WorldWideScience

Sample records for methods courses technology-based

  1. New technology-based recruitment methods

    OpenAIRE

    Oksanen, Reija

    2018-01-01

    The transformation that recruitment might encounter due to big data analytics and artificial intelligence (AI) is particularly fascinating which is why this thesis focuses on the changes recruitment processes are and will be facing as new technological solutions are emerging. The aim and main objective of this study is to widen knowledge about new technology-based recruitment methods, focusing on how they are utilized by Finnish recruitment professionals and how the opportunities and risks th...

  2. Internet of Things technology-based management methods for environmental specimen banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lihong; Wang, Qian; Yu, Ang

    2015-02-01

    The establishment and management of environmental specimen banks (ESBs) has long been a problem worldwide. The complexity of specimen environment has made the management of ESB likewise complex. Through an analysis of the development and management of ESBs worldwide and in light of the sophisticated Internet of Things (IOT) technology, this paper presents IOT technology-based ESB management methods. An IOT technology-based ESB management system can significantly facilitate ESB ingress and egress management as well as long-term storage management under quality control. This paper elaborates on the design of IOT technology-based modules, which can be used in ESB management to achieve standardized, smart, information-based ESB management. ESB management has far-reaching implications for environmental management and for research in environmental science.

  3. Technology-based self-care methods of improving antiretroviral adherence: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parya Saberi

    Full Text Available As HIV infection has shifted to a chronic condition, self-care practices have emerged as an important topic for HIV-positive individuals in maintaining an optimal level of health. Self-care refers to activities that patients undertake to maintain and improve health, such as strategies to achieve and maintain high levels of antiretroviral adherence.Technology-based methods are increasingly used to enhance antiretroviral adherence; therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to examine technology-based self-care methods that HIV-positive individuals utilize to improve adherence. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1/1/1980 through 12/31/2010. We included quantitative and qualitative studies. Among quantitative studies, the primary outcomes included ARV adherence, viral load, and CD4+ cell count and secondary outcomes consisted of quality of life, adverse effects, and feasibility/acceptability data. For qualitative/descriptive studies, interview themes, reports of use, and perceptions of use were summarized. Thirty-six publications were included (24 quantitative and 12 qualitative/descriptive. Studies with exclusive utilization of medication reminder devices demonstrated less evidence of enhancing adherence in comparison to multi-component methods.This systematic review offers support for self-care technology-based approaches that may result in improved antiretroviral adherence. There was a clear pattern of results that favored individually-tailored, multi-function technologies, which allowed for periodic communication with health care providers rather than sole reliance on electronic reminder devices.

  4. Flipping an Agricultural Education Teaching Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Nathan W.; Stripling, Christopher T.; Blythe, Jessica M.; Roberts, T. Grady; Stedman, Nicole L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Flipping or inverting a course is a relatively new approach to structuring a course. Using this method, the lectures traditionally delivered during regularly scheduled class time are converted to a media for delivery online, often in the form of videos. Learners are expected to view the online lectures prior to class. Then in turn, in-class time…

  5. Collaborative teaching of an integrated methods course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Zhou

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing diversity in American schools, teachers need to be able to collaborate in teaching. University courses are widely considered as a stage to demonstrate or model the ways of collaboration. To respond to this call, three authors team taught an integrated methods course at an urban public university in the city of New York. Following a qualitative research design, this study explored both instructors‟ and pre-service teachers‟ experiences with this course. Study findings indicate that collaborative teaching of an integrated methods course is feasible and beneficial to both instructors and pre-service teachers. For instructors, this collaborative teaching was a reciprocal learning process where they were engaged in thinking about teaching in a broader and innovative way. For pre-service teachers, this collaborative course not only helped them understand how three different subjects could be related to each other, but also provided opportunities for them to actually see how collaboration could take place in teaching. Their understanding of collaborative teaching was enhanced after the course.

  6. Methods of OR: A new graduate course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P DuT Fourie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new course entitled "Methods of Operations Research (OR" was introduced at the Department of Applied Mathematics of Stellenbosch University during the second half of 2001. The aim of this course was to introduce students of OR to the trauma of mathematical modelling in real-world scenarios, instead of merely teaching them a number of theoretical OR-related topics in the form of a lecture-driven course with an examination at the end. Therefore this project-driven course, which is offered in collaboration with a number of partners in industry, is assessed on a continued evaluation basis, by means of written reports and oral presentations by students, after having physically, or at least virtually, visited real-world OR application sites. The objectives of the course, its structure and contents, as well as lessons learnt and some student feedback are described in this paper. A selection of projects used in the course are described in some detail in an appendix.

  7. [Identification of special quality eggs with NIR spectroscopy technology based on symbol entropy feature extraction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Hong, Wen-Xue

    2011-11-01

    Fast, nondestructive and accurate identification of special quality eggs is an urgent problem. The present paper proposed a new feature extraction method based on symbol entropy to identify near infrared spectroscopy of special quality eggs. The authors selected normal eggs, free range eggs, selenium-enriched eggs and zinc-enriched eggs as research objects and measured the near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectra in the range of 12 000-4 000 cm(-1). Raw spectra were symbolically represented with aggregation approximation algorithm and symbolic entropy was extracted as feature vector. An error-correcting output codes multiclass support vector machine classifier was designed to identify the spectrum. Symbolic entropy feature is robust when parameter changed and the highest recognition rate reaches up to 100%. The results show that the identification method of special quality eggs using near-infrared is feasible and the symbol entropy can be used as a new feature extraction method of near-infrared spectra.

  8. Method for screening prevention and control measures and technologies based on groundwater pollution intensity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Yang, Yang; Huan, Huan; Li, Mingxiao; Xi, Beidou; Lv, Ningqing; Wu, Yi; Xie, Yiwen; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinjin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a system for determining the evaluation and gradation indices of groundwater pollution intensity (GPI). Considering the characteristics of the vadose zone and pollution sources, the system decides which anti-seepage measures should be implemented at the contaminated site. The pollution sources hazards (PSH) and groundwater intrinsic vulnerability (GIV) are graded by the revised Nemerow Pollution Index and an improved DRTAS model, respectively. GPI is evaluated and graded by a double-sided multi-factor coupling model, which is constructed by the matrix method. The contaminated sites are categorized as prior, ordinary, or common sites. From the GPI results, we develop guiding principles for preventing and removing pollution sources, procedural interruption and remediation, and end treatment and monitoring. Thus, we can select appropriate prevention and control technologies (PCT). To screen the technological schemes and optimize the traditional analytical hierarchy process (AHP), we adopt the technique for order preference by the similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) method. Our GPI approach and PCT screening are applied to three types of pollution sites: the refuse dump of a rare earth mine development project (a potential pollution source), a chromium slag dump, and a landfill (existing pollution sources). These three sites are identified as ordinary, prior, and ordinary sites, respectively. The anti-seepage materials at the refuse dump should perform as effectively as a 1.5-m-thick clay bed. The chromium slag dump should be preferentially treated by soil flushing and in situ chemical remediation. The landfill should be treated by natural attenuation technology. The proposed PCT screening approach was compared with conventional screening methods results at the three sites and proved feasible and effective. The proposed method can provide technical support for the monitoring and management of groundwater pollution in China. Copyright © 2015

  9. Method for screening prevention and control measures and technologies based on groundwater pollution intensity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Juan, E-mail: lijuan@craes.org.cn [College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Yang, Yang [College of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Huan, Huan; Li, Mingxiao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Xi, Beidou, E-mail: xibd413@yeah.net [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Lv, Ningqing [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China); Wu, Yi [Guizhou Academy of Environmental Science and Designing, Guizhou 550000 (China); Xie, Yiwen, E-mail: qin3201@126.com [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Dongguan University of Technology, Dongguan, 523808 (China); Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinjin [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Beijing, 100012 (China)

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a system for determining the evaluation and gradation indices of groundwater pollution intensity (GPI). Considering the characteristics of the vadose zone and pollution sources, the system decides which anti-seepage measures should be implemented at the contaminated site. The pollution sources hazards (PSH) and groundwater intrinsic vulnerability (GIV) are graded by the revised Nemerow Pollution Index and an improved DRTAS model, respectively. GPI is evaluated and graded by a double-sided multi-factor coupling model, which is constructed by the matrix method. The contaminated sites are categorized as prior, ordinary, or common sites. From the GPI results, we develop guiding principles for preventing and removing pollution sources, procedural interruption and remediation, and end treatment and monitoring. Thus, we can select appropriate prevention and control technologies (PCT). To screen the technological schemes and optimize the traditional analytical hierarchy process (AHP), we adopt the technique for order preference by the similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) method. Our GPI approach and PCT screening are applied to three types of pollution sites: the refuse dump of a rare earth mine development project (a potential pollution source), a chromium slag dump, and a landfill (existing pollution sources). These three sites are identified as ordinary, prior, and ordinary sites, respectively. The anti-seepage materials at the refuse dump should perform as effectively as a 1.5-m-thick clay bed. The chromium slag dump should be preferentially treated by soil flushing and in situ chemical remediation. The landfill should be treated by natural attenuation technology. The proposed PCT screening approach was compared with conventional screening methods results at the three sites and proved feasible and effective. The proposed method can provide technical support for the monitoring and management of groundwater pollution in China. - Highlights: • An

  10. Method for screening prevention and control measures and technologies based on groundwater pollution intensity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Juan; Yang, Yang; Huan, Huan; Li, Mingxiao; Xi, Beidou; Lv, Ningqing; Wu, Yi; Xie, Yiwen; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinjin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a system for determining the evaluation and gradation indices of groundwater pollution intensity (GPI). Considering the characteristics of the vadose zone and pollution sources, the system decides which anti-seepage measures should be implemented at the contaminated site. The pollution sources hazards (PSH) and groundwater intrinsic vulnerability (GIV) are graded by the revised Nemerow Pollution Index and an improved DRTAS model, respectively. GPI is evaluated and graded by a double-sided multi-factor coupling model, which is constructed by the matrix method. The contaminated sites are categorized as prior, ordinary, or common sites. From the GPI results, we develop guiding principles for preventing and removing pollution sources, procedural interruption and remediation, and end treatment and monitoring. Thus, we can select appropriate prevention and control technologies (PCT). To screen the technological schemes and optimize the traditional analytical hierarchy process (AHP), we adopt the technique for order preference by the similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) method. Our GPI approach and PCT screening are applied to three types of pollution sites: the refuse dump of a rare earth mine development project (a potential pollution source), a chromium slag dump, and a landfill (existing pollution sources). These three sites are identified as ordinary, prior, and ordinary sites, respectively. The anti-seepage materials at the refuse dump should perform as effectively as a 1.5-m-thick clay bed. The chromium slag dump should be preferentially treated by soil flushing and in situ chemical remediation. The landfill should be treated by natural attenuation technology. The proposed PCT screening approach was compared with conventional screening methods results at the three sites and proved feasible and effective. The proposed method can provide technical support for the monitoring and management of groundwater pollution in China. - Highlights: • An

  11. A course in mathematical methods for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Herman, Russell L

    2014-01-01

    Based on the author’s junior-level undergraduate course, this introductory textbook is designed for a course in mathematical physics. Focusing on the physics of oscillations and waves, A Course in Mathematical Methods for Physicists helps students understand the mathematical techniques needed for their future studies in physics. It takes a bottom-up approach that emphasizes physical applications of the mathematics. The book offers: •A quick review of mathematical prerequisites, proceeding to applications of differential equations and linear algebra •Classroom-tested explanations of complex and Fourier analysis for trigonometric and special functions •Coverage of vector analysis and curvilinear coordinates for solving higher dimensional problems •Sections on nonlinear dynamics, variational calculus, numerical solutions of differential equations, and Green's functions

  12. Mathematica with a Numerical Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Rodney

    2003-04-01

    An interdisciplinary "Numerical Methods" course has been shared between physics, mathematics and computer science since 1992 at Hunter C. Recently, the lectures and workshops for this course have become formalized and placed on the internet at http://www.ph.hunter.cuny.edu (follow the links "Course Listings and Websites" >> "PHYS385 (Numerical Methods)". Mathematica notebooks for the lectures are available for automatic download (by "double clicking" the lecture icon) for student use in the classroom or at home. AOL (or Netscape/Explorer) can be used provided Mathematica (or the "free" MathReader) has been made a "helper application". Using Mathematica has the virtue that mathematical equations (no LaTex required) can easily be included with the text and Mathematica's graphing is easy to use. Computational cells can be included within the notebook and students may easily modify the calculation to see the result of "what if..." questions. Homework is sent as Mathematica notebooks to the instructor via the internet and the corrected workshops are returned in the same manner. Most exam questions require computational solutions.

  13. Prevalence of Evaluation Method Courses in Education Leader Doctoral Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperson, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the prevalence of single evaluation methods courses in doctoral education leadership programs. Analysis of websites of 132 leading U.S. university programs found 62 evaluation methods courses in 54 programs. Content analysis of 49 course catalog descriptions resulted in five categories: survey, planning and…

  14. Graduate Students' Expectations of an Introductory Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    While there is a scattered literature base on teaching research methods courses, there is very little literature that speaks to what and how students learn in research methods courses. Students are often described as coming to the course not seeing its relevance, bringing negative attitudes and low motivation with them. The purpose of this…

  15. Teaching Ethics in Communication Courses: An Investigation of Instructional Methods, Course Foci, and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canary, Heather E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of ethics instruction in communication courses on students' moral reasoning competence. Using a quasi-experiment, participants in interpersonal conflict courses and communication ethics courses were exposed to different levels of ethics instruction through a variety of instructional methods. Results indicate that…

  16. Evaluating methods to improve safeguards training courses of ISCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yukiko; Nakamura, Yo; Kawata, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Although questionnaires were used to receive feedbacks from participants at the end of each training course, Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) did not establish a structured evaluation method. To this end, ISCN has started to study on methods to accurately evaluate the courses since April and started to introduce the evaluation method on trial, according to the Donald Kirkpatrick's Four-Level Training Evaluation Model, so as to better develop and conduct more effective courses. This paper will focus on how ISCN has modified the Kirkpatrick's Four-level to adapt to its safeguards training courses. This will then be followed by two particular cases of how the evaluation method functioned for the Additional Protocol training courses held in Malaysia in 2014, and the feedbacks received to improve future training courses. (author)

  17. Contribution of the analytic hierarchy process (AHP method for supporting the decision to outsource or internalize activities in the context of technology-based company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Paula Reis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The definition of business model requires, among other decisions, the structure of the value chain of an emerging new organization. This structure depends on the decision to outsource or internalize sets of processes and their activities. This decision fundamentally strategic, demand a correct definition of the activities that actually add value to the business, and therefore desirable a methodology able to assist the manager in the process of decision making. This paper aims to propose a process to aid decision to outsource or internalize activities in the context of a technology-based company, using the strategy of action research methods associated with the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP and focus group technique. The study has resulted in the structuring of the decision process and criteria relevant to the identification of activities to be internalized by the technology-based company.

  18. Are Teacher Course Evaluations Biased against Faculty That Teach Quantitative Methods Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Stockdale, Myrah R.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated graduate students' responses to teacher/course evaluations (TCE) to determine if students' responses were inherently biased against faculty who teach quantitative methods courses. Item response theory (IRT) and Differential Item Functioning (DIF) techniques were utilized for data analysis. Results indicate students…

  19. Two Undergraduate Process Modeling Courses Taught Using Inductive Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroush, Masoud; Weinberger, Charles B.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript presents a successful application of inductive learning in process modeling. It describes two process modeling courses that use inductive learning methods such as inquiry learning and problem-based learning, among others. The courses include a novel collection of multi-disciplinary complementary process modeling examples. They were…

  20. Integrating Research Skills Training into Non--Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Jules

    2014-01-01

    Research skills are a valued commodity by industry and university administrators. Despite the importance placed on these skills students typically dislike taking research method courses where these skills are learned. However, training in research skills does not necessarily have to be confined to these courses. In this study participants at a…

  1. Technology base for microgravity horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Magnuson, J. W.; Scruby, R. R.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced microgravity plant biology research and life support system development for the spacecraft environment are critically hampered by the lack of a technology base. This inadequacy stems primarily from the fact that microgravity results in a lack of convective currents and phase separation as compared to the one gravity environment. A program plan is being initiated to develop this technology base. This program will provide an iterative flight development effort that will be closely integrated with both basic science investigations and advanced life support system development efforts incorporating biological processes. The critical considerations include optimum illumination methods, root aeration, root and shoot support, and heat rejection and gas exchange in the plant canopy.

  2. Quantitative valuation of platform technology based intangibles companies

    OpenAIRE

    Achleitner, Ann-Kristin; Nathusius, Eva; Schraml, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    In the course of raising external equity, e.g. from venture capitalists, a quantitative valuation is usually required for entrepreneurial ventures. This paper examines the challenges of quantitatively valuing platform technology based entrepreneurial ventures. The distinct characteristics of such companies pose specific requirements on the applicability of quantitative valuation methods. The entrepreneur can choose from a wide range of potential commercialization strategies to pursue in the c...

  3. Children's Literature in the Undergraduate Course on Communication Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Students will develop positive attitudes toward communication research by linking new values and principles with the familiar values and principles contained in children's literature. Course: Communication Research Methods.

  4. Multivariate statistical methods a first course

    CERN Document Server

    Marcoulides, George A

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate statistics refer to an assortment of statistical methods that have been developed to handle situations in which multiple variables or measures are involved. Any analysis of more than two variables or measures can loosely be considered a multivariate statistical analysis. An introductory text for students learning multivariate statistical methods for the first time, this book keeps mathematical details to a minimum while conveying the basic principles. One of the principal strategies used throughout the book--in addition to the presentation of actual data analyses--is poin

  5. Cell Phones Transform a Science Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    A science methods instructor intentionally encouraged cell phone use for class work to discover how cell phones can be used as research tools to enhance the content and engage the students. The anecdotal evidence suggested that students who used their smartphones as research tools experienced the science content and pedagogical information…

  6. The Relationship Between Method of Viewing Lectures, Course Ratings, and Course Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, William B; Ma, Terence P; Grayson, Martha S

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, medical schools have provided students access to video recordings of course lectures, but few studies have investigated the impact of this on ratings of courses and teachers. This study investigated whether the method of viewing lectures was related to student ratings of the course and its components and whether the method used changed over time. Preclinical medical students indicated whether ratings of course lectures were based primarily on lecture attendance, video capture, or both. Students were categorized into Lecture, Video, or Both groups based on their responses to this question. The data consisted of 7584 student evaluations collected over 2 years. Students who attended live lectures rated the course and its components higher than students who only viewed the video or used both methods, although these differences were very small. Students increasingly watched lectures exclusively by video over time: in comparison with first-year students, second-year students were more likely to watch lectures exclusively by video; in comparison with students in the first half of the academic year, students in the second half of the academic year were more likely to watch lectures exclusively by video. With the increase in use of lecture video recordings across medical schools, attention must be paid to student attitudes regarding these methods.

  7. Developing students' qualitative muscles in an introductory methods course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SmithBattle, Lee

    2014-08-30

    The exponential growth of qualitative research (QR) has coincided with methodological innovations, the proliferation of qualitative textbooks and journals, and the greater availability of qualitative methods courses. In spite of these advances, the pedagogy for teaching qualitative methods has received little attention. This paper provides a philosophical foundation for teaching QR with active learning strategies and shows how active learning is fully integrated into a one-semester course. The course initiates students into qualitative dispositions and skills as students develop study aims and procedures; enter the field to gather data; analyze the full set of student-generated data; and write results in a final report. Conducting a study in one semester is challenging but has proven feasible and disabuses students of the view that QR is simple, unscientific, or non-rigorous. Student reflections on course assignments are integrated into the paper. The strengths and limitations of this pedagogical approach are also described.

  8. A Pharmacy Preregistration Course Using Online Teaching and Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jenny; Marriott, Jennifer L.; Calandra, Angela; Duncan, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Objective To design and evaluate a preregistration course utilizing asynchronous online learning as the primary distance education delivery method. Design Online course components including tutorials, quizzes, and moderated small-group asynchronous case-based discussions were implemented. Online delivery was supplemented with self-directed and face-to-face learning. Assessment Pharmacy graduates who had completed the course in 2004 and 2005 were surveyed. The majority felt they had benefited from all components of the course, and that online delivery provided benefits including increased peer support, shared learning, and immediate feedback on performance. A majority of the first cohort reported that the workload associated with asynchronous online discussions was too great. The course was altered in 2005 to reduce the online component. Participant satisfaction improved, and most felt that the balance of online to face-to-face delivery was appropriate. Conclusion A new pharmacy preregistration course was successfully implemented. Online teaching and learning was well accepted and appeared to deliver benefits over traditional distance education methods once workload issues were addressed. PMID:19777092

  9. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad......Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded...... in the academic institutions. Thus, there is a need of comprehensive technology support system to cater the demands of all educational actors. Cloud Computing is one such comprehensive and user-friendly technology support environment that is the need of an hour. Cloud computing is the emerging technology that has...

  10. Starting Point: Linking Methods and Materials for Introductory Geoscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; MacDonald, R. H.; Merritts, D.; Savina, M.

    2004-12-01

    Introductory courses are one of the most challenging teaching environments for geoscience faculty. Courses are often large, students have a wide variety of background and skills, and student motivation can include completing a geoscience major, preparing for a career as teacher, fulfilling a distribution requirement, and general interest. The Starting Point site (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/index.html) provides help for faculty teaching introductory courses by linking together examples of different teaching methods that have been used in entry-level courses with information about how to use the methods and relevant references from the geoscience and education literature. Examples span the content of geoscience courses including the atmosphere, biosphere, climate, Earth surface, energy/material cycles, human dimensions/resources, hydrosphere/cryosphere, ocean, solar system, solid earth and geologic time/earth history. Methods include interactive lecture (e.g think-pair-share, concepTests, and in-class activities and problems), investigative cases, peer review, role playing, Socratic questioning, games, and field labs. A special section of the site devoted to using an Earth System approach provides resources with content information about the various aspects of the Earth system linked to examples of teaching this content. Examples of courses incorporating Earth systems content, and strategies for designing an Earth system course are also included. A similar section on Teaching with an Earth History approach explores geologic history as a vehicle for teaching geoscience concepts and as a framework for course design. The Starting Point site has been authored and reviewed by faculty around the country. Evaluation indicates that faculty find the examples particularly helpful both for direct implementation in their classes and for sparking ideas. The help provided for using different teaching methods makes the examples particularly useful. Examples are chosen from

  11. Factors Influencing Achievement in Undergraduate Social Science Research Methods Courses: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle, Gail

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate social science research methods courses tend to have higher than average rates of failure and withdrawal. Lack of success in these courses impedes students' progression through their degree programs and negatively impacts institutional retention and graduation rates. Grounded in adult learning theory, this mixed methods study…

  12. Evaluation of teaching methods for the company management course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Ivanuša Bezjak

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching process depends on its contents, professional and didactical realization. Successful combination of these three factors is a condition to reach a quality-based objective of the pedagogical process on one side and having successfully passed the exam on the other side. Nevertheless, teachers' aims are to encourage students to use their acquired knowledge, and develop a new viewpoint of work in their professional life. In this discussion the evaluation of didactical realization of the Company Management Course in a higher educational program for commerce is presented. The results of the questionnaire and their analysis are represented. Mentioned data is feedback information, which the teachers find useful to improve their skills in Company Management Course in the following academic year. The reader of this discussion will be able to get new ideas for modernization of his or her didactical methods of teaching.

  13. Technology-based vs. traditional instruction. A comparison of two methods for teaching the skill of performing a 12-lead ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Pamela R; Woolf, Shirley; Linde, Beverly

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM with traditional methods of teaching the skill of performing a 12-lead ECG. A randomized pre/posttest experimental design was used. Seventy-seven baccalaureate nursing students in a required, senior-level critical-care course at a large midwestern university were recruited for the study. Two teaching methods were compared. The traditional method included a self-study module, a brief lecture and demonstration by an instructor, and hands-on experience using a plastic manikin and a real 12-lead ECG machine in the learning laboratory. The second method covered the same content using an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM embedded with virtual reality and supplemented with a self-study module. There were no significant (p method, or perception of self-efficacy in performing the skill. Overall results indicated that both groups were satisfied with their instructional method and were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly on a live, simulated patient. This evaluation study is a beginning step to assess new and potentially more cost-effective teaching methods and their effects on student learning outcomes and behaviors, including the transfer of skill acquisition via a computer simulation to a real patient.

  14. A Meta-Analysis Method to Advance Design of Technology-Based Learning Tool: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Research to Understand Learning in Relation to Different Technology Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Educators design and create various technology tools to scaffold students' learning. As more and more technology designs are incorporated into learning, growing attention has been paid to the study of technology-based learning tool. This paper discusses the emerging issues, such as how can learning effectiveness be understood in relation to…

  15. Successful adaptation of a research methods course in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Leonardo; Vasquez, Diego; Loor, Cecilia; Palacio, Ana

    2017-01-01

    South America has low research productivity. The lack of a structured research curriculum is one of the barriers to conducting research. To report our experience adapting an active learning-based research methods curriculum to improve research productivity at a university in Ecuador. We used a mixed-method approach to test the adaptation of the research curriculum at Universidad Catolica Santiago de Guayaquil. The curriculum uses a flipped classroom and active learning approach to teach research methods. When adapted, it was longitudinal and had 16-hour programme of in-person teaching and a six-month follow-up online component. Learners were organized in theme groups according to interest, and each group had a faculty leader. Our primary outcome was research productivity, which was measured by the succesful presentation of the research project at a national meeting, or publication in a peer-review journal. Our secondary outcomes were knowledge and perceived competence before and after course completion. We conducted qualitative interviews of faculty members and students to evaluate themes related to participation in research. Fifty university students and 10 faculty members attended the course. We had a total of 15 groups. Both knowledge and perceived competence increased by 17 and 18 percentage points, respectively. The presentation or publication rate for the entire group was 50%. The qualitative analysis showed that a lack of research culture and curriculum were common barriers to research. A US-based curriculum can be successfully adapted in low-middle income countries. A research curriculum aids in achieving pre-determined milestones. UCSG: Universidad Catolica Santiago de Guayaquil; UM: University of Miami.

  16. Comparison of technology-based cooperative learning with technology-based individual learning in enhancing fundamental nursing proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zu-Chun

    2013-05-01

    The aim of nursing education is to prepare students with critical thinking, high interests in profession and high proficiency in patient care. Cooperative learning promotes team work and encourages knowledge building upon discussion. It has been viewed as one of the most powerful learning methods. Technology has been considered an influential tool in teaching and learning. It assists students in gathering more information to solve the problems and master skills better. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of technology-based cooperative learning with technology-based individual learning in nursing students' critical thinking in catheterization knowledge gaining, error discovering, skill acquisitions, and overall scores. This study used a pretest-posttest experimental design. Ninety-eight students were assigned randomly to one of two groups. Questionnaires and tests were collected at baseline and after completion of intervention. The results of this study showed that there was no significant difference in related catheterization skill performance. However, the remaining variables differed greatly between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS AND APPLICATIONS: This study's findings guide the researchers and instructors to use technology-based cooperative learning more appropriately. Future research should address the design of the course module and the availability of mobile devices to reach student-centered and learn on the move goals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Technology-based Model for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Williams

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Math Emporium, opened in 1997, is an open 7000-squaremeter facility with 550+ workstations arranged in an array of widely spaced hexagonal "pods", designed to support group work at the same time maintaining an academic air. We operate it 24/7 with math support personnel in attendance 12 hours per day. Students have access to online course resources at all times, from anywhere. We have used this unique asset to transform traditional classroom-based courses into technology based learning programs that have no class meetings at all. The structure of the program is very different from the conventional one, having a new set of expectations and motivations. The results include: more effective students, substantial cost savings, economies of scale and scope and a stream-lined process for creating new on-line courses.

  18. Teaching Methods Associated with Student Progress in General Education Courses. IDEA Research Report #9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Stephen L.; Li, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined which teaching methods are most highly correlated with student progress on relevant course objectives in first- and second-year (lower-level) general education courses. We specifically sought to identify teaching methods that distinguish progress made by students taking a general education course from that made by students…

  19. What Math Matters? Types of Mathematics Knowledge and Relationships to Methods Course Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajander, Ann; Holm, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a departmental focus on enhanced mathematics knowledge for teaching on overall performance in upper elementary mathematics methods courses. The study examined the effect of performance on a new course in mathematics for teaching on performance at the methods course level. In addition, the effect of performance…

  20. Application of pedagogy reflective in statistical methods course and practicum statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie, Hongki

    2017-08-01

    Subject Elementary Statistics, Statistical Methods and Statistical Methods Practicum aimed to equip students of Mathematics Education about descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. The students' understanding about descriptive and inferential statistics were important for students on Mathematics Education Department, especially for those who took the final task associated with quantitative research. In quantitative research, students were required to be able to present and describe the quantitative data in an appropriate manner, to make conclusions from their quantitative data, and to create relationships between independent and dependent variables were defined in their research. In fact, when students made their final project associated with quantitative research, it was not been rare still met the students making mistakes in the steps of making conclusions and error in choosing the hypothetical testing process. As a result, they got incorrect conclusions. This is a very fatal mistake for those who did the quantitative research. There were some things gained from the implementation of reflective pedagogy on teaching learning process in Statistical Methods and Statistical Methods Practicum courses, namely: 1. Twenty two students passed in this course and and one student did not pass in this course. 2. The value of the most accomplished student was A that was achieved by 18 students. 3. According all students, their critical stance could be developed by them, and they could build a caring for each other through a learning process in this course. 4. All students agreed that through a learning process that they undergo in the course, they can build a caring for each other.

  1. An Assessment of the Effects of Teaching Methods on Academic Performance of Students in Accounting Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosal-Akman, Nazli; Simga-Mugan, Can

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the effect of teaching methods on the academic performance of students in accounting courses. The study was carried out over two semesters at a well-known university in Turkey in principles of financial accounting and managerial accounting courses. Students enrolled in the courses were assigned to treatment and control groups.…

  2. Personality and Student Performance on Evaluation Methods Used in Business Administration Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Sawsen; Sévigny, Serge; Frenette, Éric

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to verify whether personality (Big Five model) influences performance on the evaluation methods used in business administration courses. A sample of 169 students enrolled in two compulsory undergraduate business courses responded to an online questionnaire. As it is difficult within the same course to assess…

  3. Critical Communication Pedagogy and Service Learning in a Mixed-Method Communication Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudick, C. Kyle; Golsan, Kathryn B.; Freitag, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Course: Mixed-Method Communication Research Methods. Objective: The purpose of this semester-long activity is to provide students with opportunities to cultivate mixed-method communication research skills through a social justice-informed service-learning format. Completing this course, students will be able to: recognize the unique strengths of…

  4. Fostering Civic Engagement in the Communication Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min

    2011-01-01

    Civic engagement has become an essential learning goal for institutions throughout higher education. Communication scholars employ various pedagogical tools to foster civic engagement. For instance, service learning has been shown to increase political and community engagement in courses such as family communication and public relations. Teachers…

  5. A Methods-Based Biotechnology Course for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Debopam

    2009-01-01

    This new course in biotechnology for upper division undergraduates provides a comprehensive overview of the process of drug discovery that is relevant to biopharmaceutical industry. The laboratory exercises train students in both cell-free and cell-based assays. Oral presentations by the students delve into recent progress in drug discovery.…

  6. Project- versus Lecture-Based Courses: Assessing the Role of Course Structure on Perceived Utility, Anxiety, Academic Performance, and Satisfaction in the Undergraduate Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenking, Bridget; Dodd, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Previous research suggests that undergraduate research methods students doubt the utility of course content and experience math and research anxiety. Research also suggests involving students in hands-on, applied research activities, although empirical data on the scope and nature of these activities are lacking. This study compared academic…

  7. Infusing Mathematics Content into a Methods Course: Impacting Content Knowledge for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Megan; Daane, C. J.; Giesen, Judy

    2008-01-01

    This study compared content knowledge for teaching mathematics differences between elementary pre-service teachers in a traditional versus an experimental mathematics methods course. The experimental course replaced 20 minutes of traditional methods, each class, with an intervention of elementary mathematics content. The difference between groups…

  8. Collaborating to Improve Inquiry-Based Teaching in Elementary Science and Mathematics Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Paula A.; Flessner, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of promoting inquiry-based teaching (IBT) through collaboration between a science methods course and mathematics methods course in an elementary teacher education program. During the collaboration, preservice elementary teacher (PST) candidates experienced 3 different types of inquiry as a way to foster increased…

  9. Mixed Methods: Incorporating multiple learning styles into a measurements course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallone, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    The best scientists and engineers regularly combine creative and critical skill sets. As faculty, we are responsible to provide future scientists and engineers with those skills sets. EGR 390: Engineering Measurements at Murray State University is structured to actively engage students in the processes that develop and enhance those skills. Students learn through a mix of traditional lecture and homework, active discussion of open-ended questions, small group activities, structured laboratory exercises, oral and written communications exercises, student chosen team projects, and peer evaluations. Examples of each of these activities, the skill set addressed by each activity, outcomes from and effectiveness of each activity and recommendations for future directions in the EGR 390 course as designed will be presented.

  10. Pre-Service Teachers' Opinions about the Course on Scientific Research Methods and the Levels of Knowledge and Skills They Gained in This Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Cemal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the pre-service teachers taking the Scientific Research Methods course attained basic research knowledge and skills. In addition, the impact of the process, which is followed while implementing the course, on the students' anxiety and attitude during the course is examined. Moreover, the study…

  11. The Effect of Peer Review on Student Learning Outcomes in a Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jessica A.; Silva, Tony; Ceresola, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we test the effect of in-class student peer review on student learning outcomes using a quasiexperimental design. We provide an assessment of peer review in a quantitative research methods course, which is a traditionally difficult and technical course. Data were collected from 170 students enrolled in four sections of a…

  12. Normal Science and the Paranormal: The Effect of a Scientific Method Course on Students' Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morier, Dean; Keeports, David

    1994-01-01

    A study investigated the effects of an interdisciplinary course on the scientific method on the attitudes of 34 college students toward the paranormal. Results indicated that the course substantially reduced belief in the paranormal, relative to a control group. Student beliefs in their own paranormal powers, however, did not change. (Author/MSE)

  13. Developing Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching in a Methods Course: The Case of Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Michael D.; Hillen, Amy F.; Smith, Margaret S.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes teacher learning in a teaching experiment consisting of a content-focused methods course involving the mathematical knowledge for teaching function. Prospective and practicing teachers in the course showed growth in their ability to define function, to provide examples of functions and link them to the definition, in the…

  14. Influence of Course Delivery Method and Proctoring on Performance in Introductory Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Wachenheim, Cheryl J.

    2011-01-01

    This work was published in the Review of Agricultural Economics. See Wachenheim, C.J. 2009. Final Exam Scores in Introductory Economics Courses: Effect of Course Delivery Method and Proctoring. Review of Agricultural Economics 31(3), pp. 640-652.

  15. Discussion and Outline of a Course on Methods of Teaching a Foreign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Mary

    This course, designed for instructing potential teaching assistants to teach college students a foreign language, concentrates on six major areas of preparation. A detailed outline covers: (1) course introduction and definitions, (2) applied linguistics, (3) approaches and methods, (4) testing, (5) classroom techniques, and (6) demonstrations.…

  16. Integration of Technology in Elementary Pre-Service Teacher Education: An Examination of Mathematics Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Laski, Elida

    2013-01-01

    Instructors (N = 204) of elementary mathematics methods courses completed a survey assessing the extent to which they stay informed about research related to effective uses of educational technology and the kinds and numbers of educational technologies they include in their courses. Findings indicate that, while they view educational technology…

  17. Behavioral Changes Based on a Course in Agroecology: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Kristyn; King, James; Francis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated and described student perceptions of a course in agroecology to determine if participants experienced changed perceptions and behaviors resulting from the Agroecosystems Analysis course. A triangulation validating quantitative data mixed methods approach included a written survey comprised of both quantitative and open-ended…

  18. Instructors' Growth in TPACK: Teaching Technology-Infused Methods Courses to Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, Teresa S.; Buss, Ray R.; Wetzel, Keith; Lindsey, LeeAnn

    2015-01-01

    We were concerned about teaching a stand-alone technology integration course while advocating that teachers employ full integration. Our college moved to a tech-infusion model whereby our educational technology curriculum would be incorporated in methods courses. Using a qualitative approach, we documented experiences of teacher educators who were…

  19. Practice Makes Perfect: Improving Students' Skills in Understanding and Avoiding Plagiarism with a Themed Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estow, Sarah; Lawrence, Eva K.; Adams, Kathrynn A.

    2011-01-01

    To address the issue of plagiarism, students in two undergraduate Research Methods and Analysis courses conducted, analyzed, and wrote up original research on the topic of plagiarism. Students in an otherwise identical course completed the same assignments but examined a different research topic. At the start and end of the semester, all students…

  20. Use of Web Technology and Active Learning Strategies in a Quality Assessment Methods Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Therese I.; O'Neil, Christine K.

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe and evaluate quality assessment methods in a health care course that utilized web technology and various active learning strategies. The course was judged successful by student performance, evaluations and student assessments. The instructors were pleased with the outcomes achieved and the educational pedagogy used for this…

  1. Adaptive Electronic Quizzing Method for Introductory Electrical Circuit Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Batarseh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The interactive technical electronic book, TechEBook, currently under development at the University of Central Florida, provides a useful tool for engineers and scientists through unique features compared to the most used traditional electrical circuit textbooks available in the market. TechEBook has comprised the two worlds of classical circuit books and an interactive operating platform such as laptops and desktops utilizing Java Virtual Machine operator. The TechEBook provides an interactive applets screen that holds many modules, in which each had a specific application in the self learning process. This paper describes one of the interactive techniques in the TechEBook known as, QuizMe, for evaluating the readers’ performance and the overall understanding for all subjects at any stage. The QuizMe will be displayed after each section in the TechEBook for the user to evaluate his/her understanding, which introduces the term me-learning, as a comprehensive full experience for self or individualized education. In this paper, a practical example of applying the QuizMe feature is discussed as part of a basic electrical engineering course currently given at the University of Central Florida.

  2. Simultaneous reconstruction of 3D refractive index, temperature, and intensity distribution of combustion flame by double computed tomography technologies based on spatial phase-shifting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenyan; Song, Yang; Yuan, Qun; Wulan, Tuya; Chen, Lei

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a transient multi-parameter three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction method is proposed to diagnose and visualize a combustion flow field. Emission and transmission tomography based on spatial phase-shifted technology are combined to reconstruct, simultaneously, the various physical parameter distributions of a propane flame. Two cameras triggered by the internal trigger mode capture the projection information of the emission and moiré tomography, respectively. A two-step spatial phase-shifting method is applied to extract the phase distribution in the moiré fringes. By using the filtered back-projection algorithm, we reconstruct the 3D refractive-index distribution of the combustion flow field. Finally, the 3D temperature distribution of the flame is obtained from the refractive index distribution using the Gladstone-Dale equation. Meanwhile, the 3D intensity distribution is reconstructed based on the radiation projections from the emission tomography. Therefore, the structure and edge information of the propane flame are well visualized.

  3. A Guideline of Using Case Method in Software Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Dzulaiha Aryanee Putri; Razali, Rozilawati; Shukur, Zarina

    2014-01-01

    Software Engineering (SE) education has been reported to fall short in producing high quality software engineers. In seeking alternative solutions, Case Method (CM) is regarded as having potential to solve the issue. CM is a teaching and learning (T&L) method that has been found to be effective in Social Science education. In principle,…

  4. Designing, Teaching, and Evaluating Two Complementary Mixed Methods Research Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Teaching mixed methods research is difficult. This longitudinal explanatory study examined how two classes were designed, taught, and evaluated. Curriculum, Research, and Teaching (EDCS-606) and Mixed Methods Research (EDCS-780) used a research proposal generation process to highlight the importance of the purpose, research question and…

  5. A multi-method evaluation of a training course on dual diagnosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rani, S

    2012-08-01

    A training course on dual diagnosis was developed within the Irish forensic mental health service, to bridge the gap in the lack of training on dual diagnosis in Ireland. The course was designed for service providers within mental health and addiction services. Twenty participants involving nursing, social work, police and social welfare disciplines attended the first training course. A mixed methodology research design was adapted to describe participants\\' evaluation of the training course. Data were collected using multiple methods: pre- and post-test, daily evaluation and focus group interviews. Quantitative data were analysed using the spss Version 16.0 and qualitative data were analysed thematically. Findings from the pre- and post-test suggest an increase in participants\\' knowledge of dual diagnosis and an increase in confidence in conducting groups. Daily evaluation indicates that the course content largely met participants\\' needs. Finally, three themes emerged from the focus group interview: increased confidence, the training course\\/teaching methods and personal\\/organizational challenges. This study implies that service providers within mental health and addiction services benefit from inter-professional, needs and skills based courses incorporating a variety of teaching methods. The way forward for future dual diagnosis training course developments would be working in partnership with service users and carers.

  6. Integrated lecturing within clerkship course, a new learning method in nurse-anesthesia teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Akhlaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Traditional lecture-based teaching has been long used to transit theoretical knowledge to the participants. Due to some problems of this didactic approach, some believe that integration within an active method is more valuable in nursing education. In this study, we hypothesized that integrating lecture-based teaching within clerkship course would enhance nurse-anesthesia students’ knowledge.Methods: A prospective randomized study was conducted. Twenty four students of two-year nurse-anesthesia participated in the study. All of the students received either didactic lectures or integrated lectures within clerkship course during a four-month semester of their educational curriculum. Their knowledge of anesthesia course was assessed at the end of the course using Wilcoxon Rank test.Results: The integrated method improved students’ final scores at the end of the semester (p=0.004. Moreover, their scores was much better when taxonomy-2 questions were compared (p=0.001.Conclusion: Incorporating didactic lecture within anesthesia clerkship course improves participants’ knowledge of anesthesia course.Keywords:  Anesthesia, Lecture, Knowledge, Anesthesia course, Clerkship course

  7. Beyond Euler's Method: Implicit Finite Differences in an Introductory ODE Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, Trent C.

    2011-01-01

    A typical introductory course in ordinary differential equations (ODEs) exposes students to exact solution methods. However, many differential equations must be approximated with numerical methods. Textbooks commonly include explicit methods such as Euler's and Improved Euler's. Implicit methods are typically introduced in more advanced courses…

  8. Encryption Technology based on Human Biometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The research progress of encryption technologies based on human biometrics is reviewed in this paper.The technologies that utilize human biometrics to make information encryption and identity authentication,and the technologies which combine biometrics encryption with optical encryption methods are introduced in detail.The advantages and disadvantages of these encryption systems are discussed,and the obstacles in practical applications are pointed out.Finally,the prospect of the new encryption technologies that are based on human biometrics are predicted.

  9. Method of biomechanical analysis of kicks of the main course in acrobatic rock'n'roll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrо Kysym

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: biomechanical analysis of kicks of the main course in acrobatic rock'n'roll. Material & Methods: following research methods were used: theoretical analysis and generalization of data from special scientific and methodological literature; pedagogical observation; biomechanical computer analysis; video footage of the finals of World championships, Europe championships, Cup of Ukraine (2017 in acrobatic rock and roll. Result: biomechanical analysis of the kicks of the main course by qualified athletes was conducted; kinematics characteristics (path, speed, acceleration, effort of the center of mass (CM biolinks of the athlete’s body (male partner, female partner were obtained: feet, shins, hips. The energy characteristics are determined – mechanical work and kinetic energy of the legs links when performing the kick of main course. Conclusion: it is established that the method of biomechanical analysis of the kick of the main course performance significantly affects the level of technical training of qualified athletes in acrobatic rock and roll.

  10. Connecting Past with Present: A Mixed-Methods Science Ethics Course and its Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semendeferi, Ioanna; Tsiamyrtzis, Panagiotis; Dcosta, Malcolm; Pavlidis, Ioannis

    2016-02-01

    We present a graduate science ethics course that connects cases from the historical record to present realities and practices in the areas of social responsibility, authorship, and human/animal experimentation. This content is delivered with mixed methods, including films, debates, blogging, and practicum; even the instructional team is mixed, including a historian of science and a research scientist. What really unites all of the course's components is the experiential aspect: from acting in historical debates to participating in the current scientific enterprise. The course aims to change the students' culture into one deeply devoted to the science ethics cause. To measure the sought after cultural change, we developed and validated a relevant questionnaire. Results of this questionnaire from students who took the course, demonstrate that the course had the intended effect on them. Furthermore, results of this questionnaire from controls indicate the need for cultural change in that cohort. All these quantitative results are reinforced by qualitative outcomes.

  11. Research and Teaching: Implementation of Interactive Engagement Teaching Methods in a Physical Oceanography Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiner, Louis E.; Gilman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This study measures the effects of increased faculty-student engagement on student learning, success rates, and perceptions in a Physical Oceanography course. The study separately implemented two teaching methods that had been shown to be successful in a different discipline, introductory physics. These methods were the use of interactive…

  12. Rethinking the Elementary Science Methods Course: A Case for Content, Pedagogy, and Informal Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Indicates the importance of preparing prospective teachers who will be elementary science teachers with different methods. Presents the theoretical and practical rationale for developing a constructivist-based elementary science methods course. Discusses the impact student knowledge and understanding of science and student attitudes has on…

  13. Reflections from the Application of Different Type of Activities: Special Training Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, Mihriban Hacisalihoglu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the benefits gained from "Special Training Methods II" course and the problems prospective mathematics teachers encountered with it. The case study method was used in the study. The participants in the study were 34 prospective mathematics teachers studying at a Primary School Mathematics Education…

  14. Teaching for Conceptual Change in Elementary and Secondary Science Methods Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Robin; Hewson, Peter W.; Tabachnick, B. Robert; Blomker, Kathryn B.

    1999-01-01

    Describes and analyzes two science methods courses at the elementary and secondary levels for how they addressed four ideas: (1) how students learn science; (2) how teachers teach science to students; (3) how prospective science teachers learn about the first two ideas; and (4) how methods instructors teach prospective science teachers about the…

  15. A National Assessment of Colleges and University School Health Education Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Christine M.; Price, James H.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Dake, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Across the United States, school health education programs provide a wide variety of knowledge and skills to their students. There are currently no guidelines for school health methods courses. Methods: Using a 2-wave mailing followed by a third wave e-mail reminder, a final population of 226 university school health methods…

  16. Teaching Experientially with the Madeline Hunter Method: An Application in a Marketing Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alvin C.

    2006-01-01

    Due to concerns about the disparity of learning and the high nonresponse rates encountered by student marketing research teams working with sponsors, the author adopted the Hunter Method to restructure his course. This method requires the use of a model onto which students can map their learning via guided practice as well as independent practice.…

  17. Earth Systems Science in an Integrated Science Content and Methods Course for Elementary Education Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J. A.; Allen, D. E.; Donham, R. S.; Fifield, S. J.; Shipman, H. L.; Ford, D. J.; Dagher, Z. R.

    2004-12-01

    With funding from the National Science Foundation, we have designed an integrated science content and methods course for sophomore-level elementary teacher education (ETE) majors. This course, the Science Semester, is a 15-credit sequence that consists of three science content courses (Earth, Life, and Physical Science) and a science teaching methods course. The goal of this integrated science and education methods curriculum is to foster holistic understandings of science and pedagogy that future elementary teachers need to effectively use inquiry-based approaches in teaching science in their classrooms. During the Science Semester, traditional subject matter boundaries are crossed to stress shared themes that teachers must understand to teach standards-based elementary science. Exemplary approaches that support both learning science and learning how to teach science are used. In the science courses, students work collaboratively on multidisciplinary problem-based learning (PBL) activities that place science concepts in authentic contexts and build learning skills. In the methods course, students critically explore the theory and practice of elementary science teaching, drawing on their shared experiences of inquiry learning in the science courses. An earth system science approach is ideally adapted for the integrated, inquiry-based learning that takes place during the Science Semester. The PBL investigations that are the hallmark of the Science Semester provide the backdrop through which fundamental earth system interactions can be studied. For example in the PBL investigation that focuses on energy, the carbon cycle is examined as it relates to fossil fuels. In another PBL investigation centered on kids, cancer, and the environment, the hydrologic cycle with emphasis on surface runoff and ground water contamination is studied. In a PBL investigation that has students learning about the Delaware Bay ecosystem through the story of the horseshoe crab and the biome

  18. The EURADOS-KIT training course on Monte Carlo methods for the calibration of body counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breustedt, B.; Broggio, D.; Gomez-Ros, J.M.; Lopez, M.A.; Leone, D.; Poelz, S.; Marzocchi, O.; Shutt, A.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are numerical simulation techniques that can be used to extend the scope of calibrations performed in in vivo monitoring laboratories. These methods allow calibrations to be carried out for a much wider range of body shapes and sizes than would be feasible using physical phantoms. Unfortunately, nowadays, this powerful technique is still used mainly in research institutions only. In 2013, EURADOS and the in vivo monitoring laboratory of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) organized a 3-d training course to disseminate knowledge on the application of MC methods for in vivo monitoring. It was intended as a hands-on course centered around an exercise which guided the participants step by step through the calibration process using a simplified version of KIT's equipment. Only introductory lectures on in vivo monitoring and voxel models were given. The course was based on MC codes of the MCNP family, widespread in the community. The strong involvement of the participants and the working atmosphere in the classroom as well as the formal evaluation of the course showed that the approach chosen was appropriate. Participants liked the hands-on approach and the extensive course materials on the exercise. (authors)

  19. The Application of the Socratic Method in Teaching General Education Law Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Ling-Shuang Shih

    2013-01-01

    The Socratic Method emphasizes that students obtain knowledge and test their beliefs in the process of engaging in dialogues. As general education emphasizes critical thinking, this method has much applied value, specifically in teaching law courses in general education programs. In light of different perspectives, the Socratic Method could be classified into three models: the test model, the Meno model, and the Theaetetus model. Besides, it could be classified into two approaches: the non-au...

  20. WebMail versus WebApp: Comparing Problem-Based Learning Methods in a Business Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams van Rooij, Shahron

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two Problem-Based Learning (PBL) approaches on knowledge transfer, problem-solving self-efficacy, and perceived learning gains among four intact classes of adult learners engaged in a group project in an online undergraduate business research methods course. With two of the classes using a text-only PBL workbook…

  1. Preservice Science Teacher Beliefs about Teaching and the Science Methods Courses: Exploring Perceptions of Microteaching Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaury, Ralph L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates beliefs about teaching held by preservice science teachers and their influences on self-perceived microteaching outcomes within interactive secondary science teaching methods courses. Hermeneutic methodology was used in cooperation with seven preservice science teachers (N = 7) to infer participant beliefs about teaching…

  2. Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Quality in Online Education Courses: A Mixed Methods Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick Myers, Myrell Denice

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to examine preservice teacher education candidates' perceptions of quality in online education courses within a regional comprehensive university located in Texas. The research questions also addressed students' perceived efficacy in their level of preparedness to: engage in field experiences;…

  3. Investigating the Effects of a Math-Enhanced Agricultural Teaching Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2013-01-01

    Numerous calls have been made for agricultural education to support core academic subject matter including mathematics. Previous research has shown that the incorporation of mathematics content into a teaching methods course had a positive effect on preservice teachers' mathematics content knowledge. The purpose of this study was to investigate…

  4. Cooperative Learning in Virtual Environments: The Jigsaw Method in Statistical Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Vargas, Manuel; Mondejar-Jimenez, Jose; Santamaria, Maria-Letica Meseguer; Alfaro-Navarro, Jose-Luis; Fernandez-Aviles, Gema

    2011-01-01

    This document sets out a novel teaching methodology as used in subjects with statistical content, traditionally regarded by students as "difficult". In a virtual learning environment, instructional techniques little used in mathematical courses were employed, such as the Jigsaw cooperative learning method, which had to be adapted to the…

  5. Comparing methods of classifying life courses: Sequence analysis and latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga, C.H.; Liefbroer, Aart C.; Han, Sapphire

    2017-01-01

    We compare life course typology solutions generated by sequence analysis (SA) and latent class analysis (LCA). First, we construct an analytic protocol to arrive at typology solutions for both methodologies and present methods to compare the empirical quality of alternative typologies. We apply this

  6. Comparing methods of classifying life courses: sequence analysis and latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Y.; Liefbroer, A.C.; Elzinga, C.

    2017-01-01

    We compare life course typology solutions generated by sequence analysis (SA) and latent class analysis (LCA). First, we construct an analytic protocol to arrive at typology solutions for both methodologies and present methods to compare the empirical quality of alternative typologies. We apply this

  7. Improving the Development of Student's Research Questions and Hypotheses in an Introductory Business Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangman, Lauria; Knowles, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In an introductory research methods course, students often develop research questions and hypotheses that are vague or confusing, do not contain measurable concepts, and are too narrow in scope or vision. Because of this, the final research projects often fail to provide useful information or address the overall research problem. A Lesson Study…

  8. Greening a Chemistry Teaching Methods Course at the School of Educational Studies, Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Hj Ismail, Zurida; Mohamed, Norita

    2011-01-01

    Green chemistry is the design, development and implementation of chemical products and processes to reduce or eliminate the use of sub-stances hazardous to human health and the environment. This article reports on the integration of green chemistry and sustainable development concepts (SDCs) into an existing teaching methods course for chemistry…

  9. Demonstrating the Effectiveness of an Integrated and Intensive Research Methods and Statistics Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliske, Rebecca M.; Caldwell, Tracy L.; Calin-Jageman, Robert J.; Taylor-Ritzler, Tina

    2015-01-01

    We developed a two-semester series of intensive (six-contact hours per week) behavioral research methods courses with an integrated statistics curriculum. Our approach includes the use of team-based learning, authentic projects, and Excel and SPSS. We assessed the effectiveness of our approach by examining our students' content area scores on the…

  10. Online Statistics Labs in MSW Research Methods Courses: Reducing Reluctance toward Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, William; Choi, Eunhee; Friedline, Terri

    2013-01-01

    This article presents results from an evaluation of an online statistics lab as part of a foundations research methods course for master's-level social work students. The article discusses factors that contribute to an environment in social work that fosters attitudes of reluctance toward learning and teaching statistics in research methods…

  11. An Analytical Autoethnographical Account of Using Inquiry-Based Learning in a Graduate Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Jules

    2017-01-01

    Increased emphasis is being placed on integrating research and teaching in higher education because of the numerous benefits accrued by students. In accordance, research methods courses are ubiquitously contained in curricula, ostensibly to promote research training and the research-teaching nexus. Students may not appreciate the inclusion,…

  12. Scaffolding Learning for Practitioner-Scholars: The Philosophy and Design of a Qualitative Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Julie; Samkian, Artineh

    2017-01-01

    We present our approach to a qualitative research methods course to prepare practitioner-scholars for their dissertation and independent research. We explain how an instructor's guide provides consistency and rigor, and in-class activities to scaffold learning, and helps faculty connect the content to students' out-of-school lives. We explain how…

  13. (Re)Envisioning Mathematics Education: Examining Equity and Social Justice in an Elementary Mathematics Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestler, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, I present my attempts at designing an elementary mathematics methods course to support prospective teachers in developing an understanding of how to teach all students in learning powerful mathematics. To do this, I introduced them to teaching mathematics for equity and social justice by discussing ways to support students'…

  14. Implementing a Flipped Classroom Approach in a University Numerical Methods Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Barbara M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the implementation of a "flipped classroom" approach, in an undergraduate mathematics course on numerical methods. The approach replaced all the lecture contents by instructor-made videos and was implemented in the consecutive years 2014 and 2015. The sequential case study presented here begins with an…

  15. Reframing Research on Methods Courses to Inform Mathematics Teacher Educators' Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastberg, Signe E.; Tyminski, Andrew M.; Sanchez, Wendy B.

    2017-01-01

    Calls have been made for the creation of a shared knowledge base in mathematics teacher education with the power to inform the design of scholarly inquiry and mathematics teacher educators' (MTEs) scholarly practices. Focusing on mathematics methods courses, we summarize and contribute to literature documenting activities MTEs use in mathematics…

  16. Academic Procrastination and the Performance of Graduate-Level Cooperative Groups in Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; DaRos-Voseles, Denise A.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which academic procrastination predicted the performance of cooperative groups in graduate-level research methods courses. A total of 28 groups was examined (n = 83 students), ranging in size from 2 to 5 (M = 2.96, SD = 1.10). Multiple regression analyses revealed that neither within-group mean nor within-group…

  17. Using Blended Teaching to Teach Blended Learning: Lessons Learned from Pre-Service Teachers in an Instructional Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Kristen; Farrelly, Susan Glassett

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we explore the design and delivery of a blended social studies teaching methods course to examine the elements of the blended design that pre-service teachers found most constructive. In focus groups at the completion of the course, pre-service teachers were asked to reflect on their experience in the blended course, identify the…

  18. Online Learning Perceptions and Effectiveness of Research Methods Courses in a Hispanic-Serving Higher Education Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Tsan Pierre; Cavazos Vela, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors first reviewed related literature on possible factors that influence learning between an online learning (OL) course format and a face-to-face (F2F) course format. The authors investigated OL and F2F learning perceptions and effectiveness of a graduate-level research methods course at a Hispanic-serving institution…

  19. The Partially Flipped Classroom: The Effects of Flipping a Module on "Junk Science" in a Large Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Stephanie; Eaton, Judy

    2018-01-01

    Flipped classrooms are gaining popularity, especially in psychology statistics courses. However, not all courses lend themselves to a fully flipped design, and some instructors might not want to commit to flipping every class. We tested the effectiveness of flipping just one component (a module on junk science) of a large methods course. We…

  20. Qualitative to Quantitative and Spectrum to Report: An Instrument-Focused Research Methods Course for First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alyssa C.; Boucher, Michelle A.; Pulliam, Curtis R.

    2015-01-01

    Our Introduction to Research Methods course is a first-year majors course built around the idea of helping students learn to work like chemists, write like chemists, and think like chemists. We have developed this course as a hybrid hands-on/ lecture experience built around instrumentation use and report preparation. We take the product from one…

  1. Becoming a Teacher Educator: A Self-Study of the Use of Inquiry in a Mathematics Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Katherine Ariemma

    2014-01-01

    This article details the self-study of a beginning teacher educator in her first experience in teaching a mathematics methods course. The transition from teacher to teacher educator is explored through the experience of a course focused on inquiry. Inquiry is embedded within the course from two perspectives: mathematical inquiry and teaching as…

  2. Use of audio-visual methods in radiology and physics courses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, P

    1987-03-15

    Today's medicine utilizes sophisticated equipment for radiological, biochemical and microbiological investigation procedures and analyses. Hence it is necessary that physicans have adequate scientific and technical knowledge of the apparatus they are using so that the equipment can be used in the most effective way. Partly this knowledge is obtained from science-orientated courses in the preclinical stage of the study program for medical students. To increase the motivation to study science-courses (medical physics) audio-visual methods are used to describe diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the clinical routines.

  3. The use of audio-visual methods in radiology and physics courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, P.

    1987-01-01

    Today's medicine utilizes sophisticated equipment for radiological, biochemical and microbiological investigation procedures and analyses. Hence it is necessary that physicans have adequate scientific and technical knowledge of the apparatus they are using so that the equipment can be used in the most effective way. Partly this knowledge is obtained from science-orientated courses in the preclinical stage of the study program for medical students. To increase the motivation to study science-courses (medical physics) audio-visual methods are used to describe diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the clinical routines. (orig.)

  4. Interprofessional Education and Team-Based Learning in a Research Methods Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Vicki; Finch-Guthrie, Patricia; Benz, Janet

    2017-12-18

    This article describes team-based pedagogical strategies for a hybrid, four-credit research methods course with students from nursing, exercise, and nutrition science. The research problem of concussion in football, a socially relevant and controversial topic, was used to explore interprofessional perspectives and develop shared problem solving. The course was designed using permanent teams, readiness assurance, application exercises, and peer evaluation to facilitate student achievement of competencies related to interprofessional collaboration and research application. Feedback from students, faculty, and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale was used to evaluate the learning innovation.

  5. Clinical course teaching in transport of critically ill patients: Small group methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Beigmohammadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill patient transfer is potentially risky and may be lead to morbidity and mortality. Physicians' skill is very important for safe transport. We want to evaluate the effect of clinical course teaching on the promotion of physicians' abilities in the transport of critically ill patients. In an interventional study, 320 interns, male and female, were taught about patient transfer in two groups include in one day clinical course as the small group system (n=160 and other group the lecture base learning (n=160. In the clinical course, each participant under observation of an anesthesiologist in the operation room and ICU was acquainted with mask ventilation, intubation and learned to work with a defibrillator, infusion pump, portable ventilator and pulse oximeter. In lecture group, the anesthesiologist explained the topics by video and dummy. At the end of education course, the interns’ abilities were evaluated based on checklist method and scored by the project colleague in all educational items. Three hundred twenty interns, 122 males, and 198 females; were enrolled, two groups. The clinical course training caused improvements in the interns’ knowledge and abilities in intubation and use of the defibrillator and portable ventilator vs.lecture group significantly (P<0.005. The males were better than females in laryngoscopy, but the progress of the females was significantly better than males (P=0.003. The rate of adverse events was reduced significantly after clinical course teaching (P=0.041 Clinical course teaching could promote interns' clinical competencies in the transport of critically ill patients.

  6. Cutting-edge statistical methods for a life-course approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bub, Kristen L; Ferretti, Larissa K

    2014-01-01

    Advances in research methods, data collection and record keeping, and statistical software have substantially increased our ability to conduct rigorous research across the lifespan. In this article, we review a set of cutting-edge statistical methods that life-course researchers can use to rigorously address their research questions. For each technique, we describe the method, highlight the benefits and unique attributes of the strategy, offer a step-by-step guide on how to conduct the analysis, and illustrate the technique using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. In addition, we recommend a set of technical and empirical readings for each technique. Our goal was not to address a substantive question of interest but instead to provide life-course researchers with a useful reference guide to cutting-edge statistical methods.

  7. A national assessment of colleges and university school health education methods courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Christine M; Price, James H; Telljohann, Susan K; Dake, Joseph A

    2015-04-01

    Across the United States, school health education programs provide a wide variety of knowledge and skills to their students. There are currently no guidelines for school health methods courses. Using a 2-wave mailing followed by a third wave e-mail reminder, a final population of 226 university school health methods instructors at school health preparation programs were surveyed. A total of 138 completed surveys (61%) were returned. The topics taught in school health education methods courses emphasized the most included aligning objectives, instruction, and assessment (79%); development of lesson plans (73%); teaching methods that engage learners (72%); and application of the National Health Education Standards and performance indicators (69%). The content taught and how the instructors assessed their students differed statistically by 1 or more of the following: whether they had a health education degree, had experience teaching in the public schools, and if their program was accredited. This study provides information regarding what school health methods instructors across the United States are teaching in their classes. Using this information as a baseline can serve as a guide for preservice faculty teaching a school health methods course. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  8. Comparative analysis of clustering methods for gene expression time course data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan G. Costa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work performs a data driven comparative study of clustering methods used in the analysis of gene expression time courses (or time series. Five clustering methods found in the literature of gene expression analysis are compared: agglomerative hierarchical clustering, CLICK, dynamical clustering, k-means and self-organizing maps. In order to evaluate the methods, a k-fold cross-validation procedure adapted to unsupervised methods is applied. The accuracy of the results is assessed by the comparison of the partitions obtained in these experiments with gene annotation, such as protein function and series classification.

  9. Implementation fidelity of a self-management course for epilepsy: method and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wojewodka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex interventions such as self-management courses are difficult to evaluate due to the many interacting components. The way complex interventions are delivered can influence the effect they have for patients, and can impact the interpretation of outcomes of clinical trials. Implementation fidelity evaluates whether complex interventions are delivered according to protocol. Such assessments have been used for one-to-one psychological interventions; however, the science is still developing for group interventions. Methods We developed and tested an instrument to measure implementation fidelity of a two-day self-management course for people with epilepsy, SMILE(UK. Using audio recordings, we looked at adherence and competence of course facilitators. Adherence was assessed by checklists. Competence was measured by scoring group interaction, an overall impression score and facilitator “didacticism”. To measure “didacticism”, we developed a novel way to calculate facilitator speech using computer software. Using this new instrument, implementation fidelity of SMILE(UK was assessed on three modules of the course, for 28% of all courses delivered. Results Using the instrument for adherence, scores from two independent raters showed substantial agreement with weighted Kappa of 0.67 and high percent agreement of 81.2%. For didacticism, the results from both raters were highly correlated with an intraclass coefficient of 0.97 (p  50% of scored items received the maximum of 2 points and high competence. Groups were interactive (mean score: 1.9–2.0 out of 2 and the overall impression was on average assessed as “good”. Didacticism varied from 42% to 93% of total module time and was not associated with the other competence scores. Conclusion The instrument devised to measure implementation fidelity was reproducible and easy to use. The courses for the SMILE(UK study were delivered with a good level of adherence to

  10. A Comparison of Didactic and Inquiry Teaching Methods in a Rural Community College Earth Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Margery Elizabeth

    The combination of increasing enrollment and the importance of providing transfer students a solid foundation in science calls for science faculty to evaluate teaching methods in rural community colleges. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the effectiveness of two teaching methods, inquiry teaching methods and didactic teaching methods, applied in a rural community college earth science course. Two groups of students were taught the same content via inquiry and didactic teaching methods. Analysis of quantitative data included a non-parametric ranking statistical testing method in which the difference between the rankings and the median of the post-test scores was analyzed for significance. Results indicated there was not a significant statistical difference between the teaching methods for the group of students participating in the research. The practical and educational significance of this study provides valuable perspectives on teaching methods and student learning styles in rural community colleges.

  11. A permutation-based multiple testing method for time-course microarray experiments

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    George Stephen L

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time-course microarray experiments are widely used to study the temporal profiles of gene expression. Storey et al. (2005 developed a method for analyzing time-course microarray studies that can be applied to discovering genes whose expression trajectories change over time within a single biological group, or those that follow different time trajectories among multiple groups. They estimated the expression trajectories of each gene using natural cubic splines under the null (no time-course and alternative (time-course hypotheses, and used a goodness of fit test statistic to quantify the discrepancy. The null distribution of the statistic was approximated through a bootstrap method. Gene expression levels in microarray data are often complicatedly correlated. An accurate type I error control adjusting for multiple testing requires the joint null distribution of test statistics for a large number of genes. For this purpose, permutation methods have been widely used because of computational ease and their intuitive interpretation. Results In this paper, we propose a permutation-based multiple testing procedure based on the test statistic used by Storey et al. (2005. We also propose an efficient computation algorithm. Extensive simulations are conducted to investigate the performance of the permutation-based multiple testing procedure. The application of the proposed method is illustrated using the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer developmental data. Conclusion Our method is computationally efficient and applicable for identifying genes whose expression levels are time-dependent in a single biological group and for identifying the genes for which the time-profile depends on the group in a multi-group setting.

  12. ARN Training Course on Advance Methods for Internal Dose Assessment: Application of Ideas Guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.; Puerta Yepes, N.; Gossio, S.

    2010-01-01

    Dose assessment in case of internal exposure involves the estimation of committed effective dose based on the interpretation of bioassay measurement, and the assumptions of hypotheses on the characteristics of the radioactive material and the time pattern and the pathway of intake. The IDEAS Guidelines provide a method to harmonize dose evaluations using criteria and flow chart procedures to be followed step by step. The EURADOS Working Group 7 'Internal Dosimetry', in collaboration with IAEA and Czech Technical University (CTU) in Prague, promoted the 'EURADOS/IAEA Regional Training Course on Advanced Methods for Internal Dose Assessment: Application of IDEAS Guidelines' to broaden and encourage the use of IDEAS Guidelines, which took place in Prague (Czech Republic) from 2-6 February 2009. The ARN identified the relevance of this training and asked for a place for participating on this activity. After that, the first training course in Argentina took place from 24-28 August for training local internal dosimetry experts. (authors)

  13. How a science methods course may influence the curriculum decisions of preservice teachers in the Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Sonya L.

    The purpose of this study was to examine how a science methods course in primary education might influence the curriculum decisions of preservice teachers in The Bahamas related to unit plan development on environmental science topics. Grounded in a social constructivist theoretical framework for teaching and learning science, this study explored the development of the confidence and competence of six preservice teachers to teach environmental science topics at the primary school level. A qualitative case study using action research methodologies was conducted. The perspectives of preservice teachers about the relevancy of methods used in a science methods course were examined as I became more reflective about my practice. Using constant comparative analysis, data from student-written documents and interviews as well as my field notes from class observations and reflective journaling were analyzed for emerging patterns and themes. Findings of the study indicated that while preservice teachers showed a slight increase in interest regarding learning and teaching environmental science, their primary focus during the course was learning effective teaching strategies in science on topics with which they already had familiarity. Simultaneously, I gained a deeper understanding of the usefulness of reflection in my practice. As a contribution to the complexity of learning to teach science at the primary school level, this study suggests some issues for consideration as preservice teachers are supported to utilize more of the national primary science curriculum in The Bahamas.

  14. Transforming Elementary Science Teacher Education by Bridging Formal and Informal Science Education in an Innovative Science Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedinger, Kelly; Marbach-Ad, Gili; McGinnis, J. Randy; Hestness, Emily; Pease, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    We investigated curricular and pedagogical innovations in an undergraduate science methods course for elementary education majors at the University of Maryland. The goals of the innovative elementary science methods course included: improving students' attitudes toward and views of science and science teaching, to model innovative science teaching…

  15. Comparison the Students Satisfaction of Traditional and Integrated Teaching Method in Physiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavarzi Z.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Different education methods play crucial roles to improve education quality and students’ satisfaction. In the recent years, medical education highly changes through new education methods. The aim of this study was to compare medical students’ satisfaction in traditional and integrated methods of teaching physiology course. Instrument and Methods: In the descriptive analysis study, fifty 4th semester medical students of Bojnourd University of Medical Sciences were studied in 2015. The subjects were randomly selected based on availability. Data was collected by two researcher-made questionnaires; their validity and reliability were confirmed. Questionnaure 1 was completed by the students after presenting renal and endocrinology topics via traditional and integrated methods. Questionnaire 2 was only completed by the students after presenting the course via integrated method. Data was analyzed by SPSS 16 software using dependent T test. Findings: Mean score of the students’ satisfaction in traditional method (24.80±3.48 was higher than integrated method (22.30±4.03; p<0.0001. In the integrated method, most of the students were agreed and completely agreed on telling stories from daily life (76%, sitting mode in the classroom (48%, an attribution of cell roles to the students (60%, showing movies and animations (76%, using models (84%, and using real animal parts (72% during teaching, as well as expressing clinical items to enhance learning motivations (76%. Conclusion: Favorable satisfaction of the students in traditional lecture method to understand the issues, as well as their acceptance of new and active methods of learning, show effectiveness and efficiency of traditional method and the requirement of its enhancement by the integrated methods

  16. Exploring the use of statistical process control methods to assess course changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollstedt, Ann-Marie

    This dissertation pertains to the field of Engineering Education. The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) is hosting this dissertation under a special agreement. This study was motivated by the desire to find an improved, quantitative measure of student quality that is both convenient to use and easy to evaluate. While traditional statistical analysis tools such as ANOVA (analysis of variance) are useful, they are somewhat time consuming and are subject to error because they are based on grades, which are influenced by numerous variables, independent of student ability and effort (e.g. inflation and curving). Additionally, grades are currently the only measure of quality in most engineering courses even though most faculty agree that grades do not accurately reflect student quality. Based on a literature search, in this study, quality was defined as content knowledge, cognitive level, self efficacy, and critical thinking. Nineteen treatments were applied to a pair of freshmen classes in an effort in increase the qualities. The qualities were measured via quiz grades, essays, surveys, and online critical thinking tests. Results from the quality tests were adjusted and filtered prior to analysis. All test results were subjected to Chauvenet's criterion in order to detect and remove outlying data. In addition to removing outliers from data sets, it was felt that individual course grades needed adjustment to accommodate for the large portion of the grade that was defined by group work. A new method was developed to adjust grades within each group based on the residual of the individual grades within the group and the portion of the course grade defined by group work. It was found that the grade adjustment method agreed 78% of the time with the manual ii grade changes instructors made in 2009, and also increased the correlation between group grades and individual grades. Using these adjusted grades, Statistical Process Control

  17. PERCEPTION OF ACADEMIC COURSE OF DENTISTRY ON THE USE OF PORTFOLIO AS A METHOD EVALUATIVE

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    Jacques Antonio Cavalcante Maciel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The portfolio is targeted as an innovative method of learning that allows you to record the reflections and impressions on the subject or course, promoting effective learning from experiences. This present study has aimed to describe the experience of the use of portfolios as a method of assessing learning in dental students and assess students' perceptions about the method. The research was quantitative, descriptive. The survey was conducted in dentistry course at Sobral UFC. We used a questionnaire containing ten questions to 23 students of the seventh semester of Dentistry, who attended Sobral UFC-modules of Community Health III between 2011.2 and had as one of evaluative methods to build the Portfolio. The portfolio was defined by students as a reflective report of the activities developed in theory and practice, and an evaluation method well accepted by academics. You can see that the evaluation method was efficient in its purpose, leading academics to develop a critical view on the theme developed in the classroom and that proved a facilitator in the process of teaching and learning for students.

  18. Modelling of the automatic stabilization system of the aircraft course by a fuzzy logic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamonova, T.; Syryamkin, V.; Vasilyeva, T.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of the present paper concerns the development of a fuzzy model of the system of an aircraft course stabilization. In this work modelling of the aircraft course stabilization system with the application of fuzzy logic is specified. Thus the authors have used the data taken for an ordinary passenger plane. As a result of the study the stabilization system models were realised in the environment of Matlab package Simulink on the basis of the PID-regulator and fuzzy logic. The authors of the paper have shown that the use of the method of artificial intelligence allows reducing the time of regulation to 1, which is 50 times faster than the time when standard receptions of the management theory are used. This fact demonstrates a positive influence of the use of fuzzy regulation.

  19. Method for monitoring the course of oxidation of iodide ion during radioactive iodination operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuezhong, Luo

    1986-05-01

    A micro-iodine ion selective electrode is developed to follow and monitor the course of oxidation of iodide ion during radioactive iodination operation. The experimental results indicate that this method can quickly respond to the course of oxidation if the reacting liquid is greater than 30 micro liter in volume. Therefore it can be used for accurate controlling the amount of oxidzing reagent used for the reaction, for example, the amount of chloroamine T can be reduced to 1/40 of the amount ordinarily used for the preparation of angiotonin II and insulin. The effect of pH and concentration of phosphate of the reacting liquid to the oxidation reaction of I with chloroamine T is also studied.

  20. STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE CONSTRUCTIVIST INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN A TEACHING AND LEARNING COURSE

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    Meri Fuji Siahaan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Constructivism is defined as building one’s own understanding. Constructivist instructional method requires that teacher should not be the one who informs but who facilitates the students learning. The purpose of this study is to obtain the students’ perceptions on the implementation of constructivist instructional methods in Teaching and Learning course. A survey research methodology was used with first semester students who were taking teaching and learning course as the subjects of this study. Methods of collecting data were questionnaires with open ended questions, deep interview and documentation. A qualitative analysis technique was performed on data from the survey instrument and the interview to answer 4 research questions. A descriptive analysis technique was performed on data to answer 1 research question from the survey instrument and documents. The data analysis revealed that constructivism instructional methods were clearly experienced when they were required to answer a lot of probing questions, had discussion in the classroom, had Facebook online discussions with clear guidance to do so, created ted talks and debating.The study implies that the constructivist instructional methods experienced by the students in the class help them to better understand the constructivism theory and its implications.

  1. The Application of the Socratic Method in Teaching General Education Law Courses

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    Ling-Shuang Shih

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Socratic Method emphasizes that students obtain knowledge and test their beliefs in the process of engaging in dialogues. As general education emphasizes critical thinking, this method has much applied value, specifically in teaching law courses in general education programs. In light of different perspectives, the Socratic Method could be classified into three models: the test model, the Meno model, and the Theaetetus model. Besides, it could be classified into two approaches: the non-autocratic approach and the authoritarian approach. The Socratic Method is often adopted in the teaching at law schools in the United States. In their different experiences of studying and teaching, scholars’ views over the use of the Socratic Method in teaching the law is controversial. The approvers consider that the method is effective in teaching basic legal principles. The dissenters consider that the classroom experience is humiliating to all students. However, most scholars would agree that it depends on how well teachers implement the Socratic Method so that students may benefit from the process. Comparatively, there is also possibility that these models or approaches of the Socratic Method might be properly applied in the teaching of different law courses. In United States, the Meno model is mainly applied. Besides, for students’ understanding the application of law, teachers may adopt the authoritarian approach. For students to understand the amending of law, teachers may use the non-autocratic approach. In this article, the author introduced and analyzed his teaching of law using the Socratic Method and demonstrated how useful it has been for educating students to have deliberation ability.

  2. Effectiveness of creative and productive instructional method towards students' learning achievement in steel structure course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyanto, Pribadi, Supriyanto, Bambang

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Creative & Productive instructional method compared with conventional method. This research was a quasi-experimental study involving all Civil Engineering students at Universitas Negeri Malang who were taking a course of Steel Structure. The students were randomly assigned to two different treatment groups, 30 students in experimental group and 37 students in the control group. It was assumed that these groups were equal in all relevant aspects; they differed only in the treatment administered. We used the t-test to test the hypothesis. The results of this research suggest that: (l) the use of Creative & Productive instructional method can significantly improve students' learning achievement, (2) the use of Creative & Productive instructional method can significantly improve students' retention, (3) students' motivation has a significant effect on their learning achievement, and (4) students' motivation has a significant effect on their retention.

  3. The Implementation of a New Method of Student Assessment in a Pathogenic Bacteriology Laboratory Course

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    M. Frances Hite

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A new case study method of assessment was developed to challenge advanced undergraduate biology majors interested in medical careers and allied health professions. This method is an alternative to traditional "unknown" identifications used in many microbiology laboratories. Students used various biochemical tests and selective media throughout the course to identify organisms cultured from their own bodies. In preparing a final assessment for the course, an assignment was developed to challenge the students to apply what they had learned in a medically relevant setting. Also of importance was the elimination of further biochemical testing by these students and prevention of contact with strict pathogens in this lab, due to budget and safety constraints, respectively. Each student was provided with a clinical specimen data record sheet and additional information about their "diseased patient". Students used analytical skills and critical thinking, as well as knowledge gained throughout the semester, to logically deduce the causative agent of disease in the mock patients. Students were required to: (i describe the steps in this logical deduction, (ii provide a brief overview of the characteristics and virulence factors of the organism(s, (iii investigate all disease(s caused by the organism, (iv describe symptomology of the patient in detail, and (v investigate disease treatment and prevention methods. The final assignment involved library and Internet research and culminated in a written report, which further developed writing and communication skills. Detailed descriptions of and materials for this assignment are provided along with an overall evaluation of this method after implementation.

  4. Methods of teaching the physics of climate change in undergraduate physics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Although anthropogenic climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population and, therefore, in undergraduate students of all majors. Students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). I will present my experiences and recommendations for teaching the physics of climate change to both physics and non-science majors. For non-science majors, the basic approach is to try to develop an appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research) in a course on energy and the environment. For physics majors, the pertinent material is normally covered in their undergraduate courses in modern physics and thermodynamics. Nevertheless, it helps to review the basics, e.g. introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, and blackbody radiation. I have done this in a separate elective topics course, titled ``Physics of Climate Change,'' to help the students see how their knowledge gives them insight into a topic that is very volatile (socially and politically).

  5. Comparing the Effectiveness of Blended, Semi-Flipped, and Flipped Formats in an Engineering Numerical Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Renee M.; Kaw, Autar; Besterfield-Sacre, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Blended, flipped, and semi-flipped instructional approaches were used in various sections of a numerical methods course for undergraduate mechanical engineers. During the spring of 2014, a blended approach was used; in the summer of 2014, a combination of blended and flipped instruction was used to deliver a semi-flipped course; and in the fall of…

  6. A Post-Final Assignment for the Methods Course: Providing an Incentive to Professional Growth for Future Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Michael L.

    This paper describes J. Rosengren's post-final assignment and M. Harmin's truth signs activity that were incorporated into a secondary science methods course for preservice teachers. The strength of the post-final assignment is that it is a strategy for extending student learning past the end of a course and even beyond the initial teaching…

  7. Prospective Science Teachers' Attitudes and Views of Using Journal Writing in the "Methods of Teaching Science" Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambusaidi, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of prospective science teachers at Sultan Qaboos University towards and their views about using journal writing in the Methods of Teaching Science course. Twenty-six prospective science teachers were asked to write about each topic in the course in their journal to show their understanding of…

  8. Undergraduates Discovering Folds in ''Flat'' Strata: An Unusual Undergraduate Geology Field Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolins, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduates learned to measure, map, and interpret bedding plane attitudes during a semesterlong geology field methods course in a field area where strata dip less than 98. Despite the low dip of the strata, 2011 field course students discovered a half-kilometer-wide structural basin by using digital levels and Brunton pocket transits to…

  9. The Role of Delivery Methods on the Perceived Learning Performance and Satisfaction of IT Students in Software Programming Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wu; Yen, Cherng-Jyh

    2014-01-01

    More and more information technology (IT) programs are offering distance learning courses to their students. However, to date, there are a very limited number of published articles in the IT education literature that compare how different methods of delivering distance course relate to undergraduate students' learning outcomes in IT software…

  10. Assessment of Teaching Methods and Critical Thinking in a Course for Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Angela; Ruzhitskaya, L.; Whittington, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Ability to think critically is a key ingredient to the scientific mindset. Students who take science courses may or may not be predisposed to critical thinking - the ability to evaluate information analytically. Regardless of their initial stages, students can significantly improve their critical thinking through learning and practicing their reasoning skills, critical assessments, conducting and reflecting on observations and experiments, building their questioning and communication skills, and through the use of other techniques. While, there are several of teaching methods that may help to improve critical thinking, there are only a few assessment instruments that can help in evaluating the efficacy of these methods. Critical thinking skills and improvement in those skills are notoriously difficult to measure. Assessments that are based on multiple-choice questions demonstrate students’ final decisions but not their thinking processes. In addition, during the course of studies students may develop subject-based critical thinking while not being able to extend the skills to the general critical thinking. As such, we wanted to design and conduct a study on efficacy of several teaching methods in which we would learn how students’ improve their thinking processes within a science discipline as well as in everyday life situations. We conducted a study among 20 astronomy, physics and geology majors-- both graduate and undergraduate students-- enrolled in our Solar System Science course (mostly seniors and early graduate students) at the University of Missouri. We used the Ennis-Weir Critical Thinking Essay test to assess students’ general critical thinking and, in addition, we implemented our own subject-based critical thinking assessment. Here, we present the results of this study and share our experience on designing a subject-based critical thinking assessment instrument.

  11. Embedding Probeware Technology in the Context of Ocean Acidification in Elementary Science Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Todd I.; Rye, James A.; Luna, Melissa J.

    2017-12-01

    Research indicates that preservice teacher (PT) education programs can positively impact perceptions of scientific probeware use in K-8 environments. Despite the potential of probeware to improve science instruction and student engagement, its use in elementary education has been limited. Sixty-seven PT enrolled across three sections of an elementary science methods course participated in a mixed-methods study through which they utilized probeware in a thematic experience on ocean acidification. One-way repeated measures ANOVA of pre and post survey data measuring subscales of utility, ability, and intent to use probeware demonstrated a statistically significant increase with medium to large effect sizes for all subscales across all sections (p<0.01,{η}_p^2=0.384;p<0.001,{η}_p^2=0.517;p<0.001,{η}_p^2=0.214) . Analysis of reflective journals revealed over 60% felt the multiple capabilities (notably graphing) of probeware make it a useful classroom tool, and almost one-half believed that its use makes science more enjoyable and engaging. Mapping of the unitized data from the journals on the Next Generation Science Standards suggested that probeware use especially engages learners in planning and carrying out investigations and in analyzing and interpreting data. Journals also revealed that despite PT having prior experience with probeware in science courses, its use in their future elementary classroom is conditional on having a positive experience with probeware in a science methods course. Further, embedding a probeware experience in a unit on ocean acidification provides PT with strategies for addressing climate change and engaging in argument from evidence.

  12. Sustainable Industrial Production – undergraduate course on methods and tools in industry’s environmental work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    assessment and eco-design, process integration and pinch analysis, and finally a case study of own preference. All project work is done on real industry projects, and the project team gets close encounter with the companies and constructive critique during their work allowing them to incorporate the critique......The course aims at teaching key methods and tools for industry’s environmental work. It focuses on operational tools targeted for environmental improvements at various levels of intervention: the product, the production, the process and the emission. At these intervention levels, engineering...... disciplines are taught within the areas of: Management and planning, System description and inventory, Analysis and assessment, and Design & construction. The student is given the overview and holistic understanding of existing methods and tools and their field of application. Some methods and tools...

  13. Visualizing Volume to Help Students Understand the Disk Method on Calculus Integral Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasman, F.; Ahmad, D.

    2018-04-01

    Many research shown that students have difficulty in understanding the concepts of integral calculus. Therefore this research is interested in designing a classroom activity integrated with design research method to assist students in understanding the integrals concept especially in calculating the volume of rotary objects using disc method. In order to support student development in understanding integral concepts, this research tries to use realistic mathematical approach by integrating geogebra software. First year university student who takes a calculus course (approximately 30 people) was chosen to implement the classroom activity that has been designed. The results of retrospective analysis show that visualizing volume of rotary objects using geogebra software can assist the student in understanding the disc method as one way of calculating the volume of a rotary object.

  14. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an updated review of what is known about the performance of technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) and their determinants. This review brings together papers published from 1990 to 2012 in top-rated academic journals within nearly all fields...

  15. Projective methodical system of students training to the course «History of computer science»

    OpenAIRE

    С А Виденин

    2008-01-01

    Components of teachers readiness to professional activity are described in the item. The projective methods of training to a course « History of computer science « in favour to improve professional grounding of students' are considered.

  16. Evaluation of Traditional and Technology-Based Grocery Store Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jennifer; Litchfield, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background: A literature gap exists for grocery interventions with realistic resource expectations; few technology-based publications exist, and none document traditional comparison. Purpose: Compare grocery store traditional aisle demonstrations (AD) and technology-based (TB) nutrition education treatments. Methods: A quasi-experimental 4-month…

  17. A method to identify differential expression profiles of time-course gene data with Fourier transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehee; Ogden, Robert Todd; Kim, Haseong

    2013-10-18

    Time course gene expression experiments are an increasingly popular method for exploring biological processes. Temporal gene expression profiles provide an important characterization of gene function, as biological systems are both developmental and dynamic. With such data it is possible to study gene expression changes over time and thereby to detect differential genes. Much of the early work on analyzing time series expression data relied on methods developed originally for static data and thus there is a need for improved methodology. Since time series expression is a temporal process, its unique features such as autocorrelation between successive points should be incorporated into the analysis. This work aims to identify genes that show different gene expression profiles across time. We propose a statistical procedure to discover gene groups with similar profiles using a nonparametric representation that accounts for the autocorrelation in the data. In particular, we first represent each profile in terms of a Fourier basis, and then we screen out genes that are not differentially expressed based on the Fourier coefficients. Finally, we cluster the remaining gene profiles using a model-based approach in the Fourier domain. We evaluate the screening results in terms of sensitivity, specificity, FDR and FNR, compare with the Gaussian process regression screening in a simulation study and illustrate the results by application to yeast cell-cycle microarray expression data with alpha-factor synchronization.The key elements of the proposed methodology: (i) representation of gene profiles in the Fourier domain; (ii) automatic screening of genes based on the Fourier coefficients and taking into account autocorrelation in the data, while controlling the false discovery rate (FDR); (iii) model-based clustering of the remaining gene profiles. Using this method, we identified a set of cell-cycle-regulated time-course yeast genes. The proposed method is general and can be

  18. Nurse practitioner preferences for distance education methods related to learning style, course content, and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrusyszyn, M A; Cragg, C E; Humbert, J

    2001-04-01

    The relationships among multiple distance delivery methods, preferred learning style, content, and achievement was sought for primary care nurse practitioner students. A researcher-designed questionnaire was completed by 86 (71%) participants, while 6 engaged in follow-up interviews. The results of the study included: participants preferred learning by "considering the big picture"; "setting own learning plans"; and "focusing on concrete examples." Several positive associations were found: learning on own with learning by reading, and setting own learning plans; small group with learning through discussion; large group with learning new things through hearing and with having learning plans set by others. The most preferred method was print-based material and the least preferred method was audio tape. The most suited method for content included video teleconferencing for counseling, political action, and transcultural issues; and video tape for physical assessment. Convenience, self-direction, and timing of learning were more important than delivery method or learning style. Preferred order of learning was reading, discussing, observing, doing, and reflecting. Recommended considerations when designing distance courses include a mix of delivery methods, specific content, outcomes, learner characteristics, and state of technology.

  19. Delivery of a urology online course using Moodle versus didactic lectures methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Ikari, Osamu; Taha-Neto, Khaled A; Gugliotta, Antonio; Denardi, Fernandes

    2015-02-01

    To subjectively and objectively compare an accessible interactive electronic library using Moodle with lectures for urology teaching of medical students. Forty consecutive fourth-year medical students and one urology teacher were exposed to two teaching methods (4 weeks each) in the form of problem-based learning: - lectures and - student-centered group discussion based on Moodle (modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment) full time online delivered (24/7) with video surgeries, electronic urology cases and additional basic principles of the disease process. All 40 students completed the study. While 30% were moderately dissatisfied with their current knowledge base, online learning course delivery using Moodle was considered superior to the lectures by 86% of the students. The study found the following observations: (1) the increment in learning grades ranged from 7.0 to 9.7 for students in the online Moodle course compared to 4.0-9.6 to didactic lectures; (2) the self-reported student involvement in the online course was characterized as large by over 60%; (3) the teacher-student interaction was described as very frequent (50%) and moderately frequent (50%); and (4) more inquiries and requisitions by students as well as peer assisting were observed from the students using the Moodle platform. The Moodle platform is feasible and effective, enthusing medical students to learn, improving immersion in the urology clinical rotation and encouraging the spontaneous peer assisted learning. Future studies should expand objective evaluations of knowledge acquisition and retention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of participatory teaching methods in undergraduate medical students' learning along the first academic courses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gal

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area (EHEA is an opportunity to redesign medical education. Academic training is now focused on acquiring not only knowledge, but also those competencies critical to face complex professional scenarios. Together with re-evaluating traditional teaching methods, EHEA has forced a technological shift in the way we teach. By critically assessing the impact of novel teaching methodologies, we can better define biomedical education demands. Here, we address this question on a sample of medical students instructed in basic subjects along the first two academic courses. Two hundred and one medical students participated in the study (n = 128 first year, n = 73 second year. Quantitative (conventional survey statistics and qualitative (open coding approaches were combined to analyze data from surveys, confidential questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and open discussion. First year medical students rated more positively the use of participatory methodologies than second year students. A major drawback is detected in the perceived workload. Active teaching methodologies show a strong reliance on their time of implementation for medical students, a key aspect to be considered in the design of integrative participatory curricula along the first academic courses.

  1. Evaluation of participatory teaching methods in undergraduate medical students' learning along the first academic courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Beatriz; Rubio, Margarita; Iglesias, Eva; González, Purificación

    2018-01-01

    The European Higher Education Area (EHEA) is an opportunity to redesign medical education. Academic training is now focused on acquiring not only knowledge, but also those competencies critical to face complex professional scenarios. Together with re-evaluating traditional teaching methods, EHEA has forced a technological shift in the way we teach. By critically assessing the impact of novel teaching methodologies, we can better define biomedical education demands. Here, we address this question on a sample of medical students instructed in basic subjects along the first two academic courses. Two hundred and one medical students participated in the study (n = 128 first year, n = 73 second year). Quantitative (conventional survey statistics) and qualitative (open coding) approaches were combined to analyze data from surveys, confidential questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and open discussion. First year medical students rated more positively the use of participatory methodologies than second year students. A major drawback is detected in the perceived workload. Active teaching methodologies show a strong reliance on their time of implementation for medical students, a key aspect to be considered in the design of integrative participatory curricula along the first academic courses.

  2. Designing and Implementing a Computational Methods Course for Upper-level Undergraduates and Postgraduates in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Douglas, A.; Hansen, Z.

    2017-12-01

    In the modern computing age, scientists must utilize a wide variety of skills to carry out scientific research. Programming, including a focus on collaborative development, has become more prevalent in both academic and professional career paths. Faculty in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Wisconsin—Madison recognized this need and recently approved a new course offering for undergraduates and postgraduates in computational methods that was first held in Spring 2017. Three programming languages were covered in the inaugural course semester and development themes such as modularization, data wrangling, and conceptual code models were woven into all of the sections. In this presentation, we will share successes and challenges in developing a research project-focused computational course that leverages hands-on computer laboratory learning and open-sourced course content. Improvements and changes in future iterations of the course based on the first offering will also be discussed.

  3. An Educational and Entrepreneurial Ecosystem to Actualize Technology-Based Social Ventures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Khanjan; Zappe, Sarah; Brannon, Mary Lynn; Zhao, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship (HESE) Program engages students and faculty across Penn State in the rigorous research, design, field-testing, and launch of technology-based social enterprises that address global development challenges. HESE ventures are embedded in a series of five courses that integrate learning,…

  4. Evaluation of medical students of teacher-based and student-based teaching methods in Infectious diseases course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, I; Aghamolaei, T; Hosseini-Parandar, F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, medical education has changed dramatically and many medical schools in the world have been trying for expand modern training methods. Purpose of the research is to appraise the medical students of teacher-based and student-based teaching methods in Infectious diseases course, in the Medical School of Hormozgan Medical Sciences University. Methods: In this interventional study, a total of 52 medical scholars that used Section in this Infectious diseases course were included. About 50% of this course was presented by a teacher-based teaching method (lecture) and 50% by a student-based teaching method (problem-based learning). The satisfaction of students regarding these methods was assessed by a questionnaire and a test was used to measure their learning. information are examined with using SPSS 19 and paired t-test. Results: The satisfaction of students of student-based teaching method (problem-based learning) was more positive than their satisfaction of teacher-based teaching method (lecture).The mean score of students in teacher-based teaching method was 12.03 (SD=4.08) and in the student-based teaching method it was 15.50 (SD=4.26) and where is a considerable variation among them (p<0.001). Conclusion: The use of the student-based teaching method (problem-based learning) in comparison with the teacher-based teaching method (lecture) to present the Infectious diseases course led to the student satisfaction and provided additional learning opportunities.

  5. Implementing a flipped classroom approach in a university numerical methods mathematics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Barbara M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes and analyses the implementation of a 'flipped classroom' approach, in an undergraduate mathematics course on numerical methods. The approach replaced all the lecture contents by instructor-made videos and was implemented in the consecutive years 2014 and 2015. The sequential case study presented here begins with an examination of the attitudes of the 2014 cohort to the approach in general as well as analysing their use of the videos. Based on these responses, the instructor makes a number of changes (for example, the use of 'cloze' summary notes and the introduction of an extra, optional tutorial class) before repeating the 'flipped classroom' approach the following year. The attitudes to the approach and the video usage of the 2015 cohort are then compared with the 2014 cohort and further changes that could be implemented for the next cohort are suggested.

  6. A science methods course in a professional development school context: A case study of student teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Linda Diane

    The purpose of this case study was to explore how six student teachers constructed their personal understanding about teaching science to elementary students in the context of a professional development school (PDS). The science methods course was one of five university courses that they attended at the PDS site. The participants spent the remainder of the school day in an assigned classroom where they assisted the classroom teacher in a paraprofessional role. This study was an attempt to determine the knowledge that the participants constructed of science instruction and the school during the preservice semester of their PDS experience and what knowledge was transferred into their student teaching practices. The methodology selected was qualitative. A case study was conducted to determine the constructs of the participants. Data collection included documents concerning the PDS school and personal artifacts of the student teachers. Student teachers, cooperating teachers, and administrators were interviewed. The student teachers were also observed teaching. Triangulation was achieved with the use of multiple data sources, a reflexive journal, and peer debriefers. A cross case comparison was used to identify issues salient to the research questions. The PDS context immediately challenged the participants' prior conceptions about how children learn and should be instructed. Participants believed that the situational knowledge constructed during the PDS semester contributed to their self-confidence during student teaching. The instructional emphasis on standardized tests in the PDS and the limited emphasis on science curriculum and instruction constructed an image of science as a minor component in the elementary curriculum. The student teachers were able to transfer knowledge of inquiry-based instructional strategies, as modeled and practiced in their science methods course, into their science lesson during student teaching. One student teacher used inquiry

  7. A first course in ordinary differential equations analytical and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Hermann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a modern introduction to analytical and numerical techniques for solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Contrary to the traditional format—the theorem-and-proof format—the book is focusing on analytical and numerical methods. The book supplies a variety of problems and examples, ranging from the elementary to the advanced level, to introduce and study the mathematics of ODEs. The analytical part of the book deals with solution techniques for scalar first-order and second-order linear ODEs, and systems of linear ODEs—with a special focus on the Laplace transform, operator techniques and power series solutions. In the numerical part, theoretical and practical aspects of Runge-Kutta methods for solving initial-value problems and shooting methods for linear two-point boundary-value problems are considered. The book is intended as a primary text for courses on the theory of ODEs and numerical treatment of ODEs for advanced undergraduate and early graduate students. It is assumed t...

  8. Are Statistics Labs Worth the Effort?--Comparison of Introductory Statistics Courses Using Different Teaching Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose H. Guardiola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the academic performance of students in three similar elementary statistics courses taught by the same instructor, but with the lab component differing among the three. One course is traditionally taught without a lab component; the second with a lab component using scenarios and an extensive use of technology, but without explicit coordination between lab and lecture; and the third using a lab component with an extensive use of technology that carefully coordinates the lab with the lecture. Extensive use of technology means, in this context, using Minitab software in the lab section, doing homework and quizzes using MyMathlab ©, and emphasizing interpretation of computer output during lectures. Initially, an online instrument based on Gardner’s multiple intelligences theory, is given to students to try to identify students’ learning styles and intelligence types as covariates. An analysis of covariance is performed in order to compare differences in achievement. In this study there is no attempt to measure difference in student performance across the different treatments. The purpose of this study is to find indications of associations among variables that support the claim that statistics labs could be associated with superior academic achievement in one of these three instructional environments. Also, this study tries to identify individual student characteristics that could be associated with superior academic performance. This study did not find evidence of any individual student characteristics that could be associated with superior achievement. The response variable was computed as percentage of correct answers for the three exams during the semester added together. The results of this study indicate a significant difference across these three different instructional methods, showing significantly higher mean scores for the response variable on students taking the lab component that was carefully coordinated with

  9. Methods for acquiring data on terrain geomorphology, course geometry and kinematics of competitors' runs in alpine skiing: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Włodzimierz S; Giovanis, Vassilis; Aschenbrenner, Piotr; Kiriakis, Vaios; Suchanowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at the description and comparison of methods of topographic analysis of racing courses at all disciplines of alpine skiing sports for the purposes of obtaining: terrain geomorphology (snowless and with snow), course geometry, and competitors' runs. The review presents specific methods and instruments according to the order of their historical appearance as follows: (1) azimuth method with the use of a compass, tape and goniometer instruments; (2) optical method with geodetic theodolite, laser and photocells; (3) triangulation method with the aid of a tape and goniometer; (4) image method with the use of video cameras; (5) differential global positioning system and carrier phase global positioning system methods. Described methods were used at homologation procedure, at training sessions, during competitions of local level and during International Ski Federation World Championships or World Cups. Some methods were used together. In order to provide detailed data on course setting and skiers' running it is recommended to analyse course geometry and kinematics data of competitors' running for all important competitions.

  10. Research methods courses as a means of developing academic general practice. Fifteen years' experience from Sweden and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Anders; Beckman, Anders; Hansson, Eva Ekvall; Merlo, Juan; Månsson, Nils-Ove

    2005-09-01

    Since 1989, the authors have given courses in research methodology, and these courses are now given at six venues in southern Sweden, as well as in Denmark. The course corresponds to half a year's full-time study, with half the time devoted to lectures and studies of literature, while the rest is spent on an individual project under supervision. To enable part-time study, the course extends over 1(1/2) years. In 15 years roughly 1000 people, mainly physicians, have been given training in basic research methods. The course model has been appreciated by clinically active colleagues, who have been able to attend a course and simultaneously work with patients. Among the GPs in the region, one in five has taken this course, and one in five has then gone on to start formal PhD studies. The authors have thus succeeded in their goal of giving basic scientific schooling to many physicians and recruiting some for further research.

  11. The transfer of learning process: From an elementary science methods course to classroom instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Nina Leann

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore the transfer of learning process in student teachers. This was carried out by focusing on information learned from an elementary science methods and how it was transferred into classroom instruction during student teaching. Participants were a purposeful sampling of twelve elementary education student teachers attending a public university in north Mississippi. Factors that impacted the transfer of learning during lesson planning and implementation were sought. The process of planning and implementing a ten-day science instructional unit during student teaching was examined through lesson plan documentation, in-depth individual interviews, and two focus group interviews. Narratives were created to describe the participants' experiences as well as how they plan for instruction and consider science pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). Categories and themes were then used to build explanations applying to the research questions. The themes identified were Understanding of Science PCK, Minimalism, Consistency in the Teacher Education Program, and Emphasis on Science Content. The data suggested that the participants lack in their understanding of science PCK, took a minimalistic approach to incorporating science into their ten-day instructional units, experienced inconsistencies in the teacher education program, and encountered a lack of emphasis on science content in their field experience placements. The themes assisted in recognizing areas in the elementary science methods courses, student teaching field placements, and university supervision in need of modification.

  12. Prospective Foreign Language Teachers' Preference of Teaching Methods for the Language Acquisition Course in Turkish Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    GüvendIr, Emre

    2013-01-01

    Considering the significance of taking student preferences into account while organizing teaching practices, the current study explores which teaching method prospective foreign language teachers mostly prefer their teacher to use in the language acquisition course. A teaching methods evaluation form that includes six commonly used teaching…

  13. Moving toward Positive Mathematics Beliefs and Developing Socio-Mathematical Authority: Urban Preservice Teachers in Mathematics Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Rupam; Gujarati, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how preservice elementary teachers change their negative beliefs toward mathematics into positive ones after taking a mathematics methods course that follows the Concrete-Pictorial-Abstract (CPA) instructional method. Also explored is the relationship between those beliefs and sociomathematical authority. By administering…

  14. A comparative study of traditional lecture methods and interactive lecture methods in introductory geology courses for non-science majors at the college level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundley, Stacey A.

    In recent years there has been a national call for reform in undergraduate science education. The goal of this reform movement in science education is to develop ways to improve undergraduate student learning with an emphasis on developing more effective teaching practices. Introductory science courses at the college level are generally taught using a traditional lecture format. Recent studies have shown incorporating active learning strategies within the traditional lecture classroom has positive effects on student outcomes. This study focuses on incorporating interactive teaching methods into the traditional lecture classroom to enhance student learning for non-science majors enrolled in introductory geology courses at a private university. Students' experience and instructional preferences regarding introductory geology courses were identified from survey data analysis. The information gained from responses to the questionnaire was utilized to develop an interactive lecture introductory geology course for non-science majors. Student outcomes were examined in introductory geology courses based on two teaching methods: interactive lecture and traditional lecture. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups based on the student outcomes and teaching methods. Incorporating interactive lecture methods did not statistically improve student outcomes when compared to traditional lecture teaching methods. However, the responses to the survey revealed students have a preference for introductory geology courses taught with lecture and instructor-led discussions and students prefer to work independently or in small groups. The results of this study are useful to individuals who teach introductory geology courses and individuals who teach introductory science courses for non-science majors at the college level.

  15. Evaluation of an advanced physical diagnosis course using consumer preferences methods: the nominal group technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Joshua; Castiglioni, Analia; Kraemer, Ryan R; Massie, F Stanford; Morris, Jason L; Rodriguez, Martin; Russell, Stephen W; Shaneyfelt, Terrance; Willett, Lisa L; Estrada, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    Current evaluation tools of medical school courses are limited by the scope of questions asked and may not fully engage the student to think on areas to improve. The authors sought to explore whether a technique to study consumer preferences would elicit specific and prioritized information for course evaluation from medical students. Using the nominal group technique (4 sessions), 12 senior medical students prioritized and weighed expectations and topics learned in a 100-hour advanced physical diagnosis course (4-week course; February 2012). Students weighted their top 3 responses (top = 3, middle = 2 and bottom = 1). Before the course, 12 students identified 23 topics they expected to learn; the top 3 were review sensitivity/specificity and high-yield techniques (percentage of total weight, 18.5%), improving diagnosis (13.8%) and reinforce usual and less well-known techniques (13.8%). After the course, students generated 22 topics learned; the top 3 were practice and reinforce advanced maneuvers (25.4%), gaining confidence (22.5%) and learn the evidence (16.9%). The authors observed no differences in the priority of responses before and after the course (P = 0.07). In a physical diagnosis course, medical students elicited specific and prioritized information using the nominal group technique. The course met student expectations regarding education of the evidence-based physical examination, building skills and confidence on the proper techniques and maneuvers and experiential learning. The novel use for curriculum evaluation may be used to evaluate other courses-especially comprehensive and multicomponent courses.

  16. [Application of diversified teaching methods to improve the teaching effects in the course of oral histology and pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Lei; Wang, Li-zhen; Hu, Yu-hua; Zhang, Chun-ye; Li, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Oral histology and pathology is one of the most important courses in stomatological education which works as a bridge between basic medical courses and clinical courses of oral science. The knowledge of oral histopathology may help the students to correctly understand the histogenesis and development of oral diseases and provide the information for correct treatment and prevention. In order to make the students grasp the necessary basic theories, increase the interest in learning, and improve the teaching effect, we explored a diversified teaching system which included diverse teaching modes, online courses and courseware construction. The application of this system offered the interaction between students and teachers and combination of classes with the internet, and made the boring pathological knowledge be associated with clinical practice. These diversified teaching methods had been used in practice and obtained good teaching results.

  17. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Susanne J; Toberer, Matthias; Keis, Oliver; Tolks, Daniel; Fischer, Martin R; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC) method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: to analyse the motivation and satisfaction of the students in a biochemistry seminar through the use of the e-learning-based IC method, to investigate the acceptance against the IC teaching method in biochemistry, and to compare the learning success achieved using the IC approach with that of a traditional course. We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee "New Media" [30] in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students), but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the

  18. Improving Learning through Performance Assessment in a Social Studies Methods Course for Preservice Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaman, Heather; Kistler, Sara Lamb

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how two instructors used assessment data to improve an undergraduate course, Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary Classroom. This entailed revising the core assignment for the course--the creation of a thematic unit of instruction--and developing a scoring guide to assess teacher candidates' performance. Data collected…

  19. Learning Might Not Equal Liking: Research Methods Course Changes Knowledge But Not Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, O. J.; Lewandowski, Gary W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Students completed surveys at the beginning and end of a sophomore-level course on research and statistics. We hypothesized that the course would produce advances in knowledge of research and statistics and that those changes would be accompanied by more favorable attitudes toward the subject matter. Results showed that knowledge did increase…

  20. The comparison of two different embryo culture methods in the course of in vitro fertilization program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Grzechocinska

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare two different embryo culture methods in the course of in vitro fertilization program by means of fertilization rate, embryo development, total time and cost. 98 patients undergoing assisted reproduction procedures due to infertility were analyzed. The inclusion criteria for the study: first IVF-ET program, at least 10 MII oocytes, no indications for ICSI. Oocytes were divided into two study groups: group A- open culture (oocytes placed in four-well dishes together, then inseminated and cultured in successive wells and group B - a closed culture (oocytes placed in microdroplets, each embryo cultured separately. The fertilization rate was assessed around 18 hours from insemination. The embryos were classified into four classes. The best embryos were chosen for transfer. In the group A the fertilization rate obtained was lower than in group B (68% vs. 78%, respectively. The microdroplet culture required more time on the insemination day and on the second day of culture, while the four-well dish method required more time on the first day of culture and on the day of transfer. On analyzing the total cost of the above procedures (MI medium and oil costs it occurred that the microdroplet culture was more expensive than the four-well dish method (due to the intake of paraffin oil. However, the difference was of no practical importance. In the conclusion, microdroplet culture gives a higher fertilization rate than four-well dish culture, probably due to a homogenous sperm distribution. Despite the differences in time outside the incubator and laboratory expenses (which are after all insignificant microdroplet culture allows a better control over the embryo development. The embryos of best developmental potential can therefore be chosen for ET.

  1. Impact of Including Authentic Inquiry Experiences in Methods Courses for Pre-Service Secondary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.; Elfring, L.; Novodvorsky, I.; Talanquer, V.; Quintenz, J.

    2007-12-01

    Science education reform documents universally call for students to have authentic and meaningful experiences using real data in the context of their science education. The underlying philosophical position is that students analyzing data can have experiences that mimic actual research. In short, research experiences that reflect the scientific spirit of inquiry potentially can: prepare students to address real world complex problems; develop students' ability to use scientific methods; prepare students to critically evaluate the validity of data or evidence and of the consequent interpretations or conclusions; teach quantitative skills, technical methods, and scientific concepts; increase verbal, written, and graphical communication skills; and train students in the values and ethics of working with scientific data. However, it is unclear what the broader pre-service teacher preparation community is doing in preparing future teachers to promote, manage, and successful facilitate their own students in conducting authentic scientific inquiry. Surveys of undergraduates in secondary science education programs suggests that students have had almost no experiences themselves in conducting open scientific inquiry where they develop researchable questions, design strategies to pursue evidence, and communicate data-based conclusions. In response, the College of Science Teacher Preparation Program at the University of Arizona requires all students enrolled in its various science teaching methods courses to complete an open inquiry research project and defend their findings at a specially designed inquiry science mini-conference at the end of the term. End-of-term surveys show that students enjoy their research experience and believe that this experience enhances their ability to facilitate their own future students in conducting open inquiry.

  2. Integrating Inquiry-Based Science and Education Methods Courses in a "Science Semester" for Future Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J.; Fifield, S.; Allen, D.; Brickhouse, N.; Dagher, Z.; Ford, D.; Shipman, H.

    2001-05-01

    In this NSF-funded project we will adapt problem-based learning (PBL) and other inquiry-based approaches to create an integrated science and education methods curriculum ("science semester") for elementary teacher education majors. Our goal is to foster integrated understandings of science and pedagogy that future elementary teachers need to effectively use inquiry-based approaches in their classrooms. This project responds to calls to improve science education for all students by making preservice teachers' experiences in undergraduate science courses more consistent with reforms at the K-12 level. The involved faculty teach three science courses (biology, earth science, physical science) and an elementary science education methods course that are degree requirements for elementary teacher education majors. Presently, students take the courses in variable sequences and at widely scattered times. Too many students fail to appreciate the value of science courses to their future careers as teachers, and when they reach the methods course in the junior year they often retain little of the science content studied earlier. These episodic encounters with science make it difficult for students to learn the content, and to translate their understandings of science into effective, inquiry-based teaching strategies. To encourage integrated understandings of science concepts and pedagogy we will coordinate the science and methods courses in a junior-year science semester. Traditional subject matter boundaries will be crossed to stress shared themes that teachers must understand to teach standards-based elementary science. We will adapt exemplary approaches that support both learning science and learning how to teach science. Students will work collaboratively on multidisciplinary PBL activities that place science concepts in authentic contexts and build learning skills. "Lecture" meetings will be large group active learning sessions that help students understand difficult

  3. Summary of vulnerability related technologies based on machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Zhihao; Jia, Qiong

    2018-04-01

    As the scale of information system increases by an order of magnitude, the complexity of system software is getting higher. The vulnerability interaction from design, development and deployment to implementation stages greatly increases the risk of the entire information system being attacked successfully. Considering the limitations and lags of the existing mainstream security vulnerability detection techniques, this paper summarizes the development and current status of related technologies based on the machine learning methods applied to deal with massive and irregular data, and handling security vulnerabilities.

  4. A Mixed Methods Study of Teach for America Teachers' Mathematical Beliefs, Knowledge, and Classroom Teaching Practices during a Reform-Based University Mathematics Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swars, Susan Lee

    2015-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the mathematical preparation of elementary teachers in a Teach for America (TFA) program, focal participants for whom there is scant extant research. Data collection occurred before and after a university mathematics methods course, with a particular focus on the participants' (n = 22) mathematical beliefs,…

  5. Planning, implementation and analysis of an assessment method of an industrial engineering course grounded on problem based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Pereira Pinto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a highly competitive market, companies need increasingly skilled human resources, especially when it comes to engineering. Universities, therefore, play an important role in this scenario, while training future professionals of the country. However, in this task, the institutions are faced with the challenge of attracting and working with young people of Generation Y, which have characteristics and needs that are not met by traditional teaching methods. Problem-Based Learning (PBL is an approach evolved in order to study and develop educational alternatives that meet the needs of businesses as well as the new student profile. In addition, actively teaching is not a simple task and becomes more complex when it refers to assess the knowledge gained through this method. Thus, this paper presents the planning, implementation and the assessment method adopted in a course of Industrial Engineering at the Federal University of Itajubá based on PBL. For this study it was adopted the action research method, in which the authors actively participated in all stages of the course, acting as facilitators in the course planning, implementation and monitoring. As a result, it is highlighted in this article, the benefits achieved by all involved through active learning, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of the method. Moreover, improvements are proposed for future courses.

  6. Polymer Chemistry--An Elective in the New Leaving Chemistry Course: A Method of Teaching It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, G.

    1972-01-01

    A scheme is suggested for teaching concepts of polymer chemistry. Laboratory activities are suggested for the major topics. Interrelationships of different industrial uses of polymers are emphasized during the course. (PS)

  7. Energy conservation technologies based on thermodynamic principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Masaru [Shibaura Institute of Technology of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission to prevent global warming, the most promising way for electric generation in the Northeast Asia is to introduce cogeneration and {open_quotes}repowering{close_quotes} technologies based on high temperature gas turbines fueled by natural gas. Especially the old type coal burning boiler-steam turbine plants should be retrofit by introducing gas turbines to become highly efficient combined cycle. Same technologies should be applied to the old garbage incineration plants and/or even to the nuclear power plants. The exhaust heat or steam should become much increased and it should be utilized as the process heat for industries or heat supply as the distinct heating or cooling for residential area. This paper introduces a brief survey of these new technologies.

  8. Concept and benefits of the Inverted Classroom method for a competency-based biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl, Susanne J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students often have a problem recognising the relevance of basic science subjects for their later professional work in the pre-clinical stage of their studies. This can lead to a lower motivation to learn biochemical content and dissatisfaction in the courses amongst the students. Alternative teaching methods such as the Inverted Classroom (IC method can address this deficiency. The goal of this study was: We also investigated how a biochemistry course in the pre-clinical stage of a human medicine course of studies can be successfully organised according to the IC method. Furthermore, we examined the benefits of the IC method over conventional teaching formats. Method: The IC method was implemented in accordance with the guidelines of the GMA committee “New Media” in a biochemistry seminar for two student IC intervention groups with 42 students. A part of the factual knowledge from the on-site phase in the form of teaching videos together with self-learning control tasks were provided online before the seminar for both IC intervention groups. Exporting content to the self-learning phase creates new free time in the on-site phase, during which the content can be critically considered and processed and additional competency-based learning objectives can be taught. Identical biochemistry teaching content was taught in parallel control groups (14 student groups with n=299 students, but no material was handed out beforehand for a self-learning phase. These students only received the materials after the on-site phase. Motivation and satisfaction as well as the acceptance for the teaching methods were recorded by questionnaires, the acquisition of knowledge by MC exams.Results: On a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree to 6 (strongly agree, the students in the IC intervention groups could be seen to be much more motivated (5.53 than students in the control group (4.01. Students in the IC intervention groups also recognised the

  9. Interrogating the Lesson Plan in a Pre-Service Methods Course: Evidence from a University in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simwa, Kefa L.; Modiba, Maropeng

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports on research that examined how the content of a History methods course, taught in a university in Kenya, influenced student teachers' lesson planning and pedagogical skills. A lecture on a lesson plan, micro-teaching lesson plan documents and presentations were examined to determine student teachers' preparedness for teaching the…

  10. Effects of Mathematics Integration in a Teaching Methods Course on Mathematics Ability of Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating mathematics teaching and integration strategies (MTIS) in a teaching methods course on preservice agricultural teachers' mathematics ability. The research design was quasi-experimental and utilized a nonequivalent control group. The MTIS treatment had a positive effect on the…

  11. Small Private Online Research: A Proposal for A Numerical Methods Course Based on Technology Use and Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Francisco Javier Delgado

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a proposed model in blended learning for a numerical methods course evolved from traditional teaching into a research lab in scientific visualization. The blended learning approach sets a differentiated and flexible scheme based on a mobile setup and face to face sessions centered on a net of research challenges. Model is…

  12. Aiming for the Singing Teacher: An Applied Study on Preservice Kindergarten Teachers' Singing Skills Development within a Music Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neokleous, Rania

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a music methods course offered at a Cypriot university on the singing skills of 33 female preservice kindergarten teachers. To systematically measure and analyze student progress, the research design was both experimental and descriptive. As an applied study which was carried out "in situ," the normal…

  13. Teaching Intercultural Communication in a Basic Technical Writing Course: A Survey of Our Current Practices and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, Natalia

    2008-01-01

    This research article reports the results of an online survey distributed among technical writing instructors in 2006. The survey aimed to examine how we teach intercultural communication in basic technical writing courses: our current practices and methods. The article discusses three major challenges that instructors may face when teaching about…

  14. The Effects of Teaching and Assessment Methods on Academic Performance: A Study of an Operations Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán-Díaz, Macarena; Garrido-Vega, Pedro; Alfalla-Luque, Rafaela; González-Zamora, María-del-Mar

    2016-01-01

    Whether the use of more active teaching-learning methods has a positive impact on academic performance remains unanswered. This article seeks to contribute to the issue by conducting a study of an Operations Management course with almost 1000 students per year over three consecutive academic years. The study compares three scenarios with differing…

  15. The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study: objectives and methods of a study investigating causality, course, and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Win, Maartje M. L.; Jager, Gerry; Vervaeke, Hylke K. E.; Schilt, Thelma; Reneman, Liesbeth; Booij, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Ramsey, Nick F.; Korf, Dirk J.; van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the objectives and methods of The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study focussing on the causality, course, and clinical relevance of ecstasy neurotoxicity. Previous studies suggest that ecstasy (3,4 methylene-dioxymethamphetamine, MDMA, XTC) is toxic toward brain serotonin

  16. I Can Make a Scientific Research: A Course about Scientific Research Methods, in Which Learning Management System (LMS) Is Used

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özden, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes in the perception of teacher candidates towards scientific research process and their self-efficacy in this process, during Scientific Research Methods course that has been conducted using "Learning Management System" based on out-of-class learning activities. Being designed as a…

  17. Owning My Thoughts Was Difficult: Encouraging Students to Read and Write Critically in a Tertiary Qualitative Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Janine L.; Allen, Ruth E. S.; Butler, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    This paper adds to the nascent literature on teaching research methods and what students learn from courses and assessment. Postgraduate students are often confronted with large amounts of reading, and the content of material can be intimidating. Convincing them also to engage critically with readings is even more difficult. We report on a…

  18. Preservice Teachers' Reconciliation of an Epistemological Issue in an Integrated Mathematics/Science Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormas, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Preservice teachers in six sections (n = 87) of a sequenced, methodological and process-integrated elementary mathematics/science methods course were able to reconcile an issue centered on a similar area of epistemology. Preservice teachers participated in a science inquiry lesson on biological classification and a mathematics problem-solving…

  19. Development of a Moodle Course for Schoolchildren's Table Tennis Learning Based on Competence Motivation Theory: Its Effectiveness in Comparison to Traditional Training Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Junhua; Liu, Qingtang; Yang, Zongkai

    2012-01-01

    Based on Competence Motivation Theory (CMT), a Moodle course for schoolchildren's table tennis learning was developed (The URL is http://www.bssepp.com, and this course allows guest access). The effects of the course on students' knowledge, perceived competence and interest were evaluated through quantitative methods. The sample of the study…

  20. Teaching biology through statistics: application of statistical methods in genetics and zoology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel; Burrowes, Patricia A

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of mathematics into biology curricula is critical to underscore for undergraduate students the relevance of mathematics to most fields of biology and the usefulness of developing quantitative process skills demanded in modern biology. At our institution, we have made significant changes to better integrate mathematics into the undergraduate biology curriculum. The curricular revision included changes in the suggested course sequence, addition of statistics and precalculus as prerequisites to core science courses, and incorporating interdisciplinary (math-biology) learning activities in genetics and zoology courses. In this article, we describe the activities developed for these two courses and the assessment tools used to measure the learning that took place with respect to biology and statistics. We distinguished the effectiveness of these learning opportunities in helping students improve their understanding of the math and statistical concepts addressed and, more importantly, their ability to apply them to solve a biological problem. We also identified areas that need emphasis in both biology and mathematics courses. In light of our observations, we recommend best practices that biology and mathematics academic departments can implement to train undergraduates for the demands of modern biology.

  1. A Research and Study Course for learning the concept of discrete randomvariable using Monte Carlo methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente D. Estruch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of random variable is a mathematical construct that presents some theoretical complexity. However, learning  this  concept  can  be  facilitated  if  it  is  presented  as  the  end  of  a  sequential  process  of  modeling  of  a  real event. More specifically, to learn the concept of discrete random variable, the Monte Carlo simulation can provide an extremely useful tool because in the process of modeling / simulation one can approach the theoretical concept of random variable, while the random variable is observed \\in action". This paper presents a Research and Study Course  (RSC  based  on  series  of  activities  related  to  random  variables  such  as  training  and  introduction  of  simulation  elements,  then  the  construction  of  the  model  is  presented,  which  is  the  substantial  part  of  the  activity, generating a random variable and its probability function. Starting from a simple situation related to reproduction and  survival  of  the  litter  of  a  rodent,  with  random  components,  step  by  step,  the  model  that  represents  the  real raised situation is built obtaining an \\original" random variable. In the intermediate stages of the construction of the model have a fundamental role the uniform discrete and binomial distributions. The trajectory of these stages allows reinforcing the concept of random variable while exploring the possibilities offered by Monte Carlo methods to  simulate  real  cases  and  the  simplicity  of  implementing  these  methods  by  means  of  the  Matlab© programming language.

  2. Improving Nursing Students' Learning Outcomes in Fundamentals of Nursing Course through Combination of Traditional and e-Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhaboumasoudi, Rouhollah; Bagheri, Maryam; Hosseini, Sayed Abbas; Ashouri, Elaheh; Elahi, Nasrin

    2018-01-01

    Fundamentals of nursing course are prerequisite to providing comprehensive nursing care. Despite development of technology on nursing education, effectiveness of using e-learning methods in fundamentals of nursing course is unclear in clinical skills laboratory for nursing students. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of blended learning (combining e-learning with traditional learning methods) with traditional learning alone on nursing students' scores. A two-group post-test experimental study was administered from February 2014 to February 2015. Two groups of nursing students who were taking the fundamentals of nursing course in Iran were compared. Sixty nursing students were selected as control group (just traditional learning methods) and experimental group (combining e-learning with traditional learning methods) for two consecutive semesters. Both groups participated in Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and were evaluated in the same way using a prepared checklist and questionnaire of satisfaction. Statistical analysis was conducted through SPSS software version 16. Findings of this study reflected that mean of midterm (t = 2.00, p = 0.04) and final score (t = 2.50, p = 0.01) of the intervention group (combining e-learning with traditional learning methods) were significantly higher than the control group (traditional learning methods). The satisfaction of male students in intervention group was higher than in females (t = 2.60, p = 0.01). Based on the findings, this study suggests that the use of combining traditional learning methods with e-learning methods such as applying educational website and interactive online resources for fundamentals of nursing course instruction can be an effective supplement for improving nursing students' clinical skills.

  3. Practicing the practice: Learning to guide elementary science discussions in a practice-oriented science methods course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashima Mathur

    University methods courses are often criticized for telling pre-service teachers, or interns, about the theories behind teaching instead of preparing them to actually enact teaching. Shifting teacher education to be more "practice-oriented," or to focus more explicitly on the work of teaching, is a current trend for re-designing the way we prepare teachers. This dissertation addresses the current need for research that unpacks the shift to more practice-oriented approaches by studying the content and pedagogical approaches in a practice-oriented, masters-level elementary science methods course (n=42 interns). The course focused on preparing interns to guide science classroom discussions. Qualitative data, such as video records of course activities and interns' written reflections, were collected across eight course sessions. Codes were applied at the sentence and paragraph level and then grouped into themes. Five content themes were identified: foregrounding student ideas and questions, steering discussion toward intended learning goals, supporting students to do the cognitive work, enacting teacher role of facilitator, and creating a classroom culture for science discussions. Three pedagogical approach themes were identified. First, the teacher educators created images of science discussions by modeling and showing videos of this practice. They also provided focused teaching experiences by helping interns practice the interactive aspects of teaching both in the methods classroom and with smaller groups of elementary students in schools. Finally, they structured the planning and debriefing phases of teaching so interns could learn from their teaching experiences and prepare well for future experiences. The findings were analyzed through the lens of Grossman and colleagues' framework for teaching practice (2009) to reveal how the pedagogical approaches decomposed, represented, and approximated practice throughout course activities. Also, the teacher educators

  4. Implementation fidelity of a self-management course for epilepsy: method and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojewodka, G; Hurley, S; Taylor, S J C; Noble, A J; Ridsdale, L; Goldstein, L H

    2017-07-11

    Complex interventions such as self-management courses are difficult to evaluate due to the many interacting components. The way complex interventions are delivered can influence the effect they have for patients, and can impact the interpretation of outcomes of clinical trials. Implementation fidelity evaluates whether complex interventions are delivered according to protocol. Such assessments have been used for one-to-one psychological interventions; however, the science is still developing for group interventions. We developed and tested an instrument to measure implementation fidelity of a two-day self-management course for people with epilepsy, SMILE(UK). Using audio recordings, we looked at adherence and competence of course facilitators. Adherence was assessed by checklists. Competence was measured by scoring group interaction, an overall impression score and facilitator "didacticism". To measure "didacticism", we developed a novel way to calculate facilitator speech using computer software. Using this new instrument, implementation fidelity of SMILE(UK) was assessed on three modules of the course, for 28% of all courses delivered. Using the instrument for adherence, scores from two independent raters showed substantial agreement with weighted Kappa of 0.67 and high percent agreement of 81.2%. For didacticism, the results from both raters were highly correlated with an intraclass coefficient of 0.97 (p  50% of scored items received the maximum of 2 points) and high competence. Groups were interactive (mean score: 1.9-2.0 out of 2) and the overall impression was on average assessed as "good". Didacticism varied from 42% to 93% of total module time and was not associated with the other competence scores. The instrument devised to measure implementation fidelity was reproducible and easy to use. The courses for the SMILE(UK) study were delivered with a good level of adherence to protocol while not compromising facilitator competence. ISRCTN57937389 .

  5. An Effectiveness Of Vark Questionnaire In Determining The Most Suitable Teaching Method For Private Course Student : A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fietra, Yoana Tasya

    2016-01-01

    The title of this thesis is An Effectiveness of VARK Questionnaire in Determining The Most Suitable Teaching Method for Private Course Student. For many years, the goal of language pedagogy was to find the right method. As a teacher, must understand how to teach their student in a good way by selecting a suitable method. I used VARK questionnaire version (7.8). to know what the most suitable teaching method will use for the student based on the student’s learning style. VARK is the kind of ps...

  6. A Primitive Individualization of Time and Method in a Beginning Accounting Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Frank A.

    An experimental first year course in accounting was offered which utilized the concept of individualized instruction. The students were mostly sophomores at the University of Massachusetts. Two teaching assistants and the instructor provided the 60 member sample population with two types of assignment sheets, one relating to the textbook, one…

  7. New Visual Methods for Teaching Intersectionality from a Spatial Perspective in a Geography and Gender Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylina Ferré, Mireia; Rodó de Zárate, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Intersectionality is a complex concept to deal with when doing research but also when teaching the interrelationships between space and social relations. Here we present "Relief Maps" as a visual tool for teaching intersectionality and its spatial dimension in higher education courses. "Relief Maps" are a model developed for…

  8. DATA MINING AND STATISTICS METHODS USAGE FOR ADVANCED TRAINING COURSES QUALITY MEASUREMENT: CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim I. Galchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article we consider a case of the analysis of the data connected with educational statistics, namely – result of professional development courses students survey with specialized software usage. Need for expanded statistical results processing, the scheme of carrying out the analysis is shown. Conclusions on a studied case are presented. 

  9. Development of Chemical Engineering Course Methods Using Action Research: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki-Hatakka, Terhi; Tuunila, Ritva; Nurkka, Niina

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the systematic development of a teaching methodology for two chemical engineering courses. The aim was to improve the quality of teaching to achieve expected learning outcomes more effectively. The development was carried out over a period of several years based on an action research methodology with data systematically…

  10. Taking a Case Method Capstone Course Online: A Comparative Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandon Gill

    2015-06-01

    The results of the conversion proved to be consistent with some of our expectations and surprising in other ways. Consistent with expectations, the online tools that we employed allowed us to create an online design that was relatively faithful to the original version in terms of meeting learning objectives. Also consistent with our expectations, student perceptions of the course—while quite positive overall—were more mixed for the online course than for its face-to-face predecessor. The course offering produced two surprises, however. First, the online approach to the project component of the course actually seemed to result in higher quality project presentations than the face-to-face version. Second, when results were compared from the instrument we used to evaluate student learning gains, the classroom and online versions of the class proved to be nearly indistinguishable. Given the very different delivery mechanisms employed, we had anticipated far more differences in student perceptions of what they had learned over the course of the semester. Given the challenges of taking a highly interactive class online, we viewed this surprise to be a very pleasant one.

  11. Development of an Integrated GIS and Land Use Planning Course: Impacts of Hybrid Instructional Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, M.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports an action research undertaken at Queensland University of Technology. It evaluates the effectiveness of the integration of geographic information systems (GIS) within the substantive domains of an existing land use planning course in 2011. Using student performance, learning experience survey, and questionnaire survey data, it…

  12. The Socratic Method in the Introductory PR Course: An Alternative Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Michael G.; Ekachai, Daradirek

    2002-01-01

    Presents the results of a study comparing student reactions to and perceptions of learning in introductory public relations courses using a traditional lecture format and a Socratic approach. Finds significant differences in the two groups showing that students who received the Socratic instruction reported more opportunities in practicing their…

  13. Quality in statistics education : Determinants of course outcomes in methods & statistics education at universities and colleges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    Although Statistics is not a very popular course according to most students, a majority of students still take it, as it is mandatory at most Social Science departments. Therefore it takes special teacher’s skills to teach statistics. In order to do so it is essential for teachers to know what

  14. Mixed Methods Student Evaluation of an Online Systemic Human Anatomy Course with Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attardi, Stefanie M.; Choi, Suwhan; Barnett, John; Rogers, Kem A.

    2016-01-01

    A fully online section of an existing face-to-face (F2F) systemic human anatomy course with a prosection laboratory was offered for the first time in 2012-2013. Lectures for F2F students (N = 365) were broadcast in both live and archived format to online students (N = 40) using virtual classroom software. Laboratories were delivered online by a…

  15. Science Credit for Agriculture: Perceived Support, Preferred Implementation Methods and Teacher Science Course Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald M.

    1996-01-01

    Arkansas agriculture teachers (213 of 259 surveyed) expressed support for granting science credit for agriculture (88.8%); 65.6% supported science credit for a limited number of agriculture courses. Blanket endorsement for all certified agriculture teachers was favored by 71.5%; 56.6% preferred endorsement only for certified teachers completing an…

  16. Mixing problem based learning and conventional teaching methods in an analog electronics course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podges, J M; Kommers, P A M; Winnips, K; van Joolingen, W R

    2014-01-01

    This study, undertaken at the Walter Sisulu University of Technology (WSU) in South Africa, describes how problem-based learning (PBL) affects the first year 'analog electronics course', when PBL and the lecturing mode is compared. Problems were designed to match real-life situations. Data between

  17. Impact of Maple(TM) on the design, instruction and performance in an undergraduate physics mathematical methods course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Alan Paul

    1997-10-01

    A traditional undergraduate physics course on mathematical methods has been redesigned to incorporate the use of Maplesp{sc {TM}}, a computer algebra program, during all aspects of the course. Topics covered were: complex number theory; series approximations; matrix theory; partial differentiation; vector algebra; and vector calculus. Five undergraduate students were enrolled, from sophomore to senior in academic class standing. A qualitative case study methodology was used to describe the changes in the course design resulting from the incorporation of Maplesp{sc {TM}} and their impact on the instruction of the course, and to determine the effects on the students' learning and development of problem solving skills in physics using Maplesp{sc {TM}} as a problem solving tool. The impact of using Maplesp{sc {TM}} on the number and types of interactions is presented. The entire semester long course was included in this study. Each class session is described in detail. Examples of the Maplesp{sc {TM}} materials used are given. The use of the Maplesp{sc {TM}} program was allowed on all homework and exams with each student having their own computer during class. Constraints were made so that the assessment emphasis remained on the mathematics and the conceptual understanding of the problem solving methods. All of the students demonstrated some level of proficiency in using Maplesp{TM} to solve the assigned problems. Strategies for effectively using Maplesp{TM} were presented and were individualized by the students. The students reported positive and negative impacts of using Maplesp{sc {TM}}. All of the students satisfactorily completed the course requirements, receiving final course grades from B to A+. All of them continued to voluntarily use Maplesp{sc {TM}} during the following semester. Instructional methods used included various lecture techniques without Maplesp{sc {TM}} assistance, lectures and demonstrations using only Maplesp{sc {TM}}, and student tasks

  18. Portfolio : Theory and Practice of the Pedagogical Methods Course for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren

    2002-01-01

    workshops and self-studies. Finally, a portfolio is used as a tool for self-reflection. Further the portfolio is used as documentation for experience with teaching, the reflections on action and progression in teaching practice. In this discussion paper, I will reflect on the effect of the course...... and question whether it is appropriate to use a written portfolio for self-reflection and documentation of competences?...

  19. A Qualitative Study of Technology-Based Training in Organizations that Hire Agriculture and Life Sciences Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedgood, Leslie; Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Dooley, Kim E.

    2008-01-01

    Technological advances have created unlimited opportunities in education. Training and technology have merged to create new methods referred to as technology-based training. The purpose of this study was to identify organizations that hire agriculture and life sciences students for positions involving technology-based training and identify…

  20. An analysis of learning in an online biology course for teachers and teacher candidates: A mixed methods approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebec, Michael Thomas

    Due to discipline specific shortages, web-based learning has been proposed as a convenient way to upgrade the content knowledge of instructors interested in learning to teach science. Despite quantitative evidence that web-based instruction is equivalent to traditional methods, questions remain regarding its use. The efficiency and practicality of this approach with teachers in particular has not been extensively studied. This investigation examines learning in an online biology course designed to help teachers prepare for science certification exams. Research questions concern flow teachers learn biology in the online environment and how this setting influences the learning process. Quantitative and qualitative methodologies are employed in an attempt to provide a more complete perspective than typical studies of online learning. Concept maps, tests, and online discussion transcripts are compared as measures of assimilated knowledge, while interviews reflect participants' views on the course. Findings indicate that participants experienced gains in declarative knowledge, but little improvement with respect to conditional knowledge. Qualitative examination of concept maps demonstrates gaps in participants' understandings of key course ideas. Engagement in the use of online resources varied according to participants' attitudes towards online learning. Subjects also reported a lack of motivation to fully engage in the course due to busy teaching schedules and the absence of accountability.

  1. Application of scl - pbl method to increase quality learning of industrial statistics course in department of industrial engineering pancasila university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, M.; Hidayah, N. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Currently, there has been a change of new paradigm in the learning model in college, ie from Teacher Centered Learning (TCL) model to Student Centered Learing (SCL). It is generally assumed that the SCL model is better than the TCL model. The Courses of 2nd Industrial Statistics in the Department Industrial Engineering Pancasila University is the subject that belongs to the Basic Engineering group. So far, the applied learning model refers more to the TCL model, and field facts show that the learning outcomes are less satisfactory. Of the three consecutive semesters, ie even semester 2013/2014, 2014/2015, and 2015/2016 obtained grade average is equal to 56.0; 61.1, and 60.5. In the even semester of 2016/2017, Classroom Action Research (CAR) is conducted for this course through the implementation of SCL model with Problem Based Learning (PBL) methods. The hypothesis proposed is that the SCL-PBL model will be able to improve the final grade of the course. The results shows that the average grade of the course can be increased to 73.27. This value was then tested using the ANOVA and the test results concluded that the average grade was significantly different from the average grade value in the previous three semesters.

  2. Impact of Gender on Patient Preferences for Technology-Based Behavioral Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Technology-based interventions offer an opportunity to address high-risk behaviors in the emergency department (ED. Prior studies suggest behavioral health strategies are more effective when gender differences are considered. However, the role of gender in ED patient preferences for technology-based interventions has not been examined. The objective was to assess whether patient preferences for technology-based interventions varies by gender. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from a systematic survey of adult (18 years of age, English-speaking patients in a large urban academic ED. Subjects were randomly selected during a purposive sample of shifts. The iPad survey included questions on access to technology, preferences for receiving health information, and demographics. We defined ‘‘technology-based’’ as web, text message, e-mail, social networking, or DVD; ‘‘non-technology-based’’ was defined as in-person, written materials, or landline. We calculated descriptive statistics and used univariate tests to compare men and women. Gender-stratified multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations between other demographic factors (age, race, ethnicity, income and technology-based preferences for information on specific risky behaviors. Results: Of 417 participants, 45.1% were male. There were no significant demographic differences between men and women. Women were more likely to use computers (90.8% versus 81.9%; p¼0.03, Internet (66.8% versus 59.0%; p¼0.03, and social networks (53.3% versus 42.6%; p¼0.01. 89% of men and 90% of women preferred technology-based formats for at least type of health information; interest in technology-based for individual health topics did not vary by gender. Concern about confidentiality was the most common barrier to technology-based use for both genders. Multivariate analysis showed that for smoking, depression, drug/alcohol use, and injury

  3. "I Have a Love-Hate Relationship with ATLAS.ti"™: Integrating Qualitative Data Analysis Software into a Graduate Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Trena M.; Bennett, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    While research on teaching qualitative methods in education has increased, few studies explore teaching qualitative data analysis software within graduate-level methods courses. During 2013, we required students in several such courses to use ATLAS.ti™ as a project management tool for their assignments. By supporting students' early experiences…

  4. Listening to Early Career Teachers: How Can Elementary Mathematics Methods Courses Better Prepare Them to Utilize Standards-Based Practices in Their Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coester, Lee Anne

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to gather input from early career elementary teachers with the goal of finding ways to improve elementary mathematics methods courses. Multiple areas were explored including the degree to which respondents' elementary mathematics methods course focused on the NCTM Process Standards, the teachers' current standards-based…

  5. [Can medical students' motivation for a course of basic physiology education integrating into lectures some active learning methods be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentata, Yassamine; Delfosse, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Students' motivation is a critical component of learning and students' perception of activity value is one of the three major components of their motivation. How can we make students perceive the usefulness and the interest of their university courses while increasing their motivation? The aim of our study was to determine students' perception of basic physiology education value and to assess the impact of lecture integration into some active learning methods on the motivation of the students of the first cycle of Medicine in a junior faculty. We conducted a prospective study, involving the students in their second year of medical studies. At first, we assessed students' motivation for university courses through a first questionnaire, after we integrated two educational activities: the case study and the realization of a conceptual map for the lectures of the physiology module and then we evaluated, through a second questionnaire, the impact of these two activities on students' motivation. Out of 249 students in their second year of medical studies 131 and 109 students have completed and returned the 1st and 2nd questionnaire respectively. Overall students' motivation for their university courses was very favorable, even if the motivation for physiology course (70.8%) was slightly lower than for all the courses (80%). Our students enjoyed the two proposed activities and only 13% (for the case study) and 16.8% (for the map) were not satisfied. 40.9% of students completed a conceptual map whose quality judged on the identification of concepts and of the links between concepts was globally satisfactory for a first experience. Students' motivation is influenced by multiple internal and external factors and is a big problem in the university environment. In this context, a rigorous planning of diversified and active educational activities is one of the main gateways for teacher to encourage motivation.

  6. Electromagnetic wave theory for boundary-value problems an advanced course on analytical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Eom, Hyo J

    2004-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave theory is based on Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic boundary-value problems must be solved to understand electromagnetic scattering, propagation, and radiation. Electromagnetic theory finds practical applications in wireless telecommunications and microwave engineering. This book is written as a text for a two-semester graduate course on electromagnetic wave theory. As such, Electromagnetic Wave Theory for Boundary-Value Problems is intended to help students enhance analytic skills by solving pertinent boundary-value problems. In particular, the techniques of Fourier transform, mode matching, and residue calculus are utilized to solve some canonical scattering and radiation problems.

  7. RCT: Module 2.06, Air Sampling Program and Methods, Course 8772

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Kurt T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-19

    The inhalation of radioactive particles is the largest cause of an internal radiation dose. Airborne radioactivity measurements are necessary to ensure that the control measures are and continue to be effective. Regulations govern the allowable effective dose equivalent to an individual. The effective dose equivalent is determined by combining the external and internal dose equivalent values. Typically, airborne radioactivity levels are maintained well below allowable levels to keep the total effective dose equivalent small. This course will prepare the student with the skills necessary for RCT qualification by passing quizzes, tests, and the RCT Comprehensive Phase 1, Unit 2 Examination (TEST 27566) and will provide in-the-field skills.

  8. Student’s Perceptions on Simulation as Part of Experiential Learning in Approaches, Methods, and Techniques (AMT Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marselina Karina Purnomo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is a part of Experiential Learning which represents certain real-life events. In this study, simulation is used as a learning activity in Approaches, Methods, and Techniques (AMT course which is one of the courses in English Language Education Study Program (ELESP of Sanata Dharma University. Since simulation represents the real-life events, it encourages students to apply the approaches, methods, and techniques being studied based on the real-life classroom. Several experts state that students are able to involve their personal experiences through simulation which additionally is believed to create a meaningful learning in the class. This study aimed to discover ELESP students’ perceptions toward simulation as a part of Experiential Learning in AMT course. From the findings, it could be inferred that students agreed that simulation in class was important for students’ learning for it formed a meaningful learning in class.  DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2017.200104

  9. Exploring the development of science self-efficacy in preservice elementary school teachers participating in a science education methods course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Amanda M.

    The demands of society's increasing dependence on science and technology call for our students to have a solid foundation in science education, starting in the earliest grades. However, elementary school teachers often lack the necessary experiences to deliver that education. This qualitative study seeks to explore the development of six preservice elementary teachers in a semester-long science methods course. The course consisted of many components; one in particular was a microteaching experience, which emerged as especially significant. The participants' experiences throughout the semester were studied primarily through the lens of self-efficacy, but were also examined considering learning theories and mental models. It was found that two participants in particular were self-directed learners and were able to construct for themselves a self-selected cognitive apprenticeship. Other findings include the significance of a microteaching experience on development of self-efficacy in science teaching and the role mental models may or may not play in development of self-efficacy in the science methods course. This study has implications both for preservice elementary education in science and in general.

  10. Video-based Learning Versus Traditional Method for Preclinical Course of Complete Denture Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, Amir; Mazahery, Azita; Hosseinzadeh, Mohammad; Yazdanpanah, Samane

    2015-03-01

    Advances in computer science and technology allow the instructors to use instructional multimedia programs to enhance the process of learning for dental students. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a new educational modality by using videotapes on the performance of dental students in preclinical course of complete denture fabrication. This quasi-experimental study was performed on 54 junior dental students in Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (SBMU). Twenty-five and 29 students were evaluated in two consecutive semesters as controls and cases, respectively for the same course. The two groups were matched in terms of "knowledge about complete denture fabrication" and "basic dental skills" using a written test and a practical exam, respectively. After the intervention, performance and clinical skills of students were assessed in 8 steps. Eventually, a post-test was carried out to find changes in knowledge and skills of students in this regard. In the two groups with the same baseline level of knowledge and skills, independent T-test showed that students in the test group had a significantly superior performance in primary impression taking (p= 0.001) and primary cast fabrication (p= 0.001). In terms of anterior teeth set up, students in the control group had a significantly better performance (p= 0.001). Instructional videotapes can aid in teaching fabrication of complete denture and are as effective as the traditional teaching system.

  11. Data Mining and Statistics Methods for Advanced Training Course Quality Measurement: Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galchenko Maxim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced training courses in the energetics field is a very important part of human reliability growth. In the words of S.E. Magid, chief of Technical Educational systems in Energy Technologies, UNESCO department: “The number of forced outages due to failures of equipment on the power stations -30 %. The share of operational personnel fault in these infringements makes considerable size (to 15%. As a whole in the Russian Open Society ‘United Power Systems’ the infringements percentage because of the personnel from infringements total makes 2%. At the same time, on power stations this quantity makes 18%. In power supply systems of Siberia the relative quantity of infringements because of the personnel reaches 50%.” [1].

  12. Solution Method of Multi-Product Two-Stage Logistics Problem with Constraints of Delivery Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataka, Shinichiro; Gen, Mitsuo

    The logistics network design is one of the important phase of Supply Chain Management (SCM) and it is the problem that should be optimized for long-term promotion of efficiency of the whole supply chain. Usually a plant produces different type of products. Even if it is a factory of the same company, delivery is different by a kind of a produced product. The restrictions which this model has are deeply concerned with TP in the real world. In this paper, we consider the logistics network design problems with multi-products and constraints for delivery course. To solve the problem, we used a hybrid priority-based Genetic Algorithm (h-priGA), and we tried the comparison experiment with priority-based Genetic Algorithm (priGA)and h-priGA, we show it about the effectiveness of h-priGA.

  13. Methods of early revealing, prognosis of further course and complications of pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukhrienko N.D.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Under our observation there were 59 patients with pollinosis – 39 females and 20 males at the age from 18 to 68 years. All patients were in the phase of disease exacerbation. General clinical symptoms were: rhinitis, conjunctivitis and bronchial spasm. The results showed that first clinical manifestations appear in persons of young age. Half of the patients had aggravated allergologic anamnesis. Taking into account that pollinosis is a typical representative of diseases having mechanism of immunoglobulin E (IgE-dependent allergic reactions of the first type, the authors have studied in detail level of IgE and its link with other factors. Practically in all patients with pollinosis level of total IgE exceeded the norm. As a result of studies performed, it was established that high IgE level, presence of phagocytosis defect and prolong duration of illness are the criteria which affect disease progress, aggravation of patients’ state, less efficacy of treatment. Due to the fact that development of bronchial obstruction and transformation of pollinosis into bronchial asthma is the most topical issue nowadays, the authors studied its link with other factors and findings. It was established that risk of pollinosis transformation into pollen bronchial asthma increases in the presence of high level of total IgE, aggravation of allergologic anamnesis, decrease of forced expiration volume (FEV, significant duration of disease course. In the course of investigation it was revealed that the highest efficacy of treatment is noted in patients receiving allergen-specific therapy; this confirms data of world scientific literature. The best treatment results are observed in pollinosis patients, with aggravated family history not in parents but in grandparents.

  14. The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study: objectives and methods of a study investigating causality, course, and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Win, Maartje M L; Jager, Gerry; Vervaeke, Hylke K E; Schilt, Thelma; Reneman, Liesbeth; Booij, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C; Den Heeten, Gerard J; Ramsey, Nick F; Korf, Dirk J; Van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the objectives and methods of The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study focussing on the causality, course, and clinical relevance of ecstasy neurotoxicity. Previous studies suggest that ecstasy (3,4 methylene-dioxymethamphetamine, MDMA, XTC) is toxic toward brain serotonin axons, but most of these studies have serious methodological limitations. The current study is a combination of different approaches with three substudies: (1) a crosssectional substudy among heavy ecstasy users and controls with variation in drug use, which will provide information about potential neurotoxic consequences of ecstasy in relation to other drugs; (2) a prospective cohort substudy in ecstasy-naive subjects with high risk for future ecstasy use, which will provide information on the causality and short-term course of ecstasy use and potential neurotoxicity, and (3) a retrospective cohort substudy in lifetime ecstasy users and matched controls of an existing epidemiological sample that will provide information on long-term course and outcome of ecstasy use in the general population. Neurotoxicity is studied using (a) different imaging techniques (beta-CIT SPECT, 1H-MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging), and (b) neuropsychological and psychiatric assessments of memory, depression, and personality. The combined results will lead to conclusions that can be used in prevention messages, clinical decision making, and the development of an (inter)national ecstasy policy.

  15. Undergraduate Student Teachers' Views and Experiences of a Compulsory Course in Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, B. J. J.

    2015-01-01

    In comparison to attention given to research methods for education students at postgraduate level, the offering of research methods for education students at undergraduate level is less often considered. Yet, it is agreed that research methods for undergraduate level students is important for shaping student attitudes, learning and achievement in…

  16. Application of the K-W-L Teaching and Learning Method to an Introductory Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrinkle, Cheryl Schaefer; Manivannan, Mani K.

    2009-01-01

    The K-W-L method of teaching is a simple method that actively engages students in their own learning. It has been used with kindergarten and elementary grades to teach other subjects. The authors have successfully used it to teach physics at the college level. In their introductory physics labs, the K-W-L method helped students think about what…

  17. A Survey of Beginning Crop Science Courses at 49 U.S. Universities. I. Lecture Format, Teaching Methods, and Topical Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnok, Keith J.; Connors, Krista L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part series which discusses the findings related to lecture information in beginning crop science courses offered in Land Grant institutions. Survey results revealed considerable differences regarding course organization and teaching methods, but similarities in overall goals and topic areas. (ML)

  18. International Student Adaptation to a U.S. College: A Mixed Methods Exploration of the Impact of a Specialized First-Year Course at a Large Midwestern Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, Olena

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods study assessed a first-year course for international students, entitled the U.S. Education and Culture, at a large Midwestern public institution. The quantitative results indicated that participation in the course improved students' academic skills, psychosocial development, understanding of social diversity in the U.S., use of…

  19. Quantitative Skills, Critical Thinking, and Writing Mechanics in Blended versus Face-to-Face Versions of a Research Methods and Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Christopher T.; Lamoreaux, Marika; Atchison, Kristin J.; Jeffress, Elizabeth C.; Lynch, Heather L.; Sheehan, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Hybrid or blended learning (BL) has been shown to be equivalent to or better than face-to-face (FTF) instruction in a broad variety of contexts. We randomly assigned students to either 50/50 BL or 100% FTF versions of a research methods and statistics in psychology course. Students who took the BL version of the course scored significantly lower…

  20. Developing Distinct Mathematical and Scientific Pedagogical Content Knowledge in an Early Childhood Dual-Content Methods Course: An Alternative to Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchman, Mindy; Kozoll, Richard H.

    2017-01-01

    Methods for teaching early childhood mathematics and science are often addressed in a single, dual-content course. Approaches to teaching this type of course include integrating the content and the pedagogy of both subjects, or keeping the subject areas distinct. In this article, the authors discuss and illustrate their approach to such a combined…

  1. Authentic Learning Enviroment in Analytical Chemistry Using Cooperative Methods and Open-Ended Laboratories in Large Lecture Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John C.

    1996-09-01

    chemistry, in addition to increasing the depth of coverage of the material and the students' comprehension levels. Although these benefits are usually expected from small colleges, it has become clear that they can also be achieved in large-enrollment universities. Course Elements The important elements in the open-ended projects are identified during the planning of the course and are brought into the course from its beginning in order to establish a central theme that continues throughout the course. Eight changes have been made in the course where these themes are emphasized: an absolute grading scale is announced at the beginning of the course a student board of directors is appointed to oversee all aspects of the course students read and analyze research papers interactive techniques are introduced in the lecture spreadsheet programs are used for homework and laboratory problems cooperative examinations complement traditional examinations open-ended laboratory projects replace many standard laboratory experiments Grading The absolute grading scale is recognized as an essential element to a course where students work cooperatively, because the competition in a course graded on the curve discourages cooperation (4). Grades are determined by a mixture of traditional examinations and quizzes, cooperative examinations, problem sets, laboratory grades based on quantitative unknowns, and group and individual grades on open-ended projects. Several methods have been used to arrive at individual grades for group projects, but the most effective has been a peer grade assigned by the team members. For a four-member team, each individual will receive grades from the other three members and the results are averaged. The individuals consider a person's effort, team skills, and contributions. The individual grades are then normalized to the team grade. Student Formative Assessment A student board of directors is appointed from volunteers using student diversity and representation from

  2. Analytical methods being used to study the course of the catalytic reforming of benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holle, B; Svajgl, O

    1980-01-01

    Methods published in the literature and worked out at the national Institute for the Chemical Processing of Coal are examined. These are methods of observation to take place during catalytic reforming, and the following are necessary; methods of group analysis of benzenes (with boiling points of 90-205/sup 0/, determination of S, N, Pb, and C1 impurities and water impurities in the liquid and gas tests, which result from the reforming process. The Institute's proposed methods of analyzing the group composition of benzenes and determining the S, N, Pb, chloride and water present are described. A comparison is made between the results of the analysis of the group composition of fractions and Rumanian benzene using the Institute's method, and the results' of well-known methods. To investigate the amount of raw material and the products of the reforming, a universal automatic colorimeter was developed. Analysis of the group composition of benzenes using the Institute's method is done by determining certain oil-product characteristics, determing S using an oxidizing and reduction method, determining lead using flameless atomic absorption in a graphitization trough, determining chlorides through acidic mineralization, and determining water using a colorimetric method.

  3. CLOUD-BASED INTERACTIVE EDUCATIONAL AND METHODICAL COMPLEX FOR THE COURSE “INFORMATICS” IN INDEPENDENT WORK OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И Н Куринин

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article concentrates on the basic materials of the educational and methodical complex of a modern format (cloud-based and interactive, used in the educational process of the course “Informatics”, which significantly expands the share of independent work of students according to the increased number of students’ practical work (laboratory work, educational projects, essays. This workshop focuses on mastering the methods of work with personal mobile and office computers, Office programs, Internet technologies by students and making students receive the competences to solve topical applied problems. Efficiency of students’ independent work is additionally ensured by educational and methodical tutorials (lecture notes and compilations of test tasks, excercises, models and examples of performing all tasks, developed by the authors of the article.

  4. Multi-level Discourse Analysis in a Physics Teaching Methods Course from the Psychological Perspective of Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Rodrigo Drumond; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present and apply a multi-level method for discourse analysis in science classrooms. This method is based on the structure of human activity (activity, actions, and operations) and it was applied to study a pre-service physics teacher methods course. We argue that such an approach, based on a cultural psychological perspective, affords opportunities for analysts to perform a theoretically based detailed analysis of discourse events. Along with the presentation of analysis, we show and discuss how the articulation of different levels offers interpretative criteria for analyzing instructional conversations. We synthesize the results into a model for a teacher's practice and discuss the implications and possibilities of this approach for the field of discourse analysis in science classrooms. Finally, we reflect on how the development of teachers' understanding of their activity structures can contribute to forms of progressive discourse of science education.

  5. The Effect of Inquiry-Based Learning Method on Students' Academic Achievement in Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of inquiry-based learning method on students' academic achievement in sciences lesson. A total of 40 fifth grade students from two different classes were involved in the study. They were selected through purposive sampling method. The group which was assigned as experimental group was…

  6. Problem-Based Learning Method: Secondary Education 10th Grade Chemistry Course Mixtures Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üce, Musa; Ates, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    In this research; aim was determining student achievement by comparing problem-based learning method with teacher-centered traditional method of teaching 10th grade chemistry lesson mixtures topic. Pretest-posttest control group research design is implemented. Research sample includes; two classes of (total of 48 students) an Anatolian High School…

  7. An Application of Flipped Classroom Method in the Instructional Technologies and Material Development Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özpinar, Ilknur; Yenmez, Arzu Aydogan; Gökçe, Semirhan

    2016-01-01

    A natural outcome of change in technology, new approaches towards teaching and learning have emerged and the applicability of the flipped classroom method, a new educational strategy, in the field of education has started to be discussed. It was aimed with the study to examine the effect of using flipped classroom method in academic achievements…

  8. Set problem teaching methods used in the course of Control and protection systems of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Some results of pedagogical investigations on the application of the sep problem teaching method at the Obninsk Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering are presented. The method aims at improving the quality of training operation and maintenance personnel for nuclear power plants

  9. CISM-Course on Modern Optical Methods in Experimental Solid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    The book covers the theories and physics of advanced new optical measuring methods and problems of experimental performance, recent achievements in the basic interferometric methods holography, speckle-interferometry, shearography as well as linear/non-linear photoelasticity and photoviscoelasticity, Moiré- and grid-techniques. It deals with theory and application of digital image processing, methods of data recording, data processing and -visualisation, with mathematical/numerical procedures for final evaluation of digitised measured data and the principle of hybrid techniques. It introduces into the new perceptions of methods in experimental solid mechanics and it should encourage scientists to deal intensively with the theories for further developments, and enables practitioners, to understand theory and physics of the new achievements at least and to apply the methods in research als well as in developments in practice.

  10. Course Layout

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    present roll Presentation roll Interactive Media Element This is an interactive diagram of a MATLAB course layout covering 16 topics in 4 different main areas: Basics of MATLAB, Numerical Methods in MATLAB, Symbolic Manipulations in MATLAB, Mathematical Modeling in MATLAB and Simulink AE2440 Introduction to Digital Computation

  11. Technology-based interventions in social work practice: a systematic review of mental health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Alex T; Montgomery, Katherine

    2014-10-01

    Despite concerns around the use of technology-based interventions, they are increasingly being employed by social workers as a direct practice methodology to address the mental health needs of vulnerable clients. Researchers have highlighted the importance of using innovative technologies within social work practice, yet little has been done to summarize the evidence and collectively assess findings. In this systematic review, we describe accounts of technology-based mental health interventions delivered by social workers over the past 10 years. Results highlight the impacts of these tools and summarize advantages and disadvantages to utilizing technologies as a method for delivering or facilitating interventions.

  12. Nursing students' preferences of strategies surrounding cinenurducation in a first year child growth and development courses: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jina; Steefel, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Use of film in the classroom (cinenurducation) promotes nursing students' motivation and understanding of concepts about child growth and development; however, consensus has not been reached regarding students' preferred strategies and what they view as effective. To identify nursing students' preferences for pedagogical strategies surrounding film use in a Child Growth and Development course. A mixed methods study encompassing a concurrent triangulation strategy was undertaken. Eighty-three students attending the first year nursing class in the fall semester 2012 at a private University in South Korea participated. Films or film clips were shown either before or after pedagogical strategies including lecture, presentation, personal essay, group report, or group discussion, followed by a questionnaire to assess student preferences and their opinions on the impact of strategies on motivation and learning. A focus group with 10 participants provided their opinions. Although the preference for the time when films were watched showed no significant difference (t=.388, p=.699), participants preferred the following pedagogical methods: watching films with a group, saying this was more effective compared to watching films alone (t=5.488, pstrategies surrounding cinenurducation helped them gain conceptual knowledge in a Child Growth and Development course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental research on application of mutual-aid teaching method in technique teaching of university’s football elective course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jiarong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the social development and reform of education system, the quality-oriented education and lifelong education gradually become education reform goals of colleges and universities, the physical education of the higher education and university are also developed. This research adopts the literature data method, ques-tionnaire method, experimental method, mathematical statistics or other methods to do experiments for the stu-dents who take the football elective course (a total of 36 class hours per semester in Zhuhai College of Jilin University with the mutual-aid teaching method. The experimental results show that: First, there is a significant difference between achievements of the specific football technique of the students in the experimental group and the students in the control group (P <0.05; second, in the teaching evaluation, the failure rate of the students in the experimental group significantly reduces, and the pass rate and good rate significantly increases after experi-ment; third, the majority of students accept the mutual-aid teaching method; fourth, the mutual-aid teaching method can be used to significantly improve the learning motivation level of the students.

  14. EFFECTIVENESS OF THE FORUM METHOD FOR THE SELF DEVELOPMENT COURSE IN UKM AND ITS LINK WITH STUDENT INTEREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Zulkifli WAN HASSAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Student inability to explain concepts learnt in lessons using their own words academically and intellectually and their lack of interest in learning the subject are a cause of their incompetence in the development of their personality. This presents a challenge to lecturers that they should not rely entirely on conventional lectures and tutorials. Instead, there is a need to employ a variety of teaching methods to stimulate student minds and encourage them to pursue knowledge. As an effort to diversify learning and teaching methods, a study was conducted to improve weaknesses of teaching and learning methods by organizing to motivate students. This was done to help students realize that concepts learnt in the course are relevant to their daily life and to encourage them to seek knowledge of self development which can be applied outside the class. The fora were followed with an action research. This action research was aimed at analyzing the effectiveness of the forum as an alternative method of teaching and learning of the Self Development Course. A sample of 73 students of various academic faculties 2012/2013 were involved in the forum competition. The sample was divided into two groups: panelists group and audience group. Panelists wrote two reports on their experience from the beginning stage of preparing forum materials until the final stage of conducting the forum itself. Listeners groups were assessed as to their interest and observation to the forum content and its discussion while it was being conducted. The effectiveness of this strategy is based on analysis of student reports on the conducted forum and debates in it. Results show that forum received a positive response among the students. The forum approach increased student skills to relate to current issues in explaining facts they have learnt, encouraged cooperation among them to solve problems and increased interaction skill as well as built self-confidence. Therefore they could

  15. Virtualising the Quantitative Research Methods Course: An Island-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglin, James; Reece, John; Baker, Jenalle

    2015-01-01

    Many recent improvements in pedagogical practice have been enabled by the rapid development of innovative technologies, particularly for teaching quantitative research methods and statistics. This study describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a series of specialised computer laboratory sessions. The sessions combined the use of an…

  16. Integrating Program Assessment and a Career Focus into a Research Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Mary Scheuer

    2017-01-01

    Sociology research methods students in 2013 and 2016 implemented a series of "real world" data gathering activities that enhanced their learning while assisting the department with ongoing program assessment and program review. In addition to the explicit collection of program assessment data on both students' development of sociological…

  17. Equation of teachers primary school course computer with learning method based on imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Сергеевна Пучкова

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the possibility of training future teachers with the rate of computer methods of teaching through the creation of visual imagery and operate them, еxamples of practice-oriented assignments, formative professional quality based on explicit and implicit use of a visual image, which decision is based on the cognitive function of visibility.

  18. Socratic Case-Method Teaching in Sports Coach Education: Reflections of Students and Course Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Simon J.; Ryrie, Angus

    2014-01-01

    Despite reported increases in higher education (HE) sports coach education provision there are very few studies which have investigated student self-learning curricula as a mechanism to prepare sports coaches with the complexities of learning how to coach. Using an action research methodology, this article examines how case-method teaching (CMT)…

  19. Global Learning in a Geography Course Using the Mystery Method as an Approach to Complex Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applis, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In the study which is the foundation of this essay, the question is examined of whether the complexity of global issues can be solved at the level of teaching methodology. In this context, the first qualitative and constructive study was carried out which researches the Mystery Method using the Thinking-Through-Geography approach (David Leat,…

  20. BAC and Beer: Operationalizing Drunk Driving Laws in a Research Methods Course Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ralph B.; McConnell, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on an exercise utilized in a research methods class and based on social problems that invites student interest. Explains the exercise has students determine their blood alcohol level (BAC) by asking them to estimate the number of beers it would take to have them just reach driving under the influence (DUI) status. (CMK)

  1. Dental enamel defect diagnosis through different technology-based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tatiana Yuriko; Vitor, Luciana Lourenço Ribeiro; Carrara, Cleide Felício Carvalho; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel; Rios, Daniela; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2018-06-01

    Dental enamel defects (DEDs) are faulty or deficient enamel formations of primary and permanent teeth. Changes during tooth development result in hypoplasia (a quantitative defect) and/or hypomineralisation (a qualitative defect). To compare technology-based diagnostic methods for detecting DEDs. Two-hundred and nine dental surfaces of anterior permanent teeth were selected in patients, 6-11 years of age, with cleft lip with/without cleft palate. First, a conventional clinical examination was conducted according to the modified Developmental Defects of Enamel Index (DDE Index). Dental surfaces were evaluated using an operating microscope and a fluorescence-based device. Interexaminer reproducibility was determined using the kappa test. To compare groups, McNemar's test was used. Cramer's V test was used for comparing the distribution of index codes obtained after classification of all dental surfaces. Cramer's V test revealed statistically significant differences (P < .0001) in the distribution of index codes obtained using the different methods; the coefficients were 0.365 for conventional clinical examination versus fluorescence, 0.961 for conventional clinical examination versus operating microscope and 0.358 for operating microscope versus fluorescence. The sensitivity of the operating microscope and fluorescence method was statistically significant (P = .008 and P < .0001, respectively). Otherwise, the results did not show statistically significant differences in accuracy and specificity for either the operating microscope or the fluorescence methods. This study suggests that the operating microscope performed better than the fluorescence-based device and could be an auxiliary method for the detection of DEDs. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  2. Drivers of international performance of Brazilian technology-based firms

    OpenAIRE

    Serpa Fagundes de Oliveira, Maria Carolina; Scherer, Flavia Luciane; Schneider Hahn, Ivanete; de Moura Carpes, Aletéia; Brachak dos Santos, Maríndia; Nunes Piveta, Maíra

    2018-01-01

    For Technology-Based Firms, international expansion represents an opportunity for growth and value creation. The present study was designed to analyze the role of technology-based companies (TBCs) internationalization drivers on international performance. Therefore, a descriptive research was carried out with a quantitative approach performed through a survey. Data collection happened with 53 Brazilian TBCs located in innovation habitats. These data were analyzed by multivariate statistical t...

  3. Technology-based suicide prevention: current applications and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, David D; June, Jennifer D; Kinn, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    This review reports on current and emerging technologies for suicide prevention. Technology-based programs discussed include interactive educational and social networking Web sites, e-mail outreach, and programs that use mobile devices and texting. We describe innovative applications such as virtual worlds, gaming, and text analysis that are currently being developed and applied to suicide prevention and outreach programs. We also discuss the benefits and limitations of technology-based applications and discuss future directions for their use.

  4. Cervical spine instability in the course of rheumatoid arthritis – imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Mańczak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spine is affected in more than a half of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Depending on the degree of damage to the individual joints and ligaments RA-related cervical spine instability takes the form of atlanto-axial subluxation, subaxial subluxation or cranial settling. In the advanced cases spinal stenosis can occur as well as spinal cord injuries with typical neurological symptoms. The identification of patients with cervical spine instability before the occurrence of neurological complications still constitutes a diagnostic challenge. The article presents the methods of cervical spine imaging with the use of plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages associated with each method and the possibility of its application in the diagnosis of cervical spine instability in RA. The knowledge of the above mentioned issues is indispensable to select an appropriate time for surgical intervention.

  5. INFORMATIONAL-METHODICAL SUPPORT OF THE COURSE «MATHEMATICAL LOGIC AND THEORY OF ALGORITHMS»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Sinko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article the basic principles of training technique of future teachers of mathematics to foundations of mathematical logic and theory of algorithms in the Kherson State University with the use of information technologies are examined. General description of functioning of the methodical system of learning of mathematical logic with the use of information technologies, in that variant, when information technologies are presented by the integrated specialized programmatic environment of the educational purpose «MatLog» is given.

  6. METHODS FOR EVALUATION OF COMPANIES’ INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES EFFICIENCY AND CONTROL IN TEACHING COURSE "INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY GOVERNANCE"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samchynska Yaroslava

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of the information systems and technologies in economic activity is called to represent companies’ corporate principles, aims, traditions, to help in realization of the planned strategies, thanks to that the management efficiency and the cost of enterprise increases. Teaching for educational discipline «IT Governance» is directed on a study and research of these intercommunications by students of the 5th course on specialties «Computer Science», «Software Engineering» for educational level Specialist (Past Bachelor Degree, Master degree. The auditing services belong to the actual methods for evaluation of the information systems and technologies efficiency and control, which are studied according to the course «IT Governance». The article deals with the methodological basis of providing auditing services for evaluation of efficiency and control of information systems (technologies for the purpose of satisfaction of growing informational needs of companies and functional activation in their information resources. The main task of auditing services for control of information systems (information communication technologies efficiency is to evaluate independently and objectively if the information technologies provide the necessary services. The basic criteria, data ware, subject and object of audit necessary for drawing up an audit report and assurance declaring are established. The program and a detailed list of auditing procedures for evaluation of efficiency of information systems and technologies have been presented

  7. A Cornerstone Course in Sociology: Providing Students with Theory, Methods, and Career Preparation Early in the Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Mellisa

    2018-01-01

    Cornerstone courses bridge introductory content from lower-level survey courses with the more advanced theoretical and methodological content of upper-level, major-only courses. Cornerstones are implemented with the goal of better preparing students for advanced coursework and/or assisting them with understanding their major and its associated…

  8. A Method for a Retrospective Analysis of Course Objectives: Have Pursued Objectives in Fact Been Attained? Twente Educational Report Number 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, Tjeerd; van der Meer, Adri

    A method pertaining to the identification and analysis of course objectives is discussed. A framework is developed by which post facto objectives can be determined and students' attainment of the objectives can be assessed. The method can also be used for examining the quality of instruction. Using this method, it is possible to determine…

  9. A systematic review of technology-based interventions for co-occurring substance use and trauma symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Amanda K; Wilson, Sarah M; Skopp, Nancy A; Osenbach, Janyce E; Reger, Greg

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Technology-based mental health interventions are becoming increasingly common, and several have begun to target multiple outcomes in a single intervention. Recent developments in the treatment of co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder and substance use disorder has led to the development and testing of technology-based interventions for these disorders. The current systematic review examined technology-based interventions designed to improve mental health outcomes among patients with co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use. Methods Of 601 articles reviewed, 14 included a technology-based intervention for patients with these co-occurring problems. Results Seven of these studies provided preliminary evidence that technology-based interventions are likely to be efficacious in reducing either trauma symptoms or substance use. The seven remaining studies demonstrated that technology-based interventions for co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use are feasible. Discussion This review suggests that technology-based interventions for co-occurring trauma symptoms and substance use are feasible, but more work is needed to assess efficacy using scientifically rigorous studies.

  10. Method and apparatus for monitoring fluid flow between a borehole and the surrounding formations in the course of drilling operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J. L.; Gehrig, G. F.; Speers, J. M.

    1985-11-19

    A method and apparatus for establishing the rate at which fluid is transferred between a borehole and the surrounding formations in the course of moving drill string upward or downward in the borehole. A bell nipple is situated at the upper portion of the borehole. While tripping, drilling fluid is circulated into the borehole and exits through an outflow port in the bell nipple. The level of drilling fluid is maintained constant at the outflow port. Meters are provided to measure inflow and outflow rates. Circuitry is provided to establish the volume rate at which the amount of drill string within the borehole changes. The outputs of the meters and rate establishing means are summed to establish the compensated rate at which fluid is transferred between the formations and the borehole. This compensated rate is compared to an alarm limit. An alarm is activated if the compensated rate exceeds the alarm limit.

  11. Method for assessment and classification of water courses by using the community of aquatic macrophytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minciardi, M.R.; Spada, C.D.; Rossi, G.L.; Angius, R.; Orru, G.; Mancini, L.; Pace, G.; Mercheggiani, S.; Puccinelli, C.

    2009-01-01

    Studies about aquatic macrophytes as bio indicator community in Europe have been carried out since 70s. Efficient macrophytes indices, mainly for the assessment of trophic state, have been defined in nineties. In 2000, WFD includes macrophytes among the ecological quality elements for running waters. To implement Directive 2000/60/C E, European countries had to define methodologies to evaluate the ecological status of water bodies by macrophytes assessment, but almost all Member States continue to use trophic indexes. Researches carried out in Italy during last 10 years confirm the presence and the evaluability in all river types, and the efficiency of macrophytes community as bio indicator. Besides, many European indices have been tested to assess their applicability throughout the country. Particularly, the Index Macrofitique Biologique en Riviere (IBMR), formalized in France in 2003 as trophic index and currently used as french national method, is applicable in Italy. This index not only allows to evaluate the trophic level metric, but can also be used, as proposed in France, as index of ecological status, expressed as distance from the expected trophic state. [it

  12. Virtual educational complex of the courseMethods of design of experiments” in distance learning environment of Moodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Guseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the information technologies have penetrated to all spheres of human activity, including education. The main objective of the article is to show the advantages of the developed complex and to familiarize with its structure too. The article presents the arguments that the use of the distance learning tools has a significant impact on Russian education. This approach provides the conditions for the development of innovative teaching methods. The approach describes the capabilities offered by the virtual education center of distance learning Moodle too. It is attractive not only openness but because it contains a large set of libraries, classes and functions in the programming language PHP too, which makes it a convenient tool for developing various online information systems. It is shown that the effectiveness of distance learning depends on the organization of educational material. The basic modules of the course were underlined. This section provides a comprehensive understanding of material. For the verification and control of students knowledge the testing system was developed. In addition, the training package has been developed which contains the information, helping to assess the level of students knowledge. The testing system includes a list of tests divided into sections and consists of a set of questions of different complexity. The questions are stored in the single database (“The bank of questions” and can be reused in one or more courses or sections. After passing the correct answers to the test questions can be available for the student. In addition, this module includes tools for grading by the teacher. The article concludes that the virtual educational complex enables to teach students, has a friendly interface that stimulate the students to continue the work and its successful completion.

  13. INFORMATION SYSTEM QUALITY INFLUENCE ON ORGANIZATION PERFORMANCE: A MODIFICATION OF TECHNOLOGY-BASED INFORMATION SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE AND SUCCESS MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisnawati N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the effect of information system quality on technology-based accounting information systems usage and their impact on organizational performance on local government. This study is based on Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, IS Success Model, and the success of technology-based information systems. This study is a combination of previous studies conducted by Seddon and Kiew (1997, Saeed and Helm (2008, and DeLone and McLean (1992. This study used survey method and took 101 respondents from accounting staff working in Malang and Mojokerto regencies. This study uses Partial Least Square to examine research data. Research result exhibits information system qualities affecting benefit perception and user satisfaction. Technology-based accounting information systems usage in local government is influenced by benefits perception and user satisfaction. Research result concluded that technology-based accounting information systems usage will affect the performance of local government organizations.

  14. On some methods of achieving a continuous and differentiated assessment in Linear Algebra and Analytic and Differential Geometry courses and seminars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A.P. PURCARU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at highlighting some aspects related to assessment as regards its use as a differentiated training strategy for Linear Algebra and Analytic and Differential Geometry courses and seminars. Thus, the following methods of continuous differentiated assessment are analyzed and exemplified: the portfolio, the role play, some interactive methods and practical examinations.

  15. Exploring the Effectiveness of Implementing Seminars as a Teaching and an Assessment Method in a Children's Literature Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'Adawi, Sharifa Said Ali

    2017-01-01

    The classroom environment should support students' autonomy through teaching and assessment methods. This article highlights students' perceptions about the value of implementing seminars as a teaching and an assessment method in a children's literature course in a college of applied sciences (XCAS). Additionally, preparation considerations and…

  16. Two-Year Community: A Six-Year Review of Student Success in a Biology Course Using Lecture, Blended, and Hybrid Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Beatriz Y.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional lecturing has been shown again and again to be a less effective teaching method regarding student engagement and promotion in the sciences. Studies that compare different teaching methods often face limitations because, over time, courses are either substantially changed and/or are taught by different instructors. This article presents…

  17. Effect of an EBM course in combination with case method learning sessions: an RCT on professional performance, job satisfaction, and self-efficacy of occupational physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Nathalie I. R.; Schaafsma, Frederieke G.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; van Dijk, Frank J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective An intervention existing of an evidence-based medicine (EBM) course in combination with case method learning sessions (CMLSs) was designed to enhance the professional performance, self-efficacy and job satisfaction of occupational physicians. Methods A cluster randomized controlled trial

  18. Teacher candidates in an online post-baccalaureate science methods course: Implications for teaching science inquiry with technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Erica L.

    Online learning is becoming more prevalent in today's education and is changing the way students learn and instructors teach. This study proposed using an informative case study design within a multilevel conceptual framework as teacher candidates were learning to teach and use science inquiry while in an online post-baccalaureate science methods course. The purposes were to (a) explore whether the teacher candidates had a thorough understanding of scientific inquiry and how to implement higher-order thinking skills, (b) examine whether or not the teacher candidates used a variety of computer-based instructional technologies when choosing instructional objectives, and (c) identify barriers that impede teacher candidates from using science inquiry or technology singly, or the ability to incorporate technology into learning science inquiry. The findings indicate that an online approach in preparing science teachers holds great potential for using innovative technology to teach science inquiry. First, the teacher candidates did incorporate essential features of classroom inquiry, however it was limited and varied in the type of inquiry used. Second, of the 86 lesson plans submitted by the teacher candidates, less than twelve percent of the learning objectives involved higher-order skills that promoted science inquiry. Third, results supported that when using technology in their lesson planning, participants had widely varying backgrounds in reference to their familiarity with technology. However, even though each participant used some form or another, the technology used was fairly low level. Finally, when discussing implementing inquiry-based science in the lesson plans, this study identified time as a reason that participants may not be pushing for more inquiry-based lessons. The researcher also identifies that school placements were a huge factor in the amount of inquiry-based skills coded in the lesson plans. The study concludes that online teacher preparation

  19. Comparing Online with Brick and Mortar Course Learning Outcomes: An Analysis of Quantitative Methods Curriculum in Public Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ronald A.; Nikitenko, Gleb O.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching graduate students in an intensive adult-learning format presents a special challenge for quantitative analytical competencies. Students often lack necessary background, skills and motivation to deal with quantitative-skill-based course work. This study compares learning outcomes for graduate students enrolled in three course sections…

  20. Framework, process and tool for managing technology-based assets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kfir, R

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available ) and the intellectual property (IP) of the organisation, The study describes a framework linking the core processes supporting the management of technology-based assets and offerings with other organisational elements such as leadership, strategy, and culture. Specific...

  1. Technology-Based Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Erin L.; Gillard, Sharlett

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing need to implement an alternative and viable solution in U.S. K-12 schools that will address the ever-growing gap that the rapidly growing English language learner (ELL) population presents. This article examines various technology-based solutions, and their potential impact. The systematic implementation of these…

  2. What drives technology-based distractions? A structural equation model on social-psychological factors of technology-based driver distraction engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Yen Winnie; Donmez, Birsen

    2016-06-01

    With the proliferation of new mobile and in-vehicle technologies, understanding the motivations behind a driver's voluntary engagement with such technologies is crucial from a safety perspective, yet is complex. Previous literature either surveyed a large number of distractions that may be diverse, or too focuses on one particular activity, such as cell phone use. Further, earlier studies about social-psychological factors underlying driver distraction tend to focus on one or two factors in-depth, and those that examine a more comprehensive set of factors are often limited in their analyses methods. The present work considers a wide array of social-psychological factors within a structural equation model to predict their influence on a focused set of technology-based distractions. A better understanding of these facilitators can enhance the design of distraction mitigation strategies. We analysed survey responses about three technology-based driver distractions: holding phone conversations, manually interacting with cell phones, and adjusting the settings of in-vehicle technology, as well as responses on five social-psychological factors: attitude, descriptive norm, injunctive norm, technology inclination, and a risk/sensation seeking personality. Using data collected from 525 drivers (ages: 18-80), a structural equation model was built to analyse these social-psychological factors as latent variables influencing self-reported engagement in these three technology-based distractions. Self-reported engagement in technology-based distractions was found to be largely influenced by attitudes about the distractions. Personality and social norms also played a significant role, but technology inclination did not. A closer look at two age groups (18-30 and 30+) showed that the effect of social norms, especially of injunctive norm (i.e., perceived approvals), was less prominent in the 30+ age group, while personality remained a significant predictor for the 30+ age group but

  3. Plans of Implementation and Methods for Increasing Student Enrollment in the Earth Systems Science Course at Elizabeth City State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, W.

    2001-12-01

    This presentation reviews the experience of Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) in offering the Earth Systems Science (ESS) online course sponsored the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) and how it relates to our plans to offer the course in the Spring Semester of 2002. The course was offered for the first time at ECSU during the Fall semester 2000. Eight students were enrolled in the course, which may not be considered a large number; however, we felt the administration of the course was successful because of the staff's learning experience. The small number is also a reflection of the nature of ECSU's primary recruitment region of northeastern North Carolina; this area is extremely rural with a smaller population, lower economic development, and fewer cultural amenities than most regions of the state. Our approach to this project is for a long-term effective offering of a course that is much needed, especially in this area of the state. The ultimate goal is to develop ESS as our online offering of courses in the Geoscience Department curriculum as to recruit students who might not have the opportunity to take college-level courses because of daytime work commitments and/or inaccessibility to a local college or university. A major component of ESS is its focus on problem-based learning built upon the life experiences of participating students. Having learned from the previous offering of the course, the following are objectives related to the Spring Semester 2002: 1. To get ESS to become a part of the Geoscience curriculum so that it will be listed on the schedule of classes for the Spring Semester 2002 and each succeeding semester; 2. To aggressively reach out to the public school teachers, especially in the recruitment region of ECSU in northeastern North Carolina, by using effective recruitment strategies; 3. To have an active and continuous communication with prospective students prior to and immediately after the enrollment, as well as being

  4. Synthesis of Collaborative Learning Processes with Technology Based Education to Enhance Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    A major hurdle in school education in India is the presence of large number of teachers who are inexperienced and have merely taken up the profession of teaching only after exhausting all avenues or getting rejected from all quarters. Empowering and training such teachers with information is a herculean task. Students tend to pay attention and show enthusiasm in learning when they view the class as relevant to themselves and connected to their interests. The current teaching-learning methods for teaching science and astronomy have become obsolete and require a major overhaul. A teaching-learning process which concentrates on an explorative-collaborative-comprehending methodology with simultaneous combination of technology has been developed with the objective to reignite the scientific temper among the future budding scientists. Attaining this goal will be possible when instructors adopt a bottom-up approach, which involves understanding the student's needs, designing flexible course content and synchronizing teaching techniques that focus on increasing student engagement by making the learning experience meaningful and purposeful. The International Year of Light (IYL 2015) is a global initiative that highlights to the citizens of the world the importance of light and optical technologies in their lives, for their futures, and for the development of society. One of the strong legacies left by the 2009 International Year of Astronomy was to use Astronomy in making the world a better place. On the eve of IYL 2015, an Optical Society funded outreach program, 'Spark of Light' was organised for under-privileged school children by using the explorative-collaborative-technology based mechanism and make them understand the nature and properties of light with emphasis on how Astronomy has been crucial for the evolution of sophisticated technology. A major paradigm shift from our previous program was the engagement of such untrained teachers in each and every aspect of

  5. The impact of science methods courses on preservice elementary teachers' science teaching self-efficacy beliefs: Case studies from Turkey and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursal, Murat

    Four case studies in two American and two Turkish science methods classrooms were conducted to investigate the changes in preservice elementary teachers' personal science teaching efficacy (PSTE) beliefs during their course periods. The findings indicated that while Turkish preservice elementary teachers (TR sample) started the science methods course semester with higher PSTE than their American peers (US sample), due to a significant increase in the US sample's and an insignificant decline in the TR sample's PSTE scores, both groups completed the science methods course with similar PSTE levels. Consistent with Bandura's social cognitive theory, describing four major sources of self-efficacy, the inclusion of mastery experiences (inquiry activities and elementary school micro-teaching experiences) and vicarious experiences (observation of course instructor and supervisor elementary teacher) into the science methods course, providing positive social persuasion (positive appraisal from the instructor and classmates), and improving physiological states (reduced science anxiety and positive attitudes toward becoming elementary school teachers), were found to contribute to the significant enhancement of the US sample's PSTE beliefs. For the TR sample, although some of the above sources were present, the lack of student teaching experiences and inservice teacher observations, as well as the TR samples' negative attitudes toward becoming elementary school teachers and a lack of positive classroom support were found to make Turkish preservice teachers rely mostly on their mastery in science concepts, and therefore resulted in not benefiting from their science methods course, in terms of enhancing their PSTE beliefs. Calls for reforms in the Turkish education system that will include more mastery experiences in the science methods courses and provide more flexibility for students to choose their high school majors and college programs, and switch between them are made. In

  6. Exploring the experiences of instructors teaching massive open online courses in tourism and hospitality: a mixed methods approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jingjing; Cantoni, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have existed as a disruptive educational phenomenon for nine years. Grounded in the roots of distance education, open education, Open Educational Resources, and OpenCourseWare, MOOCs have now survived various critics and have continued growing globally. Reports about MOOCs in both the press and scholarly publications began to grow significantly in 2013 (Sánchez-Vera, Leon Urrutia, & Davis, 2015; Zancanaro & Domingues, 2017) and, since then, more and mo...

  7. The Promise of Technology to Confront Dilemmas in Teacher Education: The Use of WebQuests in Problem-Based Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leigh K.; Draper, Roni Jo; Sabey, Brenda L.

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the use of WebQuests as a teaching tool in problem-based elementary methods courses. We explored the potential of WebQuests to address three dilemmas faced in teacher education: (a) modeling instruction that is based on current learning theory and research-based practices, (b) providing preservice teachers with…

  8. Are Prospective Elementary School Teachers' Social Studies Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Related to Their Learning Approaches in a Social Studies Teaching Methods Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Sahin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to contribute to the growing literature on learning approaches and teacher self-efficacy beliefs by examining associations between prospective elementary school teachers' learning approaches in a social studies teaching methods course and their social studies teaching efficacy beliefs. One hundred ninety-two prospective elementary…

  9. The Effect of Blackboard Collaborate-Based Instruction on Pre-Service Teachers' Achievement in the EFL Teaching Methods Course at Faculties of Education for Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hussein El-ghamry Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of Blackboard-based instruction on pre-service teachers' achievement in the teaching methods course at The Faculty of Education for Girls, in Bisha, KSA. Forty seventh-level English Department students were randomly assigned into either the experimental group (N = 20) or the control group (N = 20). While studying…

  10. Teaching an Interdisciplinary Graduate-Level Methods Course in an Openly-Networked Connected Learning Environment: A Glass Half-Full

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secret, Mary; Bryant, Nita L.; Cummings, Cory R.

    2017-01-01

    Our paper describes the design and delivery of an online interdisciplinary social science research methods course (ISRM) for graduate students in sociology, education, social work, and public administration. Collaborative activities and learning took place in two types of computer-mediated learning environments: a closed Blackboard course…

  11. Examining the Impact of a Video Case-Based Mathematics Methods Course on Secondary Pre-Service Teachers' Skills at Analysing Students' Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mara Vanina; Superfine, Alison Castro; Carlton, Theresa; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on results from a study conducted with two cohorts of pre-service teachers (PSTs) in a video case-based mathematics methods course at a large Midwestern university in the US. The motivation for this study was to look beyond whether or not PSTs pay attention to mathematical thinking of students, as shown by previous studies when…

  12. Technology-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Communication after Acquired Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A. Des Roches

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of technology has allowed for several advances in aphasia rehabilitation for individuals with acquired brain injury. Thirty-one previous studies that provide technology-based language or language and cognitive rehabilitation are examined in terms of the domains addressed, the types of treatments that were provided, details about the methods and the results, including which types of outcomes are reported. From this, we address questions about how different aspects of the delivery of treatment can influence rehabilitation outcomes, such as whether the treatment was standardized or tailored, whether the participants were prescribed homework or not, and whether intensity was varied. Results differed by these aspects of treatment delivery but ultimately the studies demonstrated consistent improvement on various outcome measures. With these aspects of technology-based treatment in mind, the ultimate goal of personalized rehabilitation is discussed.

  13. Technology-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Communication after Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Roches, Carrie A; Kiran, Swathi

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of technology has allowed for several advances in aphasia rehabilitation for individuals with acquired brain injury. Thirty-one previous studies that provide technology-based language or language and cognitive rehabilitation are examined in terms of the domains addressed, the types of treatments that were provided, details about the methods and the results, including which types of outcomes are reported. From this, we address questions about how different aspects of the delivery of treatment can influence rehabilitation outcomes, such as whether the treatment was standardized or tailored, whether the participants were prescribed homework or not, and whether intensity was varied. Results differed by these aspects of treatment delivery but ultimately the studies demonstrated consistent improvement on various outcome measures. With these aspects of technology-based treatment in mind, the ultimate goal of personalized rehabilitation is discussed.

  14. Laparoscopy training in surgical education: the utility of incorporating a structured preclinical laparoscopy course into the traditional apprenticeship method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Win, Gunter; Van Bruwaene, Siska; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Crea, Nicola; Zhang, Zhewen; De Ridder, Dirk; Miserez, Marc

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether preclinical laparoscopy training offers a benefit over standard apprenticeship training and apprenticeship training in combination with simulation training. This randomized controlled trial consisted of 3 groups of first-year surgical registrars receiving a different teaching method in laparoscopic surgery. The KU LEUVEN Faculty of Medicine is the largest medical faculty in Belgium. Thirty final-year medical students starting a general surgical career in the next academic year. Thirty final-year medical students were randomized into 3 groups, which differed in the way they were exposed to laparoscopic simulation training but were comparable in regard to ambidexterity, sex, age, and laparoscopic psychomotoric skills. The control group received only clinical training during surgical residentship, whereas the interval group received clinical training in combination with simulation training. The registrars were allowed to do deliberate practice. The Centre for Surgical Technologies Preclinical Training Programme (CST PTP) group received a preclinical simulation course during the final year as medical students, but was not exposed to any extra simulation training during surgical residentship. At the beginning of surgical residentship and 6 months later, all subjects performed a standardized suturing task and a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a POP Trainer. All procedures were recorded together with time and motion tracking parameters. All videos were scored by a blinded observer using global rating scales. At baseline the 3 groups were comparable. At 6 months, for suturing, the CST PTP group was better than both the other groups with respect to time, checklist, and amount of movements. The interval group was better than the control group on only the time and checklist score. For the cholecystectomy evaluation, there was a statistical difference between the CST PTP study group and both other groups on all evaluation scales in favor of the CST PTP

  15. Drivers of international performance of Brazilian technology-based firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Serpa Fagundes de Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available For Technology-Based Firms, international expansion represents an opportunity for growth and value creation. The present study was designed to analyze the role of technology-based companies (TBCs internationalization drivers on international performance. Therefore, a descriptive research was carried out with a quantitative approach performed through a survey. Data collection happened with 53 Brazilian TBCs located in innovation habitats. These data were analyzed by multivariate statistical technique. The results showed that the determinants of the international performance of Brazilian TBCs, can be set by external influencers (localization in innovation habitats, integration into global productive chains, partnerships and strategic alliances for innovation and government policies and internal influencers (innovation capability, international market orientation and international marketing skills.

  16. The success factors in the new technology based firms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, C.; Villar, L.

    2007-01-01

    New Technology Based Firms (NTBFs) are taking an important role around competitive strategies inside different administrative frameworks, understanding their value for society and the need based on work plans to support their development. In this case, next lines are focused on conceptual side about NTBFs reality even more an analytical model proposal based on a structure composed by tangible and intangible assets what creating a global vision of entrepreneurial process and main issues what impacting on success rate. (Author) 88 refs

  17. Innovation Environment in Small Technology-Based Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves Silveira Fiates, Gabriela; Azevedo Fiates, José Eduardo; Ribeiro Serra, Fernando A; Portugal Ferreira, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Innovation has been identified as a strategy to achieve competitive advantage, particularly in contexts of change and especially for technology-based companies – TBCs. Although the adoption of innovation strategies is not easy, small companies have an organizational environment more conducive to innovation. This article examines how managers and employees of small TBCs perceive aspects of the internal environment of innovation in the organization (culture, organizational structure, personnel ...

  18. Subjective safety and self-confidence in prehospital trauma care and learning progress after trauma-courses: part of the prospective longitudinal mixed-methods EPPTC-trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häske, David; Beckers, Stefan K; Hofmann, Marzellus; Lefering, Rolf; Grützner, Paul A; Stöckle, Ulrich; Papathanassiou, Vassilios; Münzberg, Matthias

    2017-08-14

    Prehospital trauma care is stressful and requires multi-professional teamwork. A decrease in the number of accident victims ultimately affects the routine and skills and underlines the importance of effective training. Standardized courses, like PHTLS, are established for health care professionals to improve the prehospital care of trauma patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the subjective safety in prehospital trauma care and learning progress by paramedics in a longitudinal analysis. This was a prospective intervention trial and part of the mixed-method longitudinal EPPTC-trial, evaluating subjective and objective changes among participants and real patient care as a result of PHTLS courses. Participants were evaluated with pre/post questionnaires as well as one year after the course. We included 236 datasets. In the pre/post comparison, an increased performance could be observed in nearly all cases. The result shows that the expectations of the participants of the course were fully met even after one year (p = 0.002). The subjective safety in trauma care is significantly better even one year after the course (p < 0.001). Regression analysis showed that (ABCDE)-structure is decisive (p = 0.036) as well as safety in rare and common skills (both p < 0.001). Most skills are also rated better after one year. Knowledge and specific safety are assessed as worse after one year. The courses meet the expectations of the participants and increase the subjective safety in the prehospital care of trauma patients. ABCDE-structure and safety in skills are crucial. In the short term, both safety in skills and knowledge can be increased, but the courses do not have the power to maintain knowledge and specific subjective safety issues over a year. German Clinical Trials Register, ID DRKS00004713 , registered 14. February 2014.

  19. Embedding Entrepreneurs in Improving The Skills Of Entrepreneurs of Technology-Based Vocational School In Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam Agung, Achmad; Mukhadis, Amat; Sutadji, Eddy; Purnomo

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to identify the characteristics of entrepreneurship/entrepreneurial potential-based technology, for in order to develop the traits of an entrepreneur-based technology in Indonesia in general and Surabaya in particular. This specification aims to: 1) determine the profile of the socio-demographic and entrepreneur of technology experts (technopreneur), technology developers and students; 5) determine the need for the skills of an entrepreneur-based technology; and 3) recommend actions that will improve the skills of technology-based entrepreneurship. This study is a small study, the type of this research is research and development with a quantitative approach, whereas the respondents as the following: taken random participants 5 technology developers, 5 entrepreneurs of technology-based, and the students 10 of the vocational school in Surabaya . A tool of descriptive statistics (i.e., count the frequency, tools and analysis cross-tabular) is used to analyze the data. Score the competence of the entrepreneur personally from the respondents was also determined. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of T-test is further used to determine the significance of differences in average values between the nature of the Competence of the entrepreneur personal in between the groups of respondents are different. The results showed that the entrepreneurial technology-based and students are significantly different from the experts of today’s technology in search of opportunities, risk-taking and self-confidence. The need for the development of entrepreneurship skill-based technopreneur. Shortcomings search of opportunity, self-confidence, risk taking, networking and negotiation and an essential characteristic of the Competence of the entrepreneur and another private between the developer and the students should be addressed by a special program and training program in the future and/or courses and programs were instituted in entrepreneurship. Components of

  20. The influence of previous subject experience on interactions during peer instruction in an introductory physics course: A mixed methods analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondruska, Judy A.

    Over the past decade, peer instruction and the introduction of student response systems has provided a means of improving student engagement and achievement in large-lecture settings. While the nature of the student discourse occurring during peer instruction is less understood, existing studies have shown student ideas about the subject, extraneous cues, and confidence level appear to matter in the student-student discourse. Using a mixed methods research design, this study examined the influence of previous subject experience on peer instruction in an introductory, one-semester Survey of Physics course. Quantitative results indicated students in discussion pairs where both had previous subject experience were more likely to answer clicker question correctly both before and after peer discussion compared to student groups where neither partner had previous subject experience. Students in mixed discussion pairs were not statistically different in correct response rates from the other pairings. There was no statistically significant difference between the experience pairs on unit exam scores or the Peer Instruction Partner Survey. Although there was a statistically significant difference between the pre-MPEX and post-MPEX scores, there was no difference between the members of the various subject experience peer discussion pairs. The qualitative study, conducted after the quantitative study, helped to inform the quantitative results by exploring the nature of the peer interactions through survey questions and a series of focus groups discussions. While the majority of participants described a benefit to the use of clickers in the lecture, their experience with their discussion partners varied. Students with previous subject experience tended to describe peer instruction more positively than students who did not have previous subject experience, regardless of the experience level of their partner. They were also more likely to report favorable levels of comfort with

  1. Identification of human circadian genes based on time course gene expression profiles by using a deep learning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Zhong, Tingyan; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Chenglin; Lu, Hui

    2018-06-01

    Circadian genes express periodically in an approximate 24-h period and the identification and study of these genes can provide deep understanding of the circadian control which plays significant roles in human health. Although many circadian gene identification algorithms have been developed, large numbers of false positives and low coverage are still major problems in this field. In this study we constructed a novel computational framework for circadian gene identification using deep neural networks (DNN) - a deep learning algorithm which can represent the raw form of data patterns without imposing assumptions on the expression distribution. Firstly, we transformed time-course gene expression data into categorical-state data to denote the changing trend of gene expression. Two distinct expression patterns emerged after clustering of the state data for circadian genes from our manually created learning dataset. DNN was then applied to discriminate the aperiodic genes and the two subtypes of periodic genes. In order to assess the performance of DNN, four commonly used machine learning methods including k-nearest neighbors, logistic regression, naïve Bayes, and support vector machines were used for comparison. The results show that the DNN model achieves the best balanced precision and recall. Next, we conducted large scale circadian gene detection using the trained DNN model for the remaining transcription profiles. Comparing with JTK_CYCLE and a study performed by Möller-Levet et al. (doi: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1217154110), we identified 1132 novel periodic genes. Through the functional analysis of these novel circadian genes, we found that the GTPase superfamily exhibits distinct circadian expression patterns and may provide a molecular switch of circadian control of the functioning of the immune system in human blood. Our study provides novel insights into both the circadian gene identification field and the study of complex circadian-driven biological

  2. An Example of the Use of Research Methods and Findings as an Experiential Learning Exercise in an Accounting Theory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Bruce; Philipich, Kirk; Blatz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this teaching note is to describe an experiential learning exercise used in a master's level financial accounting theory course. The experiential exercise illustrates how order effects can affect user's judgments, a long-standing research finding. This experiential exercise was used in an attempt to make students more cognizant of…

  3. Shifting Pre-Service Teachers' Beliefs about Mathematics Teaching: The Contextual Situation of a Mathematics Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Limin

    2017-01-01

    For pre-service teachers (PSTs) who have been exposed to traditional approaches, teacher education courses can be a revelatory experience in their development as educators. This study explores if Canadian upper elementary/lower secondary (grades 4-10) PSTs change their beliefs about mathematics teaching as a result of taking a mathematics methods…

  4. Experiencing Restorative Justice Practices within the Context of an Academic Course--A Phenomenological Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedinsky, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored restorative justice arising in the context of an academic high school course in which students learned restorative justice principles and strategies. Given that the literature provided limited guidance of restorative justice in this context, these novel circumstances presented a unique opportunity for study. The central…

  5. A Grounded Theory of Preservice Music Educators' Lesson Planning Processes within Field Experience Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Elizabeth Cassidy; Bond, Vanessa L.; Powell, Sean R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to understand the process of field experience lesson planning for preservice music educators enrolled in choral, general, and instrumental music education courses within three university contexts. Data sources included multiple interviews, written responses, and field texts from 42 participants. Four…

  6. Challenging Perceptions of Academic Research as Bias Free: Promoting a Social Justice Framework in Social Work Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotera, Nicole; Walls, N. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The required research courses in social work education are, perhaps, one of the more difficult content areas in which to infuse direct teaching and knowledge acquisition of multiculturalism. The study presented in this article examines the outcomes of systematically addressing social justice within a required master's level social work research…

  7. Three Approaches to Teaching Art Methods Courses: Child Art, Visual Culture, and Issues-Based Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, EunJung; Lim, Maria; Kim, Minam

    2012-01-01

    In this article, three art educators reflect on their ideas and experiences in developing and implementing innovative projects for their courses focusing on art for elementary education majors. They explore three different approaches. The three areas that are discussed in depth include: (1) understanding child art; (2) visual culture; and (3)…

  8. Promoting mental wellbeing among older people: technology-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Anna K; Nordmyr, Johanna; Matosevic, Tihana; Park, A-La; Wahlbeck, Kristian; McDaid, David

    2017-08-30

    This systematic review explored the effectiveness of technology-based interventions in promoting the mental health and wellbeing of people aged 65 and over. Data were collected as part of a wider review commissioned by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in England on the effectiveness of different actions to promote the mental wellbeing and independence of older people. All studies identified through this review were subject to a detailed critical appraisal of quality, looking at internal and external validity. Twenty-one papers covering evaluations of technological interventions were identified. They examined the psychosocial effects of technologies for education, exposure to, and/or training to use, computers and the internet, telephone/internet communication and computer gaming. Few studies took the form of randomized controlled trials, with little comparability in outcome measures, resulting in an inconsistent evidence base with moderate strength and quality. However, three out of six studies with high or moderate quality ratings (all focused on computer/internet training) reported statistically significant positive effects on psychosocial outcomes, including increased life satisfaction and experienced social support, as well as reduced depression levels among intervention recipients. The review results highlight the need for more methodologically rigorous studies evaluating the effects of technology-based interventions on mental wellbeing. Well-performed technology-based interventions to promote various aspects of mental wellbeing, as identified in this review, can serve as best practice examples in this emerging field. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Dynamic managerial capability of technology-based international new ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altshuler, Liliya

    2014-01-01

    case study of a technology-based INV conducted over the period of 3.5 years, starting 8 years into the firm’s history. This unique design has enabled close observation of the specific events and challenges the firm has been facing after its initial success, and of the aspects in the firm’s management...... to resource availability. The study takes the dynamic capability perspective and focuses on INVs’ management, which are seen as founders and builders of the processes, rules and structures that lay the basis for long-term competitive advantage for such firms. Based on the findings, specific aspects...

  10. The Alliance Capability of Technology-Based Born Globals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxtorp, Liliya Altshuler; Elg, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the aspects comprising the alliance capability of technology-based born globals. Alliance capability is regarded as a set of organizational skills necessary from the decision to search for a partner for a technology collaboration, which may also involve a marketing...... and risks of collaborating with MNEs.Methodology: A longitudinal process study of a Danish technology born global with three embedded cases of its R&D and marketing alliances with Asian MNEs.Findings: The organisational skills comprising the alliance capability are defined to be internal and external...

  11. World food and nutrition: the scientific and technological base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortman, S

    1980-07-04

    Alleviation of world hunger and poverty will require the accelerated development and application in each low-income country of a broad spectrum of technologies based on advances in the biological, social, and physical sciences. They will range from improved cropping systems for farmers or small labor-intensive enterprises (small and beautiful) to nationwide transportation and communications systems, power grids, and other distribution and marketing capabilities (big and beautiful). Concerted action through a combination of commodity production campaigns, area development efforts, and overhaul of outdated national agencies offers the best prospect for overcoming both hunger and poverty.

  12. METHODS FOR EVALUATION OF COMPANIES’ INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES EFFICIENCY AND CONTROL IN TEACHING COURSE "INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY GOVERNANCE"

    OpenAIRE

    Samchynska Yaroslava

    2014-01-01

    The use of the information systems and technologies in economic activity is called to represent companies’ corporate principles, aims, traditions, to help in realization of the planned strategies, thanks to that the management efficiency and the cost of enterprise increases. Teaching for educational discipline «IT Governance» is directed on a study and research of these intercommunications by students of the 5th course on specialties «Computer Science», «Software Engineering» for educational ...

  13. A simplified method for power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from time-course data and steady-state flux profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Kitayama, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Ayako; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Nakayama, Yoichi; Tomita, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In order to improve understanding of metabolic systems there have been attempts to construct S-system models from time courses. Conventionally, non-linear curve-fitting algorithms have been used for modelling, because of the non-linear properties of parameter estimation from time series. However, the huge iterative calculations required have hindered the development of large-scale metabolic pathway models. To solve this problem we propose a novel method involving power-law...

  14. Comparison of traditional advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) course instruction vs. a scenario-based, performance oriented team instruction (SPOTI) method for Korean paramedic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher C; Im, Mark; Kim, Tae Min; Stapleton, Edward R; Kim, Kyuseok; Suh, Gil Joon; Singer, Adam J; Henry, Mark C

    2010-01-01

    Current Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) course instruction involves a 2-day course with traditional lectures and limited team interaction. We wish to explore the advantages of a scenario-based performance-oriented team instruction (SPOTI) method to implement core ACLS skills for non-English-speaking international paramedic students. The objective of this study was to determine if scenario-based, performance-oriented team instruction (SPOTI) improves educational outcomes for the ACLS instruction of Korean paramedic students. Thirty Korean paramedic students were randomly selected into two groups. One group of 15 students was taught the traditional ACLS course. The other 15 students were instructed using a SPOTI method. Each group was tested using ACLS megacode examinations endorsed by the American Heart Association. All 30 students passed the ACLS megacode examination. In the traditional ACLS study group an average of 85% of the core skills were met. In the SPOTI study group an average of 93% of the core skills were met. In particular, the SPOTI study group excelled at physical examination skills such as airway opening, assessment of breathing, signs of circulation, and compression rates. In addition, the SPOTI group performed with higher marks on rhythm recognition compared to the traditional group. The traditional group performed with higher marks at providing proper drug dosages compared to the SPOTI students. However, the students enrolled in the SPOTI method resulted in higher megacode core compliance scores compared to students trained in traditional ACLS course instruction. These differences did not achieve statistical significance due to the small sample size. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TECHNICAL COURSES

    CERN Multimedia

    Enseignement Technique; Technical Training; Monique Duval - Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    C++ for Particle Physicists By Paul KUNZ Please note that Paul Kunz will be giving his very popular and highly recommended C++ course again on 20 ­ 24 November. The course costs 200 CHF, and advance registration is required. People with CERN EDH accounts can apply electronically directly from the Web course description page : C++ for Particle Physicists Team Visitors should ask their Group Leader to send an e-mail to the DTO of EP Division, M. Burri, referring to the ‘C++ for Particle Physicists’ course and giving their name, CERN ID number, the Team account number to which the course fee should be charged, and VERY IMPORTANTLY an email address to which an invitation to the course can be sent.

  16. NEW COURSES

    CERN Document Server

    Enseignement Technique; Tél. 74924; Technical Training; Monique Duval; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    C++ for Particle Physicists By Paul KUNZ Please note that Paul Kunz will be giving his very popular and highly recommended C++ course again on 20-24 November. The course costs 200 CHF, and advance registration is required. People with CERN EDH accounts can apply electronically directly from the Web course description page : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P9798/Software/cpppp_e.htm Team Visitors should ask their Group Leader to send an e-mail to the DTO of EP Division, M. Burri, referring to the ‘C++ for Particle Physicists’ course and giving their name, CERN ID number, the Team account number to which the course fee should be charged, and VERY IMPORTANTLY an email address to which an invitation to the course can be sent.

  17. TECHNICAL COURSES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2000-01-01

    C++ for Particle Physicists By Paul KUNZ Please note that Paul Kunz will be giving his very popular and highly recommended C++ course again on 20 ­ 24 November. The course costs 200 CHF, and advance registration is required. People with CERN EDH accounts can apply electronically directly from the Web course description page : http://www.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P9798/Software/cpppp_e.htm Team Visitors should ask their Group Leader to send an e-mail to the DTO of EP Division, M. Burri, referring to the ‘C++ for Particle Physicists’ course and giving their name, CERN ID number, the Team account number to which the course fee should be charged, and VERY IMPORTANTLY an email address to which an invitation to the course can be sent.

  18. The Effectiveness of Conceptual Map Training Method on the Achievement of Social-Economic Skill Course in Male Students with Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoume Pourmohamadreza Tajrishi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of present study was to determine the effectiveness of conceptual map training method on the achievement of social-economic skill course in male students with intellectual disability. Methods: This study was semi-experimental and 34 male students with intellectual disability who were educating in 3rd grade at pre-professional level in high school selected randomly from Talash Exceptional Center in Tabriz City. Their academic achievement in social-economic skill course were assessed by teacher-made and performance tests. Subjects were assigned in control and experimental groups randomly and equally. Experimental group participated in 8 sessions and were trained by conceptual map method for one month (8 sessions 2 sessions weekly. At the end of eightieth session and one month later, subjects answered to teacher-made and performance tests again. Data were analyzed by analysis of covariance. Results: Findings showed that the conceptual map training method had positive effect on achievement of social-economic skill in students (P<0.01. But, its effectiveness wasn’t persistent after one month in follow-up test. Discussion: Regarding to positive effects of conceptual map training method on meaningful learning, it seems as an effective method for intellectually disabled male students who require deep learning to understand the content of their lessons.

  19. Evidence for anecdotes: Examining use of stories in introductory biology courses with a mixed-methods approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Jennifer Susan

    2005-11-01

    Instructional stories can be an effective way to teach science concepts. However, research has not examined the extent to which stories are being used, and how they are received. More research on the use of story in biology classes may lead to more conscious use of story by instructors, which may lead to a better understanding of biological concepts by students. The purpose of this study was to examine how instructors and students use stories in university introductory biology courses, and the degree to which these stories are perceived to be effective. To examine this phenomenon, a nationwide instructor survey, a university-wide student survey, and multiple case studies were used. Two case studies included observation of lectures, interviews with (36) students, and interviews with instructors (4) over two semesters of an organismal biology course. Instructor survey participants (N = 78) were gathered by posting email invitations, and student survey participants (N = 260) were volunteers from introductory biology courses at a middle-sized university. Several types of stories were observed, including personal experience stories, historical anecdotes, and "you" stories. Students reported increased affective learning when stories were told, and remembered mostly humorous stories. In the instructor survey, no significant differences emerged between genders, type of biology taught, or communicator style and instructional story frequency. However, reports of personal experience story frequency did increase significantly (p ethnicity, although non-science majors reported that their instructors used stories significantly more frequently (p perceived learning loss for non-science majors, but not for science majors. The researcher suggests that stories can be an effective tool to teach biology, particularly if the instructor is aware of her audience and uses stories primarily to help students understand how concepts are related to "real life."

  20. The Effectiveness of Drama Method in Unit “The Systems in Our Bodies” in Science and Technology Course: Using Two Tier Diagnostic Test

    OpenAIRE

    Ümmühan Ormancı; Sevil ÖZCAN

    2012-01-01

    In the study, it has been aimed to examine the effect of usage the drama method on the students’ success in the unit of “The Systems in Our Bodies’ in Science and Technology course. In this regard, as success test in the study, two tier diagnostic tests were used. In the study, a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design was used and 36 students in the 6th grade were included in the study. In the application period; the lessons were maintained with drama method supported the Science and Tech...

  1. Interprofessional education for personalized medicine through technology-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Susanne B; Mills, Rachel; Aucoin, Julia; Taekman, Jeff

    2015-06-01

    The delivery of personalized medicine utilizing genetic and genomic technologies is anticipated to involve many medical specialties. Interprofessional education will be key to the delivery of personalized medicine in order to reduce disjointed or uncoordinated clinical care, and optimize effective communication to promote patient understanding and engagement regarding the use of or need for these services. While several health professional organizations have endorsed and/or developed core competencies for genetics and genomics, the lack of interprofessional guidelines and training may hamper the delivery of coordinated personalized medicine. In this perspective, we consider the potential for interprofessional education and training using technology-based approaches, such as virtual simulation and gaming, compared with traditional educational approaches.

  2. Physical security technology base programs for physical security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, J.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is the US Department of Energy's lead laboratory for physical security research and development (R and D). In support of this mission, Sandia has maintained for several years an R and D program in each of the following technology areas: Intrusion Detection, Entry Control, CCTV Assessment, Access Delay, Alarm Display, and Guard Equipment and Training. The purpose of the technology base programs is to maintain cognizance of the capabilities of the commercial market, identify improvements and transfer technology to industry and facilities. The output of these programs supports the development of new equipment and advanced system concepts, demonstrations of proof-of-principles and system implementation. This paper will review the status of current developments and discuss trends in new technologies which are being explored for future applications, i.e., artificial intelligence, expert systems, robotics, and more automated systems

  3. Innovation Environment in Small Technology-Based Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Gonçalves Silveira Fiates

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovation has been identified as a strategy to achieve competitive advantage, particularly in contexts of change and especially for technology-based companies – TBCs. Although the adoption of innovation strategies is not easy, small companies have an organizational environment more conducive to innovation. This article examines how managers and employees of small TBCs perceive aspects of the internal environment of innovation in the organization (culture, organizational structure, personnel and infrastructure and their suitability for the innovation process. This is a qualitative research from a multicase study on five companies located in an incubator. Data were collected through open interviews, using a semi-structured script, with one of the managers and two employees from each company. Data were analyzed from preliminary content analysis. The results showed some discrepancies between the perceptions of managers and employees about the issues investigated and their suitability for the innovation system, as well as between reality and the theoretical basis used.

  4. French Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.

  5. [Application of PBL combined with SP method in during-course practice of endodontics for undergraduate dental students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Na; Qiu, Li-Hong; Zhan, Fu-Liang; Xue, Ming

    2016-10-01

    To apply problem-based learning (PBL) combined with standardized patients(SP) in during-course practice of endodontics for undergraduate dental students, in order to improve the teaching quality. One hundred and four undergraduate dental students of China Medical University School of Stomatology were randomly divided into 2 groups, 52 students in each group. One group were taught with PBL combined with SP while the other group with lecture-based learning (LBL) alone. The teaching effect was measured with examination and questionnaire survey. The data were analyzed by Student's t test using SPSS 11.5 software package. Students in PBL combined with SP group was better than LBL group in case analysis, didactic tests, practical tests and total scores, and there was significant difference between the two groups (Pendodontics to undergraduate dental students.

  6. A correction method for systematic error in (1)H-NMR time-course data validated through stochastic cell culture simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, Stanislav; Aucoin, Marc G

    2015-09-04

    as 2.5 % under a wide range of conditions. Both the simulation framework and error correction method represent examples of time-course analysis that can be applied to further developments in (1)H-NMR methodology and the more general application of quantitative metabolomics.

  7. A simplified method for power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from time-course data and steady-state flux profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Ayako; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Nakayama, Yoichi; Tomita, Masaru

    2006-07-17

    In order to improve understanding of metabolic systems there have been attempts to construct S-system models from time courses. Conventionally, non-linear curve-fitting algorithms have been used for modelling, because of the non-linear properties of parameter estimation from time series. However, the huge iterative calculations required have hindered the development of large-scale metabolic pathway models. To solve this problem we propose a novel method involving power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from the Jacobian of the targeted system and the steady-state flux profiles by linearization of S-systems. The results of two case studies modelling a straight and a branched pathway, respectively, showed that our method reduced the number of unknown parameters needing to be estimated. The time-courses simulated by conventional kinetic models and those described by our method behaved similarly under a wide range of perturbations of metabolite concentrations. The proposed method reduces calculation complexity and facilitates the construction of large-scale S-system models of metabolic pathways, realizing a practical application of reverse engineering of dynamic simulation models from the Jacobian of the targeted system and steady-state flux profiles.

  8. A simplified method for power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from time-course data and steady-state flux profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimoto Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to improve understanding of metabolic systems there have been attempts to construct S-system models from time courses. Conventionally, non-linear curve-fitting algorithms have been used for modelling, because of the non-linear properties of parameter estimation from time series. However, the huge iterative calculations required have hindered the development of large-scale metabolic pathway models. To solve this problem we propose a novel method involving power-law modelling of metabolic pathways from the Jacobian of the targeted system and the steady-state flux profiles by linearization of S-systems. Results The results of two case studies modelling a straight and a branched pathway, respectively, showed that our method reduced the number of unknown parameters needing to be estimated. The time-courses simulated by conventional kinetic models and those described by our method behaved similarly under a wide range of perturbations of metabolite concentrations. Conclusion The proposed method reduces calculation complexity and facilitates the construction of large-scale S-system models of metabolic pathways, realizing a practical application of reverse engineering of dynamic simulation models from the Jacobian of the targeted system and steady-state flux profiles.

  9. Information technology-based standardized patient education in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Minna; Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta

    2008-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to describe nurses' experiences of information technology-based standardized patient education in inpatient psychiatric care. Serious mental health problems are an increasing global concern. Emerging evidence supports the implementation of practices that are conducive to patient self-management and improved patient outcomes among chronically ill patients with mental health problems. In contrast, the attitude of staff towards information technology has been reported to be contradictory in mental health care. After 1 year of using an Internet-based portal (Mieli.Net) developed for patients with schizophrenia spectrum psychosis, all 89 participating nurses were asked to complete questionnaires about their experiences. The data were collected in 2006. Fifty-six participants (63%) returned completed questionnaires and the data were analysed using content analysis. Nurses' experiences of the information technology-based standardized patient education were categorized into two major categories describing the advantages and obstacles in using information technology. Nurses thought that it brought the patients and nurses closer to each other and helped nurses to provide individual support for their patients. However, the education was time-consuming. Systematic patient education using information technology is a promising method of patient-centred care which supports nurses in their daily work. However, it must fit in with clinical activities, and nurses need some guidance in understanding its benefits. The study data can be used in policy-making when developing methods to improve the transparency of information provision in psychiatric nursing.

  10. Exploring impacts of the EED 420 science methods course on pre-service elementary teachers’ views regarding the nature of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EunJin Bang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the impact of a semester-long science methods course examining pre-service elementary teachers’ views on the nature of science (NOS. Also examined were NOS characteristics that pre-service teachers incorporated into their science lesson plans and peer teachings, during the course. Data used for this study were obtained from 21 pre-service teachers who participated in the pre/post card exchange game, pre/post VNOS interviews, 5E lesson plans, and peer teaching performances. The results of the study showed that some changes were made as a result of EED 420— such as starting to view science as a data-gathering experimental endeavor, rather than just a theorydriven endeavor. None of the groups explicitly designed or taught their lesson’s NOS aspects. The study posits that a mere one semester-long science method’s course is insufficient to adequately improve understanding of the NOS, and to establish a sufficiently robust desire in pre-service teachers for them to implement NOS into their lessons.

  11. Exploring Impacts of the EED 420 Science Methods Course on Pre-service Elementary Teachers’ Views Regarding the Nature of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EunJin BANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the impact of a semester-long science methods course examining pre-service elementary teachers’ views on the nature of science(NOS. Also examined were NOS characteristics that pre-service teachers incorporated into their science lesson plans and peer teachings, during the course. Data used for this study were obtained from 21 pre-service teachers who participated in the pre/post card exchange game, pre/post VNOS interviews, 5E lesson plans, and peer teaching performances. The results of the study showed that some changes were made as a result of EED 420—such as starting to view science as a data-gathering experimental endeavor, rather than just a theory-driven endeavor. None of the groups explicitly designed or taught their lesson’s NOS aspects. Thestudy posits that a mere one semester-long science method’s course is insufficient to adequately improve understanding of the NOS, and to establish a sufficiently robust desire in pre-service teachersfor them to implement NOS into their lessons.

  12. The International Safeguards Technology Base: How is the Patient Doing? An Exploration of Effective Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanfein, Mark J.; Gouveia, Fernando S.

    2010-01-01

    The term 'Technology Base' is commonly used but what does it mean? Is there a common understanding of the components that comprise a technology base? Does a formal process exist to assess the health of a given technology base? These are important questions the relevance of which is even more pressing given the USDOE/NNSA initiatives to strengthen the safeguards technology base through investments in research and development and human capital development. Accordingly, the authors will establish a high-level framework to define and understand what comprises a technology base. Potential goal-driven metrics to assess the health of a technology base will also be explored, such as linear demographics and resource availability, in the hope that they can be used to better understand and improve the health of the U.S. safeguards technology base. Finally, through the identification of such metrics, the authors will offer suggestions and highlight choices for addressing potential shortfalls.

  13. English courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    New courses University of Cambridge ESOL examination course We will be starting two new courses in October leading to the Cambridge First Certificate in English (level B2 of the European Framework) and the Cambridge Advanced English (level C1) examinations. These courses will consist of two semesters of 15 weeks with two two-hourly classes per week. There will be an average of eight students per class. Normally the examination will be taken in June 2011 but strong participants could take it earlier. People wishing to take these courses should enrol: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9:1927376177842004::NO::X_COURSE_ID,X_STATUS:4133%2CD and they will then be required to take a placement test to check that their level of English is of an appropriate level. Please note that we need a minimum of seven students enrolled to open a session. For further information please contact Tessa Osborne 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: From 4th October 2010 to 5th Feb...

  14. Applying the Multisim Technology to Teach the Course of High Frequency Power Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Gang; Xue, Yuan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    As one important professional base course in the electric information specialty, the course of "high frequency electronic circuit" has strong theoretical characteristic and abstract content. To enhance the teaching quality of this course, the computer simulation technology based on Multisim is introduced into the teaching of "high…

  15. Technology-based assessment in patients with disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Di Perri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A number of studies highlight the difficulty in forming a diagnosis for patients with disorders of consciousness when this is established merely on behavioral assessments. Background. Positron emission tomography (PET, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, and electroencephalography combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS-EEG techniques are promoting the clinical characterization of this challenging population. With such technology-based "objective" tools, patients are also differentially able to follow simple commands and in some cases even communicate through modified brain activity. Consequently, the vegetative state and minimally conscious state have been revised and new nosologies have been proposed, namely the unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, the minimally conscious state plus and minus, and the functional locked-in syndrome. Aim. To our mind, an integration of different technical modalities is important to gain a holistic vision of the underlying pathophysiology of disorders of consciousness in general and to promote single-patient medical management in particular.

  16. A MEMS lamination technology based on sequential multilayer electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Jooncheol; Herrault, Florian; Schafer, Richard; Allen, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    A MEMS lamination technology based on sequential multilayer electrodeposition is presented. The process comprises three main steps: (1) automated sequential electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni 80 Fe 20 ) structural and copper sacrificial layers to form multilayer structures of significant total thickness; (2) fabrication of polymeric anchor structures through the thickness of the multilayer structures and (3) selective removal of copper. The resulting structure is a set of air-insulated permalloy laminations, the separation of which is sustained by insulating polymeric anchor structures. Individual laminations have precisely controllable thicknesses ranging from 500 nm to 5 µm, and each lamination layer is electrically isolated from adjacent layers by narrow air gaps of similar scale. In addition to air, interlamination insulators based on polymers are investigated. Interlamination air gaps with very high aspect ratio (>1:100) can be filled with polyvinylalcohol and polydimethylsiloxane. The laminated structures are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to directly examine properties such as the roughness and the thickness uniformity of the layers. In addition, the quality of the electrical insulation between the laminations is evaluated by quantifying the eddy current within the sample as a function of frequency. Fabricated laminations are comprised of uniform, smooth (surface roughness <100 nm) layers with effective electrical insulation for all layer thicknesses and insulator approaches studied. Such highly laminated structures have potential uses ranging from energy conversion to applications where composite materials with highly anisotropic mechanical or thermal properties are required. (paper)

  17. Technology Base Research Project for electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, K.

    1985-06-01

    The DOE Electrochemical Energy Storage Program is divided into two projects: (1) the exploratory technology development and testing (ETD) project and (2) the technology base research (TBR) project. The role of the TBR Project is to perform supporting research for the advanced battery systems under development by the ETD Project, and to evaluate new systems with potentially superior performance, durability and/or cost characteristics. The specific goal of the TBR Project is to identify the most promising electrochemical technologies and transfer them to industry and/or the ETD Project for further development and scale-up. This report summarizes the research, financial, and management activities relevant to the TBR Project in CY 1984. General problem areas addressed by the project include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced batteries, determination of technical feasibility of the new couples, improvements in battery components and materials, establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion, and the assessment of fuel-cell technology for transportation applications. Major emphasis is given to applied research which will lead to superior performance and lower life-cycle costs. The TBR Project is divided into three major project elements: exploratory research, applied science research, and air systems research.

  18. Reliability analysis for new technology-based transmitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brissaud, Florent, E-mail: florent.brissaud.2007@utt.f [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Institut Charles Delaunay (ICD) and STMR UMR CNRS 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes cedex (France); Barros, Anne; Berenguer, Christophe [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), Institut Charles Delaunay (ICD) and STMR UMR CNRS 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes cedex (France); Charpentier, Dominique [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2011-02-15

    The reliability analysis of new technology-based transmitters has to deal with specific issues: various interactions between both material elements and functions, undefined behaviours under faulty conditions, several transmitted data, and little reliability feedback. To handle these particularities, a '3-step' model is proposed, based on goal tree-success tree (GTST) approaches to represent both the functional and material aspects, and includes the faults and failures as a third part for supporting reliability analyses. The behavioural aspects are provided by relationship matrices, also denoted master logic diagrams (MLD), with stochastic values which represent direct relationships between system elements. Relationship analyses are then proposed to assess the effect of any fault or failure on any material element or function. Taking these relationships into account, the probabilities of malfunction and failure modes are evaluated according to time. Furthermore, uncertainty analyses tend to show that even if the input data and system behaviour are not well known, these previous results can be obtained in a relatively precise way. An illustration is provided by a case study on an infrared gas transmitter. These properties make the proposed model and corresponding reliability analyses especially suitable for intelligent transmitters (or 'smart sensors').

  19. Implementation of the Harvard Case Method through a Plan-Do-Check-Act Framework in a University Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Ruey S.; Lyu, Jr Jung; Cheng, Yun-Yao

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the Harvard Business School began to promote the Harvard case method (HCM) within the Asian region. Because of differences in classroom culture between Asian and Western countries, Asian participants' reaction to the HCM implementation is of interest. This study explores how the western initiated method was implemented in one of the Asian…

  20. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  1. Adapting a Technology-Based Implementation Support Tool for Community Mental Health: Challenges and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livet, Melanie; Fixsen, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    With mental health services shifting to community-based settings, community mental health (CMH) organizations are under increasing pressure to deliver effective services. Despite availability of evidence-based interventions, there is a gap between effective mental health practices and the care that is routinely delivered. Bridging this gap requires availability of easily tailorable implementation support tools to assist providers in implementing evidence-based intervention with quality, thereby increasing the likelihood of achieving the desired client outcomes. This study documents the process and lessons learned from exploring the feasibility of adapting such a technology-based tool, Centervention, as the example innovation, for use in CMH settings. Mixed-methods data on core features, innovation-provider fit, and organizational capacity were collected from 44 CMH providers. Lessons learned included the need to augment delivery through technology with more personal interactions, the importance of customizing and integrating the tool with existing technologies, and the need to incorporate a number of strategies to assist with adoption and use of Centervention-like tools in CMH contexts. This study adds to the current body of literature on the adaptation process for technology-based tools and provides information that can guide additional innovations for CMH settings.

  2. Technology-based interventions for mental health in tertiary students: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Louise; Gulliver, Amelia; Chan, Jade K Y; Batterham, Philip J; Reynolds, Julia; Calear, Alison; Tait, Robert; Bennett, Kylie; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2013-05-27

    .54 (range -0.07 to 3.04) for 8 interventions targeting depression and anxiety symptoms and 0.84 (range -0.07 to 2.66) for 10 interventions targeting anxiety symptoms and disorders. Internet-based technology (typically involving cognitive behavioral therapy) was the most commonly employed medium, being employed in 16 of 27 studies and approximately half of the 51 technology-based interventions (25/51, 49%). Distal and universal preventive interventions were the most common type of intervention. Some methodological problems were evident in the studies, with randomization methods either inadequate or inadequately described, few studies specifying a primary outcome, and most of the studies failing to undertake or report appropriate intent-to-treat analyses. The findings of this review indicate that although technological interventions targeting certain mental health and related problems offer promise for students in university settings, more high quality trials that fully report randomization methods, outcome data, and data analysis methods are needed.

  3. The application of confocal technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics in surface topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Guangcui; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo; Yuan, Hao; Li, Yude; Liu, Hehe; Zhao, Weigang; Zhang, Ruixia; Min, Qin; Peng, Song

    2013-01-01

    A confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics was proposed for determining surface topography. This confocal topography method involves elemental sensitivity and can be used to classify the objects according to their elemental composition while obtaining their surface topography. To improve the spatial resolution of this confocal topography technology, the center of the confocal micro-volume was overlapped with the output focal spot of the polycapillary X-ray, focusing the lens in the excitation channel. The input focal spot of the X-ray lens parallel to the detection channel was used to determine the surface position of the sample. The corresponding surface adaptive algorithm was designed to obtain the surface topography. The surface topography of a ceramic chip was obtained. This confocal MXRF surface topography method could find application in the materials sciences

  4. Survey compare team based learning and lecture teaching method, on learning-teaching process nursing student\\'s, in Surgical and Internal Diseases course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Vaezi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effect of teaching methods on learning process of students will help teachers to improve the quality of teaching by selecting an appropriate method. This study aimed to compare the team- based learning and lecture teaching method on learning-teaching process of nursing students in surgical and internal diseases courses. Method: This quasi-experimental study was carried on the nursing students in the School of Nursing and Midwifery in Yazd and Meybod cities. Studied sample was all of the students in the sixth term in the Faculty of Nursing in Yazd (48 persons and the Faculty of Nursing in Meybod (28 persons. The rate of students' learning through lecture was measured using MCQ tests and teaching based on team-based learning (TBL method was run using MCQ tests (IRAT, GRAT, Appeals and Task group. Therefore, in order to examine the students' satisfaction about the TBL method, a 5-point Likert scale (translated questionnaire (1=completely disagree, 2= disagree, 3=not effective, 4=agree, and 5=completely agree consisted of 22 items was utilized. The reliability and validity of this translated questionnaire was measured. The collected data were analyzed through SPSS 17.0 using descriptive and analytical statistic. Result: The results showed that the mean scores in team-based learning were meaningful in individual assessment (17±84 and assessment group (17.2±1.17. The mean of overall scores in TBL method (17.84±0.98% was higher compared with the lecture teaching method (16±2.31. Most of the students believed that TBL method has improved their interpersonal and group interaction skills (100%. Among them, 97.7% of students mentioned that this method (TBL helped them to understand the course content better. The lowest levels of the satisfaction have related to the continuous learning during lifelong (51.2%. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the TBL method led to improving the communication skills, understanding

  5. Effect of an EBM course in combination with case method learning sessions: an RCT on professional performance, job satisfaction, and self-efficacy of occupational physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenholtz, Nathalie I R; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; van Dijk, Frank J H

    2008-10-01

    An intervention existing of an evidence-based medicine (EBM) course in combination with case method learning sessions (CMLSs) was designed to enhance the professional performance, self-efficacy and job satisfaction of occupational physicians. A cluster randomized controlled trial was set up and data were collected through questionnaires at baseline (T0), directly after the intervention (T1) and 7 months after baseline (T2). The data of the intervention group [T0 (n = 49), T1 (n = 31), T2 (n = 29)] and control group [T0 (n = 49), T1 (n = 28), T2 (n = 28)] were analysed in mixed model analyses. Mean scores of the perceived value of the CMLS were calculated in the intervention group. The overall effect of the intervention over time comparing the intervention with the control group was statistically significant for professional performance (p Job satisfaction and self-efficacy changes were small and not statistically significant between the groups. The perceived value of the CMLS to gain new insights and to improve the quality of their performance increased with the number of sessions followed. An EBM course in combination with case method learning sessions is perceived as valuable and offers evidence to enhance the professional performance of occupational physicians. However, it does not seem to influence their self-efficacy and job satisfaction.

  6. Law of Large Numbers: the Theory, Applications and Technology-based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Ivo D; Christou, Nicolas; Gould, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Modern approaches for technology-based blended education utilize a variety of recently developed novel pedagogical, computational and network resources. Such attempts employ technology to deliver integrated, dynamically-linked, interactive-content and heterogeneous learning environments, which may improve student comprehension and information retention. In this paper, we describe one such innovative effort of using technological tools to expose students in probability and statistics courses to the theory, practice and usability of the Law of Large Numbers (LLN). We base our approach on integrating pedagogical instruments with the computational libraries developed by the Statistics Online Computational Resource (www.SOCR.ucla.edu). To achieve this merger we designed a new interactive Java applet and a corresponding demonstration activity that illustrate the concept and the applications of the LLN. The LLN applet and activity have common goals - to provide graphical representation of the LLN principle, build lasting student intuition and present the common misconceptions about the law of large numbers. Both the SOCR LLN applet and activity are freely available online to the community to test, validate and extend (Applet: http://socr.ucla.edu/htmls/exp/Coin_Toss_LLN_Experiment.html, and Activity: http://wiki.stat.ucla.edu/socr/index.php/SOCR_EduMaterials_Activities_LLN).

  7. Correlation-based iterative clustering methods for time course data: The identification of temporal gene response modules for influenza infection in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Carey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many pragmatic clustering methods have been developed to group data vectors or objects into clusters so that the objects in one cluster are very similar and objects in different clusters are distinct based on some similarity measure. The availability of time course data has motivated researchers to develop methods, such as mixture and mixed-effects modelling approaches, that incorporate the temporal information contained in the shape of the trajectory of the data. However, there is still a need for the development of time-course clustering methods that can adequately deal with inhomogeneous clusters (some clusters are quite large and others are quite small. Here we propose two such methods, hierarchical clustering (IHC and iterative pairwise-correlation clustering (IPC. We evaluate and compare the proposed methods to the Markov Cluster Algorithm (MCL and the generalised mixed-effects model (GMM using simulation studies and an application to a time course gene expression data set from a study containing human subjects who were challenged by a live influenza virus. We identify four types of temporal gene response modules to influenza infection in humans, i.e., single-gene modules (SGM, small-size modules (SSM, medium-size modules (MSM and large-size modules (LSM. The LSM contain genes that perform various fundamental biological functions that are consistent across subjects. The SSM and SGM contain genes that perform either different or similar biological functions that have complex temporal responses to the virus and are unique to each subject. We show that the temporal response of the genes in the LSM have either simple patterns with a single peak or trough a consequence of the transient stimuli sustained or state-transitioning patterns pertaining to developmental cues and that these modules can differentiate the severity of disease outcomes. Additionally, the size of gene response modules follows a power-law distribution with a consistent

  8. Transforming beliefs and practices: Elementary teacher candidates' development through shared authentic teaching and reflection experiences within an innovative science methods course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kara

    Elementary teachers are criticized for failing to incorporate meaningful science instruction in their classrooms or avoiding science instruction altogether. The lack of adequate science instruction in elementary schools is partially attributed to teacher candidates' anxiety, poor content and pedagogical preparation, and low science teaching self-efficacy. The central premise of this study was that many of these issues could be alleviated through course modifications designed to address these issues. The design tested and presented here provided prospective elementary educators' authentic science teaching experiences with elementary students in a low-stakes environment with the collaboration of peers and science teacher educators. The process of comprehensive reflection was developed for and tested in this study. Comprehensive reflection is individual and collective, written and set in dialogic discourse, focused on past and future behavior, and utilizes video recordings from shared teaching experiences. To test the central premise, an innovative science methods course was designed, implemented and evaluated using a one-group mixed-method design. The focus of the analysis was on changes in self-efficacy, identity and teaching practices as a function of authentic science teaching experiences and comprehensive reflection. The quantitative tools for analysis were t-tests and repeated-measures ANOVA on the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument-B (STEBI-B) and weekly self-rating on confidence as a learner and a teacher of science, respectively. The tools used to analyze qualitative data included thematic analysis and interpretative phenomenological analysis. In addition, theoretically grounded tools were developed and used in a case study to determine the ways one prospective educator's science teaching identity was influenced by experiences in the course. The innovative course structure led the development of teacher candidates' science teaching identity

  9. Japanese endeavors to establish technological bases for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Hiroshi, E-mail: yamada.hiroshi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ozaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8605 (Japan); Sakamoto, Ryuichi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Sakamoto, Yoshiteru [Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Takenaga, Hidenobu [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tanaka, Teruya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hisashi [Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Okano, Kunihiko [Keio University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-0061 (Japan); Tobita, Kenji [Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ushigusa, Kenkichi [Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The strategy for DEMO has been discussed by a joint effort in Japan. • DEMO should be aimed at steady power generation beyond several hundred MW. • DEMO should be aimed at availability extendable to commercialization. • DEMO should be aimed at tritium breeding to fulfill self-sufficiency of fuels. • Related actions are emerging to deliberate the Japanese fusion roadmap. - Abstract: The establishment of technology bases required for the development of a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO) has been discussed by a joint effort throughout the Japanese fusion community. The basic concept of DEMO premised for investigation has been identified and the structure of technological issues to ensure the feasibility of this DEMO concept has been examined. The Joint-Core Team, which was launched along with the request by the ministerial council, has compiled analyses in two reports to clarify technology which should be secured, maintained, and developed in Japan, to share the common targets among industry, government, and academia, and to activate actions under a framework for implementation throughout Japan. The reports have pointed out that DEMO should be aimed at steady power generation beyond several hundred thousand kilowatts, availability which must be extended to commercialization, and overall tritium breeding to fulfill self-sufficiency of fuels. The necessary technological activities, such as superconducting coils, blanket, divertor, and others, have been sorted out and arranged in the chart with the time line toward the decision on DEMO. Based upon these Joint-Core Team reports, related actions are emerging to deliberate the Japanese fusion roadmap.

  10. The use of weekly text messaging over 6 months was a feasible method for monitoring the clinical course of low back pain in patients seeking chiropractic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axen, I.; Bodin, L.; Bergstrom, G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study critically evaluates a new method of collecting frequent data using mobile phones and text messages. Fluctuating conditions such as low back pain (LBP) need frequent monitoring to describe the clinical course in detail and to account for individual and subgroup variations....... Study Design and Setting: In this multicentre prospective observational study, 262 subjects with nonspecific LBP were followed with weekly text messages for 6 months, with the question "How many days this previous week has your low back pain been bothersome?" The text replies were instantly recorded...... in a data file to be merged with baseline and follow up data (age, gender, pain intensity, duration, and self- rated health) collected through ordinary questionnaires. The response rate, user-friendliness, and compliance of this method were evaluated. Results: The mean response rate for the text messages...

  11. English course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next sessions will take place: From 3rd October 2011 to beginning of February 2012 (break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 3rd October 2011 to beginning of February 2012 (break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896. Writing Professional Documents in English - Administrative Wr...

  12. Language Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) More details Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good le...

  13. NEW COURSES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Hands-on Training Support for the Windows 2000 Migration Please note that the set of hands-on courses listed below has been added to the Technical Training Programme to support the labwide migration to Windows 2000. If there is enough demand it is planned to organise sessions throughout the summer period. Anyone interested is asked to register for the course(s) of their choice by accessing the web course description from : http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/Welcome.html As soon as a minimum number of applications have been received dates will be fixed and published in the weekly bulletin and on the web. Please note that in order to get maximum benefit from these courses it is important to have Windows 2000 installed on your computer either before or immediately after you attend the session. People who do not have access to a Windows 2000 PC are strongly recommended to plan their training to coincide with the migration of their PC. A migration plan has been prepared in agreement with the NICE 2000 divisiona...

  14. French courses

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.   Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012.   Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to ...

  15. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 5 May to 11 July 2014. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://hr-training.web.cern.ch/hr-training/ or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 5 May to 11 July 2014. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session...

  16. French courses

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July...

  17. The International Safeguards Technology Base: How is the Patient Doing? An Exploration of Effective Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schanfein, Mark J; Gouveia, Fernando S

    2010-07-01

    The term “Technology Base” is commonly used but what does it mean? Is there a common understanding of the components that comprise a technology base? Does a formal process exist to assess the health of a given technology base? These are important questions the relevance of which is even more pressing given the USDOE/NNSA initiatives to strengthen the safeguards technology base through investments in research & development and human capital development. Accordingly, the authors will establish a high-level framework to define and understand what comprises a technology base. Potential goal-driven metrics to assess the health of a technology base will also be explored, such as linear demographics and resource availability, in the hope that they can be used to better understand and improve the health of the U.S. safeguards technology base. Finally, through the identification of such metrics, the authors will offer suggestions and highlight choices for addressing potential shortfalls.

  18. Exploring Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in an Online Course: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varguez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The constant expansion of Web 2.0 applications available on the World Wide Web and expansion of technology resources has prompted the need to better prepare current and future educators to make more effective use of such resources in their classrooms. The purpose of this embedded mixed methods case study was to describe the experiences and changes…

  19. Entrepreneurship Course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    +++++++ Turn your idea into a company +++++++ Starting date: Thursday 23 October 2003 Timing: Every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Venue: University of Geneva, Sciences II Duration: 1 semester Registration: http://www.startupcafe.ch/learn More Information: info@createswitzerland.ch Deadline to submit the application: 10 October 2003. Check the CREATE website for alternative dates and venues. The course is restricted to 30 pre-selected participants. The course covers important aspects of launching a business from initial idea to growth and international expansion and addresses two kind of skills requested to start a high tech company which are divided into personal skills (entrepreneur skills) and those to start a company (Start-up tools). The 14 week course is free of charge. For any question, please, contact Ilias.Goulas@cern.ch from the Technology Transfer Group (http://cern.ch/ttdb).

  20. METHODOLOGY-TECHNOLOGICAL BASES AND COMMUNICATION FACILITIES OF COMMUNICATION IN DISTANCE LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    O. Gnedkova; V. Lyakutin

    2010-01-01

    In this article methodical and technological principles of communication process in distance learning, which are the important constituents of the effective distance course, are analyzed. Communication facilities for the conducting communication process in distance learning are examined. Recommendations for teachers (tutors) for organization of successful and effective learning process with the use of modern communication technologies are pointed.

  1. Data exchange technology based on handshake protocol for industrial automation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafiev, A. V.; Shardin, T. O.

    2018-05-01

    In the article, questions of data exchange technology based on the handshake protocol for industrial automation system are considered. The methods of organizing the technology in client-server applications are analyzed. In the process of work, the main threats of client-server applications that arise during the information interaction of users are indicated. Also, a comparative analysis of analogue systems was carried out, as a result of which the most suitable option was chosen for further use. The basic schemes for the operation of the handshake protocol are shown, as well as the general scheme of the implemented application, which describes the entire process of interaction between the client and the server.

  2. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AS A MEANS TO CAPTURE THE STUDENTS OF THE COURSE "METHODS OF "MATHEMATICS" EDUCATIONAL TEACHING FIELD"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skvortsova S.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of the concepts of "information technology", "Information Technologies in Education", "Information technology education", "computer technology", "New Information Technologies", "New Information Technologies in Education". Found that the most common concept in this list is the concept of "information technology" as a set of methods and technical means for collecting, processing, storing, processing, transmission and presentation of data. Slightly narrower in this context, the concept of "new information technologies," which mandates the involvement of computer and other technical means to work with data. The emphasis on the learning process of information technology requires detailed terms "Information Technologies in Education" and "New Information Technologies in Education", which are defined as involvement of information technology and accordingly, including the technical means to create new perceptions and knowledge transfer, evaluation studies and all-round development of the individual in the educational process. Along with these terms also used such as "information technology training," which denotes a set of training and educational materials, and technical tools for educational purposes, as well as the system of scientific knowledge about their role and place in the educational process. Meanwhile, the term "information technology" encompasses all these concepts, so in a broad sense can be used to denote any signified concepts. As an extension of the term "information technology", the term information and communication technologies (ICT, and "information technology education", understood as educational technology using special methods, software and hardware to work with information and "ICT training "- as IT training focused on the use of computer communications networks for solving instructional problems or their fragments. Taking into account tasks, such as creating methodical maintenance of discipline

  3. Methods of Academic Course Planning for Cancer Biology PhD Students to Enhance Knowledge of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Swart, Elizabeth; Markwell, Steven M; Wen, Sijin; Vona-Davis, Linda C

    2017-09-15

    Little is known about how clinical oncology concepts are taught to PhD students or the most effective methods of doing so. In this study, electronic surveys were sent to faculty and students at PhD training programs, assessing their institution's methods of clinical oncology education and their perspective on optimal approaches to clinical oncology education. Only 40.0% of students reported any clinical oncology component to their institution's training, and only 26.5% had a clinician on their graduate advisory committee. Forty-three percent of students believed that they had a good understanding for translating basic science research into clinical practice, and 77.2% of all participants believed dual degree MD/PhD students were superior to PhD students in this regard. Lectures on clinical oncology research topics were the most valuable type of experience for all participants and were also the most common type of experience utilized. Working with a clinician to develop a clinical trial with correlative endpoints was also highly valued, but was only utilized by approximately 10% of programs. Faculty rated the value of nearly all types of clinical oncology exposure significantly lower than did students. Inclusion of the approaches identified in this study is likely to enhance PhD training in oncology-related disciplines. Cancer Res; 77(18); 4741-4. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Course Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    2015-01-01

    Welcome to your first DESIGN course: ‘Mapping Meals and their Spaces’. I hope you are ready to learn about the emerging discipline of Food Design and the so‐called “Design Thinking” perspective, as well as how to implement the interdisciplinary knowledge characterizing your new education Integrated...

  5. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses: The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. Oral Expression: This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. Writing professional documents in French: These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. Cours d'anglais général et professionnel: La prochaine session se déroulera du 7 octobre 2013 au 31 janvier 2014 (interruption à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Oral Expression: F...

  6. Language Courses

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 week's break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 week's break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-play, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to e...

  7. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next...

  8. A Simple and Rapid Method for Reducing Radiocesium Concentrations in Wild Mushrooms ( Cantharellus and Boletus ) in the Course of Cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Steinhauser, Veronika

    2016-11-01

    Many species of mushrooms are known accumulators of radioactive cesium ( 137 Cs and 134 Cs). Even years and decades after major nuclear accidents, especially those at Chernobyl and Fukushima, mushrooms exhibit high concentrations of these radionuclides. We investigated a simple method for reducing the activity of radiocesium in wild mushrooms (chanterelles, Cantharellus cibarius ; and boleti, Boletus edulis ) during cooking. The juice generated while cooking mushrooms contains a relatively high fraction of the total cesium. The amount of juice can be increased by washing the mushrooms with water prior to cooking. By removing the juice, up to 29% of the radiocesium can be easily removed from chanterelles. Because boleti have a lower affinity for cesium, activity levels were lower in boleti than in chanterelles. The fraction of radiocesium in the juice was lower in boleti than in chanterelles.

  9. The Instructional Design of Case Method Combined With Role-Playing in the Soil and Groundwater Training Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yin Hwa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Almost all environmental problems are caused by human. Besides being good at environmental engineering theory and technology, to enhance the ability to solve environmental problems, the environmental practitioners need a closer understanding of the stance of different stakeholders. This study is an instructional design combining both "case method" and "role-playing" into the “Soil and Groundwater Talent Training Courses” in Taipei. The curriculum is based on the hexavalent chromium pollution case in Yunlin County. Each group of students is encouraged to play four roles, inculding leather factory owners, farmers, environmental officials, and soil testing professionals. Each group of students has to propose solution strategies after discussion and consultation. The study adopts a single group posttest design. The qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. The quantitative data were analyzed through proportion and Pearson correlation. Results were as follows: (1 The solution strategies identified by the students include: “mutual communication”, “consensus-building”, and “the formation of an environmental committee". (2 More than 80% of students were satisfied with the instruction, and they found it helpful in terms of knowledge and skills in doing surveying. A moderate positive correlation exists between students’ participation and learning satisfaction. A reflection concerning this instruction design along with some recommendations are provided.

  10. Multiculturalism in Technology-Based Education: Case Studies on ICT-Supported Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Penalvo, Francicso Jose

    2013-01-01

    Our differences in language, cultures, and history around the world play a vital role in the way we learn. As technology-based education continues to be used worldwide, there is an ever growing interest in how multiculturalism comes into effect. Multiculturalism in Technology-Based Education: Case Studies on ICT-Supported Approaches explores the…

  11. Educational course in emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velkova, K.; Stoeva, M.; Cvetkova, S.; Hilendarov, A.; Petrova, A.; Stefanov, P.; Simova, E.; Georgieva, V.; Sirakov, N.

    2012-01-01

    Emergency radiology is the part of radiology primarily focused on acute diagnosing conditions in ER patients. This advanced area of radiology improves the quality of care and treatment of patients and of the emergency medicine as a whole. The educational course in Emergency (ER) Radiology is available for medical students in their 8th and 9th semester. The main objective of the ER course is to obtain knowledge about the indications, possibilities and diagnostic value of the contemporary imaging methods in ER cases. Therapeutic methods under imaging control are also covered by the course. The curriculum of the course consists of 6 lectures and 12 practical classes. (authors)

  12. Political factors in the development and implementation of technology-based confidence-building measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The second half of the 20th century has been characterized by the continuous development and improvement of weapons of mass destruction, including strategic bombers, missiles, chemical and biological agents, and of course, a variety of nuclear weapons. In contrast to the massive change in military capabilities brought about by the rapid development of science and technology, international relations is still dominated by relations between sovereign nation states and characterized by distrust and narrow interests. At the same time that scientific developments created the foundation for the nuclear arms race, however the scientific and technical community has also sought some antidotes. Technology-based confidence building measures (TBCBMS), designed to reduce international conflict and to prevent nuclear war, have been proposed by scientists from the US and the USSR. These TBCBMS have taken a number of forms such as cooperative research and development programs, joint panels and meetings of professional societies, and specially dedicated international forums. These have provided a meeting ground for the exchange of views among scientists from many different countries. In addition, a number of more direct forms of TBCBMS, such as satellite-based observation systems and IAEA nuclear safeguards, have national technical means of verification. More recently, there have been a number of proposals to apply many of these technologies to verification of conventional force reduction, arms control, and other confidence-building measures in context of regional conflicts in the Third World. An International Satellite Monitoring Agency has bee proposed to develop space-based technologies such as observation satellites to increase stability and prevent the outbreak of accidental war in regional contexts such as the Middle East

  13. Digital Microdroplet Ejection Technology-Based Heterogeneous Objects Prototyping

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Na; Yang, Jiquan; Feng, Chunmei; Yang, Jianfei; Zhu, Liya; Guo, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    An integrate fabrication framework is presented to build heterogeneous objects (HEO) using digital microdroplets injecting technology and rapid prototyping. The heterogeneous materials part design and manufacturing method in structure and material was used to change the traditional process. The net node method was used for digital modeling that can configure multimaterials in time. The relationship of material, color, and jetting nozzle was built. The main important contributions are to combi...

  14. The Obstacles for the Teaching of 8th Grade TR History of Revolution and Kemalism Course According to the Constructivist Approach (An Example of Exploratory Sequential Mixed Method Design)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir, Yavuz; Demir, Selcuk Besir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to ascertain the problems social studies teachers face in the teaching of topics covered in 8th grade TRHRK Course. The study was conducted in line with explanatory sequential mixed method design, which is one of the mixed research method, was used. The study involves three phases. In the first step, exploratory process…

  15. Introduction to Statistics course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    The four lectures will present an introduction to statistical methods as used in High Energy Physics. As the time will be very limited, the course will seek mainly to define the important issues and to introduce the most wide used tools. Topics will include the interpretation and use of probability, estimation of parameters and testing of hypotheses.

  16. Calculus Courses' Assessment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauna, Matti

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe computer-aided assessment methods used in online Calculus courses and the data they produce. The online learning environment collects a lot of time-stamped data about every action a student makes. Assessment data can be harnessed into use as a feedback, predictor, and recommendation facility for students and instructors.…

  17. Comparing Analytic Methods for Longitudinal GWAS and a Case-Study Evaluating Chemotherapy Course Length in Pediatric AML. A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Vujkovic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Regression analysis is commonly used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS to test genotype-phenotype associations but restricts the phenotype to a single observation for each individual. There is an increasing need for analytic methods for longitudinally collected phenotype data. Several methods have been proposed to perform longitudinal GWAS for family-based studies but few methods are described for unrelated populations. We compared the performance of three statistical approaches for longitudinal GWAS in unrelated subjectes: (1 principal component-based generalized estimating equations (PC-GEE; (2 principal component-based linear mixed effects model (PC-LMEM; (3 kinship coefficient matrix-based linear mixed effects model (KIN-LMEM, in a study of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on the duration of 4 courses of chemotherapy in 624 unrelated children with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML genotyped on the Illumina 2.5M OmniQuad from the COG studies AAML0531 and AAML1031.In this study we observed an exaggerated type I error with PC-GEE in SNPs with minor allele frequencies < 0.05, wheras KIN-LMEM produces more than expected type II errors. PC-MEM showed balanced type I and type II errors for the observed versus expected P-values in comparison to competing approaches. In general, a strong concordance was observed between the P-values with the different approaches, in particular among P-values < 0.01 where the between-method AUCs exceed 99%. PC-LMEM accounts for genetic relatedness and correlations among repeated phenotype measures, shows minimal genome-wide inflation of type I errors, and yields high power. We therefore recommend PC-LMEM as a robust analytic approach for GWAS of longitudinal data in unrelated populations.

  18. Infrared small target detection technology based on OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Huang, Zhijian

    2013-09-01

    Accurate and fast detection of infrared (IR) dim target has very important meaning for infrared precise guidance, early warning, video surveillance, etc. In this paper, some basic principles and the implementing flow charts of a series of algorithms for target detection are described. These algorithms are traditional two-frame difference method, improved three-frame difference method, background estimate and frame difference fusion method, and building background with neighborhood mean method. On the foundation of above works, an infrared target detection software platform which is developed by OpenCV and MFC is introduced. Three kinds of tracking algorithms are integrated in this software. In order to explain the software clearly, the framework and the function are described in this paper. At last, the experiments are performed for some real-life IR images. The whole algorithm implementing processes and results are analyzed, and those algorithms for detection targets are evaluated from the two aspects of subjective and objective. The results prove that the proposed method has satisfying detection effectiveness and robustness. Meanwhile, it has high detection efficiency and can be used for real-time detection.

  19. Digital Microdroplet Ejection Technology-Based Heterogeneous Objects Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiquan; Feng, Chunmei; Yang, Jianfei; Zhu, Liya; Guo, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    An integrate fabrication framework is presented to build heterogeneous objects (HEO) using digital microdroplets injecting technology and rapid prototyping. The heterogeneous materials part design and manufacturing method in structure and material was used to change the traditional process. The net node method was used for digital modeling that can configure multimaterials in time. The relationship of material, color, and jetting nozzle was built. The main important contributions are to combine the structure, material, and visualization in one process and give the digital model for manufacture. From the given model, it is concluded that the method is effective for HEO. Using microdroplet rapid prototyping and the model given in the paper HEO could be gotten basically. The model could be used in 3D biomanufacturing. PMID:26981110

  20. Digital Microdroplet Ejection Technology-Based Heterogeneous Objects Prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Yang, Jiquan; Feng, Chunmei; Yang, Jianfei; Zhu, Liya; Guo, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    An integrate fabrication framework is presented to build heterogeneous objects (HEO) using digital microdroplets injecting technology and rapid prototyping. The heterogeneous materials part design and manufacturing method in structure and material was used to change the traditional process. The net node method was used for digital modeling that can configure multimaterials in time. The relationship of material, color, and jetting nozzle was built. The main important contributions are to combine the structure, material, and visualization in one process and give the digital model for manufacture. From the given model, it is concluded that the method is effective for HEO. Using microdroplet rapid prototyping and the model given in the paper HEO could be gotten basically. The model could be used in 3D biomanufacturing.

  1. Bridge continuous deformation measurement technology based on fiber optic gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Weibing; Hu, Wenbin; Liu, Fang; Tang, Jianguang; Li, Sheng; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Bridge is an important part of modern transportation systems and deformation is a key index for bridge's safety evaluation. To achieve the long span bridge curve measurement rapidly and timely and accurately locate the bridge maximum deformation, the continuous deformation measurement system (CDMS) based on inertial platform is presented and validated in this paper. Firstly, based on various bridge deformation measurement methods, the method of deformation measurement based on the fiber optic gyro (FOG) is introduced. Secondly, the basic measurement principle based on FOG is presented and the continuous curve trajectory is derived by the formula. Then the measurement accuracy is analyzed in theory and the relevant factors are presented to ensure the measurement accuracy. Finally, the deformation measurement experiments are conducted on a bridge across the Yangtze River. Experimental results show that the presented deformation measurement method is feasible, practical, and reliable; the system can accurately and quickly locate the maximum deformation and has extensive and broad application prospects.

  2. Digital Microdroplet Ejection Technology-Based Heterogeneous Objects Prototyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrate fabrication framework is presented to build heterogeneous objects (HEO using digital microdroplets injecting technology and rapid prototyping. The heterogeneous materials part design and manufacturing method in structure and material was used to change the traditional process. The net node method was used for digital modeling that can configure multimaterials in time. The relationship of material, color, and jetting nozzle was built. The main important contributions are to combine the structure, material, and visualization in one process and give the digital model for manufacture. From the given model, it is concluded that the method is effective for HEO. Using microdroplet rapid prototyping and the model given in the paper HEO could be gotten basically. The model could be used in 3D biomanufacturing.

  3. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Utrecht course ``The Generation and Transport of Radiation'' teaches basic radiative transfer to second-year students. It is a much-expanded version of the first chapter of Rybicki & Lightman's ``Radiative Processes in Astrophysics''. After this course, students understand why intensity is measured per steradian, have an Eddington-Barbier feel for optically thick line formation, and know that scattering upsets LTE. The text is a computer-aided translation by Ruth Peterson of my 1992 Dutch-language course. My aim is to rewrite this course in non-computer English and make it web-available at some time. In the meantime, copies of the Peterson translation are made yearly at Uppsala -- ask them, not me. Eventually it should become a textbook. The Utrecht course ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' is a 30-hour course for third-year students. It treats NLTE line formation in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres at a level intermediate between the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense, and Mihalas' ``Stellar Atmospheres''. After this course, students appreciate that epsilon is small, that radiation can heat or cool, and that computers have changed the field. This course is web-available since 1995 and is regularly improved -- but remains incomplete. Eventually it should become a textbook. The three Utrecht exercise sets ``Stellar Spectra A: Basic Line Formation'', ``Stellar Spectra B: LTE Line Formation'', and ``Stellar Spectra C: NLTE Line Formation'' are IDL-based computer exercises for first-year, second-year, and third-year students, respectively. They treat spectral classification, Saha-Boltzmann population statistics, the curve of growth, the FAL-C solar atmosphere model, the role of H-minus in the solar continuum, LTE formation of Fraunhofer lines, inversion tactics, the Feautrier method, classical lambda iteration, and ALI computation. The first two sets are web-available since 1998; the third will follow. Acknowledgement. Both courses owe much to previous

  4. English Course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Cours d'anglais général et professionnel : La prochaine session se déroulera : du 27 février au 22 juin 2012. Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tél. 70896. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 27 February to 22 June, 2012.  This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web page: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. ...

  5. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Cours d’anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 22 septembre au 12 décembre. Ces cours s’adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu’à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web : http://cern.ch/Training. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 29 September to 5 December. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Writing Professional Documents in English – Administrative Writing Professional Documents in English – Technical The next session will take place from 29 September to 5 December. These courses are...

  6. English courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 4 mars jusqu’au 21 juin 2013. Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 4 March to 21 June 2013. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. More information here. Writing Professional Documents in English - Administrative Writing Professional Documents in English - Technical The next sessions will take place from 4 March to 21 June 2013. These courses are designed for people with a goo...

  7. Optimization evaluation of cutting technology based on mechanical parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu

    2018-04-01

    The relationship between the mechanical manufacturing process and the carbon emission is studied on the basis of the process of the mechanical manufacturing process. The formula of carbon emission calculation suitable for mechanical manufacturing process is derived. Based on this, a green evaluation method for cold machining process of mechanical parts is proposed. The application verification and data analysis of the proposed evaluation method are carried out by an example. The results show that there is a great relationship between the mechanical manufacturing process data and carbon emissions.

  8. Managing International Consulting Projects and International Business Courses Using Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachyl, Cheryl; Quintanilla, Hector; Gutiérrez, Luis Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey and Texas Wesleyan University used technology based courses to enhance internationalization of their curricula. These courses required students to use computer technology as the distance communication medium and to complete an applied international consulting project as part of each…

  9. English Language for Teachers (EL4T): a course for EFL teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Prithvi

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and implementation of EL4T in a large-scale project. EL4T is a self-study mobile technology-based ESP course designed to enhance Bangladeshi school English language teachers’ English language skills and pedagogical practices. Key implications of developing this course for ESP in EFL contexts will be presented.

  10. Sentiment classification technology based on Markov logic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hui; Li, Zhigang; Yao, Chongchong; Zhang, Weizhe

    2016-07-01

    With diverse online media emerging, there is a growing concern of sentiment classification problem. At present, text sentiment classification mainly utilizes supervised machine learning methods, which feature certain domain dependency. On the basis of Markov logic networks (MLNs), this study proposed a cross-domain multi-task text sentiment classification method rooted in transfer learning. Through many-to-one knowledge transfer, labeled text sentiment classification, knowledge was successfully transferred into other domains, and the precision of the sentiment classification analysis in the text tendency domain was improved. The experimental results revealed the following: (1) the model based on a MLN demonstrated higher precision than the single individual learning plan model. (2) Multi-task transfer learning based on Markov logical networks could acquire more knowledge than self-domain learning. The cross-domain text sentiment classification model could significantly improve the precision and efficiency of text sentiment classification.

  11. A Sophomore Course in Codesign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan; Steensgaard-Madsen, Jørgen; Christensen, Lars Munk

    2002-01-01

    We teach a hardware and software codesign course to second-year students who have expressed an interest in either electronics or informatics (computer science). The course emphasizes concepts and methods that are useful to both hardware and software developers and in particular to developers...

  12. Research of image retrieval technology based on color feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanjun; Jiang, Guangyu; Chen, Fengying

    2009-10-01

    Recently, with the development of the communication and the computer technology and the improvement of the storage technology and the capability of the digital image equipment, more and more image resources are given to us than ever. And thus the solution of how to locate the proper image quickly and accurately is wanted.The early method is to set up a key word for searching in the database, but now the method has become very difficult when we search much more picture that we need. In order to overcome the limitation of the traditional searching method, content based image retrieval technology was aroused. Now, it is a hot research subject.Color image retrieval is the important part of it. Color is the most important feature for color image retrieval. Three key questions on how to make use of the color characteristic are discussed in the paper: the expression of color, the abstraction of color characteristic and the measurement of likeness based on color. On the basis, the extraction technology of the color histogram characteristic is especially discussed. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of the overall histogram and the partition histogram, a new method based the partition-overall histogram is proposed. The basic thought of it is to divide the image space according to a certain strategy, and then calculate color histogram of each block as the color feature of this block. Users choose the blocks that contain important space information, confirming the right value. The system calculates the distance between the corresponding blocks that users choosed. Other blocks merge into part overall histograms again, and the distance should be calculated. Then accumulate all the distance as the real distance between two pictures. The partition-overall histogram comprehensive utilizes advantages of two methods above, by choosing blocks makes the feature contain more spatial information which can improve performance; the distances between partition-overall histogram

  13. Technology-Based Healthcare for Nursing Education Within The Netherlands: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ybranda; van Houwelingen, Cornelis T M

    2017-01-01

    At the present time, nearly all Dutch nursing schools are searching for suitable ways to implement technology-based healthcare in their curriculum. Some Universities chose elective education, others a mandatory solution. Several studies were executed to determine competencies needed by nurses in order to work with technology-based healthcare. In 2016 a nationwide new curriculum for nurses has been published. Providing technology-based healthcare is included under the core competencies of this new curriculum. All baccalaureate nursing educational institutes must implement this new curriculum at the start of 2016 which will have a huge impact on the implementation of technology-based healthcare in the education programs. In the future, technology centers from Universities will collaborate and specialize, partner with technology companies and crossovers between information and communication technology and healthcare education will be expanded.

  14. Operational characterization of CSFH MEMS technology based hinges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, Rocco; Balucani, Marco; Belfiore, Nicola Pio

    2018-05-01

    Progress in MEMS technology continuously stimulates new developments in the mechanical structure of micro systems, such as, for example, the concept of so-called CSFH (conjugate surfaces flexural hinge), which makes it possible, simultaneously, to minimize the internal stresses and to increase motion range and robustness. Such a hinge may be actuated by means of a rotary comb-drive, provided that a proper set of simulations and tests are capable to assess its feasibility. In this paper, a CSFH has been analyzed with both theoretical and finite element (FEM) methods, in order to obtain the relation between voltage and generated torque. The FEM model considers also the fringe effect on the comb drive finger. Electromechanical couple-field analysis is performed by means of both direct and load transfer methods. Experimental tests have been also performed on a CSFH embedded in a MEMS prototype, which has been fabricated starting from a SOI wafer and using D-RIE (deep reactive ion etching). Results showed that CSFH performs better than linear flexure hinges in terms of larger rotations and less stress for given applied voltage.

  15. Short-term Clinical Course of Knee Pain in Children and Adolescents: A Feasibility Study Using Electronic Methods of Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Michael S; Kamper, Steven J; Maher, Chris G; Latimer, Jane; Broderick, Carolyn; McKay, Damien; Henschke, Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders, such as knee pain, are common in children and adolescents, but there is a lack of high quality research that evaluates the clinical course of these conditions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a prospective study of children and adolescents with knee pain using electronic methods of data collection. Children and adolescents with knee pain that presented to primary care physiotherapy clinics were enrolled and followed-up on a weekly basis via short messaging service (SMS) until their knee pain had recovered (i.e. two consecutive weeks of no pain). Feasibility was assessed in terms of recruitment, retention and response rates to SMS and an online questionnaire. Baseline and 6-month follow-up measures included pain, disability, physical function, physical activity and health related quality of life. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate the median time to knee pain recovery. Thirty participants (mean age 13.0 ± 2.2 years, 53% boys) were recruited over 26 months. The overall response rate to weekly SMS follow-up was 71.3% (809 received/1135 sent). One third of participants stopped responding to SMS prior to recovery, and these participants typically had a much lower response rate during the time they remained in the study. At 6-month follow-up, 80% of the cohort completed the final online questionnaire, and 29% of participants still reported current knee pain (≥1/10 VAS). The median time for knee pain recovery was 8 weeks (95%CI: 5, 10). Electronic data collection alone seems insufficient to track pain recovery in young people and may need to be supplemented with more traditional data collection methods. Researchers should consider further measures to address slow recruitment rates and high attrition when designing large prospective studies of children and adolescents in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Effect of data self-collection as an activating teaching method in a statistical software course in medical biometry - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Benjamin; Braisch, Ulrike; Meule, Marianne; Allgoewer, Andreas; Richter, Silvia; Muche, Rainer

    2018-01-01

    Background: Biostatistics is an integral part of the studies of human medicine. Students learn the basics of analyzing and interpreting study results. It is important to demonstrate the subject's relevance by means of appropriate measures to maximize learning success. We investigated whether an active involvement of students in the process of data collection may improve test performance and motivation among medical students. Methods: We conducted a pilot study comparing active involvement of students (n1=45) in the process of data collection and standard education (n2=26). All students of this pilot study participated in an observational study assessing their preferences regarding sweets or salty munchies, and students of the experimental group subsequently used this data set during the exercises throughout the semester. Primary and secondary endpoints were examination success and motivation respectively. Results: Superiority of the activating teaching method could not be demonstrated (intervention: 109.0 points (SD 8.8), control: 113.8 points (SD 6.5)). The course ratings were superior in the intervention group (median grade 1 vs. median grade 2 in the control group), although this was not a significant improvement (p=0.487). Conclusions: Biostatistics education should incorporate approaches contributing to a better understanding of learning contents. Possible reasons why this pilot study failed to prove superiority of the intervention were a lack of sample size as well as the good grades in the control group. The presented teaching concept has to be evaluated by means of a larger sample enabling more valid conclusions. Furthermore, the considered research question in the experimental group may be changed to a more relevant one for medical practice.

  17. A Review of Technology-Based Youth and Family-Focused Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonell, Kathleen Watson; Prinz, Ronald J

    2017-06-01

    In the past 10 years, mental and behavioral health has seen a proliferation of technology-based interventions in the form of online and other computer-delivered programs. This paper focuses on technology-based treatment and preventive interventions aimed at benefitting children and adolescents via either involving the parents and families, or only the youth. The review considered only technology-based interventions that had at least one published study with a randomized controlled trial design. Questions being addressed included: (1) What are the technology-based interventions in the mental/behavioral health area that have been systematically evaluated in published studies? (2) What are the common and unique characteristics of these interventions and their application with respect to sample characteristics, target problems, and technology characteristics (platforms, structures, elements, and communication formats)? and (3) Which intervention approaches and strategies have accrued the greatest evidence? The review identified 30 technology-based psychosocial interventions for children and families, 19 of which were parent or family-focused (32 studies) and 11 of which were youth-focused (in 13 studies). For the parent/family-focused interventions, greatest promise was found in those that addressed either youth behavioral problems or depressive/anxious symptoms, as well as more general bolstering of parenting efficacy. The youth-focused interventions showed some promise in reducing depressive/anxious symptoms. Advantages and disadvantages of the technology-based approaches were considered, and areas for future research and development were discussed.

  18. Environmental consequences of future biogas technologies based on separated slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik; Petersen, Bjørn M

    2011-07-01

    This consequential life cycle assessment study highlights the key environmental aspects of producing biogas from separated pig and cow slurry, a relatively new but probable scenario for future biogas production, as it avoids the reliance on constrained carbon cosubstrates. Three scenarios involving different slurry separation technologies have been assessed and compared to a business-as-usual reference slurry management scenario. The results show that the environmental benefits of such biogas production are highly dependent upon the efficiency of the separation technology used to concentrate the volatile solids in the solid fraction. The biogas scenario involving the most efficient separation technology resulted in a dry matter separation efficiency of 87% and allowed a net reduction of the global warming potential of 40%, compared to the reference slurry management. This figure comprises the whole slurry life cycle, including the flows bypassing the biogas plant. This study includes soil carbon balances and a method for quantifying the changes in yield resulting from increased nitrogen availability as well as for quantifying mineral fertilizers displacement. Soil carbon balances showed that between 13 and 50% less carbon ends up in the soil pool with the different biogas alternatives, as opposed to the reference slurry management.

  19. Early Experience with Technology-Based Eye Care Services (TECS): A Novel Ophthalmologic Telemedicine Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maa, April Y; Wojciechowski, Barbara; Hunt, Kelly J; Dismuke, Clara; Shyu, Jason; Janjua, Rabeea; Lu, Xiaoqin; Medert, Charles M; Lynch, Mary G

    2017-04-01

    The aging population is at risk of common eye diseases, and routine eye examinations are recommended to prevent visual impairment. Unfortunately, patients are less likely to seek care as they age, which may be the result of significant travel and time burdens associated with going to an eye clinic in person. A new method of eye-care delivery that mitigates distance barriers and improves access was developed to improve screening for potentially blinding conditions. We present the quality data from the early experience (first 13 months) of Technology-Based Eye Care Services (TECS), a novel ophthalmologic telemedicine program. With TECS, a trained ophthalmology technician is stationed in a primary care clinic away from the main hospital. The ophthalmology technician follows a detailed protocol that collects information about the patient's eyes. The information then is interpreted remotely. Patients with possible abnormal findings are scheduled for a face-to-face examination in the eye clinic. Any patient with no known ocular disease who desires a routine eye screening examination is eligible. Technology-Based Eye Care Services was established in 5 primary care clinics in Georgia surrounding the Atlanta Veterans Affairs hospital. Four program operation metrics (patient satisfaction, eyeglass remakes, disease detection, and visit length) and 2 access-to-care metrics (appointment wait time and no-show rate) were tracked. Care was rendered to 2690 patients over the first 13 months of TECS. The program has been met with high patient satisfaction (4.95 of 5). Eyeglass remake rate was 0.59%. Abnormal findings were noted in 36.8% of patients and there was >90% agreement between the TECS reading and the face-to-face findings of the physician. TECS saved both patient (25% less) and physician time (50% less), and access to care substantially improved with 99% of patients seen within 14 days of contacting the eye clinic, with a TECS no-show rate of 5.2%. The early experience with

  20. High-power electro-optic switch technology based on novel transparent ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue-Jiao, Zhang; Qing, Ye; Rong-Hui, Qu; Hai-wen, Cai

    2016-03-01

    A novel high-power polarization-independent electro-optic switch technology based on a reciprocal structure Sagnac interferometer and a transparent quadratic electro-optic ceramic is proposed and analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The electro-optic ceramic is used as a phase retarder for the clockwise and counter-clockwise polarized light, and their polarization directions are adjusted to their orthogonal positions by using two half-wave plates. The output light then becomes polarization-independent with respect to the polarization direction of the input light. The switch characteristics, including splitter ratios and polarization states, are theoretically analyzed and simulated in detail by the matrix multiplication method. An experimental setup is built to verify the analysis and experimental results. A new component ceramic is used and a non-polarizing cube beam splitter (NPBS) replaces the beam splitter (BS) to lower the ON/OFF voltage to 305 V and improve the extinction ratio by 2 dB. Finally, the laser-induced damage threshold for the proposed switch is measured and discussed. It is believed that potential applications of this novel polarization-independent electro-optic switch technology will be wide, especially for ultrafast high-power laser systems. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61137004, 61405218, and 61535014).

  1. High-power electro-optic switch technology based on novel transparent ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xue-Jiao; Ye Qing; Qu Rong-Hui; Cai Hai-wen

    2016-01-01

    A novel high-power polarization-independent electro-optic switch technology based on a reciprocal structure Sagnac interferometer and a transparent quadratic electro-optic ceramic is proposed and analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The electro-optic ceramic is used as a phase retarder for the clockwise and counter-clockwise polarized light, and their polarization directions are adjusted to their orthogonal positions by using two half-wave plates. The output light then becomes polarization-independent with respect to the polarization direction of the input light. The switch characteristics, including splitter ratios and polarization states, are theoretically analyzed and simulated in detail by the matrix multiplication method. An experimental setup is built to verify the analysis and experimental results. A new component ceramic is used and a non-polarizing cube beam splitter (NPBS) replaces the beam splitter (BS) to lower the ON/OFF voltage to 305 V and improve the extinction ratio by 2 dB. Finally, the laser-induced damage threshold for the proposed switch is measured and discussed. It is believed that potential applications of this novel polarization-independent electro-optic switch technology will be wide, especially for ultrafast high-power laser systems. (paper)

  2. Market Segmentation in Business Technology Base: The Case of Segmentation of Sparkling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Riscarolli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A common market segmentation premise for products and services rules consumer behavior as the segmentation center piece. Would this be the logic for segmentation used by small technology based companies? In this article we target at determining the principles of market segmentation used by a vitiwinery company, as research object. This company is recognized by its products excellence, either in domestic as well as in the foreign market, among 13 distinct countries. The research method used is a case study, through information from the company’s CEOs and crossed by primary information from observation and formal registries and documents of the company. In this research we look at sparkling wines market segmentation. Main results indicate that the winery studied considers only technological elements as the basis to build a market segment. One may conclude that a market segmentation for this company is based upon technological dominion of sparkling wines production, aligned with a premium-price policy. In the company, directorship believes that as sparkling wines market is still incipient in the country, sparkling wine market segments will form and consolidate after the evolution of consumers tasting preferences, depending on technologies that boost sparkling wines quality. 

  3. 75 FR 13305 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Evaluation of the Technology-Based Learning Grants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... Collection for Evaluation of the Technology-Based Learning Grants: New Collection AGENCY: Employment and... Technology- Based Learning Grants Evaluation. A copy of the proposed information collection request (ICR) can... INFORMATION: I. Background The Evaluation of the Technology-Based Learning (TBL) Grants is a two-year...

  4. Geospatial Field Methods: An Undergraduate Course Built Around Point Cloud Construction and Analysis to Promote Spatial Learning and Use of Emerging Technology in Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunds, M. P.

    2017-12-01

    Point clouds are a powerful data source in the geosciences, and the emergence of structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetric techniques has allowed them to be generated quickly and inexpensively. Consequently, applications of them as well as methods to generate, manipulate, and analyze them warrant inclusion in undergraduate curriculum. In a new course called Geospatial Field Methods at Utah Valley University, students in small groups use SfM to generate a point cloud from imagery collected with a small unmanned aerial system (sUAS) and use it as a primary data source for a research project. Before creating their point clouds, students develop needed technical skills in laboratory and class activities. The students then apply the skills to construct the point clouds, and the research projects and point cloud construction serve as a central theme for the class. Intended student outcomes for the class include: technical skills related to acquiring, processing, and analyzing geospatial data; improved ability to carry out a research project; and increased knowledge related to their specific project. To construct the point clouds, students first plan their field work by outlining the field site, identifying locations for ground control points (GCPs), and loading them onto a handheld GPS for use in the field. They also estimate sUAS flight elevation, speed, and the flight path grid spacing required to produce a point cloud with the resolution required for their project goals. In the field, the students place the GCPs using handheld GPS, and survey the GCP locations using post-processed-kinematic (PPK) or real-time-kinematic (RTK) methods. The students pilot the sUAS and operate its camera according to the parameters that they estimated in planning their field work. Data processing includes obtaining accurate locations for the PPK/RTK base station and GCPs, and SfM processing with Agisoft Photoscan. The resulting point clouds are rasterized into digital surface models

  5. Course Convenience, Perceived Learning, and Course Satisfaction across Course Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Douglas; Ross, Douglas; Rosenbloom, Alfred; Singer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Students' desire for course convenience may lead to their preference for online courses. But in their desire for convenience, are students sacrificing satisfaction or perceived learning? This article investigates the moderating impact of course format on the relationship between convenience and both perceived learning and satisfaction. Moderated…

  6. The experiences of lecturers in African, Asian and European universities in preparing and delivering blended health research methods courses: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myroslava Protsiv

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growing demand for Global Health (GH training and the internationalisation of education requires innovative approaches to training. Blended learning (BL, a form of e-learning combining face-to-face or real-time interaction with computer-assisted learning is a promising approach for increasing GH research capacity in low- to middle-income countries. Implementing BL, however, requires additional skills and efforts from lecturers. This paper explores lecturers’ views and experiences of delivering BL courses within the context of two north–south collaborative research capacity building projects, ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH. Design: We used a qualitative approach to explore the experiences and perceptions of 11 lecturers involved in designing and delivering BL courses collaboratively across university campuses in four countries (South Africa, Uganda, India and Sweden. Data were collected using interviews in person or via Skype. Inductive qualitative content analysis was used. Results: Participants reported that they felt BL increased access to learning opportunities and made training more flexible and convenient for adult learners, which were major motivations to engage in BL. However, despite eagerness to implement and experiment with BL courses, they lacked capacity and support, and found the task time consuming. They needed to make compromises between course objectives and available technological tools, in the context of poor Internet infrastructure. Conclusions: BL courses have the potential to build bridges between low- and middle-income contexts and between lecturers and students to meet the demand for GH training. Lecturers were very motivated to try these approaches but encountered obstacles in implementing BL courses. Considerable investments are needed to implement BL and support lecturers in delivering courses.

  7. Learning Analytics Architecture to Scaffold Learning Experience through Technology-based Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannicke Madeleine Baalsrud Hauge

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of delivering personalized learning experiences is often increased by the size of classrooms and online learning communities. Serious Games (SGs are increasingly recognized for their potential to improve education. However, the issues related to their development and their level of effectiveness can be seriously affected when brought too rapidly into growing online learning communities. Deeper insights into how the students are playing is needed to deliver a comprehensive and intelligent learning framework that facilitates better understanding of learners' knowledge, effective assessment of their progress and continuous evaluation and optimization of the environments in which they learn. This paper discusses current SOTA and aims to explore the potential in the use of games and learning analytics towards scaffolding and supporting teaching and learning experience. The conceptual model (ecosystem and architecture discussed in this paper aims to highlight the key considerations that may advance the current state of learning analytics, adaptive learning and SGs, by leveraging SGs as an suitable medium for gathering data and performing adaptations.

  8. Why simulation can be efficient: on the preconditions of efficient learning in complex technology based practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Bjørn

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important to demonstrate learning outcomes of simulation in technology based practices, such as in advanced health care. Although many studies show skills improvement and self-reported change to practice, there are few studies demonstrating patient outcome and societal efficiency. The objective of the study is to investigate if and why simulation can be effective and efficient in a hi-tech health care setting. This is important in order to decide whether and how to design simulation scenarios and outcome studies. Methods Core theoretical insights in Science and Technology Studies (STS are applied to analyze the field of simulation in hi-tech health care education. In particular, a process-oriented framework where technology is characterized by its devices, methods and its organizational setting is applied. Results The analysis shows how advanced simulation can address core characteristics of technology beyond the knowledge of technology's functions. Simulation's ability to address skilful device handling as well as purposive aspects of technology provides a potential for effective and efficient learning. However, as technology is also constituted by organizational aspects, such as technology status, disease status, and resource constraints, the success of simulation depends on whether these aspects can be integrated in the simulation setting as well. This represents a challenge for future development of simulation and for demonstrating its effectiveness and efficiency. Conclusion Assessing the outcome of simulation in education in hi-tech health care settings is worthwhile if core characteristics of medical technology are addressed. This challenges the traditional technical versus non-technical divide in simulation, as organizational aspects appear to be part of technology's core characteristics.

  9. Designing Online Education Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the main elements that characterize online course design. Topics include design constraints; analysis of learning needs; defining objectives; course prerequisites; content structuring; course flexibility; learning strategies; evaluation criteria; course activities; course structure; communication architecture; and design evaluation.…

  10. MHI's activities to maintain, strengthen and hand down the nuclear technology base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigemitsu; Kanda, Makoto; Oketani, Koichiro; Hamasaki, Manabu; Uchida, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    The recent worldwide 'Nuclear Renaissance' is encouraging the globalization of our nuclear business and making us aware of the increasing importance of the human education and trainings for it. The basic concept of MHI's human resource development and its improvement is 'The improvement in the skills and motivation of each employee leads to the strengthening of the company-wide technology base'. Under this concept we are improving our job efficiency continuously by means of information technology, institutionalizing the means to improve the individual skills and motivation and investing for the effective succession of the skills. In order to take real advantage of those efforts for maintaining, strengthening and effectively handing down the nuclear technology base, it is imperative to keep the volume of actual jobs. So, we have to keep in mind that having actual business continuously is extremely important to keep the sound and solid technology base. (author)

  11. Activities to maintain, strengthen and hand down the nuclear technology base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Makoto; Oketani, Koichiro

    2009-01-01

    The recent worldwide 'Nuclear Renaissance' is encouraging the globalization of our nuclear business and making us aware of the increasing importance of the human education and trainings for it. The basic concept of MHI's human resource development and its improvement is 'The improvement in the skills and motivation of each employee leads to the strengthening of the company-wide technology base'. Under this concept we are improving our job efficiency continuously by means of information technology, institutionalizing the means to improve the individual skills and motivation and investing for the effective succession of the skills. In order to take real advantage of those efforts for maintaining, strengthening and effectively handing down the nuclear technology base, it is imperative to keep the volume of actual jobs. So, we have to keep in mind that having actual business continuously is extremely important to keep the sound and solid technology base. (author)

  12. A Research Study Using the Delphi Method to Define Essential Competencies for a High School Game Art and Design Course Framework at the National Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Nayo Corenus-Geneva

    2011-01-01

    This research study reports the findings of a Delphi study conducted to determine the essential competencies and objectives for a high school Game Art and Design course framework at the national level. The Delphi panel consisted of gaming, industry and educational experts from all over the world who were members of the International Game…

  13. A Survey of Beginning Crop Science Courses at 49 U.S. Universities. II. Laboratory Format, Teaching Methods, and Topical Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Krista L.; Karnok, Keith J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is the second of a two-part series which discusses the findings related to laboratory segments in the beginning crop science courses offered in Land Grant institutions. Survey results reveal that laboratories are used but employ traditional teaching rather than individualized or auto-tutorial techniques. (ML)

  14. A Different Approach to the Scientific Research Methods Course: Effects of a Small-Scale Research Project on Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastürk, Savas

    2017-01-01

    Selecting and applying appropriate research techniques, analysing data using information and communication technologies, transferring the obtained results of the analysis into tables and interpreting them are the performance indicators evaluated by the Ministry of National Education under teacher competencies. At the beginning of the courses that…

  15. The Dutch Cannabis Dependence (CanDep) study on the course of frequent cannabis use and dependence: objectives, methods and sample characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, P.; Liebregts, N.; de Graaf, R.; Korf, D.J.; van den Brink, W.; van Laar, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the prospective cohort design of the Dutch Cannabis Dependence (CanDep) study, which investigates (i) the three-year natural course of frequent cannabis use (≥ three days per week in the past 12 months) and cannabis dependence; and (ii) the factors involved in the

  16. Cosmology. A first course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachieze-Rey, Marc

    This book delivers a quantitative account of the science of cosmology, designed for a non-specialist audience. The basic principles are outlined using simple maths and physics, while still providing rigorous models of the Universe. It offers an ideal introduction to the key ideas in cosmology, without going into technical details. The approach used is based on the fundamental ideas of general relativity such as the spacetime interval, comoving coordinates, and spacetime curvature. It provides an up-to-date and thoughtful discussion of the big bang, and the crucial questions of structure and galaxy formation. Questions of method and philosophical approaches in cosmology are also briefly discussed. Advanced undergraduates in either physics or mathematics would benefit greatly from use either as a course text or as a supplementary guide to cosmology courses.

  17. Why simulation can be efficient: on the preconditions of efficient learning in complex technology based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2009-07-23

    It is important to demonstrate learning outcomes of simulation in technology based practices, such as in advanced health care. Although many studies show skills improvement and self-reported change to practice, there are few studies demonstrating patient outcome and societal efficiency. The objective of the study is to investigate if and why simulation can be effective and efficient in a hi-tech health care setting. This is important in order to decide whether and how to design simulation scenarios and outcome studies. Core theoretical insights in Science and Technology Studies (STS) are applied to analyze the field of simulation in hi-tech health care education. In particular, a process-oriented framework where technology is characterized by its devices, methods and its organizational setting is applied. The analysis shows how advanced simulation can address core characteristics of technology beyond the knowledge of technology's functions. Simulation's ability to address skilful device handling as well as purposive aspects of technology provides a potential for effective and efficient learning. However, as technology is also constituted by organizational aspects, such as technology status, disease status, and resource constraints, the success of simulation depends on whether these aspects can be integrated in the simulation setting as well. This represents a challenge for future development of simulation and for demonstrating its effectiveness and efficiency. Assessing the outcome of simulation in education in hi-tech health care settings is worthwhile if core characteristics of medical technology are addressed. This challenges the traditional technical versus non-technical divide in simulation, as organizational aspects appear to be part of technology's core characteristics.

  18. Refresher courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, M.

    1981-01-01

    In order to keep the status of knowledge of the operating personnel of power plants on an equally high level, refresher training for this personnel has to be run periodically. In Germany, the method and scope of the refresher training is determined as requisition in the general direction of the Federal Minister of the Interior (Richtlinie des Bundesinnenministers). The target groups for the refresher training are the shift personnel and the specialists of the production department. In the first place, the refresher training should serve for increasing the availability and security of the plant. It will be described how, e.g., the training programs for the various groups can be structured. Furthermore, the application of a simulator as well as of accompanying material will be mentioned. (orig./RW)

  19. Transforming the Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodyskyj, L.; Ben-Naim, D.; Semken, S. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional large lecture classes are fundamentally passive and teacher-centered. Most existing online courses are as well, including massive open online courses (MOOCs). Research tells us that this mode of instruction is not ideal for student learning. However, the unique attributes of the online environment have thus far been mostly underutilized. We hypothesize that new tools and the innovative curricula they enable can foster greater student engagement and enhance learning at large scale. To test this hypothesis, over the past three years, Arizona State University developed and offered "Habitable Worlds", an online-only astrobiology lab course. The course curriculum is based on the Drake Equation, which integrates across disciplines. The course pedagogy is organized around a term-long, individualized, game-inspired project in which each student must find and characterize rare habitable planets in a randomized field of hundreds of stars using concepts learned in the course. The curriculum allows us to meaningfully integrate concepts from Earth, physical, life, and social sciences in order to address questions related to the possibility of extraterrestrial life. The pedagogy motivates students to master concepts, which are taught through interactive and adaptive inquiry-driven tutorials, featuring focused feedback and alternative pathways that adjust to student abilities, built using an intelligent tutoring system (Smart Sparrow's Adaptive eLearning Platform - AeLP). Through the combination of the project and tutorials, students construct knowledge from experience, modeling the authentic practice of science. Because the tutorials are self-grading, the teaching staff is free to dedicate time to more intense learner-teacher interactions (such as tutoring weaker students or guiding advanced students towards broader applications of the concepts), using platforms like Piazza and Adobe Connect. The AeLP and Piazza provide robust data and analysis tools that allow us to

  20. Instructor satisfaction with a technology-based resource for diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deanne L; Corman, Shelby L; Drab, Scott R; Meyer, Susan M; Smith, Randall B

    2009-05-27

    To evaluate instructor use patterns and satisfaction with DM Educate, a comprehensive, Web-based diabetes course. Instructors completed a post-course survey instrument to assess their use of course materials and components, as well as satisfaction with the course content, design, and technology utilized, and to solicit their suggestions for additional content areas. Thirty-eight percent of respondents utilized DM Educate as a standalone elective and 62% had integrated materials into existing courses. The pharmacotherapy module was the most utilized at 91% and slide sets were the most utilized course components at 63%. All instructors stated that they would use the course again the following year. Suggestions for improvement included incorporation of more active-learning activities and patient cases. Instructors' were highly satisfied with the course materials and technology used by DM Educate, a Web-based diabetes education course, and indicated they were able to customize the course materials both to establish new courses and supplement existing courses. All instructors planned to use the course again.

  1. How to encourage entrepreneurship and innovation through the development of technology-based projects in the context of university teaching?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Segarra Ciprés

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship and innovation are two of the values demanded by firms today, and therefore the associated skills are enhanced in grades with a clear focus on entrepreneurship. The goal is that students who leave their classrooms were able to undertake and not only in the sense of creating a firm, but also to have the ability to innovate in any tasks that require professional performance. However, despite the clear need to promote entrepreneurship, there are few practical examples of how to teach this competence. In this paper, we present an educational experience based on the theoretical framework provided by the Triple Helix Model, according to which synergies in entrepreneurship are multiplied when are joined the three axes in the task of undertaking: institutional, university and business. Its goal has been to support students from the business idea to the creation of a technology-based company, as a way to enhance their entrepreneurial and innovative capacity. To carry it out has created a multidisciplinary working group in which at university axis level courses of different knowledge domain have been coordinated: engineering, social sciences and humanities.

  2. Life Imitates Pokemon: The Virtues and Necessities of Technology-Based Peer Education in Today's Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, David

    1999-01-01

    As the Pokemon game craze illustrates, the combination of peer education and technology makes for powerful educational experiences. Educators need to accept technology-based peer education as a help rather than a hindrance to improve educational outcomes for students. (SLD)

  3. Dynamic capabilities and the growth of technology-based new ventures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strehle, Florian Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Under the influence of increasing globalisation the creation and development of technology-based entrepreneurial firms is considered a prevalent means to fuel economic growth and prevent further unemployment, especially in Western European economies. This dissertation denotes the process of new

  4. Technology-Based Participatory Learning for Indigenous Children in Chiapas Schools, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Yolanda; Icaza, Jose I.

    2012-01-01

    This research created a technology-based learning environment at two schools belonging to the National Council of Educational Development (CONAFE) for indigenous children in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. The purpose of the study was to describe the educational impact of using the Classmate PC netbooks and the Sugar Educational Platform in the…

  5. The Effect of Technology-Based Altered Readability Levels on Struggling Readers' Science Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Matthew T.; Coyne, Michael; Dunn, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study examining how altered readability levels affected struggling readers' (N = 288) comprehension of scientific concepts and vocabulary. Specifically, the researchers were interested in learning what effect altered readability levels have when low ability readers participate in a technology-based science…

  6. A New Direction for Technology-Based Economic Development: The Role of Innovation Intermediaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendis, Richard A.; Seline, Richard S.; Byler, Ethan J.

    2008-01-01

    Accelerating innovation to drive economic growth is the foremost goal for technology-based economic development organizations today. Realizing this goal through programmes is challenged by limited and outdated operating models. The authors outline their 21st Century Innovation Intermediary model, which pairs commercialization with regional…

  7. Innovative Technology-Based Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynszpan, Ouriel; Weiss, Patrice L.; Perez-Diaz, Fernando; Gal, Eynat

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the results of a meta-analysis of technology-based intervention studies for children with autism spectrum disorders. We conducted a systematic review of research that used a pre-post design to assess innovative technology interventions, including computer programs, virtual reality, and robotics. The selected studies provided…

  8. Innovation capabilities in food and beverages and technology-based innovation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tepic, M.; Fortuin, F.T.J.M.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to establish the differences between the food and beverages (F&B) and technology-based industries with regards to the relation between previously identified success factors and innovation project performance. Design/methodology/approach - These differences are

  9. Development of Reading Comprehension Skills among Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using Technologically-Based Reading Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Ella M.

    2016-01-01

    This research paper reported the results from research conducted regarding technologically-based reading comprehension programs for students who have intellectual disabilities. It provided evidence-based research and theoretical bases for learning (i.e. Zone of Generativity, Constructivism, Self-Efficacy) on the issue of these students not being…

  10. Strategic Planning Tools for Large-Scale Technology-Based Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koomen, Marten; Zoanetti, Nathan

    2018-01-01

    Education systems are increasingly being called upon to implement new technology-based assessment systems that generate efficiencies, better meet changing stakeholder expectations, or fulfil new assessment purposes. These assessment systems require coordinated organisational effort to implement and can be expensive in time, skill and other…

  11. The role of social networks in financing technology-based ventures: an empirical exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuven, J.M.J.; Groen, Arend J.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the role of networks in both identifying and accessing financial resource providers by technology-based ventures. We explore the role of networks by taking into account several specifications. We (1) acknowledge that new ventures can access financial resource providers

  12. VATE: VAlidation of high TEchnology based on large database analysis by learning machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meldolesi, E; Van Soest, J; Alitto, A R; Autorino, R; Dinapoli, N; Dekker, A; Gambacorta, M A; Gatta, R; Tagliaferri, L; Damiani, A; Valentini, V

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between implementation of new technologies and different outcomes can allow a broad range of researches to be expanded. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the VAlidation of high TEchnology based on large database analysis by learning machine (VATE) project that aims to combine

  13. Mobile technology-based interventions for adult users of alcohol: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Lauren A; Holt, Sidney L; Joshi, Deepti

    2016-11-01

    Worldwide, 16% of people aged 15 and older engage in harmful use of alcohol. Harmful alcohol use leads to a host of preventable negative social and health consequences. Mobile technology-based interventions provide a particularly promising avenue for the widespread and cost-effective delivery of treatment that is accessible, affordable, individualized, and destigmatized to both alcohol-dependent and nondependent individuals. The present review sought to summarize the current literature on mobile technology-based interventions among adult users of alcohol and determine the efficacy of such interventions. Five databases were searched in December 2015 (Jan. 2004-Dec. 2015). Inclusion criteria were: participants aged 18 or older, interventions delivered through mobile-technology, and outcome measurement of alcohol reduction/cessation. Eight studies met inclusion criteria. The majority of the studies reviewed found positive effects of the intervention, even though the interventions themselves varied in design, length, dosage, and target population, and were pilot or preliminary in nature. Findings from this review highlight the promising, yet preliminary state of research in this area. Studies with adequate power and valid design are necessary to evaluate the potential of mobile technology-based interventions on long-term alcohol behavior outcomes. Furthermore, future research should elucidate what the most effective length of time is for a mobile technology-based intervention, how often individuals should receive messages for maximum benefit, and determine the comparative effectiveness of mobile technology interventions with other efficacious interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Beast of Aggregating Cognitive Load Measures in Technology-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppink, Jimmie; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing part of cognitive load research in technology-based learning includes a component of repeated measurements, that is: participants are measured two or more times on the same performance, mental effort or other variable of interest. In many cases, researchers aggregate scores obtained from repeated measurements to one single sum or…

  15. Teachers' Experiences of Technology-Based Teaching and Learning in the Foundation Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaway, D. M.; Steyn, M. G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents one aspect of a larger scale doctoral study, namely the teachers' experiences of technology-based teaching and learning in the Foundation Phase. Technology is a huge driver of change and South African education has to change regularly to meet the requirements set out by the Department of Education, including the development of…

  16. Motivations of Women Participating in a Technology-Based Social Entrepreneurship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzombak, Rachel; Mouakkad, Sally; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    Academic programs focused on engineering entrepreneurship are growing in number and popularity at American universities. However, the fields of engineering, entrepreneurship and technology-based entrepreneurship struggle to recruit and retain female students: a historic and endemic failure at obtaining gender-balanced participation. Understanding…

  17. Bringing Technology to Students' Proximity: A Sociocultural Account of Technology-Based Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukama, Evode

    2014-01-01

    This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs) through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus group discussions and field…

  18. Functional Management Competence and Growth of Young Technology-Based Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomo, Søren; Brinckmann, Jan; Talke, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    . While technology management competence is positively driving development speed, the marketing management competence impact on speed is mediated by competitive advantage of the new products developed by young technology-based firms. Financial management competence has no significant link to firm...

  19. Examining the interrelationships among students' personological characteristics, attitudes toward the Unified Modeling Language, self-efficacy, and multiple intelligences with respect to student achievement in a software design methods course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Iles, Gail Marie

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interrelationships among student's demographics, attitudes toward the Unified Modeling Language (UML), general self-efficacy, and multiple intelligence (MI) profiles, and the use of UML to develop software. The dependent measures were course grades and course project scores. The study was grounded in problem solving theory, self-efficacy theory, and multiple intelligence theory. The sample was an intact class of 18 students who took the junior-level Software Design Methods course, CSE 3421, at Florida Institute of Technology in the Spring 2008 semester. The course incorporated instruction in UML with Java. Attitudes were measured by a researcher-modified instrument derived from the Computer Laboratory Survey by Newby and Fisher, and self-efficacy was measured by the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale developed by Schwarzer and Jerusalem. MI profiles, which were the proportion of Gardner's eight intelligences, were determined from Shearer's Multiple Intelligence Developmental Assessment Scales. Results from a hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that only the collective set of MI profiles was significant, but none of the individual intelligences were significant. The study's findings supported what one would expect to find relative to problem solving theory, but were contradictory to self-efficacy theory. The findings also supported Gardner's concept that multiple intelligences must be considered as an integral unit and the importance of not focusing on an individual intelligence. The findings imply that self-efficacy is not a major consideration for a software design methods class that requires a transition to problem solving strategy and suggest that the instructor was instrumental in fostering positive attitudes toward UML. Recommendations for practice include (1) teachers should not be concerned with focusing on a single intelligence simply because they believe one intelligence might be more aligned to a

  20. Badminton: Course Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, David G.

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia Life Sciences and Allied Health Services course in Badminton. Following a standard cover form, a statement of purpose explains that the course is designed to introduce students to the techniques, knowledge, and strategies of badminton. Next, course goals and a course outline are…

  1. Multi-Sensor Building Fire Alarm System with Information Fusion Technology Based on D-S Evidence Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ding

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-sensor and information fusion technology based on Dempster-Shafer evidence theory is applied in the system of a building fire alarm to realize early detecting and alarming. By using a multi-sensor to monitor the parameters of the fire process, such as light, smoke, temperature, gas and moisture, the range of fire monitoring in space and time is expanded compared with a single-sensor system. Then, the D-S evidence theory is applied to fuse the information from the multi-sensor with the specific fire model, and the fire alarm is more accurate and timely. The proposed method can avoid the failure of the monitoring data effectively, deal with the conflicting evidence from the multi-sensor robustly and improve the reliability of fire warning significantly.

  2. Building and strengthening capacity for cardiovascular research in Africa through technical training workshops: a report of the joint course on health research methods by the Clinical Research Education Networking and Consultancy and the Ivorian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzekem, Bonaventure Suiru; Kacou, Jean Baptiste; Abanda, Martin; Kramoh, Euloge; Yapobi, Yves; Kingue, Samuel; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Dzudie, Anastase

    Africa bears a quarter of the global burden of disease but contributes less than 2% of the global research publications on health, partially due to a lack of expertise and skills to carry out scientific research. We report on a short course on research methods organised by the Clinical Research Education Networking and Consultancy (CRENC) during the third international congress of the Ivorian Cardiac Society (SICARD) in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire. Results from the pre- and post-test evaluation during this course showed that African researchers could contribute more to scientific research and publications, provided adequate support and investment is geared towards the identification and training of motivated early-career scientists.

  3. THE IMPACT OF THE METHOD OF UNDERLAY SURFACE PROCESSING ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF DEFECTS IN EPITAXIAL COMPOSITIONS IN THE COURSE OF SILICON PHOTO-TRANSDUCERS PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Nikonova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For the production of silicon photo-transducers (PhT the acquisition of epitaxial compositions (EC with high resistivity of working layer. One of the main parameters characterizing the quality of EC is the density of dislocation and other structural defects. Great impact on the development of defects during epitaxial growth is produced by the quality of underlay preparation before that. Multiple research of relatively thin (less than 20-30 microns epitaxial layers demonstrated, that contamination or damages of underlay surface cause the development of defects of wrapping, counterparts, macroscopic protuberances in the growing layer. During inverted epitaxy there are no high requirements as for structural perfection of epitaxial layer as far as in PhT, produced on the basis of EC for which inverted silicon structures (ISS serve with the working layer of mono-crystal substrate. Therefore in inverted epitaxy it is the problem of the development in the course of defects growth not in epitaxial layer, but in underlay, that becomes the major one. The processes of the development of defects in underlay in the course of growing thick (approximately 300 microns epitaxial layer are scarcely researched by now. Scientists sustained the idea that when using dislocation-free underlays for growing in the working layer of ISS there are dislocations with the density of 103 sm-2 and more. Thus, investigation of the factors that determine the development of dislocations in underlay in the process of epitaxy, has now gained great practical value.

  4. Dissecting through barriers: A mixed-methods study on the effect of interprofessional education in a dissection course with healthcare professional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alisha Rebecca; Palombella, Andrew; Salfi, Jenn; Wainman, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is reliant on a team-based approach, and interprofessional education (IPE) provides a means by which such collaboration skills can be fostered prior to entering the workplace. IPE within healthcare programs has been associated with improved collaborative behavior, patient care and satisfaction, reduced clinical error, and diminished negative professional stereotypes. An intensive interprofessional gross anatomy dissection course was created in 2009 to facilitate IPE at McMaster University. Data were collected from five cohorts over five years to determine the influence of this IPE format on the attitudes and perceptions of students towards other health professions. Each year, 28 students from the medicine, midwifery, nursing, physician's assistant, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy programs were randomly assigned into interprofessional teams for 10 weeks. Sessions involved an anatomy and scope-of-practice presentation, a small-group case-based session, and a dissection. A before/after design measured changes in attitudes and perceptions, while focus group data elaborated on the student experience with the course. Pre- and postmatched data revealed significant improvements in positive professional identity, competency and autonomy, role clarity and attitudes toward other health professions. Qualitative analysis of intraprofessional focus group interviews revealed meaningful improvements in a number of areas including learning anatomy, role clarity, and attitudes towards other health professions. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. Accelerated Internationalization in Emerging Markets: Empirical Evidence from Brazilian Technology-Based Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ferreira Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers an analysis into the external factors influencing the accelerated internationalization of technology-based firms (TBFs in the context of an emerging country, Brazil. This type of firm is typically called born global and has been reported mainly in high technology sectors and from developed countries. A survey was applied to small and medium Brazilian TBFs. Logistic regression was used to test the research hypotheses. The results suggest that new and small Brazilian technology-based firms, which followed an accelerated internationalization process, are most likely to be integrated into a global production chain. Results also show that TBFs which take more than five years to enter the international market, benefit more from the location in an innovation habitat, the partnerships in the home country, and the pro-internationalization government policies. Therefore, this research contributes to a better understanding of the phenomenon and points to new perspectives of studies.

  6. Adolescents' Depressive Symptoms and Subsequent Technology-Based Interpersonal Behaviors: A Multi-Wave Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Jacqueline; Miller, Adam B; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the longitudinal effects of adolescents' depressive symptoms on engagement in technology-based social comparison and feedback seeking (SCFS) behaviors. A total of 816 adolescents (54.7% girls; M age =14.1 at Time 1) participated at three times points, each one year apart. Adolescents reported technology-based SCFS, depressive symptoms, and frequencies of technology use (cell phones, Facebook, and Instagram). Multiple group (by gender) latent growth curve models examined concurrent and lagged effects of depressive symptoms on SCFS, controlling for adolescent's underlying trajectories of SCFS and overall frequencies of technology use. Results indicated that higher levels of depressive symptoms were concurrently associated with greater SCFS after accounting for adolescents' typical patterns of SCFS. For boys only, higher depressive symptoms were prospectively associated with later increases in SCFS. Results highlight the importance of social media as a unique context in which depressed adolescents may be at risk for maladaptive interpersonal behavior.

  7. Research progress of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng WANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During the high-power laser welding process, plasmas are induced by the evaporation of metal under laser radiation, which can affect the coupling of laser energy and the workpiece, and ultimately impact on the reliability of laser welding quality and process directly. The research of laser-induced plasma is a focus in high-power deep penetration welding field, which provides a promising research area for realizing the automation of welding process quality inspection. In recent years, the research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics is mainly in two aspects, namely the research of plasma signal detection and the research of laser welding process modeling. The laser-induced plasma in the laser welding is introduced, and the related research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics at home and abroad is analyzed. The current problems in the field are summarized, and the future development trend is put forward.

  8. Using findings in multimedia learning to inform technology-based behavioral health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Ian David; Marsch, Lisa A; Acosta, Michelle C

    2013-09-01

    Clinicians and researchers are increasingly using technology-based behavioral health interventions to improve intervention effectiveness and to reach underserved populations. However, these interventions are rarely informed by evidence-based findings of how technology can be optimized to promote acquisition of key skills and information. At the same time, experts in multimedia learning generally do not apply their findings to health education or conduct research in clinical contexts. This paper presents an overview of some key aspects of multimedia learning research that may allow those developing health interventions to apply informational technology with the same rigor as behavioral science content. We synthesized empirical multimedia learning literature from 1992 to 2011. We identified key findings and suggested a framework for integrating technology with educational and behavioral science theory. A scientific, evidence-driven approach to developing technology-based interventions can yield greater effectiveness, improved fidelity, increased outcomes, and better client service.

  9. DEVELOPING A TECHNOLOGY-BASED BUSINESS STRATEGY FOR THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OF TELKOM SA

    OpenAIRE

    M. John; A.J. Buys

    2012-01-01

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This study was aimed at developing a technology-based business strategy for Telkom’s international business. Deregulation, competition and demand for converging voice, data and video in the telecommunication market were the driving forces behind this study. Without a proper strategy, Telkom will not be able to withstand the new competition. As the initial step in strategy formulation, Telkom’s strategic goals were identified. A SWOT analysis was conducted and a stra...

  10. Financing Strategies of New Technology-Based Firms: A Comparison by Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Robb

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Technology-based firms have been and will continue to be important contributors to the U.S. economy. For the past two decades, technology firms have been a major source of innovation, business development and growth, and new jobs. Securing funding for new technology-based firms is particularly problematic, however, whether they are owned by women or men. Many such firms are built upon intellectual capital rather than on physical assets, so it is difficult to determine the value and prospects of the firm. The problem of asymmetric or incomplete information is especially acute (Brierley, 2001, often resulting in a shortage of capital or capital that can only be obtained under unfavorable terms and conditions. A number of researchers contend that one of the primary reasons women-owned firms tend to be smaller than firms owned by men is that women tend to concentrate in low-growth retail and service lines of business (Rosa et al., 1996; Du Rietz & Henrekson, 2000. These businesses have a higher risk of failure (Robb, 2002; Fairlie & Robb, 2008; Watson, 2003 combined with a higher level of difficulty in attracting sources of capital due to their limited prospects for growth and profitability (Menzies et al., 2004; Sabarwal & Terrell, 2008. More recently, however, some researchers have begun to attack the “myth” that women do not want high-growth businesses (Brush et al., 2001. They contend that a new generation of women entrepreneurs is willing to “go boldly where no one has gone before” by starting firms in the fields of technology and bioscience, where there are opportunities for significant growth and profits. In this paper we will examine the financing sources and strategies, by gender, for new technology-based firms using the Kauffman Firm Survey data. We identify not only sources of financing, but also financing gaps which may impede the ability of women to launch and grow technology-based firms.

  11. The Cultivation of New Technology-Based Firms and Roles of Venture Capital Firms in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kirihata, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I analyze post-investment activities of venture capital firms (VCFs) based on a questionnaire survey and discuss the issues and challenges of post-investment activities of VCFs with new technology based firms (NTBFs) in Japan. The questionnaire survey reveals that business supports desired by NTBFs can be classified into four groups."business strategies adjustment and motivation", "business advice and networking", "finance and crisis management", and "recruitment assistance". T...

  12. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills.

  13. Course on hybrid calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.; Tellier; Bonnemay; Craigne; Chareton; Di Falco

    1969-02-01

    After a definition of hybrid calculation (combination of analogue and digital calculation) with a distinction between series and parallel hybrid computing, and a description of a hybrid computer structure and of task sharing between computers, this course proposes a description of hybrid hardware used in Saclay and Cadarache computing centres, and of operations performed by these systems. The next part addresses issues related to programming languages and software. The fourth part describes how a problem is organised for its processing on these computers. Methods of hybrid analysis are then addressed: resolution of optimisation problems, of partial differential equations, and of integral equations by means of different methods (gradient, maximum principle, characteristics, functional approximation, time slicing, Monte Carlo, Neumann iteration, Fischer iteration)

  14. An assessment of technology-based service encounters & network security on the e-health care systems of medical centers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ching

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhancing service efficiency and quality has always been one of the most important factors to heighten competitiveness in the health care service industry. Thus, how to utilize information technology to reduce work load for staff and expeditiously improve work efficiency and healthcare service quality is presently the top priority for every healthcare institution. In this fast changing modern society, e-health care systems are currently the best possible way to achieve enhanced service efficiency and quality under the restraint of healthcare cost control. The electronic medical record system and the online appointment system are the core features in employing e-health care systems in the technology-based service encounters. Methods This study implemented the Service Encounters Evaluation Model, the European Customer Satisfaction Index, the Attribute Model and the Overall Affect Model for model inference. A total of 700 copies of questionnaires from two authoritative southern Taiwan medical centers providing the electronic medical record system and the online appointment system service were distributed, among which 590 valid copies were retrieved with a response rate of 84.3%. We then used SPSS 11.0 and the Linear Structural Relationship Model (LISREL 8.54 to analyze and evaluate the data. Results The findings are as follows: (1 Technology-based service encounters have a positive impact on service quality, but not patient satisfaction; (2 After experiencing technology-based service encounters, the cognition of the service quality has a positive effect on patient satisfaction; and (3 Network security contributes a positive moderating effect on service quality and patient satisfaction. Conclusion It revealed that the impact of electronic workflow (online appointment system service on service quality was greater than electronic facilities (electronic medical record systems in technology-based service encounters. Convenience and

  15. Integration of Technology-based Behavioral Health Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The past decade has witnessed revolutionary changes to the delivery of health services, ushered in to a great extent by the introduction of electronic health record systems. More recently, a new class of technological advancements-technology-based behavioral health interventions, which involve the delivery of evidence-informed practices via computers, web-based applications, mobile phones, wearable sensors, or other technological platforms-has emerged and is primed to once again radically shift current models for behavioral healthcare. Despite the promise and potential of these new therapeutic approaches, a greater understanding of the impact of technology-based interventions on cornerstone issues of mental health and addiction services-namely access, quality, and cost -is needed. The current review highlights 1) relevant conceptual frameworks that guide this area of research, 2) key studies that inform the relevance of technology-based interventions for behavioral healthcare access, quality, and cost, 3) pressing methodological issues that require attention, 4) unresolved questions that warrant further investigation, and 5) practical implications that underscore important new directions for this emerging area of research.

  16. From Ideas to Opportunities: Exploring the Construction of Technology-Based Entrepreneurial Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Giones

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of business ideas into market opportunities is at the core of entrepreneurship. Nevertheless, the complexity of such a transformative process is seen to change depending on the variables influencing the opportunity-entrepreneur nexus. Although technology-entrepreneurship is regarded as a force of change and dynamism in socio-economic growth, it also depends upon an intricate process of opportunity development. The interest in understanding better how technology-based entrepreneurs simultaneously cope with technological uncertainty while trying to gain stakeholder support and access to resources, highlights a relevant research gap. The research described in this article uses the constructivist view to deepen our understanding of the technology-based entrepreneur’s conceptualization of the opportunity as a process of social construction. Our results show how initial consensus-building efforts and iteration with knowledgeable peers are an essential part of the emergence of the opportunity, changing both entrepreneur's and stakeholders' perceptions of the early business idea. Consequently, our results provide evidence in support of policy programs and measures that favour social-construction support mechanisms to foster technology-based entrepreneurship.

  17. Implementation of Technology-based Patient Engagement Strategies within Practice-based Research Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careyva, Beth; Shaak, Kyle; Mills, Geoffrey; Johnson, Melanie; Goodrich, Samantha; Stello, Brian; Wallace, Lorraine S

    2016-01-01

    Technology-based patient engagement strategies (such as patient portals) are increasingly available, yet little is known about current use and barriers within practice-based research networks (PBRNs). PBRN directors have unique opportunities to inform the implementation of patient-facing technology and to translate these findings into practice. PBRN directors were queried regarding technology-based patient engagement strategies as part of the 2015 CAFM Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of PBRN directors. A total of 102 PBRN directors were identified via the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's registry; 54 of 96 eligible PBRN directors completed the survey, for a response rate of 56%. Use of technology-based patient engagement strategies within PBRNs was limited, with less than half of respondents reporting experience with the most frequently named tools (risk assessments/decision aids). Information technology (IT) support was the top barrier, followed by low rates of portal enrollment. For engaging participant practices, workload and practice leadership were cited as most important, with fewer respondents noting concerns about patient privacy. Given limited use of patient-facing technologies, PBRNs have an opportunity to clarify the optimal use of these strategies. Providing IT support and addressing clinician concerns regarding workload may facilitate the inclusion of innovative technologies in PBRNs. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  18. Establishing a birth cohort to investigate the course and aetiology of asthma and allergies across three generations - rationale, design, and methods of the ACROSSOLAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, Tobias; Gerlich, Jessica; Heinrich, Sabine; Nowak, Dennis; Gerdes, Jennifer; Schlichtiger, Jenny; von Mutius, Erika; Schaub, Bianca; Vogelberg, Christian; Roller, Diana; Radon, Katja

    2015-12-04

    Atopic diseases are a major burden of disease on a global scale. Regarding their aetiology, the early years of life are assumed to play a crucial role. In addition, there is growing evidence that elucidating the impact of cross-generational effects and epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation can substantially widen the scientific knowledge of the occurrence and progression of these diseases. We are thus aiming at following the course of asthma, allergies, and potential risk factors for their occurrence across three generations by establishing a birth cohort in the offspring of an existing population-based cohort. 2051 young adults who have been recruited in 1995 for Phase II of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) and who have subsequently been followed-up by the Study on Occupational Allergy Risks (SOLAR) are asked bi-annually since 2009 if they conceived a child in the meantime. If parenthood is reported, parents are invited to enrol along with their children in the ACROSSOLAR cohort. Participation involves completing a questionnaire assessing general and health-related information about the course of the pregnancy and the first year of life of their children. Subsequently, the children are followed up until primary school age when asthma and allergies can be diagnosed reliably. In addition, DNA for epigenetic analysis will be collected and analysed. Longitudinal data analysis techniques will then be used to assess potential associations between early-life exposures and onset of childhood asthma and allergies taking into account epigenetics. Birth cohorts are especially suited to elucidate the impact of genetic predisposition, epigenetics, exposures during the first years of life, and gene-environment interactions on the occurrence and progression of asthma and allergies. By building upon an existing cohort, ACROSSOLAR offers a unique and cost-effective opportunity to investigate the aetiology of atopic disease in a

  19. A Case Study of Policies and Procedures to Address Cyberbullying at a Technology-Based Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Bettina Polite

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored the policies and procedures used to effectively address cyberbullying at a technology-based middle school. The purpose of the study was to gain an in-depth understanding of policies and procedures used to address cyberbullying at a technology-based middle school in the southern United States. The study sought…

  20. Information in medical treatment courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marianne; Hollnagel, Erik; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    Background Unintended events and suboptimal treatment with medicines are major burdens for patients and health systems all over the world. Information processes have important roles for establishing safe and effective treatment courses. The platform for this Ph.d. study is learning from situations...... to the quality of medical treatment courses. Methods Systems theory, cybernetics (steering, timing and feedback) and a classic communication model are applied as theoretical frames. Two groups of patients and their information providers are studied using qualitative methods. The data analysis focuses...... that goes well (Safety-II) while having a broad understanding of quality. Objectives The overall purpose is to investigate how information is used as a steering tool for quality in medical treatment courses. In this first part of the study, the role of information on medicine is analyzed in relation...

  1. Practice of the integrated endocrine system course

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-han MEI; Rong CAI

    2015-01-01

    The integrated curriculum is an important direction of the medical medical education reform under new situation and challenges of medical development.Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine has implemented the integrated curriculum reform in recent years.The endocrine system course is one of important intergrated courses and integrates relevant contents of multiple disciplines of basic medicine,diagnostics and medical imaging.Various teaching methods are adopted,such as classroom lecture,discussion,problembased learning,experimental lesson and clinical clerkship,etc.The teaching practice is carried on in several aspects:course arrangement,teaching methods,course website construction,teaching team construction and so on.

  2. Technology-based counseling in the management of weight and lifestyles of obese or overweight children and adolescents: A descriptive systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakinen, Pirjo; Kyngäs, Helvi; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The number of overweight and obese children and adolescents has increased worldwide. Obese children and adolescents need counseling interventions, including technology-based methods, to help them manage their weight by changing their lifestyles. To describe technology-based counseling interventions in supporting obese or overweight children and adolescents to change their weight/lifestyle. Descriptive systematic literature review. A literature search was conducted using Cinahl, Medline, PsycINFO, and Medic databases in September 2010 and updated in January 2015. Predefined inclusion criteria were used for the search. After a quality assessment, 28 studies were included in the data extraction. No statistically significant difference in BMI was detected between the intervention and control groups. However, in some studies, it was found that BMI decreases and there were statistically significant differences in fruit and vegetable consumption. In two studies, differences in physical activity were detected between the intervention and control groups, but in eight studies, the difference was not significant. Goal setting and feedback on progress support physical activity and changes in diet. This study identifies available technology interventions for obese or overweight children and adolescents. It seems that using technology-based counseling intervention may encourage obese and overweight children and adolescents to pursue a healthier lifestyle.

  3. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  4. Collaborative course design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rien Brouwers; Ellen Simons

    2002-01-01

    International Summer School on the Digital Library Course 2: Digital Libraries and Education 8 August 2002 Our proposition in this paper is: The overall quality of education can be improved by application of the different expertises of educational and library staff in course design and course

  5. Physics 3204. Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newfoundland and Labrador Dept. of Education.

    A description of the physics 3204 course in Newfoundland and Labrador is provided. The description includes: (1) statement of purpose, including general objectives of science education; (2) a list of six course objectives; (3) course content for units on sound, light, optical instruments, electrostatics, current electricity, Michael Faraday and…

  6. AP statistics crash course

    CERN Document Server

    D'Alessio, Michael

    2012-01-01

    AP Statistics Crash Course - Gets You a Higher Advanced Placement Score in Less Time Crash Course is perfect for the time-crunched student, the last-minute studier, or anyone who wants a refresher on the subject. AP Statistics Crash Course gives you: Targeted, Focused Review - Study Only What You Need to Know Crash Course is based on an in-depth analysis of the AP Statistics course description outline and actual Advanced Placement test questions. It covers only the information tested on the exam, so you can make the most of your valuable study time. Our easy-to-read format covers: exploring da

  7. Black Ink and Red Ink (BIRI) Testing: A Testing Method to Evaluate Both Recall and Recognition Learning in Accelerated Adult-Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Rodgers, Jacci L.

    2011-01-01

    We propose, develop, and evaluate the black ink-red ink (BIRI) method of testing. This approach uses two different methods within the same test administration setting, one that matches recognition learning and the other that matches recall learning. Students purposively define their own tradeoff between the two approaches. Evaluation of the method…

  8. APPLICATION OF THE MODEL CERNE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF CRITERIA INCUBATION SELECTION IN TECHNOLOGY BASED BUSINESSES : A STUDY IN INCUBATORS OF TECHNOLOGICAL BASE OF THE COUNTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clobert Jefferson Passoni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Business incubators are a great source of encouragement for innovative projects, enabling the development of new technologies, providing infrastructure, advice and support, which are key elements for the success of new business. The technology-based firm incubators (TBFs, which are 154 in Brazil. Each one of them has its own mechanism for the selection of the incubation companies. Because of the different forms of management of incubators, the business model CERNE - Reference Center for Support for New Projects - was created by Anprotec and Sebrae, in order to standardize procedures and promote the increase of chances for success in the incubations. The objective of this study is to propose selection criteria for the incubation, considering CERNE’s five dimensions and aiming to help on the decision-making in the assessment of candidate companies in a TBF incubator. The research was conducted from the public notices of 20 TBF incubators, where 38 selection criteria were identified and classified. Managers of TBF incubators validated 26 criteria by its importance via online questionnaires. As a result, favorable ratings were obtained to 25 of them. Only one criterion differed from the others, with a unfavorable rating.

  9. Oxford-Style Debates in a Microbiology Course for Majors: A Method for Delivering Content and Engaging Critical Thinking Skills †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucaud, Dwayne W.; Nabel, Michael; Eggers, Christian H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing scientific expertise in the classroom involves promoting higher-order cognitive skills as well as content mastery. Effective use of constructivism can facilitate these outcomes. However this is often difficult to accomplish when delivery of content is paramount. Utilizing many of the tenets of constructivist pedagogy, we have designed an Oxford-style debate assignment to be used in an introductory microbiology course. Two teams of students were assigned a debatable topic within microbiology. Over a five-week period students completed an informative web page consisting of three parts: background on the topic, data-based positions for each side of the argument, and a data-based persuasive argument to support their assigned position. This was followed by an in-class presentation and debate. Analysis of student performance on knowledge-based questions shows that students retain debate-derived content acquired primarily outside of lectures significantly better than content delivered during a normal lecture. Importantly, students who performed poorly on the lecture-derived questions did as well on debate-derived questions as other students. Students also performed well on questions requiring higher-order cognitive skills and in synthesizing data-driven arguments in support of a position during the debate. Student perceptions of their knowledge-base in areas covered by the debate and their skills in using scientific databases and analyzing primary literature showed a significant increase in pre- and postassignment comparisons. Our data demonstrate that an Oxford-style debate can be used effectively to deliver relevant content, increase higher-order cognitive skills, and increase self-efficacy in science-specific skills, all contributing to developing expertise in the field. PMID:23858349

  10. Technology-based functional assessment in early childhood intervention: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetani, Mary A; McManus, Beth M; Arestad, Kristen; Richardson, Zachary; Charlifue-Smith, Renee; Rosenberg, Cordelia; Rigau, Briana

    2018-01-01

    Electronic patient-reported outcomes (e-PROs) may provide valid and feasible options for obtaining family input on their child's functioning for care planning and outcome monitoring, but they have not been adopted into early intervention (EI). The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing technology-based functional assessment into EI practice and to examine child, family, service, and environmental correlates of caregiver-reported child functioning in the home. In a cross-sectional design, eight individual EI providers participated in a 90-min technology-based functional assessment training to recruit participants and a 60-min semi-structured focus group post data collection. Participants completed the Young Children's Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM) home section online and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer Adaptive Test (PEDI-CAT) via iPad. Participants' EI service use data were obtained from administrative records. A total of 37 caregivers of children between 6 and 35 months old (mean age = 19.4, SD = 7.7) enrolled, a rate of 44% (37/84) in 2.5 months. Providers suggested expanding staff training, gathering data during scheduled evaluations, and providing caregivers and providers with access to assessment summaries. Caregivers wanted their child's participation to change in 56% of home activities. Lower caregiver education and higher EI intensity were related to less child involvement in home activities. Implementing technology-based functional assessment is feasible with modifications, and these data can be useful for highlighting child, family, and EI service correlates of caregiver-reported child functioning that merit further study. Feasibility results informed protocol modifications related to EI provider training, timing of data collection, and management of EI service use data extraction, as preparation for a subsequent scale-up study that is underway.

  11. Old but sexy: Value creation of old technology-based businesses models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oke Christian Beckmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of the strategic and organisational con gurations that companies can use to generate value with product-market systems and their busi- ness models that have been dominant in the past but forced back into niche positions by innovation. The former dominant music format vinyl was rapidly substituted after the introduction of digital music. However, still nowadays some customers use and buy old technology-based products – vinyl sales boom again since 2007. Due to the two-sided nature of the market, customers have to get access to complementary goods. We are thus interested in technologies which have been outdated by the emergence of new technologies. The originality lies in the combination of the two areas: business models and old technologies. Furthermore, vinyl is an example not analysed in depth by scholars so far. We approached this by undertaking an in-depth literature review to generate hypotheses regarding the value-adding activities of old-technology based businesses as a basis for further research in this area. In addition the paper gives insights into the constellations to be expected over time for old technology-based businesses models in platform markets. We here focus on a neglected topic in the strategy literature which, however, bears relevance for many businesses locked into product-market systems which make it hard for them to (completely switch to a new technology emerging in the market. It is especially valuable to describe the consequences in a systematic fashion.

  12. Data on the relationships between financing strategies, entrepreneurial competencies and business growth of technology-based SMEs in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibidunni, Ayodotun Stephen; Kehinde, Oladele Joseph; Ibidunni, Oyebisi Mary; Olokundun, Maxwell Ayodele; Olubusayo, Falola Hezekiah; Salau, Odunayo Paul; Borishade, Taiye Tairat; Fred, Peter

    2018-06-01

    The article presents data on the relationship between financing strategies, entrepreneurial competencies and business growth of technology-based SMEs in Nigeria. Copies of structured questionnaire were administered to 233 SME owners and financial managers. Using descriptive and standard multiple regression statistical analysis, the data revealed that venture capital and business donations significantly influences profit growth of technology-based SMEs. Moreover, the data revealed that technology-`based firms can enhance their access to financing through capacity building in entrepreneurial competencies, such as acquiring the right skills and attitude.

  13. Massive open online courses are relevant for postgraduate medical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Andresen, Kristoffer; Rolskov Bojsen, Signe

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The CanMEDS framework describes seven roles in postgraduate training, but training and courses relevant to these roles can be limited. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) - free online courses in which anyone can participate, anywhere - may improve course participation. This study...... investigates the relevance of MOOCs for postgraduate medical training within the CanMEDS framework. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We extracted a list of all courses posted by the two largest MOOC providers, Coursera and EdX, and reviewed all course descriptions and categorised each course into one of three categories...

  14. A Course in Electrochemical and Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zee, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes a course designed to show similarities between electrochemistry and corrosion engineering and to show graduate students that electrochemical and corrosion engineering can be accomplished by extending their knowledge of chemical engineering models. Includes course outline, textbooks selected, and teaching methods used. (JN)

  15. A short course in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    This short course in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets is designed to fit into the Unical course on Engineering Design Methods. Three modules (called “seminars”) will guide you through . The demands for sustainable development . Professional methods for analysing and ch...... and changing products’ environmental profiles . A new approach to product service system development, where the physical product becomes an incidental aspect in the final offering to the customer...

  16. Self-directed learning can outperform direct instruction in the course of a modern German medical curriculum - results of a mixed methods trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peine, Arne; Kabino, Klaus; Spreckelsen, Cord

    2016-06-03

    Modernised medical curricula in Germany (so called "reformed study programs") rely increasingly on alternative self-instructed learning forms such as e-learning and curriculum-guided self-study. However, there is a lack of evidence that these methods can outperform conventional teaching methods such as lectures and seminars. This study was conducted in order to compare extant traditional teaching methods with new instruction forms in terms of learning effect and student satisfaction. In a randomised trial, 244 students of medicine in their third academic year were assigned to one of four study branches representing self-instructed learning forms (e-learning and curriculum-based self-study) and instructed learning forms (lectures and seminars). All groups participated in their respective learning module with standardised materials and instructions. Learning effect was measured with pre-test and post-test multiple-choice questionnaires. Student satisfaction and learning style were examined via self-assessment. Of 244 initial participants, 223 completed the respective module and were included in the study. In the pre-test, the groups showed relatively homogenous scores. All students showed notable improvements compared with the pre-test results. Participants in the non-self-instructed learning groups reached scores of 14.71 (seminar) and 14.37 (lecture), while the groups of self-instructed learners reached higher scores with 17.23 (e-learning) and 15.81 (self-study). All groups improved significantly (p learning group, whose self-assessment improved by 2.36. The study shows that students in modern study curricula learn better through modern self-instructed methods than through conventional methods. These methods should be used more, as they also show good levels of student acceptance and higher scores in personal self-assessment of knowledge.

  17. Incorporating technology-based learning tools into teaching and learning of optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Irene

    2014-07-01

    The traditional approach of teaching optimization problems in calculus emphasizes more on teaching the students using analytical approach through a series of procedural steps. However, optimization normally involves problem solving in real life problems and most students fail to translate the problems into mathematic models and have difficulties to visualize the concept underlying. As an educator, it is essential to embed technology in suitable content areas to engage students in construction of meaningful learning by creating a technology-based learning environment. This paper presents the applications of technology-based learning tool in designing optimization learning activities with illustrative examples, as well as to address the challenges in the implementation of using technology in teaching and learning optimization. The suggestion activities in this paper allow flexibility for educator to modify their teaching strategy and apply technology to accommodate different level of studies for the topic of optimization. Hence, this provides great potential for a wide range of learners to enhance their understanding of the concept of optimization.

  18. Efficacy of computer technology-based HIV prevention interventions: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M; Black, Hulda G; Pierce, Larson B

    2009-01-02

    To conduct a meta-analysis of computer technology-based HIV prevention behavioral interventions aimed at increasing condom use among a variety of at-risk populations. Systematic review and meta-analysis of existing published and unpublished studies testing computer-based interventions. Meta-analytic techniques were used to compute and aggregate effect sizes for 12 randomized controlled trials that met inclusion criteria. Variables that had the potential to moderate intervention efficacy were also tested. The overall mean weighted effect size for condom use was d = 0.259 (95% confidence interval = 0.201, 0.317; Z = 8.74, P partners, and incident sexually transmitted diseases. In addition, interventions were significantly more efficacious when they were directed at men or women (versus mixed sex groups), utilized individualized tailoring, used a Stages of Change model, and had more intervention sessions. Computer technology-based HIV prevention interventions have similar efficacy to more traditional human-delivered interventions. Given their low cost to deliver, ability to customize intervention content, and flexible dissemination channels, they hold much promise for the future of HIV prevention.

  19. Competitive intelligence information management and innovation in small technology-based companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2007-05-01

    In this article we examine how (i) company type and (ii) the competitive intelligence information used by small technology-based companies affect their innovation performance. The focus is on the specific information types used and not on the information sources. Information topics are classified in four groups - customers (10), company (9), competitor (11) and industry (12). The sample consists of 45 small new technology-based companies, specialized suppliers, and service companies from a variety of sectors - software, photonics, telecommunications, biomedical engineering and biotech, traditional manufacturing etc. The results suggest that the total number of intelligence information topics companies use to make decisions about innovation is not associated with the number of their new products, processes, services and patents. Therefore the companies in our sample do not seem to have the resources, processes or value systems required to use different competitive intelligence information when making decisions on innovation or may rely more on their own internal logic than on external information. Companies are classified using a Pavitt-like taxonomy. Service companies are considered as a separate company type. This allows for explicitly studying both, the innovative role of new services in product driven companies, and the role of new product development in service companies.

  20. Structured Course Objects in a Digital Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, K.; Zubair, M.; Liu, X.; Nelson, M.; Zeil, S.

    1999-01-01

    We are developing an Undergraduate Digital Library Framework (UDLF) that will support creation/archiving of courses and reuse of existing course material to evolve courses. UDLF supports the publication of course materials for later instantiation for a specific offering and allows the addition of time-dependent and student-specific information and structures. Instructors and, depending on permissions, students can access the general course materials or the materials for a specific offering. We are building a reference implementation based on NCSTRL+, a digital library derived from NCSTRL. Digital objects in NCSTRL+ are called buckets, self-contained entities that carry their own methods for access and display. Current bucket implementations have a two level structure of packages and elements. This is not a rich enough structure for course objects in UDLF. Typically, courses can only be modeled as a multilevel hierarchy and among different courses, both the syntax and semantics of terms may vary. Therefore, we need a mechanism to define, within a particular library, course models, their constituent objects, and the associated semantics in a flexible, extensible way. In this paper, we describe our approach to define and implement these multilayered course objects. We use XML technology to emulate complex data structures within the NCSTRL+ buckets. We have developed authoring and browsing tools to manipulate these course objects. In our current implementation a user downloading an XML based course bucket also downloads the XML-aware tools: an applet that enables the user to edit or browse the bucket. We claim that XML provides an effective means to represent multi-level structure of a course bucket.

  1. The Views of Pre-Service Teachers Regarding the Effectiveness of Peer Assisted Learning Method in the Science and Technology Laboratory Practices Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsekli, Yeter; Özer, Dilek Zeren; Güngör, Sema Nur

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the views of pre-service teachers about peer-assisted learning method which is a common practice. The peer student group of the research sample (N:40) consisted of 2nd grade pre-service primary teachers attending the Uludag University Faculty of Education during the 2010-2011 academic year and taking the…

  2. A Comparative Study of Two Methods of Instruction in a University Animal Biology Course: Audio-Tutorial with Conventional Lecture-Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowsey, Robert Ellis

    In this comparative study of instructional methods involving university students, pre- and posttest data were collected from achievement and attitude instruments as well as from opinion questionnaires. The major findings included: (1) students taught via audio-tutorial instruction demonstrated significantly greater achievement gain; (2) the number…

  3. A Mixed Method Investigation of Social Science Graduate Students' Statistics Anxiety Conditions before and after the Introductory Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liuli

    2018-01-01

    Research frequently uses the quantitative approach to explore undergraduate students' anxiety regarding statistics. However, few studies of adults' statistics anxiety use the qualitative method, or a sole focus on graduate students. Moreover, even fewer studies focus on a comparison of adults' anxiety levels before and after an introductory…

  4. Training courses run by the Department of Atomic Energy, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India, conducts a large number of courses covering a variety of fields, mainly concerned with nuclear energy and its applications. These courses are : (1) a comprehensive multidisciplinary course in nuclear sciences and engineering, (2) courses in safety aspects of: (a) the medical uses of radioisotopes, (b) research applications of ionising radiations, (c) the industrial applications of radiation sources, and (d) industrial radiography; (3) industrial radiographer's certification course, (4) course in hospital physics and radiological physics, (5) diploma course in radiation medicine, (6) courses in operation and maintenance of: (a) research reactors and facilities, (b) nuclear power reactors, and (7) course in exploration of atomic minerals. Detailed information on these courses, covering institutions of DAE conducting them, duration, academic requirements for admission to them, method of adimission, detailed syllabus, and general information such as fees, accommodation, stipend if any, etc. is given. (M.G.B.)

  5. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact: Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  6. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact : Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  7. CP Violation course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    The lecture introduces the concepts and phenomena of matter-antimatter symmetry violation, so-called "CP" violation. The lecture is organized in four courses, the first being devoted to a historical overview and an introduction into fundamental discrete symmetries. The second course introduces the most compelling CP-violating phenomena, and presents the first experimental discovery of CP violation in the neutral kaon system. The third course discusses how CP violation is beautifully incorporated into the Standard Model of particle interactions, and how modern B-meson "factories" provide precise tests of this picture. Finally, the fourth and last course introduces CP violation and the genesis of our matter world.

  8. The method of speed-up teaching the technique of ski sport of students of the second course of higher sport institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorova T.V.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The rational method of the speed-up teaching of students of flat rate of discipline is certain «Ski sport» to on to credit-module to the system. 60 students took part in an experiment. In basis of the speed-up teaching fixed integrally-separate going near mastering and perfection of technique of methods of movement on pattens. Optimum correlation of employments is set at teaching the technique of classic and skating styles of movement on pattens taking into account морфо-функциональных and physical qualities of students.

  9. Comparing the effects of problem-based learning and the traditional lecture method on critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness in nursing students in a critical care nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Mohammad; Moghadam, Parastou Kordestani; Mohammadipoor, Fatemeh; Tarahi, Mohammad Javad; Sak, Mandana; Toulabi, Tahereh; Pour, Amir Hossein Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method used to develop cognitive and metacognitive skills in nursing students. The present study was conducted to compare the effects of PBL and the traditional lecture method on critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness in nursing students in a critical care nursing course. The present study was conducted with a quasi-experimental, single group, pretest-posttest design. A group of third-year nursing students (n=40) were recruited from Khorramabad School of Nursing and Midwifery in the west of Iran. The lecture method was used in one group over the first eight weeks of the first semester and PBL was adopted in the second eight weeks. Standardized self-report questionnaires including The California Critical Thinking Skills Test-B (CCTST-B) and the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI) were administered before and after the use of each of the instruction methods. Data were analyzed in SPSS using the paired t-test. No significant changes were observed in the students' critical thinking skills and metacognitive awareness after performing the lecture method. However, a significant increase was observed in the overall critical thinking score (Pmethod. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of technology-based interventions for obesity prevention in adolescents: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jyu-Lin Chen,1 Mary Ellen Wilkosz2 1Department of Family Health Care Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, 2Nursing Department, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA, USA Abstract: About one third of adolescents in the USA are overweight and/or obese. Obesity during the adolescent years is associated with many adverse health consequences, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and psychosocial problems. Because of substantial advances in technologies and wide acceptance by adolescents, it is now possible to use technology for healthy weight management and prevention of obesity. This systematic review used Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and aimed to evaluate the existing literature reported on the effectiveness of technology-based intervention (web-based, e-learning, and active video games in preventing obesity in adolescents. The primary aim of this review was to explore if components of specific interventions were associated with a reduction in body mass index. Research articles obtained from CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database from1990 to 2014 were reviewed. A total of 131 published articles were identified, and 14 met the inclusion criteria of a randomized or nonrandomized clinical study with body mass index as primary outcome and/or secondary outcomes of diet/physical activity and/or psychosocial function, tested lifestyle interventions to prevent obesity, used technology, and studied adolescents (aged 12–18 years. The results indicated that six of 14 studies found body mass index and/or body fat decreased at short-term (less than 12 months follow-up. Six of eleven studies that examined physical activity or physical activity-related outcomes found an improved physical activity outcome (time playing active video games and increase in physical activity time, while five of seven studies which assessed dietary

  11. Efficacy of technology-based interventions for obesity prevention in adolescents: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jyu-Lin; Wilkosz, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    About one third of adolescents in the USA are overweight and/or obese. Obesity during the adolescent years is associated with many adverse health consequences, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and psychosocial problems. Because of substantial advances in technologies and wide acceptance by adolescents, it is now possible to use technology for healthy weight management and prevention of obesity. This systematic review used Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and aimed to evaluate the existing literature reported on the effectiveness of technology-based intervention (web-based, e-learning, and active video games) in preventing obesity in adolescents. The primary aim of this review was to explore if components of specific interventions were associated with a reduction in body mass index. Research articles obtained from CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database from1990 to 2014 were reviewed. A total of 131 published articles were identified, and 14 met the inclusion criteria of a randomized or nonrandomized clinical study with body mass index as primary outcome and/or secondary outcomes of diet/physical activity and/or psychosocial function, tested lifestyle interventions to prevent obesity, used technology, and studied adolescents (aged 12-18 years). The results indicated that six of 14 studies found body mass index and/or body fat decreased at short-term (less than 12 months) follow-up. Six of eleven studies that examined physical activity or physical activity-related outcomes found an improved physical activity outcome (time playing active video games and increase in physical activity time), while five of seven studies which assessed dietary outcomes indicated improvement in dietary behaviors. Five of seven studies suggested an improvement in psychosocial function (reduced depression, improved self-esteem and efficacy, improvement on Behavior Assessment Scale) in adolescents

  12. Time-course study and effects of drying method on concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid, flavonoids, anthocyanin, and 2''-hydroxynicotianamine in leaves of buckwheats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tatsuro; Watanabe, Masami; Iki, Makiko; Aoyagi, Yasuo; Kim, Sun-Ju; Mukasa, Yuji; Yokota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Shigenobu; Hashimoto, Naoto; Noda, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Hiroaki; Matsuura-Endo, Chie

    2009-01-14

    Concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), rutin, minor flavonoids (such as orientin), anthocyanin, and 2''-hydroxynicotianamine (2HN) were quantified in the leaves of common and tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench and Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn., respectively), at 14, 28, and 42 days after sowing (DAS). GABA and rutin concentrations peaked at 42 DAS, whereas anthocyain, 2HN, and minor flavonoid concentrations declined with the age of the plants. However, at 42 DAS, anthocyanin concentrations in the leaves of tartary buckwheat Hokkai T10 leaves were at least 10-fold greater than in the other buckwheats tested. In addition, the effects on target compound concentrations and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity of three different drying methods (20 h at 40 degrees C, 7 h at 70 degrees C, or lyophilization) were investigated. In general, the drying method had no significant effect on the parameters tested. These results indicate that, in terms of GABA, rutin, and anthocyanin concentrations, leaf powder from 42 day old Hokkai T10 has the potential to be a useful food ingredient, such as Ao-jiru juice.

  13. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Quantum Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    research scholars will be held at the Post-Graduate ... The Course is primarily aimed at teachers involved in teaching quantum mechanics at ... Module 2: Scattering, time-independent perturbations, WKB, variational method;. Module 3: Symmetries ...

  14. Lehigh Design Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Vincent G.; Luyben, William L.; Silebi, Cesar A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a two-semester senior design course that combines traditional steady-state economic process design with dynamic plantwide control. This unique course has been taught at Lehigh for more than a decade and has garnered rave reviews from students, industry, and ABET. Each student design group has its own industrial consultant who…

  15. Modularization of Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastern Arizona Coll., Thatcher.

    Eastern Arizona College has developed a modularized system of instruction for five vocational and vocationally related courses--Introduction to Business, Business Mathematics, English, Drafting, and Electronics. Each course is divided into independent segments of instruction and students have open-entry and exit options. This document reviews the…

  16. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  17. Russian Language Course

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The Russian Cultural Circle is organising a new course of "Russian for Beginners", and is continuing a course for Advanced Students (3rd year). Interested persons are invited to contact: Mrs M. Mikhailova e-mail : mailto:mmmacha@hotmail.com Tel. 022 788 27 53

  18. Course documentation report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Bygholm, Ann; Walther, Tina Dyngby Lyng

    A documentation report on the three pedagogical courses developed during the MVU project period. The report describes the three processes taking departure in the structure and material avaiable at the virtual learning environment. Also the report describes the way the two of the courses developed...

  19. Course Resource Lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Robert G.

    The Mountain-Plains Course Resource List is presented by job title for 26 curriculum areas. For each area the printed materials, audiovisual aids, and equipment needed for the course are listed. The 26 curriculum areas are: mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution,…

  20. Hydrologic Services Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD. National Weather Service.

    A course to develop an understanding of the scope of water resource activities, of the need for forecasting, of the National Weather Service's role in hydrology, and of the proper procedures to follow in fulfilling this role is presented. The course is one of self-help, guided by correspondence. Nine lessons are included: (1) Hydrology in the…

  1. Development of Public Training System for Emergency Exercise Using Virtual Reality Technology Based on Radioactive Release Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Song, Sub Lee; Park, Younwon [BEES Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    An exercise is normally conducted for a day or two days depending on the scale of the exercise. What we have experienced up to date there are several limitations in the radiological emergency exercises such as low public acceptance, poor enthusiasm in the exercise participation, not very attracting exercise scenarios, low efficiency in conducting an exercise, and so on. In order to overcome the limitations of the present exercising system, we would like to develop a radiological emergency exercise system using VR (virtual reality) technology based on a radioactive release accident. In this paper, we just introduce some basic development methods and event tree based scenario as a beginning stage. After the accident in Fukushima Daiichi NPP, the importance of emergency exercise especially for the public is far more emphasized around the world more and more. However, the human labor focused radiological emergency exercise up to now has many limitations. After developing this system properly and by using it, we could even expect to estimate the weak points of the emergency arrangements and strategy we have.

  2. Development of Public Training System for Emergency Exercise Using Virtual Reality Technology Based on Radioactive Release Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Il; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Dewhey; Song, Sub Lee; Park, Younwon

    2016-01-01

    An exercise is normally conducted for a day or two days depending on the scale of the exercise. What we have experienced up to date there are several limitations in the radiological emergency exercises such as low public acceptance, poor enthusiasm in the exercise participation, not very attracting exercise scenarios, low efficiency in conducting an exercise, and so on. In order to overcome the limitations of the present exercising system, we would like to develop a radiological emergency exercise system using VR (virtual reality) technology based on a radioactive release accident. In this paper, we just introduce some basic development methods and event tree based scenario as a beginning stage. After the accident in Fukushima Daiichi NPP, the importance of emergency exercise especially for the public is far more emphasized around the world more and more. However, the human labor focused radiological emergency exercise up to now has many limitations. After developing this system properly and by using it, we could even expect to estimate the weak points of the emergency arrangements and strategy we have

  3. “History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine”: The Last Ten Years. A Survey of Course Content, Methods and Structural Preconditions at Twenty-nine German Medical Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, Jan; Bruns, Florian; Hess, Volker; Vollmann, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: “History, Theory, Ethics of Medicine” (German: “Geschichte, Theorie, Ethik der Medizin”, abbreviation: GTE) forms part of the obligatory curriculum for medical students in Germany since the winter semester 2003/2004. This paper presents the results of a national survey on the contents, methods and framework of GTE teaching. Methods: Semi-structured questionnaire dispatched in July 2014 to 38 institutions responsible for GTE teaching. Descriptive analysis of quantitative data and content analysis of free-text answers. Results: It was possible to collect data from 29 institutes responsible for GTE teaching (response: 76%). There is at least one professorial chair for GTE in 19 faculties; two professorial chairs or professorships remained vacant at the time of the survey. The number of students taught per academic year ranges from 350. Teaching in GTE comprises an average of 2.18 hours per week per semester (min: 1, max: 6). Teaching in GTE is proportionally distributed according to an arithmetic average as follows: history: 35.4%, theory 14.7% and ethics 49.9%. Written learning objectives were formulated for GTE in 24 faculties. The preferred themes of teaching in history, theory or ethics which according to respondents should be taught comprise a broad spectrum and vary. Teaching in ethics (79 from a max. of 81 possible points) is, when compared to history (61/81) and theory (53/81), attributed the most significance for the training of medical doctors. Conclusion: 10 years after the introduction of GTE the number of students and the personnel resources available at the institutions vary considerably. In light of the differences regarding the content elicited in this study the pros and cons of heterogeneity in GTE should be discussed. PMID:28584871

  4. "History, Theory and Ethics of Medicine": The Last Ten Years. A Survey of Course Content, Methods and Structural Preconditions at Twenty-nine German Medical Faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, Jan; Bruns, Florian; Hess, Volker; Vollmann, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: "History, Theory, Ethics of Medicine" (German: "Geschichte, Theorie, Ethik der Medizin", abbreviation: GTE) forms part of the obligatory curriculum for medical students in Germany since the winter semester 2003/2004. This paper presents the results of a national survey on the contents, methods and framework of GTE teaching. Methods: Semi-structured questionnaire dispatched in July 2014 to 38 institutions responsible for GTE teaching. Descriptive analysis of quantitative data and content analysis of free-text answers. Results: It was possible to collect data from 29 institutes responsible for GTE teaching (response: 76%). There is at least one professorial chair for GTE in 19 faculties; two professorial chairs or professorships remained vacant at the time of the survey. The number of students taught per academic year ranges from 350. Teaching in GTE comprises an average of 2.18 hours per week per semester (min: 1, max: 6). Teaching in GTE is proportionally distributed according to an arithmetic average as follows: history: 35.4%, theory 14.7% and ethics 49.9%. Written learning objectives were formulated for GTE in 24 faculties. The preferred themes of teaching in history, theory or ethics which according to respondents should be taught comprise a broad spectrum and vary. Teaching in ethics (79 from a max. of 81 possible points) is, when compared to history (61/81) and theory (53/81), attributed the most significance for the training of medical doctors. Conclusion: 10 years after the introduction of GTE the number of students and the personnel resources available at the institutions vary considerably. In light of the differences regarding the content elicited in this study the pros and cons of heterogeneity in GTE should be discussed.

  5. [Application of electronic fence technology based on GIS in Oncomelania hupensis snail monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi-Hua, Chen; Yi-Sheng, Zhu; Zhi-Qiang, Xue; Xue-Bing, Li; Yi-Min, Ding; Li-Jun, Bi; Kai-Min, Gao; You, Zhang

    2017-07-27

    To study the application of Geographic Information System (GIS) electronic fence technique in Oncomelania hupensis snail monitoring. The electronic fence was set around the history and existing snail environments in the electronic map, the information about snail monitoring and controlling was linked to the electronic fence, and the snail monitoring information system was established on these bases. The monitoring information was input through the computer and smart phone. The electronic fence around the history and existing snail environments was set in the electronic map (Baidu map), and the snail monitoring information system and smart phone APP were established. The monitoring information was input and upload real-time, and the snail monitoring information was demonstrated in real time on Baidu map. By using the electronic fence technology based on GIS, the unique "environment electronic archives" for each snail monitoring environment can be established in the electronic map, and real-time, dynamic monitoring and visual management can be realized.

  6. Technology-base research project for electrochemical storage report for 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarnon, F.

    1982-06-01

    The technology base research (TBR) project which provides the applied reseach base that supports all electrochemical energy storage applications: electric vehicles, electric load leveling, storage of solar electricity, and energy and resource conservation is described. The TBR identifies electrochemical technologies with the potential to satisfy stringent performance and economic requirements and transfer them to industry for further development and scale up. The TBR project consists of four major elements: electrochemical systems research, supporting research, electrochemical processes, and fuel cells for transportation. Activities in these four project elements during 1981 are summarized. Information is included on: iron-air batteries; aluminum-air batteries; lithium-metal sulfide cells; materials development for various batteries; and the characteristics of an NH3-air alkaline fuel cell in a vehicle.

  7. Innovative nuclear technologies based on radiation induced surface activation (RISA). 1. The project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Kyosuke; Morooka, Shinichi; Hishida, Mamoru

    2004-01-01

    This research of the Innovative nuclear technologies based on Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) is due to start from 2003 and to be ended to 2006, and performed fund by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) Japan. One of the innovative technologies is to develop a high performance corrosion-proof film to prevent the surface of reactor internals from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), the other one is to develop the film for improving the heat transfer performance a high performance of the nuclear fuel rod. Both of these properties are derived under gamma ray irradiation by the RISA effect. This paper reports about the summary of this subsidy enterprise by METI. (author)

  8. Bringing Technology to Students’ Proximity: A Sociocultural Account of Technology-Based Learning Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evode Mukama

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper depicts a study carried out in Rwanda concerning university students who participated in a contest to produce short documentary films. The purpose of this research is to conceptualize these kinds of technology-based learning projects (TBLPs through a sociocultural perspective. The methodology included focus-group discussions and field notes to collect empirical data. The findings reveal that the more educational technologies capture objects of learning positioned in the students’ sociocultural proximity, the more focused the learners’ attention is on these objects. The study shows also that a change in learning projects may depend to a large extent on whether the technology relates to the students’ sociocultural proximity, that is, taking into consideration students’ physical, cultural, and contextual real world. The study recommends a community of learning/inquiry embedded in a collaborative, problem-solving dynamic involving cognitive support from peers, teachers, external specialists, and the wider community.

  9. RF Phase Reference Distribution System for the TESLA Technology Based Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Czuba, K; Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    Since many decades physicists have been building particle accelerators and usually new projects became more advanced, more complicated and larger than predecessors. The importance and complexity of the phase reference distribution systems used in these accelerators have grown significantly during recent years. Amongst the most advanced of currently developed accelerators are projects based on the TESLA technology. These projects require synchronization of many RF devices with accuracy reaching femtosecond levels over kilometre distances. Design of a phase reference distribution system fulfilling such requirements is a challenging scientific task. There are many interdisciplinary problems which must be solved during the system design. Many, usually negligible issues, may became very important in such system. Furthermore, the design of a distribution system on a scale required for the TESLA technology based projects is a new challenge and there is almost no literature sufficiently covering this subject. This th...

  10. Financial Management Competence of Founding Teams and Growth of New Technology-Based Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinckmann, Jan; Gemuenden, Hans Georg; Salomo, Søren

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on the resource-based view to analyze the role founding teams' financial management competencies play for firm growth. Prior research stressed the importance of acquiring external financial resources. In this study, we broaden the understanding of financial management in new......-assessments of their financial management competencies at start-up. We apply the partial least squares approach to determine the effects of the different financial management competencies on firm growth....... firms. We explore the relevance of strategic financial planning competence, external financing competence, competence in financing from cash flow, and controlling competence of entrepreneurial teams for the growth of new technology-based firms. A total of 212 founding teams provided self...

  11. The application and development of radiography technology based on x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xu, Zhou; Li, Ming

    2009-07-01

    Modern Radiography technology was combined with radiation physics and modern imaging processing, which was an important branch of information obtainment and processing. We can get the inside information of the object, by the X ray's attenuation when the ray penetrated the object, and depending on the computer's fast processing, we can see the slice imaging of the object. Computerized Tomography, Computerized Laminography, and Digital Radiography were important parts in Radiography. The institute of applied electronics, CAEP in the research of intense radiation had developed several advanced radiation sources and some advanced radiography imaging systems, for example, S-band small spot linear accelerator, full solid state modulator, C-band linear accelerator, high energy Tera-hertz radiation source and CT technology based on cone beam, DR technology, CL Technology etc. Such imaging systems had been applied in industrial NDT/NDE, security check, medical diagnosis, petroleum and gas pipeline inspection system etc.

  12. Information technology-based approaches to reducing repeat drug exposure in patients with known drug allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Sheikh, Aziz

    2008-05-01

    There is increasing interest internationally in ways of reducing the high disease burden resulting from errors in medicine management. Repeat exposure to drugs to which patients have a known allergy has been a repeatedly identified error, often with disastrous consequences. Drug allergies are immunologically mediated reactions that are characterized by specificity and recurrence on reexposure. These repeat reactions should therefore be preventable. We argue that there is insufficient attention being paid to studying and implementing system-based approaches to reducing the risk of such accidental reexposure. Drawing on recent and ongoing research, we discuss a number of information technology-based interventions that can be used to reduce the risk of recurrent exposure. Proven to be effective in this respect are interventions that provide real-time clinical decision support; also promising are interventions aiming to enhance patient recognition, such as bar coding, radiofrequency identification, and biometric technologies.

  13. Towards a Theory for Strategic Posture in New Technology Based Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Montiel-Campos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates a theory from the existing literature on subjects about entrepreneurship, strategy and innovation. Dubin’s methodology approach is used in order to develop a theory that helps better understand the strategic posture adopted by a New Technology Based Firm in its competitive environment. The theory proposes the competitive context conditions as precedents of the dominant logic and the technology strategy, which, in turn, influence in the competitive behavior adopted by the new firm. An Entrepreneurial Orientation by the new firm, combined with very particular dynamic capabilities, improve the firm’s performance. From the achieved performance, a feedback process to the strategic stance initiates. In addition to the theory, interaction laws, a set of propositions, as well as suggestions for future research projects are presented.

  14. Inner structure detection by optical tomography technology based on feedback of microchip Nd:YAG lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunxin; Zhang, Shulian; Tan, Yidong; Zhao, Shijie

    2013-05-20

    We describe a new optical tomography technology based on feedback of microchip Nd:YAG lasers. In the case of feedback light frequency-shifted, light can be magnified by a fact of 10(6) in the Nd:YAG microchip lasers, which makes it possible to realize optical tomography with a greater depth than current optical tomography. The results of the measuring and imaging of kinds of samples are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility and potential of this approach in the inner structure detection. The system has a lateral resolution of ~1 μm, a vertical resolution of 15 μm and a longitudinal scanning range of over 10mm.

  15. Teams in Small Technology-Based Firms: The Roles of Diversity and Conflict Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Enrique Carozzo-Todaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of diversity and conflict management on the relationship between teamwork and organizational outcomes of small technology-based firms. To study the relationship between those variables, a quantitative research was conducted. The results of the survey involving 107 small Brazilian high-tech firms show that diversity and conflict management positively moderate the relationship between teamwork and organizational outcomes. So that, at higher levels of diversity and conflict management, best organizational outcomes. At the same time, it has been verified that conflict management is important regardless the level of diversity within teams. This research sheds new light on the factors that should be considered to become teamwork more effective in this specific context.

  16. Nuclear power training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The training of technical manpower for nuclear power projects in developing countries is now a significant part of the IAEA Technical Assistance Programme. Two basic courses are the cornerstones of the Agency's training programme for nuclear power: a course in planning and implementation, and a course in construction and operation management. These two courses are independent of each other. They are designed to train personnel for two distinct phases of project implementation. The nuclear power project training programme has proven to be successful. A considerable number of highly qualified professionals from developing countries have been given the opportunity to learn through direct contact with experts who have had first-hand experience. It is recognized that the courses are not a substitute for on-the-job training, but their purpose is achieved if they have resulted in the transfer of practical, reliable information and have helped developing countries to prepare themselves for the planning, construction and operation management of nuclear power stations

  17. Elective course planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Simon; Sørensen, Matias; Stidsen, Thomas Riis

    2011-01-01

    Efficient planning increasingly becomes an indispensable tool for management of both companies and public organizations. This is also the case for high school management in Denmark, because the growing individual freedom of the students to choose courses makes planning much more complex. Due...... to reforms, elective courses are today an important part of the curriculum, and elective courses are a good way to make high school education more attractive for the students. In this article, the problem of planning the elective courses is modeled using integer programming and three different solution...... for the Elective Course Planning Problem has been described in the literature before. The proposed algorithms are tested on data sets from 98 of the 150 high schools in Denmark. The tests show that for the majority of the problems, the optimal solution can be obtained within the one hour time bound. Furthermore...

  18. Statistical inference a short course

    CERN Document Server

    Panik, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    A concise, easily accessible introduction to descriptive and inferential techniques Statistical Inference: A Short Course offers a concise presentation of the essentials of basic statistics for readers seeking to acquire a working knowledge of statistical concepts, measures, and procedures. The author conducts tests on the assumption of randomness and normality, provides nonparametric methods when parametric approaches might not work. The book also explores how to determine a confidence interval for a population median while also providing coverage of ratio estimation, randomness, and causal

  19. Participatory Research as One Piece of the Puzzle: A Systematic Review of Consumer Involvement in Design of Technology-Based Youth Mental Health and Well-Being Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Sharon; Venning, Anthony; Winsall, Megan; Jones, Gabrielle M; Wyld, Kaisha; Damarell, Raechel A; Antezana, Gaston; Schrader, Geoffrey; Smith, David; Collin, Philippa; Bidargaddi, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the potential of technology-based mental health interventions for young people, limited uptake and/or adherence is a significant challenge. It is thought that involving young people in the development and delivery of services designed for them leads to better engagement. Further research is required to understand the role of participatory approaches in design of technology-based mental health and well-being interventions for youth. Objective To investigate consumer involvement processes and associated outcomes from studies using participatory methods in development of technology-based mental health and well-being interventions for youth. Methods Fifteen electronic databases, using both resource-specific subject headings and text words, were searched describing 2 broad concepts-participatory research and mental health/illness. Grey literature was accessed via Google Advanced search, and relevant conference Web sites and reference lists were also searched. A first screening of titles/abstracts eliminated irrelevant citations and documents. The remaining citations were screened by a second reviewer. Full text articles were double screened. All projects employing participatory research processes in development and/or design of (ICT/digital) technology-based youth mental health and well-being interventions were included. No date restrictions were applied; English language only. Data on consumer involvement, research and design process, and outcomes were extracted via framework analysis. Results A total of 6210 studies were reviewed, 38 full articles retrieved, and 17 included in this study. It was found that consumer participation was predominantly consultative and consumerist in nature and involved design specification and intervention development, and usability/pilot testing. Sustainable participation was difficult to achieve. Projects reported clear dichotomies around designer/researcher and consumer assumptions of effective and acceptable

  20. Experience mapping and multifunctional golf course development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Ole H.; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard; Jensen, Anne Mette Dahl

    This report describes the development of a method for mapping and describing recreational experiences on golf courses. The objective is to provide a planning tool that can facilitate development of a broader multifunctional use of the golf course landscape. The project has produced several results....... The main output is this report, which provides a detailed description of the mapping procedure. This process is illustrated using examples from five test golf courses. In addition to this mapping report, a catalogue has been developed providing hands-on guidance for adapting the method in a golf club...... without the use of a specialist. During the project period, the research team has participated in a number of workshops that included representatives from golf courses, STERF, the Norwegian Golf Federation and the Danish Golf Union. At these workshops, the method was presented and discussed. This has been...