPC) was used on both machines to measure machine output. The EPID and DailyQA3 based measurements of the relative machine output were compared and cross-correlated with monthly machine output as measured by an A12 Exradin 0.65cc Ion Chamber (IC) serving as ground truth. The results were correlated using Pearson test. Results: The correlations among DailyQA3, in-house EPID and Varian MPC output measurements, with the IC for 6/15 MV were similar for TB1 (0.83–0.95) and TB2 (0.55–0.67). The machine output for the 6/15MV beams on both machines showed a similar trend, namely an increase over time as indicated by all measurements, requiring a machine recalibration after 6 months. This drift is due to a known issue with pressurized monitor chamber which tends to leak over time. MPC failed occasionally but passed when repeated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the use of EPID for daily output measurements has the potential to become a viable and efficient tool for daily routine LINAC QA, thus eliminating weather (T,P) and human setup variability and increasing efficiency of the QA process.

  11. MO-FG-202-01: A Fast Yet Sensitive EPID-Based Real-Time Treatment Verification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M; Nourzadeh, H; Neal, B; Siebers, J [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Watkins, W

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To create a real-time EPID-based treatment verification system which robustly detects treatment delivery and patient attenuation variations. Methods: Treatment plan DICOM files sent to the record-and-verify system are captured and utilized to predict EPID images for each planned control point using a modified GPU-based digitally reconstructed radiograph algorithm which accounts for the patient attenuation, source energy fluence, source size effects, and MLC attenuation. The DICOM and predicted images are utilized by our C++ treatment verification software which compares EPID acquired 1024×768 resolution frames acquired at ∼8.5hz from Varian Truebeam™ system. To maximize detection sensitivity, image comparisons determine (1) if radiation exists outside of the desired treatment field; (2) if radiation is lacking inside the treatment field; (3) if translations, rotations, and magnifications of the image are within tolerance. Acquisition was tested with known test fields and prior patient fields. Error detection was tested in real-time and utilizing images acquired during treatment with another system. Results: The computational time of the prediction algorithms, for a patient plan with 350 control points and 60×60×42cm^3 CT volume, is 2–3minutes on CPU and <27 seconds on GPU for 1024×768 images. The verification software requires a maximum of ∼9ms and ∼19ms for 512×384 and 1024×768 resolution images, respectively, to perform image analysis and dosimetric validations. Typical variations in geometric parameters between reference and the measured images are 0.32°for gantry rotation, 1.006 for scaling factor, and 0.67mm for translation. For excess out-of-field/missing in-field fluence, with masks extending 1mm (at isocenter) from the detected aperture edge, the average total in-field area missing EPID fluence was 1.5mm2 the out-of-field excess EPID fluence was 8mm^2, both below error tolerances. Conclusion: A real-time verification software, with

  12. Use of an amorphous silicon EPID for measuring MLC calibration at varying gantry angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M F; Budgell, G J

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are used to perform routine quality control (QC) checks on the multileaf collimators (MLCs) at this centre. Presently, these checks are performed at gantry angle 0 0 and are considered to be valid for all other angles. Since therapeutic procedures regularly require the delivery of MLC-defined fields to the patient at a wide range of gantry angles, the accuracy of the QC checks at other gantry angles has been investigated. When the gantry is rotated to angles other than 0 0 it was found that the apparent pixel size measured using the EPID varies up to a maximum value of 0.0015 mm per pixel due to a sag in the EPID of up to 9.2 mm. A correction factor was determined using two independent methods at a range of gantry angles between 0 deg. and 360 deg. The EPID was used to measure field sizes (defined by both x-jaws and MLC) at a range of gantry angles and, after this correction had been applied, any residual gravitational sag was studied. It was found that, when fields are defined by the x-jaws and y-back-up jaws, no errors of greater than 0.5 mm were measured and that these errors were no worse when the MLC was used. It was therefore concluded that, provided the correction is applied, measurements of the field size are, in practical terms, unaffected by gantry angle. Experiments were also performed to study how the reproducibility of individual leaves is affected by gantry angle. Measurements of the relative position of each individual leaf (minor offsets) were performed at a range of gantry angles and repeated three times. The position reproducibility was defined by the RMS error in the position of each leaf and this was found to be 0.24 mm and 0.21 mm for the two leaf banks at a gantry angle of 0 0 . When measurements were performed at a range of gantry angles, these reproducibility values remained within 0.09 mm and 0.11 mm. It was therefore concluded that the calibration of the Elekta MLC is stable at

  13. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawoud, S. M., E-mail: samir.dawoud@leedsth.nhs.uk; Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James Institute of Oncology, St. James University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Sykes, J. R. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James Institute of Oncology, St. James University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  14. A quantification of the effectiveness of EPID dosimetry and software-based plan verification systems in detecting incidents in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojechko, Casey; Phillps, Mark; Kalet, Alan; Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 N. E. Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Complex treatments in radiation therapy require robust verification in order to prevent errors that can adversely affect the patient. For this purpose, the authors estimate the effectiveness of detecting errors with a “defense in depth” system composed of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based dosimetry and a software-based system composed of rules-based and Bayesian network verifications. Methods: The authors analyzed incidents with a high potential severity score, scored as a 3 or 4 on a 4 point scale, recorded in an in-house voluntary incident reporting system, collected from February 2012 to August 2014. The incidents were categorized into different failure modes. The detectability, defined as the number of incidents that are detectable divided total number of incidents, was calculated for each failure mode. Results: In total, 343 incidents were used in this study. Of the incidents 67% were related to photon external beam therapy (EBRT). The majority of the EBRT incidents were related to patient positioning and only a small number of these could be detected by EPID dosimetry when performed prior to treatment (6%). A large fraction could be detected by in vivo dosimetry performed during the first fraction (74%). Rules-based and Bayesian network verifications were found to be complimentary to EPID dosimetry, able to detect errors related to patient prescriptions and documentation, and errors unrelated to photon EBRT. Combining all of the verification steps together, 91% of all EBRT incidents could be detected. Conclusions: This study shows that the defense in depth system is potentially able to detect a large majority of incidents. The most effective EPID-based dosimetry verification is in vivo measurements during the first fraction and is complemented by rules-based and Bayesian network plan checking.

  15. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Pankaj, E-mail: pankaj.mishra@varian.com; Mak, Raymond H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Lewis, John H. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Li, Ruijiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. Methods: The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. Results: The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. Conclusions: The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model

  16. SU-E-T-775: Use of Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Quality Assurance (QA) of Electron Beams On Varian Truebeam System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Mutic, S; Goddu, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methods - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems

  17. TU-G-BRD-08: In-Vivo EPID Dosimetry: Quantifying the Detectability of Four Classes of Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, E; Phillips, M; Bojechko, C [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: EPID dosimetry is an emerging method for treatment verification and QA. Given that the in-vivo EPID technique is in clinical use at some centers, we investigate the sensitivity and specificity for detecting different classes of errors. We assess the impact of these errors using dose volume histogram endpoints. Though data exist for EPID dosimetry performed pre-treatment, this is the first study quantifying its effectiveness when used during patient treatment (in-vivo). Methods: We analyzed 17 patients; EPID images of the exit dose were acquired and used to reconstruct the planar dose at isocenter. This dose was compared to the TPS dose using a 3%/3mm gamma criteria. To simulate errors, modifications were made to treatment plans using four possible classes of error: 1) patient misalignment, 2) changes in patient body habitus, 3) machine output changes and 4) MLC misalignments. Each error was applied with varying magnitudes. To assess the detectability of the error, the area under a ROC curve (AUC) was analyzed. The AUC was compared to changes in D99 of the PTV introduced by the simulated error. Results: For systematic changes in the MLC leaves, changes in the machine output and patient habitus, the AUC varied from 0.78–0.97 scaling with the magnitude of the error. The optimal gamma threshold as determined by the ROC curve varied between 84–92%. There was little diagnostic power in detecting random MLC leaf errors and patient shifts (AUC 0.52–0.74). Some errors with weak detectability had large changes in D99. Conclusion: These data demonstrate the ability of EPID-based in-vivo dosimetry in detecting variations in patient habitus and errors related to machine parameters such as systematic MLC misalignments and machine output changes. There was no correlation found between the detectability of the error using the gamma pass rate, ROC analysis and the impact on the dose volume histogram. Funded by grant R18HS022244 from AHRQ.

  18. Verification of the linac isocenter for stereotactic radiosurgery using cine-EPID imaging and arc delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O' Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose:Verification of the mechanical isocenter position is required as part of comprehensive quality assurance programs for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments. Several techniques have been proposed for this purpose but each of them has certain drawbacks. In this paper, a new efficient and more comprehensive method using cine-EPID images has been introduced for automatic verification of the isocenter with sufficient accuracy for stereotactic applications. Methods: Using a circular collimator fixed to the gantry head to define the field, EPID images of a Winston-Lutz phantom were acquired in cine-imaging mode during 360 deg. gantry rotations. A robust matlab code was developed to analyze the data by finding the center of the field and the center of the ball bearing shadow in each image with sub-pixel accuracy. The distance between these two centers was determined for every image. The method was evaluated by comparison to results of a mechanical pointer and also by detection of a manual shift applied to the phantom position. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method were tested and it was also applied to detect couch and collimator wobble during rotation. Results:The accuracy of the algorithm was 0.03 ± 0.02 mm. The repeatability was less than 3 μm and the reproducibility was less than 86 μm. The time elapsed for the analysis of more than 100 cine images of Varian aS1000 and aS500 EPIDs were ∼65 and 20 s, respectively. Processing of images taken in integrated mode took 0.1 s. The output of the analysis software is printable and shows the isocenter shifts as a function of angle in both in-plane and cross-plane directions. It gives warning messages where the shifts exceed the criteria for SRS/SRT and provides useful data for the necessary adjustments in the system including bearing system and/or room lasers. Conclusions: The comprehensive method introduced in this study uses cine-images, is highly accurate, fast, and independent

  19. Verification of the linac isocenter for stereotactic radiosurgery using cine-EPID imaging and arc delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O' Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales 2310, Australia and School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose:Verification of the mechanical isocenter position is required as part of comprehensive quality assurance programs for stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments. Several techniques have been proposed for this purpose but each of them has certain drawbacks. In this paper, a new efficient and more comprehensive method using cine-EPID images has been introduced for automatic verification of the isocenter with sufficient accuracy for stereotactic applications. Methods: Using a circular collimator fixed to the gantry head to define the field, EPID images of a Winston-Lutz phantom were acquired in cine-imaging mode during 360 deg. gantry rotations. A robust matlab code was developed to analyze the data by finding the center of the field and the center of the ball bearing shadow in each image with sub-pixel accuracy. The distance between these two centers was determined for every image. The method was evaluated by comparison to results of a mechanical pointer and also by detection of a manual shift applied to the phantom position. The repeatability and reproducibility of the method were tested and it was also applied to detect couch and collimator wobble during rotation. Results:The accuracy of the algorithm was 0.03 {+-} 0.02 mm. The repeatability was less than 3 {mu}m and the reproducibility was less than 86 {mu}m. The time elapsed for the analysis of more than 100 cine images of Varian aS1000 and aS500 EPIDs were {approx}65 and 20 s, respectively. Processing of images taken in integrated mode took 0.1 s. The output of the analysis software is printable and shows the isocenter shifts as a function of angle in both in-plane and cross-plane directions. It gives warning messages where the shifts exceed the criteria for SRS/SRT and provides useful data for the necessary adjustments in the system including bearing system and/or room lasers. Conclusions: The comprehensive method introduced in this study uses cine-images, is highly accurate, fast, and

  20. Comparison of forward- and back-projection in vivo EPID dosimetry for VMAT treatment of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, James L.; Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke N.

    2018-01-01

    In the forward-projection method of portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the integrated signal at the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is predicted at the time of treatment planning, against which the measured integrated image is compared. In the back-projection method, the measured signal at each gantry angle is back-projected through the patient CT scan to give a measure of total dose to the patient. This study aims to investigate the practical agreement between the two types of EPID dosimetry for prostate radiotherapy. The AutoBeam treatment planning system produced VMAT plans together with corresponding predicted portal images, and a total of 46 sets of gantry-resolved portal images were acquired in 13 patients using an iViewGT portal imager. For the forward-projection method, each acquisition of gantry-resolved images was combined into a single integrated image and compared with the predicted image. For the back-projection method, iViewDose was used to calculate the dose distribution in the patient for comparison with the planned dose. A gamma index for 3% and 3 mm was used for both methods. The results were investigated by delivering the same plans to a phantom and repeating some of the deliveries with deliberately introduced errors. The strongest agreement between forward- and back-projection methods is seen in the isocentric intensity/dose difference, with moderate agreement in the mean gamma. The strongest correlation is observed within a given patient, with less correlation between patients, the latter representing the accuracy of prediction of the two methods. The error study shows that each of the two methods has its own distinct sensitivity to errors, but that overall the response is similar. The forward- and back-projection EPID dosimetry methods show moderate agreement in this series of prostate VMAT patients, indicating that both methods can contribute to the verification of dose delivered to the patient.

  1. Frame average optimization of cine-mode EPID images used for routine clinical in vivo patient dose verification of VMAT deliveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, P. M., E-mail: pmccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada and Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); McCurdy, B. M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The in vivo 3D dose delivered to a patient during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery can be calculated using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. These images must be acquired in cine-mode (i.e., “movie” mode) in order to capture the time-dependent delivery information. The angle subtended by each cine-mode EPID image during an arc can be changed via the frame averaging number selected within the image acquisition software. A large frame average number will decrease the EPID’s angular resolution and will result in a decrease in the accuracy of the dose information contained within each image. Alternatively, less EPID images acquired per delivery will decrease the overall 3D patient dose calculation time, which is appealing for large-scale clinical implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the optimal frame average value per EPID image, defined as the highest frame averaging that can be used without an appreciable loss in 3D dose reconstruction accuracy for VMAT treatments. Methods: Six different VMAT plans and six different SBRT-VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Delivery was carried out on a Varian 2300ix model linear accelerator (Linac) equipped with an aS1000 EPID running at a frame acquisition rate of 7.5 Hz. An additional PC was set up at the Linac console area, equipped with specialized frame-grabber hardware and software packages allowing continuous acquisition of all EPID frames during delivery. Frames were averaged into “frame-averaged” EPID images using MATLAB. Each frame-averaged data set was used to calculate the in vivo dose to the patient and then compared to the single EPID frame in vivo dose calculation (the single frame calculation represents the highest possible angular resolution per EPID image). A mean percentage dose difference of low dose (<20% prescription dose) and high dose regions (>80% prescription dose) was calculated for each frame averaged

  2. Frame average optimization of cine-mode EPID images used for routine clinical in vivo patient dose verification of VMAT deliveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCowan, P. M.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The in vivo 3D dose delivered to a patient during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery can be calculated using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. These images must be acquired in cine-mode (i.e., “movie” mode) in order to capture the time-dependent delivery information. The angle subtended by each cine-mode EPID image during an arc can be changed via the frame averaging number selected within the image acquisition software. A large frame average number will decrease the EPID’s angular resolution and will result in a decrease in the accuracy of the dose information contained within each image. Alternatively, less EPID images acquired per delivery will decrease the overall 3D patient dose calculation time, which is appealing for large-scale clinical implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the optimal frame average value per EPID image, defined as the highest frame averaging that can be used without an appreciable loss in 3D dose reconstruction accuracy for VMAT treatments. Methods: Six different VMAT plans and six different SBRT-VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Delivery was carried out on a Varian 2300ix model linear accelerator (Linac) equipped with an aS1000 EPID running at a frame acquisition rate of 7.5 Hz. An additional PC was set up at the Linac console area, equipped with specialized frame-grabber hardware and software packages allowing continuous acquisition of all EPID frames during delivery. Frames were averaged into “frame-averaged” EPID images using MATLAB. Each frame-averaged data set was used to calculate the in vivo dose to the patient and then compared to the single EPID frame in vivo dose calculation (the single frame calculation represents the highest possible angular resolution per EPID image). A mean percentage dose difference of low dose ( 80% prescription dose) was calculated for each frame averaged scenario for each plan. The authors defined their

  3. TU-C-BRE-10: A Streamlined Approach to EPID Transit Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, B; Fontenot, J [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a simple and efficient transit dosimetry method using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dose delivery error detection and prevention. Methods: In the proposed method, 2D reference transit images are generated for comparison with online images acquired during treatment. Reference transit images are generated by convolving through-air EPID measurements of each field with pixel-specific kernels selected from a library of pre-calculated Monte Carlo pencil kernels of varying radiological thickness. The kernel used for each pixel is selected based on the calculated radiological thickness of the patient along a line joining the pixel and the virtual source. The accuracy of the technique was evaluated in flat homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic water phantoms, a heterogeneous cylindrical phantom, and an anthropomorphic head phantom. Gamma criteria of 3%/3 mm was used to quantify the accuracy of the technique for the various cases. Results: An average of 99.9% and 99.7% of the points in the comparison between the measured and predicted images passed a 3%/3mm gamma for the homogeneous and heterogeneous plastic water phantoms, respectively. 97.1% of the points passed for the analysis of the heterogeneous cylindrical phantom. For the anthropomorphic head phantom, an average of 97.8% of points passed the 3%/3mm gamma criteria for all field sizes. Failures were observed primarily in areas of drastic thickness or material changes and at the edges of the fields. Conclusion: The data suggest that the proposed transit dosimetry method is a feasible approach to in vivo dose monitoring. Future research efforts could include implementation for more complex fields and sensitivity testing of the method to setup errors and changes in anatomy. Oncology Data Systems provided partial funding support but did not participate in the collection or analysis of data.

  4. Commissioning and quality assurance for VMAT delivery systems: An efficient time-resolved system using real-time EPID imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwan, Benjamin J; Barnes, Michael P; Hindmarsh, Jonathan; Lim, Seng B; Lovelock, Dale M; Fuangrod, Todsaporn; O'Connor, Daryl J; Keall, Paul J; Greer, Peter B

    2017-08-01

    speed exhibited less profile stability. MLC positional accuracy was not observed to be dependent on the degree of interdigitation. MLC speed was measured for each individual leaf and slower leaf speeds were shown to be compensated for by lower dose rates. The test procedures were found to be sensitive to 1 mm systematic MLC errors, 1 mm random MLC errors, 0.4 mm MLC gap errors and synchronization errors between the MLC, dose rate and gantry angle controls systems of 1°. In general, parameters measured by both EPID and log files agreed with the plan, however, a greater average departure from the plan was evidenced by the EPID measurements. QA test plans and analysis methods have been developed to assess the performance of each dynamic component of VMAT deliveries individually and as a function of gantry angle. This methodology relies solely on time-resolved EPID imaging without the presence of a phantom and has been shown to be sensitive to a range of delivery errors. The procedures developed in this work are both comprehensive and time-efficient and can be used for streamlined commissioning and QA of VMAT delivery systems. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  6. The impact of cine EPID image acquisition frame rate on markerless soft-tissue tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, Stephen; Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor autotracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87 Hz with an amorphous silicon portal imager (AS1000, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The maximum frame rate of 12.87 Hz is imposed by the EPID. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for autotracking. The difference between the programmed and autotracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at 11 field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise are correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the autotracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29 Hz. Above 4.29 Hz, changes in errors were negligible withδ < 1.60 mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R = 0.94) and patient studies (R = 0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R −0.58 and −0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusions: Cine EPID

  7. SU-G-BRB-10: New Generation of High Frame-Rate and High Spatial-Resolution EPID QA System for Full-Body MLC-Based Robotic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B; Xing, L; Wang, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically investigate an ultra-high spatial-resolution amorphous silicon flat-panel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for MLC-based full-body robotic radiosurgery geometric and dosimetric quality assurance (QA). Methods: The high frame-rate and ultra-high spatial resolution EPID is an outstanding detector for measuring profiles, MLC-shaped radiosurgery field aperture verification, and small field dosimetry. A Monte Carlo based technique with a robotic linac specific response and calibration is developed to convert a raw EPID-measured image of a radiosurgery field into water-based dose distribution. The technique is applied to measure output factors and profiles for 6MV MLC-defined radiosurgery fields with various sizes ranging from 7.6mm×7.7mm to 100mm×100.1mm and the results are compared with the radiosurgery diode scan measurements in water tank. The EPID measured field sizes and the penumbra regions are analyzed to evaluate the MLC positioning accuracy. Results: For all MLC fields, the EPID measured output factors of MLC-shaped fields are in good agreement with the diode measurements. The mean output difference between the EPID and diode measurement is 0.05±0.87%. The max difference is −1.33% for 7.6mm×7.7mm field. The MLC field size derived from the EPID measurements are in good agreement comparing to the diode scan result. For crossline field sizes, the mean difference is −0.17mm±0.14mm with a maximum of −0.35mm for the 30.8mm×30.8mm field. For inline field sizes, the mean difference is +0.08mm±0.18mm with a maximum of +0.45mm for the 100mm×100.1mm field. The high resolution EPID is able to measure the whole radiation field, without the need to align the detector center perfectly at field center as diode or ion chamber measurement. The setup time is greatly reduced so that the whole process is possible for machine and patient-specific QA. Conclusion: The high spatial-resolution EPID is proved to be an accurate and efficient

  8. Online 3D EPID-based dose verification: Proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel, E-mail: r.rozendaal@nki.nl; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; González, Patrick; Mans, Anton; Mijnheer, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Herk, Marcel van [University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Delivery errors during radiotherapy may lead to medical harm and reduced life expectancy for patients. Such serious incidents can be avoided by performing dose verification online, i.e., while the patient is being irradiated, creating the possibility of halting the linac in case of a large overdosage or underdosage. The offline EPID-based 3D in vivo dosimetry system clinically employed at our institute is in principle suited for online treatment verification, provided the system is able to complete 3D dose reconstruction and verification within 420 ms, the present acquisition time of a single EPID frame. It is the aim of this study to show that our EPID-based dosimetry system can be made fast enough to achieve online 3D in vivo dose verification. Methods: The current dose verification system was sped up in two ways. First, a new software package was developed to perform all computations that are not dependent on portal image acquisition separately, thus removing the need for doing these calculations in real time. Second, the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm was sped up via a new, multithreaded implementation. Dose verification was implemented by comparing planned with reconstructed 3D dose distributions delivered to two regions in a patient: the target volume and the nontarget volume receiving at least 10 cGy. In both volumes, the mean dose is compared, while in the nontarget volume, the near-maximum dose (D2) is compared as well. The real-time dosimetry system was tested by irradiating an anthropomorphic phantom with three VMAT plans: a 6 MV head-and-neck treatment plan, a 10 MV rectum treatment plan, and a 10 MV prostate treatment plan. In all plans, two types of serious delivery errors were introduced. The functionality of automatically halting the linac was also implemented and tested. Results: The precomputation time per treatment was ∼180 s/treatment arc, depending on gantry angle resolution. The complete processing of a single portal frame

  9. Online 3D EPID-based dose verification: Proof of concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; González, Patrick; Mans, Anton; Mijnheer, Ben; Herk, Marcel van

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Delivery errors during radiotherapy may lead to medical harm and reduced life expectancy for patients. Such serious incidents can be avoided by performing dose verification online, i.e., while the patient is being irradiated, creating the possibility of halting the linac in case of a large overdosage or underdosage. The offline EPID-based 3D in vivo dosimetry system clinically employed at our institute is in principle suited for online treatment verification, provided the system is able to complete 3D dose reconstruction and verification within 420 ms, the present acquisition time of a single EPID frame. It is the aim of this study to show that our EPID-based dosimetry system can be made fast enough to achieve online 3D in vivo dose verification. Methods: The current dose verification system was sped up in two ways. First, a new software package was developed to perform all computations that are not dependent on portal image acquisition separately, thus removing the need for doing these calculations in real time. Second, the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm was sped up via a new, multithreaded implementation. Dose verification was implemented by comparing planned with reconstructed 3D dose distributions delivered to two regions in a patient: the target volume and the nontarget volume receiving at least 10 cGy. In both volumes, the mean dose is compared, while in the nontarget volume, the near-maximum dose (D2) is compared as well. The real-time dosimetry system was tested by irradiating an anthropomorphic phantom with three VMAT plans: a 6 MV head-and-neck treatment plan, a 10 MV rectum treatment plan, and a 10 MV prostate treatment plan. In all plans, two types of serious delivery errors were introduced. The functionality of automatically halting the linac was also implemented and tested. Results: The precomputation time per treatment was ∼180 s/treatment arc, depending on gantry angle resolution. The complete processing of a single portal frame

  10. Feasibility study on the verification of actual beam delivery in a treatment room using EPID transit dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Tae Seong; Chung, Eun Ji; Son, Jaeman; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of transit dosimetry using commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) with simple calibration method to verify the beam delivery based on detection of large errors in treatment room. Twenty four fields of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were selected from four lung cancer patients and used in the irradiation of an anthropomorphic phantom. The proposed method was evaluated by comparing the calculated dose map from TPS and EPID measurement on the same plane using a gamma index method with a 3% dose and 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit. In a simulation using a homogeneous plastic water phantom, performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, the average passing rate of the transit dose based on gamma index was high enough, averaging 94.2% when there was no error during beam delivery. The passing rate of the transit dose for 24 IMRT fields was lower with the anthropomorphic phantom, averaging 86.8% ± 3.8%, a reduction partially due to the inaccuracy of TPS calculations for inhomogeneity. Compared with the TPS, the absolute value of the transit dose at the beam center differed by −0.38% ± 2.1%. The simulation study indicated that the passing rate of the gamma index was significantly reduced, to less than 40%, when a wrong field was erroneously irradiated to patient in the treatment room. This feasibility study suggested that transit dosimetry based on the calculation with commercial TPS and EPID measurement with simple calibration can provide information about large errors for treatment beam delivery

  11. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  12. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  13. Investigations on uncertainties in patient positioning for prostate treatment with EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakai, A.; Nuesslin, F.; Paulsen, F.; Plasswilm, L.; Bamberg, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Conformal radiotherapy techniques as used in prostate treatment allow to spare normal tissue by conforming the radiation fields to the shape of the planning target volume (PTV). To be able to fully utilize the advantages of these techniques correct patient positioning is an important prerequisite. This study employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) investigated the positioning uncertainties that occur in the pelvic region for different patient positioning devices. Patients and Methods: 15 patients with prostate cancer were irradiated with or without rectal balloon/pelvic mask at a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator (MLC). For each patient multiple portal images were taken from different directions and compared to the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the treatment planning system and to simulation films (Table 1, Figure 1). Results: In spite of different positioning devices, all patients showed comparable total positioning uncertainties of 4.0 mm (lateral), 4.5 mm (cranio-caudal) and 1.7 mm (dorso-ventral). The lateral positioning error was reduced for the pelvic mask patients while the cranio-caudal error increased (Table 2, Figure 2). A systematic and a random component sum up to the total positioning error, and a good estimate of the magnitudes of the two is possible from six to eight portal images (Figure 3). Conclusions: With a small number of portal images it is possible to find out the systematic and random positioning error of a patient. Knowledge of the random error can be used to resize the treatment margin which is clinically relevant since this error differs greatly for different patients (Figure 4). Image analysis with EPID is convenient, yet has some problems. For example, one only gets indirect information on the movement of the ventral rectum wall. The successful operation of positioning devices, although, needs further improvement - especially if one focuses on IMRT. (orig.) [de

  14. SU-E-T-139: Automated Daily EPID Exit Dose Analysis Uncovers Treatment Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a fully automated EPID exit dose system for its ability to detect daily treatment deviations including patient setup, delivery, and anatomy changes. Methods: PerFRACTION (Sun Nuclear Corporation) software is a system that uses integrated EPID images taken during patient treatment and automatically pulled from the Aria database and analyzed based on user-defined comparisons. This was used to monitor 20 plans consisting of a total of 859 fields for 18 patients, for a total of 251 fractions. Nine VMAT, 5 IMRT, and 6 3D plans were monitored. The Gamma analysis was performed for each field within a plan, comparing the first fraction against each of the other fractions in each treatment course. A 2% dose difference, 1 mm distance-to-agreement, and 10% dose threshold was used. These tight tolerances were chosen to achieve a high sensitivity to treatment variations. The field passed if 93% of the pixels had a Gamma of 1 or less. Results: Twenty-nine percent of the fields failed. The average plan passing rate was 92.5%.The average 3D plan passing rate was less than for VMAT or IMRT, 84%, vs. an average of 96.2%. When fields failed, an investigation revealed changes in patient anatomy or setup variations, often also leading to variations of transmission through immobilization devices. Conclusion: PerFRACTION is a fully automated system for determining daily changes in dose transmission through the patient that requires no effort other than for the imager panel to be deployed during treatment. A surprising number of fields failed the analysis and can be attributed to important treatment variations that would otherwise not be appreciated. Further study of inter-fraction treatment variations is possible and warranted. Sun Nuclear Corporation provided a license to the software described.

  15. MO-FG-202-07: Real-Time EPID-Based Detection Metric For VMAT Delivery Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passarge, M; Fix, M K; Manser, P; Stampanoni, M F M; Siebers, J V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create and test an accurate EPID-frame-based VMAT QA metric to detect gross dose errors in real-time and to provide information about the source of error. Methods: A Swiss cheese model was created for an EPID-based real-time QA process. The system compares a treatmentplan- based reference set of EPID images with images acquired over each 2° gantry angle interval. The metric utilizes a sequence of independent consecutively executed error detection Methods: a masking technique that verifies infield radiation delivery and ensures no out-of-field radiation; output normalization checks at two different stages; global image alignment to quantify rotation, scaling and translation; standard gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) and pixel intensity deviation checks including and excluding high dose gradient regions. Tolerances for each test were determined. For algorithm testing, twelve different types of errors were selected to modify the original plan. Corresponding predictions for each test case were generated, which included measurement-based noise. Each test case was run multiple times (with different noise per run) to assess the ability to detect introduced errors. Results: Averaged over five test runs, 99.1% of all plan variations that resulted in patient dose errors were detected within 2° and 100% within 4° (∼1% of patient dose delivery). Including cases that led to slightly modified but clinically equivalent plans, 91.5% were detected by the system within 2°. Based on the type of method that detected the error, determination of error sources was achieved. Conclusion: An EPID-based during-treatment error detection system for VMAT deliveries was successfully designed and tested. The system utilizes a sequence of methods to identify and prevent gross treatment delivery errors. The system was inspected for robustness with realistic noise variations, demonstrating that it has the potential to detect a large majority of errors in real-time and indicate the error

  16. MO-FG-202-07: Real-Time EPID-Based Detection Metric For VMAT Delivery Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passarge, M; Fix, M K; Manser, P [Division of Medical Radiation Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Stampanoni, M F M [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zurich, and PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Siebers, J V [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To create and test an accurate EPID-frame-based VMAT QA metric to detect gross dose errors in real-time and to provide information about the source of error. Methods: A Swiss cheese model was created for an EPID-based real-time QA process. The system compares a treatmentplan- based reference set of EPID images with images acquired over each 2° gantry angle interval. The metric utilizes a sequence of independent consecutively executed error detection Methods: a masking technique that verifies infield radiation delivery and ensures no out-of-field radiation; output normalization checks at two different stages; global image alignment to quantify rotation, scaling and translation; standard gamma evaluation (3%, 3 mm) and pixel intensity deviation checks including and excluding high dose gradient regions. Tolerances for each test were determined. For algorithm testing, twelve different types of errors were selected to modify the original plan. Corresponding predictions for each test case were generated, which included measurement-based noise. Each test case was run multiple times (with different noise per run) to assess the ability to detect introduced errors. Results: Averaged over five test runs, 99.1% of all plan variations that resulted in patient dose errors were detected within 2° and 100% within 4° (∼1% of patient dose delivery). Including cases that led to slightly modified but clinically equivalent plans, 91.5% were detected by the system within 2°. Based on the type of method that detected the error, determination of error sources was achieved. Conclusion: An EPID-based during-treatment error detection system for VMAT deliveries was successfully designed and tested. The system utilizes a sequence of methods to identify and prevent gross treatment delivery errors. The system was inspected for robustness with realistic noise variations, demonstrating that it has the potential to detect a large majority of errors in real-time and indicate the error

  17. Suitability of markerless EPID tracking for tumor position verification in gated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpa, Marco; Baier, Kurt; Guckenberger, Matthias; Cremers, Florian; Meyer, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To maximize the benefits of respiratory gated radiotherapy (RGRT) of lung tumors real-time verification of the tumor position is required. This work investigates the feasibility of markerless tracking of lung tumors during beam-on time in electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images of the MV therapeutic beam. Methods: EPID movies were acquired at ∼2 fps for seven lung cancer patients with tumor peak-to-peak motion ranges between 7.8 and 17.9 mm (mean: 13.7 mm) undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy. The external breathing motion of the abdomen was synchronously measured. Both datasets were retrospectively analyzed inPortalTrack, an in-house developed tracking software. The authors define a three-step procedure to run the simulations: (1) gating window definition, (2) gated-beam delivery simulation, and (3) tumor tracking. First, an amplitude threshold level was set on the external signal, defining the onset of beam-on/-off signals. This information was then mapped onto a sequence of EPID images to generate stamps of beam-on/-hold periods throughout the EPID movies in PortalTrack, by obscuring the frames corresponding to beam-off times. Last, tumor motion in the superior-inferior direction was determined on portal images by the tracking algorithm during beam-on time. The residual motion inside the gating window as well as target coverage (TC) and the marginal target displacement (MTD) were used as measures to quantify tumor position variability. Results: Tumor position monitoring and estimation from beam's-eye-view images during RGRT was possible in 67% of the analyzed beams. For a reference gating window of 5 mm, deviations ranging from 2% to 86% (35% on average) were recorded between the reference and measured residual motion. TC (range: 62%–93%; mean: 77%) losses were correlated with false positives incidence rates resulting mostly from intra-/inter-beam baseline drifts, as well as sudden cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in exhale positions. Both

  18. Investigation of the dosimetric properties of an a-Si flat panel epid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, A.L.; Jahangir, S.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are primarily used as an electronic replacement for film to verify the set-up of radiotherapy patients based on imaged anatomy. There has recently been much interest in the use of amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel EPIDs for dosimetric verification in radiotherapy. The work presented here has been carried out to determine their suitability for dosimetric applications by investigating some of the basic response characteristics and the implications these might have. The measurements reported in this paper were performed using 6-MV photon beams from an Elekta Precise linear accelerator fitted with Elekta iViewGT amorphous silicon flat panel EPIDs. Measurements were performed to investigate the response of the EPID as a function of exposure and field size. Similar measurements were made with an ionisation chamber for comparison. Further measurements were carried out to investigate the response of the EPID to multiple low dose exposures (e.g. 5x2 MU) such as might be encountered in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). This was compared with the response to a single high dose exposure (e.g. 10 MU) and repeated for a range of exposures. The results show the response of the EPID, to a good approximation, to be linear with dose over the range of 1 -200 MU. However, 'under-responses' in the EPID of up to 5% were seen at the lowest exposures. For multiple low dose segments the sum of the EPID responses was found to be less than the response to the same total exposure in a single large segment. This effect reduces with increase in the magnitude of the low dose segments. The variation in EPID response with field size was found to be greater than that indicated by the ionisation chamber. The results show that the a-Si detector responds to dose, to a good approximation, in a linear manner. The EPID under-response at low doses is thought to be related to the so called ghosting effect. Each image frame has a residual

  19. SU-F-T-486: A Simple Approach to Performing Light Versus Radiation Field Coincidence Quality Assurance Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herchko, S; Ding, G [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an accurate, straightforward, and user-independent method for performing light versus radiation field coincidence quality assurance utilizing EPID images, a simple phantom made of readily-accessible materials, and a free software program. Methods: A simple phantom consisting of a blocking tray, graph paper, and high-density wire was constructed. The phantom was used to accurately set the size of a desired light field and imaged on the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A macro written for use in ImageJ, a free image processing software, was then use to determine the radiation field size utilizing the high density wires on the phantom for a pixel to distance calibration. The macro also performs an analysis on the measured radiation field utilizing the tolerances recommended in the AAPM Task Group #142. To verify the accuracy of this method, radiochromic film was used to qualitatively demonstrate agreement between the film and EPID results, and an additional ImageJ macro was used to quantitatively compare the radiation field sizes measured both with the EPID and film images. Results: The results of this technique were benchmarked against film measurements, which have been the gold standard for testing light versus radiation field coincidence. The agreement between this method and film measurements were within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: Due to the operator dependency associated with tracing light fields and measuring radiation fields by hand when using film, this method allows for a more accurate comparison between the light and radiation fields with minimal operator dependency. Removing the need for radiographic or radiochromic film also eliminates a reoccurring cost and increases procedural efficiency.

  20. SU-F-T-486: A Simple Approach to Performing Light Versus Radiation Field Coincidence Quality Assurance Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herchko, S; Ding, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an accurate, straightforward, and user-independent method for performing light versus radiation field coincidence quality assurance utilizing EPID images, a simple phantom made of readily-accessible materials, and a free software program. Methods: A simple phantom consisting of a blocking tray, graph paper, and high-density wire was constructed. The phantom was used to accurately set the size of a desired light field and imaged on the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A macro written for use in ImageJ, a free image processing software, was then use to determine the radiation field size utilizing the high density wires on the phantom for a pixel to distance calibration. The macro also performs an analysis on the measured radiation field utilizing the tolerances recommended in the AAPM Task Group #142. To verify the accuracy of this method, radiochromic film was used to qualitatively demonstrate agreement between the film and EPID results, and an additional ImageJ macro was used to quantitatively compare the radiation field sizes measured both with the EPID and film images. Results: The results of this technique were benchmarked against film measurements, which have been the gold standard for testing light versus radiation field coincidence. The agreement between this method and film measurements were within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: Due to the operator dependency associated with tracing light fields and measuring radiation fields by hand when using film, this method allows for a more accurate comparison between the light and radiation fields with minimal operator dependency. Removing the need for radiographic or radiochromic film also eliminates a reoccurring cost and increases procedural efficiency.

  1. SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bawazeer, O; Deb, P [RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Sarasanandarajah, S [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Herath, S; Kron, T [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in cine mode particularly considering linearity with delivered dose, dose rate, field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed and common IMRT fields. Methods: The EPID that attached to a Varian Clinac 21iX linear accelerator, was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV using 600 MU/min. Image acquisition is controlled by the IAS3 software, Trigger delay was 6 ms, BeamOnDelay and FrameStartDelay were zero. Different frame rates were utilized. Cine mode response was calculated using MATLAB as summation of mean pixel values in a region of interest of the acquired images. The performance of cine mode was compared to integrated mode and dose measurements in water using CC13 ionization chamber. Results: Figure1 illustrates that cine mode has nonlinear response for small MU, when delivering 10 MU was about 0.5 and 0.64 for 6 and 18 MV respectively. This is because the missing acquired images that were calculated around four images missing in each delivery. With the increase MU the response became linear and comparable with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2%. Figure 2 shows that cine mode has comparable response with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2% with changing dose rate for 10 MU delivered. This indicates that the dose rate change has no effect on nonlinearity of cine mode response. Except nonlinearity, cine mode is well matched to integrated mode response within 2% for field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed dependences. Conclusion: Cine mode has similar dosimetric characteristics to integrated mode with open and IMRT fields, and the main limitation with cine mode is missing images. Therefore, the calibration of EPID images with this mode should be run with large MU, and when IMRT verification field has low MU, the correction for missing images are required.

  2. SU-F-T-263: Dosimetric Characteristics of the Cine Acquisition Mode of An A-Si EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bawazeer, O; Deb, P; Sarasanandarajah, S; Herath, S; Kron, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of Varian a-Si-500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in cine mode particularly considering linearity with delivered dose, dose rate, field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed and common IMRT fields. Methods: The EPID that attached to a Varian Clinac 21iX linear accelerator, was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV using 600 MU/min. Image acquisition is controlled by the IAS3 software, Trigger delay was 6 ms, BeamOnDelay and FrameStartDelay were zero. Different frame rates were utilized. Cine mode response was calculated using MATLAB as summation of mean pixel values in a region of interest of the acquired images. The performance of cine mode was compared to integrated mode and dose measurements in water using CC13 ionization chamber. Results: Figure1 illustrates that cine mode has nonlinear response for small MU, when delivering 10 MU was about 0.5 and 0.64 for 6 and 18 MV respectively. This is because the missing acquired images that were calculated around four images missing in each delivery. With the increase MU the response became linear and comparable with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2%. Figure 2 shows that cine mode has comparable response with integrated mode and ionization chamber within 2% with changing dose rate for 10 MU delivered. This indicates that the dose rate change has no effect on nonlinearity of cine mode response. Except nonlinearity, cine mode is well matched to integrated mode response within 2% for field size, phantom thickness, MLC speed dependences. Conclusion: Cine mode has similar dosimetric characteristics to integrated mode with open and IMRT fields, and the main limitation with cine mode is missing images. Therefore, the calibration of EPID images with this mode should be run with large MU, and when IMRT verification field has low MU, the correction for missing images are required.

  3. Application of an EPID for fast daily dosimetric quality control of a fully computer-controlled treatment unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirkx, M.L.P.; Kroonwijk, M.; De Boer, J.C.J.; Heijmen, B.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The MM50 Racetrack Microtron, suited for sophisticated three-dimensional computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy techniques, is a complex treatment unit in various respects. Therefore, for a number of gantry angles, daily quality control of the absolute output and the profiles of the scanned photon beams in mandatory. A fast method for these daily checks, based on dosimetric measurements with the Philips SRI-100 Electronic Portal Imaging Device, has been developed and tested. Open beams are checked for four different gantry angles; for gantry angle 0, a wedged field is checked as well. The fields are set up one after another under full computer control. Performing and analyzing the measurements takes about ten minutes. The applied EPID has favourable characteristics for dosimetric quality control measurements: absolute measurements reproduce within 0.5% (1 SD) and the reproducibility of a relative (2-D) fluence profile is 0.2% (1 SD). The day-to-day sensitivity stability over a period of a month is 0.6% (1 SD). EPID-signals are within 0.2% linear with the applied dose. The 2-D fluence profile of the 25 MV photon beam of the MM50 is very stable in time: during a period of one year, a maximum fluctuation of 2.6% was observed. Once, a deviation in the cGy/MU-value of 6% was detected. Only because of the performed morning quality control checks with the EPID, erroneous dose delivery to patients could be avoided; there is no interlock in the MM50-system that would have prevented patient treatment. Based on our experiences and on clinical requirements regarding the acceptability of deviations of beam characteristics, a protocol has been developed including action levels for additional investigations. Studies on the application of the SRI-100 for in vivo dosimetry on the MM50 have been started

  4. Application of an EPID for fast daily dosimetric quality control of a fully computer-controlled treatment unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirkx, M L.P.; Kroonwijk, M; De Boer, J C.J.; Heijmen, B J.M. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    The MM50 Racetrack Microtron, suited for sophisticated three-dimensional computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy techniques, is a complex treatment unit in various respects. Therefore, for a number of gantry angles, daily quality control of the absolute output and the profiles of the scanned photon beams in mandatory. A fast method for these daily checks, based on dosimetric measurements with the Philips SRI-100 Electronic Portal Imaging Device, has been developed and tested. Open beams are checked for four different gantry angles; for gantry angle 0, a wedged field is checked as well. The fields are set up one after another under full computer control. Performing and analyzing the measurements takes about ten minutes. The applied EPID has favourable characteristics for dosimetric quality control measurements: absolute measurements reproduce within 0.5% (1 SD) and the reproducibility of a relative (2-D) fluence profile is 0.2% (1 SD). The day-to-day sensitivity stability over a period of a month is 0.6% (1 SD). EPID-signals are within 0.2% linear with the applied dose. The 2-D fluence profile of the 25 MV photon beam of the MM50 is very stable in time: during a period of one year, a maximum fluctuation of 2.6% was observed. Once, a deviation in the cGy/MU-value of 6% was detected. Only because of the performed morning quality control checks with the EPID, erroneous dose delivery to patients could be avoided; there is no interlock in the MM50-system that would have prevented patient treatment. Based on our experiences and on clinical requirements regarding the acceptability of deviations of beam characteristics, a protocol has been developed including action levels for additional investigations. Studies on the application of the SRI-100 for in vivo dosimetry on the MM50 have been started.

  5. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases. This work was partly presented at the 58th Annual meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-21

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases.

  7. Assessment of an amorphous silicon EPID for quality assurance of enhanced dynamic wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Routine quality assurance (QA) of enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) is usually performed weekly to monthly. Wedge factors are measured with ion-chamber, and profiles usually with diode-arrays such as the Profiler. The use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for these measurements would combine these into a single rapid set-up and measurement. Currently the Varian EPID in standard imaging mode will not acquire integrated images during EDW treatments, and therefore has not been utilised for EDW dosimetry. Modification to image acquisition was made to enable imaging for EDW, and the performance of the EPID for suitability for quality assurance of EDW was investigated. The accuracy of EDW profiles measured with the EPID were assessed by comparison to Profiler measurements. The EPID was positioned at 105 cm to the detector surface, with 4 cm of additional solid water build-up to give total build-up including EPID inherent build-up of 5 cm. Images of EDW fields were acquired with continuous frame-averaging throughout the delivery. Field sizes of 10x10 cm, and 20x20 cm were used for 30 deg and 60 deg wedge angles for both 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays. Profiler measurements of the same fields were made with 5 cm of solid water build-up with 105 cm to the detector. Profiles in the wedged direction along the central axis of the beam were then compared. The reproducibility of the EPID measured profiles was assessed by three measurements made at weekly intervals. The accuracy of EPID measured wedge factors was investigated with the same experimental set-up. Three images of a 10x10 cm open field were acquired, and the mean pixel value in a 9x9 pixel region at the central axis was found. As the pixel value is the average of all acquired frames, this was multiplied by the number of frames to yield an integrated pixel value. This was repeated for three 10x10 cm 60 deg wedge irradiations. The wedge factor measured with the EPID was then compared to routine weekly

  8. SU-E-T-164: Clinical Implementation of ASi EPID Panels for QA of IMRT/VMAT Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosier, K; Wu, C; Beck, K; Radevic, M; Asche, D; Bareng, J; Kroner, A; Lehmann, J; Logsdon, M; Dutton, S; Rosenthal, S

    2012-06-01

    To investigate various issues for clinical implementation of aSi EPID panels for IMRT/VMAT QA. Six linacs are used in our clinic for EPID-based plan QA; two Varian Truebeams, two Varian 2100 series, two Elekta Infiniti series. Multiple corrections must be accounted for in the calibration of each panel for dosimetric use. Varian aSi panels are calibrated with standard dark field, flood field, and 40×40 diagonal profile for beam profile correction. Additional corrections to account for off-axis and support arm backscatter are needed for larger field sizes. Since Elekta iViewGT system does not export gantry angle with images, a third-party inclinometer must be physically mounted to back of linac gantry and synchronized with data acquisition via iViewGT PC clock. A T/2 offset correctly correlates image and gantry angle for arc plans due to iView image time stamp at the end of data acquisition for each image. For both Varian and Elekta panels, a 5 MU 10×10 calibration field is used to account for the nonlinear MU to dose response at higher energies. Acquired EPID images are deconvolved via a high pass filter in Fourier space and resultant fluence maps are used to reconstruct a 3D dose 'delivered' to patient using DosimetryCheck. Results are compared to patient 3D dose computed by TPS using a 3D-gamma analysis. 120 IMRT and 100 VMAT cases are reported. Two 3D gamma quantities (Gamma(V10) and Gamma(PTV)) are proposed for evaluating QA results. The Gamma(PTV) is sensitive to MLC offsets while Gamma(V10) is sensitive to gantry rotations. When a 3mm/3% criteria and 90% or higher 3D gamma pass rate is used, all IMRT and 90% of VMAT QA pass QA. After appropriate calibration of aSi panels and setup of image acquisition systems, EPID based 3D dose reconstruction method is found clinically feasible. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. SU-C-BRD-06: Sensitivity Study of An Automated System to Acquire and Analyze EPID Exit Dose Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A; Zhuang, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric consequences of errors in patient setup or beam delivery and anatomical changes are not readily known. A new product, PerFRACTION (Sun Nuclear Corporation), is designed to detect these errors by comparing the EPID exit dose image from each field of each fraction to those from baseline fraction images. This work investigates the sensitivity of PerFRACTION to detect the deviation of induced errors in a variety of realistic scenarios. Methods: Eight plans were created mimicking potential delivery or setup errors. The plans consisted of a nominal field and the field with an induced error. These were used to irradiate the EPID simulating multiple fractions with and without the error. Integrated EPID images were acquired in clinical mode and saved in ARIA. PerFRACTION automatically pulls the images into its database and performs the user defined comparison. In some cases, images were manually pushed to PerFRACTION. We varied the distance-to-agreement or dose tolerance until PerFRACTION showed failing pixels in the affected region and recorded the values. We induced errors of 1mm and greater in jaw, MLC, and couch position, 2 degree collimation rotation (patient yaw), and 0.5% to 1.5% in machine output. Both static and arc fields with the rails in or out were also acquired and compared. Results: PerFRACTION detected position errors of the jaws, MLC, and couch with an accuracy of better than 0.5 mm, and 0.2 degrees for collimator and gantry error. PerFRACTION detected a machine output error within 0.2% and detected the change in rail position. Conclusion: A new automated system for monitoring daily treatments for machine or patient variations from the first fraction using integrated EPID images was found to be sensitive enough to detect small positional, angular, and dosimetric errors within 0.5mm, 0.2 degrees, and 0.2%, respectively. Sun Nuclear Corporation has provided a software license for the product described.

  10. SU-F-SPS-06: Implementation of a Back-Projection Algorithm for 2D in Vivo Dosimetry with An EPID System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Reyes, B; Rodriguez Perez, E; Sosa Aquino, M [Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a back-projection algorithm for 2D dose reconstructions for in vivo dosimetry in radiation therapy using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) based on amorphous silicon. Methods: An EPID system was used to calculate dose-response function, pixel sensitivity map, exponential scatter kernels and beam hardenig correction for the back-projection algorithm. All measurements were done with a 6 MV beam. A 2D dose reconstruction for an irradiated water phantom (30×30×30 cm{sup 3}) was done to verify the algorithm implementation. Gamma index evaluation between the 2D reconstructed dose and the calculated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was done. Results: A linear fit was found for the dose-response function. The pixel sensitivity map has a radial symmetry and was calculated with a profile of the pixel sensitivity variation. The parameters for the scatter kernels were determined only for a 6 MV beam. The primary dose was estimated applying the scatter kernel within EPID and scatter kernel within the patient. The beam hardening coefficient is σBH= 3.788×10{sup −4} cm{sup 2} and the effective linear attenuation coefficient is µAC= 0.06084 cm{sup −1}. The 95% of points evaluated had γ values not longer than the unity, with gamma criteria of ΔD = 3% and Δd = 3 mm, and within the 50% isodose surface. Conclusion: The use of EPID systems proved to be a fast tool for in vivo dosimetry, but the implementation is more complex that the elaborated for pre-treatment dose verification, therefore, a simplest method must be investigated. The accuracy of this method should be improved modifying the algorithm in order to compare lower isodose curves.

  11. Characterization of the a-Si EPID in the unity MR-linac for dosimetric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Xirau, I.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; Baldvinsson, G.; Mijnheer, B. J.; van der Heide, U. A.; Mans, A.

    2018-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are frequently used in external beam radiation therapy for dose verification purposes. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-response characteristics of the EPID in the Unity MR-linac (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) relevant for dosimetric applications under clinical conditions. EPID images and ionization chamber (IC) measurements were used to study the effects of the magnetic field, the scatter generated in the MR housing reaching the EPID, and inhomogeneous attenuation from the MR housing. Dose linearity and dose rate dependencies were also determined. The magnetic field strength at EPID level did not exceed 10 mT, and dose linearity and dose rate dependencies proved to be comparable to that on a conventional linac. Profiles of fields, delivered with and without the magnetic field, were indistinguishable. The EPID center had an offset of 5.6 cm in the longitudinal direction, compared to the beam central axis, meaning that large fields in this direction will partially fall outside the detector area and not be suitable for verification. Beam attenuation by the MRI scanner and the table is gantry angle dependent, presenting a minimum attenuation of 67% relative to the 90° measurement. Repeatability, observed over two months, was within 0.5% (1 SD). In order to use the EPID for dosimetric applications in the MR-linac, challenges related to the EPID position, scatter from the MR housing, and the inhomogeneous, gantry angle-dependent attenuation of the beam will need to be solved.

  12. Implementation of DMLC quality control using EPID (Portal Dosimetry); Implementacao de um controle de qualidade de DMLC utilizando um EPID (Portal Dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio R.; Furnari, Laura, E-mail: mattos.fr@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Universidade de Sao Paulo (INRAD/HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Radiologia. Setor de Radioterapia

    2017-11-01

    A Quality Assurance (QA) to ensure the expected performance of a Multileaf Collimator System (MLC) is essential to deliver dose in a safety and appropriate way. The time required for equipment control and dosimetry may be reduced when the Electronic Portal Image Device (EPID) is used. The aim of this work was to check the resolution limits of the detection system for IMRT mode, and to propose a set of tests that can provide positioning analysis of a multileaf system. A Varian iX Clinac equipped with an 80 leaf Millenium MLC, and an amorphous silicon based EPID (aS1000) was used. The EPID proved itself effective for detecting errors up to 0.5 mm. The proposed tests provided relevant results of leaf position, and revealed that the MLC system is within acceptable limits found in literature. (author)

  13. Dosimetric characterization of an a-based EPID for quality control if patient-specific IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrinaga Cortina, Eduardo Francisco; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo; Silvestre Patallo, Ileana; Garcia Yip, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    The Electronic portal imaging devices, EPID for its acronym in English is a technology widely used for verification of patient positioning on linear accelerators routinely. Its use as a dosimetry device is not as widespread, although many researches in this field. It assessed the availability and versatility of the use EPID based on an amorphous silicon (a-Si) as a means of quality control specific patient for a methodology of Radiation Intensity Modulated IMRT. Dosimetric parameters were determined for the linearity of dose versus response, dispersion and sensitivity factors off-axis radiation. For absolute measurements the linearity of the dose-response relationship EPID was better than 1.1 and 1.5% for photon beams of 6 and 15mV respectively, in the range from 2 to 500 UM. The dose dependence with field size was studied and compared with the factors of dispersion in water at different depths, in agreement with those measured at 5 cm depth, Scp (z = 5cm). Off-axis sensitivity of the EPID was determined by comparing the measured profiles versus the same profiles at different depths in water. The best correspondence was observed at 5 cm depth, where the EPID response underestimates the dose to 4% for all sizes of fields in the plateau area. The EPID can be used for the evaluation of dosimetric parameters of the beam at a specific depth in water of 5 cm and a discrepancy in an acceptable maximum rate of 4%. (author)

  14. An improved Monte-Carlo model of the Varian EPID separating support arm and rear-housing backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monville, M E; Greer, P B; Kuncic, Z

    2014-01-01

    Previous investigators of EPID dosimetric properties have ascribed the backscatter, that contaminates dosimetric EPID images, to its supporting arm. Accordingly, Monte-Carlo (MC) EPID models have approximated the backscatter signal from the layers under the detector and the robotic support arm using either uniform or non-uniform solid water slabs, or through convolutions with back-scatter kernels. The aim of this work is to improve the existent MC models by measuring and modelling the separate backscatter contributions of the robotic arm and the rear plastic housing of the EPID. The EPID plastic housing is non-uniform with a 11.9 cm wide indented section that runs across the cross-plane direction in the superior half of the EPID which is 1.75 cm closer to the EPID sensitive layer than the rest of the housing. The thickness of the plastic housing is 0.5 cm. Experiments were performed with and without the housing present by removing all components of the EPID from the housing. The robotic support arm was not present for these measurements. A MC model of the linear accelerator and the EPID was modified to include the rear-housing indentation and results compared to the measurement. The rear housing was found to contribute a maximum of 3% additional signal. The rear housing contribution to the image is non-uniform in the in-plane direction with 2% asymmetry across the central 20 cm of an image irradiating the entire detector. The MC model was able to reproduce this non-uniform contribution. The EPID rear housing contributes a non-uniform backscatter component to the EPID image, which has not been previously characterized. This has been incorporated into an improved MC model of the EPID.

  15. EPID-based verification of the MLC performance for dynamic IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; Barnes, Michael P.; O’Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In advanced radiotherapy treatments such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), verification of the performance of the multileaf collimator (MLC) is an essential part of the linac QA program. The purpose of this study is to use the existing measurement methods for geometric QA of the MLCs and extend them to more comprehensive evaluation techniques, and to develop dedicated robust algorithms to quantitatively investigate the MLC performance in a fast, accurate, and efficient manner. Methods: The behavior of leaves was investigated in the step-and-shoot mode by the analysis of integrated electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images acquired during picket fence tests at fixed gantry angles and arc delivery. The MLC was also studied in dynamic mode by the analysis of cine EPID images of a sliding gap pattern delivered in a variety of conditions including different leaf speeds, deliveries at fixed gantry angles or in arc mode, and changing the direction of leaf motion. The accuracy of the method was tested by detection of the intentionally inserted errors in the delivery patterns. Results: The algorithm developed for the picket fence analysis was able to find each individual leaf position, gap width, and leaf bank skewness in addition to the deviations from expected leaf positions with respect to the beam central axis with sub-pixel accuracy. For the three tested linacs over a period of 5 months, the maximum change in the gap width was 0.5 mm, the maximum deviation from the expected leaf positions was 0.1 mm and the MLC skewness was up to 0.2°. The algorithm developed for the sliding gap analysis could determine the velocity and acceleration/deceleration of each individual leaf as well as the gap width. There was a slight decrease in the accuracy of leaf performance with increasing leaf speeds. The analysis results were presented through several graphs. The accuracy of the method was assessed as 0.01 mm

  16. SU-E-T-335: Transit Dosimetry for Verification of Dose Delivery Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, T [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Health Insurance Co.Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, E [National Health Insurance Co.Ilsan Hospital, Ilsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S [Cheil General Hospital and Women Healthcare Center, Kwandong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gamma index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.

  17. Commissioning of Portal Dosimetry and characterization of an EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olbi, D.S.; Sales, C.P.; Nakandakari, M.V.N.

    2016-01-01

    The development of technologies compensator blocks, MLC, high dose rate accelerators, treatment planning systems, among others, permitted that new treatment techniques in radiotherapy were created. Such techniques have the capacity to modulate radiation beam fluency (IMRT, VMAT), or to deliver high doses in few fractions or unique fractions (SRS). Following the same tendency, quality control of planning became more complex. It is necessary to evaluate the fluency delivered by the accelerator. Its levels of does and its spatial distribution should co-occur with the fluency calculated by TPS. Acquisition of new detector devices in quality control of treatments is fundamental to apply techniques. Portal Vision is a device EPID has the capacity to operate either in image mode or dosimetry mode, with the allowance of Portal Dosimetry. To evaluated planning in IMRT, the device is irradiated using planning e, therefore, the fluency measured is compared with calculated fluency, through gamma analysis. The aim of this work was to perform tests of commissioning of this device. (author)

  18. TU-FG-201-06: Remote Dosimetric Auditing for Clinical Trials Using EPID Dosimetry: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miri, N; Legge, K; Greer, P [Newcastle University, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Vial, P [Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a pilot study for remote dosimetric credentialing of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based clinical trials. The study introduces a novel, time efficient and inexpensive dosimetry audit method for multi-center credentialing. The method employs electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to reconstruct delivered dose inside a virtual flat/cylindrical water phantom. Methods: Five centers, including different accelerator types and treatment planning systems (TPS), were asked to download two CT data sets of a Head and Neck (H&N) and Postprostatectomy (P-P) patients to produce benchmark plans. These were then transferred to virtual flat and cylindrical phantom data sets that were also provided. In-air EPID images of the plans were then acquired, and the data sent to the central site for analysis. At the central site, these were converted to DICOM format, all images were used to reconstruct 2D and 3D dose distributions inside respectively the flat and cylindrical phantoms using inhouse EPID to dose conversion software. 2D dose was calculated for individual fields and 3D dose for the combined fields. The results were compared to corresponding TPS doses. Three gamma criteria were used, 3%3mm-3%/2mm–2%/2mm with a 10% dose threshold, to compare the calculated and prescribed dose. Results: All centers had a high pass rate for the criteria of 3%/3 mm. For 2D dose, the average of centers mean pass rate was 99.6% (SD: 0.3%) and 99.8% (SD: 0.3%) for respectively H&N and PP patients. For 3D dose, 3D gamma was used to compare the model dose with TPS combined dose. The mean pass rate was 97.7% (SD: 2.8%) and 98.3% (SD: 1.6%). Conclusion: Successful performance of the method for the pilot centers establishes the method for dosimetric multi-center credentialing. The results are promising and show a high level of gamma agreement and, the procedure is efficient, consistent and inexpensive. Funding has been provided from Department of Radiation Oncology

  19. Commissioning of Portal Dosimetry and characterization of an EPID; Comissionamento de Portal Dosimetry e caracterizacao de EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olbi, D.S.; Sales, C.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Nakandakari, M.V.N., E-mail: diego.olbi@hc.fm.usp.br [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2016-07-01

    The development of technologies compensator blocks, MLC, high dose rate accelerators, treatment planning systems, among others, permitted that new treatment techniques in radiotherapy were created. Such techniques have the capacity to modulate radiation beam fluency (IMRT, VMAT), or to deliver high doses in few fractions or unique fractions (SRS). Following the same tendency, quality control of planning became more complex. It is necessary to evaluate the fluency delivered by the accelerator. Its levels of does and its spatial distribution should co-occur with the fluency calculated by TPS. Acquisition of new detector devices in quality control of treatments is fundamental to apply techniques. Portal Vision is a device EPID has the capacity to operate either in image mode or dosimetry mode, with the allowance of Portal Dosimetry. To evaluated planning in IMRT, the device is irradiated using planning e, therefore, the fluency measured is compared with calculated fluency, through gamma analysis. The aim of this work was to perform tests of commissioning of this device. (author)

  20. Comparison of ghosting effects for three commercial a-Si EPIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, L. N.; Nijsten, S. M. J. J. G.; Sonke, J.-J.; Partridge, M.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have reported dosimetric characteristics of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Some studies ascribed a non-linear signal to gain ghosting and image lag. Other reports, however, state the effect is negligible. This study compares the signal-to-monitor unit (MU) ratio for three different brands of EPID systems. The signal was measured for a wide range of monitor units (5-1000), dose-rates, and beam energies. All EPIDs exhibited a relative under-response for beams of few MUs; giving 4 to 10% lower signal-to-MU ratios relative to that of 1000 MUs. This under-response is consistent with ghosting effects due to charge trapping

  1. Managing the backscatter component from the robotic arm of an a-Si EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.G.; Menk, F.; Greer, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Backscatter from the robotic arm mechanism of an a-Si EPID in IMRT images was examined. Images corrected with a conventional flood field (FF) containing a backscatter component (BSC) from the robotic ann were compared with a BSC-free FF. A Yarian 21 EX linac (6 MV, 18 MV) was used. All images were acquired with two aS500 EPIDs, one R-arm and one E-arm. The BSC of an EPID image is the ratio of an image acquired with the EPID attached to the arm then detaching the arm from the EPID and acquiring the same image. A range of square field sizes from 2.5 x 2.5 cm to 27.5 x 27.5 cm were acquired and the BSC analyzed. The BSC of the FFs were also measured. A series of IMRT fields were acquired. Each field was corrected with a conventional FF and compared with a BSC-free FF. Figure I shows the magnitude of the BSC from each arm in the inplane for a 6 x beam. Square fields above 16 x l6 cm (R-arm) and lO x 10 cm (E-arm) benefited from a conventional FF as it tended to cancel out the BSC in the acquired square field. The opposite was observed for smaller field sizes. A gamma analysis of the IMRT fields showed a FF correction containing a BSC reduces the effect of the arm in the final image. IMRT EPID images using conventional FFs have been shown to be less affected by backscatter from the robotic arm compared to BSC-free flood fields. (author)

  2. Ghosting effect in Siemens electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for step and shoot IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.; Vial, P.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To assess the ghosting effect of a Siemens EPID (Optivue 1000: while acquiring IMRT fluence with step and shoot delivery. Six sets of segmented fields with 1,2,3,5, J( and 20 monitor units (MU) per segment were designed. Each set consisted of ten segments of equal MU and field size (J 0 x 10 cm 2 ) Standard single fields (non-segmented) of the same total MU as the segmented fields were also created (10-200 MU). EPID images for these fields were acquired with multi-frame acquisition mode. The integrated EPID response was determined as the mean central 20 x 21 pixel readout multiplied by the number of frames. The same fields wen measured with an ionization chamber at a depth of dose maximum in, solid water phantom. The total signal measured from the segmented fields was compared to the corresponding non-segmented fields. The ratio of EPID response between segmented and non-segmented delivery indicates an under-response for segmented fields by 5, 4, 2.5 and 2% for 1,2,3, and 5 MU per segment exposures respectively compared to ionisation chamber response (se Fig. I). The ratio was within 2% for 5 MU per segment and above. Th error bar in Fig. I indicate the intra-segment response variation. The Siemens EPID exhibited significant ghosting effect and variation in response for small M U segments. EPID dosimetry ( IMRT fields with less than 5 MU per segment requires corrections t maintain dose calibration accuracy to within 2%. (author)

  3. TH-E-17A-10: Markerless Lung Tumor Tracking Based On Beams Eye View EPID Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, T; Kearney, V; Liu, H; Jiang, L; Foster, R; Mao, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rozario, T; Bereg, S [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas (United States); Klash, S [Premier Cancer Centers, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking or motion compensation techniques have proposed to modify beam delivery following lung tumor motion on the flight. Conventional treatment plan QA could be performed in advance since every delivery may be different. Markerless lung tumor tracking using beams eye view EPID images provides a best treatment evaluation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of the online markerless lung tumor motion tracking method. Methods: The lung tumor could be located on every frame of MV images during radiation therapy treatment by comparing with corresponding digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A kV-MV CT corresponding curve is applied on planning kV CT to generate MV CT images for patients in order to enhance the similarity between DRRs and MV treatment images. This kV-MV CT corresponding curve was obtained by scanning a same CT electron density phantom by a kV CT scanner and MV scanner (Tomotherapy) or MV CBCT. Two sets of MV DRRs were then generated for tumor and anatomy without tumor as the references to tracking the tumor on beams eye view EPID images. Results: Phantom studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linac. MV treatment images were acquired continuously during each treatment beam delivery at 12 gantry angles by iTools. Markerless tumor tracking was applied with DRRs generated from simulated MVCT. Tumors were tracked on every frame of images and compared with expected positions based on programed phantom motion. It was found that the average tracking error were 2.3 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting lung tumors at complicated environment without implanting markers. It should be noted that the CT data has a slice thickness of 3 mm. This shows the statistical accuracy is better than the spatial accuracy. This project has been supported by a Varian Research Grant.

  4. Investigations on uncertainties in patient positioning for prostate treatment with EPID; Untersuchungen zur Positionierungsgenauigkeit bei Prostatakonformationsbestrahlungen mittels Portal-Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakai, A.; Nuesslin, F. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. Medizinische Physik; Paulsen, F.; Plasswilm, L.; Bamberg, M. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. Strahlentherapie

    2002-02-01

    Background: Conformal radiotherapy techniques as used in prostate treatment allow to spare normal tissue by conforming the radiation fields to the shape of the planning target volume (PTV). To be able to fully utilize the advantages of these techniques correct patient positioning is an important prerequisite. This study employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) investigated the positioning uncertainties that occur in the pelvic region for different patient positioning devices. Patients and Methods: 15 patients with prostate cancer were irradiated with or without rectal balloon/pelvic mask at a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator (MLC). For each patient multiple portal images were taken from different directions and compared to the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the treatment planning system and to simulation films (Table 1, Figure 1). Results: In spite of different positioning devices, all patients showed comparable total positioning uncertainties of 4.0 mm (lateral), 4.5 mm (cranio-caudal) and 1.7 mm (dorso-ventral). The lateral positioning error was reduced for the pelvic mask patients while the cranio-caudal error increased (Table 2, Figure 2). A systematic and a random component sum up to the total positioning error, and a good estimate of the magnitudes of the two is possible from six to eight portal images (Figure 3). Conclusions: With a small number of portal images it is possible to find out the systematic and random positioning error of a patient. Knowledge of the random error can be used to resize the treatment margin which is clinically relevant since this error differs greatly for different patients (Figure 4). Image analysis with EPID is convenient, yet has some problems. For example, one only gets indirect information on the movement of the ventral rectum wall. The successful operation of positioning devices, although, needs further improvement - especially if one focuses on IMRT. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund

  5. A methodology to determine margins by EPID measurements of patient setup variation and motion as applied to immobilization devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Frechette, Christina M.; Herman, Michael G.; Brown, Paul D.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of clinic and site specific margins are essential for the effective use of three-dimensional and intensity modulated radiation therapy. An electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based methodology is introduced which allows individual and population based CTV-to-PTV margins to be determined and compared with traditional margins prescribed during treatment. This method was applied to a patient cohort receiving external beam head and neck radiotherapy under an IRB approved protocol. Although the full study involved the use of an EPID-based method to assess the impact of (1) simulation technique (2) immobilization, and (3) surgical intervention on inter- and intrafraction variations of individual and population-based CTV-to-PTV margins, the focus of the paper is on the technique. As an illustration, the methodology is utilized to examine the influence of two immobilization devices, the UON TM thermoplastic mask and the Type-S TM head/neck shoulder immobilization system on margins. Daily through port images were acquired for selected fields for each patient with an EPID. To analyze these images, simulation films or digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR's) were imported into the EPID software. Up to five anatomical landmarks were identified and outlined by the clinician and up to three of these structures were matched for each reference image. Once the individual based errors were quantified, the patient results were grouped into populations by matched anatomical structures and immobilization device. The variation within the subgroup was quantified by calculating the systematic and random errors (Σ sub and σ sub ). Individual patient margins were approximated as 1.65 times the individual-based random error and ranged from 1.1 to 6.3 mm (A-P) and 1.1 to 12.3 mm (S-I) for fields matched on skull and cervical structures, and 1.7 to 10.2 mm (L-R) and 2.0 to 13.8 mm (S-I) for supraclavicular fields. Population-based margins ranging from 5.1 to 6.6 mm (A

  6. WE-D-BRA-04: Online 3D EPID-Based Dose Verification for Optimum Patient Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spreeuw, H; Rozendaal, R; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I; Mans, A; Mijnheer, B; Herk, M van; Gonzalez, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an online 3D dose verification tool based on EPID transit dosimetry to ensure optimum patient safety in radiotherapy treatments. Methods: A new software package was developed which processes EPID portal images online using a back-projection algorithm for the 3D dose reconstruction. The package processes portal images faster than the acquisition rate of the portal imager (∼ 2.5 fps). After a portal image is acquired, the software seeks for “hot spots” in the reconstructed 3D dose distribution. A hot spot is in this study defined as a 4 cm 3 cube where the average cumulative reconstructed dose exceeds the average total planned dose by at least 20% and 50 cGy. If a hot spot is detected, an alert is generated resulting in a linac halt. The software has been tested by irradiating an Alderson phantom after introducing various types of serious delivery errors. Results: In our first experiment the Alderson phantom was irradiated with two arcs from a 6 MV VMAT H&N treatment having a large leaf position error or a large monitor unit error. For both arcs and both errors the linac was halted before dose delivery was completed. When no error was introduced, the linac was not halted. The complete processing of a single portal frame, including hot spot detection, takes about 220 ms on a dual hexacore Intel Xeon 25 X5650 CPU at 2.66 GHz. Conclusion: A prototype online 3D dose verification tool using portal imaging has been developed and successfully tested for various kinds of gross delivery errors. The detection of hot spots was proven to be effective for the timely detection of these errors. Current work is focused on hot spot detection criteria for various treatment sites and the introduction of a clinical pilot program with online verification of hypo-fractionated (lung) treatments

  7. SU-E-T-490: Independent Three-Dimensional (3D) Dose Verification of VMAT/SBRT Using EPID and Cloud Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, A; Han, B; Bush, K; Wang, L; Xing, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric verification of VMAT/SBRT is currently performed on one or two planes in a phantom with either film or array detectors. A robust and easy-to-use 3D dosimetric tool has been sought since the advent of conformal radiation therapy. Here we present such a strategy for independent 3D VMAT/SBRT plan verification system by a combined use of EPID and cloud-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. Methods: The 3D dosimetric verification proceeds in two steps. First, the plan was delivered with a high resolution portable EPID mounted on the gantry, and the EPID-captured gantry-angle-resolved VMAT/SBRT field images were converted into fluence by using the EPID pixel response function derived from MC simulations. The fluence was resampled and used as the input for an in-house developed Amazon cloud-based MC software to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The accuracy of the developed 3D dosimetric tool was assessed using a Delta4 phantom with various field sizes (square, circular, rectangular, and irregular MLC fields) and different patient cases. The method was applied to validate VMAT/SBRT plans using WFF and FFF photon beams (Varian TrueBeam STX). Results: It was found that the proposed method yielded results consistent with the Delta4 measurements. For points on the two detector planes, a good agreement within 1.5% were found for all the testing fields. Patient VMAT/SBRT plan studies revealed similar level of accuracy: an average γ-index passing rate of 99.2± 0.6% (3mm/3%), 97.4± 2.4% (2mm/2%), and 72.6± 8.4 % ( 1mm/1%). Conclusion: A valuable 3D dosimetric verification strategy has been developed for VMAT/SBRT plan validation. The technique provides a viable solution for a number of intractable dosimetry problems, such as small fields and plans with high dose gradient

  8. SU-E-T-490: Independent Three-Dimensional (3D) Dose Verification of VMAT/SBRT Using EPID and Cloud Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, A; Han, B; Bush, K; Wang, L; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric verification of VMAT/SBRT is currently performed on one or two planes in a phantom with either film or array detectors. A robust and easy-to-use 3D dosimetric tool has been sought since the advent of conformal radiation therapy. Here we present such a strategy for independent 3D VMAT/SBRT plan verification system by a combined use of EPID and cloud-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. Methods: The 3D dosimetric verification proceeds in two steps. First, the plan was delivered with a high resolution portable EPID mounted on the gantry, and the EPID-captured gantry-angle-resolved VMAT/SBRT field images were converted into fluence by using the EPID pixel response function derived from MC simulations. The fluence was resampled and used as the input for an in-house developed Amazon cloud-based MC software to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The accuracy of the developed 3D dosimetric tool was assessed using a Delta4 phantom with various field sizes (square, circular, rectangular, and irregular MLC fields) and different patient cases. The method was applied to validate VMAT/SBRT plans using WFF and FFF photon beams (Varian TrueBeam STX). Results: It was found that the proposed method yielded results consistent with the Delta4 measurements. For points on the two detector planes, a good agreement within 1.5% were found for all the testing fields. Patient VMAT/SBRT plan studies revealed similar level of accuracy: an average γ-index passing rate of 99.2± 0.6% (3mm/3%), 97.4± 2.4% (2mm/2%), and 72.6± 8.4 % ( 1mm/1%). Conclusion: A valuable 3D dosimetric verification strategy has been developed for VMAT/SBRT plan validation. The technique provides a viable solution for a number of intractable dosimetry problems, such as small fields and plans with high dose gradient.

  9. TU-FG-201-01: 18-Month Clinical Experience of a Linac Daily Quality Assurance (QA) Solution Using Only EPID and OBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, B; Sun, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Goddu, S; Li, H; Caruthers, D; Kavanaugh, J; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the clinical use of a Linear Accelerator (Linac) DailyQA system with only EPID and OBI. To assess the reliability over an 18-month period and improve the robustness of this system based on QA failure analysis. Methods: A DailyQA solution utilizing an in-house designed phantom, combined EPID and OBI image acquisitions, and a web-based data analysis and reporting system was commissioned and used in our clinic to measure geometric, dosimetry and imaging components of a Varian Truebeam Linac. During an 18-month period (335 working days), the Daily QA results, including the output constancy, beam flatness and symmetry, uniformity, TPR20/10, MV and KV imaging quality, were collected and analyzed. For output constancy measurement, an independent monthly QA system with an ionization chamber (IC) and annual/incidental TG51 measurements with ADCL IC were performed and cross-compared to Daily QA system. Thorough analyses were performed on the recorded QA failures to evaluate the machine performance, optimize the data analysis algorithm, adjust the tolerance setting and improve the training procedure to prevent future failures. Results: A clinical workflow including beam delivery, data analysis, QA report generation and physics approval was established and optimized to suit daily clinical operation. The output tests over the 335 working day period cross-correlated with the monthly QA system within 1.3% and TG51 results within 1%. QA passed with one attempt on 236 days out of 335 days. Based on the QA failures analysis, the Gamma criteria is revised from (1%, 1mm) to (2%, 1mm) considering both QA accuracy and efficiency. Data analysis algorithm is improved to handle multiple entries for a repeating test. Conclusion: We described our 18-month clinical experience on a novel DailyQA system using only EPID and OBI. The long term data presented demonstrated the system is suitable and reliable for Linac daily QA.

  10. TH-CD-207A-02: Implementation of Live EPID-Based Inspiration Level Assessment (LEILA) for Deepinspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) Monitoring Using MV Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); The University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Sun, J; Fuangrod, T; Bhatia, S [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Doebrich, M; Greer, P [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); The University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Zwan, B [The University of Newcastle, Newcastle (Australia); Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As prior work has shown that current DIBH monitoring approaches using surrogate measures (marker block on chest) do not always correspond with the clinical quantity of interest (lung depth, LD), a software tool and workflow are introduced to use MV fluoroscopy during treatment for real-time / Live EPID-based Inspiration Level Assessment (LEILA). Methods: A prototype software tool calculates and displays the LD during the treatment of left sided breast cancer. Calculations are based on MV cine images which are acquired with the treatment beam thereby not incurring any additional imaging dose. Image capture and processing are implemented using a dedicated frame grabber computer. The calculation engine automatically detects image orientation and includes provisions for large treatment fields that exceed the size of the EPID panel. LD is measured along a line profile in the middle of the field. LEILA’s interface displays the current MV image, a reference image (DRR), the current LD, as well as a trace of LD over treatment time. The display includes patient specific LD tolerances. Tolerances are specified for each field and loaded before the treatment. A visual warning is generated when the tolerance is exceeded. LEILA is initially run in parallel with current DIBH techniques. When later run by itself DIBH setup will be done using skin marks and room laser. Results: Offline tests of LEILA confirmed accurate automatic LD measurement for a variety of patient geometries. Deployment of the EPID during all left sided breast treatments was well tolerated by patients and staff during a multi-month pilot. The frame grabber provides 11 frames-per-second; the MATLAB based LEILA prototype software can analyze five frames-per-second standalone on standard desktop hardware. Conclusion: LEILA provides an automated approach to quantitatively monitor LD on MV images during DIBH treatment. Future improvements include a database and further speed optimization.

  11. SU-E-T-133: Assessing IMRT Treatment Delivery Accuracy and Consistency On a Varian TrueBeam Using the SunNuclear PerFraction EPID Dosimetry Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieterich, S [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Trestrail, E; Holt, R [Pacific Crest Medical Physics, Chico, CA (United States); Saini, S [Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL (Australia); Pfeiffer, I [VMTH, UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Kent, M; Hansen, K [Surgical and Radiological Sciences, UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess if the TrueBeam HD120 collimator is delivering small IMRT fields accurately and consistently throughout the course of treatment using the SunNuclear PerFraction software. Methods: 7-field IMRT plans for 8 canine patients who passed IMRT QA using SunNuclear Mapcheck DQA were selected for this study. The animals were setup using CBCT image guidance. The EPID fluence maps were captured for each treatment field and each treatment fraction, with the first fraction EPID data serving as the baseline for comparison. The Sun Nuclear PerFraction Software was used to compare the EPID data for subsequent fractions using a Gamma (3%/3mm) pass rate of 90%. To simulate requirements for SRS, the data was reanalyzed using a Gamma (3%/1mm) pass rate of 90%. Low-dose, low- and high gradient thresholds were used to focus the analysis on clinically relevant parts of the dose distribution. Results: Not all fractions could be analyzed, because during some of the treatment courses the DICOM tags in the EPID images intermittently change from CU to US (unspecified), which would indicate a temporary loss of EPID calibration. This technical issue is still being investigated. For the remaining fractions, the vast majority (7/8 of patients, 95% of fractions, and 96.6% of fields) are passing the less stringent Gamma criteria. The more stringent Gamma criteria caused a drop in pass rate (90 % of fractions, 84% of fields). For the patient with the lowest pass rate, wet towel bolus was used. Another patient with low pass rates experienced masseter muscle wasting. Conclusion: EPID dosimetry using the PerFraction software demonstrated that the majority of fields passed a Gamma (3%/3mm) for IMRT treatments delivered with a TrueBeam HD120 MLC. Pass rates dropped for a DTA of 1mm to model SRS tolerances. PerFraction pass rates can flag missing bolus or internal shields. Sanjeev Saini is an employee of Sun Nuclear Corporation. For this study, a pre-release version of PerFRACTION 1

  12. SU-G-BRB-11: On the Sensitivity of An EPID-Based 3D Dose Verification System to Detect Delivery Errors in VMAT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, P; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I; Mijnheer, B; Mans, A; Rozendaal, R [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity of an EPID-based 3D dose verification system to detect delivery errors in VMAT treatments. Methods: For this study 41 EPID-reconstructed 3D in vivo dose distributions of 15 different VMAT plans (H&N, lung, prostate and rectum) were selected. To simulate the effect of delivery errors, their TPS plans were modified by: 1) scaling of the monitor units by ±3% and ±6% and 2) systematic shifting of leaf bank positions by ±1mm, ±2mm and ±5mm. The 3D in vivo dose distributions where then compared to the unmodified and modified treatment plans. To determine the detectability of the various delivery errors, we made use of a receiver operator characteristic (ROC) methodology. True positive and false positive rates were calculated as a function of the γ-parameters γmean, γ1% (near-maximum γ) and the PTV dose parameter ΔD{sub 50} (i.e. D{sub 50}(EPID)-D{sub 50}(TPS)). The ROC curve is constructed by plotting the true positive rate vs. the false positive rate. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) then serves as a measure of the performance of the EPID dosimetry system in detecting a particular error; an ideal system has AUC=1. Results: The AUC ranges for the machine output errors and systematic leaf position errors were [0.64 – 0.93] and [0.48 – 0.92] respectively using γmean, [0.57 – 0.79] and [0.46 – 0.85] using γ1% and [0.61 – 0.77] and [ 0.48 – 0.62] using ΔD{sub 50}. Conclusion: For the verification of VMAT deliveries, the parameter γmean is the best discriminator for the detection of systematic leaf position errors and monitor unit scaling errors. Compared to γmean and γ1%, the parameter ΔD{sub 50} performs worse as a discriminator in all cases.

  13. Modelos epidémicos con control por vacunación

    OpenAIRE

    Saralegui Vallejo, Unai

    2016-01-01

    Existen diferentes tipos de modelos epidémicos no lineales en los que las dinámicas de las sub-poblaciones ( susceptibles, infectados , recobrados , vacunados etc. ) están acopladas. La vacunación puede interpretatrse como un control cuyo objetivo es eliminar la infección. Se estudian estos modelos matemáticamente, para despues comprobar los resultados obtenidos mediante simulaciones.

  14. Comparative performance evaluation of a new a-Si EPID that exceeds quad high-definition resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kristen A; Alexandrian, Ara; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotiri

    2018-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are an integral part of the radiation oncology workflow for treatment setup verification. Several commercial EPID implementations are currently available, each with varying capabilities. To standardize performance evaluation, Task Group Report 58 (TG-58) and TG-142 outline specific image quality metrics to be measured. A LinaTech Image Viewing System (IVS), with the highest commercially available pixel matrix (2688x2688 pixels), was independently evaluated and compared to an Elekta iViewGT (1024x1024 pixels) and a Varian aSi-1000 (1024x768 pixels) using a PTW EPID QC Phantom. The IVS, iViewGT, and aSi-1000 were each used to acquire 20 images of the PTW QC Phantom. The QC phantom was placed on the couch and aligned at isocenter. The images were exported and analyzed using the epidSoft image quality assurance (QA) software. The reported metrics were signal linearity, isotropy of signal linearity, signal-tonoise ratio (SNR), low contrast resolution, and high-contrast resolution. These values were compared between the three EPID solutions. Computed metrics demonstrated comparable results between the EPID solutions with the IVS outperforming the aSi-1000 and iViewGT in the low and high-contrast resolution analysis. The performance of three commercial EPID solutions have been quantified, evaluated, and compared using results from the PTW QC Phantom. The IVS outperformed the other panels in low and high-contrast resolution, but to fully realize the benefits of the IVS, the selection of the monitor on which to view the high-resolution images is important to prevent down sampling and visual of resolution.

  15. SU-E-J-112: The Impact of Cine EPID Image Acquisition Frame Rate On Markerless Soft-Tissue Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, S; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially reduce the

  16. SU-E-J-112: The Impact of Cine EPID Image Acquisition Frame Rate On Markerless Soft-Tissue Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, S; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although reduction of the cine EPID acquisition frame rate through multiple frame averaging may reduce hardware memory burden and decrease image noise, it can hinder the continuity of soft-tissue motion leading to poor auto-tracking results. The impact of motion blurring and image noise on the tracking performance was investigated. Methods: Phantom and patient images were acquired at a frame rate of 12.87Hz on an AS1000 portal imager. Low frame rate images were obtained by continuous frame averaging. A previously validated tracking algorithm was employed for auto-tracking. The difference between the programmed and auto-tracked positions of a Las Vegas phantom moving in the superior-inferior direction defined the tracking error (δ). Motion blurring was assessed by measuring the area change of the circle with the greatest depth. Additionally, lung tumors on 1747 frames acquired at eleven field angles from four radiotherapy patients are manually and automatically tracked with varying frame averaging. δ was defined by the position difference of the two tracking methods. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of the background intensity. Motion blurring and image noise were correlated with δ using Pearson correlation coefficient (R). Results: For both phantom and patient studies, the auto-tracking errors increased at frame rates lower than 4.29Hz. Above 4.29Hz, changes in errors were negligible with δ<1.60mm. Motion blurring and image noise were observed to increase and decrease with frame averaging, respectively. Motion blurring and tracking errors were significantly correlated for the phantom (R=0.94) and patient studies (R=0.72). Moderate to poor correlation was found between image noise and tracking error with R -0.58 and -0.19 for both studies, respectively. Conclusion: An image acquisition frame rate of at least 4.29Hz is recommended for cine EPID tracking. Motion blurring in images with frame rates below 4.39Hz can substantially reduce the

  17. WE-DE-BRA-04: A Cost-Effective Pixelated EPID Scintillator for Enhanced Contrast and DQE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Hu, Y; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Woman’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Shedlock, D; Wang, A; Humber, D; Star-Lack, J [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Morf, D; Fueglistaller, R [Varian Medical Systems, Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Beams-eye-view imaging applications such as real-time soft-tissue motion estimation and MV-CBCT are hindered by the inherently low image contrast of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) currently in clinical use. We investigate a cost effective scintillating glass that provides substantially increased detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: A pixelated scintillator prototype was built from LKH-5 glass. The array is 12mm thick; 42.4×42.4cm2 wide and features 1.51mm pixel pitch with 20µm separation (glue+septa). The LKH-5 array was mounted on the active matrix flat panel imager (AMPFI) of an AS-1200 (Varian) with the GdO2S2:Tb removed. A second AS-1200 was utilized as reference detector. The prototype EPID was characterized in terms of CNR, modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE. Additionally, the visibility of various fiducial markers typically used in the clinic as well as a realistic 3D-printed lung tumor model was assessed. All items were placed in a 12cm thick solid water phantom. CNR is estimated using a Las Vegas contrast phantom, presampled MTF is estimated using a slanted slit technique and the DQE is calculated from measured normalized noise power spectra (NPS) and the MTF. Results: DQE(0) for the LKH-5 prototype increased by a factor of 8× to about 10%, compared to the AS-1200 equipped with its standard GdO2S2:Tb scintillator. CNR increased by a factor of 5.3×. Due to the pixel size the MTF50 decreased by about 55% to 0.23lp/mm. The visibility of all fiducial markers as well as the tumor model were however markedly improved in comparison to an acquisition with the same parameters using the GdO2S2:Tb scintillator. Conclusion: LKH-5 scintillating glasses allow the cost effective construction of thick pixelated scintillators for portal imaging which can yield a substantial increase in DQE and CNR. Soft tissue and fiducial marker visibility was found to be markedly improved. The project was supported

  18. SU-E-J-27: Shifting Multiple EPID Imager Layers to Improve Image Quality and Resolution in MV CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Rottmann, J; Yip, S; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Morf, D; Fueglistaller, R; Star-Lack, J; Zentai, G [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Vertical stacking of four conventional EPID layers can improve DQE for MV-CBCT applications. We hypothesize that shifting each layer laterally by half a pixel relative to the layer above, will improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image resolution. Methods: For CNR assessment, a 20 cm diameter digital phantom with 8 inserts is created. The attenuation coefficient of the phantom is similar to lung at the average energy of a 6 MV photon beam. The inserts have attenuations 1, 2…8 times of lung. One of the inserts is close to soft tissue, resembling the case of a tumor in lung. For resolution assessment, a digital phantom featuring a bar pattern is created. The phantom has an attenuation coefficient similar to soft tissue and the bars have an attenuation coefficient of calcium sulfate. A 2 MeV photon beam is attenuated through these phantoms and hits each of the four stacked detector layers. Each successive layer is shifted by half a pixel in the x only, y only, and x and y (combined) directions, respectively. Blurring and statistical noise are added to the projections. Projections from one, two, three and four layers are used for reconstruction. CNR and image resolution are evaluated and compared. Results: When projections from multiple layers are combined for reconstruction, CNR increases with the number of layers involved. CNR in reconstructions from two, three and four layers are 1.4, 1.7 and 1.99 times that from one layer. The resolution from the shifted four layer detector is also improved from a single layer. In a comparison between one layer versus four layers in this preliminary study, the resolution from four shifted layers is at least 20% better. Conclusion: Layer-shifting in a stacked EPID imager design enhances resolution as well as CNR for half scan MV-CBCT. The project described was supported, in part, by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc., and Award No. R01CA188446-01 from the National Cancer Institute. The content is solely

  19. Preliminary studies for implementation of a MCL quality control using EPID (Portal Dosimetry); Estudos preliminares para implementacao de um controle de qualidade de MLC com o uso do EPID (Portal Dosimetry)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio R.; Furnari, Laura [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-07-01

    A Quality Control (CQ) to ensure the expected performance of a Multileaf Collimator System (MLC) is essential for delivering dose in a safety and appropriate way. The time required for equipment control and dosimetry may be lowered when the Electronic Portal Image Device (EPID) is used. The aim of this paper was to check the resolution limits of the detection system for IMRT mode, and to do the analysis of three tests of MLC performance: Picket Fence, Slinding GAP, MLC versus Gantry. A Varian iX Clinac equipped with an 80 leaf Millennium MLC and with amorphous silicon based EPID (aS1000) was use. The EPID proved Effective, where errors up to 0,5 mm can be detected. Information about interleaf transmissions, dose profile and gravity influence in the leaf banks also were included. (author)

  20. Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson e necrólise epidérmica tóxica

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Inês Dionísio

    2013-01-01

    Trabalho final de mestrado integrado em Medicina (Dermatologia), apresentado à Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Coimbra. A Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson (SSJ) e a necrólise epidérmica tóxica (NET) são reacções mucocutâneas raras consideradas emergências médicas, podendo tornar-se fatais. Constituem dois extremos do mesmo espectro clínico das reacções cutâneas severas adversas a fármacos com necrose epidérmica, diferindo apenas na extensão do descolamento epidérmico. A gra...

  1. Estudio de diez casos de encefalitis letárgica epidémica

    OpenAIRE

    Grossman, Morris

    2014-01-01

    La aparición en forma epidémica de una rara enfermedad que afecta profundamente el sistema nervioso central ha suscitado, durante estos últimos tres años, mucho interés en el mundo científico. Esta enfermedad ha sido estudiada con mayor ahinco en Austria y Australia, en donde apareció en 1917 y en Inglaterra, Francia y Estados Unidos en donde se presentó después. The appearance in epidemic form of a rare disease that profoundly affects the central nervous system has raised during the past ...

  2. Evaluation of usefulness of portal image using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) in the patients who received pelvic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Heon Jong; Park, Seong Young; Cho, Young Kap; Loh, John J. K.; Park, Won; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of electronic portal imaging device through objective compare of the images acquired using an EPID and a conventional port film. From Apr. to Oct. 1997, a total of 150 sets of images from 20 patients who received radiation therapy in the pelvis area were evaluated in the Inha University Hospital and Severance Hospital. A dual image recording technique was devised to obtain both electronic portal images and port film images simultaneously with one treatment course. We did not perform double exposure. Five to ten images were acquired from each patient. All images were acquired from posteroanterior (PA) view except images from two patients. A dose rate of 100-300 MU/min and a 10-MV X-ray beam were used and 2-10 MUs were required to produce a verification image during treatment. Kodak diagnostic film with metal/film imaging cassette which was located on the top of the EPID detector was used for the port film. The source to detector distance was 140 cm. Eight anatomical landmarks (pelvic brim, sacrum, acetabulum, iliopectineal line, symphysis, ischium, obturator foramen, sacroiliac joint) were assessed. Four radiation oncologist joined to evaluate each image. The individual landmarks in the port film or in the EPID were rated-very clear (1), clear (2), visible (3), notclear (4), not visible (5). Using an video camera based EPID system, there was no difference of image quality between no enhanced EPID images and port film images. However, when we provided some change with window level for the portal image, the visibility of the sacrum and obturator foramen was improved in the portal images than in the port film images. All anatomical landmarks were more visible in the portal images than in the port film when we applied the CLAHE mode enhancement. The images acquired using an matrix ion chamber type EPID were also improved image quality after window level adjustment. The quality of image acquired using an electronic portal imaging device was

  3. Craniocaudal Safety Margin Calculation Based on Interfractional Changes in Tumor Motion in Lung SBRT Assessed With an EPID in Cine Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Nishiyama, Kinji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Miyagi, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate setup error and interfractional changes in tumor motion magnitude using an electric portal imaging device in cine mode (EPID cine) during the course of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to calculate margins to compensate for these variations. Materials and Methods: Subjects were 28 patients with Stage I NSCLC who underwent SBRT. Respiratory-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) at simulation was binned into 10 respiratory phases, which provided average intensity projection CT data sets (AIP). On 4D-CT, peak-to-peak motion of the tumor (M-4DCT) in the craniocaudal direction was assessed and the tumor center (mean tumor position [MTP]) of the AIP (MTP-4DCT) was determined. At treatment, the tumor on cone beam CT was registered to that on AIP for patient setup. During three sessions of irradiation, peak-to-peak motion of the tumor (M-cine) and the mean tumor position (MTP-cine) were obtained using EPID cine and in-house software. Based on changes in tumor motion magnitude (∆M) and patient setup error (∆MTP), defined as differences between M-4DCT and M-cine and between MTP-4DCT and MTP-cine, a margin to compensate for these variations was calculated with Stroom’s formula. Results: The means (±standard deviation: SD) of M-4DCT and M-cine were 3.1 (±3.4) and 4.0 (±3.6) mm, respectively. The means (±SD) of ∆M and ∆MTP were 0.9 (±1.3) and 0.2 (±2.4) mm, respectively. Internal target volume-planning target volume (ITV-PTV) margins to compensate for ∆M, ∆MTP, and both combined were 3.7, 5.2, and 6.4 mm, respectively. Conclusion: EPID cine is a useful modality for assessing interfractional variations of tumor motion. The ITV-PTV margins to compensate for these variations can be calculated.

  4. Development and implementation of EPID-based quality assurance tests for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Akbar; Poirier, Yannick; Sawant, Amit

    2018-04-28

    Although small animal image-guided radiotherapy (SA-IGRT) systems are used increasingly in preclinical research, tools for performing routine quality assurance (QA) have not been optimized and are not readily available. Robust, efficient, and reliable QA tools are needed to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of SA-IGRT systems. Several investigators have reported custom-made phantoms and protocols for SA-IGRT systems QA. These are typically time and resource intensive and are therefore not well suited to the preclinical radiotherapy environment, in which physics support is limited and routine QA is performed by technical staff. We investigated the use of the inbuilt electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to develop and validate routine QA tests and procedures. In this work, we focus on the Xstrahl Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) EPID. However, the methodology and tests developed here are applicable to any SA-IGRT system that incorporates an EPID. We performed a comprehensive characterization of the dosimetric properties of the camera-based EPID at kilovoltage energies over a 11-month period, including detector warm-up time, radiation dose history effect, stability and short- and long-term reproducibility, gantry angle dependency, output factor, and linearity of the EPID response. We developed a test to measure the constancy of beam quality in terms of half-value layer and tube peak potential using the EPID. We verified the SARRP daily output and beam profile constancy using the imager. We investigated the use of the imager to monitor beam-targeting accuracy at various gantry and couch angles. The EPID response was stable and reproducible, exhibiting maximum variations of ≤0.3% and ≤1.9% for short and long terms, respectively. The detector showed no dependence on response at different gantry angles, with a maximum variation ≤0.5%. We found close agreement in output factor measurement between the portal imager and reference dosimeters

  5. SU-F-T-262: Commissioning Varian Portal Dosimetry for EPID-Based Patient Specific QA in a Non-Aria Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M; Knutson, N [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence RI (United States); University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Herrington, J [University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Price, M [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence RI (United States); University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States); Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Development of an in-house program facilitates a workflow that allows Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) patient specific quality assurance (QA) measurements to be acquired and analyzed in the Portal Dosimetry Application (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) using a non-Aria Record and Verify (R&V) system (MOSAIQ, Elekta, Crawley, UK) to deliver beams in standard clinical treatment mode. Methods: Initial calibration of an in-house software tool includes characterization of EPID dosimetry parameters by importing DICOM images of varying delivered MUs to determine linear mapping factors in order to convert image pixel values to Varian-defined Calibrated Units (CU). Using this information, the Portal Dose Image Prediction (PDIP) algorithm was commissioned by converting images of various field sizes to output factors using the Eclipse Scripting Application Programming Interface (ESAPI) and converting a delivered configuration fluence to absolute dose units. To verify the algorithm configuration, an integrated image was acquired, exported directly from the R&V client, automatically converted to a compatible, calibrated dosimetric image, and compared to a PDIP calculated image using Varian’s Portal Dosimetry Application. Results: For two C-Series and one TrueBeam Varian linear accelerators, gamma comparisons (global 3% / 3mm) of PDIP algorithm predicted dosimetric images and images converted via the inhouse system demonstrated agreement for ≥99% of all pixels, exceeding vendor-recommended commissioning guidelines. Conclusion: Combinations of a programmatic image conversion tool and ESAPI allow for an efficient and accurate method of patient IMRT QA incorporating a 3rd party R&V system.

  6. Comparison Between the Spectrum reconstruction methodology and release transmitted by both based in pictures taken EPID; Comparacion entre la metodologia de recostruccion de espectros por transmision y por disperison, ambas basadas en imagenes tomadas con EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juste, B.; Miro, R.; Jambrina, A.; Campayo, J. M.; Diez, S.; Santos, A.; Verdu, V.

    2013-07-01

    A comparison of the spectral reconstruction based on data transmission and spectral reconstruction based on scattering data is presented, we have both developed using EPID images. It is shown that the reconstruction results based on transmission offer much better fit with the theoretical predictions.

  7. Robustness and precision of an automatic marker detection algorithm for online prostate daily targeting using a standard V-EPID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, S; Beaulieu, L; Pouliot, S; Pouliot, J; Roy, R; Girouard, L M; Martel-Brisson, N; Vigneault, E; Laverdière, J

    2003-07-01

    An algorithm for the daily localization of the prostate using implanted markers and a standard video-based electronic portal imaging device (V-EPID) has been tested. Prior to planning, three gold markers were implanted in the prostate of seven patients. The clinical images were acquired with a BeamViewPlus 2.1 V-EPID for each field during the normal course radiotherapy treatment and are used off-line to determine the ability of the automatic marker detection algorithm to adequately and consistently detect the markers. Clinical images were obtained with various dose levels from ranging 2.5 to 75 MU. The algorithm is based on marker attenuation characterization in the portal image and spatial distribution. A total of 1182 clinical images were taken. The results show an average efficiency of 93% for the markers detected individually and 85% for the group of markers. This algorithm accomplishes the detection and validation in 0.20-0.40 s. When the center of mass of the group of implanted markers is used, then all displacements can be corrected to within 1.0 mm in 84% of the cases and within 1.5 mm in 97% of cases. The standard video-based EPID tested provides excellent marker detection capability even with low dose levels. The V-EPID can be used successfully with radiopaque markers and the automatic detection algorithm to track and correct the daily setup deviations due to organ motions.

  8. SU-F-J-41: Experimental Validation of a Cascaded Linear System Model for MVCBCT with a Multi-Layer EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y; Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Berbeco, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. (United States); Fueglistaller, R; Morf, D [Varian Medical Systems, Dattwil, Aargau (Switzerland); Wang, A; Shedlock, D; Star-Lack, J [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the use of a cascaded linear system model for MV cone-beam CT (CBCT) using a multi-layer (MLI) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and provide experimental insight into image formation. A validated 3D model provides insight into salient factors affecting reconstructed image quality, allowing potential for optimizing detector design for CBCT applications. Methods: A cascaded linear system model was developed to investigate the potential improvement in reconstructed image quality for MV CBCT using an MLI EPID. Inputs to the three-dimensional (3D) model include projection space MTF and NPS. Experimental validation was performed on a prototype MLI detector installed on the portal imaging arm of a Varian TrueBeam radiotherapy system. CBCT scans of up to 898 projections over 360 degrees were acquired at exposures of 16 and 64 MU. Image volumes were reconstructed using a Feldkamp-type (FDK) filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm. Flat field images and scans of a Catphan model 604 phantom were acquired. The effect of 2×2 and 4×4 detector binning was also examined. Results: Using projection flat fields as an input, examination of the modeled and measured NPS in the axial plane exhibits good agreement. Binning projection images was shown to improve axial slice SDNR by a factor of approximately 1.4. This improvement is largely driven by a decrease in image noise of roughly 20%. However, this effect is accompanied by a subsequent loss in image resolution. Conclusion: The measured axial NPS shows good agreement with the theoretical calculation using a linear system model. Binning of projection images improves SNR of large objects on the Catphan phantom by decreasing noise. Specific imaging tasks will dictate the implementation image binning to two-dimensional projection images. The project was partially supported by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc. and grant No. R01CA188446-01 from the National Cancer Institute.

  9. Reliable detection of fluence anomalies in EPID-based IMRT pretreatment quality assurance using pixel intensity deviations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J. J.; Gardner, J. K.; Wang, S.; Siebers, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This work uses repeat images of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields to quantify fluence anomalies (i.e., delivery errors) that can be reliably detected in electronic portal images used for IMRT pretreatment quality assurance. Methods: Repeat images of 11 clinical IMRT fields are acquired on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at energies of 6 MV and 18 MV. Acquired images are corrected for output variations and registered to minimize the impact of linear accelerator and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) positioning deviations. Detection studies are performed in which rectangular anomalies of various sizes are inserted into the images. The performance of detection strategies based on pixel intensity deviations (PIDs) and gamma indices is evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Residual differences between registered images are due to interfraction positional deviations of jaws and multileaf collimator leaves, plus imager noise. Positional deviations produce large intensity differences that degrade anomaly detection. Gradient effects are suppressed in PIDs using gradient scaling. Background noise is suppressed using median filtering. In the majority of images, PID-based detection strategies can reliably detect fluence anomalies of ≥5% in ∼1 mm 2 areas and ≥2% in ∼20 mm 2 areas. Conclusions: The ability to detect small dose differences (≤2%) depends strongly on the level of background noise. This in turn depends on the accuracy of image registration, the quality of the reference image, and field properties. The longer term aim of this work is to develop accurate and reliable methods of detecting IMRT delivery errors and variations. The ability to resolve small anomalies will allow the accuracy of advanced treatment techniques, such as image guided, adaptive, and arc therapies, to be quantified.

  10. Online 3D EPID-based dose verification: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; González, Patrick; Mans, Anton; Mijnheer, Ben; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-07-01

    Delivery errors during radiotherapy may lead to medical harm and reduced life expectancy for patients. Such serious incidents can be avoided by performing dose verification online, i.e., while the patient is being irradiated, creating the possibility of halting the linac in case of a large overdosage or underdosage. The offline EPID-based 3D in vivo dosimetry system clinically employed at our institute is in principle suited for online treatment verification, provided the system is able to complete 3D dose reconstruction and verification within 420 ms, the present acquisition time of a single EPID frame. It is the aim of this study to show that our EPID-based dosimetry system can be made fast enough to achieve online 3D in vivo dose verification. The current dose verification system was sped up in two ways. First, a new software package was developed to perform all computations that are not dependent on portal image acquisition separately, thus removing the need for doing these calculations in real time. Second, the 3D dose reconstruction algorithm was sped up via a new, multithreaded implementation. Dose verification was implemented by comparing planned with reconstructed 3D dose distributions delivered to two regions in a patient: the target volume and the nontarget volume receiving at least 10 cGy. In both volumes, the mean dose is compared, while in the nontarget volume, the near-maximum dose (D2) is compared as well. The real-time dosimetry system was tested by irradiating an anthropomorphic phantom with three VMAT plans: a 6 MV head-and-neck treatment plan, a 10 MV rectum treatment plan, and a 10 MV prostate treatment plan. In all plans, two types of serious delivery errors were introduced. The functionality of automatically halting the linac was also implemented and tested. The precomputation time per treatment was ∼180 s/treatment arc, depending on gantry angle resolution. The complete processing of a single portal frame, including dose verification, took

  11. A study on characteristics of X-ray detector for CCD-based EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun

    1999-02-01

    The combination of the metal plate/phosphor screen as a x-ray detector with a CCD camera is the most popular detector system among various electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). There is a need to optimize the thickness of the metal plate/phosphor screen with high detection efficiency and high spatial resolution for effective transferring of anatomical information. In this study, the thickness dependency on the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution of the metal plate/phosphor screen was investigated by calculation and measurement. The result can be used to determine the optimal thickness of the metal plate as well as of the phosphor screen for the x-ray detector design of therapeutic x-ray imaging and for any specific application. Bremsstrahlung spectrum was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and by Schiff formula. The detection efficiency was calculated from the total absorbed energy in the phosphor screen using the Monte Carlo simulation and the light output was measured. The spatial resolution, which was defined from the spatial distribution of the absorbed energy, was also calculated and the edge spread function was measured. It was found that the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution were mainly determined by the thickness of metal plate and phosphor screen, respectively. It was also revealed that the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution have trade-off in term of the thickness of the phosphor screen. As the phosphor thickness increases, the detection efficiency increases but the spatial resolution decreases. The curve illustrating the trade-off between the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution of the metal plate/phosphor screen detector is obtained as a function of the phosphor thickness. Based on the calculations, prototype CCD-based EPID was developed and then tested by acquiring phantom images for 6 MV x-ray beam. While, among the captured images, each frame suffered from quantum noise, the frame averaging

  12. Necrolisis epidérmica tóxica: un paradigma de enfermedad crítica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Estrella-Alonso

    Full Text Available RESUMEN La necrolisis epidérmica tóxica es una reacción cutánea adversa de tipo inmunológico secundaria en la mayor parte de los casos a la administración de un fármaco. La necrolisis epidérmica tóxica, el síndrome de Steven Johnson y el eritema exudativo multiforme forman parte del mismo espectro de enfermedad. La mortalidad de la necrolisis epidérmica tóxica es alrededor del 30%. La fisiopatología de la necrolisis epidérmica tóxica es semejante en muchos aspectos a la de las quemaduras dérmicas superficiales. La afectación mucosa del epitelio ocular y genital se asocia con secuelas graves si no se trata de forma temprana. Se acepta en general que los pacientes con necrolisis epidérmica tóxica son tratados mejor en unidades de grandes quemados, donde existe experiencia en el manejo de enfermos con pérdida cutánea extensa. El tratamiento es de soporte, eliminación y cobertura con derivados biosintéticos de la piel de las zonas afectadas, tratamiento de la afectación mucosa, y tratamiento inmunosupresor específico. De los tratamientos ensayados sólo se usa actualmente en la mayor parte de los centros la inmunoglobulina G y la ciclosporina A, aun cuando no existe evidencia sólida para recomendar ningún tratamiento específico. Entre los aspectos particulares del tratamiento de esta enfermedad se encuentra la prevención de secuelas relacionadas con la formación de sinequias, los cuidados oculares para prevenir secuelas graves que pueden conducir a la ceguera, y el tratamiento específico inmunosupresor. Un mejor conocimiento de los principios del manejo de la necrolisis epidérmica tóxica llevará a un mejor manejo de la enfermedad, a una mayor supervivencia y una menor prevalencia de las secuelas.

  13. A simple approach for EPID dosimetric calibration to overcome the effect of image-lag and ghosting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshanqity, Mukhtar; Duane, Simon; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    EPID dosimetry has known drawbacks. The main issue is that a measurable residual signal is observed after the end of irradiation for prolonged periods of time, thus making measurement difficult. We present a detailed analysis of EPID response and suggest a simple, yet accurate approach for calibration that avoids the complexity of incorporating ghosting and image-lag using the maximum integrated signal instead of the total integrated signal. This approach is linear with dose and independent of dose rate. - Highlights: ► Image-lag and ghosting effects dosimetric accuracy. ► Image-lag and ghosting result in the reduction of total integrated signal for low doses. ► Residual signal is the most significant result for the image-lag and ghosting effects. ► Image-lag and ghosting can result in under-dosing of up to 2.5%.

  14. EPID-based in vivo dosimetry for stereotactic body radiotherapy of non-small cell lung tumors: Initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consorti, R; Fidanzio, A; Brainovich, V; Mangiacotti, F; De Spirito, M; Mirri, M A; Petrucci, A

    2017-10-01

    EPID-based in vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been implemented for stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments of non-small cell lung cancer to check both isocenter dose and the treatment reproducibility comparing EPID portal images. 15 patients with lung tumors of small dimensions and treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy were enrolled for this initial experience. IVD tests supplied ratios R between in vivo reconstructed and planned isocenter doses. Moreover a γ-like analysis between daily EPID portal images and a reference one, in terms of percentage of points with γ-value smaller than 1, P γlevels of 5% for R ratio, P γlevel, and an average P γ90%. Paradigmatic discrepancies were observed in three patients: a set-up error and a patient morphological change were identified thanks to CBCT image analysis whereas the third discrepancy was not fully justified. This procedure can provide improved patient safety as well as a first step to integrate IVD and CBCT dose recalculation. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. aSi EPIDs for the in-vivo dosimetry of static and dynamic beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, A.; Cilla, S.; Azario, L.; Greco, F.; Russo, M.; Grusio, M.; Orlandini, L.; Fidanzio, A.

    2015-10-01

    Portal imaging by amorphous silicon (aSi) photodiode is currently the most applied technology for in-vivo dosimetry (IVD) of static and dynamic radiotherapy beams. The strategy, adopted in this work to perform the IVD procedure by aSi EPID, is based on: in patient reconstruction of the isocenter dose and day to day comparison between 2D-portal images to verify the reproducibility of treatment delivery. About 20.000 tests have been carried out in this last 3 years in 8 radiotherapy centers using the SOFTDISO program. The IVD results show that: (i) the procedure can be implemented for linacs of different manufacturer, (ii) the IVD analysis can be obtained on a computer screen, in quasi real time (about 2 min after the treatment delivery) and (iii) once the causes of the discrepancies were eliminated, all the global IVD tests for single patient were within the acceptance criteria defined by: ±5% for the isocenter dose, and PγFisica Nucleare (INFN) and Università Cattolica del S.Cuore (UCSC).

  16. Implementation of an integral program of quality assurance based on EPID to the IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannez Ruiz-Labrandera; Emilio; Gonzalez Perez, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We bring forward with this research the implementation of a procedure related to the assurance guaranty in the control of tue quality of IMRT treatment based on the technology of electronic portal images digital (EPID). For the sake of accomplishing quality controls, based in pylic digital images, we used like main tool the System of pylic digital images IviewGT TM with his application software. For the control of positioning of the multi-plates, we implemented a program in MATLAB, which yields the errors of positioning of the plates. For the dosimetric controls, the images obtained for the fields of treatment were climbed with the software ImageJ, and compared with the treatment planning systems (TPS) model Elekta's PrecisePlan ® for it we used the software Verisoft. We managed to implement a comprehensive program of quality control for IMRT. The positioning errors of the multiplates intervening bayouth's test younger errors of positioning under a 1m threw which the requisite is for the IMRT. The rest of the geometric proofs yielded favorable results inmail with them tolerance, same as the test Picket Fence. We verified 2 cases with the technique step and shoot, for it we verified 16 field, where gamma Index varied 85,8 - 98,9. It was checked the possibility to accomplish the quality controls for IMRT using pylic digital images, in our case checked itself himself I apply the Linac Elekta specify on the Ameijeiras. (Author)

  17. TH-AB-202-01: Daily Lung Tumor Motion Characterization On EPIDs Using a Markerless Tiling Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozario, T [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Chiu, T; Lu, W; Chen, M; Yan, Y [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Bereg, S [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Mao, W [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tracking lung tumor motion in real time allows for target dose escalation while simultaneously reducing dose to sensitive structures, thus increasing local control without increasing toxicity. We present a novel intra-fractional markerless lung tumor tracking algorithm using MV treatment beam images acquired during treatment delivery. Strong signals superimposed on the tumor significantly reduced the soft tissue resolution; while different imaging modalities involved introduce global imaging discrepancies. This reduced the comparison accuracies. A simple yet elegant Tiling algorithm is reported to overcome the aforementioned issues. Methods: MV treatment beam images were acquired continuously in beam’s eye view (BEV) by an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during treatment and analyzed to obtain tumor positions on every frame. Every frame of the MV image was simulated by a composite of two components with separate digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs): all non-moving structures and the tumor. This Titling algorithm divides the global composite DRR and the corresponding MV projection into sub-images called tiles. Rigid registration is performed independently on tile-pairs in order to improve local soft tissue resolution. This enables the composite DRR to be transformed accurately to match the MV projection and attain a high correlation value through a pixel-based linear transformation. The highest cumulative correlation for all tile-pairs achieved over a user-defined search range indicates the 2-D coordinates of the tumor location on the MV projection. Results: This algorithm was successfully applied to cine-mode BEV images acquired during two SBRT plans delivered five times with different motion patterns to each of two phantoms. Approximately 15000 beam’s eye view images were analyzed and tumor locations were successfully identified on every projection with a maximum/average error of 1.8 mm / 1.0 mm. Conclusion: Despite the presence of

  18. EPID detection of radio-opaque markers for the evaluation of prostate position during megavoltage irradiation: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneault, E.; Pouliot, J.; Laverdiere, J.; Roy, J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess daily prostatic apex motion relative to pelvic bone structures during megavoltage irradiation. Materials and Methods: Radio-opaque markers were implanted under ultrasound guidance near the prostatic apex of ten patients with localized prostatic carcinoma. Patients were subsequently treated with four field box technique at a beam energy of 23 MV. During treatment, on-line images were obtained with an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for each field and fraction. The marker was easily identified, even on unprocessed images and the distance between the marker and a bony landmark was measured. Timelapse movie for the complete treatment of each patient were also reviewed. After the completion of treatment, a transrectal ultrasound examination was performed to verify the position of the marker relative to the apex. Results: Over 1000 digital portal images were acquired. Antero-posterior and lateral views of each fraction were analysed. The quality of portal images obtained with megavoltage irradiation was good. Even without image histogram equalization it was possible to evaluate pelvic bone structures. Moreover, the radio-opaque marker was easily visible on every on-line portal image. Qualitatively, the review of timelapse movies showed important interfraction motions of the marker while bone structures remained stable. Quantitatively, the position of the marker were measured for each fraction. Marker displacements of up to 1,4 cm were measured between two consecutive days of treatment. Important marker motions were predominately in the antero-posterior and cephalo-caudal directions. Position of the markers relative to the prostatic apex were verified with ultrasound at the end of the treatments and were found to remain globaly at their original position. Intratreatment images were reviewed in two cases and no change in marker positions was observed. Our results, obtained during the treatment courses, indicate similar or larger prostate motions

  19. SU-E-J-64: Evaluation of a Commercial EPID-Based in Vivo Dosimetric System in the Presence of Lung Tissue Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimeno-Olmos, J; Palomo-Llinares, R; Candela-Juan, C; Carmona Meseguer, V; Lliso-Valverde, F [Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Martinez, T [Hospital de la Ribera, Alzira, Valencia (Spain); Richart-Sancho, J [Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain); Ballester, F [University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the performance of Dosimetry Check (DC), an EPID-based dosimetry software, which allows performing transit dosimetry, in low density medium, by comparing calculations in-phantom, and analysing results for 15 lung patients. Methods: DC software (v.3.8, pencil beam-based algorithm) has been tested, for plans (Eclipse v.10.0 TPS) delivered in two Varian Clinac iX equipped with aS1000 EPIDs.In the CIRS lung phantom, comparisons between DC and Eclipse (Acuros) were performed for several plans: (1) four field box; (2) square field delivered in arc mode; (3) RapidArc lung patient plan medially centred; (4) RapidArc lung patient plan centred in one lung. Reference points analysed: P1 (medial point, plans 1–3) and P2 (located inside one lung, plan 4).For fifteen lung patients treated with RapidArc, the isocentre and 9 additional points inside the PTV as well as the gamma passing rate (3%/3mm) for the PTV and at the main planes were studied. Results: In-phantom:P1: Per-field differences in plan 1: good agreement for AP-PA fields; discrepancy of 7% for the lateral fields. Global differences (plans 1–3): about 4%, showing a compensating effect of the individual differences.P2: Global difference (plan 4): 15 %. This represents the worst case situation as it is a point surrounded by lung tissue, where the DC pencil beam algorithm is expected to give the greater difference against Acuros.Lung patients: Mean point difference inside the PTV:(5.4±4.2) %. Gamma passing rate inside the PTV:(45±12) %. Conclusion: The performance of DC in heterogeneous lung medium was studied with a special phantom and the results for 15 patients were analysed. The found deviations show that even though DC is a highly promising in vivo dosimetry tool, there is a need of incorporating a more accurate algorithm mainly for plans with low density regions involved.

  20. Perfil de ingresos y urgencias pediátricas en período epidémico de rotavirus en Valladolid: Utilidad de un modelo predictivo Profile of paediatric admissions and emergencies during an epidemic period of rotavirus in Valladolid [Spain]: Utility of a predictive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Luquero

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Este estudio pretende determinar las semanas de alta circulación de rotavirus en valladolid, y comparar las características de los ingresos y urgencias en período epidémico con respecto al período no epidémico. Métodos: Se utilizaron las declaraciones al sistema de información microbiológica, el conjunto mínimo básico de datos y el registro de urgencias. Se calcularon los casos esperados para 2006 a partir de un modelo elaborado previamente. Si los casos observados superaban el umbral superior del 95% de los esperados, la semana se consideró epidémica. Se compararon las características de los ingresos y urgencias en ambos períodos. Resultados: En 2006 se diagnosticaron un 42% menos de los casos esperados. La media de ingresos diarios fue superior en período epidémico (diferencia=1,49; p=0,01, y también fue mayor la duración media del ingreso. Conclusión: La actividad del servicio de pediatría se incrementó en período epidémico, por lo que es oportuna la implantación de actividades de vigilancia, programas de prevención y control frente a rotavirus en el ámbito hospitalario.Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the weeks of high rotavirus circulation in Valladolid (Spain and to compare the characteristics of hospitalizations and emergencies in epidemic and nonepidemic periods. Methods: The information sources consisted of the weekly notifications to the Microbiological Information System, the Minimum Data Set, and the Emergency Registry. Expected cases for 2006 were calculated using a previously developed model. Weeks with observed cases over the upper limit of the 95% confidence interval for expected cases were considered epidemic periods. Hospitalization and emergencies in epidemic and nonepidemic periods were compared. Results: The number of cases in 2006 was 42% less than the expected number. The mean number of daily admissions was higher in epidemic periods (d=1.49; p=0.01 and the

  1. Quasi 3D dosimetry (EPID, conventional 2D/3D detector matrices)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bäck, A

    2015-01-01

    Patient specific pretreatment measurement for IMRT and VMAT QA should preferably give information with a high resolution in 3D. The ability to distinguish complex treatment plans, i.e. treatment plans with a difference between measured and calculated dose distributions that exceeds a specified tolerance, puts high demands on the dosimetry system used for the pretreatment measurements and the results of the measurement evaluation needs a clinical interpretation. There are a number of commercial dosimetry systems designed for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. 2D arrays such as MapCHECK ® (Sun Nuclear), MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) and OCTAVIOUS ® 1500 (PTW), 3D phantoms such as OCTAVIUS ® 4D (PTW), ArcCHECK ® (Sun Nuclear) and Delta 4 (ScandiDos) and software for EPID dosimetry and 3D reconstruction of the dose in the patient geometry such as EPIDose TM (Sun Nuclear) and Dosimetry Check TM (Math Resolutions) are available. None of those dosimetry systems can measure the 3D dose distribution with a high resolution (full 3D dose distribution). Those systems can be called quasi 3D dosimetry systems. To be able to estimate the delivered dose in full 3D the user is dependent on a calculation algorithm in the software of the dosimetry system. All the vendors of the dosimetry systems mentioned above provide calculation algorithms to reconstruct a full 3D dose in the patient geometry. This enables analyzes of the difference between measured and calculated dose distributions in DVHs of the structures of clinical interest which facilitates the clinical interpretation and is a promising tool to be used for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. However, independent validation studies on the accuracy of those algorithms are scarce. Pretreatment IMRT QA using the quasi 3D dosimetry systems mentioned above rely on both measurement uncertainty and accuracy of calculation algorithms. In this article, these quasi 3D dosimetry systems and their use in patient specific

  2. A novel approach to EPID-based 3D volumetric dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT QA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazmi, Abdulaziz; Gianoli, Chiara; Neppl, Sebastian; Martins, Juliana; Veloza, Stella; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank; Reiner, Michael; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2018-06-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are relatively complex treatment delivery techniques and require quality assurance (QA) procedures. Pre-treatment dosimetric verification represents a fundamental QA procedure in daily clinical routine in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to develop an EPID-based approach to reconstruct a 3D dose distribution as imparted to a virtual cylindrical water phantom to be used for plan-specific pre-treatment dosimetric verification for IMRT and VMAT plans. For each depth, the planar 2D dose distributions acquired in air were back-projected and convolved by depth-specific scatter and attenuation kernels. The kernels were obtained by making use of scatter and attenuation models to iteratively estimate the parameters from a set of reference measurements. The derived parameters served as a look-up table for reconstruction of arbitrary measurements. The summation of the reconstructed 3D dose distributions resulted in the integrated 3D dose distribution of the treatment delivery. The accuracy of the proposed approach was validated in clinical IMRT and VMAT plans by means of gamma evaluation, comparing the reconstructed 3D dose distributions with Octavius measurement. The comparison was carried out using (3%, 3 mm) criteria scoring 99% and 96% passing rates for IMRT and VMAT, respectively. An accuracy comparable to the one of the commercial device for 3D volumetric dosimetry was demonstrated. In addition, five IMRT and five VMAT were validated against the 3D dose calculation performed by the TPS in a water phantom using the same passing rate criteria. The median passing rates within the ten treatment plans was 97.3%, whereas the lowest was 95%. Besides, the reconstructed 3D distribution is obtained without predictions relying on forward dose calculation and without external phantom or dosimetric devices. Thus, the approach provides a fully automated, fast and easy QA

  3. Epidémiologie de l'infection urinaire chez l'enfant au CHU-Campus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Titre : Epidémiologie de l'infection urinaire chez l'enfant au CHU-Campus de Lomé. Objectif : Evaluer la prévalence et étudier l'épidémiologie des infections urinaires. Méthodologie : Il s'agit d'une étude prospective qui s'est déroulée du 1er janvier au 31décembre 2009, dans le service de pédiatrie du CHU-Campus de ...

  4. Quiste epidérmico de inclusión de párpado. Presentación de 2 casos

    OpenAIRE

    Eréndira Güemez Sandoval; Fátima Cedillo Azuela; Rosalba García Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    El quiste epidérmico de inclusión o quiste epidermoide es una lesión intraepitelial, redonda u ovalada, de color amarillo, de crecimiento progresivo y consistencia suave; de diversa etiología, se origina por la proliferación de las células epidérmicas superficiales dentro de la dermis y su contenido es queratina. Se presenta frecuentemente en los párpados. El diagnóstico se realiza por la clínica y por el estudio histopatológico; el tratamiento es con escisión quirúrgica completa.

  5. Estudio de un brote epidémico de tos ferina en Castellón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Morán Francisco

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: A partir de la declaración de varios casos en un centro escolar se inicia el estudio de brote con el objetivo de caracterizar éste desde el punto de vista de persona, lugar y tiempo; se calcula la efectividad de la vacuna, y se estudia la concordancia entre los casos y el resultado positivo del estudio serológico. Métodos: Se define caso a la persona que presenta tos persistente de dos semanas de duración. Se realiza estudio de la difusión de la enfermedad a través de la curva epidémica, y de la efectividad de la dosis de refuerzo de la vacuna antipertussis. La concordancia entre los casos y la serología positiva se evalúa por el índice Kappa. Resultados: Entre los alumnos de varios centros escolares y sus convivientes se encuesta a 130 personas, de los que 94 entran en la definición de caso. La media de edad de los casos es 10,5 años, un 42,6% son varones, el 84% escolares, el 71,3% muestra signos de infección reciente (IgM positiva, y el tiempo medio desde la última dosis de vacuna antipertussis es de 8,25 años. La efectividad de la dosis de refuerzo de la vacuna es del 66%. La concordancia entre los casos y el resultado positivo de la serología muestra un Kappa igual a 0,45. No se aisló B. Pertussis en las 25 muestras de frotis faríngeo. Conclusiones: Las aulas y el medio familiar son un factor de difusión de la enfermedad. La inclusión de una dosis de refuerzo a los 18 meses mejora la efectividad de la vacuna antipertussis. El aislamiento de la B. Pertussis es poco frecuente, y la serología, puede ser una alternativa ante la sospecha clínica de la enfermedad.

  6. Epidermal growth factor enemas for induction of remission in left-sided ulcerative colitis Enemas de factor de crecimiento epidérmico para inducir la remisión de la colitis ulcerosa izquierda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Nodarse-Cuní

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: ulcerative colitis is a little known chronic inflammatory disease in colonic mucosa. The positive effect of epidermal growth factor was shown in a previous report, with enema use for treatment of mild to moderate left-sided manifestation of the disease. This evidence provided the basis for evaluating the efficacy and safety profile of a viscous solution of this product. Methods: thirty-one patients were randomized to three groups for daily medications during 14 days. Twelve received one 10 mg enema of epidermal growth factor dissolved in 100 mL of viscous solution whereas nine were treated with placebo enema; both groups also received 1.2 g of oral mesalamine per day. The other group included ten patients with 3 g / 100 mL of mesalamine enema. Primary end point was clinical responses after two weeks of treatment, defined as a decreased of, at least three points from baseline, the Disease Activity Index and endoscopic or histological evidences of improvement. Results: remission of disease was observed in all patients in the epidermal growth factor group, and six in both, mesalamine enema and placebo group. All the comparisons between groups showed statistically significant superiority for epidermal growth factor, the only product with significant reduction in disease activity index as well as the presence and intensity of digestive symptoms in patients after treatment. None adverse event was reported. Conclusions: the results agree with previous molecular and clinical evidences, indicating that the epidermal growth factor is effective to reduce disease activity and to induce remission. A new study involving more patients should be conducted to confirm the efficacy of the epidermal growth factor enemas.Introducción: la colitis ulcerosa es una enfermedad inflamatoria crónica de etiología poco conocida, que afecta la mucosa del colon. El efecto positivo del factor de crecimiento epidérmico fue reportado en estudio previo con uso de

  7. Feasibility of megavoltage portal CT using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and a multi-level scheme algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-ART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Huaiqun; Zhu, Yunping

    1998-01-01

    Although electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are efficient tools for radiation therapy verification, they only provide images of overlapped anatomic structures. We investigated using a fluorescent screen/CCD-based EPID, coupled with a novel multi-level scheme algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-ART), for a feasibility study of portal computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. The CT images might be useful for radiation treatment planning and verification. We used an EPID, set it to work at the linear dynamic range and collimated 6 MV photons from a linear accelerator to a slit beam of 1 cm wide and 25 cm long. We performed scans under a total of ∼200 monitor units (MUs) for several phantoms in which we varied the number of projections and MUs per projection. The reconstructed images demonstrated that using the new MLS-ART technique megavoltage portal CT with a total of 200 MUs can achieve a contrast detectibility of ∼2.5% (object size 5mmx5mm) and a spatial resolution of 2.5 mm. (author)

  8. Genetic structure of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C epidemic strains in South Brazil Estrutura genética de cepas epidêmicas de Neisseria meningitidis sorogrupo C do Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Tavares Sacchi

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we report the results of an analysis, based on serotyping, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE, and ribotyping of N. meningitidis serogroup C strains isolated from patients with meningococcal disease (MD in Rio Grande do Sul (RS and Santa Catarina (SC States, Brazil, as the Center of Epidemiology Control of Ministry of Health detected an increasing of MD cases due to this serogroup in the last two years (1992-1993. We have demonstrated that the MD due to N.meningitidis serogroup C strains in RS and SC States occurring in the last 4 years were caused mainly by one clone of strains (ET 40, with isolates indistinguishable by serogroup, serotype, subtype and even by ribotyping. One small number of cases that were not due to an ET 40 strains, represent closely related clones that probably are new lineages generated from the ET 40 clone referred as ET 11A complex. We have also analyzed N.meningitidis serogroup C strains isolated in the greater São Paulo in 1976 as representative of the first post epidemic year in that region. The ribotyping method, as well as MEE, could provide useful information about the clonal characteristics of those isolates and also of strains isolated in south Brazil. The strains from 1976 have more similarity with the actual endemic than epidemic strains, by the ribotyping, sulfonamide sensitivity, and MEE results. In conclusion, serotyping with monoclonal antibodies (C:2b:P1.3, MEE (ET 11 and ET 11A complex, and ribotyping by using ClaI restriction enzyme (Rb2, were useful to characterize these epidemic strains of N.meningitidis related to the increased incidence of MD in different States of south Brazil. It is mostly probable that these N.meningitidis serogroup C strains have poor or no genetic corelation with 1971-1975 epidemic serogroup C strains. The genetic similarity of members of the ET 11 and ET 11A complex were confirmed by the ribotyping method by using three restriction endonucleases

  9. Brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella pneumophila en niños cubanos

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    Roberto Razón Behar

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available La Legionella pneumophila es uno de los patógenos responsable de neumonías atípicas, a través de la inhalación de aerosoles o aspiración de líquidos infectados. Se detectó un brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella, originado por la aspiración de agua contaminada de una piscina en un grupo de niños cubanos. El agente causal se identificó en 5 de 9 pacientes, por la técnica de inmunofluorescencia indirecta en muestras de sueros pareados. Los síntomas y signos más frecuentes fueron malestar general, anorexia, astenia, fiebre persistente de 39 °C a 40 °C (103 °F a 105 °F, mialgias, cefaleas, náuseas, vómitos, dolor abdominal, diarreas, tos húmeda, dolor torácico y polipnea. Durante el desarrollo de la enfermedad, el tratamiento antibiótico fue empírico (incluyendo los macrólidos, por no tener confirmado el diagnóstico. Todos los pacientes evolucionaron satisfactoriamente. Se reportó un brote epidémico de neumonías por Legionella en niños por primera vez en Cuba, lo cual tiene importancia clínica y epidemiológica.The legionella pneumophila is one of the pathogens responsible for atypic pneumonias by the inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of infected liquids. An epidemic outbreak of pneumonias caused by Legionella was detected among a group of Cuban children. It was originated by the aspiration of contaminated water in a swimming pool. The causal agent was identified in 5 of 9 patients by using the indirect immunofluorescence technique in samples of matched sera. The most frequent symptoms and signs were malaise, anorexia, asthenia, persistent fever from 39°C to 40°C (103° F to 105° F, myalgias, headache, nauseas, vomits, abdominal pain, diarrheas, moist cough, thoracic pain and polypnoea. The antibiotic treatment was empiric (including the macrolides during the development of the disease, since the diagnosis was not confirmed. The patients’ evolution was satisfactory. An epidemic outbreak of pneumonias

  10. Necrólisis epidérmica tóxica: Descripción de 1 caso

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    Odalis Peña Pérez

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de necrólisis epidérmica tóxica, enfermedad poco frecuente y con alto índice de mortalidad, en un neonato a término, de madre primigesta, con tiempo de gestación de 39,2 semanas; parto eutócico y apgar 8/9, con un peso corporal de 3 770 que a las 2 horas del nacimiento comenzó con lesiones eritematoampollosas y centro necrótico, que rápidamente evolucionó de forma desfavorable y fallece a las 33 horas de nacido. Se realiza revisión bibliográfica del tema y se emiten comentarios de su probable patogenia.A case of toxic epidermal necrolysis, a rare disease with a high mortality rate, is presented in a term infant of a primigravida with 39.2 weeks of gestation, eutocic delivery, apgar 8/9, and a body weight of 3 770 g, that presented erythematous and ampollous lesions and necrotic center 2 hours after having been delivered and had a fast unfavorable evolution and died 33 hours after birth. A bibliographic review of the topic was made and its probable pathogeny was commented.

  11. Análisis comparativo de los caracteres epidérmicos en Flourensia campestris y F. oolepis (Asteraceae Comparative analysis of the epidermal characters in Flourensia campestris and F. oolepis (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Delbón

    Full Text Available En el presente estudio se examinaron y compararon cuantitativamente las epidermis foliares de Flourensia campestris Griseb. y F. oolepis S. F. Blake, especies endémicas que crecen en las sierras de Córdoba, Argentina. Para ello, se seleccionaron cinco variables: número de células epidérmicas propiamente dichas, estomas, tricomas glandulares y eglandulares e índice estomático. Los resultados obtenidos se evaluaron por métodos estadísticos; ellos indican que hay diferencias significativas entre ambas especies en las variables frecuencia de estomas, de células propiamente dichas, de tricomas glandulares e índice estomático. Estos datos podrían ser de interés para su reconocimiento cuando se dispone de muestras pequeñas o fragmentos.This study provides comparative analyses of foliar epidermis in Flourensia campestris Griseb. and F. oolepis S. F. Blake, endemic species that grow in Córdoba, Argentina. Five variables were selected: number of epidermal cells, stomata, glandular and eglandular trichomes and stomatal index. Results were evaluated by statistical methods; they show that there are significant differences between the variables of both species; these data could be of interest for their identification, when only are available small samples and fragments.

  12. Análisis de un brote epidémico de brucelosis en trabajadores de un matadero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna Sánchez Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: La notificación mediante el Sistema de Vigilancia Epidemiológica de un número inusual de casos de Brucelosis en trabajadores de un matadero a finales de 1996 hizo sospechar la existencia de un brote epidémico entre dicho colectivo profesional. MÉTODOS: Se recopiló la información disponible respecto a: 1 animales sacrificados en el matadero diagnosticados de brucelosis; 2 bajas laborales producidas y 3 datos de la mutualidad laboral relativos a los empleados del matadero con la enfermedad. Se realizó una encuesta epidemiológica a los trabajadores sobre los antecedentes de enfermedad, actividad laboral y riesgos no laborales (ingesta de leche o derivados sin higienizar. Las dependencias y actividades del matadero fueron inspeccionadas. Se diseñó un estudio de casos y controles. Se estudió cada puesto de trabajo tomando como controles a los restantes empleados del matadero. Para su verificación se realizó un estudio retrospectivo de cohortes. RESULTADOS: El brote epidémico de la enfermedad entre los trabajadores comenzó durante el mes de septiembre y duró hasta febrero del siguiente año. Las encuestas epidemiológicas descubrieron 28 trabajadores con síntomas sugestivos de la enfermedad, siendo los operarios del área de sacrificio del matadero quienes presentan la tasa de ataque más alta: 56%. En el estudio de casos y controles el riesgo más elevado se observó en dicho colectivo de trabajadores con una OR de 4,27 (IC 95%: 1,6-15 y p<0.01. Del mismo modo en el estudio de cohortes apreciamos que estos trabajadores presentan un RR de 2,5 (IC 95%: 1,5-4,3 cuando son comparados con el resto de trabajadores de la cohorte y de 8 (IC 95%: 2-30 si los comparamos con el colectivo de menor exposición. Los RR de los operarios de la limpieza y de la sala de despiece fueron de 6,56 (IC 95%: 1,6-27 para los primeros y de 4,77 (IC 95%: 1,1-21 para los segundos. Las fracciones etiológicas fueron del 87% para los de la zona de

  13. Factores de riesgo en la neuropatía epidémica periférica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Herrero Vicente

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de casos y controles con el objetivo de profundizar en el conocimiento de factores de riesgo relacionados con la neuropatía epidémica periférica. El universo de estudio estuvo conformado por la totalidad de enfermos diagnosticados por la comisión provincial durante el período de 1993 a 1998, correspondiente al área de salud del policlínico "13 de Marzo", y los controles fueron escogidos en forma aleatoria con similares variables epidemiológicas. Se comprobó que no hubo asociación con la edad, y que el sexo femenino fue el más afectado. El incremento de la actividad física y el hábito de fumar tuvieron alta significación estadística. El alcoholismo resultó importante asociado al tabaquismo. Se concluyó que la actividad física intensa, la no ingestión de suplemento vitamínico y la nutrición deficitaria son factores de riesgo importantes en la aparición de la enfermedadA case-control study was performed to expand the knowledge on risk factors related to peripheral epidemic neuropathy. The universe of study was made up of all the patients diagnosed by the provincial commission from 1993 to 1998 in the health area of "13 de Marzo" polyclinics whereas the controls with similar epidemiological variables were randomly selected. It was proved that there was no association with age, and that females were the most affected. The increased physical activity and smoking had statistical significance. Alcoholism was found to be important associated with smoking. It was concluded that the internal physical activity, no ingestion of vitamin supplements and malnutrition are important risk factors in the occurrence of the disease

  14. Narrativa epidémica. La construcción social de las crisis sanitarias en la ficción literaria

    OpenAIRE

    Nespereira García, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Las crisis sanitarias de las últimas décadas han sido al mismo tiempo crisis mediáticas, históricas y socioculturales. En este contexto, numerosos autores han señalado la importancia de las narrativas de ficción en la transformación y transmisión de los valores morales e ideológicos implicados. En el siguiente trabajo presentamos el estudio comparativo de dos obras de ficción narrativa literaria en las que el relato se estructura en torno a la gestión de una crisis epidémica...

  15. Evaluación neuroquímica de la neuropatía óptica epidémica

    OpenAIRE

    González-Quevedo Monteagudo , Alina

    2004-01-01

    La aparición súbita en Cuba de una epidemia de neuropatía óptica en 1992,desencadenó una serie de investigaciones dirigidas a esclarecer las causas subyacentes. El presente trabajo investigó la participación del balance de aminoácidos sistémicos y en el sistema nervioso, la permeabilidad de la barrera hematoencefálica (BHE) y la neurotoxicidad del metanol en la fisiopatología de la neuropatía óptica epidémica (NOE). Se llevaron a cabo estudios en pacientes con NOE y en un modelo experimental ...

  16. Diagnóstico temprano en un brote epidémico del virus Dengue en Piura usando RT-PCR y nested-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Nolasco

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Un test de diagnóstico temprano (RT-PCR y Nested-PCR fue evaluado y comparado con métodos convencionales (cultivo in vitro, IFI y MAC-ELISA. Treinta y cuatro sueros de pacientes correspondientes de un brote epidémico de la costa norte peruana (Mancora, Piura en mayo de 1997 fueron incluidos en este estudio. Todos los sueros fueron obtenidos de pacientes que presentaron en los primeros cinco días manifestaciones clínicas siendo diagnosticados luego como dengue serotipo 1. Asimismo, RT-PCR permitió diagnosticar 82% de los sueros (28/34, sin embargo Mac-ELISA y cultivo in vitro reconocieron unicamente 41% de los sueros (14/34 y 38% de los sueros (13/34 respectivamente. Por lo tanto, el uso de esta herramienta molecular (RT-PCR y Nested-PCR permitiró dar un diagnóstico temprano a estos pacientes y actuar inmediatamente ante la presencia de un brote epidémico.

  17. Use of the statistical control of processes through checking before treatment realised with the ionization chamber and by electronic portal system of imaging (E.P.I.D.) in intensity modulated radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.); Utilisation de la maitrise statistique des processus dans le cadre des controles avant traitement realises avec la chambre d'ionisation et par systeme d'imagerie portale electronique (EPID) en radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite (RCMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villani, N.; Gerard, K.; Noel, A. [Nancy univ., Lab. de Recherche en Radiophysique, CRAN UMR 7039, CNRS, Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Marchesi, V.; Huger, S. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Radiophysique Medicale, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2009-10-15

    The expected results are to demonstrate that it is possible to reduce the times devoted to the pre-treatment controls, while keeping an optimal safety, on substituting the measures of the ionization chamber by this one of the electronic portal imaging device (E.P.I.D.). (N.C.)

  18. Estimating output fluence with MCNP4 for shaped fields and their comparison with measurements in the EPID system aS1000 for dosimetry 2D in-vivo; Estimacion de la fluencia de salida con MCNP4 para campos conformados y su comparacion con mediciones en el sistema EPID aS1000 para dosimetria in-vivo 2D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez R, B.; Rodriguez P, X.; Sosa, M., E-mail: bhernandez@fisica.ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque No. 103, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Radiotherapy dosimetry is a fundamental process in quality control of the treatments performed with this technique. Different systems exist to quantify radiation dose in radiotherapy, one of them is the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID), which is widely used in IMRT to measure the output fluence of a radiation field for comparison with a predicted fluence in a planning system. The objective of this work was to simulate a Varian linear accelerator model Clinac i X using the MCNP4 code for obtaining curves of percentage depth dose (Pdd) and open fields dosimetric profiles of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 20 x 20 and 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}. The simulations were validated by comparing them with measurements made with ionization chamber. Then a mannequin of solid water (30 x 30 x 20 cm{sup 3}) with an open field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} was irradiated to measure the output fluence with EPID aS1000 system of Varian. A simulation of the solid water mannequin under the same conditions of irradiation was conducted to estimate the output fluence. Tests of index gamma and percentage differences were calculated to compare that simulated with that measured. In all cases was found that more than 95% of the evaluated points passed the acceptance criteria (ΔD= 1% and ΔS= 1 mm for curves Pdd and profiles, and ΔD= 3% and ΔS= 3 mm for fluence two-dimensional). This paper will contribute to the implementation of in-vivo dosimetry three-dimensional with the EPID system. (Author)

  19. Hiperplasia de Músculo Liso no Epidídimo: Revisão de Literatura/Smooth Muscle Hyperplasia of the Epididymis: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecília Vieira Lisboa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available O epidídimo pode ser acometido por hiperplasia ou neoplasia, benigna ou maligna, sempre diferenciadas pelo estudo histopatológico. Ele tem como função coletar, amadurecer e armazenar espermatozóides constantemente produzidos pelos túbulos seminíferos. Patologias do epidídimo acometem homens na puberdade, o que pode resultar em alterações na maturação dos espermatozóides e até mesmo levar a infertilidade. A conduta dessa afecção é cirúrgica e pode ser desde ressecção da tumoração preservando-se estruturas hígidas como, por exemplo, os testículos, em casos benignos, até exploração peritoneal para esvaziamento linfonodal mais orquiectomia, em casos malignos. O objetivo foi realizar uma revisão de literatura sobre hiperplasia do epidídimo que auxilie no diagnóstico e tratamento precoces que diminuam a mortalidade, morbidade e sequelas dos pacientes. Como a patologia em questão tem baixa incidência, com predomínio de casos benignos e evolução sem complicações, conclui-se que há a necessidade de mais análises sobre o tema para melhor elucidar seu tratamento e, principalmente, as consequências. The epididymis may be affected by hyperplasia or neoplastic cells, always differentiated by histopathological study. It has the function of collecting, maturing and storing sperm that are constantly produced by the seminiferous tubules. Pathologies of epididymis affect male puberty, which may result in changes in the maturation of sperm and even lead to infertility. The conduct in this condition can be from a tumor resection preserving healthy structures such as, for example, the testicles, in benign cases, while in malignant cases chooses whether the peritoneal exploration for a lymph node dissection plus orchiectomy. The purpose was to conduct a literature review of hyperplasia of the epididymis that helps in the diagnosis and early treatment, which can lead to lower risk of mortality and morbidity allowing a decrease in

  20. Detección del receptor de factor de crecimiento epidérmico en lesiones orales premalignas por relaxometría

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Geli, Yamirka; De la Cruz, Enrique Reynaldo; Dutok Sánchez, Carlos M.; Álvarez Guerra, Eloy D

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: detectar la sobreexpresión del receptor de factor de crecimiento epidérmico en células epiteliales de lesiones premalignas de la mucosa bucal, marcadas magnéticamente por relaxometría. Métodos: las células exfoliadas de mucosa oral de individuos sanos y enfermos se marcaron con el sistema: IgG anti-EGF-R biotinilada/IgG anti-biotina conjugada con partículas superparamagnéticas y se midieron los tiempos de relajación T1 y T2. Resultados: disminuyeron los tiempos de relajación (T1 y T...

  1. Reacções cutâneas adversas aos inibidores do receptor do factor de crescimento epidérmico: estudo de 14 doentes Adverse cutaneous reactions to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors: a study of 14 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicidade Santiago

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: O cetuximab e o erlotinib, inibidores do receptor do factor de crescimento epidérmico, provocam frequentemente reacções cutâneas adversas peculiares. OBJETIVOS: Caracterizar do ponto de vista clínico-evolutivo as reacções cutâneas adversas e avaliar a sua abordagem terapêutica. METODOLOGIA: Entre março/2005 e setembro/2009 foram seguidos 14 doentes com idade média de 59,6 anos, em tratamento com cetuximab (7 ou erlotinib (7, por neoplasia pulmonar (10 ou colorrectal (4. Retrospectivamente foi avaliado o padrão clínico evolutivo de reacção cutânea, o intervalo entre a introdução do fármaco e o início dos sintomas e a resposta ao tratamento. RESULTADOS: Doze doentes apresentaram erupção papulopustulosa predominantemente na face, decote e dorso, em média 13,5 dias após o início do fármaco. Efectuaram tratamento oral com minociclina ou doxiciclina e tópico com metronidazol, peróxido de benzoílo e/ou corticoide. Ocorreu melhoria das lesões em todos os doentes. Cinco doentes, em média oito semanas após o início da terapia, apresentaram granulomas piogénicos periungueais, em quatro casos associados a paroníquia, melhorados com tratamento tópico (antibióticos, corticoides e antissépticos. Observou-se xerose em alguns doentes e, de forma isolada, outros efeitos adversos, como telangiectasias e angiomas, alterações dos cabelos e cílios e nevos melanocíticos eruptivos. Na maioria dos doentes, a terapêutica com o inibidor do receptor do factor de crescimento epidérmico foi mantida. CONCLUSÃO: Com o crescente uso destas terapêuticas-alvo, torna-se obrigatório reconhecer e tratar os seus efeitos cutâneos adversos, assegurando uma intervenção atempada de forma a permitir a manutenção desta terapêuticaBACKGROUND: Cetuximab and erlotinib, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, often cause peculiar adverse cutaneous reactions. OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to evaluate adverse cutaneous reactions

  2. Virtual patient 3D dose reconstruction using in air EPID measurements and a back-projection algorithm for IMRT and VMAT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Rozendaal, Roel; van Oers, René F M; Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton

    2017-05-01

    At our institute, a transit back-projection algorithm is used clinically to reconstruct in vivo patient and in phantom 3D dose distributions using EPID measurements behind a patient or a polystyrene slab phantom, respectively. In this study, an extension to this algorithm is presented whereby in air EPID measurements are used in combination with CT data to reconstruct 'virtual' 3D dose distributions. By combining virtual and in vivo patient verification data for the same treatment, patient-related errors can be separated from machine, planning and model errors. The virtual back-projection algorithm is described and verified against the transit algorithm with measurements made behind a slab phantom, against dose measurements made with an ionization chamber and with the OCTAVIUS 4D system, as well as against TPS patient data. Virtual and in vivo patient dose verification results are also compared. Virtual dose reconstructions agree within 1% with ionization chamber measurements. The average γ-pass rate values (3% global dose/3mm) in the 3D dose comparison with the OCTAVIUS 4D system and the TPS patient data are 98.5±1.9%(1SD) and 97.1±2.9%(1SD), respectively. For virtual patient dose reconstructions, the differences with the TPS in median dose to the PTV remain within 4%. Virtual patient dose reconstruction makes pre-treatment verification based on deviations of DVH parameters feasible and eliminates the need for phantom positioning and re-planning. Virtual patient dose reconstructions have additional value in the inspection of in vivo deviations, particularly in situations where CBCT data is not available (or not conclusive). Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tipificación molecular del virus dengue 3 durante el brote epidémico de dengue clásico en Lima, Perú, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Mamani Z

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Identificar mediante trascripción reversa-reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (RT-PCR y sitios específicos de restricción - reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (RSS-PCR al agente causal del brote epidémico presentado en el distrito de Comas, Lima en abril del año 2005. Materiales y métodos: veinte muestras de suero colectadas durante el brote de dengue fueron procesados por RT-PCR para determinar el serotipo, esta técnica se realizó en un solo paso. Luego se aplicó la técnica RSS-PCR para la identificación del genotipo circulante y se corroboraron los resultados posteriormente con aislamiento viral y secuenciamiento. Resultados: El análisis del RTPCR del ARN extraído de las muestras presentó un producto amplificado de 290pb que corresponden al dengue serotipo 3 (DEN 3. El análisis de los productos de RSS-PCR del ARN extraído a partir de aislamientos de DEN 3 correspondió al patrón C, incluido en el genotipo III. Los aislamientos de los virus dengue 3 en líneas celulares C6/36, tipificadas por IFI y el secuenciamiento genético confirmaron los resultados obtenidos por las pruebas previamente descritas. Conclusión: Durante el brote epidémico de dengue clásico en Lima, circuló el genotipo III del virus DEN 3.

  4. Laminite experimental: aspectos morfológicos, morfométricos e ultra-estruturais das lâminas dérmicas e epidérmicas do casco de eqüinos tratados com a trinitroglicerina

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Rita de Cássia de Lima [UNESP

    2007-01-01

    As alterações ultra-estruturais ocorridas nas lâminas epidérmicas e dérmicas de eqüinos com laminite são responsáveis pela rotação ou afundamento da falange distal dentro do casco. Com o objetivo de prevenir esta ocorrência foram estudados os efeitos da sobrecarga de carboidratos (SCHO), assim como da utilização de trinitroglicerina na fase prodrômica da laminite, nas lâminas epidérmicas do casco de quinze eqüinos. A indução da laminite por meio da sobrecarga de carboidratos alterou siginific...

  5. Neosporosis epidémica y endémica: descripción de dos eventos en bovinos para cría

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio M Calandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es describir dos eventos producidos en la provincia de Buenos Aires en los cuales Neospora caninum estuvo asociado a la ocurrencia de abortos en bovinos de cría para carne. En uno de ellos se registraron 11 abortos en 57 vaquillonas durante 45 días, en este evento fue 5 veces más probable que una vaquillona que sufrió un aborto fuera seropositiva a N. caninum que una que no lo sufrió (odds ratio [OR] = 4,9 IC 1,2-19,9 (p 0,05. Se analizaron dos fetos de cada evento: estos resultaron negativos a otros patógenos de la reproducción, aunque presentaron anticuerpos específicos y lesiones histopatológicas compatibles con infecciones por N. caninum. Estos resultados sugieren dos posibles modalidades de presentación de abortos en bovinos causados por N. caninum: una epidémica, como la del primer evento aquí referido, y una endémica, como la del segundo.

  6. Síndrome de Stevens-Johnson e Necrólise Epidérmica Tóxica em um hospital do Distrito Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Ferreira Barbosa Emerick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se analisar as características demográficas e clínicas dos clientes diagnosticados com Síndrome de Stevens Johnson (SSJ e Necrólise Epidérmica Tóxica (NET, bem como identificar as ações dos profissionais de saúde para o manejo das Reações Adversas a Medicamentos (RAM em um hospital público do Distrito Federal. Pesquisa descritiva, retrospectiva, com abordagem quantitativa. Dados coletados em todos os prontuários de 22 clientes internados de janeiro de 2005 a setembro de 2012. Análise mediante estatística descritiva. Houve aumento gradativo de casos, com maior número nos anos de 2007 e 2012. Dos casos analisados, 9 foram diagnosticados com NET e 7 com SSJ; predominaram as mulheres (14 e a faixa etária de 21 aos 40 anos (10; 21 obtiveram cura. Os fármacos associados a RAM mais frequentes foram os antiepilépticos (10. Observou-se fragilidade nos registros clínicos nos prontuários e nas ações de monitoramento de RAM no serviço estudado.

  7. Error diagnóstico en la neuropatía óptica epidémica Diagnostic error in epidemic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaralis Santiesteban Freixas

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available La forma óptica de la epidemia de neuropatía, aparecida en el decenio pasado en Cuba, ha sido motivo de discusión por el posible hiperdiagnóstico, de los más de 22 000 casos notificados. El propósito principal de este trabajo es profundizar en la caracterización de esta enfermedad y dar a conocer la congruencia que debe de existir entre la agudeza visual y la visión de colores en las neuropatías de este tipo; además, estimar sobre la base de este elemento la posible cifra de errores diagnósticos de dos grupos de pacientes con neuropatía optica epidérmica y en un tercer grupo de pacientes que no mejoraron con tratamiento, donde se reunieron 78 casos remitidos porque no mejoraban con tratamiento vitamínico. Los resultados demostraron congruencia entre el estado de afectación de la agudeza visual y la visión de colores en más del 90 % de los 960 casos de los grupos 1 y 2, con diagnóstico de neuropatía óptica epidémica comprobados por expertos, a diferencia de los casos del tercer grupo, en los que se detectó que el 96,1 % tuvieron de inicio falsos diagnósticos de esta enfermedad p The optic form of the neuropathy epidemic that appeared in the last decade in Cuba has been discussed due to the possible hyperdiagnosis of the more than 22 000 notified cases. The main objective of this paper was to go deep into the characterization of this disease, to make known the congruency that should exist between the visual acuity and the vision of colors in the neuropathies of this type, and to estimate, on the basis of this element, the possible figure of diagnostic errors in 2 groups of patients with EON and of a third group of patients that did not improve with the treatment. In this group, there were 78 cases that were referred because they did not respond to vitamin therapy. The results showed congruency between the state of affection of visual acuity and the vision of colors in more than 90 % of the 960 cases from groups 1 and 2 with

  8. Acción del factor de crecimiento epidérmico sobre el desarrollo de las células estriatales cultivadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázara Castillo

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se describe la acción del factor de crecimiento epidérmico (FCE sobre las células del estriado embrionario en un sistema de cultivo disociado de neuronas y glías. El cultivo de células se preparó a partir de embriones de ratas de 16-17 días. En el sistema de cultivo empleado, la población celular fue cultivada durante 20-24 horas en un medio que contenía suero y, posteriormente, fue tratada con 20 ng/mL del FCE en un medio libre de suero. La eliminación del suero en este período inicial de desarrollo provocó una disminución apreciable de las células vivas en los cultivos tratados y en los controles. Al parecer, la población de células sobrevivientes estaba integrada, en su mayoría, por precursores celulares teniendo en cuenta su capacidad proliferativa. La acción del FCE sobre las células se manifestó en un aumento del número de células debido fundamentalmente a un estímulo de la proliferación de los precursores neuronales y astrocitos. Este efecto estuvo acompañado por una reducción de la diferenciación morfológica neuronal cuando se comparó con los cultivos controles. En los cultivos, a los 16 días, la detección de la actividad específica de la colina acetiltrasferasa evidenció la diferenciación de una subpoblación neuronal colinérgica, las cuales respondieron al tratamiento con el factor de crecimiento nervioso con un aumento de la actividad de la enzima.

  9. Genotipificación de HLA-B en pacientes colombianos afectados por el síndrome Stevens-Johnson y la Necrólisis Epidérmica Tóxica

    OpenAIRE

    León Ruiz, Maria Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Las reacciones alérgicas a medicamentos cutáneas severas (RAM) como el Síndrome Stevens Johnson (SJS) y la Necrólisis Epidérmica Tóxica (NET),caracterizadas por exantema, erosión de la piel y las membranas mucosas, flictenas, desprendimiento de la piel secundario a la muerte de queratinocitos y compromiso ocular. Son infrecuentes en la población pero con elevada morbi-mortalidad, se presentan luego de la administración de diferentes fármacos. En Asia se ha asociado el alelo HLA-B*15:02 como m...

  10. Using fluence separation to account for energy spectra dependence in computing dosimetric a-Si EPID images for IMRT fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weidong; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    This study develops a method to improve the dosimetric accuracy of computed images for an amorphous silicon flat-panel imager. Radially dependent kernels derived from Monte Carlo simulations are convolved with the treatment-planning system's energy fluence. Multileaf collimator (MLC) beam hardening is accounted for by having separate kernels for open and blocked portions of MLC fields. Field-size-dependent output factors are used to account for the field-size dependence of scatter within the imager. Gamma analysis was used to evaluate open and sliding window test fields and intensity modulated patient fields. For each tested field, at least 99.6% of the points had γ<1 with a 3%, 3-mm criteria. With a 2%, 2-mm criteria, between 81% and 100% of points had γ<1. Patient intensity modulated test fields had 94%-100% of the points with γ<1 with a 2%, 2-mm criteria for all six fields tested. This study demonstrates that including the dependencies of kernel and fluence on radius and beam hardening in the convolution improves its accuracy compared with the use of radial and beam-hardening independent kernels; it also demonstrates that the resultant accuracy of the convolution method is sufficient for pretreatment, intensity modulated patient field verification

  11. Expressão das citoceratinas em dermatoses infecto- parasitárias associadas à hiperplasia epidérmica Expression of the cytokeratins in infectious and parasitic skin diseases associated with epidermal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Marques Nogueira-Castañon

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: As citoceratinas(C são as proteínas estruturais mais importantes das células epiteliais e exibem a maior heterogeneidade dentre todas as proteínas dos filamentos intermediários. Seu estudo através de imunomarcação possibilita a análise estrutural do citoesqueleto em vários afecções neoplásicas e inflamatórias. OBJETIVOS: Verificar o padrão imuno-histoquímico da expressão das citoceratinas na epiderme de doenças infecto-parasitárias associadas à hiperplasia escamosa. MÉTODOS: Cortes histológicos obtidos de tecidos pré-fixados e incluidos em parafina à partir de lesões de cromomicose, paracoccidioidomicose, leishmaniose e condiloma acuminado foram marcados com os anticorpos DEK10, LL025, LL002 e AE1 pela técnica de imunoperoxidase (avidina-biotina. RESULTADOS: A análise de áreas com intensidade variável de hiperplasia epidérmica presentes nos fragmentos mostrou exclusivamente e/ou predominantemente nas quatro doenças: ausência de expressão da C10 nas áreas de hiperplasia intensa e retardo da expressão nas áreas de hiperplasia moderada e/ou ausente; padrão suprabasal de marcação para a C16 independentemente do grau de hiperplasia como também, liberação de epítopos suprabasais para os marcadores LL002 (C14 e AE1 (C10,14,16,19. CONCLUSÕES: As modificações indicam que, independentemente da natureza do agente etiológico e do grau de hiperplasia presente, ocorrem alterações na diferenciação e proliferação do ceratinócito.BACKGROUND: Cytokeratins (K are the major structural proteins of epithelial cells and they display the greatest heterogeneity of all intermediate filament proteins. The study of many isolated cytokeratins by immunomarcation enables the structural verification of the cytoskeleton in many neoplastic and inflammatory diseases. OBJECTIVE: To verify the immunohistochemical pattern of cytokeratin expression in infectious and parasitic diseases associated with squamous

  12. Transmission portal in vivo dosimetry by means of the Monte Carlo method and the mathematical programming language MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BadraouiCuprova, K.

    2014-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy has increased demand for dose delivery verification. In this paper transmission portal dosimetry was considered. Portal detectors are a promising tool for 2D dosimetric verification and they are nowadays one of the most widely investigated topics. In this study an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) was positioned below the patient and the transmission images were captured during the irradiation. The principle of this verification consists of comparison of the acquired images with images predicted on the basis of the entrance fluence map and the tissue distribution in the patient. Such verification is not performed at any radiotherapy department in the Czech Republic. There is no system available for the prediction of transmission portal images. Even worldwide, there is still a lack of commercially available solutions. The aim of this paper is to present a new method of prediction of transmission portal images by means of the Monte Carlo (MC) method and the mathematical programming language MATLAB. The MC code EGSnrc (Electron Gamma Shower) was used. The validity of the presented method was verified by comparison of the predicted images with the acquired ones. The acquisition of EPID images was performed at the Hospital Na Bulovce. Three different validation tests were performed. In the first case, the EPID was irradiated by regular and irregular fields while there was nothing present in the beam path. In the second case, a water-equivalent phantom was added to the EPID and was irradiated by a number of irregular fields. In the third case, a real patient was present in the beam path and the EPID images were acquired during the patient's treatment. The patient was irradiated by 8 treatment fields and the portal images were acquired during 5 treatment fractions. All of the acquired images were compared with the MC predicted ones by gamma analysis with gamma criteria of 3%, 3 mm. The average gamma values were 0.31-0.4, 0.34-0.4 and 0.35-0.61 in

  13. Enfermedad diarreica por rotavirus en brotes epidémicos Diarrheal disease caused by rotavirus in epidemic outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Reyna-Figueroa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar el perfil epidemiológico de los brotes de enfermedad diarreica aguda por rotavirus (RV ocurridos en pacientes pediátricos, mediante una revisión crítica de la literatura publicada entre 2000 y 2010. MÉTODOS: Se realizó una búsqueda de artículos publicados desde enero de 2000 hasta abril de 2010, recogidos por las bases de datos Artemisa, EBSCO, Embase, Imbiomed, Lilacs, Ovid, PubMed y Science Direct. En los estudios que cumplieron con los criterios de inclusión, se identificaron posibles factores de confusión y se atribuyeron riesgos de sesgo con base en el número de ítems considerados inadecuados en cada caso. Se describieron las características epidemiológicas y microbiológicas de los brotes. RESULTADOS: Solo 14 (10,8% de los 129 títulos identificados formaron parte de la muestra, los cuales sumaron 91 092 casos de diarrea aguda notificados. En 5 250 de estos casos se realizó la búsqueda de RV, la cual arrojó 1 711 (32,5% aislamientos positivos. Se observó que el RV del grupo A fue el agente causal en 100% de los brotes, mientras que el genotipo G9 fue documentado en 50% de los artículos. CONCLUSIONES: El RV, principalmente el serotipo G9, fue uno de los principales agentes responsables de los brotes de EDA en la última década. Un cuidadoso estudio de brote puede aportar información valiosa para el control y la prevención de la enfermedad por RV.OBJECTIVE: Determine the epidemiological profile of outbreaks of acute diarrheal disease caused by rotavirus (RV occurring in pediatric patients, based on a critical review of the literature published between 2000 and 2010. METHODS: A search was carried out for articles published from January 2000 to April 2010, collected by the Artemisa, EBSCO, Embase, Imbiomed, Lilacs, Ovid, PubMed, and Science Direct databases. In the studies that met the inclusion criteria, possible confounding factors were identified and risks of bias were attributed based on the

  14. Entre controversias científico-médicas y movilizaciones populares. Población epidémica y vacunas contra la fiebre hemorrágica argentina 1958-1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese, Graciela

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and gradual extension of a new epidemic disease, as it has been the Haemorrhagic Fever Argentina, from the Decade of the ‘ 50s, prompted the medical scientific research with the aim of finding a vaccine. In the period 1959-1990 developed three projects of vaccines with different results. This article aims to consider the behavior assumed by the epidemic population around the three vaccines in response to the tensions that exist between population and physicians and researchers in charge of vaccination campaigns; the struggles between the various scientific groups; the role of the press and the State.La irrupción y la progresiva extensión de una nueva enfermedad epidémica, como ha sido la Fiebre Hemorrágica Argentina, a partir de la década del ’50, impulsó la investigación científica médica con el objetivo fundamental de encontrar una vacuna. En el período 1959-1990 se desarrollaron tres proyectos de vacunas con distintos resultados. El objetivo de este artículo es considerar las conductas asumidas por la población epidémica en torno a las tres vacunas atendiendo a las tensiones existentes entre la población y los médicos e investigadores a cargo de las campañas de vacunación; las pugnas entre los distintos grupos científicos; el rol de la prensa y del estado.

  15. Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Fiona W.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid prototyping of microchannel gain lots of attention from researchers along with the rapid development of microfluidic technology. The conventional methods carried few disadvantages such as high cost, time consuming, required high operating pressure and temperature and involve expertise in operating the equipment. In this work, new method adapting xurography method is introduced to replace the conventional method of fabrication of microchannels. The novelty in this study is replacing the adhesion film with clear plastic film which was used to cut the design of the microchannel as the material is more suitable for fabricating more complex microchannel design. The microchannel was then mold using polymethyldisiloxane (PDMS and bonded with a clean glass to produce a close microchannel. The microchannel produced had a clean edge indicating good master mold was produced using the cutting plotter and the bonding between the PDMS and glass was good where no leakage was observed. The materials used in this method is cheap and the total time consumed is less than 5 hours where this method is suitable for rapid prototyping of microchannel.

  16. method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kimball

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interior point algorithm to solve the multiperiod hydrothermal economic dispatch (HTED. The multiperiod HTED is a large scale nonlinear programming problem. Various optimization methods have been applied to the multiperiod HTED, but most neglect important network characteristics or require decomposition into thermal and hydro subproblems. The algorithm described here exploits the special bordered block diagonal structure and sparsity of the Newton system for the first order necessary conditions to result in a fast efficient algorithm that can account for all network aspects. Applying this new algorithm challenges a conventional method for the use of available hydro resources known as the peak shaving heuristic.

  17. Avaliação da expressão e amplificação da família do receptor de fator de crescimento epidérmico em colangiocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olívia Ferreira Begnami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Colangiocarcinomas são neoplasias agressivas de origem no epitélio dos ductos biliares intra ou extra-hepáticos. Apresentam prognóstico sombrio e os esquemas usuais de quimioterapia geralmente mostram pouco benefício clínico. O tratamento com drogas antagonistas dos receptores de crescimento epidérmico tem apresentado boa resposta clínica no tratamento de carcinomas de origem em outros sítios como mama, pulmão e estômago. Poucos estudos prévios de literatura mostram a expressão ou amplificação dos genes desta família nos colangiocarcinomas. Objetivos: O objetivo deste estudo é determinar a frequência de expressão e amplificação dos genes da família dos receptores de crescimento epidérmico (EGFR, HER2, HER3 e HER4 nos colangiocarcinomas diagnosticados e tratados no Hospital AC Camargo através de imunoistoquímica e hibridização in situ (FISH e determinar possíveis correlações com achados clínicos e histopatológicos. Material e métodos: As reações imunoistoquímicas e de FISH estão sendo realizadas de acordo com os protocolos já estabelecidos no laboratório de imunoistoquímica e FISH do departamento de anatomia patológica do Hospital AC Camargo em lâminas representativas do tumor de 40 pacientes com diagnóstico de colangiocarcinoma no período de 1980 a 2006. A interpretação dos resultados segue as recomendações do fabricante e dos protocolos de interpretação do HER2 previamente estabelecidos para tumores de outras localizações. Resultados esperados: Espera-se com este estudo determinar a frequência de expressão e amplificação de EGFR, HER2, HER3 e HER4 e possíveis correlações com achados clínicos e histopatológicos dos colangiocarcinomas, identificando assim possíveis fatores prognósticos e alvos terapêuticos.

  18. Constituição epidêmica: velho e novo nas teorias e práticas da epidemiologia Epidemic constitution: old and new theories and practices in epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Czeresnia

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa a importância da idéia de constituição epidêmica, identificada pela presença recorrente do pensamento hipocrático na história da epidemiologia. Em termos gerais, constituição relaciona epidemias a circunstâncias geográfico-atmosféricas. O que se destaca é a concepção do fenômeno epidêmico como desequilíbrio da harmonia da natureza, como totalidade e ultrapassando a dimensão geográfica. Permanência de um pensamento hipocrático não significa a existência de uma continuidade. A idéia de constituição foi marcada por descontinuidades e definida por conceitos distintos no decorrer da história. A força desse pensamento deve ser compreendida a partir da base filosófica que a origina: a physis. O interesse pelo pensamento pré-socrático ganha significado especial na crise da modernidade, trazendo novos elementos, também, para a interpretação da idéia de constituição em epidemiologia.The article analyzes the importance of the concept of epidemic constitution, whose presence has been recurrently identified in Hippocratic thinking throughout the history of epidemiology. In general terms, constitution relates epidemics to geographic and atmospheric conditions. The outstanding point in the article is the view of epidemics as phenomena associated to disruption in the harmony of nature, here understood as a whole beyond geographic dimensions. The permanence of Hippocratic thinking does not imply continuity. The concept of epidemic constitution has been discontinuous and structurally different throughout history. The power of the concept lies on its philosophical foundations: physis. Pre-Socratic ideas gain special significance for the understanding of the crisis of modern times and introduces new elements for the interpretation and conceptualization of constitution in epidemiology.

  19. El abordaje médico del dengue y la emergencia epidémica del chikungunya / Dengue’s Medical Approach and Chikungunya’s Epidemical Emergency / O tratamento clínico da dengue e o chikungunya como emergência epidêmica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinna Leonor Urquiza-Suárez, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sra. Editora: El dengue como enfermedad viral de afectación exclusiva de áreas tropicales, actualmente endémica en nuestro país, representa una de las principales causas de morbimortalidad por causa de enfermedades transmitidas por vectores (1, su control depende de una articulación intersectorial que actualmente ha sido difícil de implementar, fundamentada en el manejo entomológico y el control ambiental de humedales (2,3. En el país es una enfermedad de interés en salud pública, lo que obliga al personal asistencial en salud a conocer detalladamente el perfil fisiopatológico de la enfermedad (4. La fiebre de chikungunya ha sido una enfermedad endémica en algunos países tropicales latinoamericanos desde la segunda mitad del siglo XX, extendiéndose progresivamente a otras regiones con las condiciones adecuadas de transmisión vectorial (5. De esta manera, esta carta al editor tiene como finalidad motivar a los médicos para estar dispuestos a una educación continua que permita tener claridad sobre el perfil clínico de cada una de estas enfermedades. Recientemente en Colombia se ha reportado una emergencia en la transmisión del dengue y chinkungunya, lo que ha obligado a las autoridades en salud pública a despertar las alarmas para su abordaje y vigilancia (6. Las estrategias de intervención incluyen un control entomológico y la notificación periódica de los casos detectados por el perfil clínico de la enfermedad (7. Actualmente se llevan a cabo en el país múltiples jornadas de capacitación del personal asistencial sanitario, en especial en las ciudades de ambientes cálidos donde se han reportado la mayor cantidad de casos. El fenómeno relacionado con la emergencia epidémica de la enfermedad de transmisión vectorial ha generado alerta en todo el gremio de la salud e irónicamente se ha sobrevalorado la notificación de la enfermedad (8. Esto ha repercutido en el perfil diagnóstico del dengue con un efecto cr

  20. SIFT: A method to verify the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Sandra C.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Boer, Hans C.J. de

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy patients are increasingly treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high tumor doses. As part of our quality control program to ensure accurate dose delivery, a new method was investigated that enables the verification of the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), irrespective of changes in patient geometry. Methods and materials: Each IMRT treatment field is split into a static field and a modulated field, which are delivered in sequence. Images are acquired for both fields using an EPID. The portal dose image obtained for the static field is used to determine changes in patient geometry between the planning CT scan and the time of treatment delivery. With knowledge of these changes, the delivered IMRT fluence can be verified using the portal dose image of the modulated field. This method, called split IMRT field technique (SIFT), was validated first for several phantom geometries, followed by clinical implementation for a number of patients treated with IMRT. Results: The split IMRT field technique allows for an accurate verification of the delivered IMRT fluence (generally within 1% [standard deviation]), even if large interfraction changes in patient geometry occur. For interfraction radiological path length changes of 10 cm, deliberately introduced errors in the delivered fluence could still be detected to within 1% accuracy. Application of SIFT requires only a minor increase in treatment time relative to the standard IMRT delivery. Conclusions: A new technique to verify the delivered IMRT fluence from EPID images, which is independent of changes in the patient geometry, has been developed. SIFT has been clinically implemented for daily verification of IMRT treatment delivery

  1. Local IgG synthesis in three pediatric patients with cuban epidemic neuropathy Sintesis local de IgG en tres pacientes pediátricos com neuropatía epidêmica cubana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Dorta-Contreras

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Three pediatric patients with Cuban epidemic neuropathy were studied. Cerebrospinal fluid and sera were simultaneously obtained. Albumin and IgG were quantified by immunodifusion. Albumin quotient and local synthesis of IgG were calculated by Reiber/Felgenhauer formula. A patient with optic neuritis had a dysfunction of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. All the group had local synthesis of IgG.Se estudiaron tres pacientes pediátricos con neuropatia epidêmica cubana. Se obtuvieron suero y liquido cefalorraquídeo simultaneamente. Se cuantificaran los niveles de albúmina e IgG por inmunodifusion radial. Se calculo la razón albúmina y la fórmula de Reiber/Felgenhauer. Un paciente con neuritis óptica tuvo una disfunción de la barrera sangre-líquido cefaloraquídeo. Todo el grupo tuvo síntesis local de IgG.

  2. Conteúdo de peptídeos e avaliação morfofisiológica dos espermatozóides do epidídimo e ejaculado de bovinos Peptides content and morphophisiological evaluation of epididymis and ejaculated sperm in bovine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Emidio D. Feliciano Silva

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este estudo a identificação de alguns fatores protéicos envolvidos na qualidade funcional dos espermatozóides epididimais (SPZEP e ejaculados (SPZEJ de bovinos. Foram avaliadas as características morfofisiológicas e analisado o conteúdo peptídico destas estruturas de 11 animais mestiços Nelore, de 24 a 30 meses de idade. As avaliações morfofisiológicas foram motilidade progressiva (MOT, %, vigor, patologias espermáticas, integridade acrossômica e da cromatina. Foi observado que, os SPZEJ, na média, apresentaram MOT maior do que os SPZEP, 72,3 e 46,4%, respectivamente. Considerando as patologias espermáticas, taxas de defeitos maiores (DEFMAI, menores (DEFMEN e totais (DEFTOT, houve diferença significativa entre as taxas dos DEFMEN e DEFTOT dos SPZEP e SPZEJ, sendo, em média, 91,1 e 8,5% e 95,4 e 11,8%, respectivamente. As taxas dos DEFMEN e DEFTOT dos SPZEP foram maiores em função da presença de espermatozóides com gotas citoplasmáticas distais. A análise das protéinas dos SPZEP e SPZEJ foi realizada por espectrometria de massa, método MALDI-TOF (matrix -assisted laser desorption/ionization - time of flight, e revelou presença de peptídeos de massa molecular variando de 1,1 a 26,3 kDa nos SPZEJ e de 1,1 a 11,6 kDa nos SPZEP. Foram identificados peptídeos de 10,6 e 13,4 kDa somente nos SPZEJ e de 6,8 kDa somente nos SPZEP. Foi observada relação do peptídeo de massa molecular de 7,4 kDa dos SPZEP e de 4,7 kDa dos SPZEJ, com a MOT Ê 80%, destas estruturas. Os resultados sugerem o envolvimento destes peptídeos nos processos funcionais das células espermáticas do epidídimo e ejaculado. O estudo utilizou o método MALDI/TOF para espectrômetro de massa, para identificar peptídeos em espermatozóides do epidídimo de bovinos, pela primeira vez no País.The objective of the study was to identify some protein factors involved in bovine epididymis (SPZEP and ejaculated (SPZEJ sperm functional quality

  3. SU-E-T-438: Commissioning of An In-Vivo Quality Assurance Method Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, O; Held, M; Pouliot, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patient specific pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) using arrays of detectors or film have been the standard approach to assure the correct treatment is delivered to the patient. This QA approach is expensive, labor intensive and does not guarantee or document that all remaining fractions were treated properly. The purpose of this abstract is to commission and evaluate the performance of a commercially available in-vivo QA software using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to record the daily treatments. Methods: The platform EPIgray V2.0.2 (Dosisoft), which machine model compares ratios of TMR with EPID signal to predict dose was commissioned for an Artiste (Siemens Oncology Care Systems) and a Truebeam (Varian medical systems) linear accelerator following the given instructions. The systems were then tested on three different phantoms (homogeneous stack of solid water, anthropomorphic head and pelvis) and on a library of patient cases. Simple and complex fields were delivered at different exposures and for different gantry angles. The effects of the table attenuation and the EPID sagging were evaluated. Gamma analysis of the measured dose was compared to the predicted dose for complex clinical IMRT cases. Results: Commissioning of the EPIgray system for two photon energies took 8 hours. The difference between the dose planned and the dose measured with EPIgray was better than 3% for all phantom scenarios tested. Preliminary results on patients demonstrate an accuracy of 5% is achievable in high dose regions for both 3DCRT and IMRT. Large discrepancies (>5%) were observed due to metallic structures or air cavities and in low dose areas. Flat panel sagging was visible and accounted for in the EPIgray model. Conclusion: The accuracy achieved by EPIgray is sufficient to document the safe delivery of complex IMRT treatments. Future work will evaluate EPIgray for VMAT and high dose rate deliveries. This work is supported by Dosisoft, Cachan, France

  4. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 ±0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of ±0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  5. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300 (United States); Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States); Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tulane University, 1415 Tulane Ave, HC65, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Health Science Center, University of Florida, P.O. Box 100385, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0385 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 {+-}0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of {+-}0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  6. Efeitos da tela de polipropileno no testículo, epidídimo e ducto deferente de cães Effects of the polypropilene mesh in the testicle, epididimus and ductus deferens of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Goldenberg

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Investigar os efeitos da tela sintética sobre o testículo, epidídimo e ducto deferente de cães. Métodos: Foram utilizados 10 cães, machos, adultos, pesando entre 9 e 12 kg. Os animais, após realizada anestesia, foram submetidos à laparoscopia com formação de pneumoperitônio por incisão em linha mediana. Era então fixada tela de polipropileno, de dimensões 2,5X3,5 cm² na região inguinal esquerda do cão em contato direto com o funículo espermático, com o uso de grampos metálicos, sem dissecar a região. O lado direito, sem colocação de tela, serviu de controle. O procedimento tinha duração de 15 minutos. Após observação pós-operatória de 30 dias, os animais eram novamente anestesiados e reoperados sendo o testículo e ducto deferente retirados e enviados para análise histológica. Análise estatística foi realizada com os dados obtidos desta análise. Resultados: No lado esquerdo, as secções histológicas de testículo revelaram focalmente, diminuição da espermatogênese e processo degenerativo em 20% dos animais. No epidídimo, observou-se inflamação crônica e dilatação dos túbulos seminíferos em 70%. No ducto deferente foi observado processo inflamatório crônico em 60% dos cães. Não foram verificadas alterações histológicas no lado contralateral. Conclusão: A tela de polipropileno em contato com o funículo espermático de cães provoca alterações histológicas com discreta redução da espermatogênese.The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the synthetic mesh on the ductus deferens and testicle of dogs. Ten adult male dogs were anesthetized and a 2,5X3,5 cm² polypropilene mesh was fixed in the inguinal region in direct contact with the ductus deferens, using metallic staples without dissection of the region and therefore, without manipulation. The right side, with no mesh was the control. . The operative time was 15 minutes. The animals were observed for 30 days and

  7. Micronutrient dietary patterns associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus among women of the E3N-EPIC (Etude Epidémiologique auprès de femmes de l'Education Nationale) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Francesca Romana; Dow, Courtney; Affret, Aurélie; Rajaobelina, Kalina; Dartois, Laureen; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnet, Fabrice; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy

    2018-02-19

    Micronutrients play a key role in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but methodological difficulties arise from their collinearity and interdependencies with foods. The aim of the present study was to identify micronutrient dietary patterns in the E3N-EPIC (Etude Epidémiologique auprès de femmes de l'Education Nationale) cohort and to investigate their association with risk of T2DM. Principal component analysis was used to identify micronutrient patterns among 71 270 women from the E3N-EPIC cohort. Associations between micronutrient patterns and risk of T2DM were quantified by hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from Cox proportional hazards regression models, adjusted for potential confounders. Six micronutrient patterns were identified explaining 78% of the total variance in micronutrient intake. A positive association was found between T2DM and a pattern highly correlated with intake of vitamins B 2 and B 5 (HR 1.34; 95% CI 1.16-1.56). Similarly, a positive association was found with a pattern characterized by high intakes of vitamin B 12 and retinol, and a low intake of vitamin C (HR 1.30; 95% CI 1.15-1.48). An inverse association was observed between T2DM and another two patterns: one correlated with magnesium and vitamin B 3 (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.66-0.86), and the other correlated with manganese intake (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.72-0.94). The findings of the present study identify micronutrients that have an effect on the risk of T2DM, and enable better understanding of the complexity of the diet when investigating the association between micronutrients and T2DM. © 2018 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Estudo da mutação do recetor do fator de crescimento epidérmico, durante 5 anos, numa população de doentes com cancro do pulmão de não pequenas células

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Castro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Introdução: Em 2006, a Unidade de Pneumologia Oncológica do Serviço de Pneumologia do Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho iniciou a sequenciação da mutação do recetor do fator de crescimento epidérmico (EGFR em doentes com CPNPC selecionados e desde 2010 realiza a sequenciação sistematicamente em todos os doentes, independentemente da histologia, hábitos tabágicos, idade ou sexo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar o grupo de doentes que efetuou a sequenciação entre 2006-2010, determinar a frequência da mutação EGFR, avaliar as sobrevidas globais e após uso de inibidores da tirosina quinase (ITK, nos doentes que efetuaram esta terapêutica em 2.a e 3.a linha com conhecimento do estado da mutação do EGFR. Métodos: Análise estatística descritiva dos doentes que efetuaram sequenciação EGFR em 2006-2010 e sobrevida mediana global nos doentes que efetuaefetuaram ITK em 2.a e 3.a linha. Registo do material disponível para análise e demora média de resultado do exame, de acordo com o material enviado. Resultados: A sequenciação foi efetuada em 374 doentes, 71,1% sexo masculino, 67,1% não/ex-fumadores, 32,9% fumadores; 57,8% adenocarcinoma e 23,5% carcinoma epidermoide (CE. A mutação foi detetada em 49 doentes (13,1%. No total dos doentes estudados, a taxa de mutação foi de 9% no sexo masculino e 23% no sexo feminino. A sobrevida mediana global após o uso de erlotinib foi de 14 meses para os doentes com mutação positiva do EGFR versus 6 meses nos doentes não mutados (p = 0,003. Conclusão: O nosso grupo teve uma taxa de mutação global de 13,1%, com predomínio no sexo feminino, não fumadores, histologia adenocarcinoma. Em doentes selecionados (2006/2009, a taxa de mutação foi de 16%; nos doentes não selecionados (2010 foi de 10,4%. Este estudo tem vindo a permitir um melhor conhecimento da taxa de mutação do EGFR na população portuguesa, bem como avaliar os resultados das

  9. A novel method for patient exit and entrance dose prediction based on water equivalent path length measured with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuma, Awusi; Glegg, Martin; Metwaly, Mohamed; Currie, Garry; Elliott, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry is one of the quality assurance tools used in radiotherapy to monitor the dose delivered to the patient. Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images for a set of solid water phantoms of varying thicknesses were acquired and the data fitted onto a quadratic equation, which relates the reduction in photon beam intensity to the attenuation coefficient and material thickness at a reference condition. The quadratic model is used to convert the measured grey scale value into water equivalent path length (EPL) at each pixel for any material imaged by the detector. For any other non-reference conditions, scatter, field size and MU variation effects on the image were corrected by relative measurements using an ionization chamber and an EPID. The 2D EPL is linked to the percentage exit dose table, for different thicknesses and field sizes, thereby converting the plane pixel values at each point into a 2D dose map. The off-axis ratio is corrected using envelope and boundary profiles generated from the treatment planning system (TPS). The method requires field size, monitor unit and source-to-surface distance (SSD) as clinical input parameters to predict the exit dose, which is then used to determine the entrance dose. The measured pixel dose maps were compared with calculated doses from TPS for both entrance and exit depth of phantom. The gamma index at 3% dose difference (DD) and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA) resulted in an average of 97% passing for the square fields of 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm. The exit dose EPID dose distributions predicted by the algorithm were in better agreement with TPS-calculated doses than phantom entrance dose distributions.

  10. Epidermal characteristics of toxic plants for cattle from the Salado River basin (Buenos Aires, Argentina Caracteres epidérmicos de las plantas tóxicas para el ganado de la Depresión del Salado (Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana E. Freire

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and eighty species belonging to 41 families inhabiting the Salado River Basin of the province of Buenos Aires (Argentina were previously reported to be toxic for cattle. The purpose of this study was to provide a tool to distinguish the taxa when the plant material is desintegrated. In this way, an approach to the identification of these taxa through leaf epidermal features (anticlinal epidermal cell wall patterns, cuticular ornamentation, stomata, and hair types is performed. A key to the 180 species as well as illustrations of diagnostic characters are given.Las plantas tóxicas para el ganado están representadas en la Depresión del Salado (provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina por 180 especies pertenecientes a 41 familias. El objetivo del presente trabajo es determinar estos taxa a partir de material desintegrado, utilizando caracteres epidérmicos foliares (paredes anticlinales de las células epidérmicas, ornamentación de la cutícula, tipos de estomas y pelos. Se brinda una clave para la determinación de las especies e ilustraciones de los caracteres diagnósticos.

  11. Análisis retrospectivo de 23 años de necrólisis epidérmica tóxica en la Unidad de Quemados de Alicante, España

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    F.I. Castillo-Muñoz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available El Síndrome de Lyell o Necrólisis Epidérmica Tóxica (NET se encuadra dentro del espectro de reacciones cutáneas adversas graves y se caracteriza por presentar una baja incidencia pero una elevada mortalidad. La mayoría de los casos de NET se relacionan con una reacción medicamentosa idiosincrática. El objetivo de este trabajo es reflejar la experiencia clínica con esta entidad en la Unidad de Quemados del Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, España, durante los últimos 23 años. Realizamos un estudio retrospectivo recogiendo los datos epidemiológicos, agentes causales probables, pruebas complementarias, patologías concomitantes, tratamiento y evolución clínica. En total recogimos 16 pacientes con una media de edad de 53,19 años, 68,75% mujeres y 31,25% varones. Los antibióticos fueron los fármacos más comúnmente implicados (31,25%, seguidos de los AINES (25%. Durante el ingreso hospitalario, el 43,75% de los pacientes recibió corticoides sistémicos, el 37,5% exclusivamente tratamiento de soporte y el 25% inmunoglobulinas intravenosas. El 56,25% sufrió algún tipo de secuela, siendo la afectación ocular la más frecuente (18,75%. Calculamos el SCORTEN (Severity of illness score for toxic epidermal necrolisys para todos los pacientes en las primeras 24 horas de ingreso, siendo la suma de las probabilidades predichas de morir por NET de un 32%, cifra superior a los datos reales (mortalidad del 25%. La utilización de corticoides sistémicos sigue siendo controvertida, apareciendo en nuestro estudio un mayor número de infecciones y una mayor mortalidad asociada a dicho tratamiento. La retirada inmediata del fármaco sospechoso, el ingreso precoz en una Unidad de Quemados o de Cuidados Intensivos, el tratamiento de soporte y la reposición hidroelectrolítica, siguen siendo medidas cruciales y de primera línea en el tratamiento de estos pacientes. A pesar de que están descritos diferentes tipos de tratamiento

  12. La ciclooxigenasa-2 (COX-2 y el factor de crecimiento epidérmico (EFG en lesiones epiteliales orales premalignas Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and epidermal growth factor (EGF in oral premalignant epithelial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Díaz Prado

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Las lesiones premalignas orales incluyen eritroplasias (manchas rojas y leucoplasias (manchas blancas, las cuales se desarrollan a lo largo de superficies epiteliales. Estas lesiones son considerados marcadores en la "carcinogénesis de campo" ya que pacientes con lesiones premalignas orales pueden desarrollar carcinoma de células escamosas (CCS en el sitio de las lesiones, así como en otros lugares de tracto aerodigestivo superior. Se está haciendo un gran esfuerzo para identificar nuevos biomarcadores SEBs (surrogate endpoint biomarkers para el carcinoma de células escamosas de cabeza y cuello. Los SEBs candidatos para el carcinoma de células escamosas invasivo en el trato aerodigestivo superior deben ser detectables con los cambios moleculares celulares y tisulares que tienen lugar durante la formación del tumor. Entre los diferentes marcadores que se han propuesto hasta la actualidad, la ciclooxigenasa- 2 (COX-2 y el receptor del factor de crecimiento epidérmico (EGFR parecen ser los más prometedores. COX-2 se sobre expresa durante el proceso tumoral, desde hiperplasia temprana a enfermedad metastásica. EGFR también está anormalmente activado en tumores epiteliales, pues las células de casi todas estas neoplasias expresan altos niveles de este receptor, una característica asociada con un peor pronóstico clínico. En este sentido el tracto aerodigestivo superior proporciona un sistema o modelo único para el estudio de CCS y para la investigación de nuevos candidatos SEBs.Oral premalignant lesions include leukoplakia (white patch and erythroplakia (red patch, which develop on epithelial surfaces. These lesions are markers for field cancerization because patients with oral premalignancy can develop squamous cell carcinoma at the site of the lesion(s and at other sites in the upper aerodigestive tract. An effort is being made to identify surrogate endpoint biomarkers (SEBs for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC

  13. Perspectivas de salud ambiental en la investigación de brotes epidémicos asociados con una zona de abastecimiento de aguas de consumo humano Perspectives of environmental health in outbreaks research associated with a zone of consumption water supply human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lara Villegas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El propósito de este trabajo fue estudiar la magnitud, posibles causas y factores ambientales contribuyentes en la aparición de brotes de origen hídrico, en el ámbito de actuación de la localidad de Benaoján (Serranía de Ronda, Málaga.Material y métodos. Análisis de la potabilidad del agua y controles de desinfección. Evaluación del cumplimiento de la calidad del agua potable y requisitos técnico sanitarios de abastecimientos de aguas, conforme a la normativa española sobre aguas de consumo público.Resultados. Se han realizado 110 análisis de potabilidad, comprobando que el 13,4% de las muestras no cumplen con los criterios de potabilidad del agua. Se practicaron 647 controles de desinfección, de los que el 53% resultaron no conformes. El diseño de la red de abastecimiento es del tipo ramificada y al menos presenta 30 ramales ciegos, puntos donde el agua queda estancada. El servicio municipal de aguas no realiza autocontroles de la calidad del agua ni tiene implantados planes generales de higiene de las instalaciones del abastecimiento.Discusión. La investigación ambiental sugiere que la red pública de abastecimiento de aguas es una fuente de infección, problema relacionado con la aparición de brotes epidémicos. Por ello el consumo de agua no tratada debe ser evitado.Introduction. The purpose of this work was studied the magnitude, possible causes and contributing environmental factors in the waterbourne outbreaks appearance, in the performance area of the locality of Benaoján (Town of Málaga, Spain.Material/Methods. Analysis of the potability of the water and disinfection controls. Evaluation of the fulfillment of the quality of the drinking water and sanitary technical requirements of water supplies, pursuant to the Spanish regulation on public consumption waters.Results. We have been accomplished 110 potability analysis, proving that 13,4% of the samples do not comply with the potability criteria of

  14. Dengue: inquérito sorológico pós-epidêmico em zona urbana do Estado de São Paulo (Brasil Dengue fever: a post-epidemic sero-epidemiological survey in an urban setting at a northwestern county of S. Paulo State - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgília L C de Lima

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o tamanho real da epidemia sobre dengue ocorrida na zona urbana do Município de Santa Bárbara D'Oeste, SP, Brasil, de abril a junho de 1995. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um inquérito soroepidemiológico pós-epidêmico 5 meses após o final da epidemia da dengue. Foram processados 1.113 soros através de amostragem aleatória domiciliar da população da cidade pesquisada. As taxas de infecção em diferentes partes da cidade foram relacionadas com os graus de infestação por Aedes aegipty e com a quantidade de casos notificados durante a epidemia. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: Foi encontrada variação concomitante e diretamente proporcional entre as taxas de infecção pelo vírus da dengue, em diferentes partes da cidade, e os graus de infestação domiciliar por Aedes aegipty, bem como em relação ao número de casos notificados durante a epidemia. Encontrou-se prevalência de 630 por 100 mil habitantes, representando valor 15 vezes superior ao de incidência de casos confirmados laboratorialmente durante a epidemia. Através de comparação retrospectiva com dados de notificação compulsória, observou-se que a vigilância epidemiológica não detectou a maioria das pessoas soro-reativas. Apesar disso, notificou grande quantidade de casos que não eram de indivíduos com dengue, tipificando um valor preditivo positivo baixo (15,6% para o diagnóstico clínico de dengue quando o resultado laboratorial (HAI é tomado como padrão-ouro.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the real size of the epidemics registered in the urban area of the county of Santa Bárbara D'Oeste, SP, Brazil, from April to June, 1995. The measurement of the epidemiological validity of the official surveillance system criteria and its positive predicted value were adopted as specific goals. METHODS: A sero-epidemiological survey was carried out over a sample of 1,113 sera from citizens of Santa Barbara D'Oeste, through a systematic random

  15. Epidémie de choléra au Burkina Faso en 2005: aspects épidémiologiques et diagnostiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Gilberte Kyelem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: L’objectif de cette étude était de décrire les aspects épidémiologiques et diagnostiques de l’épidémie de choléra au Burkina Faso en 2005. METHODES: Etude rétrospective, d’août à octobre 2005. Elle a concerné dix districts sanitaires du Burkina Faso. A été inclus dans l’étude, tout patient présentant un syndrome cholériforme, admis dans les différentes formations sanitaires dont la coproculture s’est révélée positive à Vibrio cholerae. RESULTATS: Au cours cette épidémie, 1050 cas de diarrhées cholériformes ont été notifiés par l’ensemble des structures sanitaires du pays. Vibrio cholerae a été identifié à l’examen bactériologique des selles de 121 patients (17,2%, constituant notre population d’étude. Les hommes étaient majoritaires (57%. La moyenne d’âge était de 30 ans. Les femmes au foyer (24% et les sujets non scolarisés (62,8% représentaient les couches sociales les plus touchées. Les forages ont été la source de boisson de 39,7% des patients 72 heures avant le début de la maladie. Tous les patients ont présenté une diarrhée aqueuse. Vibrio cholerae, sérotype Ogawa, responsable de cette épidémie, était résistant au chloramphénicol et au cotrimoxazole dans respectivement 71,7% et 38,3% des cas. Ni le cas index, ni la source initiale de contamination n’ont pu être identifiés. La létalité de notre échantillon était de 3,5%. CONCLUSION: Cette épidémie a relancé la question de l’hygiène et mis à nu le problème de ces villes ou la croissance démographique galopante est en inadéquation avec le degré d’urbanisation

  16. Set-up improvement in head and neck radiotherapy using a 3D off-line EPID-based correction protocol and a customised head and neck support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Vight, Lisette van der; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Visser, Andries G.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: First, to investigate the set-up improvement resulting from the introduction of a customised head and neck (HN) support system in combination with a technologist-driven off-line correction protocol in HN radiotherapy. Second, to define margins for planning target volume definition, accounting for systematic and random set-up uncertainties. Methods and materials: In 63 patients 498 treatment fractions were evaluated to develop and implement a 3D shrinking action level correction protocol. In the comparative study two different HN-supports were compared: a flexible 'standard HN-support' and a 'customised HN-support'. For all three directions (x, y and z) random and systematic set-up deviations (1 S.D.) were measured. Results: The customised HN-support improves the patient positioning compared to the standard HN-support. The 1D systematic errors in the x, y and z directions were reduced from 2.2-2.3 mm to 1.2-2.0 mm (1 S.D.). The 1D random errors for the y and z directions were reduced from 1.6 and 1.6 mm to 1.1 and 1.0 mm (1 S.D.). The correction protocol reduced the 1D systematic errors further to 0.8-1.1 mm (1 S.D.) and all deviations in any direction were within 5 mm. Treatment time per measured fraction was increased from 10 to 13 min. The total time required per patient, for the complete correction procedure, was approximately 40 min. Conclusions: Portal imaging is a powerful tool in the evaluation of the department specific patient positioning procedures. The introduction of a comfortable customised HN-support, in combination with an electronic portal imaging device-based correction protocol, executed by technologists, led to an improvement of overall patient set-up. As a result, application of proposed recipes for CTV-PTV margins indicates that these can be reduced to 3-4 mm

  17. Supernumerary epidermal shields and carapace variation in Orbigny's slider turtles, Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae Escudos epidérmicos supernumerários e variação na carapaça na tartaruga-tigre-d'água, Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis S. Bujes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal plates of the carapace and plastron of 51 adults (38 females and 13 males, 07 immature individuals, and 46 hatchlings of the freshwater turtle Trachemys dorbigni (Durémil & Bibron, 1835, originated from the delta of Rio Jacuí region, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, were examined. The results showed that 7.7% of males, 10.52% of females, 14.28% of immature individuals, and 6.52% of the hatchlings presented a kind of anomaly on the shell, as well as a presence of supernumerary epidermal shields. Although the modification in the number of epidermal shields presents a high frequency in Testudines, these are the first descriptions of the variation in the pattern of carapacial scutation in eleven individuals from a population of T. dorbigni. The association of several environmental factors acting on the embryonic development of the individual may be responsible for the alteration of the pattern of carapacial scutation in this species.Os escudos epidérmicos da carapaça e do plastrão de 51 adultos (38 fêmeas e 13 machos, 07 imaturos e 46 filhotes da tartaruga de água doce Trachemys dorbigni (Durémil & Bibron, 1835, procedentes da região do delta do Rio Jacuí, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, foram examinados. Desta análise, 7,7% dos machos, 10,52% das fêmeas, 14,28% dos imaturos e 6,52% dos filhotes apresentaram algum tipo de anomalia no casco, bem como presença de escudos epidérmicos supernumerários. Embora a alteração no número dos escudos epidérmicos seja relativamente freqüente em Testudines, estas são as primeiras descrições de variação no padrão de escutelação em onze indivíduos de uma população de T. dorbigni. A associação de diferentes fatores ambientais, interagindo sobre o desenvolvimento embrionário do indivíduo, parece ser a responsável pela alteração do padrão de escutelação nessa espécie.

  18. A distortion correction method for image intensifier and electronic portal images used in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioannidis, G T; Geramani, K N; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Uzunoglu, N [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    At the most of radiation departments a simulator and an `on line` verification system of the treated volume, in form of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), are available. Networking and digital handling (saving, archiving etc.) of the image information is a necessity in the image processing procedures in order to evaluate verification and simulation recordings at the computer screen. Distortion is on the other hand prerequisite for quantitative comparison of both image modalities. Another limitation factor, in order to make quantitative assertions, is the fact that the irradiation fields in radiotherapy are usually bigger than the field of view of an image intensifier. Several segments of the irradiation field must therefore be acquired. Using pattern recognition techniques these segments can be composed into a single image. In this paper a distortion correction method will be presented. The method is based upon a well defined Grid which is embedded during the registration process on the image. The video signal from the image intensifier is acquired and processed. The grid is then recognised using image processing techniques. Ideally if all grid points are recognised, various methods can be applied in order to correct the distortion. But in practice this is not the case. Overlapping structures (bones etc.) have as a consequence that not all of the grid points can be recognised. Mathematical models from the Graph theory are applied in order to reconstruct the whole grid. The deviation of the grid points positions from the rated value is then used to calculate correction coefficients. This method (well defined grid, grid recognition, correction factors) can also be applied in verification images from the EPID or in other image modalities, and therefore a quantitative comparison in radiation treatment is possible. The distortion correction method and the application on simulator images will be presented. (authors)

  19. SU-F-E-19: A Novel Method for TrueBeam Jaw Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corns, R; Zhao, Y; Huang, V [Fraser Valley Cancer Centre - BC Cancer Agency, Surrey, BC (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A simple jaw calibration method is proposed for Varian TrueBeam using an EPID-Encoder combination that gives accurate fields sizes and a homogeneous junction dose. This benefits clinical applications such as mono-isocentric half-beam block breast cancer or head and neck cancer treatment with junction/field matching. Methods: We use EPID imager with pixel size 0.392 mm × 0.392 mm to determine the radiation jaw position as measured from radio-opaque markers aligned with the crosshair. We acquire two images with different symmetric field sizes and record each individual jaw encoder values. A linear relationship between each jaw’s position and its encoder value is established, from which we predict the encoder values that produce the jaw positions required by TrueBeam’s calibration procedure. During TrueBeam’s jaw calibration procedure, we move the jaw with the pendant to set the jaw into position using the predicted encoder value. The overall accuracy is under 0.1 mm. Results: Our in-house software analyses images and provides sub-pixel accuracy to determine field centre and radiation edges (50% dose of the profile). We verified the TrueBeam encoder provides a reliable linear relationship for each individual jaw position (R{sup 2}>0.9999) from which the encoder values necessary to set jaw calibration points (1 cm and 19 cm) are predicted. Junction matching dose inhomogeneities were improved from >±20% to <±6% using this new calibration protocol. However, one technical challenge exists for junction matching, if the collimator walkout is large. Conclusion: Our new TrueBeam jaw calibration method can systematically calibrate the jaws to crosshair within sub-pixel accuracy and provides both good junction doses and field sizes. This method does not compensate for a larger collimator walkout, but can be used as the underlying foundation for addressing the walkout issue.

  20. Nascimento de bezerros normais após inseminação artificial utilizando espermatozóides criopreservados obtidos de epidídimos refrigerados de bovinos após a morte Birth of normal calves after artificial insemination using cryopreserved spermatozoa obtained from refrigerated epididymides of death bovine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Melo Costa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar as características morfológicas e funcionais dos espermatozóides bovinos recuperados de epidídimos resfriados por longos períodos e posteriormente criopreservados. Testículos bovinos foram coletados no abatedouro, transportados ao laboratório e armazenados a 5°C por 0, 24, 48 e 72 horas (n=10 para cada tratamento. Os espermatozóides foram extraídos de cada epidídimo, avaliados e diluídos em meio tris-gema-glicerol a 7% e criopreservados em nitrogênio líquido. As características morfológicas e funcionais dos espermatozóides foram avaliadas in vitro por análise microscópica e in vivo, por meio de inseminação artificial. Foram observadas alterações morfológicas características da imaturidade dos espermatozóides e redução da motilidade após 72 horas de refrigeração dos epidídimos. Esses parâmetros também foram alterados após o descongelamento, em todos os tratamentos. A manutenção dos espermatozoides a 5°C por 72h reduziu a motilidade espermática. Em todos os tratamentos foram observadas alterações morfológicas características da imaturidade dos espermatozoides e redução da motilidade após o descongelamento. A integridade de membrana plasmática e acrossoma somente foram afetadas pós criopreservação nos grupos mantidos a 5°C durante 48 ou 72h antes da criopreservação. Contudo, a capacidade de fecundação dos espermatozóides mantidos a 5°C durante 24 ou 72h antes da criopreservação foi suficiente para promover duas gestações e nascimento de bezerros saudáveis. Esses resultados indicam que a recuperação e a criopreservação de espermatozóides obtidos de epidídimos mantidos a 5°C, até 72h, provenientes de animais mortos é uma opção viável para preservar gametas masculinos para compor um banco de germoplasma.The objective of this study was to evaluate the morphological and functional characteristics of bovine spermatozoa retrieved from chilled

  1. A novel method for quantification of beam's-eye-view tumor tracking performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Houng; Myronakis, Marios; Rottmann, Joerg; Wang, Adam; Morf, Daniel; Shedlock, Daniel; Baturin, Paul; Star-Lack, Josh; Berbeco, Ross

    2017-11-01

    In-treatment imaging using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) can be used to confirm patient and tumor positioning. Real-time tumor tracking performance using current digital megavolt (MV) imagers is hindered by poor image quality. Novel EPID designs may help to improve quantum noise response, while also preserving the high spatial resolution of the current clinical detector. Recently investigated EPID design improvements include but are not limited to multi-layer imager (MLI) architecture, thick crystalline and amorphous scintillators, and phosphor pixilation and focusing. The goal of the present study was to provide a method of quantitating improvement in tracking performance as well as to reveal the physical underpinnings of detector design that impact tracking quality. The study employs a generalizable ideal observer methodology for the quantification of tumor tracking performance. The analysis is applied to study both the effect of increasing scintillator thickness on a standard, single-layer imager (SLI) design as well as the effect of MLI architecture on tracking performance. The present study uses the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (d') as a surrogate for tracking performance. We employ functions which model clinically relevant tasks and generalized frequency-domain imaging metrics to connect image quality with tumor tracking. A detection task for relevant Cartesian shapes (i.e., spheres and cylinders) was used to quantitate trackability of cases employing fiducial markers. Automated lung tumor tracking algorithms often leverage the differences in benign and malignant lung tissue textures. These types of algorithms (e.g., soft-tissue localization - STiL) were simulated by designing a discrimination task, which quantifies the differentiation of tissue textures, measured experimentally and fit as a power-law in trend (with exponent β) using a cohort of MV images of patient lungs. The modeled MTF and NPS were used to investigate the effect of

  2. Determinación inmunohistoquímica y utilidad pronóstica del receptor del factor de crecimiento epidérmico en los tumores estromales gastrointestinales Immnunohistochemical expression of epidermal growth factor and its prognostic value for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Padilla

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el receptor del factor de crecimiento epidérmico, EGFR(HER-1, es un receptor de tirosina quinasas cuya activación permite un aumento de la proliferación celular, angiogénesis, proceso metastásico y disminución de la apoptosis celular. Nuestro objetivo es conocer el valor pronóstico de la inmunotinción de EGFR en tumores estromales gastrointestinales (GIST. Pacientes y método: estudio retrospectivo que incluye todos los GIST intervenidos quirúrgicamente entre 1995-2007 en el Servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo del Hospital General de Ciudad Real. Variables clínicas: edad, sexo, clínica, mortalidad, recidiva. Variables patológicas: a macroscópicas: localización, diámetro; b microscópicas: necrosis tumoral, índice mitótico, tipo celular; y c inmunohistoquímicas: vimentina (V9, Dako A/s; actina del músculo liso (HHF-35, Biogenex; CD34 (QBEND/10; S100 (Policlonal Dako A/S; CD117 (c-kit Rabbit, antihuman polyclonal antibody, 1:600; PDGFR-alfa (Rabbit polyclonal antibody, 1:50, Sta. Cruz Biotechnology. Variables moleculares pronósticas: P-53, PAb240 (DakoCytomation, 1:75, Ki-67, clona MIB1 (Dako, 1:120 y EGFR pharmDx™ Dako Autostainer (Dako, Dinamarca. Criterios de malignidad: criterios de Fletcher. Resultados: entre 1995 y 2007, 35 GIST, fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente en nuestro Servicio. Edad media: 61,11 ± 11,02, siendo mujeres en el 62,9% de los casos. Debutaron con hemorragia digestiva en un 40%. La mediana de seguimiento fue de 28 meses (3-133. La mortalidad fue de 54,3%, con recidiva del 40%. Variables morfológicas: la localización más frecuente fue gástrica, 51,4% (18. Existió necrosis tumoral en un 57,1%, 20. El patrón celular fue fusocelular en un 57,1%, y epitelioide en un 14,3%. El diámetro máximo fue de 9,58 ± 6,29. El índice mitótico por 50 campos de gran aumento fue de 13,44 ± 16,08. En un 51,45%, 18, fueron neoplasias de alto riesgo. Valores inmunohistoqu

  3. Two self-referencing methods for the measurement of beam spot position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyiri, Balazs J.; Smale, Jason R.; Gerig, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Two quantitative methods of measuring electron beam spot position with respect to the collimator axis of rotation (CAOR) are described. Methods: Method 1 uses a cylindrical ion chamber (IC) mounted on a jig corotational with the collimator making the relationship among the chamber, jaws, and CAOR fixed and independent of collimator angle. A jaw parallel to the IC axis is set to zero and the IC position adjusted so that the IC signal is approximately 50% of the open field value, providing a large dose gradient in the region of the IC. The cGy/MU value is measured as a function of collimator rotation, e.g., every 30°. If the beam spot does not lie on the CAOR, the signal from the ion chamber will vary with collimator rotation. Based on a measured spatial sensitivity, the distance of the beam spot from the CAOR can be calculated from the IC signal variation with rotation. The 2nd method is image based. Two stainless steel rods, 3 mm in diameter, are mounted to a jig attached to the Linac collimator. The rods, offset from the CAOR, lay in different planes normal to the CAOR, one at 158 cm SSD and the other at 70 cm SSD. As the collimator rotates the rods move tangent along an envelope circle, the centers of which are on the CAOR in their respective planes. Three images, each at a different collimator rotation, containing the shadows of both rods, are acquired on the Linac EPID. At each angle the shadow of the rods on the EPID defines lines tangent to the projection of the envelope circles. From these the authors determine the projected centers of the two circles at different heights. From the distance of these two points using the two heights and the source to EPID distance, the authors calculate the distance of the beam spot from the CAOR. Measurements with all two techniques were performed on an Elekta Linac. Measurements were performed with the beam spot in nominal clinical position and in a deliberately offset position. Measurements were also performed

  4. Two self-referencing methods for the measurement of beam spot position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyiri, Balazs J.; Smale, Jason R.; Gerig, Lee H. [Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa K1H 8L6 (Canada) and Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa K1H 8M5 (Canada); Elekta Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 1Z3 (Canada); Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa K1S 5B6 (Canada) and Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa K1H 8M5 (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Two quantitative methods of measuring electron beam spot position with respect to the collimator axis of rotation (CAOR) are described. Methods: Method 1 uses a cylindrical ion chamber (IC) mounted on a jig corotational with the collimator making the relationship among the chamber, jaws, and CAOR fixed and independent of collimator angle. A jaw parallel to the IC axis is set to zero and the IC position adjusted so that the IC signal is approximately 50% of the open field value, providing a large dose gradient in the region of the IC. The cGy/MU value is measured as a function of collimator rotation, e.g., every 30 Degree-Sign . If the beam spot does not lie on the CAOR, the signal from the ion chamber will vary with collimator rotation. Based on a measured spatial sensitivity, the distance of the beam spot from the CAOR can be calculated from the IC signal variation with rotation. The 2nd method is image based. Two stainless steel rods, 3 mm in diameter, are mounted to a jig attached to the Linac collimator. The rods, offset from the CAOR, lay in different planes normal to the CAOR, one at 158 cm SSD and the other at 70 cm SSD. As the collimator rotates the rods move tangent along an envelope circle, the centers of which are on the CAOR in their respective planes. Three images, each at a different collimator rotation, containing the shadows of both rods, are acquired on the Linac EPID. At each angle the shadow of the rods on the EPID defines lines tangent to the projection of the envelope circles. From these the authors determine the projected centers of the two circles at different heights. From the distance of these two points using the two heights and the source to EPID distance, the authors calculate the distance of the beam spot from the CAOR. Measurements with all two techniques were performed on an Elekta Linac. Measurements were performed with the beam spot in nominal clinical position and in a deliberately offset position. Measurements were also

  5. Uso de fatores de crescimento epidérmico e estimulador de colônias de granulócitos na prevenção e tratamento da enterocolite necrosante no recém-nascido Use of epidermic and granulocyte-colony stimulating growth factors in the prevention and treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis of the newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dáfne Cardoso B. da Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar os conhecimentos existentes em relação ao uso de fatores de crescimento epidérmico e estimulador de colônias de granulócitos na prevenção e/ou no tratamento da enterocolite necrosante (ECN durante o período neonatal. FONTES DE DADOS: Revisão da literatura, nas bases de dados Medline, Lilacs, SciELO e PubMed, utilizando os unitermos "recém-nascidos", "enterocolite" e "fatores de crescimento", no período de 2003 a 2007. Nesta busca, 49 artigos foram encontrados, sendo 17 pertinentes ao tema. Também foram utilizados outros artigos, independente do ano de publicação, relacionados a aspectos definidores da ECN no recém-nascido. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A ECN continua sendo responsável por uma elevada morbimortalidade neonatal. Os mecanismos fisiopatológicos vêm sendo elucidados e, a partir deles, são discutidas novas terapias, como o uso de fatores de crescimento, destacando-se o fator de crescimento epidérmico e o fator estimulador de colônias de granulócitos. CONCLUSÕES: O uso de fatores de crescimento no tratamento e prevenção da ECN neonatal parece promissor. É necessário maior número de ensaios clínicos para comprovar sua eficácia e segurança. Enquanto isso, a melhor prática médica continua sendo a prevenção da doença.OBJECTIVE: To review the literature regarding the use of hematopoietic and epidermic growth factors for prevention or treatment of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. DATA SOURCES: Literature review of Medline, Lilacs, SciELO and Pubmed databases, using the key-words "newborn", "enterocolitis" and "growth factors", from 2003 to 2007. Fourty-nine papers were retrieved, but only 17 related to the subject. Other studies that described some clinical aspects of enterocolitis were also included, regardless of the year of publication. DATA SYNTHESIS: Necrotizing and enterocolitis has been an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. As the knowledge about the

  6. Descripción de un brote epidémico de toxoplasmosis aguda en pacientes inmunocompetentes miembros de las fuerzas militares de Colombia durante operaciones de selva Description of an epidemic outbreak of acute toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients from Colombian Armed Forces during jungle operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Pino

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La toxoplasmosis es una de las infecciones oportunistas más frecuentes en los pacientes infectados con el virus de inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH, mientras que, en los pacientes inmunocompetentes, la infección es sintomática sólo en 10% a 20% de los casos, generalmente con un comportamiento benigno y autolimitado. En la última década se han informado casos graves de compromiso visceral por toxoplasmosis aguda en pacientes inmunocompetentes. En este artículo se presenta un brote epidémico causado por Toxoplasma gondii en personal militar durante el desarrollo de operaciones de selva en el área general de La Macarena, Meta, Colombia. Los 18 casos reportados se confirmaron mediante inmunofluorescencia indirecta (IFI de anticuerpos IgG anti-toxoplasma, al obtener títulos iguales o superiores a 1:1.024 (valor negativo inferior a 1:16. Los síntomas más importantes en estos pacientes fueron fiebre prolongada, adenopatías y compromiso pulmonar y gastrointestinal. Un paciente desarrolló compromiso miopericárdico grave. Todos los pacientes se recuperaron después de tratamiento con pirimetamina/sulfodaxina y clindamicina durante tres semanas. Una hipótesis para la presentación del brote epidémico es el consumo de agua contaminada con ooquistes y, probablemente, la seriedad del compromiso puede atribuirse a una cepa silvestre del parásito, tal como se ha descrito en otros casos reportados en la literatura, aunque en nuestro caso en particular, no se pudo realizar el aislamiento y tipificación de las cepas involucradas.Toxoplasmosis is a common opportunistic infection in patients infected with HIV/AIDS while in immunocompetent patients this infection causes symptoms only in 10% to 20% of the cases, generally with a benign and autoresolutive course. In the last decade some severe cases with visceral involvement has been reported in immunocompetent patients, though they were isolated or recovered during years. We present the first Colombian

  7. Las “respuestas lentas” a la angiotensina II, la activación de la proteína Src y del factor de crecimiento epidérmico en la génesis de la hipertensión esencial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabas Iván Gómez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La hipertensión esencial es inducida por disfunción renal. Receptores normotensos de riñones de hipertensos desarrollan hipertensión y viceversa. La alteración renal más importante es el desacople del SRA respecto del nivel de sodio. El estrés oxidativo (ST-OX es estimulado cuando los niveles de angiotensina II (Ang II son inapropiados respecto del sodio corporal total. El ST-OX potencia el efecto vasoconstrictor de la Ang II por disminución del óxido nítrico (NO y/o por incremento de los vasoconstrictores, como isoprostanos, ET1 y otros. Estos efectos se ponen de manifiesto en la “respuesta lenta a la Ang II” en la que la infusión en dosis pequeñas (subpresoras induce retención de sodio y consecuente estímulo del STOX, con vasoconstricción. Estos efectos están mediados por señales intracelulares como la activación de proteína Src y del receptor del factor de crecimiento epidérmico por la Ang II, que parecen ser un mecanismo de vasoconstricción importante. Las especies reactivas de oxígeno inducidas por estos factores sostendrían una reacción autocatalítica, responsable de la producción sostenida de vasoconstrictores, con lo que se perpetúa la hipertensión.

  8. Application of a practical method for the isocenter point in vivo dosimetry by a transit signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piermattei, Angelo; Fidanzio, Andrea; Azario, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    This work reports the results of the application of a practical method to determine the in vivo dose at the isocenter point, D iso , of brain thorax and pelvic treatments using a transit signal S t . The use of a stable detector for the measurement of the signal S t (obtained by the x-ray beam transmitted through the patient) reduces many of the disadvantages associated with the use of solid-state detectors positioned on the patient as their periodic recalibration, and their positioning is time consuming. The method makes use of a set of correlation functions, obtained by the ratio between S t and the mid-plane dose value, D m , in standard water-equivalent phantoms, both determined along the beam central axis. The in vivo measurement of D iso required the determination of the water-equivalent thickness of the patient along the beam central axis by the treatment planning system that uses the electron densities supplied by calibrated Hounsfield numbers of the computed tomography scanner. This way it is, therefore, possible to compare D iso with the stated doses, D iso,TPS , generally used by the treatment planning system for the determination of the monitor units. The method was applied in five Italian centers that used beams of 6 MV, 10 MV, 15 MV x-rays and 60 Co γ-rays. In particular, in four centers small ion-chambers were positioned below the patient and used for the S t measurement. In only one center, the S t signals were obtained directly by the central pixels of an EPID (electronic portal imaging device) equipped with commercial software that enabled its use as a stable detector. In the four centers where an ion-chamber was positioned on the EPID, 60 pelvic treatments were followed for two fields, an anterior-posterior or a posterior-anterior irradiation and a lateral-lateral irradiation. Moreover, ten brain tumors were checked for a lateral-lateral irradiation, and five lung tumors carried out with three irradiations with different gantry angles were

  9. Application of a practical method for the isocenter point in vivo dosimetry by a transit signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piermattei, Angelo [UO di Fisica Sanitaria, Centro di Ricerca e Formazione ad Alta Tecnologia nelle Scienze Biomediche dell' Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Fidanzio, Andrea [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Azario, Luigi [Istituto di Fisica, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy)] (and others)

    2007-08-21

    This work reports the results of the application of a practical method to determine the in vivo dose at the isocenter point, D{sub iso}, of brain thorax and pelvic treatments using a transit signal S{sub t}. The use of a stable detector for the measurement of the signal S{sub t} (obtained by the x-ray beam transmitted through the patient) reduces many of the disadvantages associated with the use of solid-state detectors positioned on the patient as their periodic recalibration, and their positioning is time consuming. The method makes use of a set of correlation functions, obtained by the ratio between S{sub t} and the mid-plane dose value, D{sub m}, in standard water-equivalent phantoms, both determined along the beam central axis. The in vivo measurement of D{sub iso} required the determination of the water-equivalent thickness of the patient along the beam central axis by the treatment planning system that uses the electron densities supplied by calibrated Hounsfield numbers of the computed tomography scanner. This way it is, therefore, possible to compare D{sub iso} with the stated doses, D{sub iso,TPS}, generally used by the treatment planning system for the determination of the monitor units. The method was applied in five Italian centers that used beams of 6 MV, 10 MV, 15 MV x-rays and {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. In particular, in four centers small ion-chambers were positioned below the patient and used for the S{sub t} measurement. In only one center, the S{sub t} signals were obtained directly by the central pixels of an EPID (electronic portal imaging device) equipped with commercial software that enabled its use as a stable detector. In the four centers where an ion-chamber was positioned on the EPID, 60 pelvic treatments were followed for two fields, an anterior-posterior or a posterior-anterior irradiation and a lateral-lateral irradiation. Moreover, ten brain tumors were checked for a lateral-lateral irradiation, and five lung tumors carried out with

  10. Fatty acid consumption and incident type 2 diabetes: an 18-year follow-up in the female E3N (Etude Epidémiologique auprès des femmes de la Mutuelle Générale de l'Education Nationale) prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Courtney; Mangin, Marie; Balkau, Beverley; Affret, Aurélie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Bonnet, Fabrice; Fagherazzi, Guy

    2016-11-15

    We evaluated the association between dietary estimates of fatty acid (FA) consumption and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in the French E3N (Etude Epidémiologique auprès des femmes de la Mutuelle Générale de l'Education Nationale) cohort. In total, 71 334 women without diabetes at baseline were followed up from 1993 to 2011. Diabetes was identified using questionnaires and drug-reimbursement claims, and incident cases were validated. FA consumption in 1993 was estimated from a validated dietary questionnaire. Cox regression estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % CI of diabetes risk, comparing the upper tertile group with the lowest. High n-3 PUFA consumption was associated with T2D even after adjustment for confounders, including other FA and BMI (HR 1·26; 95 % CI 1·13, 1·41; upper tertile compared with lowest). Upon stratification by overweight (BMI≥25 kg/m2)/non-overweight, a positive association between total PUFA consumption and T2D was observed, but it was restricted to non-overweight women (HR 1·22; 95 % CI 1·05, 1·42), whereas n-3 PUFA consumption was associated with increased T2D risk in both BMI strata (BMI<25 kg/m2: HR 1·19; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·40 and BMI≥25 kg/m2: HR 1·38; 95 % CI 1·20, 1·59). Within the n-3 PUFA, high DPA (HR 1·41; 95 % CI 1·23, 1·63) and α-linolenic acid (ALA) intakes were associated with increased T2D risk, but the effects of ALA were restricted to overweight women (HR 1·17; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·36). Within the n-6 PUFA, only arachidonic acid (AA) intake was associated with T2D risk (HR 1·49; 95 % CI 1·33, 1·66). The associations with DPA and AA persisted even after adjustment of their principal source in this cohort, the consumption of meat. The effects of PUFA are heterogeneous within the FA group. Intake of DPA and AA may contribute to T2D development.

  11. SU-E-J-35: Using CBCT as the Alternative Method of Assessing ITV Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Redler, G; Chu, J [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To study the accuracy of Internal Target Volumes (ITVs) created on cone beam CT (CBCT) by comparing the visible target volume on CBCT to volumes (GTV, ITV, and PTV) outlined on free breathing (FB) CT and 4DCT. Methods A Quasar Cylindrical Motion Phantom with a 3cm diameter ball (14.14 cc) embedded within a cork insert was set up to simulate respiratory motion with a period of 4 seconds and amplitude of 2cm superioinferiorly and 1cm anterioposteriorly. FBCT and 4DCT images were acquired. A PTV-4D was created on the 4DCT by applying a uniform margin of 5mm to the ITV-CT. PTV-FB was created by applying a margin of the motion range plus 5mm, i.e. total of 1.5cm laterally and 2.5cm superioinferiorly to the GTV outlined on the FBCT. A dynamic conformal arc was planned to treat the PTV-FB with 1mm margin. A CBCT was acquired before the treatment, on which the target was delineated. During the treatment, the position of the target was monitored using the EPID in cine mode. Results ITV-CBCT and ITV-CT were measured to be 56.6 and 62.7cc, respectively, with a Dice Coefficient (DC) of 0.94 and disagreement in center of mass (COM) of 0.59 mm. On the other hand, GTV-FB was 11.47cc, 19% less than the known volume of the ball. PTV-FB and PTV-4D were 149 and 116 cc, with a DC of 0.71. Part of the ITV-CT was not enclosed by the PTV-FB despite the large margin. The cine EPID images have confirmed geometrical misses of the target. Similar under-coverage was observed in one clinical case and captured by the CBCT, where the implanted fiducials moved outside PTV-FB. Conclusion ITV-CBCT is in good agreement with ITV-CT. When 4DCT was not available, CBCT can be an effective alternative in determining and verifying the PTV margin.

  12. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 11: Quantification of chest wall motion during deep inspiration breast hold treatments using cine EPID images and a physics based algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E.; VanBeek, Timothy [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); Sasaki, David; Rivest, Ryan; Akra, Mohamed [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada); University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This work presents an algorithm used to quantify intra-fraction motion for patients treated using deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). The algorithm quantifies the position of the chest wall in breast tangent fields using electronic portal images. Methods: The algorithm assumes that image profiles, taken along a direction perpendicular to the medial border of the field, follow a monotonically and smooth decreasing function. This assumption is invalid in the presence of lung and can be used to calculate chest wall position. The algorithm was validated by determining the position of the chest wall for varying field edge positions in portal images of a thoracic phantom. The algorithm was used to quantify intra-fraction motion in cine images for 7 patients treated with DIBH. Results: Phantom results show that changes in the distance between chest wall and field edge were accurate within 0.1 mm on average. For a fixed field edge, the algorithm calculates the position of the chest wall with a 0.2 mm standard deviation. Intra-fraction motion for DIBH patients was within 1 mm 91.4% of the time and within 1.5 mm 97.9% of the time. The maximum intra-fraction motion was 3.0 mm. Conclusions: A physics based algorithm was developed and can be used to quantify the position of chest wall irradiated in tangent portal images with an accuracy of 0.1 mm and precision of 0.6 mm. Intra-fraction motion for patients treated with DIBH at our clinic is less than 3 mm.

  13. Etude séro-epidémiologique de trois infections sexuellement transmissibles (Chlamydia Trachomatis, Hépatite B, Syphilis): cas de l’Hôpital de District de Nkoldongo à Yaoundé

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essome, Marie Chantal Ngonde; Nsawir, Bonglaisin Julius; Nana, Rodrigue Dongang; Molu, Patrick; Mohamadou, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    are still frequent in developing countries and particularly in Cameroon. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of the following sexually transmitted infections: viral hepatitis B, Chlamydia trachomatis and syphilis in a population of women spontaneously visiting the Nkoldongo District Hospital in Yaoundé as well as to evaluate possible co-infections among these three conditions and to bring out women’s prior knowledge of how sexual transmission occurs. Methods We conducted a prospective and descriptive study including 182 women aged between 18 and 48 years. These women underwent serologic testing for Chlamydia trachomatis with ELISA (General Biological Corp laboratory test kit. Hepatitis B virus was detected using immunochromatographic method (Human laboratory kit) while syphilis was detected using RPR agglutination (Biocentric Laboratories kit )and TPHA agglutination (Human laboratory kit) method. Results Our results showed that the distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis, viral hepatitis B and syphilis was 22.52%, 4.39%, 0.54% respectively. Moreover, we reported a Chlamydia trachomatis and Viral hepatitis B coinfection rate of 2.74%. In addition, Chlamydia trachomatis reinfection was detected in 4.94% of cases. Regarding the mode of transmission of these infections, 67.57% and 70.87% of women didn’t know how Chlamydia trachomatis and viral hepatitis sexual transmission could occur respectively, while 91.2% of women knew how was syphilis spread. Conclusion The diagnosis of chlamydia trachomatis infection should prompt screening for viral hepatitis B. PMID:28293360

  14. Evaluation of an aSi-EPID with flattening filter free beams: Applicability to the GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and first experience for pretreatment QA of RapidArc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, G.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Cozzi, L.; Fogliata, A.; Krauss, H.; Fenoglietto, P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of portal dosimetry with an amorphous silicon mega voltage imager for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams by means of the GLAaS methodology and to validate it for pretreatment quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc).Methods: The GLAaS algorithm, developed for flattened beams, was applied to FFF beams of nominal energy of 6 and 10 MV generated by a Varian TrueBeam (TB). The amorphous silicon electronic portal imager [named mega voltage imager (MVI) on TB] was used to generate integrated images that were converted into matrices of absorbed dose to water. To enable GLAaS use under the increased dose-per-pulse and dose-rate conditions of the FFF beams, new operational source-detector-distance (SDD) was identified to solve detector saturation issues. Empirical corrections were defined to account for the shape of the profiles of the FFF beams to expand the original methodology of beam profile and arm backscattering correction. GLAaS for FFF beams was validated on pretreatment verification of RapidArc plans for three different TB linacs. In addition, the first pretreatment results from clinical experience on 74 arcs were reported in terms of γ analysis.Results: MVI saturates at 100 cm SDD for FFF beams but this can be avoided if images are acquired at 150 cm for all nominal dose rates of FFF beams. Rotational stability of the gantry-imager system was tested and resulted in a minimal apparent imager displacement during rotation of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm at SDD = 150 cm. The accuracy of this approach was tested with three different Varian TrueBeam linacs from different institutes. Data were stratified per energy and machine and showed no dependence with beam quality and MLC model. The results from clinical pretreatment quality assurance, provided a gamma agreement index (GAI) in the field area for six and ten FFF beams of (99.8 ± 0.3)% and (99.5 ± 0.6)% with distance to agreement and dose difference criteria

  15. Efeitos da laserterapia de baixa potência na reposta oxidativa epidérmica induzida pela cicatrização de feridas Effects of low-level laser therapy on epidermal oxidative response induced by wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PCL Silveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O uso terapêutico do laser de baixa potência na fisioterapia tem aumentado significativamente. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos da laserterapia de baixa potência nos parâmetros oxidativos na cicatrização de feridas em ratos. MÉTODOS: Dezoito ratos Wistar foram divididos randomicamente em 3 grupos (controle 5 dias, n=6; 5 dias/2 J/cm², n=6; 5 dias/4 J/cm², n=6. Uma única ferida circular medindo 8 X 8 mm foi cirurgicamente realizada no dorso do rato. Trinta minutos após a última irradiação, os ratos foram submetidos à eutanásia, e o tecido irradiado foi removido cirurgicamente e armazenado a -70ºC. Foi determinada a atividade das enzimas da cadeia respiratória: DCIP oxirredutase (complexo II e succinato desidrogenase solúvel (SDH, atividade do citocromo c oxidase (complexo IV, produção de ânion superóxido, atividade da superóxido dismutase (SOD e catalase (CAT. A lipoperoxidação foi avaliada pela técnica de TBARS. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mostram uma diminuição na atividade do complexo II nos grupos irradiados por 5 dias com 2 e 4 J/cm², enquanto a produção de ânion superóxido mostrou uma diminuição significativa no grupo irradiado por 5 dias com 4 J/cm² em relação ao grupo controle. Além disso, um aumento significativo na atividade da catalase foi observado no grupo irradiado por 5 dias com 2 J/cm², como também uma diminuição da peroxidação lipídica nos dois grupos irradiados. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados do presente estudo indicam que o laser estimula a atividade antioxidante e protege a célula contra danos oxidativos durante o processo de cicatrização de feridas cutâneas em ratos.BACKGROUND: Therapeutic use of low-level laser in physical therapy has increased significantly. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of low-level laser therapy on the oxidative parameters of wound healing in rats. METHODS: Eighteen Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (control, 5 days, n=6; 2 J

  16. Artropatia de charcot do mediopé no paciente diabético: complicação de uma doença epidêmica Mid-foot charcot arthropathy in diabetic patients: complication of an epidemic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cardenuto Ferreira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Traçar o perfil epidemiológico dos pacientes diabéticos portadores de artropatia de Charcot acometendo exclusivamente o mediopé ou estendendo-se do mediopé ao retropé. Avaliar, a médio prazo, o resultado do tratamento a que esses pacientes são submetidos seguindo um protocolo preestabelecido. MÉTODOS: Avaliamos, retrospectivamente, 88 pacientes (110 extremidades portadores de artropatia de Charcot do mediopé, com seguimento mínimo de 12 meses. Incluímos os pacientes portadores de artropatia de Charcot acometendo as articulações tarsometatársicas, 45 pacientes (51%; as articulações talonavicular, calcaneocuboide e subtalar, 20 pacientes (23%; e aqueles com envolvimento do mediopé e retropé, 23 pacientes (26%, segundo Brodsky e Trepman. Definimos como sucesso a preservação de um pé funcional e insucesso como amputação do pé. RESULTADOS: O tratamento da artropatia de Charcot envolvendo primariamente o mediopé foram satisfatórios em 75 pacientes (85% tratados seguindo nosso protocolo. Nos pacientes com lesões graves, acometendo tanto o mediopé quanto o retropé, foi necessário maior número de cirurgias complexas do tipo artrodese para se obter o mesmo índice global de resultados satisfatórios. A lesão osteoarticular originada no mediopé provavelmente estende-se progressivamente ao retropé devido à demora no diagnóstico no início do tratamento adequado. CONCLUSÃO: Foi possível preservar uma extremidade funcional em 85% dos pacientes. Lesões graves envolvendo o mediopé e estendendo-se ao retropé necessitaram maior número de cirurgias para o tratamento.OBJECTIVES: To outline the epidemiological profile of diabetic patients with Charcot arthropathy affecting the midfoot alone or extending from the midfoot to the hindfoot; To assess the results from the treatment that these patients undergo, according to a preestablished protocol, over the medium term. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 88

  17. Using an electronic portal imaging device for exit dose measurements in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganowicz, M.; Wozniak, B.; Bekman, A.; Maniakowski, Z.

    2003-01-01

    To present a method of determining the exit dose with the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The device used was the Portal Vision LC250 (Varian). The EPID signals on the central beam axis have been related to the exit dose. The exit dose measurements were performed with the ionisation chamber in the slab phantom at the distance of dose maximum from the exit surface of the phantom. EPID reading was investigated as a function of field size, phantom thickness and source-detector distance. The relation between dose rate and the EPID reading is described with empirical functions applicable to the obtained data. The exit dose is calculated from the EPID reading as a product of the calibration factor and appropriate correction factors. The determination of the exit dose rate from the EPID signal requires the knowledge of many parameters and earlier determination of essential characteristics. (author)

  18. Encefalitis epidémica. Encefalitis letárgica

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzáles Olaechea, Max

    2014-01-01

    In late 1915 and during 1916. He called their attention to RENE CRUCHET and other French doctors some patients whose predominant brain symptoms, but their comments were incomplete due to the incessant movement of the military hospitals in the areas of war; only in April 1917 CRUCHET, MOUTlER and CALMETTES founded observations in 40 cases under the name catalogaro encef allo-myelitis, published a statement in the Bulletin de la Societe Medicale des hospitaux Paris. Later in March 1918 drew att...

  19. An alternative effective method for verifying the multileaf collimator leaves speed by using a digital-video imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ing-Ming; Wu, Jay; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Ding, Hueisch-Jy

    2010-01-01

    We present an alternative effective method for verifying the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves speed using a digital-video imaging system in daily dynamic conformal radiation therapy (DCRT) and intensity-modulation radiation therapy (IMRT) in achieving increased convenience and shorter treatment times. The horizontal leaves speed measured was within 1.76-2.08 cm/s. The mean full range of traveling time was 20 s. The initial speed-up time was within 1.5-2.0 s, and the slowing-down time was within 2.0-2.5 s. Due to gravity the maximum speed-up effect in the X1 bank was +0.10 cm/s, but the lagging effect in the X2 bank was -0.20 cm/s. This technique offered an alternative method with electronic portal imaging device (EPID), charged coupled device (CCD) or a light field for the measurement of MLC leaves speed. When time taken on the linac was kept to a minimum, the image could be processed off-line.

  20. A Monte Carlo calculation model of electronic portal imaging device for transit dosimetry through heterogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won, E-mail: jungj@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858 (United States); Kim, Jong Oh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Yeo, Inhwan [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on its effective atomic number modeling in the XVMC code. Methods: A previously developed EPID model, based on the XVMC code by density scaling of EPID structures, was modified by additionally considering effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of each structure and adopting a phase space file from the EGSnrc code. The model was tested under various homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms and field sizes by comparing the calculations in the model with measurements in EPID. In order to better evaluate the model, the performance of the XVMC code was separately tested by comparing calculated dose to water with ion chamber (IC) array measurement in the plane of EPID. Results: In the EPID plane, calculated dose to water by the code showed agreement with IC measurements within 1.8%. The difference was averaged across the in-field regions of the acquired profiles for all field sizes and phantoms. The maximum point difference was 2.8%, affected by proximity of the maximum points to penumbra and MC noise. The EPID model showed agreement with measured EPID images within 1.3%. The maximum point difference was 1.9%. The difference dropped from the higher value of the code by employing the calibration that is dependent on field sizes and thicknesses for the conversion of calculated images to measured images. Thanks to the Z{sub eff} correction, the EPID model showed a linear trend of the calibration factors unlike those of the density-only-scaled model. The phase space file from the EGSnrc code sharpened penumbra profiles significantly, improving agreement of calculated profiles with measured profiles. Conclusions: Demonstrating high accuracy, the EPID model with the associated calibration system may be used for in vivo dosimetry of radiation therapy. Through this study, a MC model of EPID has been developed, and their performance has been rigorously

  1. In-vivo dosimetry in external radiotherapy with amorphous silicon Portal Imaging Devices: from method to clinical validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissard, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In vivo dose verification is used to prevent major deviations between the prescribed dose and the dose really delivered to the patient. This quality control was, nationally and internationally, widely recommended by scientific organizations. In France, its implementation and its use are now regulated. To do this, small detectors are fixed on the patient skin at the beginning of the treatment. However, the treatment delay is increased and not all treatment techniques could be assessed, such as IMRT plans (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy). In this context, Transit dosimetry performed with Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) appears as an interesting alternative for in vivo dose verification. During the treatment session, a transit dose is measured with the EPID, in two dimensions, and the dose in the patient is estimated from back projection of the portal dose. This work presents a quick and simple alternative method for verification of dose delivered to the patient using photon beams. Verifications in cases of complexes patient shapes and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) have been improved by using a Clarkson-Cunningham's integration method. 46 phantom test cases were designed to assess the accuracy of the method for 4, 6, 10 and 20 MV photon beams. For some points of interest the dose reconstructed by the method is compared to the dose measured with an ionization chamber. An additional in vivo uncertainty due to day to day deviations is defined and investigated. In the same time, a clinical study was driven during three years. In vivo dosimetry was performed for 494 patients treated for various tumors sites. Most of the patients were treated for a prostate cancer using IMRT. The in vivo dose is here compared to the dose calculated by the Treatment Planning System, TPS. The results of these two ways of validations are within the accepted tolerance of classical in vivo dosimetry. From the phantom study, we have estimated that the standard

  2. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines.

  3. Dose patient verification during treatment using an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Today, amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (aSi EPID) are currently used to check the accuracy of patient positioning. However, they are not use for dose reconstruction yet and more investigations are required to allow the use of an aSi EPID for routine dosimetric verification. The aim of this work is first to study the dosimetric characteristics of the EPID available at the Institut Curie and then, to check patient dose during treatment using these EPID. First, performance optimization of the Varian aS500 EPID system is studied. Then, a quality assurance system is set up in order to certify the image quality on a daily basis. An additional study on the dosimetric performance of the aS500 EPID is monitored to assess operational stability for dosimetry applications. Electronic portal imaging device is also a useful tool to improve IMRT quality control. The validation and the quality assurance of a portal dose image prediction system for IMRT pre-treatment quality control are performed. All dynamic IMRT fields are verified in clinical routine with the new method based on portal dosimetry. Finally, a new formalism for in vivo dosimetry using transit dose measured with EPID is developed and validated. The absolute dose measurement issue using aSi EPID is described and the midplane dose determination using in vivo dose measurements in combination with portal imaging is used with 3D-conformal-radiation therapy. (author) [fr

  4. Perturbation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Nayfeh, Ali H

    2008-01-01

    1. Introduction 1 2. Straightforward Expansions and Sources of Nonuniformity 23 3. The Method of Strained Coordinates 56 4. The Methods of Matched and Composite Asymptotic Expansions 110 5. Variation of Parameters and Methods of Averaging 159 6. The Method of Multiple Scales 228 7. Asymptotic Solutions of Linear Equations 308 References and Author Index 387 Subject Index 417

  5. Distillation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konecny, C.

    1975-01-01

    Two main methods of separation using the distillation method are given and evaluated, namely evaporation and distillation in carrier gas flow. Two basic apparatus are described for illustrating the methods used. The use of the distillation method in radiochemistry is documented by a number of examples of the separation of elements in elemental state, volatile halogenides and oxides. Tables give a survey of distillation methods used for the separation of the individual elements and give conditions under which this separation takes place. The suitability of the use of distillation methods in radiochemistry is discussed with regard to other separation methods. (L.K.)

  6. galerkin's methods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The assumed deflection shapes used in the approximate methods such as in the Galerkin's method were normally ... to direct compressive forces Nx, was derived by Navier. [3]. ..... tend to give higher frequency and stiffness, as well as.

  7. Mining Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Shik; Lee, Kyung Woon; Kim, Oak Hwan; Kim, Dae Kyung [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    The reducing coal market has been enforcing the coal industry to make exceptional rationalization and restructuring efforts since the end of the eighties. To the competition from crude oil and natural gas has been added the growing pressure from rising wages and rising production cost as the workings get deeper. To improve the competitive position of the coal mines against oil and gas through cost reduction, studies to improve mining system have been carried out. To find fields requiring improvements most, the technologies using in Tae Bak Colliery which was selected one of long running mines were investigated and analyzed. The mining method appeared the field needing improvements most to reduce the production cost. The present method, so-called inseam roadway caving method presently is using to extract the steep and thick seam. However, this method has several drawbacks. To solve the problems, two mining methods are suggested for a long term and short term method respectively. Inseam roadway caving method with long-hole blasting method is a variety of the present inseam roadway caving method modified by replacing timber sets with steel arch sets and the shovel loaders with chain conveyors. And long hole blasting is introduced to promote caving. And pillar caving method with chock supports method uses chock supports setting in the cross-cut from the hanging wall to the footwall. Two single chain conveyors are needed. One is installed in front of chock supports to clear coal from the cutting face. The other is installed behind the supports to transport caved coal from behind. This method is superior to the previous one in terms of safety from water-inrushes, production rate and productivity. The only drawback is that it needs more investment. (author). 14 tabs., 34 figs.

  8. Projection Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin

    1999-01-01

    When trying to solve a DAE problem of high index with more traditional methods, it often causes instability in some of the variables, and finally leads to breakdown of convergence and integration of the solution. This is nicely shown in [ESF98, p. 152 ff.].This chapter will introduce projection...... methods as a way of handling these special problems. It is assumed that we have methods for solving normal ODE systems and index-1 systems....

  9. Discipline methods

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Kikila; Ioannis Koutelekos

    2012-01-01

    Child discipline is one of the most important elements of successful parenting. As discipline is defined the process that help children to learn appropriate behaviors and make good choices. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the literature about the discipline methods. The method οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature, mainly in the pubmed data base which referred to the discipline methods. Results: In the literature it is ci...

  10. Maintenance methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchis, H.; Aucher, P.

    1990-01-01

    The maintenance method applied at the Hague is summarized. The method was developed in order to solve problems relating to: the different specialist fields, the need for homogeneity in the maintenance work, the equipment diversity, the increase of the materials used at the Hague's new facilities. The aim of the method is to create a knowhow formalism, to facilitate maintenance, to ensure the running of the operations and to improve the estimation of the maintenance cost. One of the method's difficulties is the demonstration of the profitability of the maintenance operations [fr

  11. Spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.; Murray, A.

    1992-01-01

    The principles involved in the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter are described, as are the principles behind methods of radiation detection. Different types of radiation detectors are described and methods of detection such as alpha, beta and gamma spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis are presented. Details are given of measurements of uranium-series disequilibria. (UK)

  12. Method Mixins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2002-01-01

    . Method mixins use shared name spaces to transfer information between caller and callee, as opposed to traditional invocation which uses parameters and returned results. This relieves a caller from dependencies on the callee, and it allows direct transfer of information further down the call stack, e......The procedure call mechanism has conquered the world of programming, with object-oriented method invocation being a procedure call in context of an object. This paper presents an alternative, method mixin invocations, that is optimized for flexible creation of composite behavior, where traditional...

  13. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowshanfarzad P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pejman Rowshanfarzad,1 Peter Häring,2 Hans L Riis,3 Sune J Zimmermann,3 Martin A Ebert1,4 1School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia; 2German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg, Germany; 3Radiofysisk Laboratorium, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia Background: In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods: The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD, EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. Results: The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. Conclusion: The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines. Keywords: linac, Siemens, arc, sag, EPID, gantry

  14. Method Mixins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2002-01-01

    invocation is optimized for as-is reuse of existing behavior. Tight coupling reduces flexibility, and traditional invocation tightly couples transfer of information and transfer of control. Method mixins decouple these two kinds of transfer, thereby opening the doors for new kinds of abstraction and reuse......The procedure call mechanism has conquered the world of programming, with object-oriented method invocation being a procedure call in context of an object. This paper presents an alternative, method mixin invocations, that is optimized for flexible creation of composite behavior, where traditional....... Method mixins use shared name spaces to transfer information between caller and callee, as opposed to traditional invocation which uses parameters and returned results. This relieves a caller from dependencies on the callee, and it allows direct transfer of information further down the call stack, e...

  15. Dosimetry methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, A.; Kovacs, A.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and physical radiation dosimetry methods, used for the measurement of absorbed dose mainly during the practical use of ionizing radiation, are discussed with respect to their characteristics and fields of application....

  16. Method Mixins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The world of programming has been conquered by the procedure call mechanism, including object-oriented method invocation which is a procedure call in context of an object. This paper presents an alternative, method mixin invocations, that is optimized for flexible creation of composite behavior, ...... the call stack, e.g., to a callee's callee. The mechanism has been implemented in the programming language gbeta. Variants of the mechanism could be added to almost any imperative programming language.......The world of programming has been conquered by the procedure call mechanism, including object-oriented method invocation which is a procedure call in context of an object. This paper presents an alternative, method mixin invocations, that is optimized for flexible creation of composite behavior...

  17. SU-F-J-177: A Novel Image Analysis Technique (center Pixel Method) to Quantify End-To-End Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Snyder, K [Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI (United States); Scheib, S [Varian Medical System, Barton (Switzerland); Qin, Y; Li, H [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a novel image analysis technique, “center pixel method”, to quantify end-to-end tests accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom. The phantom was scanned with 0.8 mm slice thickness. The treatment isocenter was placed at the center of the phantom. In the treatment room, CBCT images of the phantom (kVp=77, mAs=1022, slice thickness 1 mm) were acquired to register to the reference CT images. 6D couch correction were applied based on the registration results. Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)-based Winston Lutz (WL) tests were performed to quantify the errors of the targeting accuracy of the system at 15 combinations of gantry, collimator and couch positions. The images were analyzed using two different methods. a) The classic method. The deviation was calculated by measuring the radial distance between the center of the central BB and the full width at half maximum of the radiation field. b) The center pixel method. Since the imager projection offset from the treatment isocenter was known from the IsoCal calibration, the deviation was determined between the center of the BB and the central pixel of the imager panel. Results: Using the automatic registration method to localize the phantom and the classic method of measuring the deviation of the BB center, the mean and standard deviation of the radial distance was 0.44 ± 0.25, 0.47 ± 0.26, and 0.43 ± 0.13 mm for the jaw, MLC and cone defined field sizes respectively. When the center pixel method was used, the mean and standard deviation was 0.32 ± 0.18, 0.32 ± 0.17, and 0.32 ± 0.19 mm respectively. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that the center pixel method accurately analyzes the WL images to evaluate the targeting accuracy of the radiosurgery system. The work was supported by a Research Scholar Grant, RSG-15-137-01-CCE from the American

  18. Ensemble Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Matteo; Valentini, Giorgio

    2012-03-01

    Ensemble methods are statistical and computational learning procedures reminiscent of the human social learning behavior of seeking several opinions before making any crucial decision. The idea of combining the opinions of different "experts" to obtain an overall “ensemble” decision is rooted in our culture at least from the classical age of ancient Greece, and it has been formalized during the Enlightenment with the Condorcet Jury Theorem[45]), which proved that the judgment of a committee is superior to those of individuals, provided the individuals have reasonable competence. Ensembles are sets of learning machines that combine in some way their decisions, or their learning algorithms, or different views of data, or other specific characteristics to obtain more reliable and more accurate predictions in supervised and unsupervised learning problems [48,116]. A simple example is represented by the majority vote ensemble, by which the decisions of different learning machines are combined, and the class that receives the majority of “votes” (i.e., the class predicted by the majority of the learning machines) is the class predicted by the overall ensemble [158]. In the literature, a plethora of terms other than ensembles has been used, such as fusion, combination, aggregation, and committee, to indicate sets of learning machines that work together to solve a machine learning problem [19,40,56,66,99,108,123], but in this chapter we maintain the term ensemble in its widest meaning, in order to include the whole range of combination methods. Nowadays, ensemble methods represent one of the main current research lines in machine learning [48,116], and the interest of the research community on ensemble methods is witnessed by conferences and workshops specifically devoted to ensembles, first of all the multiple classifier systems (MCS) conference organized by Roli, Kittler, Windeatt, and other researchers of this area [14,62,85,149,173]. Several theories have been

  19. Method Mixins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The world of programming has been conquered by the procedure call mechanism, including object-oriented method invocation which is a procedure call in context of an object. This paper presents an alternative, method mixin invocations, that is optimized for flexible creation of composite behavior...... of abstraction and reuse. Method mixins use shared name spaces to transfer information between caller and callee, as opposed to traditional invocation which uses parameters and returned results. This relieves the caller from dependencies on the callee, and it allows direct transfer of information further down...... the call stack, e.g., to a callee's callee. The mechanism has been implemented in the programming language gbeta. Variants of the mechanism could be added to almost any imperative programming language....

  20. Statistical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Szulc, Stefan

    1965-01-01

    Statistical Methods provides a discussion of the principles of the organization and technique of research, with emphasis on its application to the problems in social statistics. This book discusses branch statistics, which aims to develop practical ways of collecting and processing numerical data and to adapt general statistical methods to the objectives in a given field.Organized into five parts encompassing 22 chapters, this book begins with an overview of how to organize the collection of such information on individual units, primarily as accomplished by government agencies. This text then

  1. Sieve methods

    CERN Document Server

    Halberstam, Heine

    2011-01-01

    Derived from the techniques of analytic number theory, sieve theory employs methods from mathematical analysis to solve number-theoretical problems. This text by a noted pair of experts is regarded as the definitive work on the subject. It formulates the general sieve problem, explores the theoretical background, and illustrates significant applications.""For years to come, Sieve Methods will be vital to those seeking to work in the subject, and also to those seeking to make applications,"" noted prominent mathematician Hugh Montgomery in his review of this volume for the Bulletin of the Ameri

  2. SU-E-J-58: Comparison of Conformal Tracking Methods Using Initial, Adaptive and Preceding Image Frames for Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, P; Guo, K; Alayoubi, N; Kehler, K; Pistorius, S [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accounting for tumor motion during radiation therapy is important to ensure that the tumor receives the prescribed dose. Increasing the field size to account for this motion exposes the surrounding healthy tissues to unnecessary radiation. In contrast to using motion-encompassing techniques to treat moving tumors, conformal radiation therapy (RT) uses a smaller field to track the tumor and adapts the beam aperture according to the motion detected. This work investigates and compares the performance of three markerless, EPID based, optical flow methods to track tumor motion with conformal RT. Methods: Three techniques were used to track the motions of a 3D printed lung tumor programmed to move according to the tumor of seven lung cancer patients. These techniques utilized a multi-resolution optical flow algorithm as the core computation for image registration. The first method (DIR) registers the incoming images with an initial reference frame, while the second method (RFSF) uses an adaptive reference frame and the third method (CU) uses preceding image frames for registration. The patient traces and errors were evaluated for the seven patients. Results: The average position errors for all patient traces were 0.12 ± 0.33 mm, −0.05 ± 0.04 mm and −0.28 ± 0.44 mm for CU, DIR and RFSF method respectively. The position errors distributed within 1 standard deviation are 0.74 mm, 0.37 mm and 0.96 mm respectively. The CU and RFSF algorithms are sensitive to the characteristics of the patient trace and produce a wider distribution of errors amongst patients. Although the mean error for the DIR method is negatively biased (−0.05 mm) for all patients, it has the narrowest distribution of position error, which can be corrected using an offset calibration. Conclusion: Three techniques of image registration and position update were studied. Using direct comparison with an initial frame yields the best performance. The authors would like to thank Dr.YeLin Suh for

  3. SU-E-J-58: Comparison of Conformal Tracking Methods Using Initial, Adaptive and Preceding Image Frames for Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, P; Guo, K; Alayoubi, N; Kehler, K; Pistorius, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Accounting for tumor motion during radiation therapy is important to ensure that the tumor receives the prescribed dose. Increasing the field size to account for this motion exposes the surrounding healthy tissues to unnecessary radiation. In contrast to using motion-encompassing techniques to treat moving tumors, conformal radiation therapy (RT) uses a smaller field to track the tumor and adapts the beam aperture according to the motion detected. This work investigates and compares the performance of three markerless, EPID based, optical flow methods to track tumor motion with conformal RT. Methods: Three techniques were used to track the motions of a 3D printed lung tumor programmed to move according to the tumor of seven lung cancer patients. These techniques utilized a multi-resolution optical flow algorithm as the core computation for image registration. The first method (DIR) registers the incoming images with an initial reference frame, while the second method (RFSF) uses an adaptive reference frame and the third method (CU) uses preceding image frames for registration. The patient traces and errors were evaluated for the seven patients. Results: The average position errors for all patient traces were 0.12 ± 0.33 mm, −0.05 ± 0.04 mm and −0.28 ± 0.44 mm for CU, DIR and RFSF method respectively. The position errors distributed within 1 standard deviation are 0.74 mm, 0.37 mm and 0.96 mm respectively. The CU and RFSF algorithms are sensitive to the characteristics of the patient trace and produce a wider distribution of errors amongst patients. Although the mean error for the DIR method is negatively biased (−0.05 mm) for all patients, it has the narrowest distribution of position error, which can be corrected using an offset calibration. Conclusion: Three techniques of image registration and position update were studied. Using direct comparison with an initial frame yields the best performance. The authors would like to thank Dr.YeLin Suh for

  4. Characterization methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, J.T. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Methods discussed in this compilation of notes and diagrams are Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and other surface analysis techniques (auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and scanning tunnelling microscopy). A comparative evaluation of different techniques is performed. In-vacuo and in-situ analyses are described.

  5. Digital Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, R.

    2013-01-01

    In Digital Methods, Richard Rogers proposes a methodological outlook for social and cultural scholarly research on the Web that seeks to move Internet research beyond the study of online culture. It is not a toolkit for Internet research, or operating instructions for a software package; it deals

  6. Chromatographic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhol, M.; Stary, J.

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics are given of chromatographic separation and the methods are listed. Methods and data on materials used in partition, adsorption, precipitation and ion exchange chromatography are listed and conditions are described under which ion partition takes place. Special attention is devoted to ion exchange chromatography where tables are given to show the course of values of the partition coefficients of different ions in dependence on the concentration of agents and the course of equilibrium sorptions on different materials in dependence on the solution pH. A theoretical analysis is given and the properties of the most widely used ion exchangers are listed. Experimental conditions and apparatus used for each type of chromatography are listed. (L.K.)

  7. Numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlquist, Germund

    1974-01-01

    ""Substantial, detailed and rigorous . . . readers for whom the book is intended are admirably served."" - MathSciNet (Mathematical Reviews on the Web), American Mathematical Society.Practical text strikes fine balance between students' requirements for theoretical treatment and needs of practitioners, with best methods for large- and small-scale computing. Prerequisites are minimal (calculus, linear algebra, and preferably some acquaintance with computer programming). Text includes many worked examples, problems, and an extensive bibliography.

  8. Sampling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughran, R.J.; Wallbrink, P.J.; Walling, D.E.; Appleby, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Methods for the collection of soil samples to determine levels of 137 Cs and other fallout radionuclides, such as excess 210 Pb and 7 Be, will depend on the purposes (aims) of the project, site and soil characteristics, analytical capacity, the total number of samples that can be analysed and the sample mass required. The latter two will depend partly on detector type and capabilities. A variety of field methods have been developed for different field conditions and circumstances over the past twenty years, many of them inherited or adapted from soil science and sedimentology. The use of them inherited or adapted from soil science and sedimentology. The use of 137 Cs in erosion studies has been widely developed, while the application of fallout 210 Pb and 7 Be is still developing. Although it is possible to measure these nuclides simultaneously, it is common for experiments to designed around the use of 137 Cs along. Caesium studies typically involve comparison of the inventories found at eroded or sedimentation sites with that of a 'reference' site. An accurate characterization of the depth distribution of these fallout nuclides is often required in order to apply and/or calibrate the conversion models. However, depending on the tracer involved, the depth distribution, and thus the sampling resolution required to define it, differs. For example, a depth resolution of 1 cm is often adequate when using 137 Cs. However, fallout 210 Pb and 7 Be commonly has very strong surface maxima that decrease exponentially with depth, and fine depth increments are required at or close to the soil surface. Consequently, different depth incremental sampling methods are required when using different fallout radionuclides. Geomorphic investigations also frequently require determination of the depth-distribution of fallout nuclides on slopes and depositional sites as well as their total inventories

  9. Decontaminating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Toshiharu; Shibuya, Kiichiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of eliminating radioactive contaminations capable of ease treatment for decontaminated liquid wastes and grinding materials. Method: Those organic grinding materials such as fine wall nuts shell pieces cause no secondary contaminations since they are softer as compared with inorganic grinding materials, less pulverizable upon collision against the surface to be treated, being capable of reusing and producing no fine scattering powder. In addition, they can be treated by burning. The organic grinding material and water are sprayed by a nozzle to the surface to be treated, and decontaminated liquid wastes are separated into solid components mainly composed of organic grinding materials and liquid components mainly composed of water by filtering. The thus separated solid components are recovered in a storage tank for reuse as the grinding material and, after repeating use, subjected to burning treatment. While on the other hand, water is recovered into a storage tank and, after repeating use, purified by passing through an ion exchange resin-packed column and decontaminated to discharge. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  11. Casting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  12. Radiochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This little volume is one of an extended series of basic textbooks on analytical chemistry produced by the Analytical Chemistry by Open Learning project in the UK. Prefatory sections explain its mission, and how to use the Open Learning format. Seventeen specific sections organized into five chaptrs begin with a general discussion of nuclear properties, types, and laws of nuclear decay and proceeds to specific discussions of three published papers (reproduced in their entirety) giving examples of radiochemical methods which were discussed in the previous chapter. Each section begins with an overview, contains one or more practical problems (called self-assessment questions or SAQ's), and concludes with a summary and a list of objectives for the student. Following the main body are answers to the SAQ's, and several tables of physical constants, SI prefixes, etc. A periodic table graces the inside back cover

  13. Moment methods and Lanczos methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to many of the speakers at this conference I am less interested in average properties of nuclei than in detailed spectroscopy. I will try to show, however, that the two are very closely connected and that shell-model calculations may be used to give a great deal of information not normally associated with the shell-model. It has been demonstrated clearly to us that the level spacing fluctuations in nuclear spectra convey very little physical information. This is true when the fluctuations are averaged over the entire spectrum but not if one's interest is in the lowest few states, whose spacings are relatively large. If one wishes to calculate a ground state (say) accurately, that is with an error much smaller than the excitation energy of the first excited state, very high moments, μ/sub n/, n approx. 200, are needed. As I shall show, we use such moments as a matter of course, albeit without actually calculating them; in fact I will try to show that, if at all possible, the actual calculations of moments is to be avoided like the plague. At the heart of the new shell-model methods embodied in the Glasgow shell-model program and one or two similar ones is the so-called Lanczos method and this, it turns out, has many deep and subtle connections with the mathematical theory of moments. It is these connections that I will explore here

  14. Use of Electronic Portal Image Detectors for Quality Assurance of Advanced Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Jean M, E-mail: jmmoran@med.umich.ed [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor MI 48109-0010 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    As the complexity of radiation therapy has increased, the need for quantitative dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery has also increased. A growing number of investigations have expanded the use of EPIDs from anatomic applications to dosimetric verification. This work focuses on the applications of EPIDs for pre-treatment dosimetric verification of IMRT and intensity modulated arc therapy techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are discussed along with methods to extrapolate to 3D dose verification applications.

  15. On method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Kortlandt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The basis of linguistic reconstruction is the comparative method, which starts from the assumption that there is “a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident”, implying the existence of a common source (thus Sir William Jones in 1786. It follows that there must be a possible sequence of developments from the reconstructed system to the attested data. These developments must have been either phonetically regular or analogical. The latter type of change requires a model and a motivation. A theory which does not account for the data in terms of sound laws and well-motivated analogical changes is not a linguistic reconstruction but philosophical speculation.The pre-laryngealist idea that any Proto-Indo-European long vowel became acute in Balto-Slavic is a typical example of philosophical speculation contradicted by the comparative evidence. Other examples are spontaneous glottalization (Jasanoff’s “acute assignment”, unattested anywhere in the world, Jasanoff’s trimoraic long vowels, Eichner’s law, Osthoff’s law, and Szemerényi’s law, which is an instance of circular reasoning. The Balto-Slavic acute continues the Proto-Indo-European laryngeals and the glottalic feature of the traditional Proto-Indo-European “unaspirated voiced” obstruents (Winter’s law. My reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European glottalic obstruents is based on direct evidence from Indo-Iranian, Armenian, Baltic and Germanic and indirect evidence from Indo-Iranian, Greek, Latin and Slavic.

  16. Comparison between Electronic Portal Imaging Devices and ion chamber matrix for intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance; Comparacao entre Dispositivos Eletronicos de Imagens Portais e matriz de camaras de ionizacao para garantia da qualidade de radioterapia de intensidade modulada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Thiago B.; Rosa, Luiz A.R., E-mail: thiago.fisimed@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Marilia B., E-mail: thiago.fisimed@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica Medica

    2012-08-15

    The treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) demands an individual and specific quality assurance procedure. The use of ion chamber matrix is a well establish method to dose distribution verifications, despite the lower spatial resolution. An alternative method arising is the use of the Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs). The aim of this paper is to validate the EPID use for quality assurance of IMRT comparing it to the previous method employing an ion chamber matrix. We analyzed 10 treatment planning for different tumor sites and photons energies of the linac Trilogy (Varian Medical Systems). We used Sliding-window IMRT and the measurements were acquired in EPID and in Physikalisch-Technische Werkstaetten (PTW) 2D Array seven29. Two different software were used to analyze the data: Verisoft version 4.0, for Array data; and Eclipse 8.6 with Portal Dosimetry for EPID data. The evaluation of concordance levels between measured and predicted images used the Gamma Index tool with 3% of dose difference and 3 mm of distance to agreement. The EPID showed worse results for approval percentiles, in average 2.17%, and bigger values of average gamma index, although its analysis confirmed the approvals of all planning. This happens because of the better sensitivity generated by the higher spatial resolution of the EPID, 0,784 mm against 1,0 cm of the Array, so it has bigger capacity to identify small dose variations. The EPID, jointly with the Portal Dosimetry, proved to be excellent tools to perform pre-treatment IMRT verifications, providing significant gain in dose distribution analysis. Also, the EPID is easier for positioning, for images manipulation, for data acquisition and analysis and has detection area 60% bigger. (author)

  17. Verification of multileaf collimator leaf positions using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Zheng Wei; Parra, Nestor Andres; Chandler, Jason; Gopal, Arun; Wu Jian; Jain Jinesh; Zhu Yunping; Sontag, Marc

    2002-01-01

    An automated method is presented for determining individual leaf positions of the Siemens dual focus multileaf collimator (MLC) using the Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS) electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Leaf positions are computed with an error of 0.6 mm at one standard deviation (σ) using separate computations of pixel dimensions, image distortion, and radiation center. The pixel dimensions are calculated by superimposing the film image of a graticule with the corresponding EPID image. A spatial correction is used to compensate for the optical distortions of the EPID, reducing the mean distortion from 3.5 pixels (uncorrected) per localized x-ray marker to 2 pixels (1 mm) for a rigid rotation and 1 pixel for a third degree polynomial warp. A correction for a nonuniform dosimetric response across the field of view of the EPID images is not necessary due to the sharp intensity gradients across leaf edges. The radiation center, calculated from the average of the geometric centers of a square field at 0 deg. and 180 deg. collimator angles, is independent of graticule placement error. Its measured location on the EPID image was stable to within 1 pixel based on 3 weeks of repeated extensions/retractions of the EPID. The MLC leaf positions determined from the EPID images agreed to within a pixel of the corresponding values measured using film and ionization chamber. Several edge detection algorithms were tested: contour, Sobel, Roberts, Prewitt, Laplace, morphological, and Canny. These agreed with each other to within ≤1.2 pixels for the in-air EPID images. Using a test pattern, individual MLC leaves were found to be typically within 1 mm of the corresponding record-and-verify values, with a maximum difference of 1.8 mm, and standard deviations of <0.3 mm in the daily reproducibility. This method presents a fast, automatic, and accurate alternative to using film or a light field for the verification and calibration of the MLC

  18. Utilization of an electronic portal imaging device for measurement of dynamic wedge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, Eric S.; Miner, Marc S.; Butker, Elizabeth K.; Sutton, Danny S.; Davis, Lawrence W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Due to the motion of the collimator during dynamic wedge treatments, the conventional method of collecting comprehensive wedge data with a water tank and a scanning ionization chamber is obsolete. It is the objective of this work to demonstrate the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and software to accomplish this task. Materials and Methods: A Varian Clinac[reg] 2300 C/D, equipped with a PortalVision TM EPID and Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software, was used to produce the radiation field. The Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software allows for a band of 10 of 256 high voltage electrodes to be continuously read and averaged by the 256 electrometer electrodes. The file that is produced contains data relating to the integrated ionization at each of the 256 points, essentially the cross plane beam profile. Software was developed using Microsoft C ++ to reformat the data for import into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet allowing for easy mathematical manipulation and graphical display. Beam profiles were measured by the EPID with a 100 cm TSD for various field sizes. Each field size was measured open, steel wedged, and dynamically wedged. Scanning ionization chamber measurements performed in a water tank were compared to the open and steel wedged fields. Ionization chamber measurements taken in a water tank were compared with the dynamically wedged measurements. For the EPID measurements the depth was varied using Gammex RMI Solid Water TM placed directly above the EPID sensitive volume. Bolus material was placed between the Solid Water TM and the EPID to avoid an air gap. Results: Comparison of EPID measurements with those from an ion chamber in a water tank showed a discrepancy of ∼5%. Scans were successfully obtained for open, steel wedged and dynamically wedged beams. Software has been developed to allow for easy graphical display of beam profiles. Conclusions: Measurement of dynamic wedge data proves to be easily

  19. Outbreak of rubella after mass vaccination of children and adult women: challenges for rubella elimination strategies Brote epidémico de rubéola tras la vacunación masiva de niños y mujeres adultas: un reto para las estrategias de eliminación de la rubéola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone Andreatta Menegolla

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe rubella outbreaks and control strategies in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul before rubella elimination. METHODS: We analyzed rubella and congenital rubella syndrome surveillance data for the state of Rio Grande do Sul and calculated age- and gender-specific incidence of confirmed rubella cases in 2007. We obtained data on measles-rubella doses administered during the outbreak from the state immunization program and reviewed the timing of suspect case notification and implementation of control measures. RESULTS: Of 2 842 confirmed rubella cases reported to the state health department in 2007, 2 145 (75.5% were in males (39.5 cases per 100 000 population and 697 (24.5% were in females (12.3 per 100 000 population. Incidence among 15- to 39-year-olds was 1.8 to 5.5 times higher in males than in females. Rubella genotype 2B was detected in nasopharyngeal specimens from 13 patients from multiple chains of transmission. Eight children were born with congenital rubella syndrome (5.9 cases per 100 000 births in 2008. Delayed notification of initial cases hampered early control efforts, resulting in outbreak spread throughout the state. Rubella transmission was interrupted after mass vaccination of adult men and women as part of a national vaccination campaign. CONCLUSIONS: Routine vaccination strategies and mass vaccination of adolescents and adults for accelerated rubella control and elimination should target men and women.OBJETIVO: Describir los brotes de rubéola y las estrategias para el control de la enfermedad anteriores a la eliminación de la rubéola en el estado brasileño de Rio Grande do Sul. MÉTODOS: Se analizaron los datos de vigilancia epidemiológica sobre la rubéola y el síndrome de rubéola congénita del estado de Rio Grande do Sul y se calculó la incidencia específica por edad y sexo de los casos confirmados de rubéola en el 2007. A partir del programa de vacunación estatal se obtuvieron datos

  20. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sangwook; Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yi, Byong Yong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Suk; Cho, Sam Ju; Choi, Jinho

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  1. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sangwook, E-mail: medicalphysics@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Seo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Seo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Byong Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lee, Sang Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Jung-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sam Ju [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji General Hospital, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jinho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Namdong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  2. Aspects epidémiologiques des accidents domestiques de l'enfant à ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2. Clinics in Mother and Child Health. Tableau 1: Types d'accidents domestiques retrouvés. Type d'accident. Nombre. Pourcentage. Chute. 26. 46,4. Intoxication au pétrole. 9. 16,1. Brûlure. 5. 8,9. Coupure. 5. 8,9. Corps étranger. 4. 7,1. Collusion avec un objet contondant. 4. 7,1. Morsure. 2. 3,7. Suffocation. 1. 1,8. Total. 56.

  3. Epidémiologie de la furonculose des salmonidés.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUBOIS-DARNAUDPEYS A.

    1977-04-01

    Full Text Available L'antagonisme bactérien dû à la flore d'accompagnement est le seul facteur jouant un rôle dans la dynamique des populations de A. salmonicida. L'action lytique des bactériophages ou de Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus est inactive sur cette bactérie.

  4. Surto epidêmico de sarampo na Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson A. Araújo Filho

    1980-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem durante os meses de março e abril de 1976, a ocorrência de um surto de sarampo com 50 casos, em um povoado da Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, situado a 17 km de distância do continente. A incidência sobre a população residente na área de 453 pessoas foi de 11,03%; na faixa entre um a 15 anos não ocorreram diferenças estatisticamentes significativas entre as taxas de incidência; nenhum caso acometeu menores de um ano, e três casos ocorreram em maiores de 15 anos; os autores acreditam que há muitos anos não ocorria sarampo na área, e que provavelmente daqui a cinco ou sete haverá novo surto; concluem também que apenas a imunização dos estudantes será suficiente para prevenir outros membros da comunidade de adquirirem sarampo, visto serem os estudantes responsáveis pela disseminação do surto através da escola primária da área.

  5. Los riesgos epidémicos actuales desde una perspectiva geográfica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Buj Buj

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hace algunas décadas la comunidad internacional creyó que se podían erradicar algunas de las plagas que han azotado a la humanidad y que a lo largo de la historia han incidido gravemente en los recursos demográficos del planeta. A pesar del importante éxito logrado frente a la viruela, declarada erradicada en 1980, en los últimos decenios parecen haberse recrudecido algunas de las epidemias más dañinas, como el cólera, la malaria, la tuberculosis o la fiebre amarilla, al tiempo que han aparecido otras, como el sida, que han puesto en cuestión el paradigma hasta ahora dominante sobre las enfermedades infecciosas. En este artículo se analiza la nueva situación desde el punto de vista de la documentación producida en el campo de la geografía

  6. Epide·miology of non-fatal injuries due to external causes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-20

    Apr 20, 1991 ... as well as information concerning spatial and temporal details ... In 1984, trauma was the leading cause of potential years of life .... making up the Soweto primary health care system, because they treated ... no longer than 24 hours before being interviewed. .... projected disability and projected time off work.

  7. Nuevo método para elaborar corredores endémicos New method for determining endemic levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Wenceslao Orellano

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Diseñar un instrumento para elaborar corredores o canales endémicos mediante cálculos sencillos y, en el caso de enfermedades transmisibles, identificar y estimar parámetros relacionados con la dinámica de la transmisión. MÉTODOS: Se obtuvieron parámetros para elaborar una curva teórica de incidencia esperada, basada en el modelo logístico de crecimiento. Los parámetros se estimaron por medio de una regresión no lineal, a partir de datos de incidencia acumulada de los cinco años anteriores. Se tomó como ejemplo la incidencia semanal acumulada de casos de enfermedad tipo influenza para Argentina en 2009 y se la comparó con la serie de casos de 2004 a 2008 para construir los canales endémicos acumulados y no acumulados. RESULTADOS: De acuerdo a los canales endémicos acumulados obtenidos, el país entró en zona de brote a partir de la semana dos. El máximo número esperado de casos o capacidad de carga (K de acuerdo a los datos de años previos fue de 1 090 660. Considerando los corredores no acumulados, la situación de brote se presentó en 34 de las 51 semanas. Se estimó un rango para la tasa básica de reproducción (R0 de 1,05 a 1,13 para el período no epidémico 2004-2008. CONCLUSIONES: El nuevo método permitió elaborar canales endémicos de una manera sencilla, con la obtención de parámetros importantes para la transmisión. Si bien tiene limitaciones, entre ellas que la ecuación utilizada es más útil para evaluar enfermedades con un ciclo anual marcado y menos exacta para ciclos menores de un año, puede ser considerado como una alternativa valiosa para elaborar corredores endémicos y una nueva contribución al estudio de brotes epidémicos en los niveles locales de vigilancia de la salud.OBJECTIVE: Design an instrument for determining endemic levels or ranges using simple calculations; identify and estimate the parameters related to the dynamic transmission of communicable diseases. METHODS: The

  8. NOTE: A method for controlling image acquisition in electronic portal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    Certain types of camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) which initiate image acquisition based on sensing a change in video level have been observed to trigger unreliably at the beginning of dynamic multileaf collimation sequences. A simple, novel means of controlling image acquisition with an Elekta linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is proposed which is based on illumination of a photodetector (ORP-12, Silonex Inc., Plattsburgh, NY, USA) by the electron gun of the accelerator. By incorporating a simple trigger circuit it is possible to derive a beam on/off status signal which changes at least 100 ms before any dose is measured by the accelerator. The status signal does not return to the beam-off state until all dose has been delivered and is suitable for accelerator pulse repetition frequencies of 50-400 Hz. The status signal is thus a reliable means of indicating the initiation and termination of radiation exposure, and thus controlling image acquisition of such EPIDs for this application.

  9. Ensemble Data Mining Methods

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ensemble Data Mining Methods, also known as Committee Methods or Model Combiners, are machine learning methods that leverage the power of multiple models to achieve...

  10. WE-E-18A-08: Towards a Next-Generation Electronic Portal Device for Simultaneous Imaging and Dose Verification in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, S; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Kuncic, Z

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This work forms part of an ongoing study to develop a next-generation electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to characterize the imaging performance of a novel EPID that has previously been demonstrated to exhibit a water-equivalent response. The EPID ' s response was quantified in several configurations and model parameters were empirically validated against experimental measurements. Methods: A MC model of a novel a-Si EPID incorporating an array of plastic scintillating fibers was developed. Square BCF-99-06A scintillator fibers with PMMA cladding (Saint-Gobain Crystals) were modelled in a matrix with total area measuring 150×150 mm 2 . The standard electromagnetic and optical physics Geant4 classes were used to simulate radiation transport from an angled slit source (6 MV energy spectrum) through the EPID and optical photons reaching the photodiodes were scored. The prototype's modulation transfer function (MTF) was simulated and validated against experimental measurements. Several optical transport parameters, fiber lengths and thicknesses of an air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes were investigated to quantify their effects on the prototype's detection efficiency, sensitivity and MTF. Results: Simulated EPID response was more sensitive to variations in geometry than in the optical parameters studied. The MTF was particularly sensitive to the introduction of a 0.5–1.0 mm air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes, which lowered the MTF relative to that simulated without the gap. As expected, increasing the fiber length increased the detector efficiency and sensitivity while decreasing the MTF. Conclusion: A model of a novel water-equivalent EPID has been developed and benchmarked against measurements using a physical prototype. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this new device and are continuing to optimize

  11. The use of an electronic portal imaging device for exit dosimetry and quality control measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Michael C.; Williams, Peter C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine ways in which electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) could be used to (a) measure exit doses for external beam radiotherapy and (b) perform quality control checks on linear accelerators. Methods and Materials: When imaging, our fluoroscopic EPID adjusts the gain, offset, and frame acquisition time of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera automatically, to allow for the range of photon transmissions through the patient, and to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio. However, our EPID can be programmed to act as an integrating dosemeter. EPID dosemeter measurements were made for 20 MV photons, for different field sizes and thicknesses of unit density phantom material placed at varying exit surface to detector distances. These were compared with simultaneous Silicon diode exit dose measurements. Our exit dosimetry technique was verified using an anthropomorphic type phantom, and some initial measurements have been made for patients treated with irregularly shaped 20 MV x-ray fields. In this dosimetry mode, our EPID was also used to measure certain quality control parameters, x-ray field flatness, and the verification of segmented intensity modulated field prescriptions. Results: Configured for dosimetry, our EPID exhibited a highly linear response, capable of resolving individual monitor units. Exit doses could be measured to within about 3% of that measured using Silicon diodes. Field flatness was determined to within 1.5% of Farmer dosemeter measurements. Segmented intensity modulated fields can be easily verified. Conclusions: Our EPID has the versatility to assess a range of parameters pertinent to the delivery of high quality, high precision radiotherapy. When configured appropriately, it can measure exit doses in vivo, with reasonable accuracy, perform certain quick quality control checks, and analyze segmented intensity modulated treatment fields

  12. BDF-methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Astrid Kuijers

    1999-01-01

    An introduction to BDF-methods is given. The use of these methods on differential algebraic equations (DAE's) with different indexes with respect to order, stability and convergens of the BDF-methods is presented.......An introduction to BDF-methods is given. The use of these methods on differential algebraic equations (DAE's) with different indexes with respect to order, stability and convergens of the BDF-methods is presented....

  13. Uranium price forecasting methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews a number of forecasting methods that have been applied to uranium prices and compares their relative strengths and weaknesses. The methods reviewed are: (1) judgemental methods, (2) technical analysis, (3) time-series methods, (4) fundamental analysis, and (5) econometric methods. Historically, none of these methods has performed very well, but a well-thought-out model is still useful as a basis from which to adjust to new circumstances and try again

  14. Methods in aquatic bacteriology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Austin, B

    1988-01-01

    .... Within these sections detailed chapters consider sampling methods, determination of biomass, isolation methods, identification, the bacterial microflora of fish, invertebrates, plants and the deep...

  15. Transport equation solving methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granjean, P.M.

    1984-06-01

    This work is mainly devoted to Csub(N) and Fsub(N) methods. CN method: starting from a lemma stated by Placzek, an equivalence is established between two problems: the first one is defined in a finite medium bounded by a surface S, the second one is defined in the whole space. In the first problem the angular flux on the surface S is shown to be the solution of an integral equation. This equation is solved by Galerkin's method. The Csub(N) method is applied here to one-velocity problems: in plane geometry, slab albedo and transmission with Rayleigh scattering, calculation of the extrapolation length; in cylindrical geometry, albedo and extrapolation length calculation with linear scattering. Fsub(N) method: the basic integral transport equation of the Csub(N) method is integrated on Case's elementary distributions; another integral transport equation is obtained: this equation is solved by a collocation method. The plane problems solved by the Csub(N) method are also solved by the Fsub(N) method. The Fsub(N) method is extended to any polynomial scattering law. Some simple spherical problems are also studied. Chandrasekhar's method, collision probability method, Case's method are presented for comparison with Csub(N) and Fsub(N) methods. This comparison shows the respective advantages of the two methods: a) fast convergence and possible extension to various geometries for Csub(N) method; b) easy calculations and easy extension to polynomial scattering for Fsub(N) method [fr

  16. Advanced differential quadrature methods

    CERN Document Server

    Zong, Zhi

    2009-01-01

    Modern Tools to Perform Numerical DifferentiationThe original direct differential quadrature (DQ) method has been known to fail for problems with strong nonlinearity and material discontinuity as well as for problems involving singularity, irregularity, and multiple scales. But now researchers in applied mathematics, computational mechanics, and engineering have developed a range of innovative DQ-based methods to overcome these shortcomings. Advanced Differential Quadrature Methods explores new DQ methods and uses these methods to solve problems beyond the capabilities of the direct DQ method.After a basic introduction to the direct DQ method, the book presents a number of DQ methods, including complex DQ, triangular DQ, multi-scale DQ, variable order DQ, multi-domain DQ, and localized DQ. It also provides a mathematical compendium that summarizes Gauss elimination, the Runge-Kutta method, complex analysis, and more. The final chapter contains three codes written in the FORTRAN language, enabling readers to q...

  17. Inflow Turbulence Generation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Research activities on inflow turbulence generation methods have been vigorous over the past quarter century, accompanying advances in eddy-resolving computations of spatially developing turbulent flows with direct numerical simulation, large-eddy simulation (LES), and hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes-LES. The weak recycling method, rooted in scaling arguments on the canonical incompressible boundary layer, has been applied to supersonic boundary layer, rough surface boundary layer, and microscale urban canopy LES coupled with mesoscale numerical weather forecasting. Synthetic methods, originating from analytical approximation to homogeneous isotropic turbulence, have branched out into several robust methods, including the synthetic random Fourier method, synthetic digital filtering method, synthetic coherent eddy method, and synthetic volume forcing method. This article reviews major progress in inflow turbulence generation methods with an emphasis on fundamental ideas, key milestones, representative applications, and critical issues. Directions for future research in the field are also highlighted.

  18. Methods of nonlinear analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bellman, Richard Ernest

    1970-01-01

    In this book, we study theoretical and practical aspects of computing methods for mathematical modelling of nonlinear systems. A number of computing techniques are considered, such as methods of operator approximation with any given accuracy; operator interpolation techniques including a non-Lagrange interpolation; methods of system representation subject to constraints associated with concepts of causality, memory and stationarity; methods of system representation with an accuracy that is the best within a given class of models; methods of covariance matrix estimation;methods for low-rank mat

  19. Consumer Behavior Research Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysochou, Polymeros

    2017-01-01

    This chapter starts by distinguishing consumer behavior research methods based on the type of data used, being either secondary or primary. Most consumer behavior research studies phenomena that require researchers to enter the field and collect data on their own, and therefore the chapter...... emphasizes the discussion of primary research methods. Based on the nature of the data primary research methods are further distinguished into qualitative and quantitative. The chapter describes the most important and popular qualitative and quantitative methods. It concludes with an overall evaluation...... of the methods and how to improve quality in consumer behavior research methods....

  20. Dissolution Methods Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — For a drug product that does not have a dissolution test method in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the FDA Dissolution Methods Database provides information on...

  1. The three circle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garncarek, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The three circle method in its general form is presented. The method is especially useful for investigation of shapes of agglomerations of objects. An example of its applications to investigation of galaxies distribution is given. 17 refs. (author)

  2. Design Methods in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Elgaard; Andreasen, Mogens Myrup

    2010-01-01

    The paper challenges the dominant and widespread view that a good design method will guarantee a systematic approach as well as certain results. First, it explores the substantial differences between on the one hand the conception of methods implied in Pahl & Beitz’s widely recognized text book...... on engineering design, and on the other hand the understanding of method use, which has emerged from micro-sociological studies of practice (ethnomethodology). Second, it reviews a number of case studies conducted by engineering students, who were instructed to investigate the actual use of design methods...... in Danish companies. The paper concludes that design methods in practice deviate substantially from Pahl & Beitz’s description of method use: The object and problems, which are the starting points for method use, are more contested and less given than generally assumed; The steps of methods are often...

  3. Advances in Numerical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mastorakis, Nikos E

    2009-01-01

    Features contributions that are focused on significant aspects of current numerical methods and computational mathematics. This book carries chapters that advanced methods and various variations on known techniques that can solve difficult scientific problems efficiently.

  4. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  5. Conformable variational iteration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Acan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce the conformable variational iteration method based on new defined fractional derivative called conformable fractional derivative. This new method is applied two fractional order ordinary differential equations. To see how the solutions of this method, linear homogeneous and non-linear non-homogeneous fractional ordinary differential equations are selected. Obtained results are compared the exact solutions and their graphics are plotted to demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the method.

  6. VALUATION METHODS- LITERATURE REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Dorisz Talas

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a theoretical overview of the often used valuation methods with the help of which the value of a firm or its equity is calculated. Many experts (including Aswath Damodaran, Guochang Zhang and CA Hozefa Natalwala) classify the methods. The basic models are based on discounted cash flows. The main method uses the free cash flow for valuation, but there are some newer methods that reveal and correct the weaknesses of the traditional models. The valuation of flexibility of managemen...

  7. Mixed methods research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2015-04-08

    Mixed methods research involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data in a single research project. It represents an alternative methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative research approaches, which enables nurse researchers to explore complex phenomena in detail. This article provides a practical overview of mixed methods research and its application in nursing, to guide the novice researcher considering a mixed methods research project.

  8. Possibilities of roentgenological method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivash, Eh.S.; Sal'man, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Literary and experimental data on estimating possibilities of roentgenologic investigations using an electron optical amplifier, X-ray television and roentgen cinematography are generalized. Different methods of studying gastro-intestinal tract are compared. The advantage of the roentgenologic method over the endoscopic method after stomach resection is shown [ru

  9. Two-dimensional exit dosimetry using a liquid-filled electronic portal imaging device and a convolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Herk, Marcel van; Uiterwaal, Hans; Mijnheer, Ben

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the accuracy of two-dimensional exit dose measurements with an electronic portal imaging device, EPID, using a convolution model for a variety of clinically relevant situations. Materials and methods: Exit doses were derived from portal dose images, obtained with a liquid-filled EPID at distances of 50 cm or more behind the patient, by using a convolution model. The resulting on- and off-axis exit dose values were first compared with ionization chamber exit dose measurements for homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms in open and wedged 4,8 and 18 MV photon beams. The accuracy of the EPID exit dose measurements was then determined for a number of anthropomorphic phantoms (lung and larynx) irradiated under clinical conditions and for a few patients treated in an 8 MV beam. The latter results were compared with in vivo exit dose measurements using diodes. Results: The exit dose can be determined from portal images with an accuracy of 1.2% (1 SD) compared with ionization chamber measurements for open beams and homogeneous phantoms at all tested beam qualities. In the presence of wedges and for inhomogeneous phantoms the average relative accuracy slightly deteriorated to 1.7% (1 SD). For lung phantoms in a 4 MV beam a similar accuracy was obtained after refinement of our convolution model, which requires knowledge of the patient contour. Differences between diode and EPID exit dose measurements for an anthropomorphic lung phantom in an 8 MV beam were 2.5% at most, with an average agreement within 1% (1 SD). For larynx phantoms in a 4 MV beam exit doses obtained with an ionization chamber and EPID agreed within 1.5% (1 SD). Finally, exit doses in a few patients irradiated in an 8 MV beam could be determined with the EPID with an accuracy of 1.1% (1 SD) relative to exit dose measurements using diodes. Conclusions: Portal images, obtained with our EPID and analyzed with our convolution model, can be used to determine the exit dose

  10. The Generalized Sturmian Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, James Emil

    2011-01-01

    these ideas clearly so that they become more accessible. By bringing together these non-standard methods, the book intends to inspire graduate students, postdoctoral researchers and academics to think of novel approaches. Is there a method out there that we have not thought of yet? Can we design a new method...... generations of researchers were left to work out how to achieve this ambitious goal for molecular systems of ever-increasing size. This book focuses on non-mainstream methods to solve the molecular electronic Schrödinger equation. Each method is based on a set of core ideas and this volume aims to explain...

  11. Mimetic discretization methods

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Jose E

    2013-01-01

    To help solve physical and engineering problems, mimetic or compatible algebraic discretization methods employ discrete constructs to mimic the continuous identities and theorems found in vector calculus. Mimetic Discretization Methods focuses on the recent mimetic discretization method co-developed by the first author. Based on the Castillo-Grone operators, this simple mimetic discretization method is invariably valid for spatial dimensions no greater than three. The book also presents a numerical method for obtaining corresponding discrete operators that mimic the continuum differential and

  12. DOE methods compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leasure, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established an analytical methods compendium development program to integrate its environmental analytical methods. This program is administered through DOE's Laboratory Management Division (EM-563). The primary objective of this program is to assemble a compendium of analytical chemistry methods of known performance for use by all DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program. This compendium will include methods for sampling, field screening, fixed analytical laboratory and mobile analytical laboratory analyses. It will also include specific guidance on the proper selection of appropriate sampling and analytical methods in using specific analytical requirements

  13. Methods for assessing geodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwoliński, Zbigniew; Najwer, Alicja; Giardino, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The accepted systematics of geodiversity assessment methods will be presented in three categories: qualitative, quantitative and qualitative-quantitative. Qualitative methods are usually descriptive methods that are suited to nominal and ordinal data. Quantitative methods use a different set of parameters and indicators to determine the characteristics of geodiversity in the area being researched. Qualitative-quantitative methods are a good combination of the collection of quantitative data (i.e. digital) and cause-effect data (i.e. relational and explanatory). It seems that at the current stage of the development of geodiversity research methods, qualitative-quantitative methods are the most advanced and best assess the geodiversity of the study area. Their particular advantage is the integration of data from different sources and with different substantive content. Among the distinguishing features of the quantitative and qualitative-quantitative methods for assessing geodiversity are their wide use within geographic information systems, both at the stage of data collection and data integration, as well as numerical processing and their presentation. The unresolved problem for these methods, however, is the possibility of their validation. It seems that currently the best method of validation is direct filed confrontation. Looking to the next few years, the development of qualitative-quantitative methods connected with cognitive issues should be expected, oriented towards ontology and the Semantic Web.

  14. Methods of Software Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Gurin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the problem of software verification (SW. Methods of software verification designed to check the software for compliance with the stated requirements such as correctness, system security and system adaptability to small changes in the environment, portability and compatibility, etc. These are various methods both by the operation process and by the way of achieving result. The article describes the static and dynamic methods of software verification and paid attention to the method of symbolic execution. In its review of static analysis are discussed and described the deductive method, and methods for testing the model. A relevant issue of the pros and cons of a particular method is emphasized. The article considers classification of test techniques for each method. In this paper we present and analyze the characteristics and mechanisms of the static analysis of dependencies, as well as their views, which can reduce the number of false positives in situations where the current state of the program combines two or more states obtained both in different paths of execution and in working with multiple object values. Dependences connect various types of software objects: single variables, the elements of composite variables (structure fields, array elements, the size of the heap areas, the length of lines, the number of initialized array elements in the verification code using static methods. The article pays attention to the identification of dependencies within the framework of the abstract interpretation, as well as gives an overview and analysis of the inference tools.Methods of dynamic analysis such as testing, monitoring and profiling are presented and analyzed. Also some kinds of tools are considered which can be applied to the software when using the methods of dynamic analysis. Based on the work a conclusion is drawn, which describes the most relevant problems of analysis techniques, methods of their solutions and

  15. Radiometric dating methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdon, B.

    2003-01-01

    The general principle of isotope dating methods is based on the presence of radioactive isotopes in the geologic or archaeological object to be dated. The decay with time of these isotopes is used to determine the 'zero' time corresponding to the event to be dated. This paper recalls the general principle of isotope dating methods (bases, analytical methods, validation of results and uncertainties) and presents the methods based on natural radioactivity (Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, Re-Os, K-Ar (Ar-Ar), U-Th-Ra- 210 Pb, U-Pa, 14 C, 36 Cl, 10 Be) and the methods based on artificial radioactivity with their applications. Finally, the methods based on irradiation damages (thermoluminescence, fission tracks, electron spin resonance) are briefly evoked. (J.S.)

  16. Performative Schizoid Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2016-01-01

    is presented and an example is provided of a first exploratory engagement with it. The method is used in a specific project Becoming Iris, making inquiry into arts-based knowledge creation during a three month visiting scholarship at a small, independent visual art academy. Using the performative schizoid......A performative schizoid method is developed as a method contribution to performance as research. The method is inspired by contemporary research in the human and social sciences urging experimentation and researcher engagement with creative and artistic practice. In the article, the method...... method in Becoming Iris results in four audio-visual and performance-based productions, centered on an emergent theme of the scholartist as a bird in borrowed feathers. Interestingly, the moral lesson of the fable about the vain jackdaw, who dresses in borrowed peacock feathers and becomes a castout...

  17. Angular correlation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, A.J.

    1974-01-01

    An outline of the theory of angular correlations is presented, and the difference between the modern density matrix method and the traditional wave function method is stressed. Comments are offered on particular angular correlation theoretical techniques. A brief discussion is given of recent studies of gamma ray angular correlations of reaction products recoiling with high velocity into vacuum. Two methods for optimization to obtain the most accurate expansion coefficients of the correlation are discussed. (1 figure, 53 references) (U.S.)

  18. Maximum Quantum Entropy Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Jae-Hoon; Han, Myung Joon

    2018-01-01

    Maximum entropy method for analytic continuation is extended by introducing quantum relative entropy. This new method is formulated in terms of matrix-valued functions and therefore invariant under arbitrary unitary transformation of input matrix. As a result, the continuation of off-diagonal elements becomes straightforward. Without introducing any further ambiguity, the Bayesian probabilistic interpretation is maintained just as in the conventional maximum entropy method. The applications o...

  19. Rossi Alpha Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Rossi Alpha Method has proved to be valuable for the determination of prompt neutron lifetimes in fissile assemblies having known reproduction numbers at or near delayed critical. This workshop report emphasizes the pioneering applications of the method by Dr. John D. Orndoff to fast-neutron critical assemblies at Los Alamos. The value of the method appears to disappear for subcritical systems where the Rossi-α is no longer an α-eigenvalue

  20. Qualitative methods textbooks

    OpenAIRE

    Barndt, William

    2003-01-01

    Over the past few years, the number of political science departments offering qualitative methods courses has grown substantially. The number of qualitative methods textbooks has kept pace, providing instructors with an overwhelming array of choices. But how to decide which text to choose from this exhortatory smorgasbord? The scholarship desperately needs evaluated. Yet the task is not entirely straightforward: qualitative methods textbooks reflect the diversity inherent in qualitative metho...

  1. The Box Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactor...... description of this momentum flow. The Box Method is a practical method for the description of an Air Terminal Device which will save grid points and ensure the right level of the momentum flow....

  2. Applied Bayesian hierarchical methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Congdon, P

    2010-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 Posterior Inference from Bayes Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling in Relation to Monte Carlo Methods: Obtaining Posterior...

  3. [Methods of quantitative proteomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A T; Zgoda, V G

    2007-01-01

    In modern science proteomic analysis is inseparable from other fields of systemic biology. Possessing huge resources quantitative proteomics operates colossal information on molecular mechanisms of life. Advances in proteomics help researchers to solve complex problems of cell signaling, posttranslational modification, structure and functional homology of proteins, molecular diagnostics etc. More than 40 various methods have been developed in proteomics for quantitative analysis of proteins. Although each method is unique and has certain advantages and disadvantages all these use various isotope labels (tags). In this review we will consider the most popular and effective methods employing both chemical modifications of proteins and also metabolic and enzymatic methods of isotope labeling.

  4. Methods in ALFA Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Melendez, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    This note presents two model-independent methods for use in the alignment of the ALFA forward detectors. Using a Monte Carlo simulated LHC run at \\beta = 90m and \\sqrt{s} = 7 TeV, the Kinematic Peak alignment method is utilized to reconstruct the Mandelstam momentum transfer variable t for single-diractive protons. The Hot Spot method uses fluctuations in the hitmap density to pinpoint particular regions in the detector that could signal a misalignment. Another method uses an error function fit to find the detector edge. With this information, the vertical alignment can be determined.

  5. Method of chronokinemetrical invariants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, Yu.S.; Shelkovenko, A.Eh.

    1976-01-01

    A particular case of a general dyadic method - the method of chronokinemetric invariants is formulated. The time-like dyad vector is calibrated in a chronometric way, and the space-like vector - in a kinemetric way. Expressions are written for the main physical-geometrical values of the dyadic method and for differential operators. The method developed may be useful for predetermining the reference system of a single observer, and also for studying problems connected with emission and absorption of gravitational and electromagnetic waves [ru

  6. Nondestructive testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) is the use of physical and chemical methods for evaluating material integrity without impairing its intended usefulness or continuing service. Nondestructive tests are used by manufaturer's for the following reasons: 1) to ensure product reliability; 2) to prevent accidents and save human lives; 3) to aid in better product design; 4) to control manufacturing processes; and 5) to maintain a uniform quality level. Nondestructive testing is used extensively on power plants, oil and chemical refineries, offshore oil rigs and pipeline (NDT can even be conducted underwater), welds on tanks, boilers, pressure vessels and heat exchengers. NDT is now being used for testing concrete and composite materials. Because of the criticality of its application, NDT should be performed and the results evaluated by qualified personnel. There are five basic nondestructive examination methods: 1) liquid penetrant testing - method used for detecting surface flaws in materials. This method can be used for metallic and nonmetallic materials, portable and relatively inexpensive. 2) magnetic particle testing - method used to detect surface and subsurface flaws in ferromagnetic materials; 3) radiographic testing - method used to detect internal flaws and significant variation in material composition and thickness; 4) ultrasonic testing - method used to detect internal and external flaws in materials. This method uses ultrasonics to measure thickness of a material or to examine the internal structure for discontinuities. 5) eddy current testing - method used to detect surface and subsurface flaws in conductive materials. Not one nondestructive examination method can find all discontinuities in all of the materials capable of being tested. The most important consideration is for the specifier of the test to be familiar with the test method and its applicability to the type and geometry of the material and the flaws to be detected

  7. Methods for data classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, George [Okemos, MI; Lilburn, Timothy G [Front Royal, VA

    2011-10-11

    The present invention provides methods for classifying data and uncovering and correcting annotation errors. In particular, the present invention provides a self-organizing, self-correcting algorithm for use in classifying data. Additionally, the present invention provides a method for classifying biological taxa.

  8. Computational methods working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    During the Cold Moderator Workshop several working groups were established including one to discuss calculational methods. The charge for this working group was to identify problems in theory, data, program execution, etc., and to suggest solutions considering both deterministic and stochastic methods including acceleration procedures.

  9. Method for exchanging data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for exchanging data between at least two servers with use of a gateway. Preferably the method is applied to healthcare systems. Each server holds a unique federated identifier, which identifier identifies a single patient (P). Thus, it is possible for the

  10. WWW: The Scientific Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blystone, Robert V.; Blodgett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific method is the principal methodology by which biological knowledge is gained and disseminated. As fundamental as the scientific method may be, its historical development is poorly understood, its definition is variable, and its deployment is uneven. Scientific progress may occur without the strictures imposed by the formal…

  11. Methods of numerical relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piran, T.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical Relativity is an alternative to analytical methods for obtaining solutions for Einstein equations. Numerical methods are particularly useful for studying generation of gravitational radiation by potential strong sources. The author reviews the analytical background, the numerical analysis aspects and techniques and some of the difficulties involved in numerical relativity. (Auth.)

  12. Differential equation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotikov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    A new method of massive Feynman diagrams calculation is presented. It provides a fairly simple procedure to obtain the result without the D-space integral calculation (for the dimensional regularization). Some diagrams are calculated as an illustration of this method capacities. (author). 7 refs

  13. DISCOURSE ON METHODS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOUCHER, JOHN G.

    THE AUTHOR STATES THAT BEFORE PRESENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING METHODS CAN BE DISCUSSED INTELLIGENTLY, THE RESEARCH IN PSYCHOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS WHICH HAS INFLUENCED THE DEVELOPMENT OF THESE METHODS MUST BE CONSIDERED. MANY FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS WERE BEGINNING TO FEEL COMFORTABLE WITH THE AUDIOLINGUAL APPROACH WHEN NOAM CHOMSKY, IN HIS 1966…

  14. Research Methods in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, Joseph; Schutt, Russell K.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Methods in Education" introduces research methods as an integrated set of techniques for investigating questions about the educational world. This lively, innovative text helps students connect technique and substance, appreciate the value of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and make ethical research decisions.…

  15. Attribute-Based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Holmes; Wiktor L. Adamowicz

    2003-01-01

    Stated preference methods of environmental valuation have been used by economists for decades where behavioral data have limitations. The contingent valuation method (Chapter 5) is the oldest stated preference approach, and hundreds of contingent valuation studies have been conducted. More recently, and especially over the last decade, a class of stated preference...

  16. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. It can lower ... at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Proven Weight Loss Methods Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  17. Radiation borehole logging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylie, A.; Mathew, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method of obtaining an indication of the diameter of a borehole is described. The method comprises subjecting the walls of the borehole to monoenergetic gamma radiation and making measurements of the intensity of gamma radiation backscattered from the walls. The energy of the radiation is sufficiently high for the shape to be substantially independent of the density and composition of the borehole walls

  18. Isotope methods in hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, H.; Rauert, W.

    1980-01-01

    Of the investigation methods used in hydrology, tracer methods hold a special place as they are the only ones which give direct insight into the movement and distribution processes taking place in surface and ground waters. Besides the labelling of water with salts and dyes, as in the past, in recent years the use of isotopes in hydrology, in water research and use, in ground-water protection and in hydraulic engineering has increased. This by no means replaces proven methods of hydrological investigation but tends rather to complement and expand them through inter-disciplinary cooperation. The book offers a general introduction to the application of various isotope methods to specific hydrogeological and hydrological problems. The idea is to place the hydrogeologist and the hydrologist in the position to recognize which isotope method will help him solve his particular problem or indeed, make a solution possible at all. He should also be able to recognize what the prerequisites are and what work and expenditure the use of such methods involves. May the book contribute to promoting cooperation between hydrogeologists, hydrologists, hydraulic engineers and isotope specialists, and thus supplement proven methods of investigation in hydrological research and water utilization and protection wherever the use of isotope methods proves to be of advantage. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Essential numerical computer methods

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    The use of computers and computational methods has become ubiquitous in biological and biomedical research. During the last 2 decades most basic algorithms have not changed, but what has is the huge increase in computer speed and ease of use, along with the corresponding orders of magnitude decrease in cost. A general perception exists that the only applications of computers and computer methods in biological and biomedical research are either basic statistical analysis or the searching of DNA sequence data bases. While these are important applications they only scratch the surface of the current and potential applications of computers and computer methods in biomedical research. The various chapters within this volume include a wide variety of applications that extend far beyond this limited perception. As part of the Reliable Lab Solutions series, Essential Numerical Computer Methods brings together chapters from volumes 210, 240, 321, 383, 384, 454, and 467 of Methods in Enzymology. These chapters provide ...

  20. Adaptive method of lines

    CERN Document Server

    Saucez, Ph

    2001-01-01

    The general Method of Lines (MOL) procedure provides a flexible format for the solution of all the major classes of partial differential equations (PDEs) and is particularly well suited to evolutionary, nonlinear wave PDEs. Despite its utility, however, there are relatively few texts that explore it at a more advanced level and reflect the method''s current state of development.Written by distinguished researchers in the field, Adaptive Method of Lines reflects the diversity of techniques and applications related to the MOL. Most of its chapters focus on a particular application but also provide a discussion of underlying philosophy and technique. Particular attention is paid to the concept of both temporal and spatial adaptivity in solving time-dependent PDEs. Many important ideas and methods are introduced, including moving grids and grid refinement, static and dynamic gridding, the equidistribution principle and the concept of a monitor function, the minimization of a functional, and the moving finite elem...

  1. Bayesian Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabalinejad, M.

    2010-01-01

    To reduce cost of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for time-consuming processes, Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) is introduced in this paper. The BMC method reduces number of realizations in MC according to the desired accuracy level. BMC also provides a possibility of considering more priors. In other words, different priors can be integrated into one model by using BMC to further reduce cost of simulations. This study suggests speeding up the simulation process by considering the logical dependence of neighboring points as prior information. This information is used in the BMC method to produce a predictive tool through the simulation process. The general methodology and algorithm of BMC method are presented in this paper. The BMC method is applied to the simplified break water model as well as the finite element model of 17th Street Canal in New Orleans, and the results are compared with the MC and Dynamic Bounds methods.

  2. Methods in Modern Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Nölting, Bengt

    2006-01-01

    Incorporating recent dramatic advances, this textbook presents a fresh and timely introduction to modern biophysical methods. An array of new, faster and higher-power biophysical methods now enables scientists to examine the mysteries of life at a molecular level. This innovative text surveys and explains the ten key biophysical methods, including those related to biophysical nanotechnology, scanning probe microscopy, X-ray crystallography, ion mobility spectrometry, mass spectrometry, proteomics, and protein folding and structure. Incorporating much information previously unavailable in tutorial form, Nölting employs worked examples and 267 illustrations to fully detail the techniques and their underlying mechanisms. Methods in Modern Biophysics is written for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, postdocs, researchers, lecturers and professors in biophysics, biochemistry and related fields. Special features in the 2nd edition: • Illustrates the high-resolution methods for ultrashort-living protei...

  3. The surface analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Nowadays, there are a lot of surfaces analysis methods, each having its specificity, its qualities, its constraints (for instance vacuum) and its limits. Expensive in time and in investment, these methods have to be used deliberately. This article appeals to non specialists. It gives some elements of choice according to the studied information, the sensitivity, the use constraints or the answer to a precise question. After having recalled the fundamental principles which govern these analysis methods, based on the interaction between radiations (ultraviolet, X) or particles (ions, electrons) with matter, two methods will be more particularly described: the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-rays photoemission spectroscopy (ESCA or XPS). Indeed, they are the most widespread methods in laboratories, the easier for use and probably the most productive for the analysis of surface of industrial materials or samples submitted to treatments in aggressive media. (O.M.)

  4. Cooperative method development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Yvonne; Rönkkö, Kari; Eriksson, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    The development of methods tools and process improvements is best to be based on the understanding of the development practice to be supported. Qualitative research has been proposed as a method for understanding the social and cooperative aspects of software development. However, qualitative...... research is not easily combined with the improvement orientation of an engineering discipline. During the last 6 years, we have applied an approach we call `cooperative method development', which combines qualitative social science fieldwork, with problem-oriented method, technique and process improvement....... The action research based approach focusing on shop floor software development practices allows an understanding of how contextual contingencies influence the deployment and applicability of methods, processes and techniques. This article summarizes the experiences and discusses the further development...

  5. Engaging with mobile methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    2014-01-01

    This chapter showcases how mobile methods are more than calibrated techniques awaiting application by tourism researchers, but productive in the enactment of the mobile (Law and Urry, 2004). Drawing upon recent findings deriving from a PhD course on mobility and mobile methods it reveals...... the conceptual ambiguousness of the term ‘mobile methods’. In order to explore this ambiguousness the chapter provides a number of examples deriving from tourism research, to explore how mobile methods are always entangled in ideologies, predispositions, conventions and practice-realities. Accordingly......, the engagements with methods are acknowledged to be always political and contextual, reminding us to avoid essentialist discussions regarding research methods. Finally, the chapter draws on recent fieldwork to extend developments in mobilities-oriented tourism research, by employing auto-ethnography to call...

  6. Determination method of radiostrontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This manual provides determination methods of strontium-90 and strontium-89 in the environment released from nuclear facilities, and it is a revised edition of the previous manual published in 1974. As for the preparation method of radiation counting sample, ion exchange method, oxalate separation method and solvent extraction method were adopted in addition to the method of fuming nitric acid separation adopted in the previous edition. Strontium-90 is determined by the separation and radioactivity determination of yttrium-90 in radioequilibrium with strontium-90. Strontium-89 is determined by subtraction of radioactivity of strontium-90 plus yttrium-90 from gross radioactivity of isolated strontium carbonate. Radioactivity determination should be carried out with a low-background 2 π-gas-flow counting system for the mounted sample on a filter having a chemical form of ferric hydroxide, yttrium oxalate or strontium carbonate. This manual describes sample preparation procedures as well as radioactivity counting procedures for environmental samples of precipitates as rain or snow, airborne dust, fresh water, sea water and soil, and also for ash sample made from biological or food samples such as grains, vegetables, tea leaves, pine needle, milk, marine organisms, and total diet, by employing a method of fuming nitric acid separation, ion exchange separation, oxalate precipitate separation or solvent extraction separation (only for an ash sample). Procedures for reagent chemicals preparation is also attached to this manual. (Takagi, S.)

  7. Basics of Bayesian methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sujit K

    2010-01-01

    Bayesian methods are rapidly becoming popular tools for making statistical inference in various fields of science including biology, engineering, finance, and genetics. One of the key aspects of Bayesian inferential method is its logical foundation that provides a coherent framework to utilize not only empirical but also scientific information available to a researcher. Prior knowledge arising from scientific background, expert judgment, or previously collected data is used to build a prior distribution which is then combined with current data via the likelihood function to characterize the current state of knowledge using the so-called posterior distribution. Bayesian methods allow the use of models of complex physical phenomena that were previously too difficult to estimate (e.g., using asymptotic approximations). Bayesian methods offer a means of more fully understanding issues that are central to many practical problems by allowing researchers to build integrated models based on hierarchical conditional distributions that can be estimated even with limited amounts of data. Furthermore, advances in numerical integration methods, particularly those based on Monte Carlo methods, have made it possible to compute the optimal Bayes estimators. However, there is a reasonably wide gap between the background of the empirically trained scientists and the full weight of Bayesian statistical inference. Hence, one of the goals of this chapter is to bridge the gap by offering elementary to advanced concepts that emphasize linkages between standard approaches and full probability modeling via Bayesian methods.

  8. Methods in mummy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Mummies are human remains with preservation of non-bony tissue. Many mummy studies focus on the development and application of non-destructive methods for examining mummies, including radiography, CT-scanning with advanced 3-dimensional visualisations, and endoscopic techniques, as well as minima......Mummies are human remains with preservation of non-bony tissue. Many mummy studies focus on the development and application of non-destructive methods for examining mummies, including radiography, CT-scanning with advanced 3-dimensional visualisations, and endoscopic techniques, as well...... as minimally-destructive chemical, physical and biological methods for, e.g., stable isotopes, trace metals and DNA....

  9. Montessori Method and ICTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Drigas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article bridges the gap between the Montessori Method and Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs in contemporary education. It reviews recent research works which recall the Montessori philosophy, principles and didactical tools applying to today’s computers and supporting technologies in children’s learning process. This article reviews how important the stimulation of human senses in the learning process is, as well as the development of Montessori materials using the body and the hand in particular, all according to the Montessori Method along with recent researches over ICTs. Montessori Method within information society age acquires new perspectives, new functionality and new efficacy.

  10. Rubidium-strontium method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubansky, A.

    1980-01-01

    The rubidium-strontium geological dating method is based on the determination of the Rb and Sr isotope ratio in rocks, mainly using mass spectrometry. The method is only practical for silicate minerals and rocks, potassium feldspars and slates. Also described is the rubidium-strontium isochrone method. This, however, requires a significant amount of experimental data and an analysis of large quantities of samples, often of the order of tons. The results are tabulated of rubidium-strontium dating of geological formations in the Czech Socialist Republic. (M.S.)

  11. Structural Reliability Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Madsen, H. O.

    The structural reliability methods quantitatively treat the uncertainty of predicting the behaviour and properties of a structure given the uncertain properties of its geometry, materials, and the actions it is supposed to withstand. This book addresses the probabilistic methods for evaluation...... of structural reliability, including the theoretical basis for these methods. Partial safety factor codes under current practice are briefly introduced and discussed. A probabilistic code format for obtaining a formal reliability evaluation system that catches the most essential features of the nature...... of the uncertainties and their interplay is the developed, step-by-step. The concepts presented are illustrated by numerous examples throughout the text....

  12. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  13. Nuclear physics mathematical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.; Gervois, A.; Giannoni, M.J.; Levesque, D.; Maille, M.

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear physics mathematical methods, applied to the collective motion theory, to the reduction of the degrees of freedom and to the order and disorder phenomena; are investigated. In the scope of the study, the following aspects are discussed: the entropy of an ensemble of collective variables; the interpretation of the dissipation, applying the information theory; the chaos and the universality; the Monte-Carlo method applied to the classical statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics; the finite elements method, and the classical ergodicity [fr

  14. Methods for RNA Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Signe

    of the transcriptome, 5’ end capture of RNA is combined with next-generation sequencing for high-throughput quantitative assessment of transcription start sites by two different methods. The methods presented here allow for functional investigation of coding as well as noncoding RNA and contribute to future...... RNAs rely on interactions with proteins, the establishment of protein-binding profiles is essential for the characterization of RNAs. Aiming to facilitate RNA analysis, this thesis introduces proteomics- as well as transcriptomics-based methods for the functional characterization of RNA. First, RNA...

  15. Electromigration method in radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarova, T.P.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations are reviewd of the period 1969-1975 accomplished by such methods as zonal electrophoresis in countercurrent, focusing electrophoresis, isotachophoresis, electrophoresis with elution, continuous two-dimensional electrophoresis. Since the methods considered are based on the use of porous fillers for stabilizing the medium, some attention is given to the effect of the solid-solution interface on the shape and rate of motion of the zones of the rare-earth elements investigated, Sr and others. The trend of developing electrophoresis as a method for obtaining high-purity elements is emphasized

  16. Numerical methods using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Lindfield, George

    2012-01-01

    Numerical Methods using MATLAB, 3e, is an extensive reference offering hundreds of useful and important numerical algorithms that can be implemented into MATLAB for a graphical interpretation to help researchers analyze a particular outcome. Many worked examples are given together with exercises and solutions to illustrate how numerical methods can be used to study problems that have applications in the biosciences, chaos, optimization, engineering and science across the board. Numerical Methods using MATLAB, 3e, is an extensive reference offering hundreds of use

  17. Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Randrup-Thomsen, Søren; Morsing Johannesen, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    The model correction factor method is proposed as an alternative to traditional polynomial based response surface techniques in structural reliability considering a computationally time consuming limit state procedure as a 'black box'. The class of polynomial functions is replaced by a limit...... of the model correction factor method, is that in simpler form not using gradient information on the original limit state function or only using this information once, a drastic reduction of the number of limit state evaluation is obtained together with good approximations on the reliability. Methods...

  18. Imaging methods in otorhinolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.W.; Mees, K.; Vogl, T.

    1989-01-01

    This book is the work of an otorhinolaryngologist and two radiologists, who combined their experience and efforts in order to solve a great variety and number of problems encountered in practical work, taking into account the latest technical potentials and the practical feasibility, which is determined by the equipment available. Every chapter presents the full range of diagnostic methods applicable, starting with the suitable plain radiography methods and proceeding to the various tomographic scanning methods, including conventional tomography. Every technique is assessed in terms of diagnostic value and drawbacks. (orig./MG) With 778 figs [de

  19. Generalized subspace correction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolm, P. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Arbenz, P.; Gander, W. [Eidgenoessiche Technische Hochschule, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    A fundamental problem in scientific computing is the solution of large sparse systems of linear equations. Often these systems arise from the discretization of differential equations by finite difference, finite volume or finite element methods. Iterative methods exploiting these sparse structures have proven to be very effective on conventional computers for a wide area of applications. Due to the rapid development and increasing demand for the large computing powers of parallel computers, it has become important to design iterative methods specialized for these new architectures.

  20. Leaf trajectory verification during dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy using an amorphous silicon flat panel imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Brand, Bob; Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Herk, Marcel van

    2004-01-01

    An independent verification of the leaf trajectories during each treatment fraction improves the safety of IMRT delivery. In order to verify dynamic IMRT with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), the EPID response should be accurate and fast such that the effect of motion blurring on the detected moving field edge position is limited. In the past, it was shown that the errors in the detected position of a moving field edge determined by a scanning liquid-filled ionization chamber (SLIC) EPID are negligible in clinical practice. Furthermore, a method for leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT was successfully applied using such an EPID. EPIDs based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) arrays are now widely available. Such a-Si flat panel imagers (FPIs) produce portal images with superior image quality compared to other portal imaging systems, but they have not yet been used for leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT. The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of motion distortion and motion blurring on the detection accuracy of a moving field edge for an Elekta iViewGT a-Si FPI and to investigate its applicability for the leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT. We found that the detection error for a moving field edge to be smaller than 0.025 cm at a speed of 0.8 cm/s. Hence, the effect of motion blurring on the detection accuracy of a moving field edge is negligible in clinical practice. Furthermore, the a-Si FPI was successfully applied for the verification of dynamic IMRT. The verification method revealed a delay in the control system of the experimental DMLC that was also found using a SLIC EPID, resulting in leaf positional errors of 0.7 cm at a leaf speed of 0.8 cm/s

  1. SU-F-T-260: Using Portal Image Device for Pre-Treatment QA in Volumetric Modulated Arc Plans with Flattening Filter Free (FFF) Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, H; Qi, P; Yu, N; Xia, P [The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement and validate a method of using electronic portal image device (EPID) for pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using flattering filter free (FFF) beams for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: On Varian Edge with 6MV FFF beam, open field (from 2×2 cm to 20×20 cm) EPID images were acquired with 200 monitor unit (MU) at the image device to radiation source distance of 150cm. With 10×10 open field and calibration unit (CU) provided by vendor to EPID image pixel, a dose conversion factor was determined by dividing the center dose calculated from the treatment planning system (TPS) to the corresponding CU readout on the image. Water phantom measured beam profile and the output factors for various field sizes were further correlated to those of EPID images. The dose conversion factor and correction factors were then used for converting the portal images to the planner dose distributions of clinical fields. A total of 28 VMAT fields of 14 SBRT plans (8 lung, 2 prostate, 2 liver and 2 spine) were measured. With 10% low threshold cutoff, the delivered dose distributions were compared to the reference doses calculated in water phantom from the TPS. A gamma index analysis was performed for the comparison in percentage dose difference/distance-to-agreement specifications. Results: The EPID device has a linear response to the open fields with increasing MU. For the clinical fields, the gamma indices between the converted EPID dose distributions and the TPS calculated 2D dose distributions were 98.7%±1.1%, 94.0%±3.4% and 70.3%±7.7% for the criteria of 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm and 1%/1mm, respectively. Conclusion: Using a portal image device, a high resolution and high accuracy portal dosimerty was achieved for pre-treatment QA verification for SBRT VMAT plans with FFF beams.

  2. Concrete compositions and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin; Lee, Patricia Tung; Patterson, Joshua

    2015-06-23

    Provided herein are compositions, methods, and systems for cementitious compositions containing calcium carbonate compositions and aggregate. The compositions find use in a variety of applications, including use in a variety of building materials and building applications.

  3. Ensemble Data Mining Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2004-01-01

    Ensemble Data Mining Methods, also known as Committee Methods or Model Combiners, are machine learning methods that leverage the power of multiple models to achieve better prediction accuracy than any of the individual models could on their own. The basic goal when designing an ensemble is the same as when establishing a committee of people: each member of the committee should be as competent as possible, but the members should be complementary to one another. If the members are not complementary, Le., if they always agree, then the committee is unnecessary---any one member is sufficient. If the members are complementary, then when one or a few members make an error, the probability is high that the remaining members can correct this error. Research in ensemble methods has largely revolved around designing ensembles consisting of competent yet complementary models.

  4. Diagnostic method and reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgington, T.S.; Plow, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    The discovery of an isomeric species of carcinoembryonic antigen and methods of isolation, identification and utilization as a radiolabelled species of the same as an aid in the diagnosis of adenocarcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract are disclosed. 13 claims

  5. Methods of dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatty, B

    1986-04-01

    Scientific methods of dating, born less than thirty years ago, have recently improved tremendously. First the dating principles will be given; then it will be explained how, through natural radioactivity, we can have access to the age of an event or an object; the case of radiocarbon will be especially emphasized. The principle of relative methods such as thermoluminescence or paleomagnetism will also be shortly given. What is the use for dating. The fields of its application are numerous; through these methods, relatively precise ages can be given to the major events which have been keys in the history of universe, life and man; thus, dating is a useful scientific tool in astrophysics, geology, biology, anthropology and archeology. Even if certain ages are still subject to controversies, we can say that these methods have confirmed evolution's continuity, be it on a cosmic, biologic or human scale, where ages are measured in billions, millions or thousands of years respectively.

  6. Energy consumption assessment methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K S

    1975-01-01

    The why, what, and how-to aspects of energy audits for industrial plants, and the application of energy accounting methods to a chemical plant in order to assess energy conservation possibilities are discussed. (LCL)

  7. Stochastic optimization methods

    CERN Document Server

    Marti, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    Optimization problems arising in practice involve random parameters. For the computation of robust optimal solutions, i.e., optimal solutions being insensitive with respect to random parameter variations, deterministic substitute problems are needed. Based on the distribution of the random data, and using decision theoretical concepts, optimization problems under stochastic uncertainty are converted into deterministic substitute problems. Due to the occurring probabilities and expectations, approximative solution techniques must be applied. Deterministic and stochastic approximation methods and their analytical properties are provided: Taylor expansion, regression and response surface methods, probability inequalities, First Order Reliability Methods, convex approximation/deterministic descent directions/efficient points, stochastic approximation methods, differentiation of probability and mean value functions. Convergence results of the resulting iterative solution procedures are given.

  8. Predictive Methods of Pople

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemistry for their pioneering contri butions to the development of computational methods in quantum chemistry and density functional theory .... program of Pop Ie for ab-initio electronic structure calculation of molecules. This ab-initio MO ...

  9. Methods for cellobiosan utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linger, Jeffrey; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2017-07-11

    Disclosed herein are enzymes useful for the degradation of cellobiosan in materials such a pyrolysis oils. Methods of degrading cellobiosan using enzymes or organisms expressing the same are also disclosed.

  10. Methods of neutron spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.

    1981-01-01

    The different methods of neutron spectrometry are based on the direct measurement of neutron velocity or on the use of suitable energy-dependent interaction processes. In the latter case the measuring effect of a detector is connected with the searched neutron spectrum by an integral equation. The solution needs suitable unfolding procedures. The most important methods of neutron spectrometry are the time-of-flight method, the crystal spectrometry, the neutron spectrometry by use of elastic collisions with hydrogen nuclei, and neutron spectrometry with the aid of nuclear reactions, especially of the neutron-induced activation. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are contrasted considering the resolution, the measurable energy range, the sensitivity, and the experimental and computational efforts. (author)

  11. Methods in Modern Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Nölting, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    Incorporating recent dramatic advances, this textbook presents a fresh and timely introduction to modern biophysical methods. An array of new, faster and higher-power biophysical methods now enables scientists to examine the mysteries of life at a molecular level. This innovative text surveys and explains the ten key biophysical methods, including those related to biophysical nanotechnology, scanning probe microscopy, X-ray crystallography, ion mobility spectrometry, mass spectrometry, proteomics, and protein folding and structure. Incorporating much information previously unavailable in tutorial form, Nölting employs worked examples and about 270 illustrations to fully detail the techniques and their underlying mechanisms. Methods in Modern Biophysics is written for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, postdocs, researchers, lecturers, and professors in biophysics, biochemistry and related fields. Special features in the 3rd edition: Introduces rapid partial protein ladder sequencing - an important...

  12. Lean Government Methods Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Guide focuses primarily on Lean production, which is an organizational improvement philosophy and set of methods that originated in manufacturing but has been expanded to government and service sectors.

  13. Number projection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, K.

    1987-01-01

    A relationship between the number projection and the shell model methods is investigated in the case of a single-j shell. We can find a one-to-one correspondence between the number projected and the shell model states

  14. Etching method employing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, B.N.; Winters, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    This invention provides a method for etching a silicon oxide, carbide, nitride, or oxynitride surface using an electron or ion beam in the presence of a xenon or krypton fluoride. No additional steps are required after exposure to radiation

  15. GEM simulation methods development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.; Veenhof, R.

    2002-01-01

    A review of methods used in the simulation of processes in gas electron multipliers (GEMs) and in the accurate calculation of detector characteristics is presented. Such detector characteristics as effective gas gain, transparency, charge collection and losses have been calculated and optimized for a number of GEM geometries and compared with experiment. A method and a new special program for calculations of detector macro-characteristics such as signal response in a real detector readout structure, and spatial and time resolution of detectors have been developed and used for detector optimization. A detailed development of signal induction on readout electrodes and electronics characteristics are included in the new program. A method for the simulation of charging-up effects in GEM detectors is described. All methods show good agreement with experiment

  16. Improved radioanalytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, M.D.; Aldstadt, J.H.; Alvarado, J.S.; Crain, J.S.; Orlandini, K.A.; Smith, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    Methods for the chemical characterization of the environment are being developed under a multitask project for the Analytical Services Division (EM-263) within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. This project focuses on improvement of radioanalytical methods with an emphasis on faster and cheaper routine methods. We have developed improved methods, for separation of environmental levels of technetium-99 and strontium-89/90, radium, and actinides from soil and water; and for separation of actinides from soil and water matrix interferences. Among the novel separation techniques being used are element- and class-specific resins and membranes. (The 3M Corporation is commercializing Empore trademark membranes under a cooperative research and development agreement [CRADA] initiated under this project). We have also developed methods for simultaneous detection of multiple isotopes using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS method requires less rigorous chemical separations than traditional radiochemical analyses because of its mass-selective mode of detection. Actinides and their progeny have been isolated and concentrated from a variety of natural water matrices by using automated batch separation incorporating selective resins prior to ICP-MS analyses. In addition, improvements in detection limits, sample volume, and time of analysis were obtained by using other sample introduction techniques, such as ultrasonic nebulization and electrothermal vaporization. Integration and automation of the separation methods with the ICP-MS methodology by using flow injection analysis is underway, with an objective of automating methods to achieve more reproducible results, reduce labor costs, cut analysis time, and minimize secondary waste generation through miniaturization of the process

  17. Continuation Newton methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Axelsson, Owe; Sysala, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 11 (2015), s. 2621-2637 ISSN 0898-1221 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18652S Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : system of nonlinear equations * Newton method * load increment method * elastoplasticity Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.398, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0898122115003818

  18. Nuclear methods monitor nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron activation of nitrogen and hydrogen in the body, the isotope dilution technique and the measurement of naturally radioactive potassium in the body are among the new nuclear methods, now under collaborative development by the Australian Nuclear Scientific and Technology Organization and medical specialists from several Sydney hospitals. These methods allow medical specialists to monitor the patient's response to various diets and dietary treatments in cases of cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, long-term surgical trauma, renal diseases and AIDS. ills

  19. The fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.

    1990-01-01

    During the last decade fission track (FT) analysis has evolved as an important tool in exploration for hydrocarbon resources. Most important is this method's ability to yield information about temperatures at different times (history), and thus relate oil generation and time independently of other maturity parameters. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the basics of the method and give an example from the author's studies. (AB) (14 refs.)

  20. Experimental physics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yang Su; Oh, Byeong Seong

    2010-05-01

    This book introduces measurement and error, statistics of experimental data, population, sample variable, distribution function, propagation of error, mean and measurement of error, adjusting to rectilinear equation, common sense of error, experiment method, and record and statement. It also explains importance of error of estimation, systematic error, random error, treatment of single variable, significant figure, deviation, mean value, median, mode, sample mean, sample standard deviation, binomial distribution, gauss distribution, and method of least squares.

  1. Methods for measuring shrinkage

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Paul; Templar, Simon

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents findings from research amongst European grocery retailers into their methods for measuring shrinkage. The findings indicate that: there is no dominant method for valuing or stating shrinkage; shrinkage in the supply chain is frequently overlooked; data is essential in pinpointing where and when loss occurs and that many retailers collect data at the stock-keeping unit (SKU) level and do so every 6 months. These findings reveal that it is difficult to benc...

  2. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

    1983-05-13

    A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  3. Method of treating depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Fritz [East Patchogue, NY

    2012-01-24

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  4. Methods of experimental physics

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Dudley

    1962-01-01

    Methods of Experimental Physics, Volume 3: Molecular Physics focuses on molecular theory, spectroscopy, resonance, molecular beams, and electric and thermodynamic properties. The manuscript first considers the origins of molecular theory, molecular physics, and molecular spectroscopy, as well as microwave spectroscopy, electronic spectra, and Raman effect. The text then ponders on diffraction methods of molecular structure determination and resonance studies. Topics include techniques of electron, neutron, and x-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic, nuclear quadropole, and electron spin reson

  5. The ICARE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Luke

    2010-01-01

    The ICARE method is a flexible, widely applicable method for systems engineers to solve problems and resolve issues in a complete and comprehensive manner. The method can be tailored by diverse users for direct application to their function (e.g. system integrators, design engineers, technical discipline leads, analysts, etc.). The clever acronym, ICARE, instills the attitude of accountability, safety, technical rigor and engagement in the problem resolution: Identify, Communicate, Assess, Report, Execute (ICARE). This method was developed through observation of Space Shuttle Propulsion Systems Engineering and Integration (PSE&I) office personnel approach in an attempt to succinctly describe the actions of an effective systems engineer. Additionally it evolved from an effort to make a broadly-defined checklist for a PSE&I worker to perform their responsibilities in an iterative and recursive manner. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Systems Engineering Handbook states, engineering of NASA systems requires a systematic and disciplined set of processes that are applied recursively and iteratively for the design, development, operation, maintenance, and closeout of systems throughout the life cycle of the programs and projects. ICARE is a method that can be applied within the boundaries and requirements of NASA s systems engineering set of processes to provide an elevated sense of duty and responsibility to crew and vehicle safety. The importance of a disciplined set of processes and a safety-conscious mindset increases with the complexity of the system. Moreover, the larger the system and the larger the workforce, the more important it is to encourage the usage of the ICARE method as widely as possible. According to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook, elements of a system can include people, hardware, software, facilities, policies and documents; all things required to produce system-level results, qualities, properties, characteristics

  6. VALUATION METHODS- LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorisz Talas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a theoretical overview of the often used valuation methods with the help of which the value of a firm or its equity is calculated. Many experts (including Aswath Damodaran, Guochang Zhang and CA Hozefa Natalwala classify the methods. The basic models are based on discounted cash flows. The main method uses the free cash flow for valuation, but there are some newer methods that reveal and correct the weaknesses of the traditional models. The valuation of flexibility of management can be conducted mainly with real options. This paper briefly describes the essence of the Dividend Discount Model, the Free Cash Flow Model, the benefit from using real options and the Residual Income Model. There are a few words about the Adjusted Present Value approach as well. Different models uses different premises, and an overall truth is that if the required premises are real and correct, the value will be appropriately accurate. Another important condition is that experts, analysts should choose between the models on the basis of the purpose of valuation. Thus there are no good or bad methods, only methods that fit different goals and aims. The main task is to define exactly the purpose, then to find the most appropriate valuation technique. All the methods originates from the premise that the value of an asset is the present value of its future cash flows. According to the different points of view of different techniques the resulted values can be also differed from each other. Valuation models and techniques should be adapted to the rapidly changing world, but the basic statements remain the same. On the other hand there is a need for more accurate models in order to help investors get as many information as they could. Today information is one of the most important resources and financial models should keep up with this trend.

  7. The lod score method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J P; Saccone, N L; Corbett, J

    2001-01-01

    The lod score method originated in a seminal article by Newton Morton in 1955. The method is broadly concerned with issues of power and the posterior probability of linkage, ensuring that a reported linkage has a high probability of being a true linkage. In addition, the method is sequential, so that pedigrees or lod curves may be combined from published reports to pool data for analysis. This approach has been remarkably successful for 50 years in identifying disease genes for Mendelian disorders. After discussing these issues, we consider the situation for complex disorders, where the maximum lod score (MLS) statistic shares some of the advantages of the traditional lod score approach but is limited by unknown power and the lack of sharing of the primary data needed to optimally combine analytic results. We may still learn from the lod score method as we explore new methods in molecular biology and genetic analysis to utilize the complete human DNA sequence and the cataloging of all human genes.

  8. Advances in iterative methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauwens, B.; Arkuszewski, J.; Boryszewicz, M.

    1981-01-01

    Results obtained in the field of linear iterative methods within the Coordinated Research Program on Transport Theory and Advanced Reactor Calculations are summarized. The general convergence theory of linear iterative methods is essentially based on the properties of nonnegative operators on ordered normed spaces. The following aspects of this theory have been improved: new comparison theorems for regular splittings, generalization of the notions of M- and H-matrices, new interpretations of classical convergence theorems for positive-definite operators. The estimation of asymptotic convergence rates was developed with two purposes: the analysis of model problems and the optimization of relaxation parameters. In the framework of factorization iterative methods, model problem analysis is needed to investigate whether the increased computational complexity of higher-order methods does not offset their increased asymptotic convergence rates, as well as to appreciate the effect of standard relaxation techniques (polynomial relaxation). On the other hand, the optimal use of factorization iterative methods requires the development of adequate relaxation techniques and their optimization. The relative performances of a few possibilities have been explored for model problems. Presently, the best results have been obtained with optimal diagonal-Chebyshev relaxation

  9. SU-E-T-77: A Statistical Approach to Manage Quality for Pre-Treatment Verification in IMRT/VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jassal, K [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Sarkar, B [AMRI Cancer Centre and GLA university, Mathura, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Mohanti, B; Roy, S; Ganesh, T [FMRI, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Munshi, A [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgon, Haryana (India); Chougule, A [SMS Medical College and Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Sachdev, K [Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India)

    2015-06-15

    Objective: The study presents the application of a simple concept of statistical process control (SPC) for pre-treatment quality assurance procedure analysis for planar dose measurements performed using 2D-array and a-Si electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID). Method: A total of 195 patients of four different anatomical sites: brain (n1=45), head & neck (n2=45), thorax (n3=50) and pelvis (n4=55) were selected for the study. Pre-treatment quality assurance for the clinically acceptable IMRT/VMAT plans was measured with 2D array and a-Si EPID of the accelerator. After the γ-analysis, control charts and the quality index Cpm was evaluated for each cohort. Results: Mean and σ of γ ( 3%/3 mm) were EPID γ %≤1= 99.9% ± 1.15% and array γ %<1 = 99.6% ± 1.06%. Among all plans γ max was consistently lower than for 2D array as compared to a-Si EPID. Fig.1 presents the X-bar control charts for every cohort. Cpm values for a-Si EPID were found to be higher than array, detailed results are presented in table 1. Conclusion: Present study demonstrates the significance of control charts used for quality management purposes in newer radiotherapy clinics. Also, provides a pictorial overview of the clinic performance for the advanced radiotherapy techniques.Higher Cpm values for EPID indicate its higher efficiency than array based measurements.

  10. Independent random sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Martino, Luca; Míguez, Joaquín

    2018-01-01

    This book systematically addresses the design and analysis of efficient techniques for independent random sampling. Both general-purpose approaches, which can be used to generate samples from arbitrary probability distributions, and tailored techniques, designed to efficiently address common real-world practical problems, are introduced and discussed in detail. In turn, the monograph presents fundamental results and methodologies in the field, elaborating and developing them into the latest techniques. The theory and methods are illustrated with a varied collection of examples, which are discussed in detail in the text and supplemented with ready-to-run computer code. The main problem addressed in the book is how to generate independent random samples from an arbitrary probability distribution with the weakest possible constraints or assumptions in a form suitable for practical implementation. The authors review the fundamental results and methods in the field, address the latest methods, and emphasize the li...

  11. Grid generation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Liseikin, Vladimir D

    2017-01-01

    This new edition provides a description of current developments relating to grid methods, grid codes, and their applications to actual problems. Grid generation methods are indispensable for the numerical solution of differential equations. Adaptive grid-mapping techniques, in particular, are the main focus and represent a promising tool to deal with systems with singularities. This 3rd edition includes three new chapters on numerical implementations (10), control of grid properties (11), and applications to mechanical, fluid, and plasma related problems (13). Also the other chapters have been updated including new topics, such as curvatures of discrete surfaces (3). Concise descriptions of hybrid mesh generation, drag and sweeping methods, parallel algorithms for mesh generation have been included too. This new edition addresses a broad range of readers: students, researchers, and practitioners in applied mathematics, mechanics, engineering, physics and other areas of applications.

  12. Bayesian methods in reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, P.; Badoux, R.

    1991-11-01

    The present proceedings from a course on Bayesian methods in reliability encompasses Bayesian statistical methods and their computational implementation, models for analyzing censored data from nonrepairable systems, the traits of repairable systems and growth models, the use of expert judgment, and a review of the problem of forecasting software reliability. Specific issues addressed include the use of Bayesian methods to estimate the leak rate of a gas pipeline, approximate analyses under great prior uncertainty, reliability estimation techniques, and a nonhomogeneous Poisson process. Also addressed are the calibration sets and seed variables of expert judgment systems for risk assessment, experimental illustrations of the use of expert judgment for reliability testing, and analyses of the predictive quality of software-reliability growth models such as the Weibull order statistics.

  13. Energy methods in dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Khanh Chau

    2012-01-01

    The above examples should make clear the necessity of understanding the mechanism of vibrations and waves in order to control them in an optimal way. However vibrations and waves are governed by differential equations which require, as a rule, rather complicated mathematical methods for their analysis. The aim of this textbook is to help students acquire both a good grasp of the first principles from which the governing equations can be derived, and the adequate mathematical methods for their solving. Its distinctive features, as seen from the title, lie in the systematic and intensive use of Hamilton's variational principle and its generalizations for deriving the governing equations of conservative and dissipative mechanical systems, and also in providing the direct variational-asymptotic analysis, whenever available, of the energy and dissipation for the solution of these equations. It will be demonstrated that many well-known methods in dynamics like those of Lindstedt-Poincare, Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky, Ko...

  14. Nuclear methods for tribology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racolta, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The tribological field of activity is mainly concerned with the relative movement of different machine components, friction and wear phenomena and their dependence upon lubrication. Tribological studies on friction and wear processes are important because they lead to significant parameter-improvements of engineering tools and machinery components. A review of fundamental aspects of both friction and wear phenomena is presented. A number of radioindicator-based methods have been known for almost four decades, differing mainly with respect to the mode of introducing the radio-indicators into the machine part to be studied. All these methods briefly presented in this paper are based on the measurement of the activity of wear products and therefore require high activity levels of the part. For this reason, such determinations can be carried out only in special laboratories and under conditions which do not usually agree with the conditions of actual use. What is required is a sensitive, fast method allowing the determination of wear under any operating conditions, without the necessity of stopping and disassembling the machine. The above mentioned requirements are the features that have made the Thin Layer Activation technique (TLA) the most widely used method applied in wear and corrosion studies in the last two decades. The TLA principle, taking in account that wear and corrosion processes are characterised by a loss of material, consists in an ion beam irradiation of a well defined volume of a machine part subjected to wear. The radioactivity level changes can usually be measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy methods. A review of both main TLA fields of application in major laboratories abroad and of those performed at the U-120 cyclotron of I.P.N.E.-Bucharest together with the existing trends to extend other nuclear analytical methods to tribological studies is presented as well. (author). 25 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Methods for pretreating biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir; Sousa, Leonardo

    2017-05-09

    A method for pretreating biomass is provided, which includes, in a reactor, allowing gaseous ammonia to condense on the biomass and react with water present in the biomass to produce pretreated biomass, wherein reactivity of polysaccharides in the biomass is increased during subsequent biological conversion as compared to the reactivity of polysaccharides in biomass which has not been pretreated. A method for pretreating biomass with a liquid ammonia and recovering the liquid ammonia is also provided. Related systems which include a biochemical or biofuel production facility are also disclosed.

  16. Exploring Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, William L

    2012-01-01

    Exploring Monte Carlo Methods is a basic text that describes the numerical methods that have come to be known as "Monte Carlo." The book treats the subject generically through the first eight chapters and, thus, should be of use to anyone who wants to learn to use Monte Carlo. The next two chapters focus on applications in nuclear engineering, which are illustrative of uses in other fields. Five appendices are included, which provide useful information on probability distributions, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes for radiation transport, and other matters. The famous "Buffon's needle proble

  17. Research on teaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, M H

    1990-01-01

    Research on teaching methods in nursing education was categorized into studies on media, CAI, and other nontraditional instructional strategies. While the research differed, some generalizations may be made from the findings. Multimedia, whether it is used for individual or group instruction, is at least as effective as traditional instruction (lecture and lecture-discussion) in promoting cognitive learning, retention of knowledge, and performance. Further study is needed to identify variables that may influence learning and retention. While learner attitudes toward mediated instruction tended to be positive, investigators failed to control for the effect of novelty. Control over intervening variables was lacking in the majority of studies as well. Research indicated that CAI is as effective as other teaching methods in terms of knowledge gain and retention. Attitudes toward CAI tended to be favorable, with similar problems in measurement as those evidenced in studies of media. Chang (1986) also recommends that future research examine the impact of computer-video interactive instruction on students, faculty, and settings. Research is needed on experimental teaching methods, strategies for teaching problem solving and clinical judgment, and ways of improving the traditional lecture and discussion. Limited research in these areas makes generalizations impossible. There is a particular need for research on how to teach students the diagnostic reasoning process and encourage critical thinking, both in terms of appropriate teaching methods and the way in which those strategies should be used. It is interesting that few researchers studied lecture and lecture-discussion except as comparable teaching methods for research on other strategies. Additional research questions may be generated on lecture and discussion in relation to promoting concept learning, an understanding of nursing and other theories, transfer of knowledge, and development of cognitive skills. Few

  18. Carbon 14 dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This document gives a first introduction to 14 C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the 14 C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of 14 C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  19. Methods of Multivariate Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rencher, Alvin C

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book is a systematic, well-written, well-organized text on multivariate analysis packed with intuition and insight . . . There is much practical wisdom in this book that is hard to find elsewhere."-IIE Transactions Filled with new and timely content, Methods of Multivariate Analysis, Third Edition provides examples and exercises based on more than sixty real data sets from a wide variety of scientific fields. It takes a "methods" approach to the subject, placing an emphasis on how students and practitioners can employ multivariate analysis in real-life sit

  20. Tautomerism methods and theories

    CERN Document Server

    Antonov, Liudmil

    2013-01-01

    Covering the gap between basic textbooks and over-specialized scientific publications, this is the first reference available to describe this interdisciplinary topic for PhD students and scientists starting in the field. The result is an introductory description providing suitable practical examples of the basic methods used to study tautomeric processes, as well as the theories describing the tautomerism and proton transfer phenomena. It also includes different spectroscopic methods for examining tautomerism, such as UV-VIs, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and NMR spectrosc

  1. Speeding Fermat's factoring method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, James

    A factoring method is presented which, heuristically, splits composite n in O(n^{1/4+epsilon}) steps. There are two ideas: an integer approximation to sqrt(q/p) provides an O(n^{1/2+epsilon}) algorithm in which n is represented as the difference of two rational squares; observing that if a prime m divides a square, then m^2 divides that square, a heuristic speed-up to O(n^{1/4+epsilon}) steps is achieved. The method is well-suited for use with small computers: the storage required is negligible, and one never needs to work with numbers larger than n itself.

  2. High frequency asymptotic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, D.; Dessarce, R.; Gay, J.; Vermersch, S.

    1991-01-01

    The asymptotic methods allow us to compute the interaction of high frequency electromagnetic waves with structures. After an outline of their foundations with emphasis on the geometrical theory of diffraction, it is shown how to use these methods to evaluate the radar cross section (RCS) of complex tri-dimensional objects of great size compared to the wave-length. The different stages in simulating phenomena which contribute to the RCS are reviewed: physical theory of diffraction, multiple interactions computed by shooting rays, research for creeping rays. (author). 7 refs., 6 figs., 3 insets

  3. Practical methods of optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, R

    2013-01-01

    Fully describes optimization methods that are currently most valuable in solving real-life problems. Since optimization has applications in almost every branch of science and technology, the text emphasizes their practical aspects in conjunction with the heuristics useful in making them perform more reliably and efficiently. To this end, it presents comparative numerical studies to give readers a feel for possibile applications and to illustrate the problems in assessing evidence. Also provides theoretical background which provides insights into how methods are derived. This edition offers rev

  4. Electrorheological fluids and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Peter F.; McIntyre, Ernest C.

    2015-06-02

    Electrorheological fluids and methods include changes in liquid-like materials that can flow like milk and subsequently form solid-like structures under applied electric fields; e.g., about 1 kV/mm. Such fluids can be used in various ways as smart suspensions, including uses in automotive, defense, and civil engineering applications. Electrorheological fluids and methods include one or more polar molecule substituted polyhedral silsesquioxanes (e.g., sulfonated polyhedral silsesquioxanes) and one or more oils (e.g., silicone oil), where the fluid can be subjected to an electric field.

  5. Method of sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peel, J.L.; Waites, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    A method of sterilisation of food packaging is described which comprises treating microorganisms with an ultraviolet irradiated solution of hydrogen peroxide to render the microorganisms non-viable. The wavelength of ultraviolet radiation used is wholly or predominantly below 325 nm and the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide is no greater than 10% by weight. The method is applicable to a wide variety of microorganisms including moulds, yeasts, bacteria, viruses and protozoa and finds particular application in the destruction of spore-forming bacteria, especially those which are dairy contaminants. (U.K.)

  6. Unorthodox theoretical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedd, Sean [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The use of the ReaxFF force field to correlate with NMR mobilities of amine catalytic substituents on a mesoporous silica nanosphere surface is considered. The interfacing of the ReaxFF force field within the Surface Integrated Molecular Orbital/Molecular Mechanics (SIMOMM) method, in order to replicate earlier SIMOMM published data and to compare with the ReaxFF data, is discussed. The development of a new correlation consistent Composite Approach (ccCA) is presented, which incorporates the completely renormalized coupled cluster method with singles, doubles and non-iterative triples corrections towards the determination of heats of formations and reaction pathways which contain biradical species.

  7. Monte Carlo methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardenet Rémi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bayesian inference often requires integrating some function with respect to a posterior distribution. Monte Carlo methods are sampling algorithms that allow to compute these integrals numerically when they are not analytically tractable. We review here the basic principles and the most common Monte Carlo algorithms, among which rejection sampling, importance sampling and Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC methods. We give intuition on the theoretical justification of the algorithms as well as practical advice, trying to relate both. We discuss the application of Monte Carlo in experimental physics, and point to landmarks in the literature for the curious reader.

  8. The SPH homogeneization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavenoky, Alain

    1978-01-01

    The homogeneization of a uniform lattice is a rather well understood topic while difficult problems arise if the lattice becomes irregular. The SPH homogeneization method is an attempt to generate homogeneized cross sections for an irregular lattice. Section 1 summarizes the treatment of an isolated cylindrical cell with an entering surface current (in one velocity theory); Section 2 is devoted to the extension of the SPH method to assembly problems. Finally Section 3 presents the generalisation to general multigroup problems. Numerical results are obtained for a PXR rod bundle assembly in Section 4

  9. Splines and variational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Prenter, P M

    2008-01-01

    One of the clearest available introductions to variational methods, this text requires only a minimal background in calculus and linear algebra. Its self-contained treatment explains the application of theoretic notions to the kinds of physical problems that engineers regularly encounter. The text's first half concerns approximation theoretic notions, exploring the theory and computation of one- and two-dimensional polynomial and other spline functions. Later chapters examine variational methods in the solution of operator equations, focusing on boundary value problems in one and two dimension

  10. Probabilistic methods for physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirier, G

    2013-01-01

    We present an asymptotic method giving a probability of presence of the iterated spots of R d by a polynomial function f. We use the well-known Perron Frobenius operator (PF) that lets certain sets and measure invariant by f. Probabilistic solutions can exist for the deterministic iteration. If the theoretical result is already known, here we quantify these probabilities. This approach seems interesting to use for computing situations when the deterministic methods don't run. Among the examined applications, are asymptotic solutions of Lorenz, Navier-Stokes or Hamilton's equations. In this approach, linearity induces many difficult problems, all of whom we have not yet resolved.

  11. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  12. Supercritical fluid analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.; Kalinoski, H.T.; Wright, B.W.; Udseth, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Supercritical fluids are providing the basis for new and improved methods across a range of analytical technologies. New methods are being developed to allow the detection and measurement of compounds that are incompatible with conventional analytical methodologies. Characterization of process and effluent streams for synfuel plants requires instruments capable of detecting and measuring high-molecular-weight compounds, polar compounds, or other materials that are generally difficult to analyze. The purpose of this program is to develop and apply new supercritical fluid techniques for extraction, separation, and analysis. These new technologies will be applied to previously intractable synfuel process materials and to complex mixtures resulting from their interaction with environmental and biological systems

  13. A flexible homework method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lei; Stonebraker, Stephen R.; Sadaghiani, Homeyra

    2008-09-01

    The traditional methods of assigning and grading homework in large enrollment physics courses have raised concerns among many instructors and students. In this paper we discuss a cost-effective approach to managing homework that involves making half of the problem solutions available to students before the homework is due. In addition, students are allowed some control in choosing which problems to solve. This paper-based approach to homework provides more detailed and timely support to students and increases the amount of self-direction in the homework process. We describe the method and present preliminary results on how students have responded.

  14. SU-G-JeP1-08: Dual Modality Verification for Respiratory Gating Using New Real- Time Tumor Tracking Radiotherapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiinoki, T; Hanazawa, H; Shibuya, K [Yamaguchi University, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kawamura, S; Koike, M; Yuasa, Y; Uehara, T; Fujimoto, K [Yamaguchi University Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The respirato ry gating system combined the TrueBeam and a new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system (RTRT) was installed. The RTRT system consists of two x-ray tubes and color image intensifiers. Using fluoroscopic images, the fiducial marker which was implanted near the tumor was tracked and was used as the internal surrogate for respiratory gating. The purposes of this study was to develop the verification technique of the respiratory gating with the new RTRT using cine electronic portal image device images (EPIDs) of TrueBeam and log files of the RTRT. Methods: A patient who underwent respiratory gated SBRT of the lung using the RTRT were enrolled in this study. For a patient, the log files of three-dimensional coordinate of fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were acquired using the RTRT. Simultaneously, the cine EPIDs were acquired during respiratory gated radiotherapy. The data acquisition was performed for one field at five sessions during the course of SBRT. The residual motion errors were calculated using the log files (E{sub log}). The fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate into the cine EPIDs was automatically extracted by in-house software based on the template-matching algorithm. The differences between the the marker positions of cine EPIDs and digitally reconstructed radiograph were calculated (E{sub EPID}). Results: Marker detection on EPID using in-house software was influenced by low image contrast. For one field during the course of SBRT, the respiratory gating using the RTRT showed the mean ± S.D. of 95{sup th} percentile E{sub EPID} were 1.3 ± 0.3 mm,1.1 ± 0.5 mm,and those of E{sub log} were 1.5 ± 0.2 mm, 1.1 ± 0.2 mm in LR and SI directions, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed the verification method of respiratory gating combined TrueBeam and new real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system using EPIDs and log files.

  15. Molecular methods for biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Ferrera, Isabel; Balagué , Vanessa; Voolstra, Christian R.; Aranda, Manuel; Bayer, Till; Abed, Raeid M.M.; Dobretsov, Sergey; Owens, Sarah M.; Wilkening, Jared; Fessler, Jennifer L.; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter deals with both classical and modern molecular methods that can be useful for the identification of microorganisms, elucidation and comparison of microbial communities, and investigation of their diversity and functions. The most important and critical steps necessary for all molecular methods is DNA isolation from microbial communities and environmental samples; these are discussed in the first part. The second part provides an overview over DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing methods. Protocols and analysis software as well as potential pitfalls associated with application of these methods are discussed. Community fingerprinting analyses that can be used to compare multiple microbial communities are discussed in the third part. This part focuses on Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Automated rRNA Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) methods. In addition, classical and next-generation metagenomics methods are presented. These are limited to bacterial artificial chromosome and Fosmid libraries and Sanger and next-generation 454 sequencing, as these methods are currently the most frequently used in research. Isolation of nucleic acids: This chapter discusses, the most important and critical steps necessary for all molecular methods is DNA isolation from microbial communities and environmental samples. Nucleic acid isolation methods generally include three steps: cell lysis, removal of unwanted substances, and a final step of DNA purification and recovery. The first critical step is the cell lysis, which can be achieved by enzymatic or mechanical procedures. Removal of proteins, polysaccharides and other unwanted substances is likewise important to avoid their interference in subsequent analyses. Phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol is commonly used to recover DNA, since it separates nucleic acids into an aqueous phase and precipitates proteins and

  16. Molecular methods for biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Ferrera, Isabel

    2014-08-30

    This chapter deals with both classical and modern molecular methods that can be useful for the identification of microorganisms, elucidation and comparison of microbial communities, and investigation of their diversity and functions. The most important and critical steps necessary for all molecular methods is DNA isolation from microbial communities and environmental samples; these are discussed in the first part. The second part provides an overview over DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing methods. Protocols and analysis software as well as potential pitfalls associated with application of these methods are discussed. Community fingerprinting analyses that can be used to compare multiple microbial communities are discussed in the third part. This part focuses on Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Automated rRNA Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) methods. In addition, classical and next-generation metagenomics methods are presented. These are limited to bacterial artificial chromosome and Fosmid libraries and Sanger and next-generation 454 sequencing, as these methods are currently the most frequently used in research. Isolation of nucleic acids: This chapter discusses, the most important and critical steps necessary for all molecular methods is DNA isolation from microbial communities and environmental samples. Nucleic acid isolation methods generally include three steps: cell lysis, removal of unwanted substances, and a final step of DNA purification and recovery. The first critical step is the cell lysis, which can be achieved by enzymatic or mechanical procedures. Removal of proteins, polysaccharides and other unwanted substances is likewise important to avoid their interference in subsequent analyses. Phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol is commonly used to recover DNA, since it separates nucleic acids into an aqueous phase and precipitates proteins and

  17. Brote epidémico por consumo de pez mantequilla: keriorrea e intoxicación histamínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Azucena Fariñas Cabrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentos: El consumo de pez mantequilla se está extendiendo en nuestro país. Si no se cumplen unas adecuadas normas de conservación y preparación de este tipo de alimento puede producir intoxicaciones. El objetivo del trabajo fue describir un brote de doble intoxicación por histamina y ésteres cerosos tras el consumo de pez mantequilla. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo de la doble intoxicación producida en un banquete celebrado en julio de 2013 en Valladolid. Se estudió mediante la cumplimentación de una encuesta específica telefónica o desde los centros asistenciales que atendieron a los comensales. La base de datos y posterior análisis estadístico descriptivo se realizaron con el programa Microsoft Excel Professional Plus 2010. Resultados. De los 27 casos declarados,en 24 se obtuvo información sobre los síntomas. La tasa de ataque fue 22,5%, con un cuadro clínico en el que predominó la diarrea (75%, la cefalea (46%, el dolor abdominal (38% y la sudoración (38%, destacando por su especificidad el picor/ardor de boca (29%. Cuatro pacientes presentaron heces anaranjadas y oleosas (keriorrhea. El tiempo medio transcurrido, desde el inicio de la cena hasta la aparición de los síntomas, fue de dos horas. La duración media de la sintomatología fue de 14 horas. La analítica del pescado servido mostró niveles de histamina superiores a 2.000 mg/kg. Conclusiones. Se produjo una doble intoxicación (histamina y ésteres cerosos por consumo de pez mantequilla. El cuadro fue leve y autolimitado.

  18. La ciclooxigenasa-2 (COX-2) y el factor de crecimiento epidérmico (EFG) en lesiones epiteliales orales premalignas

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Prado, S.; Gallego Guadalupe, A.; López-Cedrún, J.L.; Ferreras Granado, J.; Antón Aparicio, L.

    2009-01-01

    Las lesiones premalignas orales incluyen eritroplasias (manchas rojas) y leucoplasias (manchas blancas), las cuales se desarrollan a lo largo de superficies epiteliales. Estas lesiones son considerados marcadores en la "carcinogénesis de campo" ya que pacientes con lesiones premalignas orales pueden desarrollar carcinoma de células escamosas (CCS) en el sitio de las lesiones, así como en otros lugares de tracto aerodigestivo superior. Se está haciendo un gran esfuerzo para identificar nuevos ...

  19. Performing daily prostate targeting with a standard V-EPID and an automated radio-opaque marker detection algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Girouard, Louis-Martin; Aubin, Sylviane; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Brouard, Lucie; Roy-Lacroix, Lise; Dumont, Jean; Tremblay, Daniel; Laverdiere, Jacques; Vigneault, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Online prostate positioning using gold markers and a standard video-based electronic portal imaging device is reported. The average systematic (random) errors have been reduced from 2.1 mm (2.7 mm) to 0.5 mm (1.5 mm) in AP direction, 1.1 mm (1.7 mm) to 0.7 mm (1.2 mm) SI and 1.2 mm (1.7 mm) to 0.6 mm (1.3 mm) LR

  20. EPID-28. PROGNOSTIC AND PREDICTIVE BIOMARKERS IN RECURRENT WHO GRADE 3 GLIOMA PATIENTS TREATED WITH BEVACIZUMAB AND IRINOTECAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Anders; Urup, Thomas; Grunnet, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) has shown activity in the treatment of recurrent malignant glioma. Predictive markers and prognostic models are required in order to individualize treatment for grade 3 glioma patients. The prim......BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) has shown activity in the treatment of recurrent malignant glioma. Predictive markers and prognostic models are required in order to individualize treatment for grade 3 glioma patients...... response MRI (RANO criteria). Responders had significantly prolonged OS (p ¼ 0.007) and trended toward longer PFS (p ¼ 0.067) as compared to non-responders (OS: 12.4 vs 4.3 months, PFS: 5.6 vs 3.2 months). A favorable WHO performance status (PS) and absence of necrosis were significantly more common...... in responders than nonresponders. Multivariate analysis also identified a poor PS as the only prognostic factor for PFS, while an unfavorable PS and immunohistochemical p53 accumulation were prognostic of reducedOS.CONCLUSIONS:Apoor baseline PS and the presence of necrosis were negatively associated...

  1. Software specification methods

    CERN Document Server

    Habrias, Henri

    2010-01-01

    This title provides a clear overview of the main methods, and has a practical focus that allows the reader to apply their knowledge to real-life situations. The following are just some of the techniques covered: UML, Z, TLA+, SAZ, B, OMT, VHDL, Estelle, SDL and LOTOS.

  2. Leak detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a method for removing nuclear fuel elements from a fabrication building while at the same time testing the fuel elements for leaks without releasing contaminants from the fabrication building or from the fuel elements. The vacuum source used, leak detecting mechanism and fuel element fabrication building are specified to withstand environmental hazards. (UK)

  3. Photovoltaic device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleereman, Robert J; Lesniak, Michael J; Keenihan, James R; Langmaid, Joe A; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K; Boven, Michelle L

    2015-01-27

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  4. Methods for Risk Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alverbro, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Many decision-making situations today affect humans and the environment. In practice, many such decisions are made without an overall view and prioritise one or other of the two areas. Now and then these two areas of regulation come into conflict, e.g. the best alternative as regards environmental considerations is not always the best from a human safety perspective and vice versa. This report was prepared within a major project with the aim of developing a framework in which both the environmental aspects and the human safety aspects are integrated, and decisions can be made taking both fields into consideration. The safety risks have to be analysed in order to be successfully avoided and one way of doing this is to use different kinds of risk analysis methods. There is an abundance of existing methods to choose from and new methods are constantly being developed. This report describes some of the risk analysis methods currently available for analysing safety and examines the relationships between them. The focus here is mainly on human safety aspects

  5. HEV and cirrhosis: methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. HEV and cirrhosis: methods. Study group. Patients with cirrhosis and recent jaundice for <30 d. Controls. Patients with liver cirrhosis but no recent worsening. Exclusions. Significant alcohol consumption. Recent hepatotoxic drugs. Recent antiviral therapy. Recent ...

  6. Method of killing microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tensmeyer, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    A method of sterilizing the contents of containers involves exposure to a plasma induced therein by focusing a high-power laser beam in an electromagnetic field preferably for a period of from 1.0 millisec to 1.0 secs. (U.K.)

  7. Method of signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthomier, Charles

    1975-01-01

    A method capable of handling the amplitude and the frequency time laws of a certain kind of geophysical signals is described here. This method is based upon the analytical signal idea of Gabor and Ville, which is constructed either in the time domain by adding an imaginary part to the real signal (in-quadrature signal), or in the frequency domain by suppressing negative frequency components. The instantaneous frequency of the initial signal is then defined as the time derivative of the phase of the analytical signal, and his amplitude, or envelope, as the modulus of this complex signal. The method is applied to three types of magnetospheric signals: chorus, whistlers and pearls. The results obtained by analog and numerical calculations are compared to results obtained by classical systems using filters, i.e. based upon a different definition of the concept of frequency. The precision with which the frequency-time laws are determined leads then to the examination of the principle of the method and to a definition of instantaneous power density spectrum attached to the signal, and to the first consequences of this definition. In this way, a two-dimensional representation of the signal is introduced which is less deformed by the analysis system properties than the usual representation, and which moreover has the advantage of being obtainable practically in real time [fr

  8. TRAC methods and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Liles, D.R.; Bott, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    The numerical methods and physical models used in the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) versions PD2 and PF1 are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on TRAC-PF1, the version specifically designed to analyze small-break loss-of-coolant accidents

  9. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  10. Immunocytochemical methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Javois, Lorette C

    1999-01-01

    ... monoclonal antibodies to study cell differentiation during embryonic development. For a select few disciplines volumes have been published focusing on the specific application of immunocytochemical techniques to that discipline. What distinguished Immunocytochemical Methods and Protocols from earlier books when it was first published four years ago was i...

  11. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O'Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  12. Ferrari's Method and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoen, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Some tips that combine knowledge of mathematics history and technology for adapting Ferrar's method to factor quintics with a TI-83 graphing calculator are presented. A demonstration on the use of the root finder and regression capabilities of the graphing calculator are presented, so that the tips can be easily adapted for any graphing calculator…

  13. Truth and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenbrock, Reed Way

    1995-01-01

    Examines literary theory's displacing of "method" in the New Historicist criticism. Argues that Stephen Greenblatt and Lee Paterson imply that no objective historical truth is possible and as a result do not give methodology its due weight in their criticism. Questions the theory of "truth" advanced in this vein of literary…

  14. Sparse Classification - Methods & Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsson, Gudmundur

    for analysing such data carry the potential to revolutionize tasks such as medical diagnostics where often decisions need to be based on only a few high-dimensional observations. This explosion in data dimensionality has sparked the development of novel statistical methods. In contrast, classical statistics...

  15. Method of complex scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braendas, E.

    1986-01-01

    The method of complex scaling is taken to include bound states, resonances, remaining scattering background and interference. Particular points of the general complex coordinate formulation are presented. It is shown that care must be exercised to avoid paradoxical situations resulting from inadequate definitions of operator domains. A new resonance localization theorem is presented

  16. Alternative methods in criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis two new methods of calculating the criticality of a nuclear system are introduced and verified. Most methods of determining the criticality of a nuclear system depend implicitly upon knowledge of the angular flux, net currents, or moments of the angular flux, on the system surface in order to know the leakage. For small systems, leakage is the predominant element in criticality calculations. Unfortunately, in these methods the least accurate fluxes, currents, or moments are those occurring near system surfaces or interfaces. This is due to a mathematical inability to satisfy rigorously with a finite order angular polynomial expansion or angular difference technique the physical boundary conditions which occur on these surfaces. Consequently, one must accept large computational effort or less precise criticality calculations. The methods introduced in this thesis, including a direct leakage operator and an indirect multiple scattering leakage operator, obviate the need to know angular fluxes accurately at system boundaries. Instead, the system wide scalar flux, an integral quantity which is substantially easier to obtain with good precision is sufficient to obtain production, absorption, scattering, and leakage rates

  17. Materials and Methods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Norris

    genetic variance and its distribution in the population structure can lead to the design of optimum ... Recent developments in statistical methods and computing algorithms ..... This may be an indication of the general effect of the population structure. .... Presentation at the 40th anniversary, Institute of Genetics and Animal.

  18. Biomass treatment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, III; Melvin P.; Lyons, Robert C.

    2010-10-26

    A method for treating biomass was developed that uses an apparatus which moves a biomass and dilute aqueous ammonia mixture through reaction chambers without compaction. The apparatus moves the biomass using a non-compressing piston. The resulting treated biomass is saccharified to produce fermentable sugars.

  19. Embodied Design Ideation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilde, Danielle; Vallgårda, Anna; Tomico, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Embodied design ideation practices work with relationships between body, material and context to enliven design and research potential. Methods are often idiosyncratic and – due to their physical nature – not easily transferred. This presents challenges for designers wishing to develop and share ...

  20. gel template method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TiO2 nanotubes have been synthesized by sol–gel template method using alumina membrane. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, UV absorption spectrum and X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to investigate the structure, morphology and optical ...

  1. Audience Methods and Gratifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lull, James

    A model of need gratification inspired by the work of K.E. Rosengren suggests a theoretical framework making it possible to identify, measure, and assess the components of the need gratification process with respect to the mass media. Methods having cognitive and behavioral components are designed by individuals to achieve need gratification. Deep…

  2. Method for forming ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  3. Fashion, Mediations & Method Assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille

    of handling multiple, fluid realities with multiple, fluid methods. Empirically, the paper works with mediation in fashion - that is efforts the active shaping of relations between producer and consumer through communication, marketing and PR. Fashion mediation is by no means simple, but organise complex...

  4. Universal Image Steganalytic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Banoci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we introduce a new universal steganalytic method in JPEG file format that is detecting well-known and also newly developed steganographic methods. The steganalytic model is trained by MHF-DZ steganographic algorithm previously designed by the same authors. The calibration technique with the Feature Based Steganalysis (FBS was employed in order to identify statistical changes caused by embedding a secret data into original image. The steganalyzer concept utilizes Support Vector Machine (SVM classification for training a model that is later used by the same steganalyzer in order to identify between a clean (cover and steganographic image. The aim of the paper was to analyze the variety in accuracy of detection results (ACR while detecting testing steganographic algorithms as F5, Outguess, Model Based Steganography without deblocking, JP Hide and Seek which represent the generally used steganographic tools. The comparison of four feature vectors with different lengths FBS (22, FBS (66 FBS(274 and FBS(285 shows promising results of proposed universal steganalytic method comparing to binary methods.

  5. Ergonomics research methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiy, S. I.; Yermakova, S. V.; Chaynova, L. D.; Mitkin, A. A.; Gushcheva, T. M.; Strelkov, Y. K.; Tsvetkova, N. F.

    1973-01-01

    Various factors used in ergonomic research are given. They are: (1) anthrometric measurement, (2) polyeffector method of assessing the functional state of man, (3) galvanic skin reaction, (4) pneumography, (5) electromyography, (6) electrooculography, and (7) tachestoscopy. A brief summary is given of each factor and includes instrumentation and results.

  6. Research Methods in Sociolinguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Campoy, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The development of Sociolinguistics has been qualitatively and quantitatively outstanding within Linguistic Science since its beginning in the 1950s, with a steady growth in both theoretical and methodological developments as well as in its interdisciplinary directions within the spectrum of language and society. Field methods in sociolinguistic…

  7. Kriging : Methods and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we present Kriging— also known as a Gaussian process (GP) model— which is a mathematical interpolation method. To select the input combinations to be simulated, we use Latin hypercube sampling (LHS); we allow uniform and non-uniform distributions of the simulation inputs. Besides

  8. Sampling system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  9. Six Sigma method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Does, R.J.M.M.; de Mast, J.; Balakrishnan, N.; Brandimarte, P.; Everitt, B.; Molenberghs, G.; Piegorsch, W.; Ruggeri, F.

    2015-01-01

    Six Sigma is built on principles and methods that have proven themselves over the twentieth century. It has incorporated the most effective approaches and integrated them into a full program. It offers a management structure for organizing continuous improvement of routine tasks, such as

  10. Modern Reduction Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Pher G

    2008-01-01

    With its comprehensive overview of modern reduction methods, this book features high quality contributions allowing readers to find reliable solutions quickly and easily. The monograph treats the reduction of carbonyles, alkenes, imines and alkynes, as well as reductive aminations and cross and heck couplings, before finishing off with sections on kinetic resolutions and hydrogenolysis. An indispensable lab companion for every chemist.

  11. Methods of information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosarev, Yu G; Gusev, V D

    1978-01-01

    Works are presented on automation systems for editing and publishing operations by methods of processing symbol information and information contained in training selection (ranking of objectives by promise, classification algorithm of tones and noise). The book will be of interest to specialists in the automation of processing textural information, programming, and pattern recognition.

  12. Dual completion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamedov, N Ya; Kadymova, K S; Dzhafarov, Sh T

    1963-10-28

    One type of dual completion method utilizes a single tubing string. Through the use of the proper tubing equipment, the fluid from the low-productive upper formation is lifted by utilizing the surplus energy of a submerged pump, which handles the production from the lower stratum.

  13. Methods Evolved by Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Montessori's idea of the child's nature and the teacher's perceptiveness begins with amazing simplicity, and when she speaks of "methods evolved," she is unveiling a methodological system for observation. She begins with the early childhood explosion into writing, which is a familiar child phenomenon that Montessori has written about…

  14. Alternative methods in criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new methods of calculating the criticality of a nuclear system are introduced and verified. Most methods of determining the criticality of a nuclear system depend implicitly upon knowledge of the angular flux, net currents, or moments of the angular flux, on the system surface in order to know the leakage. For small systems, leakage is the predominant element in criticality calculations. Unfortunately, in these methods the least accurate fluxes, currents, or moments are those occuring near system surfaces or interfaces. This is due to a mathematical inability to satisfy rigorously with a finite order angular polynomial expansion or angular difference technique the physical boundary conditions which occur on these surfaces. Consequently, one must accept large computational effort or less precise criticality calculations. The methods introduced in this thesis, including a direct leakage operator and an indirect multiple scattering leakage operator, obviate the need to know angular fluxes accurately at system boundaries. Instead, the system wide scalar flux, an integral quantity which is substantially easier to obtain with good precision, is sufficient to obtain production, absorption, scattering, and leakage rates

  15. WATER CHEMISTRY ASSESSMENT METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This section summarizes and evaluates the surfce water column chemistry assessment methods for USEPA/EMAP-SW, USGS-NAQA, USEPA-RBP, Oho EPA, and MDNR-MBSS. The basic objective of surface water column chemistry assessment is to characterize surface water quality by measuring a sui...

  16. Analysis of numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Isaacson, Eugene

    1994-01-01

    This excellent text for advanced undergraduates and graduate students covers norms, numerical solution of linear systems and matrix factoring, iterative solutions of nonlinear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, polynomial approximation, and other topics. It offers a careful analysis and stresses techniques for developing new methods, plus many examples and problems. 1966 edition.

  17. Die singulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiler, Thomas P.; Garcia, Ernest J.; Francis, Kathryn M.

    2013-06-11

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a semiconductor substrate (e.g. a semiconductor-on-insulator substrate or a bulk silicon substrate) containing an oxide layer (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass) and one or more semiconductor layers (e.g. monocrystalline or polycrystalline silicon) located above the oxide layer. The method etches trenches through the substrate and through each semiconductor layer about the die being singulated, with the trenches being offset from each other around at least a part of the die so that the oxide layer between the trenches holds the substrate and die together. The trenches can be anisotropically etched using a Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) process. After the trenches are etched, the oxide layer between the trenches can be etched away with an HF etchant to singulate the die. A release fixture can be located near one side of the substrate to receive the singulated die.

  18. Epitope prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita

    Analysis. The chapter provides detailed explanations on how to use different methods for T cell epitope discovery research, explaining how input should be given as well as how to interpret the output. In the last chapter, I present the results of a bioinformatics analysis of epitopes from the yellow fever...... peptide-MHC interactions. Furthermore, using yellow fever virus epitopes, we demonstrated the power of the %Rank score when compared with the binding affinity score of MHC prediction methods, suggesting that this score should be considered to be used for selecting potential T cell epitopes. In summary...... immune responses. Therefore, it is of great importance to be able to identify peptides that bind to MHC molecules, in order to understand the nature of immune responses and discover T cell epitopes useful for designing new vaccines and immunotherapies. MHC molecules in humans, referred to as human...

  19. Methods for forming particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V.; Zhang, Fengyan; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin

    2016-06-21

    Single source precursors or pre-copolymers of single source precursors are subjected to microwave radiation to form particles of a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Such particles may be formed in a wurtzite phase and may be converted to a chalcopyrite phase by, for example, exposure to heat. The particles in the wurtzite phase may have a substantially hexagonal shape that enables stacking into ordered layers. The particles in the wurtzite phase may be mixed with particles in the chalcopyrite phase (i.e., chalcopyrite nanoparticles) that may fill voids within the ordered layers of the particles in the wurtzite phase thus produce films with good coverage. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form layers of semiconductor materials comprising a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Devices such as, for example, thin-film solar cells may be fabricated using such methods.

  20. Motor degradation prediction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  1. The random projection method

    CERN Document Server

    Vempala, Santosh S

    2005-01-01

    Random projection is a simple geometric technique for reducing the dimensionality of a set of points in Euclidean space while preserving pairwise distances approximately. The technique plays a key role in several breakthrough developments in the field of algorithms. In other cases, it provides elegant alternative proofs. The book begins with an elementary description of the technique and its basic properties. Then it develops the method in the context of applications, which are divided into three groups. The first group consists of combinatorial optimization problems such as maxcut, graph coloring, minimum multicut, graph bandwidth and VLSI layout. Presented in this context is the theory of Euclidean embeddings of graphs. The next group is machine learning problems, specifically, learning intersections of halfspaces and learning large margin hypotheses. The projection method is further refined for the latter application. The last set consists of problems inspired by information retrieval, namely, nearest neig...

  2. Grid generation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Liseikin, Vladimir D

    2010-01-01

    This book is an introduction to structured and unstructured grid methods in scientific computing, addressing graduate students, scientists as well as practitioners. Basic local and integral grid quality measures are formulated and new approaches to mesh generation are reviewed. In addition to the content of the successful first edition, a more detailed and practice oriented description of monitor metrics in Beltrami and diffusion equations is given for generating adaptive numerical grids. Also, new techniques developed by the author are presented, in particular a technique based on the inverted form of Beltrami’s partial differential equations with respect to control metrics. This technique allows the generation of adaptive grids for a wide variety of computational physics problems, including grid clustering to given function values and gradients, grid alignment with given vector fields, and combinations thereof. Applications of geometric methods to the analysis of numerical grid behavior as well as grid ge...

  3. Cross-impact method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzić Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper displays the application of the Cross-Impact method in pedagogy, namely a methodological approach which crosses variables in a novel, but statistically justified manner. The method is an innovation in pedagogy as well as in research methodology of social and psychological phenomena. Specifically, events and processes are crossed, that is, experts' predictions of about future interaction of events and processes. Therefore, this methodology is futuristic; it concerns predicting future, which is of key importance for pedagogic objectives. The paper presents two instances of the cross-impact approach: the longer, displayed in fourteen steps, and the shorter, in four steps. They are both accompanied with mathematic and statistical formulae allowing for quantification, that is, a numerical expression of the probability of a certain event happening in the future. The advantage of this approach is that it facilitates planning in education which so far has been solely based on lay estimates and assumptions.

  4. Method through motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary scenography often consists of video-projected motion graphics. The field is lacking in academic methods and rigour: descriptions and models relevant for the creation as well as in the analysis of existing works. In order to understand the phenomenon of motion graphics in a scenographic...... construction as a support to working systematically practice-led research project. The design model is being developed through design laboratories and workshops with students and professionals who provide feedback that lead to incremental improvements. Working with this model construction-as-method reveals...... context, I have been conducting a practice-led research project. Central to the project is construction of a design model describing sets of procedures, concepts and terminology relevant for design and studies of motion graphics in spatial contexts. The focus of this paper is the role of model...

  5. Semiconductor testing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Stephen.

    1992-01-01

    In a method of avoiding use of nuclear radiation, eg gamma rays, X-rays, electron beams, for testing semiconductor components for resistance to hard radiation, which hard radiation causes data corruption in some memory devices and 'latch-up' in others, similar fault effects can be achieved using a xenon or other 'light' flash gun even though the penetration of light is significantly less than that of gamma rays. The method involves treating a device with gamma radiation, measuring a particular fault current at the onset of a fault event, repeating the test with light to confirm the occurrence of the fault event at the same measured fault current, and using the fault current value as a reference for future tests using light on similar devices. (author)

  6. Quaternary dating methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaney, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The papers in this book cover absolute, relative and multiple dating methods, and have been written by specialists from a number of different earth sciences disciplines - their common interest being the dating of geological materials within the Quaternary. Papers on absolute dating methods discuss radiocarbon, uranium-series, potassium argon, 40 Ar/ 39 Ar, paleomagnetic, obsidian hydration, thermoluminescence, amino acid racemization, tree rings, and lichenometric techniques. Those on relative dating include discussions on various geomorphic relative age indicators such as drainage density changes, hypsometric integrals, bifurcation ratios, stream junction angles, spur morphology, hillslope geometry, and till sheet characteristics. The papers on multiple dating cite examples from the Rocky Mountains, Australia, Lake Agassiz Basin, and the Southern Andes. Also included is the panel discussion which reviews and assesses the information presented, and a field trip guide which discusses the sequences of Wisconian tills and interlayered lacustrine and fluvial sediments. (orig.)

  7. method with pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szasz, L.

    1980-01-01

    The Xα method for an atom or molecule is transformed into an all-electron pseudopotential formalism. The equations of the Xα method are exactly transformed into pseudo-orbital equations and the resulting pseudopotentials are replaced by simple density-dependent potentials derived from Thomas-Fermi model. It is shown that the new formalism satisfies the virial theorem. As the first application it is shown that the model explains the shell-structure of atoms by the property that the pseudo-orbitals for the (ns), (np), (nd) etc. electrons are, in a very good approximation, the solutions of the same equation and have their maxima at the same point thereby creating the peaks in the radial density characterizing the shell structure. (orig.)

  8. Developments in Surrogating Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans van Dormolen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I would like to talk about the developments in surrogating methods for preservation. My main focus will be on the technical aspects of preservation surrogates. This means that I will tell you something about my job as Quality Manager Microfilming for the Netherlands’ national preservation program, Metamorfoze, which is coordinated by the National Library. I am responsible for the quality of the preservation microfilms, which are produced for Metamorfoze. Firstly, I will elaborate on developments in preservation methods in relation to the following subjects: · Preservation microfilms · Scanning of preservation microfilms · Preservation scanning · Computer Output Microfilm. In the closing paragraphs of this paper, I would like to tell you something about the methylene blue test. This is an important test for long-term storage of preservation microfilms. Also, I will give you a brief report on the Cellulose Acetate Microfilm Conference that was held in the British Library in London, May 2005.

  9. Motor degradation prediction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor's duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures

  10. Thermoluminescence dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zink, A.

    2004-01-01

    A crystal that is submitted to radiation stores energy and releases this energy under the form of light whenever it is heated. These 2 properties: the ability to store energy and the ability to reset the energy stored are the pillars on which time dating methods like thermoluminescence are based. A typical accuracy of the thermoluminescence method is between 5 to 7% but an accuracy of 3% can be reached with a sufficient number of measurement. This article describes the application of thermoluminescence to the dating of a series of old terra-cotta statues. This time measurement is absolute and does not require any calibration, it represents the time elapsed since the last heating of the artifact. (A.C.)

  11. Method of reducing zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for making nuclear-grade zirconium from a zirconium compound, which ismore economical than previous methods since it uses aluminum as the reductant metal rather than the more expensive magnesium. A fused salt phase containing the zirconium compound to be reduced is first prepared. The fused salt phase is then contacted with a molten metal phase which contains aluminum and zinc. The reduction is effected by mutual displacment. Aluminum is transported from the molten metal phase to the fused salt phase, replacing zirconium in the salt. Zirconium is transported from the fused salt phase to the molten metal phase. The fused salt phase and the molten metal phase are then separated, and the solvent metal and zirconium are separated by distillation or other means. (DN)

  12. INNOVATIVE SALES METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana L. IONESCU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Companies operating in a global economy that is constantly changing and developming, especially during the financial crisis and political instability. It is necessary to adapt and develop sales methods in such environment. For large companies who base their activity on sales it has become a necessity to learn different types of sales approaches because their knowledge enables them to grow the number of customers and therefore the sales and the turnover. This paper aims to exame the most effective sales methods used on the highly sensitive economic and social environment – the insurance market. In the field of insurances, the sales process is even more important because sellers need to sell an intangible product that may materialize in the future, but there is no certainty.

  13. in the DSMC Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong-Zhi Chen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the Plücker coordinates representation is used to formulate the ruled surface and the molecular path for pumping speed performance evaluation of a molecular vacuum pump. The ruled surface represented by the Pliicker coordinates is used to develop a criterion for when gas molecules hit the pump surface wall. The criterion is applied to analyze the flow rate of a new developed vacuum pump in transition regimes by using the DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method. When a molecule flies in a neutral electrical field its path is a straight line. If the molecular path and the generators of a ruled surface are both represented by the Pliicker coordinates, the position of the molecular hit on the wall can be verified by the reciprocal condition of the lines. The Plücker coordinates representation is quite convenient in the DSMC method for this three-dimensional molecular flow simulation.

  14. Method card design dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölfel, Christiane; Merritt, T.

    2013-01-01

    There are many examples of cards used to assist or provide structure to the design process, yet there has not been a thorough articulation of the strengths and weaknesses of the various examples. We review eighteen card-based design tools in order to understand how they might benefit designers....... The card-based tools are explained in terms of five design dimensions including the intended purpose and scope of use, duration of use, methodology, customization, and formal/material qualities. Our analysis suggests three design patterns or archetypes for existing card-based design method tools...... and highlights unexplored areas in the design space. The paper concludes with recommendations for the future development of card-based methods for the field of interaction design....

  15. Ion sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard Harding; Martin, Glenn Brian

    2004-05-18

    The present invention allows the determination of trace levels of ionic substances in a sample solution (ions, metal ions, and other electrically charged molecules) by coupling a separation method, such as liquid chromatography, with ion selective electrodes (ISE) prepared so as to allow detection at activities below 10.sup.-6 M. The separation method distributes constituent molecules into fractions due to unique chemical and physical properties, such as charge, hydrophobicity, specific binding interactions, or movement in an electrical field. The separated fractions are detected by means of the ISE(s). These ISEs can be used singly or in an array. Accordingly, modifications in the ISEs are used to permit detection of low activities, specifically, below 10.sup.-6 M, by using low activities of the primary analyte (the molecular species which is specifically detected) in the inner filling solution of the ISE. Arrays constructed in various ways allow flow-through sensing for multiple ions.

  16. Laser device and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of treatment of opacity of the lens of an eye resulting from foreign matter at the back surface of the eye lens within the vitreous fluid body of the eye with a passively Q-switched laser device. The method consists of: (a) generating a single lasing pulse emitted from the laser device focused within the eye vitreous fluid body, spaced from the lens back surface, creating a microplasma dot in the vitreous fluid body (b) then increasing the frequency of the lasing pulses emitted from the lasing device having a frequency greater than the life of the microplasma to generate an elongated lasing plasma within the eye vitreous fluid moving toward the lens back surface, until the elongated lasing plasma contacts and destroys the foreign matter

  17. Dislocation-dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Brutzel, L.

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation-Dynamics (DD) technique is identified as the method able to model the evolution of material plastic properties as a function of the microstructural transformation predicted at the atomic scale. Indeed, it is the only simulation method capable of taking into account the collective behaviour of a large number of dislocations inside a realistic microstructure. DD simulations are based on the elastic dislocation theory following rules inherent to the dislocation core structure often call 'local rules'. All the data necessary to establish the local rules for DD have to come directly from experiment or alternatively from simulations carried out at the atomic scale such as molecular dynamics or ab initio calculations. However, no precise information on the interaction between two dislocations or between dislocations and defects induced by irradiation are available for nuclear fuels. Therefore, in this article the DD technique will be presented and some examples are given of what can be achieved with it. (author)

  18. The Montessori Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathleen HASKINS

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Maria Montessori provided the world with a powerful philosophy and practice for the advancement of humanity: change how we educate children and we change the world. She understood two things very clearly: One, that we can build a better world, a more just and peaceful place, when we educate for the realization of the individual and collective human potential; and two, that the only way to create an educational system that will that will serve this end is to scrap the current system entirely and replace it with a completely new system. She gave us a system through which to accomplish that goal: The Montessori Method. The following is a personal and professional account of the Montessori Method of educating children.

  19. Stereoscopic methods in TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.E.

    1975-07-01

    Stereoscopic methods used in TEM are reviewed. The use of stereoscopy to characterize three-dimensional structures observed by TEM has become widespread since the introduction of instruments operating at 1 MV. In its emphasis on whole structures and thick specimens this approach differs significantly from conventional methods of microstructural analysis based on three-dimensional image reconstruction from a number of thin-section views. The great advantage of stereo derives from the ability to directly perceive and measure structures in three-dimensions by capitalizing on the unsurpassed human ability for stereoscopic matching of corresponding details on picture pairs showing the same features from different viewpoints. At this time, stereo methods are aimed mainly at structural understanding at the level of dislocations, precipitates, and irradiation-induced point-defect clusters in crystal and on the cellular irradiation-induced point-defect clusters in crystal and on the cellular level of biological specimens. 3-d reconstruction methods have concentrated on the molecular level where image resolution requirements dictate the use of very thin specimens. One recent application of three-dimensional coordinate measurements is a system developed for analyzing depth variations in the numbers, sizes and total volumes of voids produced near the surfaces of metal specimens during energetic ion bombardment. This system was used to correlate the void volumes at each depth along the ion range with the number of atomic displacements produced at that depth, thereby unfolding the entire swelling versus dose relationship from a single stereo view. A later version of this system incorporating computer-controlled stereo display capabilities is now being built

  20. Polymer compositions and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Scott D.; Willkomm, Wayne R.

    2018-02-06

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane foams, thermoplastics and elastomers derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure: ##STR00001## In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive foam and elastomer compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  1. Methods of celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brouwer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Methods of Celestial Mechanics provides a comprehensive background of celestial mechanics for practical applications. Celestial mechanics is the branch of astronomy that is devoted to the motions of celestial bodies. This book is composed of 17 chapters, and begins with the concept of elliptic motion and its expansion. The subsequent chapters are devoted to other aspects of celestial mechanics, including gravity, numerical integration of orbit, stellar aberration, lunar theory, and celestial coordinates. Considerable chapters explore the principles and application of various mathematical metho

  2. Assessment methods for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biefang, S; Potthoff, P

    1995-09-01

    Diagnostics and evaluation in medical rehabilitation should be based on methods that are as objective as possible. In this context quantitative methods are an important precondition. We conducted for the German Pensions Insurance Institutions (which are in charge of the medical and vocational rehabilitation of workers and employees) a survey on assessment methods for rehabilitation which included an evaluation of American literature, with the aim to indicate procedures that can be considered for adaptation in Germany and to define further research requirements. The survey identified: (1) standardized procedures and instrumented tests for the assessment of musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary and neurophysiological function; (2) personality, intelligence, achievement, neuropsychological and alcoholism screening tests for the assessment of mental or cognitive function; (3) rating scales and self-administered questionnaires for the assessment of Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL Scales); (4) generic profiles and indexes as well as disease-specific measures for the assessment of health-related quality of life and health status; and (5) rating scales for vocational assessment. German equivalents or German versions exist only for a part of the procedures identified. Translation and testing of Anglo-Saxon procedures should have priority over the development of new German methods. The following procedures will be taken into account: (a) instrumented tests for physical function, (b) IADL Scales, (c) generic indexes of health-related quality of life, (d) specific quality of life and health status measures for disorders of the circulatory system, metabolic system, digestive organs, respiratory tract and for cancer, and (e) vocational rating scales.

  3. Method to liquefy coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronauer, D.C.; Kehl, W.L.

    1977-06-08

    In a method to liquify coal in the presence of hydrogen and hydrogen-transfer solvents, a hydrogenation catalyst is used in which an amorphous aluminium phosphate is taken as catalyst carrier. The particular advantage of aluminium phosphate catalyst carriers is their property of not loosing their mechanical strength even after manifold oxidizing regeneration (burning off the deposited carbon). The quantity of carbon deposited on the catalyst when using an aluminium phosphate carrier is considerably loss than with usual catalyst carriers.

  4. Methods of risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (identification, quantificatio