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Sample records for methods clay mineral

  1. Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, no reliable method for quantitative analysis of clay minerals has been established so far. In this study, an attempt was made to propose an optimization method for the quantitative ... 2. Basic principles. The mineralogical constitution of soil is rather complex. ... K2O, MgO, and TFe as variables for the calculation.

  2. Thermal Analysis: A Complementary Method to Study the Shurijeh Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Jozanikohan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clay minerals are considered the most important components of clastic reservoir rock evaluation studies. The Shurijeh gas reservoir Formation, represented by shaly sandstones of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous age, is the main reservoir rock in the Eastern Kopet-Dagh sedimentary Basin, NE Iran. In this study, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, scanning electron microscopic (SEM studies, and thermal analysis including differential thermal analysis (DTA, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA techniques were utilized in the characterization of the Shurijeh clay minerals in ten representative samples. The XRF studies showed that silica and aluminum oxides are present quantities. The XRD test was then used to determine the mineralogical composition of bulk components, as well as the clay fraction. The XRD patterns indicated the presence of dominant amount of quartz and plagioclase, with moderate to minor amounts of alkali feldspar, anhydrite, carbonates (calcite and dolomite, hematite and clay minerals. The most common clays in the Shurijeh Formation were illite, chlorite, and kaolinite. However, in very few samples, glauconite, smectite, and mixed layer clay minerals of both illite-smectite and chlorite-smectite types were also recognized. The XRD results were quantified, using the elemental information from the XRF test, showing that each Shurijeh exhibited low to moderate amounts of clay minerals, typically up to 21%. The amount of illite, the most dominant clay mineral, reached maximum of 13.5%, while the other clay types were significantly smaller. Based on the use of SEM and thermal data, the results of the identification of clay minerals, corresponded with the powder X-ray diffraction analysis, which can be taken into account as an evidence of the effectiveness of the thermal analysis technique in clay typing, as a complementary method besides the XRD.

  3. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A.

    2002-01-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  4. Molecular Structural Transformation of 2:1 Clay Minerals by a Constant-Pressure Molecular Dynamics Simulation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Gutierre, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of a molecular dynamics simulation study of dehydrated 2:1 clay minerals using the Parrinello-Rahman constant-pressure molecular dynamics method. The method is capable of simulating a system under the most general applied stress conditions by considering the changes of MD cell size and shape. Given the advantage of the method, it is the major goal of the paper to investigate the influence of imposed cell boundary conditions on the molecular structural transformation of 2:1 clay minerals under different normal pressures. Simulation results show that the degrees of freedom of the simulation cell (i.e., whether the cell size or shape change is allowed) determines the final equilibrated crystal structure of clay minerals. Both the MD method and the static method have successfully revealed unforeseen structural transformations of clay minerals upon relaxation under different normal pressures. It is found that large shear distortions of clay minerals occur when full allowance is given to the cell size and shape change. A complete elimination of the interlayer spacing is observed in a static simulation. However, when only the cell size change is allowed, interlayer spacing is retained, but large internal shear stresses also exist.

  5. Hyperspectral analysis of clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaki Rama Suresh, G.; Sreenivas, K.; Sivasamy, R.

    2014-11-01

    A study was carried out by collecting soil samples from parts of Gwalior and Shivpuri district, Madhya Pradesh in order to assess the dominant clay mineral of these soils using hyperspectral data, as 0.4 to 2.5 μm spectral range provides abundant and unique information about many important earth-surface minerals. Understanding the spectral response along with the soil chemical properties can provide important clues for retrieval of mineralogical soil properties. The soil samples were collected based on stratified random sampling approach and dominant clay minerals were identified through XRD analysis. The absorption feature parameters like depth, width, area and asymmetry of the absorption peaks were derived from spectral profile of soil samples through DISPEC tool. The derived absorption feature parameters were used as inputs for modelling the dominant soil clay mineral present in the unknown samples using Random forest approach which resulted in kappa accuracy of 0.795. Besides, an attempt was made to classify the Hyperion data using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm with an overall accuracy of 68.43 %. Results showed that kaolinite was the dominant mineral present in the soils followed by montmorillonite in the study area.

  6. Multifaceted role of clay minerals in pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, Inderpreet Singh; Kaur, Satvinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Khurana, Rajneet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The desirable physical and physiochemical properties of clay minerals have led them to play a substantial role in pharmaceutical formulations. Clay minerals like kaolin, smectite and palygorskite-sepiolite are among the world's most valuable industrial minerals and of considerable importance. The elemental features of clay minerals which caused them to be used in pharmaceutical formulations are high specific area, sorption capacity, favorable rheological properties, chemical inertness, swelli...

  7. Moessbauer spectroscopy of iron in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raclavsky, K.; Sitek, J.; Lipka, J.

    1975-01-01

    Selected pure clay minerals predominantly of Czechoslovak origin were studied, such as montmorillonite, nontronite, beidellite, glauconite, seladonite, illite, vermiculite, saponite, palygorskite, goethite. Moessbauer measurements were performed at room temperature with a 57 Co in Pd source. The spectra were fitted by the least square method. The parameters of the measured Moessbauer spectra are given. The values of isomer shifts, quadrupole splittings and line widths were obtained with an error of +- 0.03 mm/sec. (Z.S.)

  8. [Mechanism of tritium persistence in porous media like clay minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Jie; Wang, Jin-Sheng; Teng, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Ni

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of tritium persistence in clay minerals, three types of clay soils (montmorillonite, kaolinite and illite) and tritiated water were used in this study to conduct the tritium sorption tests and the other related tests. Firstly, the ingredients, metal elements and heat properties of clay minerals were studied with some instrumental analysis methods, such as ICP and TG. Secondly, with a specially designed fractionation and condensation experiment, the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in the clay minerals separated from the tritium sorption tests were fractionated for investigating the tritium distributions in the different types of adsorptive waters. Thirdly, the location and configuration of tritium adsorbed into the structure of clay minerals were studied with infrared spectrometry (IR) tests. And finally, the forces and mechanisms for driving tritium into the clay minerals were analyzed on the basis of the isotope effect of tritium and the above tests. Following conclusions have been reached: (1) The main reason for tritium persistence in clay minerals is the entrance of tritium into the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in clay minerals. The percentage of tritium distributed in these three types of adsorptive water are in the range of 13.65% - 38.71%, 0.32% - 5.96%, 1.28% - 4.37% of the total tritium used in the corresponding test, respectively. The percentages are different for different types of clay minerals. (2) Tritium adsorbed onto clay minerals are existed in the forms of the tritiated hydroxyl radical (OT) and the tritiated water molecule (HTO). Tritium mainly exists in tritiated water molecule for adsorbed water and interlayer water, and in tritiated hydroxyl radical for structural water. (3) The forces and effects driving tritium into the clay minerals may include molecular dispersion, electric charge sorption, isotope exchange and tritium isotope effect.

  9. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-01-01

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  10. Climatic control on clay mineral formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type,climate,topography and exposure age affect weathering environments.In the present study,an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering pro ...

  11. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay

  12. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Fachgebiet Theoretische Chemie

    2016-11-01

    This first systematic survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, is currently being extended to neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals, like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we examine if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally to support the interpretation of pertinent experiments. A further facet of these studies is to account also for the dynamic nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamic simulations.

  13. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Reynolds

    Full Text Available Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  14. Mineral Acquisition from Clay by Budongo Forest Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W; English, Christopher J; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay consumed indicates that it takes the form of kaolinite. We discuss the contribution of clay geophagy to the mineral intake of the Sonso chimpanzees and show that clay eaten using leaf sponges is particularly rich in minerals. We show that termite mound soil, also regularly consumed, is rich in minerals. We discuss the frequency of clay and termite soil geophagy in the context of the disappearance from Budongo Forest of a formerly rich source of minerals, the decaying pith of Raphia farinifera palms.

  15. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  16. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. © 2013.

  17. Feasibility of classification of clay minerals by using PAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Y; Yoshida, Y; Akiyama, Y; Nishijima, S

    2015-01-01

    After the nuclear power plant disaster, the evaluation of radioactive Cs kept in soil, especially in clay minerals and the elucidation of its movement are urgent subjects to promote decontamination. It is known that the extractable level of Cs depends on the sort of clay minerals. We tried to find the characteristics of clay minerals belonging to phillosilicate group using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and the relationship between the results of PAS and the amounts of substantially extracted Cs from the clay minerals. The results showed that each clay mineral was found to be distinguishable from other clay minerals by PAS and the extraction rate of Cs was different among those clay minerals, however the direct correlation between the results of PAS and the extraction rates of Cs was not found. (paper)

  18. Recent advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li Zhi; Zhou, Chun Hui; Wang, Jing; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua; Wang, Hao

    2015-12-28

    Clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels have been proven to have exceptional composition, properties, and applications, and consequently have attracted a significant amount of research effort over the past few years. The objective of this paper is to summarize and evaluate scientific advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels in terms of their specific preparation, formation mechanisms, properties, and applications, and to identify the prevailing challenges and future directions in the field. The state-of-the-art of existing technologies and insights into the exfoliation of layered clay minerals, in particular montmorillonite and LAPONITE®, are discussed first. The formation and structural characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogels made from in situ free radical polymerization, supramolecular assembly, and freezing-thawing cycles are then examined. Studies indicate that additional hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, coordination bonds, hydrophobic interaction, and even covalent bonds could occur between the clay mineral nanoplatelets and polymer chains, thereby leading to the formation of unique three-dimensional networks. Accordingly, the hydrogels exhibit exceptional optical and mechanical properties, swelling-deswelling behavior, and stimuli-responsiveness, reflecting the remarkable effects of clay minerals. With the pivotal roles of clay minerals in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels, the nanocomposite hydrogels possess great potential as superabsorbents, drug vehicles, tissue scaffolds, wound dressing, and biosensors. Future studies should lay emphasis on the formation mechanisms with in-depth insights into interfacial interactions, the tactical functionalization of clay minerals and polymers for desired properties, and expanding of their applications.

  19. Reconstruction of a digital core containing clay minerals based on a clustering algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanlong; Pu, Chunsheng; Jing, Cheng; Gu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Qingdong; Liu, Hongzhi; Khan, Nasir; Dong, Qiaoling

    2017-10-01

    It is difficult to obtain a core sample and information for digital core reconstruction of mature sandstone reservoirs around the world, especially for an unconsolidated sandstone reservoir. Meanwhile, reconstruction and division of clay minerals play a vital role in the reconstruction of the digital cores, although the two-dimensional data-based reconstruction methods are specifically applicable as the microstructure reservoir simulation methods for the sandstone reservoir. However, reconstruction of clay minerals is still challenging from a research viewpoint for the better reconstruction of various clay minerals in the digital cores. In the present work, the content of clay minerals was considered on the basis of two-dimensional information about the reservoir. After application of the hybrid method, and compared with the model reconstructed by the process-based method, the digital core containing clay clusters without the labels of the clusters' number, size, and texture were the output. The statistics and geometry of the reconstruction model were similar to the reference model. In addition, the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm was used to label various connected unclassified clay clusters in the initial model and then the number and size of clay clusters were recorded. At the same time, the K -means clustering algorithm was applied to divide the labeled, large connecting clusters into smaller clusters on the basis of difference in the clusters' characteristics. According to the clay minerals' characteristics, such as types, textures, and distributions, the digital core containing clay minerals was reconstructed by means of the clustering algorithm and the clay clusters' structure judgment. The distributions and textures of the clay minerals of the digital core were reasonable. The clustering algorithm improved the digital core reconstruction and provided an alternative method for the simulation of different clay minerals in the digital cores.

  20. Reconstruction of a digital core containing clay minerals based on a clustering algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanlong; Pu, Chunsheng; Jing, Cheng; Gu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Qingdong; Liu, Hongzhi; Khan, Nasir; Dong, Qiaoling

    2017-10-01

    It is difficult to obtain a core sample and information for digital core reconstruction of mature sandstone reservoirs around the world, especially for an unconsolidated sandstone reservoir. Meanwhile, reconstruction and division of clay minerals play a vital role in the reconstruction of the digital cores, although the two-dimensional data-based reconstruction methods are specifically applicable as the microstructure reservoir simulation methods for the sandstone reservoir. However, reconstruction of clay minerals is still challenging from a research viewpoint for the better reconstruction of various clay minerals in the digital cores. In the present work, the content of clay minerals was considered on the basis of two-dimensional information about the reservoir. After application of the hybrid method, and compared with the model reconstructed by the process-based method, the digital core containing clay clusters without the labels of the clusters' number, size, and texture were the output. The statistics and geometry of the reconstruction model were similar to the reference model. In addition, the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm was used to label various connected unclassified clay clusters in the initial model and then the number and size of clay clusters were recorded. At the same time, the K-means clustering algorithm was applied to divide the labeled, large connecting clusters into smaller clusters on the basis of difference in the clusters' characteristics. According to the clay minerals' characteristics, such as types, textures, and distributions, the digital core containing clay minerals was reconstructed by means of the clustering algorithm and the clay clusters' structure judgment. The distributions and textures of the clay minerals of the digital core were reasonable. The clustering algorithm improved the digital core reconstruction and provided an alternative method for the simulation of different clay minerals in the digital cores.

  1. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact-Induced Clay Mineral Formation and Distribution on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Craig, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals have been identified in the central peaks and ejecta blankets of impact craters on Mars. Several studies have suggested these clay minerals formed as a result of impact induced hydrothermalism either during Mars' Noachian era or more recently by the melting of subsurface ice. Examples of post-impact clay formation is found in several locations on Earth such as the Mjolnir and Woodleigh Impact Structures. Additionally, a recent study has suggested the clay minerals observed on Ceres are the result of impact-induced hydrothermal processes. Such processes may have occurred on Mars, possibly during the Noachian. Distinguishing between clay minerals formed preor post-impact can be accomplished by studying their IR spectra. In fact, showed that the IR spectra of clay minerals is greatly affected at longer wavelengths (i.e. mid-IR, 5-25 micron) by impact-induced shock deformation while the near-IR spectra (1.0-2.5 micron) remains relatively unchanged. This explains the discrepancy between NIR and MIR observations of clay minerals in martian impact craters noted. Thus, it allows us to determine whether a clay mineral formed from impact-induced hydrothermalism or were pre-existing and were altered by the impact. Here we study the role of impacts on the formation and distribution of clay minerals on Mars via a fully 3-D Monte Carlo cratering model, including impact- melt production using results from modern hydrocode simulations. We identify regions that are conducive to clay formation and the location of clay minerals post-bombardment.

  3. Clay minerals in sandstone uranium deposits: radwaste applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Clay minerals play an important role in the genesis of uranium deposits in sandstones. They incorporate the rate earths (REE), U, Sb, Th, Cs, Rb, Sr, Y, Ba, and even small amounts of chalcophiles. These minerals possess analog elements for many of the radwaste fission products as well as actinides and some actinide daughters. In sandstone uranium deposits, clay minerals are also associated with sulfide minerals, usually pyrite, and organic carbonaceous matter. The primary clay minerals are usually smectites, illites, chlorites and mixed layer varieties. The integrity of these clay minerals is demonstrated by their retention of formational-mineralization ages determined by Rb-Sr geochronologic investigation of the Grants Mineral Belt of the United States. The importance of the clay minerals as analog for parts of the multi-barrier concept in radwaste disposal is their ability to impede water penetration into - and movement of key elements out of uranium rich zones. The clay minerals further sorb and in other ways incorporate into their structures many fission products and actinide analogs from man-made nuclear wastes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  4. Performance Study of the Natural Rubber Composite with Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyo Nyo Myint; Tin Tin Aye; Kyaw Myo Naing; Nyunt Wynn

    2008-03-01

    The preparation, characterization and some applications of natural rubber clay composite have been studied. This study investigated the possibility of natural rubber latex to replace some part of natural clays. In formulation of rubber clay composite from natural rubber latex and various clay minerals, three main steps were involved (i) preparation of latex cream (ii) prevulcanization of latex cream (iii) mixing vulcanized latex compound, with other ingredients. In each step, several parameters have been carefully investigated to optimize the performance of natural rubber clay composite production. The composite products were of better quality and can be considered to be more cost effective.

  5. Hydrogen isotope ratios of clay minerals constituting clay veins found in granitic rocks in Hiroshima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Ryuji; Kakitani, Satoru; Kuroda, Yoshimatsu; Matsuo, Sadao; Suzuoki, Tetsuro.

    1980-01-01

    The deuterium content of the constitutional and interlayer water extracted from the clay minerals (illite, montmorillonite, interstratified illite-montmorillonite mineral, kaolinite, halloysite) constituting the clay veins found in the granitic rocks in Hiroshima Prefecture was measured. The clay minerals were heated at 270 deg C to extract the interlayer water, then heated to 1,400 or 1,500 deg C to extract the constitutional water. The deuterium content of the local surface water collected from sampling points was measured. In the clay veins formed along perpendicular joints, the constituent clay minerals change from lower to upper part: illite → montmorillonite → kaolinite → halloysite. The deuterium content values of the constitutional water for illite and montmorillonite were estimated to be -67 to -69% and -86 to -89%, respectively. The deuterium content values of the constitutional water for halloysite range from -68 to -80% and for kaolinite from -63 to -67%. (J.P.N.)

  6. Dynamics of water confined in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Caer, S.; Pommeret, S.; Renault, J.Ph.; Lima, M.; Righini, R.; Gosset, D.; Simeone, D.; Bergaya, F.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the O-D stretching mode of dilute HOD in H 2 O probes the local environment and the hydrogen bond network of confined water. The dynamics of water molecules confined in the interlayer space of montmorillonites (Mt) and in interaction with two types of cations (Li + and Ca 2+ ) but also with the negatively charged siloxane surface are studied. The results evidence that the OD vibrational dynamics is significantly slowed down in confined media: it goes from 1.7 ps in neat water to 2.6 Ps in the case of Li + cations with two water pseudo-layers (2.2-2.3 ps in the case of Ca 2+ cations) and to 4.7 ps in the case of Li + cations with one water pseudo-layer. No significant difference between the two cations is noticed. In this 2D confined geometry (the interlayer space being about 0.6 nm for two water pseudo-layers), the relaxation time constants obtained are comparable to the ones measured in analogous concentrated salt solutions. Nevertheless, and in strong opposition to the observations performed in the liquid phase, anisotropy experiments evidence the absence of rotational motions on a 5 ps time scale, proving that the hydrogen bond network in the interlayer space of the clay mineral is locked at this time scale. (authors)

  7. Characterization of clay minerals; Caracterizacion de minerales arcillosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A. [Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  8. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  9. Clay mineral distribution on the Kerala continental shelf and slope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of @iRV gaveshani@@ were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral cntent. The distribution of total clay (< 4~k fraction...

  10. Control of clay minerals effect in flotation. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Hasan Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased exposure to low grade ores highlights the importance of understanding phyllosilicate gangue mineralogy which consists of common gangue minerals. To improve the flotation performance and ore quality the negative effect of the clay minerals on flotation should be identified. The presence of clay minerals leads to problems, such as changing the froth stability, which are related to swelling behaviour, increase in pulp viscosity, overconsumption of reagents, slime coating and mechanical entrainment. The clay content in the ore is changing from time to time and it is necessary to provide quick solutions to the issues caused by the new ore composition. The objective of this paper is to give an overview how to control the colloidal properties of clay minerals on flotation.

  11. Clay minerals in the sediments around the Andaman Islands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P

    on the Island proper and the slope samples show contribution from the Ganges. Distribution of detrital minerals such as quartz and feldspar support the above conclusions. The 2 distinct clay mineral provenances result because the Andaman Islands appear to be a...

  12. Significance of saturation index of certain clay minerals in shallow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Significance of saturation index of certain clay minerals in shallow ... The value of ionic activity product (IAP) for a mineral ... where γi is the activity coefficient of ionic species ...... Domenico P A and Schwartz W 1990 Physical and Chemical.

  13. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  14. Crystallite size distribution of clay minerals from selected Serbian clay deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The BWA (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique for the measurement of the mean crystallite thickness and thickness distributions of phyllosilicates was applied to a set of kaolin and bentonite minerals. Six samples of kaolinitic clays, one sample of halloysite, and five bentonite samples from selected Serbian deposits were analyzed. These clays are of sedimentary volcano-sedimentary (diagenetic, and hydrothermal origin. Two different types of shape of thickness distribution were found - lognormal, typical for bentonite and halloysite, and polymodal, typical for kaolinite. The mean crystallite thickness (T BWA seams to be influenced by the genetic type of the clay sample.

  15. Evaluation of the bleaching flux in clays containing hematite and different clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, E.M.; Lusa, T.; Silva, T.M.; Medeiros, B.B.; Santos, G.R. dos; Morelli, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the addition of a synthetic flux in a clay mineral constituted by illite phase in the presence of iron oxide with the hematite, promotes color change of the firing products, making the reddish color firing into whiteness. This flow is constituted of a vitreous phase of the silicates family obtained by fusion/solidification of oxides and carbonates. Thus, the objective of this work was that of studying the interaction of the iron element in the final color mechanism of the different types of mineral crystal phase of the clays. In order to study the phenomenon, we obtained different compositions between the select clays and the synthetic flow, and characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and visual analysis. The results showed that the action of the synthetic flow as a modifying agent for color depends on the mineral crystal phase of the clays. The color firing modification does not occur in the clays content high levels of kaolinite mineral phase. (author)

  16. Soil Microbes and soil microbial proteins: interactions with clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, A.; Kelleher, B. P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial enumeration in soil environments estimates that the population may reach approximately 10 1 0 g - 1 of soil and comprise up to 90% of the total soil microbial biomass. Bacteria are present in soils as single cells or multicell colonies and often strongly adsorb onto mineral surfaces such as sand and clay. The interactions of microbes and microbial biomolecules with these minerals have profound impacts on the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils. (Author)

  17. Heteroaggregation of Silver Nanoparticles with Clay Minerals in Aqueous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Burrow, E.; Hwang, Y.; Lenhart, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being used in industrial processes and consumer products that exploit their beneficial properties and improve our daily lives. Nevertheless, they also attract attention when released into natural environment due to their potential for causing adverse effects. The fate and transport of nanoparticles in aqueous systems have been the focus of intense study. However, their interactions with other natural particles have received only limited attention. Clay minerals are ubiquitous in most aquatic systems and their variably charged surfaces can act as deposition sites that can alter the fate and transport of nanoparticles in natural aqueous environments. In this study, we investigated the homoaggregation of silver nanoparticles with different coating layers and their heteroaggregation behavior with clay minerals (illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite) in neutral pH solutions. Silver nanoparticles with a nominal diameter of 80 nm were synthesized with three different surface coating layers: uncoated, citrate-coated and Tween-coated. Illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), and montmorillonite (SWy-2) were purchased from the Clay Mineral Society (Indiana) and pretreated to obtain monocationic (Na-clay) and dicationic (Ca-clay) suspensions before the experiments. The change in hydrodynamic diameter as a function of time was monitored using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements in order to evaluate early stage aggregation as a function of electrolyte concentration in both the homo- and heteroaggregation scenarios. A shift in the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values to lower electrolyte concentrations was observed in binary systems, compared to single silver nanoparticle and clay systems. The results also suggest more rapid aggregation in binary system during the early aggregation stage when compared to the single-particle systems. The behavior of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles was similar to that of the bare particles, while the

  18. Depth distribution of 137Cs adsorption property of clay minerals influenced by mineral weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Funakawa, Shinya; Kosaki, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Radiocesium adsorption potential of mica clay mineral can increase as it is weathered, because K depletion in mica interlayer sites generates new Cs selective sites. However, in soils weathered under field conditions, the increase in 137 Cs adsorption potential associated with mineral weathering has not been observed extensively. We investigated four soil profiles from Japan and Thailand with different soil pH ranges (3.3-4.0, 4.2-4.3, 5.0-5.7, and 5.5-7.3). The solid/liquid distribution coefficients of Cs ( Cs Kd) in clay ( 137 Cs adsorption potential of mica clay minerals. In three soil profiles, Cs Kd value in clay was the largest at a surface horizon and was decreased with depth, whereas in the most acidic of Podzolic soil profile, it was the largest at B horizon. The large Cs Kd value in surface clays relative to deeper horizons were well associated with that of 2.0-1.0 μm clay fraction. We assumed that the 137 Cs adsorption potential increased at surface horizons mainly because coarser clay micas were weathered and generated Cs selective sites. The exceptional result obtained in Podzolic soil profile suggests that too intensive weathering destruct mica structure and may decrease in Cs adsorption potential of mica clay minerals. (author)

  19. Fixation of Selenium by Clay Minerals and Iron Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdy, A. A.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1977-01-01

    In studying Se fixation, soil components capable of retaining Se were investigated. The importance of Fe hydrous oxides in the fixation of Se was established. The clay minerals common to soils, such as kaolinite, montmorillonite and vermiculite, all exhibited Se fixation, but greater fixation occ...

  20. Picloram and Aminopyralid Sorption to Soil and Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminopyralid sorption data are lacking, and these data are needed to predict off-target transport and plant available herbicide in soil solution. The objective of this research was to determine the sorption of picloram and aminopyralid to five soils and three clay minerals and determine if the pote...

  1. Modeling of Cation Binding in Hydrated 2:1 Clay Minerals - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals are high surface area, layered silicates that play a unique role in determining the fate of radionuclides in the environment. This project consisted of developing and implementing computer simulation methods for molecular characterization of the swelling and ion exchange properties of Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals, and the subsequent analysis and theoretical modeling with a view toward improving contaminant transport modeling as well as soil remediation and radionuclide containment strategies. Project results included the (a) development of simulation methods to treat clays under environmentally relevant conditions of variable water vapor pressure; (b) calculation of clay swelling thermodynamics as a function of interlayer ion size and charge (calculated quantities include immersion energies, free energies, and entropies of swelling); and (c) calculation of ion exchange free energies, including contributions from changing interlayer water contents and layer spacing

  2. Sorption of Metal Ions on Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel; Manceau; Chateigner; Charlet

    1999-07-01

    The local structural environment of Co sorbed on hectorite (a magnesian smectite) has been investigated by polarized EXAFS (P-EXAFS) spectroscopy on a self-supporting film of Co-sorbed hectorite. This sorption sample was prepared by contacting Co and hectorite at pH 6.5 and at high ionic strength (0.3 M NaNO3) to favor pH-dependent sorption reaction over cation exchange. A self-supporting film was elaborated after 120 h of reacting time, when apparent quasi-equilibrium conditions were attained. The half-width at half maximum of the orientation distribution of c* axis of individual clay platelets off the film normal was determined by quantitative texture analysis, and found to be equal to 18.9 degrees. Co K-edge P-EXAFS spectra were recorded at angles between the incident beam and the film normal equal to 0 degrees, 35 degrees, 50 degrees, and 60 degrees; the 90 degrees spectrum was obtained by extrapolation. Spectral analysis led to the identification of the two nearest cationic subshells containing 1.6 +/- 0.4 Mg at 3.03 Å and 2.2 +/- 0.5 Si at 3.27 Å. These distances are respectively characteristic of edge-sharing linkages between Mg and Co octahedra and of corner-sharing linkages between Co octahedra and Si tetrahedra, as in clay structures. The angular dependence of the Co-Mg and Co-Si contributions indicates that Co-Mg pairs are oriented parallel to the film plane, whereas Co-Si pairs are not. These results are interpreted by the formation of Co inner-sphere mononuclear surface complexes located at the edges of hectorite platelets, in the continuity of the (Mg, Li) octahedral sheet. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Molecular Basis of Clay Mineral Structure and Dynamics in Subsurface Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals and their interfaces play an essential role in many geochemical, environmental, and subsurface engineering applications. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these processes are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods, and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals provide constrained interfacial environments to facilitate the evaluation of these complex processes. We have developed and used classical molecular and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms of radionuclides on clay minerals provides a scientific basis for predicting the suitability of engineered barriers associated with nuclear waste repositories and the fate of contaminants in the environment. Similarly, the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into geological reservoirs—to mitigate the impact of climate change—is evaluated by molecular models of multi-fluid interactions with clay minerals. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the wettability of different fluids—water, electrolyte solutions, and supercritical carbon dioxide—on clay surfaces, and which ultimately affects capillary fluid flow and the integrity of shale caprocks. This work is supported as part of Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program

  4. The acid solubility test of clay mineral under microwave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Ying; Niu Yuqing; Wu Peisheng; Niu Xuejun

    2001-01-01

    The acid solubility test of Al 3+ in clay from some uranium ores under microwave is introduced. The result shows that the concentration of Al 3+ in solution and the acid consumption increase rapidly under microwave comparing with normal leaching condition. It is infeasible to adopt microwave slacking method for intensively leaching uranium from uranium ore containing more clay

  5. Geochemical Investigation of Clay Minerals in Marte, Borno State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Adams

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay deposit collected from various locations in Marte (Northern Borno, were studied to determine their physical and chemical characteristics in order to evaluate their suitability for industrial uses. Major and trace element analyses were carried out on clay samples using Inductively Couple Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES and X- Ray Fluorescence (XRF. The result of the chemical analysis of the ten (10 samples collected showed significant amounts of SiO2 and Al2O3. Silica content ranges from 51.48 to 62.44 % while alumina varies from 12.49 to 19.00 %. The calcium oxide ranges from 1.17 to 3.39 %, Na2O ranges from 1.1 to 8.61 %, K2O from 1.54 to 3.66 %, MgO varies from 0.04 to0.14 %, Fe2O3 varies from 0.3 to 2.7 % and MnO ranges from 0.01 to 1.03 %. The result showed that the clays are mainly smectite with quartz and felspar as the main non-clay minerals. Generally, the geochemical results of the samples do not meet the standard for industrial utilization when compared to the Industrial specifications. However, for industrial utilization, some of the clay samples may be used after necessary beneficiations.

  6. X-ray diffraction identification of clay minerals by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, S.; Imasava, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The identification of clay minerals by X-ray powder diffraction are done by searching an unknown pattern with a file of standard X-ray diffraction patterns. For this searching done by hand is necessary a long time. This paper shows a program in ''Basic'' language to be utilized in microcomputers for the math of the unknown pattern, using the high velocity of comparison of the microcomputer. A few minutes are used for the match. (author) [pt

  7. Decontamination of radioactive liquid systems by modified clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Petrushka, Ihor; Moroz, Olexandr

    2016-01-01

    The process mechanism for sorption of strontium and cesium from liquid radioactive waste using modified bentonites from Yaziv sulfur deposit was investigated. The technique for predicting the intensity of the sorption process based on the comparison of experimental and calculated values of mass transfer coefficients was proposed. It was detected that the process of sorption extraction of strontium and cesium from liquid medium using modified clay minerals may be bes...

  8. Clay minerals behaviour in thin sandy clay-rich lacustrine turbidites (Lake Hazar, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ouahabi, Meriam; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurelia; Lamair, Laura; Hage, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Turbidites have been extensively studied in many different areas using cores or outcrop, which represent only an integrated snapshot of a dynamic evolving flow. Laboratory experiments provide the missing relationships between the flow characteristics and their deposits. In particular, flume experiments emphasize that the presence of clay plays a key role in turbidity current dynamics. Clay fraction, in small amount, provides cohesive strength to sediment mixtures and can damp turbulence. However, the degree of flocculation is dependent on factors such as the amount and size of clay particles, the surface of clay particles, chemistry and pH conditions in which the clay particles are dispersed. The present study focuses on thin clayey sand turbidites found in Lake Hazar (Turkey) occurring in stacked thin beds. Depositional processes and sources have been previously studied and three types were deciphered, including laminar flows dominated by cohesion, transitional, and turbulence flow regimes (Hage et al., in revision). For the purpose of determine the clay behavior in the three flow regimes, clay mineralogical, geochemical measurements on the cores allow characterising the turbidites. SEM observations provide further information regarding the morphology of clay minerals and other clasts. The study is particularly relevant given the highly alkaline and saline water of the Hazar Lake. Clay minerals in Hazar Lake sediments include kaolinite (1:1-type), illite and chlorite (2:1-type). Hazar lake water is alkaline having pH around 9.3, in such alkaline environment, a cation-exchange reaction takes place. Furthermore, in saline water (16‰), salts can act as a shield and decrease the repulsive forces between clay particle surfaces. So, pH and salt content jointly impact the behaviour of clays differently. Since the Al-faces of clay structures have a negative charge in basic solutions. At high pH, all kaolinite surfaces become negative-charged, and then kaolinite

  9. Influence of clay minerals on curcumin properties: Stability and singlet oxygen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Joyce L. S.; Valandro, Silvano R.; Poli, Alessandra L.; Schmitt, Carla C.

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has showed promising photophysical properties regarding to biological and chemical sciences. However, the main barrier for those applications are their low solubility and stability in aqueous solution. The effects of two different clay minerals, the montmorillonite (SWy-2) and the Laponite RD (Lap) nanoclay, on the stabilization of Curcumin were investigated. Their effects were compared with two well-established environments (acidic and neutral aqueous media). CUR/clay hybrids were prepared using a simple and fast method, where CUR solution was added into clay suspensions, to obtain well dispersed hybrids in water. The degradation process of CUR and CUR/clays hybrids was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopic. For both studied hybrids, the CUR degradation process was suppressed by the presence of the clay particles. Furthermore, the Lap showed a great stabilization effect than SWy-2. This behavior was due to the smaller particle size and higher exfoliation ability of Lap, providing a large surface for CUR adsorption compared to SWy-2. The degradation process of CUR solutions and CUR/clay hybrids was also studied in the presence of light. CUR photodegradation process was faster not only in the aqueous solution but also in the clay suspension compared to those studied in the dark. The presence of clay particles accelerated the photodegradation of CUR due to the products formation in the reactions between CUR and oxygen radicals. Our results showed that the singlet oxygen quantum yield (ΦΔ) of CUR were about 59% higher in the clay suspensions than CUR in aqueous solution. Therefore, the formation of CUR/clay hybrids, in particularly with Lap, suppressed the degradation in absence light of CUR and increased the singlet oxygen generation, which makes this hybrids of CUR/clay a promising material to enlarge the application of CUR in the biological sciences.

  10. Molecular dynamics of interfacial water and cations associated with clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Daemen, Luke L.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay mineral interfaces, including interlayer and external surfaces, play an essential role in many geochemical processes. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these geochemical processes are especially important in evaluating the fate of radionuclide waste in the environment. Such details are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, the basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals offer structurally constrained interfacial environments to better evaluate the local molecular chemistry. We have developed and used classical and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. In particular, inelastic neutron scattering methods provide a successful probe of vibrational behavior of interlayer species to help guide the simulations. Librations involving rock, wag, and twist motions of water molecules are particularly sensitive to the interlayer environment of smectite minerals such as montmorillonite and beidellite. Trends in librational modes for interlayer water as a function of clay structure and cation hydration energy are readily explained using structural and vibrational analysis derived from molecular simulation. Molecular dynamics simulations of virtual phases, including hydrated pyrophyllite, help to explain the behavior of interlayer water that is not associated with cation species. Additionally, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of other layered minerals, such as muscovite, to evaluate adsorption

  11. Clay-mineral assemblages from some levels of K-118 drill core of Maha Sarakham evaporites, northeastern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanich, Parkorn

    Clay-mineral assemblages in Middle Clastic, Middle Salt, Lower Clastic, Potash Zone, and Lower Salt, totalling 13 samples from K-118 drill core, in the Maha Sarakham Formation, Khorat Basin, northeastern Thailand were studied. The clay-size particles were separated from the water-soluble salt by water leaching. Then the samples were leached again in the EDTA solution and separated into clay-size particles by using the timing sedimentation. The EDTA-clay residues were divided and analyzed by using the XRD and XRF method. The XRD peaks show that the major-clay minerals are chlorite, illite, and mixed-layer corrensite including traces of rectorite? and paragonite? The other clay-size particles are quartz and potassium feldspar. The XRF results indicate Mg-rich values and moderate MgAl atom ratio values in those clay minerals. The variable Fe, Na, and K contents in the clay-mineral assemblages can explain the environment of deposition compared to the positions of the samples from the core. Hypothetically, mineralogy and the chemistry of the residual assemblages strongly indicate that severe alteration and Mg-enrichment of normal clay detritus occurred in the evaporite environment through brine-sediment interaction. The various Mg-enrichment varies along the various members reflecting whether sedimentation is near or far from the hypersaline brine.

  12. Methylene blue adsorption in clay mineral dealt with organic cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.L.; Lemos, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction among organic cations, as the methylene blue (AM) and benzyltrimethylammonium (BTMA), and clay minerals of the group of the smectite they result in the formation of applied materials in the adsorption of organic pollutant presents in waters, soils and you cultivate. In this work they were prepared the adsorbents (organic-clays) smectite - AM and smectite-BTMA. The precursory sample of smectite was collected in Rio Branco-Acre. We were also used an smectite sample collected in Sena Madureira (SM)-Acre already characterized in previous work and a sample of standard smectite Swy-2-Na-Montmorillonite (SWy-2) of Wymong - USA. The organic agents selected for this study they were: Blue of Methylene, denominated AM and Benzyltrimethylammonium, denominated BTMA. They were appraised the capacities adsorptive of the treated samples with BTMA being used AM as adsorbate. The results of these evaluations detected that ran total adsorption of AM (concentrations varying from 1 to 10 ppm) for the treated samples with BTMA. The organic cation, BTMA, interacting with the surfaces of the natural clay was more efficient in the adsorption of AM than the clay without the previous treatment with this salt. (author)

  13. Adsorption of Nucleic Acid Bases, Ribose, and Phosphate by Some Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Hashizume

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Besides having a large capacity for taking up organic molecules, clay minerals can catalyze a variety of organic reactions. Derived from rock weathering, clay minerals would have been abundant in the early Earth. As such, they might be expected to play a role in chemical evolution. The interactions of clay minerals with biopolymers, including RNA, have been the subject of many investigations. The behavior of RNA components at clay mineral surfaces needs to be assessed if we are to appreciate how clays might catalyze the formation of nucleosides, nucleotides and polynucleotides in the “RNA world”. The adsorption of purines, pyrimidines and nucleosides from aqueous solution to clay minerals is affected by suspension pH. With montmorillonite, adsorption is also influenced by the nature of the exchangeable cations. Here, we review the interactions of some clay minerals with RNA components.

  14. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  15. Aqueous suspensions of natural swelling clay minerals. 2. Rheological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paineau, Erwan; Michot, Laurent J; Bihannic, Isabelle; Baravian, Christophe

    2011-06-21

    We report in this article a comprehensive investigation of the viscoelastic behavior of different natural colloidal clay minerals in aqueous solution. Rheological experiments were carried out under both dynamic and steady-state conditions, allowing us to derive the elasticity and yield stress. Both parameters can be renormalized for all sizes, ionic strength, and type of clay using in a first approach only the volume of the particles. However, applying such a treatment to various clays of similar shapes and sizes yields differences that can be linked to the repulsion strength and charge location in the swelling clays. The stronger the repulsive interactions, the better the orientation of clay particles in flows. In addition, a master linear relationship between the elasticity and yield stress whose value corresponds to a critical deformation of 0.1 was evidenced. Such a relationship may be general for any colloidal suspension of anisometric particles as revealed by the analysis of various experimental data obtained on either disk-shaped or lath- and rod-shaped particles. The particle size dependence of the sol-gel transition was also investigated in detail. To understand why suspensions of larger particles gel at a higher volume fraction, we propose a very simplified view based on the statistical hydrodynamic trapping of a particle by an another one in its neighborhood upon translation and during a short period of time. We show that the key parameter describing this hydrodynamic trapping varies as the cube of the average diameter and captures most features of the sol-gel transition. Finally, we pointed out that in the high shear limit the suspension viscosity is still closely related to electrostatic interactions and follows the same trends as the viscoelastic properties. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals in the immersion mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pinti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Emulsion and bulk freezing experiments were performed to investigate immersion ice nucleation on clay minerals in pure water, using various kaolinites, montmorillonites, illites as well as natural dust from the Hoggar Mountains in the Saharan region. Differential scanning calorimeter measurements were performed on three different kaolinites (KGa-1b, KGa-2 and K-SA, two illites (Illite NX and Illite SE and four natural and acid-treated montmorillonites (SWy-2, STx-1b, KSF and K-10. The emulsion experiments provide information on the average freezing behaviour characterized by the average nucleation sites. These experiments revealed one to sometimes two distinct heterogeneous freezing peaks, which suggest the presence of a low number of qualitatively distinct average nucleation site classes. We refer to the peak at the lowest temperature as "standard peak" and to the one occurring in only some clay mineral types at higher temperatures as "special peak". Conversely, freezing in bulk samples is not initiated by the average nucleation sites, but by a very low number of "best sites". The kaolinites and montmorillonites showed quite narrow standard peaks with onset temperatures 238 K<Tonstd<242 K and best sites with averaged median freezing temperature Tmedbest=257 K, but only some featuring a special peak (i.e. KSF, K-10, K-SA and SWy-2 with freezing onsets in the range 240–248 K. The illites showed broad standard peaks with freezing onsets at 244 K Tonstd<246 K and best sites with averaged median freezing temperature Tmedbest=262 K. The large difference between freezing temperatures of standard and best sites shows that characterizing ice nucleation efficiencies of dust particles on the basis of freezing onset temperatures from bulk experiments, as has been done in some atmospheric studies, is not appropriate. Our investigations

  17. Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes.

  18. Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes

  19. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Apartado Postal 70-543, Deleg. Coyoacan, C.P. 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  20. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine

  1. Towards an understanding of the role of clay minerals in crude oil formation, migration and accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin Mei; Zhou, Chun Hui; Keeling, John; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews progress in the understanding of the role of clay minerals in crude oil formation, migration and accumulation. Clay minerals are involved in the formation of kerogen, catalytic cracking of kerogen into petroleum hydrocarbon, the migration of crude oil, and the continued change to hydrocarbon composition in underground petroleum reservoirs. In kerogen formation, clay minerals act as catalysts and sorbents to immobilize organic matter through ligand exchange, hydrophobic interactions and cation bridges by the mechanisms of Maillard reactions, polyphenol theory, selective preservation and sorptive protection. Clay minerals also serve as catalysts in acid-catalyzed cracking of kerogen into petroleum hydrocarbon through Lewis and Brønsted acid sites on the clay surface. The amount and type of clay mineral affect the composition of the petroleum. Brønsted acidity of clay minerals is affected by the presence and state of interlayer water, and displacement of this water is a probable driver in crude oil migration from source rocks. During crude oil migration and accumulation in reservoirs, the composition of petroleum is continually modified by interaction with clay minerals. The clays continue to function as sorbents and catalysts even while they are being transformed by diagenetic processes. The detail of chemical interactions and reaction mechanisms between clay minerals and crude oil formation remains to be fully explained but promises to provide insights with broader application, including catalytic conversion of biomass as a source of sustainable energy into the future.

  2. Modified clay minerals efficiency against chemical and biological warfare agents for civil human protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachá, Daniela; Rosenbergová, Kateřina; Slabotínský, Jiří; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Studentová, Soňa; Martynková, Gražyna Simha

    2014-04-30

    Sorption efficiencies of modified montmorillonite and vermiculite of their mono ionic Na and organic HDTMA and HDP forms were studied against chemical and biological warfare agents such as yperite and selected bacterial strains. Yperite interactions with modified clay minerals were observed through its capture in low-density polyethylene foil-modified clay composites by measuring yperite gas permeation with using chemical indication and gas chromatography methods. The antibacterial activities of synthetized organoclays were tested against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species in minimum inhibitory concentration tests. The obtained results showed a positive influence of modified clay minerals on the significant yperite breakthrough-time increase. The most effective material was the polyethylene-Na form montmorillonite, while the polyethylene-Na form vermiculite showed the lowest efficiency. With increasing organic cations loading in the interlayer space the montmorillonite efficiency decreased, and in the case of vermiculite an opposite effect was observed. Generally the modified montmorillonites were more effective than modified vermiculites. The HDP cations seem to be more effective compare to the HDTMA. The antibacterial activity tests confirmed efficiency of all organically modified clay minerals against Gram-positive bacteria. The confirmation of antibacterial activity against Y. pestis, plague bacteria, is the most interesting result of this part of the study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetic Study of Denatonium Sorption to Smectite Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, Garry S; Sandmann, Emily

    2013-06-01

    The denatonium cation, as a benzoate salt, is the most bitter cation known to modern society and is frequently added to consumer products to reduce accidental and intentional consumption by humans and animals. Denatonium can enter the environment by accidental discharges, potentially rendering water supplies undrinkable. Interactions of denatonium with soil components ( i.e. , smectite minerals) ultimately control the environmental fate of denatonium, but the current literature is devoid of studies that evaluate denatonium sorption to smectite minerals. This study investigated the mechanism and kinetics of denatonium sorption to smectite clay minerals as a function of smectite type, temperature, pH and ionic strength. Uptake by synthetic mica montmorillonite (Syn-1), Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2), and Texas montmorillonite (STx-1b) at 305K was rapid, with equilibrium being reached within 2 min for all clays. Complete removal of denatonium was observed for STx-1b at pH 6.9, while partial removal was observed for Syn-1 and SWy-2. Kinetic behavior of SWy-2 and Syn-1 is consistent with a pseudo-second-order model at 305K. An activation energy of +25.9 kJ/mol was obtained for sorption to Syn-1 and was independent of temperature between 286K and 338K. Activation-free energy (Δ G *), activation enthalpy (Δ H *), and activation entropy (Δ S *) for Syn-1 were found to be +62.91 kJ/mol, +23.36 kJ/mol, and -0.130 kJ/(K·mol), respectively. Sorption capacities at pH 3.6, 6.9, and 8.2 were constant at 1.3×10 -2 g denatonium/g clay; however, the kinetic rate constant increased by 56%, going from acidic to basic solution conditions. Distribution coefficients were negatively correlated with ionic strength, suggesting cation exchange. Collectively, results suggested that smectite minerals can serve as efficient sinks for denatonium cations. This is much-needed information for agencies developing regulations regarding denatonium usage and for water treatment professionals

  4. Effects of clay mineral type and organic matter on the uptake of radiocesium by pasture plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, T.J.

    1980-10-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the influence of interaction of clay minerals and organic matter on the uptake of radiocesium by two pasture plants, namely, ryegrass (Lolium italicum L) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L). The clay minerals used were bentonite (2.1 layer type) and kaolinite (1/1 layer type). Mixtures of clay and sand were prepared with 0.5, 10, 20 and 40 per cent clay and treated with organic matter (forest turf) at 0,5 and 10 per cent of the clay-sand mixtures. Results indicated that 134 Cs uptake by plants grown on the kaolinite-clay medium was greater than that on the bentonite-clay medium at a given organic matter level. Increasing the clay content of mixtures resulted in reduction in 134 Cs uptake by both plant species. The plant uptake of 134 Cs increased with additions of organic matter at a given clay content. (author)

  5. Crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal via clay-microbe-oil interactions: Effect of acid activated clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Fialips, Claire I

    2017-07-01

    Acid treatment of clay minerals is known to modify their properties such as increase their surface area and surface acidity, making them suitable as catalysts in many chemical processes. However, the role of these surface properties during biodegradation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is only known for mild acid (0.5 M Hydrochloric acid) treated clays. Four different clay minerals were used for this study: a montmorillonite, a saponite, a palygorskite and a kaolinite. They were treated with 3 M hydrochloric acid to produce acid activated clay minerals. The role of the acid activated montmorillonite, saponite, palygorskite and kaolinite in comparison with the unmodified clay minerals in the removal of PAHs during biodegradation was investigated in microcosm experiments. The microcosm experiments contained micro-organisms, oil, and clays in aqueous medium with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community predominantly composed of Alcanivorax spp. Obtained results indicated that acid activated clays and unmodified kaolinite did not enhance the biodegradation of the PAHs whereas unmodified montmorillonite, palygorskite and saponite enhanced their biodegradation. In addition, unmodified palygorskite adsorbed the PAHs significantly due to its unique channel structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clay mineral distribution from Bhimunipatnam to Pudimadaka along cental eastern continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.

    Forty eight sediment samples, collected from 50-100m depth, have been analysed for their clay mineral composition and distribution. Kaolinite with chlorite (K + C) is the predominant mineral followed by illite and montmorillonite. K + C and illite...

  7. Isotopic exchange of 65Zn with stable Zn adsorbed on reference clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, A.C.M.; Filby, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    For reference clays of low organic content, Zn adsorbed on the clay minerals is in kinetic equilibrium with 65 Zn in solution. Thus the specific activity approach applied to the transport of 65 Zn(II) at the water-reference clay interface is intrinsically valid. (author)

  8. Understanding the role of clay minerals in the chromium(VI) bioremoval by Pseudomonas aeruginosa CCTCC AB93066 under growth condition: microscopic, spectroscopic and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chunxi; Wu, Pingxiao; Li, Yuewu; Ruan, Bo; Li, Liping; Tran, Lytuong; Zhu, Nengwu; Dang, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to investigate the role of clay minerals, e.g., kaolinite and vermiculite, in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under growth condition in glucose-amended mediums as a method for treating Cr(VI)-contaminated subsurface environment such as soil. Our results indicated that glucose could acted as an essential electron donor, and clay minerals significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by improving the consumption rate of glucose and stimulating the growth and propagation of P. aeruginosa. Cr(VI) bioreduction by both free cells and clay minerals-amended cells followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, with the latter one fitting better. The mass balance analyses and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis found that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) and the adsorption of total chromium on clay minerals-bacteria complex was small, implying that Cr(VI) bioremoval was not mainly due to the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto cells or clay minerals or clay minerals-cells complex but mainly due to the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of P. aeruginosa under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). Atomic force microscopy revealed that the addition of clay minerals (e.g. vermiculite) decreased the surface roughness of Cr(VI)-laden cells and changed the cell morphology and dimension. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that organic matters such as aliphatic species and/or proteins played an important role in the combination of cells and clay minerals. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the attachment of cells on the surface of clay minerals, indicating that clay minerals could provide a microenvironment to protect cells from Cr(VI) toxicity and serve as growth-supporting materials. These findings manifested the underlying influence of clay minerals on microbial reduction of Cr(VI) and gave an understanding of the interaction between pollutants, the environment and the biota.

  9. Preparation of Synthetic Zeolites from Myanmar Clay Mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phyu Phyu Win

    2004-04-01

    Faujasite type zeolite X was successfully synthesized from Myanmar clay mineral kaolinite, by treating with sodium hydroxide at 820 C followed by dissolution in water and hydrothermal treatment. It was found that the solution of fused clay powder can be crystallized at 90C under ambient pressure to synthesize faujasite type zeolite X. The effects of aging time and the amount of water on the formation of the product phase and Si/ Al ratios of the resulting products were investigated. Most of the Si and Al components in kaolinite might be dissolved into an alkaline solution and reacted to form ring-like structures. Then it was effectively transformed into zeolite materials. The maximum relative crystallinity of faujasite zeolite obtained was found to be 100%. Zeolite P was found to be a competitive phase present in some resulting products during hydrothermal treatment. The cation exchange capacity of kaolinite is very low, but increased after a proper treatment. It was found that the prepared faujasite type zeolite X, zeolite P and hydrogen zeolite (HZ) can reduce the hardness, the alkalinity, the total dissolved solid and the dissolved iron of raw water in the batch wise operation of water treatment. Therefore, it can be used as the cation exchanged resin for water treatment

  10. Study of Adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, M. L.; Escolano, O.; Rodriguez, V.; Diaz, F. J.; Perez, R.; Garcia, S.; Garcia Frutos, F. J.

    2003-01-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay minerals also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represents ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs

  11. Removal of Phenol in Aqueous Solution Using Kaolin Mineral Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Kaolin clay were tested for phenol removal as toxic liquid waste from aqueous waste water. Several experimental conditions such as weight and particle size of clay were investigated to study batch kinetic techniques, also the ph and concentration of the phenol solution were carried out. The stability of the Langmuir adsorption model of the equilibrium data were studied for phenol sorbent clay system. Infrared spectra, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis techniques were used to characterize the behavior of kaolin clay and kaolin clay saturated with phenol. The results obtained showed that kaolin clay could be used successfully as an efficient sorbent material to remove phenol from aqueous solution

  12. Mineral carbonation of gaseous carbon dioxide using a clay-hosted cation exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Il-Mo; Roh, Ki-Min

    2013-01-01

    The mineral carbonation method is still a challenge in practical application owing to: (1) slow reaction kinetics, (2) high reaction temperature, and (3) continuous mineral consumption. These constraints stem from the mode of supplying alkaline earth metals through mineral acidification and dissolution. Here, we attempt to mineralize gaseous carbon dioxide into calcium carbonate, using a cation exchange reaction of vermiculite (a species of expandable clay minerals). The mineralization is operated by draining NaCI solution through vermiculite powders and continuously dropping into the pool of NaOH solution with CO2 gas injected. The mineralization temperature is regulated here at 293 and 333 K for 15 min. As a result of characterization, using an X-ray powder diffractometer and a scanning electron microscopy, two types of pure CaCO3 polymorphs (vaterite and calcite) are identified as main reaction products. Their abundance and morphology are heavily dependent on the mineralization temperature. Noticeably, spindle-shaped vaterite, which is quite different from a typical vaterite morphology (polycrystalline spherulite), forms predominantly at 333 K (approximately 98 wt%).

  13. Change effects in the land use about the mineral clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cespedes Payret, C.; Gutierrez, O; Panario, D.; Pineiro, G

    2012-01-01

    The Pampas land changes during the Quaternary, left their mark on the mineralogy of soil clays. This work is oriented to compare the mineralogical composition of the clays and the value of potassium in an eucalyptus forestation. These results show that the mineralogical illite alteration is the cause of its destruction. This clay is the main reservoir of potassium for the agricultural soils

  14. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Light Coal Fractions and the Thermal Reaction Products of These Clay Minerals during Combustion in a Drop Tube Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the contribution of clay minerals in light coal fractions to ash deposition in furnaces, we investigated their distribution and thermal reaction products. The light fractions of two Chinese coals were prepared using a 1.5 g·cm−3 ZnCl2 solution as a density separation medium and were burned in a drop-tube furnace (DTF. The mineral matter in each of the light coal fractions was compared to that of the relevant raw coal. The DTF ash from light coal fractions was analysed using hydrochloric acid separation. The acid-soluble aluminium fractions of DTF ash samples were used to determine changes in the amorphous aluminosilicate products with increasing combustion temperature. The results show that the clay mineral contents in the mineral matter of both light coal fractions were higher than those in the respective raw coals. For the coal with a high ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction thermally transformed more dehydroxylation products compared with those in the raw coal, possibly contributing to solid-state reactions of ash particles. For the coal with a low ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction produced more easily-slagging material compared with those in the raw coal, playing an important role in the occurrence of slagging. Additionally, ferrous oxide often produces low-melting substances in coal ash. Due to the similarities of zinc oxide and ferrous oxide in silicate reactions, we also investigated the interactions of clay minerals in light coal fractions with zinc oxide introduced by a zinc chloride solution. The extraneous zinc oxide could react, to a small extent, with clay minerals in the coal during DTF combustion.

  15. Rheological properties of different minerals and clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgor Khaydapova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of kaolinite, montmorillonite, ferralitic soil of the humid subtropics (Norfolk island, southwest of Oceania, alluvial clay soil of arid subtropics (Konyaprovince, Turkey and carbonate loess loam of Russian forest-steppe zone were determined. A parallel plate rheometer MCR-302 (Anton Paar, Austria was used in order to conduct amplitude sweep test. Rheological properties allow to assess quantitatively structural bonds and estimate structural resistance to a mechanical impact. Measurements were carried out on samples previously pounded and capillary humidified during 24 hours. In the amplitude sweep method an analyzed sample was placed between two plates. The upper plate makes oscillating motions with gradually extending amplitude. Software of the device allows to receive several rheological parameters such as elastic modulus (G’, Pa, viscosity modulus (G", Pa, linear viscoelasticity range (G’>>G”, and point of destruction of structure at which the elastic modulus becomes equal to the viscosity modulus (G’=G”- crossover. It was found out that in the elastic behavior at G '>> G " strength of structural links of kaolinite, alluvial clay soil and loess loam constituted one order of 105 Pa. Montmorillonit had a minimum strength - 104 Pa and ferrallitic soil of Norfolk island [has] - a maximum one -106 Pa. At the same time montmorillonite and ferralitic soil were characterized by the greatest plasticity. Destruction of their structure (G '= G" took place only in the cases when strain was reaching 11-12%. Destraction of the kaolinite structure happened at 5% of deformation and of the alluvial clay soil and loess loam - at 4.5%.

  16. Dynamic mechanical properties and anisotropy of synthetic shales with different clay minerals under confining pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fei; Di, Bangrang; Wei, Jianxin; Ding, Pinbo; Shuai, Da

    2018-03-01

    The presence of clay minerals can alter the elastic behaviour of reservoir rocks significantly as the type of clay minerals, their volume and distribution, and their orientation control the shale's intrinsic anisotropic behaviours. Clay minerals are the most abundant materials in shale, and it has been proven extremely difficult to measure the elastic properties of natural shale by means of a single variable (in this case, the type of clay minerals), due to the influences of multiple factors, including water, TOC content and complex mineral compositions. We used quartz, clay (kaolinite, illite and smectite), carbonate and kerogen extract as the primary materials to construct synthetic shale with different clay minerals. Ultrasonic experiments were conducted to investigate the anisotropy of velocity and mechanical properties in dry synthetic and natural shale as a function of confining pressure. Velocities in synthetic shale are sensitive to the type of clay minerals, possibly due to the different structures of the clay minerals. The velocities increase with confining pressure and show higher rate of velocity increase at low pressures, and P-wave velocity is usually more sensitive than S-wave velocity to confining pressure according to our results. Similarly, the dynamic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increase with applied pressure, and the results also reveal that E11 is always larger than E33 and ν31 is smaller than ν12. Velocity and mechanical anisotropy decrease with increasing stress, and are sensitive to stress and the type of clay minerals. However, the changes of mechanical anisotropy with applied stress are larger compared with the velocity anisotropy, indicating that mechanical properties are more sensitive to the change of rock properties.

  17. Studies in Finishing Effects of Clay Mineral in Polymers and Synthetic Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Uddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of clay mineral in modifying the properties of polymeric material is improved in application. The current interest in modifying the polymeric materials, particularly polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, and nylon using clay mineral for improved flame retardancy, thermal stability, peak heat release rate, fracture, and strength properties generated significant research literature. This paper aims to review some of the important recent modification achieved in the performance of polymeric materials using organoclay mineral. Degradation of clay mineral-polymer (nm composite is discussed with appropriate known examples. Clay mineral (nm loading of 5 wt.% to 7 wt.% that was significantly smaller than the percent loading of conventional fillers in polymeric materials introduced significant improvement in terms of thermal and physical stability. An attempt is made to emphasize flammability and thermal stability and to indicate the areas that are relatively little explored in modification of fiber-forming polymers to enhance further research interest.

  18. Phase transformations of pyrophyllite clay mineral after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The termal transformation of the Pyrophyllite clay mineral, given by the equations: AL sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2).H sub(2) O → Al sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2) + H sub(2) O Pyrophyllite Anhydride Water vapour. 3 (Al sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2)) → 3 Al sub(2) O sub(3). 2SiO sub(2) + 10 (SiO sub(2)) Pyrophyllite Anhydride Mullite Cristobalite, were studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) associated to Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAD), applied to a very pure sample, colected at Diamantina, M.G. Some other tgechniques were also used, as X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), applied to other different Pyrophyllite samples. A thermodynamical theoretical study was undertaken to estimate the values for the entropyu of formation, enthalpy and molar thermal capacity for the Pyrophyllite Anhydride. (author)

  19. Treatment and Conditioning of Radioactive Waste Solution by Natural Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dessouky, M.I.; Abdel-Raouf, M.W.; El-Massry, E.H.; Khalifa, S.M.; Aly, H.F.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical precipitation processes have been used for the treatment of radioactive elements from aqueous solution. The volume reduction is not very great and storage facilities are expensive. There are some radionuclides which are so difficult to be precipitated by this common method, so they may be precipitated by adding solid materials such as natural inorganic exchangers. In this woek, improvement the removal of caesium, cobalt and europium with zinc sulfate as coagulant and different clay minerals have been investigated. These include, Feldespare, Aswanly, Bentionite, Hematite, Mud, Calcite, Basalt, Magnetite, Kaoline, Sand stone, Limonite and Sand. The parameters affecting the precipitation process such as pH, particle size, temperature and weight of the clay have been studied. The results indicate that, the highest removal for Cs-137, Co-60 and Eu-152 and154 by Asswanly, Bentonite and Sand stone is more than the other clays. Removal of Cs-137 from low level waste solution with these three natural clays took the sequence, Aswanly (85.5%) > Bentonite (82.2%) > Sandstone (65.4%). Solidified cement products have been evaluated to determine mechanical strength and leaching rates of the waste products. The solidified waste forms were found more acceptable for handling ,storage and ultimate disposal

  20. Preferred Orientation and Anisotropy of Clay minerals and Pores in Posidonia Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Chen, K.; Wenk, H.

    2010-12-01

    Shales compose a large part of sedimentary basins and form the seal and source rocks for hydrocarbon reservoirs. They are also of great interest in context of repositories for nuclear waste and carbon sequestration. A comprehensive study of shale properties is thus crucial for seismic prospecting, particularly due to high elastic anisotropy that is contributed by the alignment of constituent clay minerals during compaction and diagenesis. In this study, we quantitatively analyze composition, crystal preferred orientation (or texture), and the 3D porosity structure in four Posidonia shales from Germany using high energy synchrotron x-rays. We can infer texture information from x-ray diffraction images relying on the Rietveld method, as well as determine the 3D porosity structure from tomography images. We observed that quartz and calcite are dominating phases while illite-smectite, illite-mica and kaolinite are the major clay minerals. The texture strength of clays range from 4.22 to 6.12 m.r.d. A comparison of shallow Posidonia shales with deep shales from the North Sea, Saudi Arabia, and the Gulf of Mexico documents that P-wave anisotropy increases with increasing phyllosilicate content (mainly illite-smectite and kaolinite) and increasing burial. Low absorption features in microtomography images indicate porosity (including kerogen and fractures), which is estimated at 1 vol% and observed to be anisotropic, mainly organized parallel to bedding with little connectivity of flat pores in direction perpendicular to the bedding plane.

  1. Clays as mineral dust aerosol: An integrated approach to studying climate, atmospheric chemistry, and biogeochemical effects of atmospheric clay minerals in an undergraduate research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C. D.; Crane, C. C.; Harris, K. J.; Thompson, C. E.; Miles, M. K.; Weingold, R. M.; Bucuti, T.

    2011-12-01

    Entrained mineral dust aerosol accounts for 45% of the global annual atmospheric aerosol load and can have a significant influence on important environmental issues, including climate, atmospheric chemistry, cloud formation, biogeochemical processes, visibility, and human health. 70% of all mineral aerosol mass originating from Africa consists of layered aluminosilicates, including illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite clays. Clay minerals are a largely neglected component of mineral aerosol, yet they have unique physiochemical properties, including a high reactive surface area, large cation exchange capacities, small particle sizes, and a relatively large capacity to take up adsorbed water, resulting in expansion of clay layers (and a larger reactive surface area for heterogeneous interactions) in some cases. An integrated laboratory research approach has been implemented at Hendrix College, a Primarily Undergraduate Institution, in which undergraduate students are involved in independent and interdisciplinary research projects that relate the chemical aging processes (heterogeneous chemistry) of clay minerals as a major component of mineral aerosol to their effects on climate (water adsorption), atmospheric chemistry (trace gas uptake), and biogeochemistry (iron dissolution and phytoplankton biomarker studies). Preliminary results and future directions will be reported.

  2. Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy study of mineral-organic matter associations in pasture soil clay fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmei; Dynes, James J; Wang, Jian; Karunakaran, Chithra; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-06-17

    There is a growing acceptance that associations with soil minerals may be the most important overarching stabilization mechanism for soil organic matter. However, direct investigation of organo-mineral associations has been hampered by a lack of methods that can simultaneously characterize organic matter (OM) and soil minerals. In this study, STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopy at the C 1s, Ca 2p, Fe 2p, Al 1s, and Si 1s edges was used to investigate C associations with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si species in soil clay fractions from an upland pasture hillslope. Bulk techniques including C and N NEXAFS, Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, and XRD were applied to provide additional information. Results demonstrated that C was associated with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si with no separate phase in soil clay particles. In soil clay particles, the pervasive C forms were aromatic C, carboxyl C, and polysaccharides with the relative abundance of carboxyl C and polysaccharides varying spatially at the submicrometer scale. Only limited regions in the soil clay particles had aliphatic C. Good C-Ca spatial correlations were found for soil clay particles with no CaCO3, suggesting a strong role of Ca in organo-mineral assemblage formation. Fe EXAFS showed that about 50% of the total Fe in soils was contained in Fe oxides, whereas Fe-bearing aluminosilicates (vermiculite and Illite) accounted for another 50%. Fe oxides in the soil were mainly crystalline goethite and hematite, with lesser amounts of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite. XRD revealed that soil clay aluminosilicates were hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, Illite, and kaolinite. C showed similar correlation with Fe to Al and Si, implying a similar association of Fe oxides and aluminosilicates with organic matter in organo-mineral associations. These direct microscopic determinations can help improve understanding of organo-mineral interactions in soils.

  3. Radiation-induced catalysis of fatty acids adsorbed onto clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.; Colin-Garcia, M.; Mosqueira, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the behavior of small fatty (acetic acid) and dicarboxylic acids (succinic and malonic acids) adsorbed onto Na + -montmorillonite (a clay mineral) and exposed to gamma radiation. A decarboxylation reaction was found to predominate when the clay was present. This preferential synthesis promoted the formation of a compound with one less carbon atom than its target compound. In the system without clay, dimerization was the predominate outcome following radiolysis. (author)

  4. Characterization of sands and mineral clays in channel and floodplain deposits of Portuguesa river, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando José González Clemente

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the main channel and floodplain of Portuguesa River were studied the mineralogical characteristics of sand and clay minerals respectively. The methodology consisted of X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, for both mineral fractions. The results indicated the presence of mainly of quartz sands with minor amounts of chlorite, muscovite, calcite and feldspar which are considered quartz sand mature. Its origin is related to the source area and rework of soils and sediments of the floodplain. The clay fraction is characterized by the presence of 13 mineral crystalline phases consisting mainly of quartz, muscovite and chlorite, and clay minerals such as kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite and nontronita. Its detrital origin may be due to mineral neoformation and inheritance. Therefore both mineral fractions consist mainly of quartz and kaolinite, which are essential components of the source area as well as the Quaternary alluvial deposits and the soils that make up the region.

  5. Clay mineral distribution on tropical shelf: an example from the western shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of RV Gaveshani were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral content. The distribution of total clay ( 4 mu fraction...

  6. Quality-assured evaluation of effective porosity using fit-for-purpose estimates of clay-mineral volume fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Paul F.

    2010-05-01

    Reservoirs that contain dispersed clay minerals traditionally have been evaluated petrophysically using either the effective or the total porosity system. The major weakness of the former is its reliance on "shale" volume fraction ( Vsh) as a clay-mineral indicator in the determination of effective porosity from well logs. Downhole clay-mineral indicators have usually delivered overestimates of fractional clay-mineral volume ( Vcm) because they use as a reference nearby shale beds that are often assumed to comprise clay minerals exclusively, whereas those beds also include quartzitic silts and other detritus. For this reason, effective porosity is often underestimated significantly, and this shortfall transmits to computed hydrocarbons in place and thence to estimates of ultimate recovery. The problem is overcome here by using, as proxy groundtruths, core porosities that have been upscaled to match the spatial resolutions of porosity logs. Matrix and fluid properties are established over clean intervals in the usual way. Log-derived values of Vsh are tuned so that, on average, the resulting log-derived porosities match the corresponding core porosities over an evaluation interval. In this way, Vsh is rendered fit for purpose as an indicator of clay-mineral content Vcm for purposes of evaluating effective porosity. The method is conditioned to deliver a value of effective porosity that shows overall agreement with core porosity to within the limits of uncertainty of the laboratory measurements. This is achieved through function-, reservoir- and tool-specific Vsh reduction factors that can be applied to downhole estimates of clay-mineral content over uncored intervals of similar reservoir character. As expected, the reduction factors can also vary for different measurement conditions. The reduction factors lie in the range of 0.29-0.80, which means that in its raw form, log-derived Vsh can overestimate the clay-mineral content by more than a factor of three. This

  7. Simulation of the long term alteration of clay minerals in engineered bentonite barriers: nucleation and growth of secondary clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, B.; Clement, A.; Zwingmann, H.; Noguera, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The long term stability of clay rich rocks used as barriers to the migration of radionuclides in the environment of nuclear wastes has been intensively studied, looking at the geochemical interactions between clay minerals and aqueous solutions. These studies combine experimental approaches for the short term and numerical modellings for the long term extrapolations, in the frame of the research supported by ANDRA in the French design for High Level Waste (HLW) repository. The main objective of the geochemical numerical tools devoted to clay-solutions interaction processes was to predict the feed-back effects of mineralogical and chemical transformations of clay mineral, in repository conditions as defined by Andra, on their physical and transport properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). The 1D transport-reaction coupled simulation was done using the code KIRMAT, at 100 deg. C for 100000 years. The fluid considered is that of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological formation (COX) and assumed to diffuse into the clay barrier from one side. On the other side, ferrous iron, is provided by the steel overpack corrosion. Under these conditions, montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed into illite, chlorite, and saponite. The simulation shows that only outer parts of the clay barrier is significantly modified, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. These modifications correspond to a closure of the porosity, followed by a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier is predicted to decrease, but in its major part, the engineered barrier seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure). In this modelling approach, the very important role of secondary clay minerals has to be taken into account with relevant kinetic rate laws; particularly

  8. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover is influenced by interactions between organic matter and the mineral soil fraction. However, the influence of clay content and type on SOC turnover rates remains unclear, particularly in tropical soils under natural vegetation. We examined the lability...... of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving....... Basal soil respiration rates were determined from bulk soils and soil fractions. Substrate induced respiration rates were determined from soil fractions. SOC lability was significantly influenced by clay mineralogy, but not by clay content when compared across contrasting clay minerals. The lability...

  9. The growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on natural clay minerals (kaolinite, nontronite and sepiolite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastorková, K.; Jesenák, K.; Kadlečíková, M.; Breza, J.; Kolmačka, M.; Čaplovičová, M.; Lazišťan, F.; Michalka, M.

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of clay minerals - kaolinite, nontronite and sepiolite - is studied for synthesis of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotubes. Particles of iron were used as catalysts. Prior to synthesis, kaolinite and sepiolite were doped by the catalytically active metal, whereas in the case of nontronite the presence was used of this metal in the matrix of this mineral. Synthesis of CNTs was performed by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. The produced nanocomposites were examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experiment verified the potential of the three microcrystalline phyllosilicates for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Under the same technology conditions, the type of catalyst carrier affects the morphology and structure of the nanotube product markedly.

  10. Kinetics and Products of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Iron(II/III)-Bearing Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe-Wong, Claresta; Brown, Gordon E; Maher, Kate

    2017-09-05

    Hexavalent chromium is a water-soluble pollutant, the mobility of which can be controlled by reduction of Cr(VI) to less soluble, environmentally benign Cr(III). Iron(II/III)-bearing clay minerals are widespread potential reductants of Cr(VI), but the kinetics and pathways of Cr(VI) reduction by such clay minerals are poorly understood. We reacted aqueous Cr(VI) with two abiotically reduced clay minerals: an Fe-poor montmorillonite and an Fe-rich nontronite. The effects of ionic strength, pH, total Fe content, and the fraction of reduced structural Fe(II) [Fe(II)/Fe(total)] were examined. The last variable had the largest effect on Cr(VI) reduction kinetics: for both clay minerals, the rate constant of Cr(VI) reduction varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude with Fe(II)/Fe(total) and is described by a linear free energy relationship. Under all conditions examined, Cr and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra show that the main Cr-bearing product is a Cr(III)-hydroxide and that Fe remains in the clay structure after reacting with Cr(VI). This study helps to quantify our understanding of the kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by Fe(II/III)-bearing clay minerals and may improve predictions of Cr(VI) behavior in subsurface environments.

  11. Adsorption of zinc and lead on clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Jablonovská

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Clays (especially bentonite, zeolite and quartz sand are widely used as landfill barriers to prevent contamination of subsoil and groundwater by leachates containing heavy metals. The sorption of zinc and lead on these clays was studied as a function of time and it was found that the initial 1 h our was sufficient to exchange most of the metal ions. The retention efficiency of clay samples of Zn2+ and Pb2+ follows the order of bentonite > zeolite> quartz sand. Whatever the clay sample, lead is retained more than zinc. The concentration of elements in the solution was followed by atomic adsorption spectrofotometry. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus, previously isolated from the kaoline deposit Horna Prievrana was added into the clay samples to comparise the accumulation of Zn2+ and Pb2+ from the model solution. The study of heavy metal adsorption capacity of bacteria- enriched clay adsorbent showed a high retention efficiency for lead ions as comparised with zinc ions. Biosorption is considered a potential instrument for the removal of metals from waste solutions and for the precious metals recovery as an alternative to the conventional processes.

  12. Influence of non-clay minerals on the interaction between metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Villieras, F.; Michau, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, it is of prime importance to understand the interaction mechanisms between the geological matrix, Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (COx) and metallic iron, from the package overpack. In order to evidence the individual role of each clay component entering in the mineralogy of the COx, interactions between metallic iron and pure clays (smectites, illite and kaolinite) were first conducted. To investigate the role of the other minerals, the reactivity of COx, COx clay fraction (COxCF) and mixtures between COxCF and quartz, calcite or pyrite, was studied. Clays and additional minerals were put in contact with powder metallic iron with a weight ratio iron:clay fixed at 1:3 and a clay:solution ratio of 1:20. Proportions of non-clay minerals were deduced from the average COx composition: 50% clays, 24.5% quartz, 24.5% calcite and 1% pyrite. Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) in Parr reactors for durations of one, three or nine months. After reaction, solid and liquid phases were separated by centrifugation and characterized by classical techniques combining chemical analyses (liquid analyses, transmission electron microscopy combined with Energy Dispersive of X-rays spectroscopy TEM-EDS), mineralogical (X-ray diffraction), spectroscopic ( 57 Fe Moessbauer) and morphometric techniques (TEM, scanning electron microscopy and N 2 adsorption). For COx, COxCF and all the pure clay phases, major evolutions were observed during the first month, which shows that the oxidation of metallic iron is rapid in our experimental conditions. Release of iron cations in solution, pH increase (8-10) and Eh decrease (reductive conditions) are responsible for the partial dissolution of initial clay phases. Released iron is involved in the crystallization of Fe

  13. Reconstruction of late Quaternary monsoon oscillations based on clay mineral proxies using sediment cores from the western margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.; Rao, V.P.; Schneider, R.R.

    sites were from the hinterland rocks and soils. Careful evaluations of several factors that could complicate the clay distribution in marine environment indicate that the clay mineral parameters can be used as proxies for the intensity of summer monsoon...

  14. Distribution of clay minerals in marine sediments off Chennai, Bay of Bengal, India: Indicators of sediment sources and transport processes .

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Ramkumar, T.

    Clay mineralogy, texture size and statistical analyses were carried out on surface sediments from the continental shelf of Chennai, Bay of Bengal, India. The purpose of this study is to characterize the clay mineral distribution and its relation...

  15. Ground Truthing Orbital Clay Mineral Observations with the APXS Onboard Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C.; Gellert, R.; VanBommel, S.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. S.; Yen, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring approximately 22 km diameter Endeavour crater since 2011. Its rim segments predate the Hesperian-age Burns formation and expose Noachian-age material, which is associated with orbital Fe3+-Mg-rich clay mineral observations [1,2]. Moving to an orders of magnitude smaller instrumental field of view on the ground, the clay minerals were challenging to pinpoint on the basis of geochemical data because they appear to be the result of near-isochemical weathering of the local bedrock [3,4]. However, the APXS revealed a more complex mineral story as fracture fills and so-called red zones appear to contain more Al-rich clay minerals [5,6], which had not been observed from orbit. These observations are important to constrain clay mineral formation processes. More detail will be added as Opportunity is heading into her 10th extended mission, during which she will investigate Noachian bedrock that predates Endeavour crater, study sedimentary rocks inside Endeavour crater, and explore a fluid-carved gully. ESA's ExoMars rover will land on Noachian-age Oxia Planum where abundant Fe3+-Mg-rich clay minerals have been observed from orbit, but the story will undoubtedly become more complex once seen from the ground.

  16. Use of thermogravimetry on rational analysis of clay minerals from state of Mato Grosso do Sul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvetti, Alfredo Roque; Rodrigues, Henrique Mauro

    1997-01-01

    The rational analysis on clay minerals, normally uses as structural water, the mass loss by firing. The presence of organic materials, sulphur or others minerals, can cause an error on quantification of structural water. With the use of thermal gravimetric analysis, we can calculate, in a more precise way, the quantity of mass loss by dehydroxylation, without take into account the loss of mass from others process. We compared the rational chemical analysis on some clay minerals from state of Mato Grosso do Sul using burning loss and thermal gravimetric analysis. (author)

  17. Paleoenvironmental Implications of Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Blake, David F.

    2014-01-01

    heating >60 C in the presence of water. Given estimated geothermal gradients on Mars temperatures <60 C might still be consistent with (but do not require) moderate burial. However, our ability to identify interstratified minerals is greatly limited by the lack of access to traditional treatments methods used in the lab (e.g., ethylene glycol solvation). Our preferred explanation for the origin of trioctahedral smectites in Sheepbed mudstone is in situ production via reaction of olivine, water and Si-bearing amorphous material, an important mudstone component detected by XRD. Elevated levels of magnetite in the Sheepbed and the trioctahedral monomineralic nature of the clay minerals support this model. These observations, combined with previous studies of olivine stability, support the persistence of circum-neutral hydrous conditions for thousands of years at YKB.

  18. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas; Blake, David; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Farmer, Jack, D.; Treiman, Allan H; hide

    2013-01-01

    >60degC in the presence of water. Given estimated geothermal gradients on Mars temperatures <60 degC might still be consistent with (but do not require) moderate burial. However, our ability to identify interstratified minerals is greatly limited by the lack of access to traditional treatments methods used in the lab (e.g., ethylene glycol solvation). Our preferred explanation for the origin of trioctahedral smectites in Sheepbed mudstone is in situ production via reaction of olivine, water and Si-bearing amorphous material, an important mudstone component detected by XRD. Elevated levels of magnetite in the Sheepbed and the trioctahedral monomineralic nature of the clay minerals support this model. These observations, combined with previous studies of olivine stability, support the persistence of circum-neutral hydrous conditions for thousands of years at YKB.

  19. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  20. Clay mineral formation under oxidized conditions and implications for paleoenvironments and organic preservation on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainey, Seth R; Hausrath, Elisabeth M; Adcock, Christopher T; Tschauner, Oliver; Hurowitz, Joel A; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Xiao, Yuming; Bartlett, Courtney L

    2017-11-01

    Clay mineral-bearing locations have been targeted for martian exploration as potentially habitable environments and as possible repositories for the preservation of organic matter. Although organic matter has been detected at Gale Crater, Mars, its concentrations are lower than expected from meteoritic and indigenous igneous and hydrothermal reduced carbon. We conducted synthesis experiments motivated by the hypothesis that some clay mineral formation may have occurred under oxidized conditions conducive to the destruction of organics. Previous work has suggested that anoxic and/or reducing conditions are needed to synthesize the Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite at low temperatures. In contrast, our experiments demonstrated the rapid formation of Fe-rich clay minerals of variable crystallinity from aqueous Fe 3+ with small amounts of aqueous Mg 2+ . Our results suggest that Fe-rich clay minerals such as nontronite can form rapidly under oxidized conditions, which could help explain low concentrations of organics within some smectite-containing rocks or sediments on Mars.

  1. Clay mineral formation under oxidized conditions and implications for paleoenvironments and organic preservation on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainey, Seth R.; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Adcock, Christopher T.; Tschauner, Oliver; Hurowitz, Joel A.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Xiao, Yuming; Bartlett, Courtney L. (CIW); (UNLV); (CIT); (SBU)

    2017-11-01

    Clay mineral-bearing locations have been targeted for martian exploration as potentially habitable environments and as possible repositories for the preservation of organic matter. Although organic matter has been detected at Gale Crater, Mars, its concentrations are lower than expected from meteoritic and indigenous igneous and hydrothermal reduced carbon. We conducted synthesis experiments motivated by the hypothesis that some clay mineral formation may have occurred under oxidized conditions conducive to the destruction of organics. Previous work has suggested that anoxic and/or reducing conditions are needed to synthesize the Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite at low temperatures. In contrast, our experiments demonstrated the rapid formation of Fe-rich clay minerals of variable crystallinity from aqueous Fe3+ with small amounts of aqueous Mg2+. Our results suggest that Fe-rich clay minerals such as nontronite can form rapidly under oxidized conditions, which could help explain low concentrations of organics within some smectite-containing rocks or sediments on Mars.

  2. Characterization of Heat-treated Clay Minerals in the Context of Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, E. N.; Wang, Y.; Kruichak, J. N.; Mills, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Establishing the thermal limit for clay minerals in a nuclear waste repository is a potentially important component of repository design, as flexibility of the heat load within the repository can have a major impact on the selection of repository design. For example, the thermal limit plays a critical role in the time that waste packages would need to cool before being transferred to the repository. Understanding the chemical and physical changes, if any, that occur in clay minerals at various temperatures above the current thermal limit (of 100 °C) can enable decision-makers with information critical to evaluating the potential trade-offs of increasing the thermal limit within the repository. Most critical is gaining understanding of how varying thermal conditions in the repository will impact radionuclide sorption and transport in clay materials either as engineered barriers or as disposal media. A variety of repository-relevant clay minerals (illite, mixed layer illite/smectite, and montmorillonite), were heated for a range of temperatures between 100-1000 °C. These samples were characterized to determine surface area, mineralogical alteration, and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Our results show that for conditions up to 500 °C, no significant change occurs, so long as the clay mineral remains mineralogically intact. At temperatures above 500 °C, transformation of the layered silicates into silica phases leads to alteration that impacts important clay characteristics. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's Nation Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND Number: SAND2015-6524 A

  3. Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clay mineralogical studies on Bijawars of the Sonrai Basin: palaeoenvironmental implications and inferences on the uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Surendra Kumar; Shrivastava, J.P.; Bhairam, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Clays associated with the Precambrian unconformity-related (sensu lato) uranium mineralization that occur along fractures of Rohini carbonate, Bandai sandstone and clay-organic rich black carbonaceous Gorakalan shale of the Sonrai Formation from Bijawar Group is significant. Nature and structural complexity of these clays have been studied to understand depositional mechanism and palaeoenvironmental conditions responsible for the restricted enrichment of uranium in the Sonrai basin. Clays ( chlorite> illite > smectite mineral assemblages, whereas, Solda Formation contains kaolinite > illite > chlorite clays. It has been found that the former mineral assemblage resulted from the alteration process is associated with the uranium mineralization and follow progressive reaction series, indicating palaeoenvironmental (cycles of tropical humid to semi-arid/arid) changes prevailed during maturation of the Sonrai basin. The hydrothermal activity possibly associated with Kurrat volcanics is accountable for the clay mineral alterations

  5. Exploring biotic vs. abiotic controls on syngenetic carbonate and clay mineral precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Gabriela S.; McKenzie, Judith A.; Martinez Ruiz, Francisca; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2016-04-01

    A possible syngenetic relationship between carbonate and clay mineral precipitation has been reported for sedimentary rocks deposited in both lacustrine and marine sedimentary environments throughout the geological record. In particular, the mineral dolomite is often found associated with Mg-rich clays, such as stevensite. It is notable that this carbonate/clay association has been recorded in numerous samples taken from modern dolomite precipitating environments; for example, the Coorong lakes, South Australia, coastal sabkhas, Abu Dhabi, UAE and coastal hypersaline lagoons (Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho) east of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An HRTEM study of samples from these three locations indicates a possible physical/chemical association between the Ca-dolomite and Mg-rich clays, demonstrating a probable co-precipitation. To test this hypothesis, we have conducted a series of biotic and abiotic laboratory experiments. If this syngenesis actually occurs in nature, what, if any, are the biogeochemical processes controlling these precipitation reactions? Our experiments were designed to determine the extent of the biotic versus abiotic component influencing the mineral precipitation and, in the case of a biotic influence, to understand the mechanism through which microorganisms might mediate the formation of clay minerals. The experiments were carried out in the Geomicrobiology Laboratory of ETH Zürich using cultures of living microbes and artificial organic compounds that simulate functional groups present in natural biofilms formed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In addition, pure inorganic experiments were designed to understand possible physico-chemical conditions for diagenetic processes that could induce dissolution of Mg-carbonates and precipitation of Mg-rich clays. Our results show a remarkable biotic influence during the formation of clay minerals. Specifically, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), released by microbes in their

  6. Investigation of mineral composition of differently treated devonian, quaternary and triassic clays of Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosorukovs, A.; Viss, R.

    1999-01-01

    Clayey fractions (particle size less than 5 μm )of the Latvian Devonian (Kuprava and Liepa deposits), Quaternary (Laza and Ugale deposits) and Triassic (Akmene deposit, Republic of Lithuania) clays have been obtained. The clayey fractions were converted in the form in which all the cations were exchanged for magnesium ions. After the ion exchange the fractions were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide or glycerol in the course for two days, one sample being subjected to thermal treatment at 550±110 C for two hours. Diffractograms for the treated samples have been obtained using a DRON-2,0 diffractometer (Co-radiation). Analysis of the obtained diffractograms show that: 1) the main clayey minerals of the Devonian clays occur to be hydromicas (mainly hydromuscovite) containing admixtures of kaolinite and quartz; 2) the main clayey minerals of the Quarternary clays also occur to be hydromicas - mixtures of hydrobiotite and hydromuscovite containing admixtures of kaolinite and iron-containing chlorite; 3) smectite occurs to be the main mineral of the Triassic clay; it contains admixtures of hydromica and chlorite; 4) the Triassic and Quaternary clays contain fine- and coarse-grained carbonates, mainly calcite, in quantities of 10-16%; 5) iron and titanium are included in fine grained minerals. (author)

  7. Mineral potential of clays that cover the gypsum deposits in Araripina-PE region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, B.B.; Anjos, I.F. dos; Rego, S.A.B.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work the applicability of the clays that cover the deposits of Gypsum Plaster in the region of Araripina - PE for use as the ceramic pigments and for bricks production in the red ceramic industry was analyzed. The clay minerals contained the illite, kaolinite and smectite, with high proportion of the last one. The possibility of industrial application of this mineral clay is considerable; however, the mining industries that mine and process the gypsum in the region do not take the clays into account as the potential mineral. In general, industries use the clay minerals in manufacturing processes or as key raw materials, or as the alternatives for some kinds of the chemical processing industries. This paper aims to highlight the potential of materials that cover the deposits of gypsum in reference. The material sampled from different deposit layers was characterized and the physical treatment of ore was applied. The results showed that the material analyzed can be used in various kinds of industry, such as the production of natural ceramic pigments. (author)

  8. Atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Wu, Lingling; Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L; Johnson, Clark M; Rosso, Kevin M; Frierdich, Andrew J; Scherer, Michelle M

    2015-03-03

    Due to their stability toward reductive dissolution, Fe-bearing clay minerals are viewed as a renewable source of Fe redox activity in diverse environments. Recent findings of interfacial electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe in clay minerals and electron conduction in octahedral sheets of nontronite, however, raise the question whether Fe interaction with clay minerals is more dynamic than previously thought. Here, we use an enriched isotope tracer approach to simultaneously trace Fe atom movement from the aqueous phase to the solid ((57)Fe) and from the solid into the aqueous phase ((56)Fe). Over 6 months, we observed a significant decrease in aqueous (57)Fe isotope fraction, with a fast initial decrease which slowed after 3 days and stabilized after about 50 days. For the aqueous (56)Fe isotope fraction, we observed a similar but opposite trend, indicating that Fe atom movement had occurred in both directions: from the aqueous phase into the solid and from the solid into aqueous phase. We calculated that 5-20% of structural Fe in clay minerals NAu-1, NAu-2, and SWa-1 exchanged with aqueous Fe(II), which significantly exceeds the Fe atom layer exposed directly to solution. Calculations based on electron-hopping rates in nontronite suggest that the bulk conduction mechanism previously demonstrated for hematite1 and suggested as an explanation for the significant Fe atom exchange observed in goethite2 may be a plausible mechanism for Fe atom exchange in Fe-bearing clay minerals. Our finding of 5-20% Fe atom exchange in clay minerals indicates that we need to rethink how Fe mobility affects the macroscopic properties of Fe-bearing phyllosilicates and its role in Fe biogeochemical cycling, as well as its use in a variety of engineered applications, such as landfill liners and nuclear repositories.

  9. In-situ nanoscale imaging of clay minerals with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosbach, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay minerals play a key role in many concepts for high-level nuclear waste repository systems in deep geological formations. Various aspects related to the long-term safety of nuclear disposal are linked to their fundamental physical-chemical properties, in particular with respect to their reactivity in aqueous environments. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows high resolution imaging of clay minerals in-situ while they are exposed to an aqueous solution. The presentation is intended to provide an overview of examples of AFM studies on clay minerals: 1. AFM is an ideal tool to visualize the shape of individual clay particles down to molecular scales including a quantitative description of for example their aspect ratio. Furthermore, the particle size can be easily extracted from AFM data for individual particles as well as particle size distribution. 2. Surface area of clay minerals is a key issue when discussing heterogeneous reactions such as dissolution, adsorption or (surface) precipitation - total surface area, BET surface area, reactive surface area need to be distinguished. In particular reactive surface area is linked to specific reactive surface sites. AFM is of course able to identify such sites and consequently AFM data allow to characterize and to quantify reactive surface area. 3. The reactivity of clay mineral surfaces in aqueous environments controls the behaviour of clay minerals under repository conditions and also affects the migration/retention of radionuclides. It could be shown that the dissolution of smectite particles under acidic conditions at room temperature primarily occurs at (hk0) particle edges, whereas the reactivity of the (001) basal surfaces is very limited. The heterogeneous (surface) precipitation of secondary iron (hydr)oxides phase could be unraveled by AFM observations. Surface precipitation occurs preferentially at (hk0) edges surfaces. Ignoring the surface site specific

  10. Role of clay minerals in the formation of atmospheric aggregates of Saharan dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadros, Javier; Diaz-Hernandez, José L.; Sanchez-Navas, Antonio; Garcia-Casco, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Saharan dust can travel long distances in different directions across the Atlantic and Europe, sometimes in episodes of high dust concentration. In recent years it has been discovered that Saharan dust aerosols can aggregate into large, approximately spherical particles of up to 100 μm generated within raindrops that then evaporate, so that the aggregate deposition takes place most times in dry conditions. These aerosol aggregates are an interesting phenomenon resulting from the interaction of mineral aerosols and atmospheric conditions. They have been termed "iberulites" due to their discovery and description from aerosol deposits in the Iberian Peninsula. Here, these aggregates are further investigated, in particular the role of the clay minerals in the aggregation process of aerosol particles. Iberulites, and common aerosol particles for reference, were studied from the following periods or single dust events and locations: June 1998 in Tenerife, Canary Islands; June 2001 to August 2002, Granada, Spain; 13-20 August 2012, Granada; and 1-6 June 2014, Granada. Their mineralogy, chemistry and texture were analysed using X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, SEM and TEM. The mineral composition and structure of the iberulites consists of quartz, carbonate and feldspar grains surrounded by a matrix of clay minerals (illite, smectite and kaolinite) that also surrounds the entire aggregate. Minor phases, also distributed homogenously within the iberulites, are sulfates and Fe oxides. Clays are apparently more abundant in the iberulites than in the total aerosol deposit, suggesting that iberulite formation concentrates clays. Details of the structure and composition of iberulites differ from descriptions of previous samples, which indicates dependence on dust sources and atmospheric conditions, possibly including anthropic activity. Iberulites are formed by coalescence of aerosol mineral particles captured by precursor water droplets. The concentration of

  11. Climatic control on clay mineral formation: Evidence from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are the most important factors that determine kinetics of chemical weathering. Mineral alteration ... perature, pressure and microbial activity. Among various factors ... physical factor) and rainfall (a chemical factor). (Velde 1992, p. 118).

  12. Color measurement of methylene blue dye/clay mixtures and its application using economical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Maja; Kaludjerovic, Lazar; Logar, Mihovil

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the clay mineral components of clay materials by staining tests is rapid and simple, but their applicability is restricted because of the mutual interference of the common components of clay materials and difficulties in color determination. The change of color with concentration of the dye is related to the use of colorants as a field test for identifying clay minerals and has been improved over the years to assure the accuracy of the tests (Faust G. T., 1940). The problem of measurement and standardization of color may be solved by combination of colors observed in staining tests with prepared charts of color chips available in the Munsell Book of Color, published by Munsell Color Co. Under a particular set of illumination conditions, a human eye can achieve an approximate match between the color of the dyed clay sample and that of a standard color chip, even though they do have different spectral reflectance characteristics. Experiments were carried out with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy on selected clay samples (three montmorillonite, three kaolinite and one mix-layer clay samples) saturated with different concentration of methylene blue dye solution. Dominant wavelength and purity of the color was obtained on oriented dry samples and calculated by use of the I. C. I. (x, y) - diagram in the region of 400-700 nm (reflectance spectra) without MB and after saturation with different concentrations of MB solutions. Samples were carefully photographed in the natural light environment and processed with user friendly and easily accessible applications (Adobe color CC and ColorHexa encyclopedia) available for android phones or tablets. Obtained colors were compared with Munsell standard color chips, RGB and Hexa color standards. Changes in the color of clay samples in their interaction with different concentration of the applied dye together with application of economical methods can still be used as a rapid fieldwork test. Different types of clay

  13. X-ray-phase and IR-spectral study of clay rocks mineral content of the Caspian Sea Gulf depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakonov, A.N.; Mukhanova, M.U.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of clays selected from different oil fields (Sazankurak, Kemerkol, Kozha and others) and deposition depths are examined on both the X-ray diffractometers (Dron-2 and Dron-4) and the infrared-spectrometers (IR-20). In this diagnostic the American file with different minerals X-ray systematized data is used. The X-ray reflections, which are in compliance with suitable inter-plane distances and clay impurities reflex intensities are determined. With confirmation purpose for mineral content correctness obtained according X-ray-phase analysis the infrared-spectrometric method is used, in which principal attention was paid to absorption field (3,400-3,700 cm -1 ) of H 2 O and OH valency frequency vibrations

  14. Surveying Clay Mineral Diversity in the Murray Formation, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T.F.; Blake, D. F..; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W..; Morrison, S. M.; Yen, A. S.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The CheMin XRD instrument aboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has documented clay minerals in various drill samples during its traverse of Gale Crater's floor and ascent of Mt. Sharp. The most recent samples, named Marimba, Quela and Sebina were acquired from the Murray Formation in the Murray Buttes region of lower Mt. Sharp. Marimba and Quela come from a approx. 30 m package of finely laminated lacustrine mudstones. Sebina comes from an overlying package of heterolithic mudstone-sandstones. Clay minerals make up approx.15-25 wt.% of the bulk rock with similar contributions to XRD patterns in all three samples. Broad basal reflections at approx. 10deg 2(theta) CoK(alpha) indicate the presence of 2:1 group clay minerals. The 02(lambda) clay mineral band lies at approx. 22.9deg 2(theta), a region typically occupied by Fe-bearing dioctahedral 2:1 clay minerals like nontronite or Fe-illite. The low humidity within the CheMin instrument, which is open to the martian atmosphere, promotes loss of interlayer H2O and collapse of smectite interlayers making them difficult to distinguish from illites. However, based on the low K content of the bulk samples, it appears that smectitic clay minerals are dominant. Peak dehydroxylation of the Marimba sample measured by the SAM instrument on MSL occurred at 610C and 780C. Fe-bearing smectites are not consistent with these dehydroxylation temperatures. Thus, we suggest that a mixture of dioctahedral and trioctahedral smectite phases are present giving the appearance of intermediate octahedral occupancy in XRD. Dioctahedral smectites have not previously been reported in Gale Crater by MSL. Earlier in the mission, relatively clay mineral rich samples (approx. 20 wt.%) from lacustrine mudstones in Yellowknife Bay (YKB) were found to contain ferrian saponites. It is proposed that YKB saponites formed via isochemical aqueous alteration of detrital olivine close to the time of sediment deposition, under anoxic to poorly oxidizing

  15. Treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste solution by natural clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dessouky, M.I.; El-Massry, E.H.; Khalifa, S.M.; Aly, H.F.

    1999-01-01

    Natural inorganic exchangers. Was used to remove caesium, cobalt and europium using zinc sulfate as coagulant also different clay minerals. These calys include, feldrspare, aswanly, bentionite, hematite, mud, calcite, basalt, magnetite, kaoline sand stone, limonite and sand. The factros affecting the removal process namely PH, particle size, temperature and weight of the clay have been studied. Highest removal for Cs-137, Co-60 and Eu-152 and 154 was achived by asswanly and bentonite. Sand stone is more effective than the other clays. Removal of Cs-137 from low level waste solution is in the order the sequence, aswanly (85.5%)> bentonite (82.2%)> sandstone (65.4%). Solidified cement products have been evaluated to determine optimum conditions of mixing most sludges contained clays by testing mechanical strength and leaching rates of the waste products. The solidified waste forms were found more acceptable for handing, storage and ultimate disposal

  16. Heterogeneous uptake of the C1 to C4 organic acids on a swelling clay mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Tolbert

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mineral aerosol is of interest due to its physiochemical impacts on the Earth's atmosphere. However, adsorbed organics could influence the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric mineral particles and alter their impact on the biosphere and climate. In this work, the heterogeneous uptake of a series of small organic acids on the swelling clay, Na-montmorillonite, was studied at 212 K as a function of relative humidity (RH, organic acid pressure and clay mass. A high vacuum chamber equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer and a transmission Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was used to detect the gas and condensed phases, respectively. Our results show that while the initial uptake efficiency was found to be independent of organic acid pressure, it increased linearly with increasing clay mass. Thus, the small masses studied allow access to the entire surface area of the clay sample with minimal effects due to surface saturation. Additionally, results from this study show that the initial uptake efficiency for butanoic (butyric acid on the clay increases by an order of magnitude as the RH is raised from 0% to 45% RH at 212 K while the initial uptake efficiency of formic, acetic and propanoic (propionic acids increases only slightly at higher humidities. However, the initial uptake efficiency decreases significantly in a short amount of time due to surface saturation effects. Thus, although the initial uptake efficiencies are appropriate for initial times, the fact that the uptake efficiency will decrease over time as the surface saturates should be considered in atmospheric models. Surface saturation results in sub-monolayer coverage of organic acid on montmorillonite under dry conditions and relevant organic acid pressures that increases with increasing humidity for all organic acids studied. Additionally, the presence of large organic acids may slightly enhance the water content of the clay above 45% RH. Our results indicate

  17. Selenium containing clays minerals as additive for the discoloration of glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, K.; Limpt, J.A.C. van; Fischer, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    While selenium is applied as decolorizing agent for flint container glass or tableware glass, the retention of selenium in glass however is very low. Generally more than 75% of the total selenium input sublimes from the glass melt and leaves the clay minerals due to the high volatility of

  18. Spatial distribution and longitudinal variation of clay minerals in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.

    in the Central Indian Basin (CIB). The average sand content in the basin is 3.8%, which decreases systematically and longitudinally to 0.3% towards south. The average illite and chlorite major clay mineral abundance also decrease southwards along the four...

  19. THE STUDYING OF COLLOIDAL-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF CLAY MINERALS DISPERSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Tymchuk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The element structure is studied, the microscopic analysis of fine-dispersed min­eral systems (ground sediments of a mouth of the river Danube is carried out. The sedimentation process of clay minerals dispersions in solutions of surfactants and macromolecular substances is studied. Concentration intervals of stabilization of investigating dispersions were defined.

  20. Sedimentological and clay mineral studies in Kakinada Bay, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.

    are of sandy sediments (2.9 to 3.05 phi). Interrelationships of size statistical parameters and the CM diagram of the bay sediments suggest a mechanism of slow deposition from quiet water. Montmorillonite is the predominant clay mineral followed by kaolinite...

  1. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  2. Clay mineral distribution in the continental shelf and slope off Saurashtra, West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    Clay mineral distribution in the sediments of the west coast of India indicates that the illite and chlorite-rich sediments, derived from the Indus, occupy the continental shelf of the northern part of the Gulf of Kutch. Montmorillonite derived from...

  3. Development of the methodology of sample preparation to X-ray diffractometry of clay minerals at Petrobras Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Various procedures can be used in the analysis of the clay mineral content of rocks by X-ray diffraction. This article describes the principal ones and discusses those adopted in the X-ray clay mineral laboratory of the PETROBRAS Research Center (CENPES) in Rio de Janeiro. This article presents the methodology used and provides users with information about its application and limitations. The methodology has been developed to study polymineral samples. The aim to identify clay mineral groups and to estimate their relative proportions. Of the four main steps of this analysis - separation and concentration of clay minerals, preparation of oriented specimens, X-ray irradiation under standard conditions and interpretation of X-ray diffraction patterns - only the first three are discussed here. Clay minerals occur mainly in the [pt

  4. The Efficacy of the clay meat ball as a method of traditional meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: meat ball, protein, mineral content. This work was carried out to determine the effectiveness of the use of clay meat balls (an African traditional method of preserving meat) in extending the shelf life of meat over a period of months against microbial (bacterial and fungal) spoilage and contamination without ...

  5. Comparison studies adsorption of thorium and uranium on pure clay minerals and local Malaysian soil sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    Adsorption studies of thorium and uranium radionuclides on 9 different pure clay minerals and 4 local Malaysian soil sediments were conducted. Solution containing dissolved thorium and uranium at pH 4.90 was prepared from concentrate sludges from a long term storage facility at a local mineral processing plant. The sludges are considered as low level radioactive wastes. The results indicated that the 9 clay minerals adsorbed more uranium than thorium at pH ranges from 3.74 to 5.74. Two local Malaysian soils were observed to adsorb relatively high concentration of both radionuclides at pH 3.79 to 3.91. The adsorption value 23.27 to 27.04 ppm for uranium and 33.1 to 50.18 ppm for thorium indicated that both soil sediments can be considered as potential enhanced barrier material for sites disposing conditioned wastes containing uranium and thorium. (author)

  6. Adsorption of Dissolved Gases (CH4, CO2, H2, Noble Gases) by Water-Saturated Smectite Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, I. C.; Gadikota, G.; Dazas, B.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of dissolved gases by water-saturated clay minerals plays important roles in a range of fields. For example, gas adsorption in on clay minerals may significantly impact the formation of CH4 hydrates in fine-grained sediments, the behavior of CH4 in shale, CO2 leakage across caprocks of geologic CO2 sequestration sites, H2 leakage across engineered clay barriers of high-level radioactive waste repositories, and noble gas geochemistry reconstructions of hydrocarbon migration in the subsurface. Despite its importance, the adsorption of gases on clay minerals remains poorly understood. For example, some studies have suggested that clay surfaces promote the formation of CH4 hydrates, whereas others indicate that clay surfaces inhibit the formation of CH4 hydrates. Here, we present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the adsorption of a range of gases (CH4, CO2, H2, noble gases) on clay mineral surfaces. Our results indicate that the affinity of dissolved gases for clay mineral surfaces has a non-monotone dependence on the hydrated radius of the gas molecules. This non-monotone dependence arises from a combination of two effects: the polar nature of certain gas molecules (in particular, CO2) and the templating of interfacial water structure by the clay basal surface, which results in the presence of interfacial water "cages" of optimal size for intermediate-size gas molecules (such as Ne or Ar).

  7. First principles molecular dynamics insight into acid-base chemistry of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiandong; Lu, Xiancai; Wang, Rucheng; Meijer, Evert Jan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Microscopic knowledge on the interfaces between clay minerals (2:1- and 1:1-type) and water is critical for both understanding natural processes and guiding development of advanced hybrid materials. Due to the unique layered structures of clay minerals, their surfaces are usually grouped into basal surfaces and edge surfaces (i.e. broken surfaces). Thanks to previous studies, structures and properties of basal surfaces have been well recognized: these surfaces are terminated with siloxanes and surface Si-O six-member rings normally act as the adsorbing sites of cations. In contrast, edge surfaces are more complicated structures and have more subtle chemical properties. On these surfaces, there are a lot of dangling bonds and under ambient conditions they are usually saturated by chemically adsorbed waters. These edge groups are usually amphoteric, which is responsible to the pH dependent behaviors of many interfacial processes, such as cations complexing. For example, adsorption of heavy metal cations (e.g. Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cd 2+ ) on clay basal surfaces is through cation exchange mechanism and that is hardly influenced by environmental pH. In contrast, it has been well accepted that the adsorption on edge surfaces is pH-dependent. The ubiquitous isomorphic substitutions further increase the complexity of their interfacial chemistry. Due to the high heterogeneity and rather small sizes, it is quite difficult to reveal the complex interfacial chemistry with experiments alone. FPMD method (first principles molecular dynamics), a combination of density functional theory and molecular dynamics, can provide valuable information. With FPMD [1, 2] and free-energy calculation techniques [3, 4], we investigated the microscopic structures and acid chemistry of these clay-water interfaces [5, 6]. According to systematic simulations, the following has been achieved. (1) Acidity of interlayer waters. The simulations show

  8. Clay mineral association in the salt formation of the Transylvanian Basin and its paleoenvironmental significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Bican-Bris̡an

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The investigated clay fraction was separated from salt samples recovered from three boreholes located in the Praid salt deposit area. For comparison, samples collected from Turda deposit (Franz Josef adit, the Rudolf and Ghizele chambers and from the salt massif from Sărăţel were also analyzed. The qualitative investigations evidenced a clay minerals association dominated by illite and chlorite accompanied by subordinate amounts of kaolinite, smectite, fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite, and in minor amounts, by 14/14 chlorite/vermiculite and chlorite/smectite interstratifications. A quantitative evaluation (% including a standard graphical representation was performed only for the borehole samples (Praid, according to the vertical distribution. The genetical interpretation of the identified clay minerals association took into account the influence of the sedimentation mechanisms and the climate control on the mineral phases. The environment of formation for the salt in the Transylvanian Basin was defined by the presence of specific climatic factors, also suggested by the palynological investigations.

  9. Clay mineral distribution and provenance in the Heuksan mud belt, Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyen Goo; Kim, Soon-Oh; Kwak, Kyeong Yoon; Choi, Hunsoo; Khim, Boo-Keun

    2015-12-01

    The Heuksan mud belt (HMB), located in the southeastern Yellow Sea, runs parallel to the southwest coast of Korea. In this study, the distribution and relative contribution of four major clay minerals are investigated using 101 surface sediment samples collected in the course of KIOST (2001, 2010, 2011) and KIGAM (2012) cruises, as well as 33 river sediment samples (four from the Huanghe River, three from the Changjiang River, and 26 from Korean rivers) in order to clarify the provenance of fine-grained sediments in the HMB. Based on this currently largest and most robust dataset available for interpretation, the clay mineral assemblages of the fine-grained sediments in the HMB are found to be on average composed of 64.7% illite, 17.9% chlorite, 11.4% kaolinite, and 5.9% smectite. Overall, the clay mineral assemblages are similar in both the northern and the southern parts of the HMB, although smectite seems to be relatively enriched in the southern part, whereas kaolinite is slightly more dominant in the northern part. This clearly indicates that the clays are mostly derived from Korean rivers and, in the southern part of the HMB, partly also from the Huanghe River in China. The new data thus confirm and strengthen the tentative interpretation of some earlier work based on a more limited dataset.

  10. Water-mineral interaction in hygromechanics of clays exposed to environmental loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueckel, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    Water-mineral interaction in narrow interstices (<3 nm) in dense, saturated clays is discussed in view of recent experimental findings and molecular dynamics simulations. Consequences to the macroscopic behavior are considered. A mixture theory for two interacting constituents is developed. Effects of temperature and chemicals are discussed. A postulate of mass transfer of absorbed water from solid to fluid fraction caused by thermal or chemical load is then discussed. Theory of plasticity of clays affected by heat or chemicals is developed to deal with the effects of thermal and chemical consolidation

  11. Evaluation of mineral kaolinite present in portuguese clays for use in porcelain stoneware; Avaliacao do mineral caulinita presente em argilas portuguesas para uso em gres porcelanato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna da Silveira, G.C. [Instituto Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (IFRN), RN (Brazil); Acchar, W.; Gomes, U.U.; Luna da Silveira, R.V. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grnde do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil); Labrincha, A.; Miranda, C.M.P., E-mail: glebacoelli@hotmail.com [Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-07-01

    Kaolinite is a mineral from the kaolin, product resulting from transformation in depth of alumino silicate mineral type, such as feldspars, plagioclase and feldspars contained in the rocks. Clays are raw materials that have as main characteristic the plasticity property, which gives the product, after applying a certain pressure, a defined shape and an increase in the mechanical resistance when they become from green to dry and then to sintered. Given these characteristics, this paper analyzes the presence of the existing mineral kaolinite in two portuguese clays who are used in the preparation of formulations of porcelain stoneware tiles. The analyzes of the two clays were made by fluorescence x-ray diffraction of x-rays, thermal analysis, particle size and scanning electron microscopy, to better use of this mineral in the formulations. In both clays were found aluminum oxide, as well as mineral quartz, kaolinite and illite. (author)

  12. Subsurface water and clay mineral formation during the early history of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Bethany L; Mustard, John F; Murchie, Scott L; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Alain; Fraeman, Abigail A; Langevin, Yves

    2011-11-02

    Clay minerals, recently discovered to be widespread in Mars's Noachian terrains, indicate long-duration interaction between water and rock over 3.7 billion years ago. Analysis of how they formed should indicate what environmental conditions prevailed on early Mars. If clays formed near the surface by weathering, as is common on Earth, their presence would indicate past surface conditions warmer and wetter than at present. However, available data instead indicate substantial Martian clay formation by hydrothermal groundwater circulation and a Noachian rock record dominated by evidence of subsurface waters. Cold, arid conditions with only transient surface water may have characterized Mars's surface for over 4 billion years, since the early-Noachian period, and the longest-duration aqueous, potentially habitable environments may have been in the subsurface.

  13. Clay mineral facies and lateritization in basalts of the southeastern Parana Basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.T.G. de; Formoso, M.L.L.; Trescases, J.J.; Meunier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Seventeen samples from two lateritic profiles, each with five facies, were studied. These profiles occur on the old planation surface of the plateau basalts of the southern part of ParanáBasin, Brazil. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, Mössbauer spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra were used to obtain information about the nature and chemical composition of each weathering facies. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and analyses of clay minerals were performed to detect microcrystalline environmental changes. Both profiles have two major parts: a loose red-clay latosol separated from an underlying mottled clay and an alterite facies; a stone line may or may not be present between the latosol and the underlying units. In both profiles the latosol consists principally of kaolinite, hematite and goethite. Two alterite facies, shaped by differential weathering, are also present in the lower profile: a halloysite–nontronite clayey matrix with a well developed fissure system occurs in the argillaceous alterite and a network of Al–goethite aggregates is typical of the highly porous cortex of the boulder alterite that is found in the stone line and below it. Gibbsite has crystallized in the large pores of porphyritic boulder alterite but is absent in the small pores of the subaphyric boulder alterite. Clay minerals observed in fissures include halloysite associated with goethite and manganese oxides. The basalt has hydrothermal green-clays (mixed layers and trioctahedral smectites) that formed between primary plagioclase, pyroxene and Ti–magnetite crystals while fresh corestones of the boulder alterite have cryptocrystalline iron-rich material. The study of these profiles shows one principal evolutionary trend for clay minerals. This trend is from smectite and mixed layers that form green clays in altered bedrock at the base of the profile to an intermediate association of nontronite and halloysite in the argillaceous

  14. [Rapid determination of major and trace elements in the salt lake clay minerals by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Huan; Meng, Qing-Fen; Dong, Ya-Ping; Chen, Mei-Da; Li, Wu

    2010-03-01

    A rapid multi-element analysis method for clay mineral samples was described. This method utilized a polarized wave-length dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer--Axios PW4400, which had a maximum tube power of 4 000 watts. The method was developed for the determination of As, Mn, Co, Cu, Cr, Dy, Ga, Mo, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sr, Ni, ,Cs, Ta, Th, Ti, U, V, Y, Zn, Zr, MgO, K2O, Na2O, CaO, Fe2O3, Al2O3, SiO2 and so on. Thirty elements in clay mineral species were measured by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with pressed powder pellets. Spectral interferences, in particular the indirect interferences of each element, were studied. A method to distinguish the interference between each other periodic elements in element periodic table was put forward. The measuring conditions and existence were mainly investigated, and the selected background position as well as corrected spectral overlap for the trace elements were also discussed. It was found that the indirect spectral overlap line was the same important as direct spectral overlap line. Due to inducing the effect of indirect spectral overlap, some elements jlike Bi, Sn, W which do not need analysis were also added to the elements channel. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was in the range of 0.01% to 5.45% except three elements Mo, Cs and Ta. The detection limits, precisions and accuracies for most elements using this method can meet the requirements of sample analysis in clay mineral species.

  15. Competitive sorption between glyphosphate and inorganic phosphate on clay minerals and low organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, H.M.; Hill, H.H.Jr.; Washington State Univ., Pullmann, WA; Harsh, J.B.; Washington State Univ., Pullmann, WA

    2001-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate may influence the adsorption of glyphosate to soil surface sites. It has been postulated that glyphosphate sorption is dominated by the phosphoric acid moiety, therefore, inorganic phosphate could compete with glyphosate for surface sorption sites. Sorption of glyphosate is examined in low organic carbon systems where clay minerals dominate the available adsorption sites using 32 P-labeled phosphate and 14 C-labeled glyphosate to track sorption. Glyphosate sorption was found to be strongly dependent on phosphate additions. Isotherms were generally of the L type, which is consistent with a limited number of surface sites. Most sorption on whole soils could be accounted for by sorption observed on model clays of the same mineral type as found in the soils. (author)

  16. An update on synthetic dyes adsorption onto clay based minerals: A state-of-art review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngulube, T

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available of Environmental Management An update on synthetic dyes adsorption onto clay based minerals: A state- of-art review Tholiso Ngulube a,*, Jabulani Ray Gumbo b, Vhahangwele Masindi c,d, Arjun Maity e a Department of Ecology and Resources Management..., University of Venda, Private Bag X5050, Thohoyandou, 0950, Limpopo, South Africa b Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Venda, Private Bag X5050, Thohoyandou, 0950, Limpopo, South Africa c Council...

  17. Application of short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectroscopy in quantitative estimation of clay mineral contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jinfeng; Xing, Lixin; Pan, Jun; Meng, Tao; Liang, Liheng

    2014-01-01

    Clay minerals are significant constituents of soil which are necessary for life. This paper studied three types of clay minerals, kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite, for they are not only the most common soil forming materials, but also important indicators of soil expansion and shrinkage potential. These clay minerals showed diagnostic absorption bands resulting from vibrations of hydroxyl groups and structural water molecules in the SWIR wavelength region. The short-wave infrared reflectance spectra of the soil was obtained from a Portable Near Infrared Spectrometer (PNIS, spectrum range: 1300∼2500 nm, interval: 2 nm). Due to the simplicity, quickness, and the non-destructiveness analysis, SWIR spectroscopy has been widely used in geological prospecting, chemical engineering and many other fields. The aim of this study was to use multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression to establish the optimizing quantitative estimation models of the kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite contents from soil reflectance spectra. Here, the soil reflectance spectra mainly refers to the spectral reflectivity of soil (SRS) corresponding to the absorption-band position (AP) of kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite representative spectra from USGS spectral library, the SRS corresponding to the AP of soil spectral and soil overall spectrum reflectance values. The optimal estimation models of three kinds of clay mineral contents showed that the retrieval accuracy was satisfactory (Kaolinite content: a Root Mean Square Error of Calibration (RMSEC) of 1.671 with a coefficient of determination (R 2 ) of 0.791; Illite content: a RMSEC of 1.126 with a R 2 of 0.616; Montmorillonite content: a RMSEC of 1.814 with a R 2 of 0.707). Thus, the reflectance spectra of soil obtained form PNIS could be used for quantitative estimation of kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite contents in soil

  18. Effect of clay minerals on the stabilization of black cotton and lateritic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyambok, I.O.

    1986-01-01

    The problem associated with black cotton and lateritic soils because of the swelling-shrinkage property of their constituent clay minerals were investigated. Samples of black cotton lateritic soils were collected from different parts of Kenya. The samples were analysed for their mineral compositions and later treated with hydrated lime in order to eliminate the swelling shrinkage behaviour. The samples were subsequently tested for their engineering properties in a soil mechanics laboratory using shear box and Casagrande apparatus. It was found that the chemical treatment of the soils with hydrated lime removes their plastic property and improves their shear strength. (author)

  19. Cathodoluminescence (CL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetze, J.; Ploetze, M.; Goette, T.; Neuser, R.D.; Richter, D.K.

    2002-01-01

    Sheet silicates of the serpentine-kaolin-group (serpentine, kaolinite, dickite, nacrite, halloysite), the talc-pyrophyllite-group (talc, pyrophyllite), the smectite-group (montmorillonite), and illite (as a mineral of the mica-group) were investigated to obtain information concerning their cathodoluminescence behavior. The study included analyses by cathodoluminescence (CL microscopy and spectroscopy), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and trace element analysis. In general, all dioctahedral clay minerals exhibit a visible CL. Kaolinite, dickite, nacrite and pyrophyllite have a characteristic deep blue CL, whereas halloysite emission is in the greenish-blue region. On the contrary, the trioctahedral minerals (serpentine, talc) and illite do not show visible CL. The characteristic blue CL is caused by an intense emission band around 400 nm (double peak with two maxima at 375 and 410 nm). EPR measurements indicate that his blue emission can be related to radiation induced defect centers (RID), which occur as electron holes trapped on apical oxygen (Si-O center) or located at the Al-O-Al group (Al substituting Si in the tetrahedron). Additional CL emission bands were detected at 580 nm in halloysite and kaolinite, and between 700 and 800 nm in kaolinite, dickite, nacrite and pyrophyllite. Time-resolved spectral CL measurements show typical luminescence kinetics for the different clay minerals, which enable differentiation between the various dioctahedral minerals (e.g. kaolinite and dickite), even in thin section. (author)

  20. Sodium-calcium ion exchange on clay minerals at moderate to high ionic strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, W.J.

    1979-12-01

    Sodium-calcium ion exchange on several clay minerals was studied at ionic strengths ranging from 0.01 to above 1.0. The minerals studied included attapulgite, illite, kaolin, and several montmorillonites. Distribution coefficients of calcium and sodium were obtained for the minerals over a wide range of solution conditions at pH five and equilibrium constants were calculated. The distribution coefficient of calcium, D/sub Ca/, was studied as a function of time, solution pH, loading, sodium concentration, and ionic strength fraction of sodium in constant ionic strength solutions. The distribution coefficient of sodium, D/sub Na/, was also studied as a function of time, loading, and sodium ionic strength fraction in constant total ionic strength solutions. Values of equilibrium constants calculated from distribution coefficients for solutions of constant ionic strength scattered bwteen 2 and 10 kg/kg for the montmorillonites and attapulgite while equilibrium constants for illite ranged from 5 to 10 kg/kg. No equilibrium constants for kaolin were calculated since distribution coefficients of sodium on this clay were too small to be measured. It was found that equilibrium constants at trace sodium loading were generally lower than those for higher sodium loadings by an order of magnitude or more due to the sensitivity of sodium distribution coefficients to the concentration of sodium in the clay at low loadings. Theoretical and experimental treatments of ion exclusion were included

  1. Rates and time scales of clay-mineral formation by weathering in saprolitic regoliths of the southern Appalachians from geochemical mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason R. Price; Michael A. Velbel; Lina C. Patino

    2005-01-01

    Rates of clay formation in three watersheds located at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, western North Carolina, have been determined from solute flux-based mass balance methods. A system of mass balance equations with enough equations and unknowns to allow calculation of secondary mineral formation rates as well as the more commonly determined primary-...

  2. Evaluation of the bleaching flux in clays containing hematite and different clay minerals; Avaliacao do fundente descolorante em argilas contendo hematita e diferentes argilominerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Junior, E.M.; Lusa, T.; Silva, T.M.; Medeiros, B.B.; Santos, G.R. dos [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (DAMEC/UFTPR), Pato Branco, PR (Brazil); Morelli, M.R., E-mail: geocrisr@utfpr.edu.com, E-mail: morelli@power.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/PPGCEM/UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the addition of a synthetic flux in a clay mineral constituted by illite phase in the presence of iron oxide with the hematite, promotes color change of the firing products, making the reddish color firing into whiteness. This flow is constituted of a vitreous phase of the silicates family obtained by fusion/solidification of oxides and carbonates. Thus, the objective of this work was that of studying the interaction of the iron element in the final color mechanism of the different types of mineral crystal phase of the clays. In order to study the phenomenon, we obtained different compositions between the select clays and the synthetic flow, and characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and visual analysis. The results showed that the action of the synthetic flow as a modifying agent for color depends on the mineral crystal phase of the clays. The color firing modification does not occur in the clays content high levels of kaolinite mineral phase. (author)

  3. Clay mineral distribution in the shelf sediments off the northern part of the east coast of india

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, Ch.M.

    Forty-eight sediment samples from the continental shelf between Visakhapatnam and the Ganges were analysed by X-ray diffraction for the composition and distribution of clay minerals. Estuarine samples of the Hooghly are dominated by illite...

  4. Clay minerals trap hydrogen in the Earth's crust: Evidence from the Cigar Lake uranium deposit, Athabasca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truche, Laurent; Joubert, Gilles; Dargent, Maxime; Martz, Pierre; Cathelineau, Michel; Rigaudier, Thomas; Quirt, David

    2018-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2)-rich fluids are observed in a wide variety of geologic settings including gas seeps in serpentinized ultramafic rocks, sub-seafloor hydrothermal vents, fracture networks in crystalline rocks from continental and oceanic crust, and volcanic gases. Natural hydrogen sources can sustain deep microbial ecosystems, induce abiotic hydrocarbons synthesis and trigger the formation of prebiotic organic compounds. However, due to its extreme mobility and small size, hydrogen is not easily trapped in the crust. If not rapidly consumed by redox reactions mediated by bacteria or suitable mineral catalysts it diffuses through the rocks and migrates toward the surface. Therefore, H2 is not supposed to accumulate in the crust. We challenge this view by demonstrating that significant amount of H2 may be adsorbed by clay minerals and remain trapped beneath the surface. Here, we report for the first time H2 content in clay-rich rocks, mainly composed of illite, chlorite, and kaolinite from the Cigar Lake uranium ore deposit (northern Saskatchewan, Canada). Thermal desorption measurements reveal that H2 is enriched up to 500 ppm (i.e. 0.25 mol kg-1 of rock) in these water-saturated rocks having a very low total organic content (reported elsewhere for pure clay minerals or shales. Sudoite (Al-Mg di-trioctahedral chlorite) is probably the main mineral responsible for H2 adsorption in the present case. The presence of multiple binding sites in interlinked nanopores between crystal layers of illite-chlorite particles offers the ideal conditions for hydrogen sorption. We demonstrate that 4 to 17% of H2 produced by water radiolysis over the 1.4-Ga-lifetime of the Cigar Lake uranium ore deposit has been trapped in the surrounding clay alteration haloes. As a result, sorption processes on layered silicates must not be overlooked as they may exert an important control on the fate and mobility of H2 in the crust. Furthermore, the high capacity of clay minerals to sorb molecular

  5. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1993-06-01

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 ± 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area

  6. Provenance and distribution of clay minerals in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Rao, B.R.

    -Goa (93 samples) For the convenience of description, the Saurashtra-Goa region has been divided into the Saurashtra, Gulf of Cambay-Ratnagiri and Ratnagiri-Goa sectors based on variations in clay mineral abundances. The boundaries between these sectors... are approximate and variations in the mineral abundances tend to grade one to the other. Smectite is the most abundant mineral in the inner shelf sediments of all the sectors [Fig. 3(Ba), 3(Ca) and Provenance and distribution of clay minerals 1763 0 Sm*ctlt* m...

  7. Clay minerals: Properties and applications to dermocosmetic products and perspectives of natural raw materials for therapeutic purposes-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Jemima Daniela Dias; Bertolino, Silvana Raquel Alina; Cuffini, Silvia Lucia; Ducart, Diego Fernando; Bretzke, Pedro Eriberto; Leonardi, Gislaine Ricci

    2017-12-20

    Clay minerals are layered materials with a number of peculiar properties, which find many relevant applications in various industries. Since they are easily found everywhere, they are particularly attractive due to their economic viability. In the cosmetic industry, clay minerals are often used as excipients to stabilize emulsions or suspensions and to modify the rheological behavior of these systems. They also play an important role as adsorbents or absorbents, not only in cosmetics but also in other industries, such as pharmaceuticals. This reviewer believes that since this manuscript is presented as covering topical applications that include pharmaceuticals, some types of clay minerals should be considered as a potential material to be used as drug delivery systems. We review several applications of clay minerals to dermocosmetic products, relating them to the underlying properties of these materials and exemplifying with a number of clay minerals available in the market. We also discuss the use of clay minerals in topically-applied products for therapeutic purposes, specially for skin treatment and protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of clay mineral on air oxidation of PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biache, Coralie; Kouadio, Olivier; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Faure, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    This work investigated the impact of a clay mineral (bentonite) on the air oxidation of the solvent extractable organic matters (EOMs) and the PAHs from contaminated soils. EOMs were isolated from two coking plant soils and mixed with silica sand or bentonite. These samples, as well as raw soils and bentonite/soil mixtures, were oxidized in air at 60 and 100 °C for 160 days. Mineralization was followed by measuring the CO2 produced over the experiments. EOM, polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC), including PAH, contents were also determined. Oxidation led to a decrease in EOM contents and PAH concentrations, these diminutions were enhanced by the presence of bentonite. Transfer of carbon from EOM to insoluble organic matter pointed out a condensation phenomenon leading to a stabilization of the contamination. Higher mineralization rates, observed during the oxidation of the soil/bentonite mixtures, seem to indicate that this clay mineral had a positive influence on the transformation of PAC into CO2.

  9. Distribution of clay minerals in the process streams produced by the extraction of bitumen from Athabasca oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminsky, H.A.W.; Etsell, T.H.; Ivey, D.G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering; Omotoso, O. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CETC

    2009-02-15

    The clay minerals present in the oil sands were studied with particular reference to how they are partitioned in bitumen ore during the extraction process. Bitumen production from surface-mined oil sands accounts for nearly two-thirds of the total bitumen production in Alberta. Every cubic meter of mined ore results in 1.3 cubic meters of mature fine tailings (MFT). The characteristic differences between the clay minerals that report to the froth versus the tailings streams were also examined to determine which minerals could impact different unit operations in the bitumen extraction process. X-ray diffraction and random powder samples were used to quantify the clay minerals. Particle size distribution and clay activity balances were also conducted. The degree of partitioning during the conditioning and flotation stages in a batch extractor was determined by the surface properties of the clay minerals. The water-continuous tailings stream was separated into fine and coarse tailings fractions through sedimentation. The study showed that bitumen-clay interactions may be dominated by kaolinite or iron oxides. Clays are responsible for the poor settling behaviour of MFTs. The clay minerals present in the oil sands include illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite, kaolinite-smectite, and chlorite. The close proximity of the tailings ponds to the Athabasca River and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission require that the ponds be reclaimed to a natural landscape before mine closure. In addition to its impact on fine tailings reclamation, clay mineralogy plays a role in extraction froth flotation and emulsion stability during froth treatment. The mineralogy of the froth solids was found to be different from the mineralogy of the middlings and tailings solids. 39 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  10. Transmission X-ray Microscopy—A New Tool in Clay Mineral Floccules Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray L. Frost

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective flocculation and dewatering of mineral processing streams containing clays are microstructure dependent in clay-water systems. Initial clay flocculation is crucial in the design and for the development of a new methodology of gas exploitation. Microstructural engineering of clay aggregates using covalent cations and Keggin macromolecules have been monitored using the new state of the art Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM with 60 nm tomography resolution installed in a Taiwanese synchrotron. The 3-D reconstructions from TXM images show complex aggregation structures in montmorillonite aqueous suspensions after treatment with Na+, Ca2+ and Al13 Keggin macromolecules. Na-montmorillonite displays elongated, parallel, well-orientated and closed-void cellular networks, 0.5–3 µm in diameter. After treatment by covalent cations, the coagulated structure displays much smaller, randomly orientated and openly connected cells, 300–600 nm in diameter. The average distances measured between montmorillonite sheets was around 450 nm, which is less than half of the cell dimension measured in Na-montmorillonite. The most dramatic structural changes were observed after treatment by Al13 Keggin; aggregates then became arranged in compacted domains of a 300 nm average diameter composed of thick face-to-face oriented sheets, which forms porous aggregates with larger intra-aggregate open and connected voids.

  11. Adsorption and Desorption of Cesium in Clay Minerals: Effects of Natural Organic Matter and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Ilgen, Anastasia; Mills, Melissa; Lee, Moo; Seol, Jeung Gun; Cho, Nam Chan; Kang, Hyungyu

    2017-04-01

    Cesium (Cs) released into the environment (e.g., Fukushima accident) poses significant environmental concerns and remediation challenges. A majority of Cs in the environment have remained within the surface soils due to the strong adsorption affinity of Cs towards clay minerals. Different clay minerals have different bonding sites, resulting in various adsorption mechanisms at nanometer scale. For example, the illite commonly has a basal spacing of 1.0 nm, but becomes wider to 1.4 nm once other cations exchange with K in the interlayer site. Cs adsorbs into these expanded wedged zone strongly, which can control its mobility in the environment. In addition, natural organic matter (NOM) in the surface soils can interact with clay minerals, which can modify the mechanisms of Cs adsorption on the clay minerals by blocking specific adsorption sites and/or providing Cs adsorption sites on NOM surface. In this work, three representative clay minerals (illite, vermiculite, montmorillonite) and humic acid (HA) are used to systematically investigate the adsorption and desorption behavior of Cs. We performed batch adsorption experiments over a range of Cs concentrations on three clay minerals with and without HA, followed by sequential desorption batch testing. We tested desorption efficiency as a function of initial adsorbed Cs concentration, HA content, sodium concentration, and pH. The sequential extraction results are compared to the structural changes in clay minerals, measured using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) - energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Hence, this work aims to identify the mechanisms of Cs fixation at the nanometer (or atomic-) scale as a function of the clay mineral properties (e.g. expandability, permanent surface charge) and varying organic matter content at different pH values and to enhance our atomic-scale mechanistic understanding of

  12. Adsorption Properties of Hydrocarbons (n-Decane, Methyl Cyclohexane and Toluene on Clay Minerals: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of hydrocarbons may significantly affect hydrocarbon migration in unconventional reservoirs. Clay minerals form the primary adsorbent surfaces for hydrocarbons adsorbed in mudstone/shale. To study the adsorption properties of hydrocarbons (n-decane (C10H22, methyl cyclohexane (C7H14 and toluene (C7H8 on clay minerals (i.e., cookeite, ripidolite, kaolinite, illite, illite/smectite mixed-layer, Na-montmorillonite and Ca-montmorillonite, hydrocarbon vapor adsorption (HVA tests were conducted at 298.15 K. The results showed that (i the adsorption amounts of C10H22, C7H14 and C7H8 ranged from 0.45–1.03 mg/m2, 0.28–0.90 mg/m2 and 0.16–0.53 mg/m2, respectively; (ii for cookeite, ripidolite and kaolinite, the adsorption capacity of C10H22 was less than C7H14, which was less than C7H8; (iii for illite, Na-montmorillonite and Ca-montmorillonite, the adsorption capacity of C10H22 was greater than that of C7H8, and the adsorption capacity of C7H14 was the lowest; (iv for an illite/smectite mixed-layer, C7H14 had the highest adsorption capacity, followed by C10H22, and C7H8 had the lowest capacity. Adsorption properties were correlated with the microscopic parameters of pores in clay minerals and with experimental pressure. Finally, the weighted average method was applied to evaluate the adsorption properties of C10H22, C7H14 and C7H8 on clay minerals in oil-bearing shale from the Shahejie Formation of Dongying Sag in the Bohai Bay Basin, China. For these samples, the adsorbed amounts of C7H14 ranged from 18.03–28.02 mg/g (mean 23.33 mg/g, which is larger than that of C10H22, which ranges from 15.40–21.72 mg/g (mean 18.82 mg/g. The adsorption capacity of C7H8 was slightly low, ranging from 10.51–14.60 mg/g (mean 12.78 mg/g.

  13. Redox properties of clay-rich sediments as assessed by mediated electrochemical analysis : Separating pyrite, siderite and structural Fe in clay minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, Alwina L.; Sander, Michael; Bruggeman, Christophe; Behrends, Thilo

    2017-01-01

    Redox reactions with Fe-containing minerals in clay-rich sediments largely affect the speciation, mobility, and (bio-) availability of redox-sensitive contaminants. Here, we use mediated electrochemical oxidation (MEO) and reduction (MER), to quantify the electron accepting and donating capacities

  14. Influence of the mineral composition of clay rocks on the stability of oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorocho, P. R; Badillo, Juan

    2012-01-01

    In the oil companies, the operation of drilling well bore could be more expensive if the composition of the rocks is clay, the cost could increase between 10 and 15% from the starting budget. In order to decrease this problem, the oil industry has spent too much money for developing mechanisms that can provide better control and stability in clay formations during the drilling. The Society Petroleum Engineers (SPE) in some researches have published that the main chemical effects that are involved in the interaction of perforation fluids and the clay formation are: 1) chemical osmosis; and 2) hydration stresses, although, there are others like: Capillary effects, dehydration, differences in pressure and cationic exchange. These factors are not present generally in independent form. At Piedemonte Llanero the problem of the well bore stability represents a high spending of money for oil companies, caused in this region by chemical factors between fluid/rock and mechanical factors as resulted of the stresses in the area. Metil Blue Testing (MBT) and X-ray Diffraction (DR-X) were made in samples of clay; these were taken from cuts extracted of boreholes drilled in some places of the Colombian Llanos. It was found that these samples had a moderate content of reactive and low content of swell minerals.The samples main component was kaolinite, this mineral does not let the rock get swell, but it produces caving in the hole. However, it is necessary to do other tests to quantify the damages and evaluate the influence of there gime of the stress during the perforation of well bore.

  15. Clay minerals related to the circulation of geothermal fluids in boreholes at Rittershoffen (Alsace, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jeanne; Patrier, Patricia; Genter, Albert; Beaufort, Daniel; Dezayes, Chrystel; Glaas, Carole; Lerouge, Catherine; Sanjuan, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Two geothermal wells, GRT-1 and GRT-2, were drilled into the granite at Rittershoffen (Alsace, France) in the Upper Rhine Graben to exploit geothermal resources at the sediment-basement interface. Brine circulation occurs in a permeable fracture network and leads to hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks. The goal of the study was to characterize the petrography and mineralogy of the altered rocks with respect to the permeable fracture zones in the granitic basement. As clay minerals are highly reactive to hydrothermal alteration, they can be used as indicators of present-day and paleo-circulation systems. Special attention has been paid to the textural, structural and chemical properties of these minerals. The fine-grained clay fraction (smectite ( 10% smectite) provide a promising guide for identifying the fracture zones that control the present-day circulation of geothermal fluids in the Rittershoffen wells. However, multistage paleo-circulation systems could lead to an abundance of heterogeneous and fine-grained illitic minerals that could plug the fracture system. The permeability of fracture zones in the GRT-1 well was likely reduced because of an intense illitization, and the well was stimulated. The occurrence of chlorite in the permeable fracture zones of GRT-2 is indicative of less intense illitization, and the natural permeability is much higher in GRT-2 than in GRT-1.

  16. [Research on characteristics of soil clay mineral evolution in paddy field and dry land by XRD spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-dan; Li, Qiao; Luo, Xiang-li; Jiang, Hai-chao; Zheng, Qing-fu; Zhao, Lan-po; Wang, Ji-hong

    2014-08-01

    The present paper took the typical saline-alkali soil in Jilin province as study object, and determinated the soil clay mineral composition characteristics of soil in paddy field and dry land. Then XRD spectrum was used to analyze the evolutionary mechanism of clay mineral in the two kinds of soil. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better than those in dry land, and paddy field would promote the weathering of mineral particles in saline-alkali soil and enhance the silt content. Paddy field soil showed a strong potassium-removal process, with a higher degree of clay mineral hydration and lower degree of illite crystallinity. Analysis of XRD spectrum showed that the clay mineral composition was similar in two kinds of soil, while the intensity and position of diffraction peak showed difference. The evolution process of clay mineral in dry land was S/I mixture-->vermiculite, while in paddy field it was S/I mixture-->vermiculite-->kaolinite. One kind of hydroxylated 'chlorite' mineral would appear in saline-alkali soil in long-term cultivated paddy field. Taking into account that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better then those in dry land, we could know that paddy field could help much improve soil structure, cultivate high-fertility soil and improve saline-alkali soil. This paper used XRD spectrum to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two'kinds of land use comparatively, and was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  17. Application of clay minerals from Cayo Guan, Cuba, as sorbents of heavy metals and ceramic raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, D.; Barba, F.; Callejas, P.; Recio, P.

    2012-01-01

    It has been studied by Analysis Heating Microscope Optical the behaviour of some kaolinitic clays from a reservoir of Cayo Guan rich in iron oxides and low silica content proving to be a refractory materials whose softening appears after 1500 degree centigrade. It has obtained the workability diagram of the different clay minerals calculating the plasticity by the method of Casagrande spoon; only one of the samples is in the area suitable for extrusion. Vitrification diagrams report that the capacity of water absorption is 2 +, Cr 3 +. The results of the immobilization of these elements have been compared with those obtained with thermally activated vermiculite at 800 degree centigrade, showing that the treated samples show sorption of both cadmium and chromium below the vermiculite, but the non-treated ones are suitable to remove chromium; this is because these clays do not contain in its composition exchangeable ions (Ca 2 +, Mg 2 +, Na + , K + ), and even if they are chemically activated only the presence of Fe ions is which produces form bindings (Cr x .Fe 1 -x) (OH) 3 which favor Cr sorption. (Author) 26 refs.

  18. Fluorescence X-ray microscopy on hydrated tributyltin-clay mineral suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhäusler, U.; Schmidt, C.; Hoch, M.; Susini, J.

    2003-03-01

    Using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope at ID21 beamline of the ESRF in fluorescence mode, we mapped tin at a bulk concentration of 1000 μg(Sn)/ml within hydrated tributyltin (TBT)-clay mineral (Kaolinite) dispersion with sub-300 nm spatial resolution. Using the L absorption edges of tin at 3929, 4156 and 4465 eV fluorescence radiation was excited in tin atoms with incident photon energies of 4 and 4.5 keV. When using 4 keV radiation, only tin fluorescence is excited. For 4.5 keV X rays, both the fluorescence of tin and calcium (which is present in the solid phase) can be measured. Methodologically, we were interested in assessing and proving the possibilities and limitations of fluorescence mapping using the L absorption edges of tin, where the fluorescence yield is significantly lower compared to other elements with their K edges in the same energy range. Scientifically, organotin-clay mineral interactions are of environmental concern because this factor influences significantly the distribution of toxic TBT in the aquatic System. On one hand, the half-life of TBT deposited to the sediment phase increases, and consequently the time of its bioavailability. On the other hand, the adsorption process is reversible, which means that contaminated sediments can act as a source of pollution. The adsorption and desorption effects can be studied directly with high spatial resolution and brought into connection to the surface properties of the clay mineral under study as well as to other experimental parameters, like pH or salinity.

  19. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals: 3. Relationships between smectite redox and structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura E; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important redox-active species in many pristine and contaminated environments as well as in engineered systems. Understanding the extent and kinetics of redox reactions involving Fe-bearing clay minerals has been challenging due to the inability to relate structural Fe(2+)/Fe(total) fractions to fundamental redox properties, such as reduction potentials (EH). Here, we overcame this challenge by using mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) to characterize the fraction of redox-active structural Fe (Fe(2+)/Fe(total)) in smectites over a wide range of applied EH-values (-0.6 V to +0.6 V). We examined Fe(2+)/Fe(total )- EH relationships of four natural Fe-bearing smectites (SWy-2, SWa-1, NAu-1, NAu-2) in their native, reduced, and reoxidized states and compared our measurements with spectroscopic observations and a suite of mineralogical properties. All smectites exhibited unique Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships, were redox active over wide EH ranges, and underwent irreversible electron transfer induced structural changes that were observable with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Variations among the smectite Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships correlated well with both bulk and molecular-scale properties, including Fe(total) content, layer charge, and quadrupole splitting values, suggesting that multiple structural parameters determined the redox properties of smectites. The Fe(2+)/Fe(total) - EH relationships developed for these four commonly studied clay minerals may be applied to future studies interested in relating the extent of structural Fe reduction or oxidation to EH-values.

  20. Clay minerals assemblage in the Neogene fluvial succession of the Pishin Belt, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal Khan; Kassi, Akhtar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    indicate derivation of material from the Pre-Miocene sedimentary and meta-sedimentary terrains of the Pishin Belt. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that clay minerals in various mudstones and sandstone samples are identical and detrital in nature and include smectite, chlorite, illite, serpentine...... and kaolinite. Smectite and chlorite are most probably derived from the metavolcanic and mafic volcanic rocks, respectively. Presence of serpentine in samples of the Bostan Formation indicates altered ultramafic rocks as one of the source terrains. Illite is probably recycled from the older sedimentary...

  1. Comparison of clay mineral stratigraphy to other proxy palaeoclimate indicators in the Mesozoic of NW Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffell, Alastair; McKinley, Jennifer M; Worden, Richard H

    2002-04-15

    This paper reviews the opportunities and pitfalls associated with using clay mineralogical analysis in palaeoclimatic reconstructions. Following this, conjunctive methods of improving the reliability of clay mineralogical analysis are reviewed. The Mesozoic succession of NW Europe is employed as a case study. This demonstrates the relationship between clay mineralogy and palaeoclimate. Proxy analyses may be integrated with clay mineralogical analysis to provide an assessment of aridity-humidity contrasts in the hinterland climate. As an example, the abundance of kaolinite through the Mesozoic shows that, while interpretations may be difficult, the Mesozoic climate of NW Europe was subject to great changes in rates of continental precipitation. We may compare sedimentological (facies, mineralogy, geochemistry) indicators of palaeoprecipitation with palaeotemperature estimates. The integration of clay mineralogical analyses with other sedimentological proxy indicators of palaeoclimate allows differentiation of palaeoclimatic effects from those of sea-level and tectonic change. We may also observe how widespread palaeoclimate changes were; whether they were diachronous or synchronous; how climate, sea level and tectonics interact to control sedimentary facies and what palaeoclimate indicators are reliable.

  2. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  3. Response surface method as a tool for heavy clay firing process optimization: Roofing tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Arsenović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Heavy clay samples collected in close vicinity of Toplička Mala Plana, Serbia, were surveyed to examine their possible use in heavy clay industry. The representative raw material, which contained the lowest content of clay minerals and the highest content of carbonates, was enriched with two more plastic clays. Chemical and mineralogical composition, as well as particle size distribution, were determined to distinct the samples. The samples in the form of tiles, hollow blocks and cubes were prepared following the usual practice in ceramic laboratories. The effect of process parameters, such as temperature (850–950 °C and concentration of the added clays (both in the range of 0–10 wt.%, were investigated in terms of compressive strength, water absorption, firing shrinkage, weight loss during firing and volume mass of cubes. The optimal conditions were determined by the response surface method, coupled with the fuzzy synthetic evaluation algorithm, using membership trapezoidal function, and showed that these materials can be used for roofing tiles production.

  4. Clay minerals as palaeoenvironment indicators exemplified on a Karoo sequence from the Bothaville area, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehmann, C.; Buehmann, D.

    1990-01-01

    The whole-rock and clay mineral composition of 74 samples from a 184 m borehole core from the Ecca Group and Dwyka Formation from the vicinity of Bothaville, 100 km southwest of Johannesburg, South Africa, has been determined by means of X-ray diffractometry. The objective was to establish the salinity and pH of the water of the original environments of deposition. The sediment investigated was subjected to a low degree of diagenesis. Clay mineral associations display characteristic variations while distinctive vertical trends in kaolinite occurrence have been established. Mineralogical trends are ascribed to fundamental changes, which must have existed in the pore fluid composition during deposition (palaeoenvironment setting) which have been maintained through the early stages of diagenesis. Conditions were alkaline-marine during the Dwyka and in the lower section of the Vryheid Formation, as indicated by the dominance of 2:1 layer silicates. From the middle section of the Vryheid Formation the entire brackish water mixing range is recorded mineralogically by kaolinite contents which increase progressively at the cost of 2:1 layer silicates. Acid-freshwater conditions, characterised by the dominance of kaolinite are interpreted for the upper section of the Vryheid Formation. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies on silver atoms and clusters in regularly interstratified clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Tamura, K.; Shimomura, S.; Sadlo, J.; Turek, J.; Michalik, J.

    2004-01-01

    The formation and stabilization of reduced silver species in the regularly interstratified clay minerals, trioctahedral smectite/chlorite (tri-Sm/Ch) and dioctahedral smectite/mica (di-Sm/M), have been studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Both minerals loaded with Ag + cations after degassing and dehydration were γ-irradiated at 77 K and monitored by EPR as the temperature increased. Some samples were exposed to water or methanol vapor after dehydration. In both hydrated and dehydrated samples only the doublets to Ag 0 atoms were observed with no evidence of the formation of Ag clusters. However, the EPR parameter of silver atoms in both matrices are different. In tri-Sm/Ch the narrow anisotropic EPR lines overlap with the broader isotropic lines, whereas in di-Sm/M only broad lines are recorded. The hyperfine splitting - A iso (Ag 0 ) is larger in tri-Sm/Ch than in di-Sm/M. Also the stability of Ag 0 in both clay minerals is distinctly different. Ag 0 doublet in di-Sm/M disappears completely above 230 K, Whereas in tri-Sm/Ch it is still recorded at 310 K. It is proposed, basing on the EPR results that Ag 0 atoms appear at different sites in both matrices: - in tri-Sm/Ch in the middle of smectite interlayer and in hexagonal cavities in the silicate sheets of tetrahedron layer and in di-Sm.M in hexagonal cavities only. When samples had been exposed to methanol before irradiation, the silver clusters become stabilized in the interlayer sites. In tri-Sm/M matrix the silver dimer Ag 2 + formed by gamma-irradiation at 77 K is transformed to tetrameric cluster, Ag 4 + at 150 K. In di-Sm/M the radiation-induced silver agglomeration proceeds in a similar way, but with a slower rate and Ag tetramer is formed only above 190 K. In both clay minerals, Ag 4 + clusters decay above 250 K. (author)

  6. Clay mineral formation and fabric development in the DFDP-1B borehole, central Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, A.M.; Sutherland, R.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.G.; Van der Pluijm, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Clay minerals are increasingly recognised as important controls on the state and mechanical behaviour of fault systems in the upper crust. Samples retrieved by shallow drilling from two principal slip zones within the central Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand, offer an excellent opportunity to investigate clay formation and fluid-rock interaction in an active fault zone. Two shallow boreholes, DFDP-1A (100.6 m deep) and DFDP-1B (151.4 m) were drilled in Phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1) in 2011. We provide a mineralogical and textural analysis of clays in fault gouge extracted from the Alpine Fault. Newly formed smectitic clays are observed solely in the narrow zones of fault gouge in drill core, indicating that localised mineral reactions are restricted to the fault zone. The weak preferred orientation of the clay minerals in the fault gouge indicates minimal strain-driven modification of rock fabrics. While limited in extent, our results support observations from surface outcrops and faults systems elsewhere regarding the key role of clays in fault zones and emphasise the need for future, deeper drilling into the Alpine Fault in order to understand correlative mineralogies and fabrics as a function of higher temperature and pressure conditions. (author).

  7. Multi-scale experimental and numerical study of the structure and the dynamics of water confined in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaud, Emmanuel Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Clay are complex minerals with a multi-scale porosity and a remarkable ability to swell under humid atmosphere. These materials have many applications in catalysis, waste management, construction industry... However, the properties of confined water are still not fully understood, due in particular to the complexity of water itself. The aim of this work is, using mainly molecular simulations and vibrational spectroscopy, to understand the structure and the dynamics of water confined in clay minerals. To evaluate the accuracy of numerical models to describe water confined in clay minerals, and to understand the origin of its structural and dynamical properties, a large part of the work was devoted to the building blocks of clays: pure bulk water, water at the surface of a solid, and salt water. To this extent, the viscoelastic properties of water from the deeply supercooled regime to the boiling temperature were investigated using classical molecular dynamics. The evolution of the friction properties of water on a prototypical solid surface was also analyzed, and the accuracy of ab initio approaches and empirical salt models was studied. In a second part, those results were confronted to the properties of water confined in clay minerals at low and room temperature, studied both experimentally and numerically. Experimental work consisted mostly in extensive far- and -mid infrared absorption spectrometry measurements, whereas numerical work mainly consisted in empirical molecular dynamics simulations. Especially, the existence of confinement- or temperature-induced phase transitions of confined water was investigated. (author)

  8. Heteroagglomeration of zinc oxide nanoparticles with clay mineral modulates the bioavailability and toxicity of nanoparticle in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Govind Sharan; Senapati, Violet Aileen; Dhawan, Alok; Shanker, Rishi

    2017-06-01

    The extensive use of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in cosmetics, sunscreens and healthcare products increases their release in the aquatic environment. The present study explored the possible interaction of ZnO NPs with montmorillonite clay minerals in aqueous conditions. An addition of ZnO NPs on clay suspension significantly (pclay particles from 1652±90nm to 2158±13nm due to heteroagglomeration. The electrokinetic measurements showed a significant (pclay association (-1.37±0.03μmcm/Vs) that results to the electrostatic interaction between ZnO NPs and clay particles. The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of ZnO NPs-clay association demonstrated the binding of ZnO NPs with the Si-O-Al region on the edges of clay particles. The increase in size of ZnO NPs-clay heteroagglomerates further leads to their sedimentation at 24h. Although, the stability of ZnO NPs in the clay suspension was decreased due to heteroagglomeration, but the bioavailability and toxicity of ZnO NPs-clay heteroagglomerates in Tetrahymena pyriformis was enhanced. These observations provide an evidence on possible mechanisms available in natural environment that can facilitate nanoparticles entry into the organisms present in lower trophic levels of the food web. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Terrestrial Analogs for Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H; Morris, Richard V.; Bristow, Thomas; Ming, Douglas W.; Achillies, Cherie; Bish, David L.; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Chipera, Steve

    2013-01-01

    the last three varieties may be contemporaneous. One sample shows agate (alpha- quartz) that was precipitated between the episodes of deposition of the fine-grained and coarse-grained 'griffithite.' 'Griffithite' is not unique as a possible terrestrial analog - some clay minerals from the Doushantou formation, China, have similar 02L diffraction bands, and many basalts contain smectites in vesicles and as replacements after olivine. Similar trioctahedral smectites occur also in the nakhlite martian meteorites - as veinlets and replacements of olivine. By understanding the formation of these terrestrial clays, we hope to constrain the nature and mechanism of formation of the Sheepbed clay mineral.

  10. The influence of mineralization on the phase composition and properties of low-burned clay-dolomited composition materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirin-zade, I.N.; Ganbarov, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    With aim of acceleration of dissociation of carbonates in clay-dolomited compositions Na 2 SiF 6 was added. Addition mineralization raise stability of composition reaches 20-30 MPa. Na 2 SiF 6 mineralization makes more active decomposition of dolomite and accelerate appearance of new creations. It was experimentally proved that adding of mineralization of Na 2 SiF 6 promote to appearance in mixture of intermediate double salts which are bring down temperature of dissociation of carbonates. Accelerated action of mineralization Na 2 SiF 6 accepted by x-ray, DTA and x-ray spectroscopy

  11. Contact angles at the water-air interface of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofinskaya, O. A.; Kosterin, A. V.; Kosterina, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Contact angles at the water-air interface have been measured for triturated preparations of clays and soils in order to assess changes in their hydrophobic properties under the effect of oil hydrocarbons. Tasks have been to determine the dynamics of contact angle under soil wetting conditions and to reveal the effect of chemical removal of organic matter from soils on the hydrophilicity of preparations. The potentialities of static and dynamic drop tests for assessing the hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties of soils have been estimated. Clays (kaolinite, gumbrine, and argillite) have been investigated, as well as plow horizons of soils from the Republic of Tatarstan: heavy loamy leached chernozem, medium loamy dark gray forest soil, and light loamy soddy-calcareous soil. The soils have been contaminated with raw oil and kerosene at rates of 0.1-3 wt %. In the uncontaminated and contaminated chernozem, capillary water capacity has been maintained for 250 days. The contact angles have been found to depend on the degree of dispersion of powdered preparation, the main type of clay minerals in the soil, the presence and amount of oxidation-resistant soil organic matter, and the soil-water contact time. Characteristic parameters of mathematical models for drop behavior on triturated preparations have been calculated. Contamination with hydrocarbons has resulted in a reliable increase in the contact angles of soil preparations. The hydrophobization of soil surface in chernozem is more active than in soils poorer in organic matter. The complete restoration of the hydrophilic properties of soils after hydrocarbon contamination is due to the oxidation of easily oxidizable organic matter at the low content of humus, or to wetting during several months in the absence of the mazut fraction.

  12. Effect of clay mineral on utilization of some mineral elements in ruminant feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IBRAHIM, A.K.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of tafla and bentofarm addition on feed intake, water intake, digestibility, nutritive values, some rumen parameters, nitrogen retention, some minerals retention and some blood parameters of rams, growth performance and some blood constituents of growing lambs. Twenty seven Rahmani mature rams, averaged 45 kg of live body weight were divided randomly to three main groups each main group subdivided into three treatments (three animals each). Main first group fed 100% bereseam and served as control (T 1 ), the other two subgroups fed the T 1 diet plus 3% tafla (T 2 ) or 3% bentofarm (T 3 ).The second main group fed 50% bereseam and 50% concentrate feed mixture (T 4 ), the other two subgroups fed the T 4 diet plus 3% tafla (T 5 ) or 3% bentofarm (T 6 ).The third main group fed 100% concentrate feed mixture and rice straw (T 7 ), the other subgroups fed (T 7 )diet plus 3% tafla (T 8 ) or 3% bentofarm (T 9 ).To carry out the growth trial, forty eight growing baladi male lambs about 2 months of age and average live body weight 17 kg were divided into six similar groups (eight lambs for each) according to their body weight. The experimental rations were: T 4 -T 9 in previous tasted rations. The results of digestibility of DM and CP significantly (P<0.05) decreased as a result of tafla and bentofarm addition than that of the control, while OM, CF, EE and NFE digestibilities were slightly improved with tafla or bentofarm compared with those of control, but the differences were not significant among treatments. However, the results of nutritive values as TDN, SV and DCP showed no significant differences among treatments. The results of ruminal parameters as TVFA's, ph and microbial protein significantly increased as a result of tafla and bentofarm addition than that of the control, but the values of ammonia-N concentrations significantly decreased by addition of tafla and bentofarm compared with the control treatments.

  13. The Imprint of Atmospheric Evolution in the D/H of Hesperian Clay Minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, A. E.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Flesch, G. J.; Christensen, L. E.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio in strongly bound water or hydroxyl groups in ancient Martian clays retains the imprint of the water of formation of these minerals. Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment measured thermally evolved water and hydrogen gas released between 550 degrees Centigrade and 950 degrees Centigrade from samples of Hesperian-era Gale crater smectite to determine this isotope ratio. The D/H value is 3.0 (plus or minus 0.2) times the ratio in standard mean ocean water. The D/H ratio in this approximately 3-billion-year-old mudstone, which is half that of the present Martian atmosphere but substantially higher than that expected in very early Mars, indicates an extended history of hydrogen escape and desiccation of the planet.

  14. Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, R. E.; Ewing, R. C.; Fischer, W. W.; Hurowitz, J.

    2014-02-01

    Gale Crater contains Mount Sharp, a ~5 km thick stratigraphic record of Mars' early environmental history. The strata comprising Mount Sharp are believed to be sedimentary in origin, but the specific depositional environments recorded by the rocks remain speculative. We present orbital evidence for the occurrence of eolian sandstones within Gale Crater and the lower reaches of Mount Sharp, including preservation of wind-blown sand dune topography in sedimentary strata—a phenomenon that is rare on Earth and typically associated with stabilization, rapid sedimentation, transgression, and submergence of the land surface. The preserved bedforms in Gale are associated with clay minerals and elsewhere accompanied by typical dune cross stratification marked by bounding surfaces whose lateral equivalents contain sulfate salts. These observations extend the range of possible habitable environments that may be recorded within Gale Crater and provide hypotheses that can be tested in situ by the Curiosity rover payload.

  15. Bacillus subtilis biofilm development in the presence of soil clay minerals and iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenting; Peng, Donghai; Walker, Sharon L; Cao, Bin; Gao, Chun-Hui; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Clay minerals and metal oxides, as important parts of the soil matrix, play crucial roles in the development of microbial communities. However, the mechanism underlying such a process, particularly on the formation of soil biofilm, remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effects of montmorillonite, kaolinite, and goethite on the biofilm formation of the representative soil bacteria Bacillus subtilis . The bacterial biofilm formation in goethite was found to be impaired in the initial 24 h but burst at 48 h in the liquid-air interface. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the biofilm biomass in goethite was 3-16 times that of the control, montmorillonite, and kaolinite at 48 h. Live/Dead staining showed that cells had the highest death rate of 60% after 4 h of contact with goethite, followed by kaolinite and montmorillonite. Atomic force microscopy showed that the interaction between goethite and bacteria may injure bacterial cells by puncturing cell wall, leading to the swarming of bacteria toward the liquid-air interface. Additionally, the expressions of abrB and sinR , key players in regulating the biofilm formation, were upregulated at 24 h and downregulated at 48 h in goethite, indicating the initial adaptation of the cells to minerals. A model was proposed to describe the effects of goethite on the biofilm formation. Our findings may facilitate a better understanding of the roles of soil clays in biofilm development and the manipulation of bacterial compositions through controlling the biofilm in soils.

  16. The role of clay minerals in the preservation of organic matter in sediments of Qinghai Lake, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bingsong; Dong, Hailiang; Jiang, Hongchen; Lv, Guo; Eberl, Dennis D.; Li, Shanying; Kim, Jinwook

    2009-01-01

    The role of saline lake sediments in preserving organic matter has long been recognized. In order to further understand the preservation mechanisms, the role of clay minerals was studied. Three sediment cores, 25, 57, and 500 cm long, were collected from Qinghai Lake, NW China, and dissected into multiple subsamples. Multiple techniques were employed, including density fractionation, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), total organic carbon (TOC) and carbon compound analyses, and surface area determination. The sediments were oxic near the water-sediment interface, but became anoxic at depth. The clay mineral content was as much as 36.8%, consisting mostly of illite, chlorite, and halloysite. The TEM observations revealed that organic matter occurred primarily as organic matter-clay mineral aggregates. The TOC and clay mineral abundances are greatest in the mid-density fraction, with a positive correlation between the TOC and mineral surface area. The TOC of the bulk sediments ranges from 1 to 3% with the non-hydrocarbon fraction being predominant, followed by bitumen, saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbons, and chloroform-soluble bitumen. The bimodal distribution of carbon compounds of the saturated hydrocarbon fraction suggests that organic matter in the sediments was derived from two sources: terrestrial plants and microorganisms/algae. Depthrelated systematic changes in the distribution patterns of the carbon compounds suggest that the oxidizing conditions and microbial abundance near the water-sediment interface promote degradation of labile organic matter, probably in adsorbed form. The reducing conditions and small microbial biomass deeper in the sediments favor preservation of organic matter, because of the less labile nature of organic matter, probably occurring within clay mineral-organic matter aggregates that are inaccessible to microorganisms. These results have important implications for our

  17. Effects of magnesium minerals representative of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay-stone on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debure, M.

    2012-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses dissolution has been studied in presence of magnesium minerals. Those minerals (dolomite, illite, smectite...) belong to the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone layer, studied in France as a potential site for nuclear waste disposal. Such minerals contain magnesium, an element able to sustain glass alteration when it is available in solution. In the confined media of the wastes disposal, the solids reactivity controls the solution composition and can be the driving force of nuclear glass alteration. Experiments show that magnesium carbonates (hydro-magnesite and dolomite) increase in the glass alteration: the precipitation of magnesium silicates consumes silicon which slows down the formation of the glass passivating layer. The lower the magnesium mineral solubility, the lower the glass alteration. The purified clay phases (illite, smectite...) from the COx layer increase the glass alteration. Half the magnesium was replaced by sodium during the purification process. In such conditions, the effect of clay phases on glass alteration is in part due to the acidic pH-buffering effect of the clay fraction. The GRAAL model implemented in the geochemical transport code HYTEC has confirmed and quantified the mechanisms put in evidence in the experiments. Cells diffusion experiments where the two solids were separated by an inert diffusion barrier allow to valid reactive transport modelling. Such experiments are more representative of the glass package which will be separated from the COx by corrosion products. They show that glass alteration rate is reduced when solids are not close. (author) [fr

  18. Complexity of clay mineral formation during 120,000 years of soil development along the Franz Josef chronosequence, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietel, J.; Dohrmann, R.; Guggenberger, G.; Meyer-Stueve, S.; Turner, S.; Schippers, A.; Kaufhold, S.; Butz-Braun, R.; Condron, L.M.; Mikutta, R.

    2017-01-01

    Weathering of primary silicates to secondary clay minerals over time affects multiple soil functions such as the accumulation of organic matter and nutrient cations. However, the extent of clay mineral (trans)formation as a function of soil development is poorly understood. In this study, the degree of weathering of sediments along a 120 kyr soil formation gradient was investigated using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Irrespective of site age, mica and chlorite were the dominant clay minerals. During weathering, a remarkable suite of transitional phases such as vermiculite and several interstratifications with vermiculitic, smectitic, chloritic and micaceous layers developed. The degree of weathering was correlated with soil pH and depletion of K, Ca, Na, Fe and Al, regarding both soil depth and site age. Kaolinite occurred especially at the 120 kyr site, indicating slow formation via transitional phases. The findings of this study revealed that long-term soil development caused complex clay mineral assemblages, both temporally and spatially, and linking this variability to soil functioning warrants further research. (author).

  19. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes on clay minerals and its application to a hydrogen peroxide biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, H.-L.; Jehng, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on clay minerals, and the development of biosensors based on Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au and Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-Glucose oxidase (GOD) composite films for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and glucose, respectively. The CNTs are synthesized on nickel cation exchanged clay mineral platelets. From field-emission scanning electron microscope images, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transfer infrared and thermogravimetric analysis results, the clay layers are exfoliated and delaminated after the growth of CNTs on them. The mixed hybrid film of Nafion, CNT/Clay, Au particles and GOD is coated on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode to detect H 2 O 2 or glucose. This film exhibits a detection limit of 5.0 x 10 -5 M for H 2 O 2 with a sensitivity of 280 nA mM -1 . In addition, the amperometric response for glucose containing 2.0 mg mL -1 GOD in the Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-GOD modified GC electrode exhibits a sensitivity of 620 nA mM -1 with a linear range up to 1850 μM. A higher sensitivity and shorter response time are observed with increasing GOD content in the composite matrix film. Besides, the highest sensitivity of 2032 nA mM -1 is obtained with the addition of the 10.0 mg mL -1 GOD in the composite film. Consequently, the CNT/Clay/Nafion medium can probably be a useful electrode for the development of sensors due to its high sensitivity and applicability

  20. Laboratory experiments on ammoniated clay minerals with relevance for asteroid (1) Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Simone; Stefani, Stefania; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Ammannito, Eleonora

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations with VIR spectrometer onboard Dawn spacecraft [1] have suggested the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates widespread on the surface of asteroid (1) Ceres [2,3]. The global surface composition of Ceres as suggested by VIR average infrared spectrum in the 1-4 micron range appears to be due to a mixture of NH4-bearing phyllosilicates, serpentine, carbonates and a dark absorbing phase (magnetite or amorphous carbon) [2]. An absorption feature occurring near 3.1 micron in the average spectrum is considered the main evidence for the presence of NH4-bearing phase; nevertheless in the past several authors tried to explain this feature, as observed with telescopic spectra, invoking the presence of brucite, cronstedtite, water ice or clays [4]. In this project we are carrying out laboratory experiments with the aim of studying ammoniated phyllosilicates in the visible-infrared range. A suite of 9 clay minerals has been used for this study, including illite, nontronite and montmorillonite. In order to produce the ammoniated species we followed a modified procedure based on the one described in Bishop et al. (2002) [5]. All minerals were reduced in fine grain size (features, appearing at different wavelengths near 2, 3, 6 and 7 micron. In some cases the spectral shape of already existent absorption bands resulted deeply modified. A few species did not show the appearance of new features. These results suggest that NH4+ ions fix in various ways in different minerals. Nontronite and montmorillonite appear to be the best candidates, among the studied suite, to be used in future laboratory reproduced analog mixtures. [1] Russell C.T. et al., 2004, Planetary and Space Science, 52, 465-489 [2] De Sanctis M.C. et al., 2015, Nature, 528, 241-244 [3] Ammannito E. et al., 2016, Science, vol.353, issue 6303 [4] Rivkin A.S. et al., 2011, Space Science Reviews, 163, 95-116 [5] Bishop J.L. et al., 2002, Planetary and Space Science, 50, 11-19

  1. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  2. Study of adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals; Estudio de Adsorcion de Fenentreno en Diferentes Tipos de Arcillas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, M L; Escolano, O; Rodriguez, V; Diaz, F J; Perez, R; Garcia, S; Garcia Frutos, F J

    2003-07-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay mineral also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represent ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs.

  3. Selection strategy for the most Suitable CEC method for clay barrier characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohrmann, R.; Kaufhold, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) is one of the most relevant properties of clay barriers. CEC results often are used for characterization of the clay host rock or for sensitive detection of degradation of the barrier material, e.g. bentonite buffer. Numerous methods exist for the determination of the CEC and exchangeable cations. However, a lot of methods suffer from systematic errors. These errors are caused by interactions (that differ from cation exchange) of the exchange solutions used with minerals in the barrier material: i) Dissolution of soluble minerals such as calcite, gypsum, or dolomite which causes inflated exchangeable calcium (magnesium) values. Other reactions of carbonates or gypsum not only affect exchangeable cations but also the CEC (index cation) values in a way that ii) witherite (barium carbonate) is formed and dissolved later (barium chloride method) which causes inflated CEC values or iii) rests of gypsum are present during reexchange with magnesium chloride (barium chloride method) which then leads to drastic CEC underestimation by formation of barium sulphate (here simultaneously barium ions are desorbed from exchange positions and sulphate enters the solution due to gypsum dissolution). When the ammonium acetate method is used for CEC determination of calcareous clays/bentonites another mechanism for a systematic CEC decrease occurs: iv) ammonium acetate is first used to saturate the clay components in a regular way (cation exchange), but during washing for removal of excess salt, ammonium is desorbed again from exchange positions by calcium which is liberated (dissolved) from remaining calcite of calcareous clays studied. Other errors may be v) the degradation of cationic complexes (silver thiourea, if pH > 8) or vi) substances which are added to adjust the pH of the exchange solutions such as triethanolamine in barium chloride exchange solution which may be protonated and adsorbed in

  4. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S.; Souza Filho, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm -1 in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  5. Experiments on the reduction of radiocesium in pigs by adding clay minerals to the contaminated feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdt, C.S.

    1987-05-01

    For some time now clay minerals are used as feed additives in animal production but are even discussed lately as a possibility of decontamination of radiocesium in the living animal because of their ion exchange property. The nuclear accident of Chernobyl in April 1986 induced the Austrian government to set radioactivity limits for contamination with Cs-137 and 134. For pork the total of 5nCi Cs-137 and 134/kg was set which proved to be a problem for pig fattening when fed on whey and concentrate. The aim of this study was to see if the addition of clays to the animal feed can reduce the cesium content in the meat. After 3 short-term-trials with the total amount of 21 animals one long-term pig-fattening experiment with 40 animals was conducted. For 70 days their feed contained fallout Cs in form of dried whey. The control group was fed the normal ration, for test group 1 bentonite and for test group 2 bolus alba were mixed into the concentrate in amounts corresponding to 5%. After administering fallout-Cs for 70 days 5 animals of each group were slaughtered and the Cs-activity specified in leg, butt, neck, liver, kidney and blood. With exception of the liver the mean values of the control group reached higher levels than 5nCi Cs-137 and 134, test group 2 showed the same tendency in the leg. Test group 1 proved satisfactorily with all mean values well beyond the limit with highly significant response. Feeding the remaining animals with uncontaminated rations of feed it could be demonstrated that bentonite decreases the biological half-life of cesium. 52 refs., 10 figs., 26 tabs

  6. Luminescent Oxygen Gas Sensors Based on Nanometer-Thick Hybrid Films of Iridium Complexes and Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Sato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Ir(III complexes in photo-responsive molecular devices for oxygen gas sensing is reviewed. Attention is focused on the immobilization of Ir(III complexes in organic or inorganic host materials such as polymers, silica and clays in order to enhance robustness and reliability. Our recent works on constructing nanometer-thick films comprised of cyclometalated cationic Ir(III complexes and clay minerals are described. The achievement of multi-emitting properties in response to oxygen pressure is demonstrated.

  7. Study on rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuxiang; Qian Guangren; Yi Facheng; Shi Rongming; Fu Yibei; Li Lihua; Zhang Jun

    1999-01-01

    The composition and some properties of its pastes of rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals (RAAASCM) cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste are studied. Experimental results show that heat activated kaolinite, Xingjiang zeolite, modified attapulgite clay are better constituents of RAAASCM. RAAASCM cementitious materials pastes exhibit high strength, low porosity, fewer harmful pore, and high resistance to sulphate corrosion as well as gamma irradiation. The Sr 2+ , Cs + leaching portion of the simulated radioactive waste forms based on RAAASCM, is low

  8. Characterization of clay deposits from Egypt and assessment of their potential application for waste water treatment: How dissolved organic matter determines the interaction of heavy metals and clay minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Refaey Mohammed, Y.B.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the potential of using clay minerals abundant in local soils in Egypt as low cost materials to reduce Cu, Ni and Zn pollution of soil and groundwater originating from polluted wastewater; specifically focusing on the influence of the interaction of clay

  9. Sorption kinetics and chemical forms of Cd(II) sorbed by thiol-functionalized 2:1 clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malferrari, D.; Brigatti, M.F.; Laurora, A.; Pini, S.; Medici, L.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between Cd(II) in aqueous solution and two 2:1 expandable clay minerals (i.e., montmorillonite and vermiculite), showing different layer charge, was addressed via batch sorption experiments on powdered clay minerals both untreated and amino acid (cysteine) treated. Reaction products were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRDP), chemical analysis (elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectrophotometry), thermal analysis combined with evolved gasses mass spectrometry (TGA-MSEGA) and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy via extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) characterization. Sorption isotherms for Cd(II) in presence of different substrates, shows that Cd(II) uptake depends both on Cd(II) starting concentration and the nature of the substrate. Thermal decomposition of Cd-cysteine treated clay minerals evidences the evolution of H 2 O, H 2 S, NO 2 , SO 2 , and N 2 O 3 . These results are well consistent with XRDP data collected both at room and at increasing temperature and further stress the influence of the substrate, in particular cysteine, on the interlayer. EXAFS studies suggest that Cd(II) coordinates with oxygen atoms, to give monomer complexes or CdO molecules, either on the mineral surface and/or in the interlayer. For Cd-cysteine complexes EXAFS data agree with the existence of Cd-S clusters, thus suggesting a predominant role of the thiol group in the bonding of Cd with the amino acid

  10. Visible-near-infrared spectroscopy can predict the clay/organic carbon and mineral fines/organic carbon ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Cecilie; Knadel, Maria; Møldrup, Per

    2016-01-01

    The ratios of mineral fines (carbon (OC), consisting of the n-ratio (i.e., the clay/OC ratio) and m-ratio (i.e., the fines/OC ratio) have recently been used to analyze and predict soil functional properties such as tilth conditions, clay dispersibility, degree...... from seven Danish and one Greenlandic fields, with a large textural range (clay: 0.027–0.355 kg kg−1; OC: 0.011–0.084 kg kg−1; n-ratio: 0.49–16.80; m-ratio: 1.46–32.14), were analyzed for texture and OC and subsequently scanned with a vis-NIR spectrometer from 400 to 2500 nm. The spectral data were...

  11. Characterization and technological properties of mineral clays used in the Southwest of Parana and West of Santa Catarina states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdameri, C.Z.; Ciesca, D.F.; Zatta, L.; Anaissi, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to characterize clay minerals used in the ceramic industry in southwestern region of Parana and west of Santa Catarina states. The precursors used were the same used by industries in these regions for the production of bricks. The precursors were characterized,preliminary results are shown with respect to structural, chemical and physical precursors (XRD, EDS and plasticity). The specimens were characterized for technological burning properties: linear shrinkage, water absorption, flexural tension and density. The results show that the clays present Typical chemical composition of raw clay, however, the evaluation of technological properties after burning indicate negative results to be applied to the manufacture of red ceramic because did not meet the regulatory requirements. (author)

  12. Effects of Calcined clay minerals and Silica fume on the compressive strength of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Soltani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pozzolanic materials are well known as potential replacements for cement manufacturing in order to increase compressive strength and improve durability of concrete in different environments and leading to save energy particularly reducing global warming effect. The present study reveals the effect of calcined clay minerals as natural pozzolanic material, separately and in combination with and without silica fume. To achieve this aim, 15 mixed designs with a constant water to cementitious ratio of  0.38 is made. In six mixed designs only metakaolin, zeolite or silica fume  and in eight other designs metakaolin and silica fume or zeolite and silica fume have been combined. Mixes containing metakaolin or zeolite with ratio of 10 or 20 percent and silica fume with 7 or 10 percent show significant increasing in compressive strength and improving durability, being valuable replacement for cement (in percentages. In particular, the best practice is attributed to the age of 28 days for compressive strength the replacement of the composition is 10% zeolite with 7% of silica fume and for electrical resistance the replacement of the composition is 10% zeolite with 7% of silica fume.

  13. Stochastic Approach to Determine CO2 Hydrate Induction Time in Clay Mineral Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Lee, W.

    2008-12-01

    A large number of induction time data for carbon dioxide hydrate formation were obtained from a batch reactor consisting of four independent reaction cells. Using resistance temperature detector(RTD)s and a digital microscope, we successfully monitored the whole process of hydrate formation (i.e., nucleation and crystal growth) and detected the induction time. The experiments were carried out in kaolinite and montmorillonite suspensions at temperatures between 274 and 277 K and pressures ranging from 3.0 to 4.0 MPa. Each set of data was analyzed beforehand whether to be treated by stochastic manner or not. Geochemical factors potentially influencing the hydrate induction time under different experimental conditions were investigated by stochastic analyses. We observed that clay mineral type, pressure, and temperature significantly affect the stochastic behavior of the induction times for CO2 hydrate formation in this study. The hydrate formation kinetics along with stochastic analyses can provide basic understanding for CO2 hydrate storage in deep-sea sediment and geologic formation, securing its stability under the environments.

  14. Cs adsorption mechanism on clay minerals based on material sciences using synchrotron radiation and first principle calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Toru; Ikeda, Takashi; Matsumura, Daiju; Machida, Masahiko; Okumura, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive Cs released from Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident is one of the important sources to increase air dose rate in environment, and thus the local and Japanese governments are still promoting the decontamination project in the contaminated area in Fukushima. On this backgrounds, in this study, 'the comprehensive researches', i.e., the elucidation of Cs speciation through the structural and electronic structural studies in clay minerals for supporting to develop the promising volume reduction methods of soil wastes (we will not touch the chemical treatment, wet classification, incineration, and alkaline fusion methods in this article) and the evaluation of Cs stability in soil wastes over mid- to long-term period, and the field investigation for elucidation of seasonal variation of bottom soil of agricultural reservoir in litate village on considering the features of local soil in Fukushima, have been performed. In this article, we introduce a part of the results obtaining by the synchrotron based X-ray analysis and the first principle molecular dynamics simulation methods. (author)

  15. Use of clay-mineral alteration patterns to define syntectonic permeability of joints (cleat) in Pennsylvania anthracite coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, E.J.; Marshak, S.; Altaner, S.P. [Chevron Oil Field Research Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1996-10-15

    Joints (cleat) in Pennsylvania anthracite contain two distinct clay-mineral assemblages, both of which formed by alteration of preexisting kaolinite at peak metamorphic conditions during the Alleghanian orogeny. The first assemblage, NH{sub 4} - illite or pyrophyllite {+-} quartz, formed by reaction of kaolinite with methane-rich fluids derived from within the coal. The second assemblage, sudoite {+-} tosudite {+-} rectorite {+-} berthierine, formed by the reaction of kaolinite with ferromagnesian-bearing hydrothermal fluids which must have come from outside the coal. In an earlier paper, the authors suggested that the first assemblage indicated clay diagenesis in low-permeability environments, and that the second assemblage indicated clay diagenesis in high-permeability environments. If this premise is correct, then the distribution of clay-mineral alteration assemblages serves to define syntectonic permeability variations in coal cleat. The first assemblage dominates in the coal matrix itself, in isolated cleat, in cleat that parallel the regional trend of Alleghanian folds, and in the mirror portions of cleat oriented perpendicular to the fold trends, suggesting that these regions are low-permeability environments. The second assemblage dominates in the hackle fringe of interconnected cleat that trend perpendicular to the strike of the Appalachian orogen, suggesting that these regions are high-permeability environments. These results emphasize that syntectonic cleat permeability is a function of cleat orientation, macroscopic cleat interconnetivity and orientation, as well as microscopic cleat-surface morphology.

  16. Mineral-produced high-pressure striae and clay polish: Key evidence for nonballistic transport of ejecta from Ries crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.

    1976-01-01

    Recently discovered mineral-produced, deeply incised striae and mirror-like polish on broken surfaces of limestone fragments from the sedimentary ejecta of the Ries impact crater of southern Germany are described. The striae and polish were produced under high confining pressures during high-velocity nonballistic transport of the ejecta mass within the time span of the cratering event (measured in terms of seconds). The striae on these fragments were produced by scouring by small mineral grains embedded in the surrounding clay matrix, and the polish was formed under the same condition, by movements of relatively fragment-free clay against the fragment surfaces. The occurrence of these striae and polish is key evidence for estimating the distribution and determining the relative importance of nonballistic and ballistic transport of ejecta from the shallow Ries stony meteorite impact crater.

  17. Evaluation of the lithology contents and types of clay minerals using downhole spectral analyzer of natural gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivanov, M.; Savicic, M.; Grbovic, G.

    1992-01-01

    The microprocessor downhole spectrum analyzer of natural gamma radiation is an important part of the new generation of geophysical well logging systems. This instrument produces complete energy spectra of the penetrated formations. here physical principles of logging are shown. based on the logging results from one of the wells complex lithology was identified, together with shale contents in the formation and types of clay and minerals. (author)

  18. Rates of biotite weathering, and clay mineral transformation and neoformation, determined from watershed geochemical mass-balance methods for the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, Southern Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason R. Price; Michael A. Velbel

    2013-01-01

    Biotite is a common constituent of silicate bedrock. Its weathering releases plant nutrients and consumes atmospheric CO2. Because of its stoichiometric relationship with its transformational weathering product and sensitivity to botanical activity, calculating biotite weathering rates using watershed mass-balance methods has proven challenging....

  19. On the role of clay minerals in the disposal of radioactive waste in a clay geological formation; Les mineraux argileux. Leur role et importance dans un site de stockage de dechets radioactifs en couche argileuse profonde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauer, N. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Centre de Geochimie de la Surface, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2005-05-01

    Clay minerals represent appropriate candidates in the search of geological sites and man-made barriers for potential underground storage of nuclear waste, because of their cation-exchange capabilities and swelling properties. However, this statement needs also to take into consideration other aspects such as physical parameters specific (imbrication of the mineral aggregates, occurrence of oxy-hydroxides and/or organic matter), or not of the rocks (temperature, compaction, etc), and the evolutionary history of the target units as they might indirectly modify the above potentials. Alternatively, original micro-discontinuities (micro-fractures) or those induced by the construction of the site do not appear to represent potential drains for fluid escapes, at least over long distances. The few examples presented here emphasize also that one should be careful about generalizing any conclusion, and that analytical data acquisition should be privileged in order to control better the reliability of the results and the potentials of the applied method. (author)

  20. Method for preventing plugging of water wells by clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazhkov, V I

    1966-01-01

    A method is suggested for preventing the plugging of water-bearing sands by clay from drilling fluids. It consists in placing a cement plug in the upper nipple above the filter, in order to prevent its plugging during the installation. The drilling mud passes through the rinsing windows and fills the internal void of the filter column, thus preventing further percolation and plugging of the filter during its lowering. When a 2-filter column is lowered, the clay solution is pumped into the interval between the cement plug and the next filter; this is done gradually in proportion to the addition of new pipes. When the drilling mud level lowers in the annular space between the pipes, the mud cake, together with water-saturated sand, passes through the rinsing windows into the pipes and is removed to the surface by airlift or other methods. This procedure is described in detail, discussed for various conditions of well structure, and illustrated by schematic drawings. Its advantage is in the possibility of separate testing and production of all water-bearing zones in the well, and it does not require the use of pure water for well washing.

  1. Physicochemical Study of Photocatalytic Activity of TiO2 Supported Palygorskite Clay Mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahcen Bouna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the influence of physicochemical parameters, namely, the photocatalyst loading, dye concentration, and pH of polluted solutions, on the degradation efficiency of Orange G (OG solutions containing TiO2 nanoparticles supported on palygorskite clay mineral (TiO2-Pal. The TiO2 photocatalyst attached to natural palygorskite fibers was elaborated by colloidal sol-gel route. It exhibits the anatase structure that is the most photoactive crystallographic form. The highest performances of supported photocatalyst on OG degradation were found using an optimum amount of TiO2-Pal around 0.8 g·L−1, which corresponds properly to ca. 0.4 g·L−1 of TiO2. This amount is interestingly lower than the 2.5 g·L−1 generally reported when using pure unsupported TiO2 powder. The photodegradation rate increases by decreasing OG initial concentration, and it was found significantly higher when the OG solution is either acidic (pH<4 or basic (pH≈11. For OG concentrations in the range 5×10-6– 5×10-4 M, the kinetic law of the OG degradation in presence of TiO2-Pal is similar to that reported for unsupported TiO2 nanopowder. It follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood model with a first-order reaction and an apparent rate constant of about 2.9×10-2 min−1.

  2. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of various bentonite and smectite-rich clay materials Part A: Comparison and development of mineralogical characterization methods Part B: Mineralogical and chemical characterization of clay materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L.

    2010-06-01

    Mineralogy is an essential issue in understanding thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of bentonite materials. Mineralogy affects, among others, chemical composition of pore water, susceptibility for erosion, and transport of radionuclides. Consequently, mineralogy affects the designs of the buffer and backfill components. The objective of this work was to implement and develop mineralogical and chemical methods for characterization of reference clays considered for use as buffer and backfill materials in nuclear waste disposal. In this work, different methods were tested, compared, developed, and best available techniques selected. An additional aim was to characterize reference materials that are used in various nuclear waste disposal supporting studies, e.g., the SKB's alternative buffer material (ABM) experiment. Materials studied included three Wyoming-bentonites, two bentonites from Milos, four bentonites from Kutch district, and two Friedland clays. Minerals were identified using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and polarizing microscopy. Mineralogical composition was estimated using Rietveld-analysis. Chemical methods were used to support and validate mineralogical interpretation. Total chemical composition was determined from decomposed samples using spectrometry (ICP-AES) and combustion (Leco-S, Leco-C). Ferric and ferrous iron species were distinguished titrimetrically and the amount of soluble sulphate was determined using ion chromatography. In addition, cation exchange capacity and original exchangeable cations were determined. Chemical composition of fine (<2 μ m) fractions and poorly crystalline Fe-, Al- and Si-phases determined by selective extractions were used in structural calculations of smectite. XRD is a basic method for all mineralogical characterization, but it is insensitive for detecting trace minerals and variations in the structural chemical composition of clay minerals. Polarizing

  3. Degradative crystal–chemical transformations of clay minerals under the influence of cyanobacterium-actinomycetal symbiotic associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Ivanova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and actinomycetes are essential components of soil microbial community and play an active role in ash elements leaching from minerals of the parent rock. Content and composition of clay minerals in soil determine the sorption properties of the soil horizons, water-holding capacity of the soil, stickiness, plasticity, etc. The transformative effect of cyanobacterial–actinomycetes associations on the structure of clay minerals – kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite, biotite and muscovite – was observed, with the greatest structural lattice transformation revealed under the influence of association in comparison with monocultures of cyanobacterium and actinomycete. The range of the transformative effect depended both on the type of biota (component composition of association and on the crystal–chemical parameters of the mineral itself (trioctahedral mica – biotite, was more prone to microbial degradation than the dioctahedral – muscovite. The formation of the swelling phase – the product of biotite transformation into the mica–vermicullite mixed-layered formation was revealed as a result of association cultivation. Crystal chemical transformation of vermiculite was accompanied by the removal of potassium (К, magnesium (Mg and aluminum (Al from the crystal lattice. The study of such prokaryotic communities existed even in the early stages of the Earth's history helps to understand the causes and nature of the transformations undergone by the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere of the planet.contribution of treatments on structure induces and model parameters are discussed in the paper.

  4. An accelerated test method for efflorescence in clay bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beggan, John Edward

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the creation of accelerated efflorescence in clay bricks was undertaken with a view to creating a viable test procedure for determining efflorescence potential. The testing programme incorporated ambient conditions similar to those which promote efflorescence growth in bricks in use. Theoretical investigations into the physical mechanism underlying the creation of efflorescence directed the attempts to accelerate the process. It was found that calcium sulphate efflorescence could not be sufficiently accelerated such that a useful efflorescence test procedure could be proposed. The inability to produce accelerated efflorescence in brick samples was attributed to limitations associated with time dependent salt diffusion in the efflorescence mechanism. The preliminary testing that was undertaken into the creation of efflorescence prompted the use of acid assisted methods to accelerate efflorescence. The acid assisted method that was adopted to provide a possible indication of efflorescence potential relies upon the transformation of low solubility calcium to a more soluble form. The movement of the transformed salt is then induced by cyclic temperature exposure at temperatures similar to those experienced in Spring. The appearance of the transformed calcium salt on the surface of the brick specimen provides an indication of the efflorescence potential. Brick piers constructed on an exposed site and monitored over a 12 month period provided information on the validity of the acid assisted test method. The efflorescence observed on the piers correlated well with that predicted by the acid assisted test, suggesting that the new test has the potential to accurately predict the efflorescence potential of clay bricks Relationships between other properties such as air permeability, sorptivity and tensile strength were investigated such that an alternative method of predicting efflorescence could be achieved. It was found that (within the bounds of the

  5. Influence of composition of the raw materials on phase formation in solid compounds based on slag and clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.V.; Tolebaev, T.; Omarova, V.I.; Burkitbaev, M.; Blynskiy, A.P.; Bachilova, N.V.; Matsynina, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Activation of solidification processes in a compound formed on the basis of slag and clay minerals using sodium hydroxide - the output product from processing the BN-350 sodium coolant it is expedient to form the final product with a phase composition representing (in terms of long term storage) hydro-alumino-silicates incorporating Na-22 and Cs-137 radionuclides, which isomorphly replace other atoms in the crystal lattice sites. Combination of mineral phases, such as alkaline and alkaline-earth hydro-alumino-silicates with zeolite-like structure, providing sorptive properties, and the tobermorite like low-base hydro silicates of calcium defining the physico-mechanical properties of compound is the necessary condition for the compound stability. Investigations of phase formation in the mixtures of Kazakhstan clay, slag materials and alkali have been conducted targeted to control the physico-chemical properties of solid compound. The mixtures of alkali, thermal power plant ashes and clays of various mineralogical genesis (kaolinite, bentonite, Ca-Na-smectite montmorillonite) have been studied. The ashes and phosphorous slag while interacting with alkali are determined to form the non-alkaline hydro-silicates of stavrolite and indianite (anortite) type with free alkali being found in an unbound state. Both alkaline and alkaline-alkaline-earth hydro-silicates of Na 2 Ca 2 Si 2 O 7 H 2 O type are only formed in a compounds containing metallurgical slag. Formation of alkaline hydro-alumino-silicates of NaAlSiO 4 H 2 0 type as well as tomsonite (Na 4 Ca 8 [Al 20S i 20 O 80 ] 24H 2 O) - the zeolite like mineral have been detected in a two-component alkali-clay mixtures. Besides the quantity of tomsonite was determined to be not only dependent on Al 2 O 3 content in clay component but is also defined by stoichiometric composition of the mixture, because zeolite synthesis takes place under conditions of gels co-deposition and high pH value. Maximum quantity of

  6. Enhancement of the glass corrosion in the presence of clay minerals: testing experimental results with an integrated glass dissolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.; Vernaz, E.Y.

    1992-01-01

    Recent glass dissolution experiments, conducted at 90 deg C in the presence of potential backfill materials, indicate remarkably faster glass corrosion in the presence of clay, compared to tests where the glass is leached either alone or with alternative backfill materials. This effect correlates with the clay content in the backfill, and may be attributed to the removal of silica from solution. Scorpion, or dissolution with reprecipitation of a silica-rich clay, have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the silica consumption. The results of some experiments have been tested against a glass dissolution model, in which a widely used kinetic equation for glass corrosion is coupled with diffusive silica transport through a single porosity, linearly sorbing medium, which represents the backfilling. Because the glass corrosion rates imposed by the kinetic equation are inversely proportional to the silicic acid concentration of the leachant contacting the glass, the model predicts enhanced glass dissolution if silica is sorbed by the porous medium. The experimental data proved to be consistent with the predicted enhancement of the glass dissolution. Moreover, the model-estimated distribution coefficients for silica sorption (K d ) fall within the range of values extracted from available literature data, thus supporting the hypothesis that the observed high corrosion rates are due to sorption of silica on the clay mineral surfaces. (author)

  7. The influence of shale depositional fabric on the kinetics of hydrocarbon generation through control of mineral surface contact area on clay catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Habibur M.; Kennedy, Martin; Löhr, Stefan; Dewhurst, David N.; Sherwood, Neil; Yang, Shengyu; Horsfield, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Accurately assessing the temperature and hence the depth and timing of hydrocarbon generation is a critical step in the characterization of a petroleum system. Clay catalysis is a potentially significant modifier of hydrocarbon generation temperature, but experimental studies of clay catalysis show inconsistent or contradictory results. This study tests the hypothesis that source rock fabric itself is an influence on clay mineral catalysis as it controls the extent to which organic matter and clay minerals are physically associated. Two endmember clay-organic fabrics distinguish the source rocks studied: (1) a particulate fabric where organic matter is present as discrete, >5 μm particles and (2) a nanocomposite fabric in which amorphous organic matter is associated with clay mineral surfaces at sub-micron scale. High-resolution electron imaging and bulk geochemical characterisation confirm that samples of the Miocene Monterey Formation (California) are representative of the nanocomposite source rock endmember, whereas samples from the Permian Stuart Range Formation (South Australia) represent the particulate source rock endmember. Kinetic experiments are performed on paired whole rock and kerogen isolate samples from these two formations using open system, non-isothermal pyrolysis at three different heating rates (0.7, 2 and 5 K/min) to determine the effects of the different shale fabrics on hydrocarbon generation kinetics. Extrapolation to a modelled geological heating rate shows a 20 °C reduction in the onset temperature of hydrocarbon generation in Monterey Formation whole rock samples relative to paired kerogen isolates. This result is consistent with the Monterey Formations's nanocomposite fabric where clay catalysis can proceed because reactive clay minerals are intimately associated with organic matter. By contrast, there is no significant difference in the modelled hydrocarbon generation temperature of paired whole rock and kerogen isolates from the

  8. Clay minerals in uraniferous deposit of Imouraren (Tim Mersoi basin, Niger): implications on genesis of deposit and on ore treatment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billon, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Nigerian uraniferous deposits are located in carboniferous and Jurassic formations of Tim Mersoi basin. AREVA is shareholder of 3 mine sites in this area: SOMAIR and COMINAK, both in exploitation since 1960's and IMOURAREN, 80 km further South, whose exploitation is planned for 2015. Mineralization of Imouraren deposit is included in the fluvial formation of Tchirezrine 2 (Jurassic), composed of channels and flood plains. Facies of channel in-fillings range from coarse sandstones to siltstones, while overflow facies are composed of analcimolites. Secondary mineralogy was acquired during 2 stages: 1- diagenesis, with formation of clay minerals, analcime, secondary quartz and albites, and 2- stage of fluids circulations, which induced alteration of detrital and diagenetic minerals, formation of new phases and uranium deposition. A mineralogical zoning, at the scale of deposit resulted from this alteration. The heterogeneity of Tchirezrine 2, at the level of both facies and mineralogy, is also evidenced during ore treatment, as ore reacts differently depending on its source, with sometimes problems of U recovery. Ore treatment tests showed that analcimes and chlorites were both penalizing minerals, because of 1- the sequestration of U-bearing minerals into analcimes, 2- their dissolution which trends to move away from U solubilization conditions (pH and Eh) and to form numerous sulfates, and 3- problems of percolation. A detection method of analcime-rich ores, based on infrared spectroscopy, was developed in order to optimize ore blending and so to reduce negative effects during ore treatment process. (author)

  9. Investigating Interactions between the Silica and Carbon Cycles during Precipitation and Early Diagenesis of Authigenic Clay/Carbonate-Mineral Associations in the Carbonate Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Francisca Martinez Ruiz, F.; Sanchez-Roman, M.; Anjos, S.; Bontognali, T. R. R.; Nascimento, G. S.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2017-12-01

    The study of authigenic clay/carbonate-mineral associations within carbonate sequences has important implications for the interpretation of scientific problems related with rock reservoir properties, such as alteration of potential porosity and permeability. More specifically, when clay minerals are randomly distributed within the carbonate matrix, it becomes difficult to predict reservoir characteristics. In order to understand this mineral association in the geological record, we have undertaken a comparative study of specially designed laboratory experiments with modern environments, where clay minerals have been shown to precipitate together with a range of carbonate minerals, including calcite, Mg-calcite and dolomite. Two modern dolomite-forming environments, the Coorong lakes, South Australia and Brejo do Espinho Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were selected for this investigation. For comparative evaluation, enrichment microbial culture experiments, using natural pore water from Brejo do Espinho as the growth medium to promote mineral precipitation, were performed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To establish the environmental parameters and biological processes facilitating the dual mineral association, the experimental samples have been compared with the natural minerals using HRTEM measurements. The results demonstrate that the clay and carbonate minerals apparently do not co-precipitate, but the precipitation of the different minerals in the same sample has probably occurred under different environmental conditions with variable chemistries, e.g., hypersalinity versus normal salinity resulting from the changing ratio of evaporation versus precipitation. Thus, the investigated mineral association is not a product of diagenetic processes but of sequential in situ precipitation processes related to changes in the silica and carbon availability. Implications for ancient carbonate formations will be presented and discussed in the context of a specific

  10. Sorption of VX to Clay Minerals and Soils: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Kaolinite, a member of the kaolin family, is a 1:1 clay, consisting of a single silicon-containing tetrahedral sheet linked to a single aluminum...14,15,18,19 The kaolinite is a white-firing, plastic kaolinite mined from claystone deposits in Georgia. This clay, identified as no. 6 tile kaolin , was...Validation of Model Predictions for the Dispersion and Fate of Reactive Chemical Releases in a Sub- Estuary of the Chesapeake Bay. Presented at the 2011

  11. Clay minerals and metal oxides strongly influence the structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities during soil maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Annelie; Schulz, Stefanie; Giebler, Julia; Schulz, Stephan; Pronk, Geertje J; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y; Schloter, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Clay minerals, charcoal and metal oxides are essential parts of the soil matrix and strongly influence the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. We investigated the role of these parental materials for the development of functional microbial guilds using the example of alkane-degrading bacteria harbouring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in artificial mixtures composed of different minerals and charcoal, sterile manure and a microbial inoculum extracted from an agricultural soil. We followed changes in abundance and community structure of alkane-degrading microbial communities after 3 and 12 months of soil maturation and in response to a subsequent 2-week plant litter addition. During maturation we observed an overall increasing divergence in community composition. The impact of metal oxides on alkane-degrading community structure increased during soil maturation, whereas the charcoal impact decreased from 3 to 12 months. Among the clay minerals illite influenced the community structure of alkB-harbouring bacteria significantly, but not montmorillonite. The litter application induced strong community shifts in soils, maturated for 12 months, towards functional guilds typical for younger maturation stages pointing to a resilience of the alkane-degradation function potentially fostered by an extant 'seed bank'.

  12. Effects of clay minerals, hydroxides, and timing of dissolved organic matter addition on the competitive sorption of copper, nickel, and zinc : a column experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Refaey, Y.; Jansen, B.; Parsons, J.R.; de Voogt, P.; Bagnis, S.; Markus, A.; El-Shater, A.-H.; El-Haddad, A.-A.; Kalbitz, K.

    2017-01-01

    Infiltration of heavy metal (HM) polluted wastewater can seriously compromise soil and groundwater quality. Interactions between mineral soil components (e.g. clay minerals) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) play a crucial role in determining HM mobility in soils. In this study, the influence of

  13. Heavy sediment influx during early Holocene: Inference from clay mineral studies in a core from the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.

    is attributed to heavy sediment influx du r- ing Mid Termination (MT) (12,500 ? 10,000 years BP), due to i n creased precipitation and run - off resulting from high inte n sity monsoonal regime. C LAY minerals are a powerful source for the interpret a... to address to the prov e nance of the sediments in a sediment core from the western Bengal Fan. In this paper, we report clay mi n eralogy and provide an explanation for the heavy sed i ment deposition du r ing the Holocene. A sediment core of 650...

  14. Clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides and soil organic carbon distribution within soil aggregates in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Fernández-Ugalde, Oihane; Virto, Iñigo; Arias-González, Ander

    2017-04-01

    Soil mineralogy is of primary importance for key environmental services provided by soils like carbon sequestration. However, current knowledge on the effects of clay mineralogy on soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization is based on limited and conflicting data. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clay minerals, metallic oxides and oxy-hydroxides and SOC distribution within soil aggregates in mature Pinus radiata D.Don forest plantations. Nine forest stands located in the same geographical area of the Basque Country (North of Spain) were selected. These stands were planted on different parent material (3 on each of the following: sandstone, basalt and trachyte). There were no significant differences in climate and forest management among them. Moreover, soils under these plantations presented similar content of clay particles. We determined bulk SOC storage, clay mineralogy, the content of Fe-Si-Al-oxides and oxyhydroxides and the distribution of organic C in different soil aggregate sizes at different soil depths (0-5 cm and 5-20 cm). The relationship between SOC and abiotic factors was investigated using a factor analysis (PCA) followed by stepwise regression analysis. Soils developed on sandstone showed significantly lower concentration of SOC (29 g C kg-1) than soils developed on basalts (97 g C kg-1) and trachytes (119 g C kg-1). The soils on sandstone presented a mixed clay mineralogy dominated by illite, with lesser amounts of hydroxivermiculite, hydrobiotite and kaolinite, and a total absence of interstratified chlorite/vermiculite. In contrast, the major crystalline clay mineral identified in the soils developed on volcanic rocks was interstratified chlorite/vermiculite. Nevertheless, no major differences were observed between basaltic and trachytic soils in the clay mineralogy. The selective extraction of Fe showed that the oxalate extractable iron was significantly lower in soils on sandstone (3.7%) than on basalts (11.2%) and

  15. Adhesion of the clay minerals montmorillonite, kaolinite, and attapulgite reduces respiration of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, S; Stotzky, G

    1986-01-01

    The respiration of three phenotypes of Histoplasma capsulatum, the causal agent of histoplasmosis in humans, was markedly reduced by low concentrations of montmorillonite but was reduced less by even higher concentrations of kaolinite or attapulgite (palygorskite). The reduction in respiration followed a pattern that suggested saturation-type kinetics: an initial sharp reduction that occurred with low concentrations of clay (0.01 to 0.5% [wt/vol]), followed by a more gradual reduction with higher concentrations (1 to 8%). Increases in viscosity (which could impair the movement of O2) caused by the clays were not responsible for the reduction in respiration, and the clays did not interfere with the availability of nutrients. Scanning electron microscopy after extensive washing showed that the clay particles were tightly bound to the hyphae, suggesting that the clays reduced the rate of respiration of H. capsulatum by adhering to the mycelial surface and, thereby, interfered with the movement of nutrients, metabolites, and gases across the mycelial wall.

  16. Methods for obtention of PS/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, Pedro G.; Valera, Ticiane S.; Coelho, Caio P.D.; Demarquette, Nicole R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, nanocomposites of Polystyrene (PS) and organoclay were obtained using a twin-screw extruder and a mixer Haake. A commercial clay named Cloisite 20A was used. The clay and the nanocomposites were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction. The rheological properties were investigated carrying out small amplitude oscillatory strain (SAOS). The results of X-ray diffraction showed that the polymer was incorporated by the organoclay. The results of SAOS indicated a better clay dispersion for the samples obtained using the mixer. (author)

  17. Preparation and characterization of polymer nanocomposites based on chitosan and clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiori, Ana Paula Santos de Melo; Gabiraba, Victor Parizio; Praxedes, Ana Paula Perdigao; Nunes, Marcelo Ramon da Silva; Balliano, Tatiane L.; Silva, Rosanny Christhinny da; Tonholo, Josealdo; Ribeiro, Adriana Santos

    2014-01-01

    In this work nanocomposites based on chitosan and different clays were prepared using polyethyleneglycol (PEG) as plasticizer. The samples obtained were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG) and by mechanical characterization (tensile test) with the aim of investigating the interactions between chitosan and clay. The nanocomposite films prepared using sodium bentonite (Ben) showed an increase of 81.2% in the maximum tensile stress values and a decrease of 16.0% in the Young’s modulus when compared to the chitosan with PEG (QuiPEG) films, evidencing that the introduction of the clay into the polymer matrix provided a more flexible and resistant film, whose elongation at break was 93.6% higher than for the QuiPEG film. (author)

  18. Physical Matrix Characterisation: Studies of Crystalline Rocks and Consolidated Clays by PMMA Method and Electron Microscopy as Support of Diffusion Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Leskinen, A.; Kelokaski, A.; Togneri, L.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Patelli, A.

    2007-07-01

    Crystalline rock and consolidated clay are both considered adequate host rocks for a high-level radioactive waste deep geological repository (HLWR). Over the extended periods of HLWR operation, long-lived radionuclides (RN) may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. To predict the fate of contaminants and to assess the safety of the host rock, it is very important to determine transport parameters, as diffusion coefficients, and to relate them to the physical properties of the barriers, as connected porosity. In heterogeneous materials, it is also a major task to describe the transport at the mineral scale evaluating diffusion coefficients and mineral-specific porosities on single minerals. The main objective of this study was to determine within granite and consolidated clay, the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities by poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) autoradiography method. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDS) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. By the novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) apparent diffusion coefficients were determined at mineral scale. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the effective diffusion coefficients and retention parameters of single minerals in different granite samples and consolidated clays. (Author) 42 refs.

  19. Physical Matrix Characterisation: Studies of Crystalline Rocks and Consolidated Clays by PMMA Method and Electron Microscopy as a Support of Diffusion Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Leskinen, A.; Kelokaski, A.; Togneri, L.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Patelli, A.

    2007-01-01

    Crystalline rock and consolidated clay are both considered adequate host rocks for a high-level radioactive waste deep geological repository (HLWR). Over the extended periods of HLWR operation, long-lived radionuclides (RN) may be released from the fuel and migrate to the geo/biosphere. To predict the fate of contaminants and to assess the safety of the host rock, it is very important to determine transport parameters, as diffusion coefficients, and to relate them to the physical properties of the barriers, as connected porosity. In heterogeneous materials, it is also a major task to describe the transport at the mineral scale evaluating diffusion coefficients and mineral-specific porosities on single minerals. The main objective of this study was to determine within granite and consolidated clay, the connective porosity and mineral-specific porosities by poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) autoradiography method. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses (FESEM/EDS) were performed in order to study the pore apertures of porous regions in greater detail and to identify the corresponding minerals. By the novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) apparent diffusion coefficients were determined at mineral scale. Finally, the porosity results were used to evaluate the effective diffusion coefficients and retention parameters of single minerals in different granite samples and consolidated clays. (Author) 42 refs

  20. The effect of high pH alkaline solutions on the mineral stability of the Boom Clay - Batch experiments at 60 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honty, M.; De Craen, M.; Wang, L.; Madejova, J.; Czimerova, A.; Pentrak, M.; Stricek, I.; Van Geet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Boom Clay is currently viewed as a reference host formation for studies on deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Belgium. The interactions between bulk rock Boom Clay and 0.1 M KOH, 0.1 M NaOH, 0.1 M Ca(OH) 2 , young cement water and evolved cement water solutions, ranging in pH from 12.5 to 13.2, were examined as static batch experiments at 60 deg. C to simulate alkaline plume perturbations, which are expected to occur in the repository due to the presence of concrete. Both liquids and solids were investigated at specific times between 90 and 510 days in order to control the elemental budget and to search for potential mineralogical alterations. Also, the clay fraction was separated from the whole-rock Boom Clay at the end of each run and characterized for its mineralogical composition. Thereby, the importance of the mineral matrix to buffer the alkaline attack and the role of organic matter to protect clay minerals were also addressed. The results indicate that the degree of geochemical perturbation in Boom Clay is dependent on the initial pH of the applied solution together with the nature of the major cation in the reactant fluids. The higher the initial pH of the media, the stronger its interaction with Boom Clay. No major non-clay mineralogical alteration of the Boom Clay was detected, but dissolution of kaolinite, smectite and illite occurred within the studied experimental conditions. The dissolution of clays is accompanied by the decrease in the layer charge, followed by a decrease in the cation-exchange capacity. The highest TOC values coincide with the highest total elemental concentrations in the leachates, and correspondingly, the highest dissolution degree. However, no quantitative link could be established between the degree of organic matter decomposition and clay dissolution.

  1. New aluminium-rich alkali slag matrix with clay minerals for immobilizing simulated radioactive Sr and Cs waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Guangren; Sun, Darren Delai; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2001-01-01

    A new aluminium-rich alkali-activated slag matrix (M-AAS) with clay absorbents has been developed for immobilization of simulated radioactive Sr or Cs waste by introducing metakaolin, natural zeolite and NaOH-treated attapulgite clay minerals into alkali-activated slag matrix (AAS). The results revealed that the additions of metakaolin and clay absorbents into the cementitious matrixes would greatly enhance the distribution ratio, R d , of selective adsorption whether the matrix was OPC matrix or AAS matrix. The new immobilizing matrix M-AAS not only exhibited the strongest selective adsorption for both Sr and Cs ions, but also was characterized by lower porosity and small pore diameter so that it exhibited the lowest leaching rate. Hydration product analyses also demonstrated that (Na+Al)-substituted C-S-H(I) and self-generated zeolite were major hydration products in the M-AAS matrix, which provided this new immobilizing matrix with better selective adsorption on Sr and Cs and lower leaching rate

  2. Adsorption of Sr(II) on clay minerals: effects of salt concentration, loading and pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafferty, P.; Shiao, S.Y.; Binz, C.M.; Meyer, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of Sr(II) on a number of clay minerals has been investigated by means of a batch technique in solutions of sodium salts. Generally the results can be approximated by ideal ion exchange equations. Distribution coefficients at trace loading follow the linear relation log D = s log [Na(I)sub(aq)] + b where b is a constant and s had values of from about - 1.5 to - 2.0, which are fairly close to the ideal valve of - 2. Adsorption isotherms at constant pH and salt concentration are linear in the low loading region. Distribution coefficients for montmorillonite are almost independent of pH in the intermediate pH region 5 to 7 but for illite and kaolinite, increases in the distribution coefficient with pH are observed. Comparison of these results with literature values, insofar as it is possible, shows that distribution coefficients are usually within a factor of two or three for the same mineral with similar capacities under the same conditions even if techniques of preparation and measurement are different, but values may vary considerably more if the capacities of the different mineral samples are greatly different. Values of the distribution coefficient at very high salt concentration are very low, considerably less than unity at 4 M NaCl. Thus migration rates of Sr(II), relative to water flow, through geologic formations whose adsorption behavior is dominated by these clay minerals are likely to be high at high salt concentrations. (author)

  3. Antibiotic eluting clay mineral (Laponite®) for wound healing application: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, M; Chrzanowski, W; Rohanizadeh, R

    2014-11-01

    Different materials in form of sponge, hydrogel and film have been developed and formulated for treating and dressing burn wounds. In this study, the potential of Laponite, a gel forming clay, in combination with an antimicrobial agent (mafenide), as a wound dressing material was tested in vitro. Laponite/mafenide (Lap/Maf) hydrogel was formulated in three different ratios of Lap/Maf 1:1, 1:2, 1:3. Laponite/mafenide/alginate (Lap/Maf/Alg) film was also formulated by combining Lap/Maf gel (1:1) with alginate. Intercalation rate of mafenide into the layers of Laponite nanoparticles and physico-chemical properties, including wound dressing characteristics of materials were studied using various analytical methods. Furthermore, the degradation of materials and the release profile of mafenide were investigated in simulated wound exudates fluid and antibacterial effectiveness of the eluted mafenide was tested on a range of bacterial species. The cytotoxicity of materials was also evaluated in skin fibroblast culture. The results showed that mafenide molecules were intercalated between the nano-sized layers of Laponite. The eluted mafenide showed active antibacterial effects against all three tested bacteria. All intercalated mafenide released from Lap/Maf 1:1 and 1:2 gel formulations and nearly 80% release from 1:3 formulation during test period. No significant difference was observed in release profile of mafenide between Lap/Maf/Alg film and Lap/Maf formulations. Wound dressing tests on Lap/Maf/Alg film showed it is a breathable dressing and has capacity to absorb wound exudates. The study showed that prepared Lap/Maf composite has the potential to be used as an antibiotic eluting gel or film for wound healing application. Additionally, Laponite has shown benefits in wound healing processes by releasing Mg(2+) ions and thereby reducing the cytotoxic effect of mafenide on fibroblast cells.

  4. Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerter, Erik; Finstad, Kari; Schaefer, Justin; Goldsmith, Gregory R.; Dawson, Todd; Amundson, Ronald

    2014-07-01

    In isotope-enabled hydrology, soil and vadose zone sediments have been generally considered to be isotopically inert with respect to the water they host. This is inconsistent with knowledge that clay particles possessing an electronegative surface charge and resulting cation exchange capacity (CEC) interact with a wide range of solutes which, in the absence of clays, have been shown to exhibit δ18O isotope effects that vary in relation to the ionic strength of the solutions. To investigate the isotope effects caused by high CEC clays in mineral-water systems, we created a series of monominerallic-water mixtures at gravimetric water contents ranging from 5% to 32%, consisting of pure deionized water of known isotopic composition with homoionic (Mg, Ca, Na, K) montmorillonite. Similar mixtures were also created with quartz to determine the isotope effect of non-, or very minimally-, charged mineral surfaces. The δ18O value of the water in these monominerallic soil analogs was then measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) after direct headspace CO2 equilibration. Mg- and Ca-exchanged homoionic montmorillonite depleted measured δ18O values up to 1.55‰ relative to pure water at 5% water content, declining to 0.49‰ depletion at 30% water content. K-montmorillonite enriched measured δ18O values up to 0.86‰ at 5% water content, declining to 0.11‰ enrichment at 30% water. Na-montmorillonite produces no measureable isotope effect. The isotope effects observed in these experiments may be present in natural, high-clay soils and sediments. These findings have relevance to the interpretation of results of direct CO2-water equilibration approaches to the measurement of the δ18O value of soil water. The adsorbed cation isotope effect may bear consideration in studies of pedogenic carbonate, plant-soil water use and soil-atmosphere interaction. Finally, the observed isotope effects may prove useful as molecular scale probes of the nature of mineral

  5. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  6. Transport of vanadium (V in saturated porous media: effects of pH, ionic-strength and clay mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulu Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium, a hazardous pollutant, has been frequently detected in soil and groundwater, however, its transport behavior in porous media were not clearly understood. In this study, the effects of solution pH, ionic strength (IS and the effect of clay mineral on the transport of vanadium in saturated porous media were investigated. Laboratory experiments using a series of columns packed with quartz sand were carried out to explore the retention and transport of vanadium with a range of ionic-strength (0.001–0.1 M and pH (4–8 and two different types of clay minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite. Results of the breakthrough experiments showed that vanadium was highly mobile in the saturated porous media. The increase in pH rendered a higher transport of vanadium in saturated porous media. The study also indicated an easier transfer of vanadium with an increase in IS. Montmorillonite enhanced the mobility of vanadium in the column when compared to kaolinite. A mathematical model based on advection-dispersion equation coupled with equilibrium and kinetic reactions was used to describe the retention and transport of vanadium in the columns very well.

  7. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of clay minerals on the adsorption of Sr-85 and Tc-95m under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Washburne, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of three clay minerals with hydrogen peroxide affects the observed adsorption behavior of technetium relative to untreated clay under anoxic conditions. A possible adsorption mechanism of Tc is the reduction of TcO - 4 to a more positively charged or better adsorbed species. Oxidation of the clay by H 2 O 2 would hinder the reduction of TcO - 4 by buffering the clay-water system at a higher Eh value, although a difference in measured Eh value may go undetected. Sorption of strontium by the clays under the same conditions is not affected by a pretreatment with H 2 O 2 . The behavior of strontium follows that expected from ion exchange theory. 13 tables

  8. Relationship between the isotopic composition of strontium in newly formed continental clay minerals and their source material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, N.

    1979-01-01

    The 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of recent montmorillonites and kaolinites newly formed in weathering profiles of western and central Africa and of Nosy Be and La Reunion islands near Madagascar are directly related to the composition and age of the parent rocks or minerals. They may, therefore, be used as a genetic tracer. The 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios are about 0.704 when these clays crystallise from recent basalts and they are higher than 0.715 when the parent rocks are of sialic composition and old in age. Kaolinites newly formed in situ from feldspars contain small amounts of Sr with abnormally high 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios: in this study they are higher than 1.094. When these minerals crystallize from biotites, their 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios are much lower and can be close to the value of the primary Sr trapped in the biotites during their crystallization. On the other hand, the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr of continental montmorillonites are less scattered: they range, in this study, between 0.704 and 0.722. These low values, as well as the high adsorption capacities of these minerals in the sedimentary environment, allow the assumption that they frequently have 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios close to that of marine Sr during sedimentation. Therefore, montmorillonites are able to form homogeneous authigenic minerals by synsedimentary alterations. (Auth.)

  9. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Qingling; Deng Yali; Li Huishu; Liu Jie [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Hu Hongqing, E-mail: hqhu@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Chen Shouwen [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resource and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Sa Tongmin [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, College of Agriculture, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L{sup -1}. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ({Delta}{sub r}G{sub m}{sup {theta}}) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ({Delta}{sub r}H{sub m}{sup {theta}}) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  10. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Qingling; Deng Yali; Li Huishu; Liu Jie; Hu Hongqing; Chen Shouwen; Sa Tongmin

    2009-01-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L -1 . The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy (Δ r G m θ ) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy (Δ r H m θ ) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  11. Precision test method by x-ray absorbent clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakadai, Toru; Matsukawa, Hideyuki; Sekita, Jun-ichiro; Murakoshi, Atsushi.

    1982-01-01

    In X-ray penetration photography of such as welds with reinforcing metal and castings of complex shape, the X-ray absorbent clay developed to eliminate various disadvantages of the conventional absorbents was further studied for better application. The results of the usage are as follows. Because the X-ray absorbent is clay, it is flexible in form, and gives good adhesion to test objects. In the welds and castings mentioned, it is effective for reducing the scattered ray, accordingly, it results in superior images. The following matters are described: contrast in radiographs, the required conditions for X-ray absorbents in general, the properties of the absorbent (absorption coefficient, consistency, density), improvement in radiographs by means of the X-ray absorbent clay (wall thickness compensation, masking, the application together with narrow-field irradiation photography). (Mori, K.)

  12. Study of methods for electrical modification of a clay suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimov, R A; Kudaktina, T T; Parpiyev, T R

    1982-01-01

    As a result of the conducted experiments it was established that the viscosity and maximum static shear stress of the drilling muds prepared on electrically treated water increases 2-3-fold as compared to the muds prepared on standard water. This is explained by the fact that the unipolar treatment results in deep change in the water structure. Under the influence of the electrical current, there is activation, rise in the electrical conductivity, decrease in surface tension, considerable rise in the pH value, etc. The output of clay mud increases 1.5-fold in the clay suspension that is prepared on electrically treated water.

  13. Nanoscale spatial analysis of clay minerals containing cesium by synchrotron radiation photoemission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Toru; Shimoyama, Iwao; Matsumura, Daiju; Tsuji, Takuya; Nishihata, Yasuo; Kogure, Toshihiro; Ohkochi, Takuo; Yasui, Akira; Yaita, Tsuyoshi

    2018-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation photoemission electron microscope (SR-PEEM) was applied to demonstrate the pinpoint analysis of micrometer-sized weathered biotite clay particles with artificially adsorbed cesium (Cs) atoms. Despite the insulating properties of the clay, we observed the spatial distributions of constituent elements (Si, Al, Cs, Mg, and Fe) without charging issues and clarified reciprocal site-correlations among these elements with nanometer resolution. We found that Cs atoms were likely to be adsorbed evenly over the entire particle; however, we identified an occupational conflict between Cs and Mg atoms, implying that Cs sorption involves ion exchange processes. Spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of the Cs4,5 M-edge region showed Cs to be present in a monocation state (Cs+) as typically observed for Cs compounds. Further pinpoint XAS measurements were also performed at the Fe L2,3-edge to determine the chemical valence of the Fe atoms. The shapes of the spectra were similar to those for Fe2O3, indicating that Fe in the clay was in a 3+ oxidation state. From these observations, we infer that charge compensation facilitates Cs adsorption in the vicinity of a substitution site where Si4+ ions are replaced by Fe3+ ions in SiO4 tetrahedral sheets. Our results demonstrate the utility of SR-PEEM as a tool for spatially resolved chemical analyses of various environmental substances, which is not limited by the poor conductivity of samples.

  14. Preparation of Al/Fe-Pillared Clays: Effect of the Starting Mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Helir-Joseph; Blanco, Carolina; Gil, Antonio; Vicente, Miguel-Ángel; Galeano, Luis-Alejandro

    2017-11-28

    Four natural clays were modified with mixed polyoxocations of Al/Fe for evaluating the effect of the physicochemical properties of the starting materials (chemical composition, abundance of expandable clay phases, cationic exchange capacity and textural properties) on final physicochemical and catalytic properties of Al/Fe-PILCs. The aluminosilicate denoted C2 exhibited the highest potential as starting material in the preparation of Al/Fe-PILC catalysts, mainly due to its starting cationic exchange capacity (192 meq/100 g) and the dioctahedral nature of the smectite phase. These characteristics favored the intercalation of the mixed (Al 13- x /Fe x ) 7+ Keggin-type polyoxocations, stabilizing a basal spacing of 17.4 Å and high increase of the BET surface (194 m²/g), mainly represented in microporous content. According to H₂-TPR analyses, catalytic performance of the incorporated Fe in the Catalytic Wet Peroxide Oxidation (CWPO) reaction strongly depends on the level of location in mixed Al/Fe pillars. Altogether, such physicochemical characteristics promoted high performance in CWPO catalytic degradation of methyl orange in aqueous medium at very mild reaction temperatures (25.0 ± 1.0 °C) and pressure (76 kPa), achieving TOC removal of 52% and 70% of azo-dye decolourization in only 75 min of reaction under very low concentration of clay catalyst (0.05 g/L).

  15. Development of clay characterization methods for use in repository design with application to a natural Ca bentonite clay containing a redox front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, O.; Pusch, R.

    1990-12-01

    Natural smectite clays in the form of 'true' bentonites formed from volcanic ash, or resulting from in-situ weathering of rock, are suitable for a number of sealing options in repositories, both as tightening component of sand/clay backfills and as highly efficient buffer for embedment of canisters, as well as for fracture sealing. The price and quality, in terms of smectite content and type of smectite, vary considerably and an optimum choice of clay for use in repositories has to be based on quantitative quality data. This requires characterization of the clay material for which a test scheme has been worked out. It comprises determination of the granulometrical, chemical, and mineralogical compositions, as well as of certain physical properties. Recent research shows the importance of the type of smectite for the longevity of buffers in repository environment, beidellite being less favourable and saponite superior to montmorillonite, which is the most common smectite species. The test scheme hence includes means of distinguishing between various smectite minerals. The influence of accessory minerals on the chemical integrity of both the smectite and the canister material requires identification also of such minerals, for which the scheme is useful as well. The report summarizes the various test procedures and gives data from application of the scheme to samples from a natural Ca bentonite containing a redox front. This study suggests that a significant part of the iron in the clay fraction is in the form of Fe 2+ in octahedral positions of the montmorillonite of unoxidized natural clay and that it is converted to Fe 3+ on oxidation. Part of the iron is probably in the form of the Fe 2+ Fe 3+ hydroxy compounds that give the unoxidized clay its bluish colour, while they can be assumed to be transformed to yellowish FeOOH forms on oxidation. (author)

  16. Comparaison de diverses méthodes de dosage des argiles d'un sable de gisement. Dosage des argiles Comparison of Different Methods of Determining Clays in a Reservoir Sand. Quantitative Analysis of Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvon J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les argiles d'un sable de gisement, concentrées dans la fraction de diamètre Phi Oil, gas and geothermal reservoirs all contain clayey fractions no matter how small they may be. This has been blamed whenever operating or producing problems arise. It may be revealed by phenomena of mechanical resistance, permeability or interfacial properties (ion exchange, adsorption, etc. . Tests to understand such phenomena then go via the quantitative mineralogical analysis of the clays present. This analysis must also be looked at in terms of methods. It is subjected to constraints of cost, instrumentation, competence or deadlines. This article proposes:(a A so-called conventional route (Dejou et al, 1977 based on chemical and weighted analyses. (b An overall assessment method of the clay phase by difference (determination of two nonclay species. (c A method based on the statistical processing of microanalytic data obtained by an electronic microprobe. The material examined was a quartzose arenite made up mainly of quartz, jarosite, orthoclase, plagioclases, calcite, dolomite, muscovite, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, interstratified illite-montmorillionite, iron oxyhydroxides and accessory minerals such as rutile, zircon, garnet, tourmaline and hydroxylapatite. The arenite was subjected to an ultrasonic treatment (Letelier, 1986 to recover pellicular or weakly cemented clays. After this treatment, all the free clays were found in the < 40 m fraction which were used for the measurements. The so-called conventionalmethod is based on the associating of multiple techniques that are normally used for analyzing clays. They include X-ray diffraction, TDA, TGA, selective dissolution, CEC, adsorption of various reagents and gravimetric separations. They have been reviewed by Dejou et al (1977. The results they give depend on the grain size, chrystallochemistry, presence of amorphous elements and especially the typical chemical compositions assigned to the

  17. Method and apparatus for determining characteristics of clay-bearing formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertl, W.H.; Ruhovets, N.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to methods and apparatus for determining characteristics of clay-bearing geological formations by radioactivity well logging. In its broadest aspect, the invention comprises the steps of determining the volume of clay contained in the earth formations; determining a first property of the formations functionally related to the volume of clay; and determining a second property functionally related to the first property, the second property indicating potential clay swelling. In particular, the volume of clay is determined using electrical signals generated in response to the energy and frequency of detected radiations. The method is carried out with a well logging instrument that includes a high-resolution gamma ray spectrometer that traverses a borehole, whereby natural radiation strikes a scintillation crystal contained therein

  18. Influence of organic matter and clay minerals in migration of derivative compounds of hydrocarbons; Influencia da materia organica e argilominerais na migracao de compostos derivados de hidrocarbonetos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Denize Gloria Barcellos; Mendonca Filho, Joao Graciano de; Polivanov, Helena [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: denize@geologia.ufrj.br; graciano@geologia.ufrj.br; helena@acd.ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    Soil samples from the Guanabara Bay in Duque de Caxias city (RJ) were submitted to mineralogical and organic geochemistry analyses. This proceeding was used mainly to determine a possible interaction of hydrocarbons contaminants with the organic matter and the clay minerals presents in this mangrove. The sampling was carried out using Direct Push techniques. Thus, the mainly clay minerals characterizes were: gibbsite, illite, caulinite and smectite. The compositional analysis of organic constituents showed a predominance of amorphous material (degraded cuticles), followed of wood material and sporomorphs constituents, suggesting that the biological degradation occurred in situ. (author)

  19. Detection of Soluble and Fixed NH4+ in Clay Minerals by DTA and IR Reflectance Spectroscopy : A Potential Tool for Planetary Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice, Bishop; Banin, A.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Klovstad, M. R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life. It is the only element among the six major biogenic elements, C, O, S, O, P, H, whose presence in the Martian soil has not been positively and directly established. We describe here a study assessing the ability to detect NH4 in soils by two methods: differential thermal analysis (DTA) and infrared (IR) reflectance spectroscopy. Four standard clay minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite and attapulgite) and an altered tephra sample from Mauna Kea were treated with NH4 in this study. Samples of the NH4-treated and leached clays were analyzed by DTA and infrared (IR) reflectance spectroscopy to quantify the delectability of soluble and sorbed/fixed NH4. An exotherm at 270-280 C was clearly detected in the DTA curves of NH4-treated (non-leached) samples. This feature is assigned to the thermal decomposition reaction of NH4. Spectral bands observed at 1.56, 2.05, 2.12, 3.06, 3.3, 3.5, 5.7 and 7.0 microns in the reflectance spectra of NH4-treated and leached samples are assigned to the sorbed/fixed ammonium in the clays. The montmorillonite has shown the most intense absorbance due to fixed ammonium among the leached samples in this study, as a result of its high cation sorption capacity. It is concluded that the presence of sorbed or fixed NH4 in clays may be detected by infrared (IR) reflectance or emission spectroscopy. Distinction between soluble and sorbed NH4 may be achieved through the presence or absence of several spectral features assigned to the sorbed NH4 moietyi and, specifically, by use of the 4.2 micrometer feature assigned to solution NH4. Thermal analyses furnish supporting evidence of ammonia in our study through detection of N released at temperatures of 270-330 C. Based on these results it is estimated that IR spectra measured from a rover should be able to detect ammonia if present above 20 mg NH4/g sample in the surface layers. Orbital IR spectra and thermal analyses measured on a rover may be able to

  20. Shear Strength of Remoulding Clay Samples Using Different Methods of Moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhaliza, W.; Ismail, B.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Nurul, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    Shear strength for clay soil was required to determine the soil stability. Clay was known as a soil with complex natural formations and very difficult to obtain undisturbed samples at the site. The aim of this paper was to determine the unconfined shear strength of remoulded clay on different methods in moulding samples which were proctor compaction, hand operated soil compacter and miniature mould methods. All the samples were remoulded with the same optimum moisture content (OMC) and density that were 18% and 1880 kg/m3 respectively. The unconfined shear strength results of remoulding clay soils for proctor compaction method was 289.56kPa with the strain 4.8%, hand operated method was 261.66kPa with the strain 4.4% and miniature mould method was 247.52kPa with the strain 3.9%. Based on the proctor compaction method, the reduction percentage of unconfined shear strength of remoulded clay soil of hand operated method was 9.66%, and for miniature mould method was 14.52%. Thus, because there was no significant difference of reduction percentage of unconfined shear strength between three different methods, so it can be concluded that remoulding clay by hand operated method and miniature mould method were accepted and suggested to perform remoulding clay samples by other future researcher. However for comparison, the hand operated method was more suitable to form remoulded clay sample in term of easiness, saving time and less energy for unconfined shear strength determination purposes.

  1. Evidence of cyclic climatic changes recorded in clay mineral assemblages from a continental Paleocene-Eocene sequence, northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Campo, Margarita; Bauluz, Blanca; del Papa, Cecilia; White, Timothy; Yuste, Alfonso; Mayayo, Maria Jose

    2018-06-01

    The continental Paleocene-Eocene sequence investigated in this study belongs to the Salta Group, deposited in an intracontinental rift, the Salta Basin (NW Argentina), that evolved from the lower Cretaceous to the middle Paleogene, and is subdivided into the Pirgua, the Balbuena and the Santa Barbara Subgroups. The Maíz Gordo Formation (200 m thick) is the middle unit of the Santa Bárbara Subgroup, deposited during late post-rift sedimentation. We studied the mineralogy of fine-grained horizons of this formation by X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to examine the connection between vertical changes in clay mineralogy in alluvial sediments and paleosols, and global paleoclimatic changes registered during the Paleogene. Paleosols vary from calcic vertisols in the lowermost levels, to inseptisols and gleysols in intermediate positions, to gleyed oxisols in the upper section, indicating increased chemical weathering through time. Clay mineral relative abundances vary with a general increase in kaolinite content from bottom to top. However, at one site there are significant variations in kaolinite/muscovite (Kln/Ms) that define five cycles of kaolinite abundance and Kln/Ms. that indicate cyclic patterns of paleoprecipitation and paleotemperature. These are interpreted as several short-lived hyperthermals during the Paleocene-early Eocene in the Southern Hemisphere, which correlate with well-established episodes of warmth documented from the Northern Hemisphere.

  2. Characterization of clay minerals and organic matter in shales: Application to high-level nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueven, N.; Landis, C.R.; Jacobs, G.K.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to conduct investigations to assess the potential for shale to serve as a host medium for the isolation of high-level nuclear wastes. The emphasis on shale is a result of screening major sedimentary rock types (shale, sandstone, carbonate , anhydrite, and chalk) for a variety of attributes that affect the performance of repositories. The retardation of radionuclides was recognized as one of the potentially favorable features of shale. Because shale contains both clay minerals and organic matter, phases that may provide significant sorption of radioelement, the characterization of these phases is essential. In addition, the organic matter in shale has been identified as a critical area for study because of its potential to play either a favorable (reductant) or deleterious (organic ligands) role in the performance of a repository sited in shale. 36 refs., 36 figs., 10 tabs

  3. The redox properties of the natural iron-bearing clay mineral ferruginous smectite SWA-1: a combined electrochemical and spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, Christopher A.; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Iron-bearing clay minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and clay-mineral-based materials have been proposed to be part of backfill material in nuclear waste repositories. Laboratory and field studies have confirmed that structural iron (Fe) in clay minerals participates in redox reactions with organic pollutants, metals, and radionuclides, thus influencing their transport and reactivity. Knowledge of the redox properties of Fe-bearing clay minerals is therefore essential for understanding and predicting the fate, mobility, and bioavailability subsurface contaminants. A quantitative understanding of clay mineral redox behavior remains lacking, however, due to constraints in previous experimental approaches and the complex structural changes that accompany changes in the Fe oxidation state. This work provides a quantitative means for measuring the redox properties of Fe-bearing clay minerals, which can be applied to both field and laboratory studies tracking radionuclide-clay mineral redox reactions. Here we use mediated electrochemical reduction and oxidation to determine the electron accepting and donating capacities of several natural Fe-bearing clay minerals with different structural Fe content (2.3 to 21 wt-%) and varied redox histories. Results indicate that the fraction of redox-active Fe in clay minerals is mineral-dependent, and is linked to the thermodynamics of reduction and oxidation as well as to the ability of clay minerals to conduct electrons and facilitate structural re-arrangements required to maintain charge balance. The reduction potential (E H ) characteristics of a natural ferruginous smectite (SWa-1) were further characterized as a function of solution conditions and repeated Fe reduction and oxidation cycles. SWa-1 samples were analyzed with Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to link observed redox potential behavior to structural properties and changes

  4. Action of a clay suspension on an Fe(0) surface under anoxic conditions: Characterization of neoformed minerals at the Fe(0)/solution and Fe(0)/atmosphere interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, Pierre; Rivard, Camille; Pelletier, Manuel; Bihannic, Isabelle; Gley, Renaud; Mathieu, Sandrine; Salsi, Lise; Migot, Sylvie; Barres, Odile; Villiéras, Frédéric; Michau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Immersion of an Fe(0) foil in a clay suspension at 90 °C and in anoxic conditions. • Magnetite was observed on the atmospheric part. • Iron-rich 7 Å serpentines were observed on the clay suspension part. • A gradient in serpentine cristallochemistry was observed. • A pure Fe–Si phyllosilicate was identified at the Fe(0)/clay suspension contact. - Abstract: To better understand the reaction mechanisms involved at the Fe(0)/clay minerals interface, we investigate in the present study the reaction between an Fe(0) surface and a clay suspension extracted from the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone (COx). Batch experiments were carried out under anoxic conditions in sealed autoclave, at 90 °C to mimic predicted radioactive waste disposal conditions. An Fe(0) foil was introduced into the autoclave so that the lower part of the foil was immersed in the clay suspension while the upper part was contacted with the atmosphere of the experimental setup. After two months, the mineralogical deposits that precipitated at the surface of the Fe(0) foil were analyzed using multiple techniques, namely X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy associated to microanalysis (SEM/TEM–EDXS), and micro-spectroscopic measurements (μ-FTIR and μ-Raman). Both parts of the Fe(0) foil were then shown to react: magnetite was the main resulting mineral formed at the Fe(0) surface in the atmospheric conditions whereas serpentine 1:1 phyllosilicates were the main end-products in the clay suspension. The analyses performed on the immersed part of the foil revealed a spatial heterogeneity in both serpentine cristallochemistry and morphology, with a gradient from the Fe(0) contact point toward the clay suspension. A pure Fe–Si phyllosilicate ring was observed at the direct contact point with the Fe(0) foil and a progressive incorporation of Al instead of Fe into the clay phases was identified as deposit thickness increased from the Fe(0) surface to

  5. Radiation-related retrograde hydrogen isotope and K-Ar exchange in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halter, C.; Pagel, M.; Sheppard, S.M.F.; Weber, F.; Clauer, N.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies have been widely applied to characterize the origin of fluids during ore-foaming processes. The primary isotope record, however, may be disturbed by retrograde exchange reactions, thus complicating the interpretation of the data. The susceptibility of minerals to retrograde isotope and chemical exchange is variable, reflecting differences in the mechanism and rate of isotope exchange. Results are presented on deuterium depletion, K/Ar ages and H 2 O + content of illites associated with uranium mineralization from the Athabasca basin (Canada). (author)

  6. Stratigraphic and climatic implications of clay mineral changes around the Paleocene/Eocene boundary of the northeastern US margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, T.G.; Bybell, L.M.; Mason, D.B.

    2000-01-01

    Kaolinite usually is present in relatively small amounts in most upper Paleocene and lower Eocene neritic deposits of the northern US Atlantic Coastal Plain. However, there is a short period (less than 200,000 k.y.) in the latest Paleocene (upper part of calcareous nannoplankton Zone NP 9) when kaolinite-dominated clay mineral suites replaced the usual illite/smectite-dominated suites. During this time of global biotic and lithologic changes, kaolinite increased from less than 5% of the clay mineral suite to peak proportions of 50-60% of the suite and then returned to less than 5% in uppermost Paleocene/lowermost Eocene strata. This kaolinite pulse is present at numerous localities from southern Virginia to New Jersey. These sites represent both inner and middle neritic depositional environments and reflect input from several river drainage systems. Thus, it is inferred that kaolinite-rich source areas were widespread in the northeastern US during the latest Paleocene. Erosion of these source areas contributed the kaolinite that was transported and widely dispersed into shelf environments of the Salisbury embayment. The kaolinite increase, which occurred during a time of relatively high sea level, probably is the result of intensified weathering due to increased temperature and precipitation. The southern extent of the kaolinite pulse is uncertain in that uppermost Paleocene beds have not been identified in the southern Atlantic Coastal Plain. The late Paleocene kaolinite pulse that consists of an increase to peak kaolinite levels followed by a decrease can be used for detailed correlation between more upbasin and more downbasin sections in the Salisbury embayment. Correlations show that more upbasin Paleocene/Eocene boundary sections are erosionally truncated. They have varying portions of the kaolinite increase and, if present at all, discontinuous portions of the subsequent kaolinite decrease. As these truncated sections are disconformably overlain by lower

  7. Geochemical simulation of the evolution of granitic rocks and clay minerals submitted to a temperature increase in the vicinity of a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, B.; Kam, M.; Tardy, Y.

    1984-07-01

    The alteration of a granitic rock around a repository for spent nuclear fuel has been simulated considering the effect of an increase of temperature due to this kind of induced geothermal system. The results of the simulation have been interpreted in terms of mass transfer and volumic consequences. The alteration proceeds by dissolution of minerals (with an increase of the volumes of fissures and cracks) and precipitation of secondary miminerals as calcite and clay minerals particularly (with a decrease of the porosity). The increase of the temperature from 10 degrees C to about 100 degrees C will favour the alteration of the granitic rock around the repository by the solution filling the porosity. The rock is characterized by a very low fissure porosity and a consequent very low water velocity. This too, favours intense water rock interactions and production of secondary clays and the total possible mass transfer will decrease the porosity. A combination of these thermodynamic mass balance calculations with a kinetic approach of mineral dissolutions gives a first attempt to calibrate the modelling in the time scale: the decrease of porosity can be roughly estimated between 2 and 20% for 100,000 years. The particular problem of Na-bentonites behaviour in the proximate vicinity of the repository has been studied too. One must distinguish between two types of clay-water interactions: -within the rock around the repository, Na-bentonites should evolute with illitization in slighltly open system with low clay/water ratios, -within the repository itself, the clay reacts in a closed system for a long time with high clay/water ratios and a self-buffering effect should maintain the bentonite type. This chemical buffering effect is a positive point for the use of this clay as chemical barrier. (Author)

  8. Evidence of contrasting low-grade metamorphic conditons from clay mineral assablages in Triassic Alpujárride-Maláguide transtional units in the Betic Cordilleras, Spain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruiz Cruz, M. D.; Franco, F.; Sanz de Galdeano, C.; Novák, Jiří Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, 2 (2006), s. 621-638 ISSN 0009-8558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : low-grade metamorphism * clay minerals * Betic Cordilleras Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.974, year: 2006

  9. Preparation and characterization of nanocrystalline ITO thin films on glass and clay substrates by ion-beam sputter deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachalam, S.; Nanjo, H.; Kawasaki, K.; Wakui, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Ebina, T.

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystalline indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were prepared on clay-1 (Clay-TPP-LP-SA), clay-2 (Clay-TPP-SA) and glass substrates using ion-beam sputter deposition method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that the as-deposited ITO films on both clay-1 and clay-2 substrates were a mixture of amorphous and polycrystalline. But the as-deposited ITO films on glass substrates were polycrystalline. The surface morphologies of as-deposited ITO/glass has smooth surface; in contrast, ITO/clay-1 has rough surface. The surface roughnesses of ITO thin films on glass and clay-1 substrate were calculated as 4.3 and 83 nm, respectively. From the AFM and SEM analyses, the particle sizes of nanocrystalline ITO for a film thickness of 712 nm were calculated as 19.5 and 20 nm, respectively. Optical study showed that the optical transmittance of ITO/clay-2 was higher than that of ITO/clay-1. The sheet resistances of as-deposited ITO/clay-1 and ITO/clay-2 were calculated as 76.0 and 63.0 Ω/□, respectively. The figure of merit value for as-deposited ITO/clay-2 (12.70 x 10 -3 /Ω) was also higher than that of ITO/clay-1 (9.6 x 10 -3 /Ω), respectively. The flexibilities of ITO/clay-1 and ITO/clay-2 were evaluated as 13 and 12 mm, respectively. However, the ITO-coated clay-2 substrate showed much better optical and electrical properties as well as flexibility as compared to clay-1.

  10. A method for producing electrolyte and heat resistant drilling muds from bentonite clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyev, K; Bedelcheva, A; Uzunova, I

    1979-01-01

    A method is developed for producing clay suspensions, which are resistant to electrolytes, high temperature and pressure, on the basis of bentonite clays with a high content of montmorillonite. The method is based on the subsequent introduction into the suspension of magnesium chloride (calcium chloride) and sodium chloride with intense mixing and maintenance of the high viscosity of the clay mass. The electrolytes are added in a specific order and volume: the magnesium chloride or calcium chloride at 1-3% and the sodium chloride at approximately 30%. The clay suspensions are characterized by high SNS and filtration (40 cm/sup 3/ in 30 min). The operational indicators may be regulated so that they remain in accordance with the required standards.

  11. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals, markers of the mobility of the uranium in solution in the unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morichon, E.

    2008-10-01

    This study presents the works driven on three groups of clay minerals (kaolins, illite, sudoite (di-tri-octahedral chlorites)) characteristics of the alteration halos surrounding unconformity-type uranium deposits, in order to reveal uranium paleo-circulations in the intra-cratonic meso-Proterozoic basins (1,2 - 1,6 Ga). Thanks to Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR), we were able to highlight the persistence of structural defects in kaolin-group minerals contemporaneous of the basin diagenesis, and demonstrate the existence of relatively stable defects in illites and sudoites contemporaneous of the uranium deposits setting. Thus, the main defect in illite (Ai centre) and the main defect in sudoite (As centre) are characterized by their g components such as, respectively, gt = 2,003 et g// = 2,051 for illite and gt = 2,008 et g// = 2,051 for sudoite. As the main defect in kaolins (kaolinite/dickite), the main defects in illite and sudoite are perpendicularly oriented according to the (ab) plane, on the tetrahedral Si-O bound. However, their thermal stabilities seem different. The observation of samples from different zones (background, anomal or mineralized) of the Athabasca basin (Canada) allowed to identify a parallel evolution between actual defects concentration measured in the different clay minerals and the proximity of the mineralisation zones. Consequently, clays minerals can be considered as potential plotters of zones where uranium-rich solutions have circulated. (author)

  12. Modelling of niobium sorption on clay minerals in sodium and calcium perchlorate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ervanne, Heini; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Laboratory of Radiochemistry

    2014-11-01

    The sorption behaviour of niobium on kaolinite and illite minerals in sodium and calcium perchlorate solutions was evaluated with use of the mass distribution coefficient, Rd, obtained in batch sorption experiments. Very high distribution coefficient values, about 100 m{sup 3}/kg, were obtained for both minerals in the neutral pH range between 6 and 8. Values were somewhat lower at pH 5. In NaClO{sub 4} solution, the sorption of niobium starts to decrease at pH higher than 8. This is in agreement with the increase, with pH, in the proportion of anionic niobate species, which are presumed to be low or non-sorbing. A similar decrease was not observed in Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} solution, probably owing to the influence of Ca on niobium solution speciation and surface species. The surface complexation model was applied to model the Rd values. The model fitted well for the NaClO{sub 4} solution but only at pH below 9 for the Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} solution. The discrepancy between the strong sorption of niobium in calcium-bearing solution at high pH and the calculated speciation is due in part to the non-inclusion of calcium niobate solution species and Ca-Nb compounds in the present NEA and other similar thermodynamic databases.

  13. [Histochemical stains for minerals by hematoxylin-lake method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to establish the experimental animal model by histological staining methods for minerals. After intraperitoneal injections of minerals, precipitates deposited on the surface of the liver. Liver tissues were fixed in paraformaldehyde, embedded in paraffin and cut into thin sections which were used as minerals containing standard section. Several reagents for histological stains and spectrophotometry for minerals were applied in both test-tube experiments and stainings of tissue sections to test for minerals. Hematoxylin-lake was found of capable of staining minerals in tissue. A simple technique used was described for light microscopic detection of minerals.

  14. Reduction and long-term immobilization of technetium by Fe(II) associated with clay mineral nontronite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Plymale, Andrew E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Heald, S.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2009-01-01

    99Tc is formed mostly during nuclear reactions and is released into the environment during weapons testing and inadvertent waste disposal. The long half-life, high environmental mobility (as Tc(VII)O4-) and its possible uptake into the food chain cause 99Tc to be a significant environmental contaminant. In this study, we evaluated the role of Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay mineral, nontronite (NAu-2), in reducing Tc(VII)O4- to poorly soluble Tc(IV) species as a function of pH and Fe(II) concentration. The rate of Tc(VII) reduction by Fe(II) in NAu-2 was higher at neutral pH (pH 7.0) than at acidic and basic pHs when Fe(II) concentration was low (< 1 mmol/g). The effect of pH, however, was insignificant at higher Fe(II) concentrations. The reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) associated with NAu-2 was also studied in the presence of common subsurface oxidants including iron and manganese oxides, nitrate, and oxygen, to evaluate the effect of the oxidants on the enhancement and inhibition of Tc(VII) reduction, and reoxidation of Tc(IV). Addition of iron oxides (goethite and hematite) to the Tc(VII)-NAu-2 system, where Tc(VII) reduction was ongoing, enhanced reduction of Tc(VII), apparently as a result of re-distribution of reactive Fe(II) from NAu-2 to more reactive goethite/hematite surfaces. Addition of manganese oxides stopped further Tc(VII) reduction, and in case of K+-birnessite, it reoxidized previously reduced Tc(IV). Nitrate neither enhanced reduction of Tc(VII) nor promoted reoxidation of Tc(IV). Approximately 11% of Tc(IV) was oxidized by oxygen. The rate and extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation was found to strongly depend on the nature of the oxidants and concentration of Fe(II). When the same oxidants were added to aged Tc reduction products (mainly NAu-2 and TcO2nH2O), the extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation decreased significantly relative to fresh Tc(IV) products. Increasing NAu-2 concentration also resulted in the decreased extent of Tc(IV) reoxidation. The results

  15. Column studies on the sorption of radioactive isotopes by some natural clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Gawad, A.S.; Misak, N.Z.; Maghrawy, H.B.; Shafik, A.

    1982-01-01

    Different types of naturally occuring minerals have been investigated in respect of the sorption of various radioisotopes. The present work deals with column studies of the sorption of 89 Sr and 60 Co on four natural bentonites. Columns having a cross section of 1.47 cm 2 were used for determining the breakthrough capacities for both Sr and Co. The applicability of the Glueckauf plate theory to the systems was tested. It was found that HETP is constant for a given system of column and cationic species, which proves the applicability of the theory. From this, it follows that the data obtained for the short laboratory columns can be used to predict the breakthrough behaviour for longer columns. (author)

  16. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies for the Removal of Europium Ions from Waste Solution Using Some Local Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kamash, A.M.; El-Masry, E.H.; El-Dessouky, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic investigations on the removal of Eu 3+ ions from aqueous waste solution using bentonite and sandstone, as local clay minerals, has been done using batch technique. The influences of ph, contact time between liquid and solid phases, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature have been evaluated. Pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order kinetic models were used to analyze the sorption rate data and the results showed that the pseudo second-order model is best correlate the kinetic data. Equilibrium isotherms were determined to assess the maximum sorption capacity of bentonite and sandstone and the equilibrium sorption data were analyzed using Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. All tested models fit the data reasonably well in terms of regression coefficients. The maximum sorption capacity of bentonite was found to be greater than that of sandstone and the mean free energy is in all cases in the range corresponding to the ion exchange type of sorption. Sorption studies were also performed at different temperatures to obtain the thermodynamic parameters of the process. The numerical value of δG degree decreases with an increase in temperature, indicating that the sorption reaction is more favorable at higher temperature. The positive values of δH degree correspond to the endothermic nature of the sorption process

  17. Mild acid and alkali treated clay minerals enhance bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in long-term contaminated soil: A 14C-tracer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Rusmin, Ruhaida; Naidu, Ravi

    2017-04-01

    Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils requires a higher microbial viability and an increased PAH bioavailability. The clay/modified clay-modulated bacterial degradation could deliver a more efficient removal of PAHs in soils depending on the bioavailability of the compounds. In this study, we modified clay minerals (smectite and palygorskite) with mild acid (HCl) and alkali (NaOH) treatments (0.5-3 M), which increased the surface area and pore volume of the products, and removed the impurities without collapsing the crystalline structure of clay minerals. In soil incubation studies, supplements with the clay products increased bacterial growth in the order: 0.5 M HCl ≥ unmodified ≥ 0.5 M NaOH ≥ 3 M NaOH ≥ 3 M HCl for smectite, and 0.5 M HCl ≥ 3 M NaOH ≥ 0.5 M NaOH ≥ 3 M HCl ≥ unmodified for palygorskite. A 14 C-tracing study showed that the mild acid/alkali-treated clay products increased the PAH biodegradation (5-8%) in the order of 0.5 M HCl ≥ unmodified > 3 M NaOH ≥ 0.5 M NaOH for smectite, and 0.5 M HCl > 0.5 M NaOH ≥ unmodified ≥ 3 M NaOH for palygorskite. The biodegradation was correlated (r = 0.81) with the bioavailable fraction of PAHs and microbial growth as affected particularly by the 0.5 M HCl and 0.5 M NaOH-treated clay minerals. These results could be pivotal in developing a clay-modulated bioremediation technology for cleaning up PAH-contaminated soils and sediments in the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Vecstaudža, J; Stepanova, V; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  19. Physical Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Stepanova, V; Ločs, J; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of clays mostly depends on its mineral and chemical composition, particle size and pH value. The mutual influence of these parameters is complex. Illite is the most abundant clay mineral in Latvia and usually used in building materials and pottery. The viscosity and plasticity of Latvian clays from several deposits were investigated and correlated with mineral composition, particle size and pH value. Fractionated and crude clay samples were used. The p...

  20. Impact of clay mineral, wood sawdust or root organic matter on the bacterial and fungal community structures in two aged PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Bongoua-Devisme, Jeanne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Faure, Pierre; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Parisot, Nicolas; Peyret, Pierre; Leyval, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    The high organic pollutant concentration of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated wasteland soils is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation due to its very low bioavailability. In such soils, the microbial community is well adapted to the pollution, but the microbial activity is limited by nutrient availability. Management strategies could be applied to modify the soil microbial functioning as well as the PAH contamination through various amendment types. The impact of amendment with clay minerals (montmorillonite), wood sawdust and organic matter plant roots on microbial community structure was investigated on two aged PAH-contaminated soils both in laboratory and 1-year on-site pot experiments. Total PAH content (sum of 16 PAHs of the US-EPA list) and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (pPAC) were monitored as well as the available PAH fraction using the Tenax method. The bacterial and fungal community structures were monitored using fingerprinting thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) method. The abundance of bacteria (16S rRNA genes), fungi (18S rRNA genes) and PAH degraders (PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase genes) was followed through qPCR assays. Although the treatments did not modify the total and available PAH content, the microbial community density, structure and the PAH degradation potential changed when fresh organic matter was provided as sawdust and under rhizosphere influence, while the clay mineral only increased the percentage of catechol-1,2-dioxygenase genes. The abundance of bacteria and fungi and the percentage of fungi relative to bacteria were enhanced in soil samples supplemented with wood sawdust and in the plant rhizospheric soils. Two distinct fungal populations developed in the two soils supplemented with sawdust, i.e. fungi related to Chaetomium and Neurospora genera and Brachyconidiellopsis and Pseudallescheria genera, in H and NM soils respectively. Wood sawdust amendment favoured the

  1. Synthesis of Various Polyaniline / Clay Nanocomposites Derived from Aniline and Substituted Aniline Derivatives by Mechanochemical Intercalation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kalaivasan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline clay nanocomposite can be prepared by mechano-chemical method in which intercalation of anilinium ion into the clay lattices accomplished by mechanical grinding of sodium montmorillonite (Na+MMT in presence of anilinium hydrochloride at room temperature using mortar & pestle for about 30 min and subsequent grinding with oxidizing agent, ammonium peroxysulfate. The appearance of green colour indicates the formation of polyaniline/clay nanocomposite (PANI/Clay. Similarly aniline derivatives like o-toludine and o-anisidine in the form of HCl salt can form intercalation into the clay lattices. The intercalated aniline derivatives were ground mechanically in presence of oxidizing agent ammonium peroxysulfate lead to formation of substituted polyaniline/ clay nanocomposites. The characteristics of various polyaniline-clay nanocomposites were investigated using UV-Visible, FT-IR, cyclic voltammetry studies.

  2. Sorption of radionuclides by tertiary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Czurda, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sorption capacity of different clay types for some metals (Co, Cs, Sr and Zn), occurring as common radionuclides in radioactive waste deposits, had been analysed by a static (batch technique) and a dynamic method (percolation tests, in which the driving force is a hydraulic gradient). Sorption capacity generally increased with an increasing pH of solution. A decrease of sorption capacity had been observed in the order Zn > Cs ≥ Co > Sr for the batch and Cs > Zn > Sr > Co for the percolation tests. Clay marls showed a distinctly higher sorption respectively retention capacity as pure clays. Sorption capacity depends on solution parameters like type and concentration of radionuclide, pH, salt concentration, etc., and on rock parameters like mineral content (e.g. swelling clay minerals and carbonates), organic material, rock pH, micro fabric, etc. A third parameter of great influence is the contact time between clay and solution. The adsorption isotherms reflect two different adsorption mechanisms: a very rapid adsorption (a few minutes) on the external surfaces of clay minerals and a slow adsorption process (weeks and longer), due to the diffusion of metal ions into the interlayer space of clay minerals. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  3. Pre-treatment of Used-Cooking Oil as Feed Stocks of Biodiesel Production by Using Activated Carbon and Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Syah Putra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many low-cost feedstock i.e. used-cooking oil (UCO for the production of biodiesel fuel (BDF has contained a large amount of water and high proportion of free fatty acids (FFAs. Therefore, a pre-treatment process to reduce the water content (<0.1 wt.% and FFAs (<2.0 wt.% were necessary in order to avoid an undesirable side reactions, such as saponification, which could lead to serious problem of product separation and low fatty acid methyl ester (FAME yield. . In this study, a pre-treatment process of used cooking oil as a feedstock for the production of BDF by using various adsorbents such as Activated Carbon (AC and various clay minerals, for example Smectite (S, Bentonite (B, Kaolinite (K, and Powdered Earthenware (PE were evaluated. The oil obtained from pre-treatment was compared with oil without pre-treatment process. In this study, we reported a basic difference in material ability to the oil, depending on the adsorption condition with respect to the physico-chemical parameters, e.g. refractive index (R, density (ρ, FFAs, and water content (W. The results showed that the water content and FFAs in the oil has decreased when using AC as an adsorbent compared with clay minerals. However, the refractive index of oil has similar with the oil without pre-treatment process as well; meanwhile, the density of oil has increased after the pre-treatment process by using clay minerals.

  4. Determination of sorption mechanisms of radionuclides onto clay minerals using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daehn, R.; Scheidegger, A.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H

    2001-03-01

    Much of the experimental work in the Waste Management Laboratory at PSI concentrates on trying to understand the processes and mechanisms which govern the release of safety-relevant radionuclides from waste matrices, and their transport through engineered barrier systems and the surrounding geosphere. For this reason, detailed sorption studies of radionuclides (Cs, Sr, Ni, Zn, Eu, Am, Th and Se) in clay and cement systems are being conducted. The sorption and modelling studies are combined with kinetic investigations and advanced spectroscopic and microscopic methods in order to understand the sorption mechanism on an atomic level. This approach is part of a new multidisciplinary research field called Molecular Environmental Science (MES). In this paper, a case study of Ni sorption on montmorillonite is presented to illustrate how EXAFS can be used successfully to better understand sorption processes. (author)

  5. Determination of sorption mechanisms of radionuclides onto clay minerals using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daehn, R.; Scheidegger, A.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Much of the experimental work in the Waste Management Laboratory at PSI concentrates on trying to understand the processes and mechanisms which govern the release of safety-relevant radionuclides from waste matrices, and their transport through engineered barrier systems and the surrounding geosphere. For this reason, detailed sorption studies of radionuclides (Cs, Sr, Ni, Zn, Eu, Am, Th and Se) in clay and cement systems are being conducted. The sorption and modelling studies are combined with kinetic investigations and advanced spectroscopic and microscopic methods in order to understand the sorption mechanism on an atomic level. This approach is part of a new multidisciplinary research field called Molecular Environmental Science (MES). In this paper, a case study of Ni sorption on montmorillonite is presented to illustrate how EXAFS can be used successfully to better understand sorption processes. (author)

  6. Delineation of a quick clay zone at Smørgrav, Norway, with electromagnetic methods under geotechnical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalscheuer, Thomas; Bastani, Mehrdad; Donohue, Shane; Persson, Lena; Aspmo Pfaffhuber, Andreas; Reiser, Fabienne; Ren, Zhengyong

    2013-05-01

    In many coastal areas of North America and Scandinavia, post-glacial clay sediments have emerged above sea level due to iso-static uplift. These clays are often destabilised by fresh water leaching and transformed to so-called quick clays as at the investigated area at Smørgrav, Norway. Slight mechanical disturbances of these materials may trigger landslides. Since the leaching increases the electrical resistivity of quick clay as compared to normal marine clay, the application of electromagnetic (EM) methods is of particular interest in the study of quick clay structures. For the first time, single and joint inversions of direct-current resistivity (DCR), radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) and controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric (CSAMT) data were applied to delineate a zone of quick clay. The resulting 2-D models of electrical resistivity correlate excellently with previously published data from a ground conductivity metre and resistivity logs from two resistivity cone penetration tests (RCPT) into marine clay and quick clay. The RCPT log into the central part of the quick clay identifies the electrical resistivity of the quick clay structure to lie between 10 and 80 Ω m. In combination with the 2-D inversion models, it becomes possible to delineate the vertical and horizontal extent of the quick clay zone. As compared to the inversions of single data sets, the joint inversion model exhibits sharper resistivity contrasts and its resistivity values are more characteristic of the expected geology. In our preferred joint inversion model, there is a clear demarcation between dry soil, marine clay, quick clay and bedrock, which consists of alum shale and limestone.

  7. Review of Underground Construction Methods and Opening Stability for Repositories in Clay/Shale Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report reviews the art and practice of excavating and constructing underground facilities in clay/shale media, as part of a multi-year evaluation of the technical feasibility of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in dual-purpose canisters (DPCs). The purpose is to review worldwide examples of large-scale excavations in clay/shale media, the methods used for excavation and constructi on, and the costs. It is anticipated that this information will help to show the feasibility of construction for a deep geologic respository for (on the order of) 10,000 large, heavy, heat-generating waste packages. This report will refine the clay/shale disposal concept for DPC -based waste packages, in support of future studies that include cost estimation.

  8. A scanning electron microscope method for automated, quantitative analysis of mineral matter in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A.; Ward, C.R. [R.A. Creelman and Associates, Epping, NSW (Australia)

    1996-07-01

    Quantitative mineralogical analysis has been carried out in a series of nine coal samples from Australia, South Africa and China using a newly-developed automated image analysis system coupled to a scanning electron microscopy. The image analysis system (QEM{asterisk}SEM) gathers X-ray spectra and backscattered electron data from a number of points on a conventional grain-mount polished section under the SEM, and interprets the data from each point in mineralogical terms. The cumulative data in each case was integrated to provide a volumetric modal analysis of the species present in the coal samples, expressed as percentages of the respective coals` mineral matter. Comparison was made of the QEM{asterisk}SEM results to data obtained from the same samples using other methods of quantitative mineralogical analysis, namely X-ray diffraction of the low-temperature oxygen-plasma ash and normative calculation from the (high-temperature) ash analysis and carbonate CO{sub 2} data. Good agreement was obtained from all three methods for quartz in the coals, and also for most of the iron-bearing minerals. The correlation between results from the different methods was less strong, however, for individual clay minerals, or for minerals such as calcite, dolomite and phosphate species that made up only relatively small proportions of the mineral matter. The image analysis approach, using the electron microscope for mineralogical studies, has significant potential as a supplement to optical microscopy in quantitative coal characterisation. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Method for the determination of clay and mica concentrations in subsurface sandstone formations through radioactive logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for radioactivity well logging in a subsurface sandstone formation penetrated by a borehole. The invention relates particularly to clay and mica contents, which are determined from the natural gamma-ray activities. The natural sources of gamma radiation in the formation, are the trace elements thorium, uranium and potassium. (U.K.)

  10. Methylene blue adsorption in clay mineral dealt with organic cation; Sorcao de azul de metileno em argila esmectitica tratada com cation organico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, T.L. [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Maraba, PA (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia de Materiais; Lemos, V.P., E-mail: tls1981@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Centro de Geociencias

    2011-07-01

    The interaction among organic cations, as the methylene blue (AM) and benzyltrimethylammonium (BTMA), and clay minerals of the group of the smectite they result in the formation of applied materials in the adsorption of organic pollutant presents in waters, soils and you cultivate. In this work they were prepared the adsorbents (organic-clays) smectite - AM and smectite-BTMA. The precursory sample of smectite was collected in Rio Branco-Acre. We were also used an smectite sample collected in Sena Madureira (SM)-Acre already characterized in previous work and a sample of standard smectite Swy-2-Na-Montmorillonite (SWy-2) of Wymong - USA. The organic agents selected for this study they were: Blue of Methylene, denominated AM and Benzyltrimethylammonium, denominated BTMA. They were appraised the capacities adsorptive of the treated samples with BTMA being used AM as adsorbate. The results of these evaluations detected that ran total adsorption of AM (concentrations varying from 1 to 10 ppm) for the treated samples with BTMA. The organic cation, BTMA, interacting with the surfaces of the natural clay was more efficient in the adsorption of AM than the clay without the previous treatment with this salt. (author)

  11. Clay mineral assemblages of terrestrial records (Xining Basin, China) during the Eocene-Oligocene climate Transition (EOT) and its environmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Guo, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) between ~34.0 and 33.5 million years ago, where global climate cooled from 'greenhouse' to 'icehouse' at ~33.5 Ma ago, is one of the great events during Cenozoic climate deterioration. In contrast to the marine records of the EOT, significantly less research has focused on the continental climate change during this time, particularly in inner Asia. We present a comprehensive study of the upper Eocene to lower Oligocene succession with regular alternations of laterally continuous gypsum/gypsiferous layers and red mudstone beds in Tashan section of Xining Basin, which is located at the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Clay minerals, which were extracted from this succession, were analyzed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by using X-ray differaction (XRD). Base on detailed magnetostratigraphic time control, clay mineral compositions of this succession (33.1-35.5 Ma) are compared with open ocean marine records and Northern Hemisphere continental records to understand the process and characteristics of Asian climate change before, during and after EOT. Our results indicate that illite is the dominant clay mineral with less chlorite and variable smectite. Multi-parameter evidence suggests that the source areas of detrital inputs in Tashan have not changed and climate is the main control for the composition of the clay fraction. The characteristics of clay mineral concentrations suggest warm and humid fluctuations with cold and dry conditions and intense of seasonality during ~35.5-34.0 Ma in inner Asian. This changed to cold and dry condition at ~34 Ma and remained so from ~34-33.1 Ma. The comparisons between continental and marine records indicate that the climate changes experienced in the Xining basin region are more consistent with Northern Hemisphere rather than open oceans records. This indicates that paleoclimate changes for inner Asian before, during and after EOT was not controlled by Antarctic ice growth

  12. Comparative study of methods to estimate hydraulic parameters in the hydraulically undisturbed Opalinus Clay (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.; Matray, J.-M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, (France); Yu, C.; Gonçalvès, J. [Aix Marseille Université UMR 6635 CEREGE Technopôle Environnement Arbois-Méditerranée Aix-en-Provence, Cedex 4 (France); and others

    2017-04-15

    The deep borehole (DB) experiment gave the opportunity to acquire hydraulic parameters in a hydraulically undisturbed zone of the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland). Three methods were used to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage values of the Opalinus Clay formation and its bounding formations through the 248 m deep borehole BDB-1: application of a Poiseuille-type law involving petrophysical measurements, spectral analysis of pressure time series and in situ hydraulic tests. The hydraulic conductivity range in the Opalinus Clay given by the first method is 2 × 10{sup -14}-6 × 10{sup -13} m s{sup -1} for a cementation factor ranging between 2 and 3. These results show low vertical variability whereas in situ hydraulic tests suggest higher values up to 7 × 10{sup -12} m s{sup -1}. Core analysis provides economical estimates of the homogeneous matrix hydraulic properties but do not account for heterogeneities at larger scale such as potential tectonic conductive features. Specific storage values obtained by spectral analysis are consistent and in the order of 10{sup -6} m{sup -1}, while formulations using phase shift and gain between pore pressure signals were found to be inappropriate to evaluate hydraulic conductivity in the Opalinus Clay. The values obtained are globally in good agreement with the ones obtained previously at the rock laboratory. (authors)

  13. Methods of mineral potential assessment of uranium deposits: A mineral systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaireth, S.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Choice of methods depends on the objective; • Basics: – Know your mineral system (deposit-type): SCIENCE; – Create useful datasets: A MUST; • Mineral system approach can be rewarding. For successful examples visit GA’s website; • Don’t overdo or oversell it (only detailed exploration such as drilling can find a deposit)

  14. Contribution in the study of the stability of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock minerals in the presence of iron at 90 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Camille

    2011-01-01

    In the context of underground disposal of high-level radioactive waste, it is of prime importance to understand the interaction mechanisms between Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (COx), selected as a potential host-rock by Andra (French national radioactive waste management agency) and metallic iron, that enters the composition of containers and disposal cells. Interactions between metallic iron and COx clay-rock, COx Callovo-Oxfordian clay fraction (SCOx) and pure clay phases (kaolinite, illite, smectites) were investigated at 90 deg. C under anoxic atmosphere in chlorine solution. In order to study the role of COx non clay minerals, the reactivity of mixtures between SCOx and quartz, calcite, dolomite or pyrite, was also studied. Liquid and solid by-products were characterised by chemical analyses, mineralogical and morphometric techniques, at different scales. In our experimental conditions, major evolutions were observed during the first month, which shows that the oxidation of metallic iron is rapid. The release of iron cations in solution, pH increase (8-10) and Eh decrease (reductive conditions) are responsible for the partial dissolution of initial clay phases. Released iron is involved in the crystallization of Fe-serpentines (odinite or berthierite mainly) or precipitates under the form of magnetite in low amount. Fe-serpentine stability is controlled by the redox conditions as the introduction of dioxygen into the system leads to iron exsolution under the form of iron oxides and hydroxides and precipitation of clay particles with composition close to the initial ones. Whereas carbonates and pyrite do not significantly influence SCOx-metallic iron interactions, reaction pathways are modified in the presence of quartz. Indeed, in such conditions one observes a slight decrease of pH, an increase in Eh, the absence of magnetite and differences in the crystal chemistry of Fe-serpentines that are silica enriched, in comparison with those formed without any quartz

  15. On the origin of mixed-layered clay minerals from the San Andreas Fault at 2.5-3 km vertical depth (SAFOD drillhole at Parkfield, California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, A. M.; Warr, L. N.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2009-02-01

    A detailed mineralogical study is presented of the matrix of mudrocks sampled from spot coring at three key locations along the San Andreas Fault Observatory at depth (SAFOD) drill hole. The characteristics of authigenic illite-smectite (I-S) and chlorite-smectite (C-S) mixed-layer mineral clays indicate a deep diagenetic origin. A randomly ordered I-S mineral with ca. 20-25% smectite layers is one of the dominant authigenic clay species across the San Andreas Fault zone (sampled at 3,066 and 3,436 m measured depths/MD), whereas an authigenic illite with ca. 2-5% smectite layers is the dominant phase beneath the fault (sampled at 3,992 m MD). The most smectite-rich mixed-layered assemblage with the highest water content occurs in the actively deforming creep zone at ca. 3,300-3,353 m (true vertical depth of ca. 2.7 km), with I-S (70:30) and C-S (50:50). The matrix of all mudrock samples show extensive quartz and feldspar (both plagioclase and K-feldspar) dissolution associated with the crystallization of pore-filling clay minerals. However, the effect of rock deformation in the matrix appears only minor, with weak flattening fabrics defined largely by kinked and fractured mica grains. Adopting available kinetic models for the crystallization of I-S in burial sedimentary environments and the current borehole depths and thermal structure, the conditions and timing of I-S growth can be evaluated. Assuming a typical K+ concentration of 100-200 ppm for sedimentary brines, a present-day geothermal gradient of 35°C/km and a borehole temperature of ca. 112°C for the sampled depths, most of the I-S minerals can be predicted to have formed over the last 4-11 Ma and are probably still in equilibrium with circulating fluids. The exception to this simple burial pattern is the occurrence of the mixed layered phases with higher smectite content than predicted by the burial model. These minerals, which characterize the actively creeping section of the fault and local thin film

  16. Stepwise effects of the BCR sequential chemical extraction procedure on dissolution and metal release from common ferromagnesian clay minerals: A combined solution chemistry and X-ray powder diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, P.C. [Geology Department, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)], E-mail: pryan@middlebury.edu; Hillier, S. [Macaulay Institute, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH UK (United Kingdom); Wall, A.J. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Sequential extraction procedures (SEPs) are commonly used to determine speciation of trace metals in soils and sediments. However, the non-selectivity of reagents for targeted phases has remained a lingering concern. Furthermore, potentially reactive phases such as phyllosilicate clay minerals often contain trace metals in structural sites, and their reactivity has not been quantified. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of trace metal-bearing clay minerals exposed to the revised BCR 3-step plus aqua regia SEP. Mineral quantification based on stoichiometric analysis and quantitative powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) documents progressive dissolution of chlorite (CCa-2 ripidolite) and two varieties of smectite (SapCa-2 saponite and SWa-1 nontronite) during steps 1-3 of the BCR procedure. In total, 8 ({+-} 1) % of ripidolite, 19 ({+-} 1) % of saponite, and 19 ({+-} 3) % of nontronite (% mineral mass) dissolved during extractions assumed by many researchers to release trace metals from exchange sites, carbonates, hydroxides, sulfides and organic matter. For all three reference clays, release of Ni into solution is correlated with clay dissolution. Hydrolysis of relatively weak Mg-O bonds (362 kJ/mol) during all stages, reduction of Fe(III) during hydroxylamine hydrochloride extraction and oxidation of Fe(II) during hydrogen peroxide extraction are the main reasons for clay mineral dissolution. These findings underscore the need for precise mineral quantification when using SEPs to understand the origin/partitioning of trace metals with solid phases.

  17. Absorption characteristics of Kupravas deposit clays modified by phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruplis, A.; Mezinskis, G.; Chaghuri, M.

    1998-01-01

    Literature data suggested that clays may be used as sorbents for waste water treatment. The surface and sorption properties of minerals changes due to the influence of acid rains. The process of recession of clay properties has been modeled in laboratory by treatment of clays with mineral acids at higher temperature that in natural conditions. The present paper is devoted to the study of influence of phosphoric acid on the sorption properties of Kupravas deposit clays. Natural clay samples and samples treated with phosphoric acid were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction an differential thermal analysis (DTA) methods These methods were used also to identify the sample of Lebanese clays. X-ray diffraction analysis data show that the samples of clays from the deposit of Kuprava contain illite and kaolinite while sample of Lebanese clay contains quartz, calcite, and montmorillonite. DTA results show characteristic features of Kuprava clays described in reference with DTA of Lebanese clay clearly demonstrate the presence of large quantity of calcite

  18. Leaching of Heavy Metals Using SPLP Method from Fired Clay Brick Incorporating with Sewage Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Salim, Nurul Salhana Abdul; Amira Sarani, Noor; Aqma Izurin Rahmat, Nur

    2017-05-01

    Sewage sludge is a by-product generate from wastewater treatment process. The sewage sludge contains significant trace metal such as Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb which are toxic to the environment. Sewage sludge is disposed of by landfilling method. However, this option not suitable because of land restriction and environmental control regulations imposed. Therefore, sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plant was incorporated into fired clay brick to produce good quality of brick as well as reducing heavy metals from sludge itself. Sewage sludge with 0%, 1%, 5%, 10% and 20% of were incorporated into fired clay bricks and fired at 1050°C temperature with heating rates of 1°C/min. The brick sample then crushed and sieved through 9.5 mm sieve for Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP). From the results, incorporation up to 20% of sewage sludge has leached less heavy metals and compliance with USEPA standard.

  19. Physical and chemical parameters acquisition in situ, in deep clay. Development of sampling and testing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajudie, A.; Coulon, H.; Geneste, P.

    1991-01-01

    Knowledge of deep formation for radioactive waste disposal requires field-tests or bench-scale experiments on samples of the site material. In the case of clay massifs the taking of cores and the sampling of these are particularly difficult. The most suitable materials and techniques were selected from a study of clay colling and conservation methods. These were used for a series of core samples taken at Mol in Belgium. Subsequently permeability measurements were carried out in laboratory on samples from vertical drilling and compared with in situ measurements. The latter were made by horizontal drillings from the shaft excavation of the underground facility HADES at Mol. There is a good overall agreement between the results of the two types of measurements. 25 figs.; 4 tabs.; 12 refs.; 16 photos

  20. Using the direct method in organophilization of clay chocolate 'A' with organic surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patricio, A.C.L.; Sousa, A.B.; Silva, M.M. da; Rodrigues, M.G.F.; Laborde, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    During the development of this work, we studied the preparation of organoclays through direct method, starting from the natural clay Chocolate 'A' using the quaternary ammonium salt, chloride, alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium (Dodigen). The samples were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Infrared Spectroscopy in the Region (IV), Gravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA / TGA) and swelling of Foster using solvents, gasoline, kerosene and diesel. Was observed by the results XRD, IR and DTA / TG effective intercalation of quaternary ammonium salts of the inter lamellar spaces of the clay, and by Foster swelling test samples treated with the quaternary ammonium salt Dodigen showed affinity for all the solvents tested. (author)

  1. Application of clay minerals from Cayo Guan, Cuba, as sorbents of heavy metals and ceramic raw materials; Aplicaciones de los minerales arcillosos de Cayo Guan, Cuba, como adsorbentes de metales pesados y materia prima ceramica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, D.; Barba, F.; Callejas, P.; Recio, P.

    2012-11-01

    It has been studied by Analysis Heating Microscope Optical the behaviour of some kaolinitic clays from a reservoir of Cayo Guan rich in iron oxides and low silica content proving to be a refractory materials whose softening appears after 1500 degree centigrade. It has obtained the workability diagram of the different clay minerals calculating the plasticity by the method of Casagrande spoon; only one of the samples is in the area suitable for extrusion. Vitrification diagrams report that the capacity of water absorption is <0.6 % when the temperature of 1400 degree centigrade is achieved. We have designed a program to calculate compositions of porcelain stoneware prepared from these modified clays adding low-cost raw materials that facilitate the formation of glassy phase ((potassium feldspar and glass cullet) and/or increase the silica (sand and diatomaceous earth used as filters in the brewing industry). With one of these compositions, prepared in the laboratory (60 % of clay, 30 % feldspar and 10 % of diatomaceous earth), calcined at 1250 degree centigrade with a heating rate of 15 degree centigrade/min, the results were: water absorption 0.8 %, and linear shrinkage 21 % without any deformation observed. These clays have been treated with acid to eliminate its high iron content and study its application as an sorbent of heavy metals as Cd{sup 2}+, Cr{sup 3}+. The results of the immobilization of these elements have been compared with those obtained with thermally activated vermiculite at 800 degree centigrade, showing that the treated samples show sorption of both cadmium and chromium below the vermiculite, but the non-treated ones are suitable to remove chromium; this is because these clays do not contain in its composition exchangeable ions (Ca{sup {sub 2}} +, Mg{sup 2} +, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}), and even if they are chemically activated only the presence of Fe ions is which produces form bindings (Cr{sub x}.Fe{sub 1}-x) (OH){sub 3} which favor Cr sorption

  2. Clay Mineralogy of Coal-Hosted Nb-Zr-REE-Ga Mineralized Beds from Late Permian Strata, Eastern Yunnan, SW China: Implications for Paleotemperature and Origin of the Micro-Quartz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The clay mineralogy of pyroclastic Nb(Ta-Zr(Hf-REE-Ga mineralization in Late Permian coal-bearing strata from eastern Yunnan Province; southwest China was investigated in this study. Samples from XW and LK drill holes in this area were analyzed using XRD (X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electronic microscope. Results show that clay minerals in the Nb-Zr-REE-Ga mineralized samples are composed of mixed layer illite/smectite (I/S; kaolinite and berthierine. I/S is the major component among the clay assemblages. The source volcanic ashes controlled the modes of occurrence of the clay minerals. Volcanic ash-originated kaolinite and berthierine occur as vermicular and angular particles, respectively. I/S is confined to the matrix and is derived from illitization of smectite which was derived from the original volcanic ashes. Other types of clay minerals including I/S and berthierine precipitated from hydrothermal solutions were found within plant cells; and coexisting with angular berthierine and vermicular kaolinite. Inferred from the fact that most of the I/S is R1 ordered with one case of the R3 I/S; the paleo-diagenetic temperature could be up to 180 °C but mostly 100–160 °C. The micro-crystalline quartz grains (<10 µm closely associated with I/S were observed under SEM and were most likely the product of desiliconization during illitization of smectite.

  3. Late-Quaternary variations in clay minerals along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence of climatic variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Sukhija, B.S.; Gujar, A.R.; Nagabhushanam, P.; Paropkari, A.L.

    Down-core variations in illite, chlorite, smectite and kaolinite (the major clays) in two sup(14)C-dated cores collected along the SW continental margin of India show that illite and chlorite have enhanced abundance during 20-17, 12.5, 11-9.5, and 5...

  4. Clay mineral distribution in the continental shelf sediments from Krishna to Ganges river mouth, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    Ninety six sediment samples (less than 2 mu m fractions) of the eastern continental shelf of India between Ganges in the north and Krishna in the south have been studiEd. by X-ray diffraction. On the basis of nature and abundance of different clay...

  5. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals. 2. Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization of electron transfer irreversibility in ferruginous smectite, SWa-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2012-09-04

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important, albeit poorly characterized, redox-active phase found in many natural and engineered environments. This work develops an experimental approach to directly assess the redox properties of a natural Fe-bearing smectite (ferruginous smectite, SWa-1, 12.6 wt % Fe) with mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO). By utilizing a suite of one-electron-transfer mediating compounds to facilitate electron transfer between structural Fe in SWa-1 and a working electrode, we show that the Fe2+/Fe3+ couple in SWa-1 is redox-active over a large range of potentials (from E(H) = -0.63 V to +0.61 V vs SHE). Electrochemical and spectroscopic analyses of SWa-1 samples that were subject to reduction and re-oxidation cycling revealed both reversible and irreversible structural Fe rearrangements that altered the observed apparent standard reduction potential (E(H)(ø)) of structural Fe. E(H)(ø)-values vary by as much as 0.56 V between SWa-1 samples with different redox histories. The wide range of E(H)-values over which SWa-1 is redox-active and redox history-dependent E(H)(ø)-values underscore the importance of Fe-bearing clay minerals as redox-active phases in a wide range of redox regimes.

  6. Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  7. Metal oxides, clay minerals and charcoal determine the composition of microbial communities in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Doreen; Ding, Guo-Chun; Pronk, Geertje Johanna; Heister, Katja; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Smalla, Kornelia

    2013-10-01

    Microbial communities in soil reside in a highly heterogeneous habitat where diverse mineral surfaces, complex organic matter and microorganisms interact with each other. This study aimed to elucidate the long-term effect of the soil mineral composition and charcoal on the microbial community composition established in matured artificial soils and their response to phenanthrene. One year after adding sterile manure to different artificial soils and inoculating microorganisms from a Cambisol, the matured soils were spiked with phenanthrene or not and incubated for another 70 days. 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer fragments amplified from total community DNA were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Metal oxides and clay minerals and to a lesser extent charcoal influenced the microbial community composition. Changes in the bacterial community composition in response to phenanthrene differed depending on the mineral composition and presence of charcoal, while no shifts in the fungal community composition were observed. The abundance of ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes was increased in phenanthrene-spiked soils except for charcoal-containing soils. Here we show that the formation of biogeochemical interfaces in soil is an ongoing process and that different properties present in artificial soils influenced the bacterial response to the phenanthrene spike. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pretreatment process for mineral analysis in FFH using INAA-method and evaluation of mineral intakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ok Hee; Youn, Kyung Jin; Lee, Ji Bum; Kim, Mi Jin

    2010-05-01

    This study were aimed to set up the pre-treatment process for FFH and analyse Pretreatment processes for the analysis of food mineral contents by INAA were established according to FFH state using freeze-drying and homogenization. The Se contents showed higher precision with INAA-method than ICP-method. The content of Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, Co in FFH measured using INAA-method showed that the mineral contents in the amount of recommended intakes by manufacturer were not significantly different according to FFH type. The average Ca contents was the highest in Yousanguns > nutritional supplement> glucosamines. The average K content of FFH with one serving size were the highest in glucosamines>aloes> nutritional supplements. I content among FFH was the highest in nutritional supplements. The average Mg contents were highest in Chlorella-Spirurina and Aloes. The average Cu content of FFH was the highest in Yeasts. The contents of Fe, Zn and Se were the highest in nutritional supplements. The mineral contents in recommended intake amounts by manufacturer were over the maximum contents regulated by Korean FDA in some imported FFH products. their mineral contents of FFH using NAA-method and to assess the mineral intakes by FFH

  9. Pretreatment process for mineral analysis in FFH using INAA-method and evaluation of mineral intakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ok Hee; Youn, Kyung Jin; Lee, Ji Bum; Kim, Mi Jin [Yongin University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    This study were aimed to set up the pre-treatment process for FFH and analyse Pretreatment processes for the analysis of food mineral contents by INAA were established according to FFH state using freeze-drying and homogenization. The Se contents showed higher precision with INAA-method than ICP-method. The content of Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cr, Co in FFH measured using INAA-method showed that the mineral contents in the amount of recommended intakes by manufacturer were not significantly different according to FFH type. The average Ca contents was the highest in Yousanguns > nutritional supplement> glucosamines. The average K content of FFH with one serving size were the highest in glucosamines>aloes> nutritional supplements. I content among FFH was the highest in nutritional supplements. The average Mg contents were highest in Chlorella-Spirurina and Aloes. The average Cu content of FFH was the highest in Yeasts. The contents of Fe, Zn and Se were the highest in nutritional supplements. The mineral contents in recommended intake amounts by manufacturer were over the maximum contents regulated by Korean FDA in some imported FFH products. their mineral contents of FFH using NAA-method and to assess the mineral intakes by FFH

  10. Clay minerals in sediments of Portuguese reservoirs and their significance as weathering products from over-eroded soils: a comparative study of the Maranhão, Monte Novo and Divor Reservoirs (South Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rita M. F.; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.; Conceição, Patrícia I. S. T.

    2010-12-01

    The Southern region of Portugal is subjected to several forms of over-erosion. Most leached products, mainly composed of fine particles containing nutrients, metals or pesticides, are easily transported by river flows. When these are hindered by a physical barrier such as a dam, the particulate load accumulates on the bottom of the reservoirs, often leading to a pronounced decrease of water quality. Bottom sediments from three reservoirs were subjected to grain-size analysis and a study of clay minerals by X-ray diffraction. Most sediments contain a diverse set of clay minerals, mostly illites, smectites, chlorites and kaolinites. The nature of the clay minerals reflects the nature of the parent rocks. During the cycles of transport and temporary deposition, they may undergo significant chemical and physical transformations, which lead to an increase of expandable properties and therefore, to a higher cationic exchange capacity, determining its important role as vehicles of environmental pollutants.

  11. Methods of mineral potential assessment of uranium deposits: A mineral systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaireth, S.

    2014-01-01

    deposit). The five questions include: i) what is the architecture and size of the system; ii) what is P-T and geodynamic history of the system; iii) what is the nature of the fluids and fluid reservoirs in the system; iv) what is the nature of fluid pathways; and v) what is the chemistry of metal transport and deposition in space as well as time. Analysis of fertile mineral systems can provide useful information on geological processes essential to form an economic mineral deposit in an area. Mappable features of these processes in geological datasets can then be used to estimate probabilities visualised in the form of mineral potential, prospectivity and favourability maps. The probabilities (levels of mineral potential, favourability index) can be either shown using non-numerical (high, moderate and low), ordinal (numbers expressing ranking) and cardinal (numbers expressing quantities) scales. This paper will discuss advantages and disadvantages of various GIS-based methods of qualitative assessment and will also present a number of case studies illustrating mineral potential assessment of uranium deposits carried out in Geoscience Australia. (author)

  12. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  13. The clay mineral and Sr-Nd isotopic composition for fine-grained fraction of sediments from northwestern South China Sea: implications for sediment provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, G.

    2013-12-01

    *Guanqiang Cai caiguanqiang@sina.com Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey, Guangzhou, 510760, P.R. China As the largest marginal sea in the western pacific, the South China Sea (SCS) receives large amount of terrigenous material annually through numerous rivers from surrounding continents and islands, which make it as the good place for the study of source to sink process. Yet few studies put emphasis on the northwestern continental shelf and slope in the SCS, even though most of the detrital materials derived from the Red River and Hainan Island are deposited in this area, and northwestern shelf plays a significant role in directly linking the South China, the Indochina and the South China Sea and thus controlling the source to sink process of terrestrial sediment. We presented the clay mineral and Sr-Nd isotopic composition of fine-grained fraction for sediments from northwestern SCS, in order to identify sediment source and transportation. The results show that the clay mineral of northwestern SCS sediments are mainly illite (30%~59%), smectite (20%~40%) and kaolinite (8%~35%), with minor chlorite. The illite chemical index varies between 0.19 and 0.75 with an average of 0.49, indicating an intensive hydrolysis in the source region. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of sediments range from 0.716288 to 0.734416 (average of 0.724659), and ɛ Nd(0) values range from -10.31 to -11.62 (average of -10.93), which suggest that the source rocks of these sediments are derived from continental crust. The Hainan Island is an important source for sediments deposited in the nearshore and western shelf, especially for illite, kaolinite and smectite clay minerals. Furthermore, the relatively high contents of kaolinite and smectite in sediments from eastern shelf and southern slope of Hainan Island are also controlled by the supply of terrigenous materials from Hainan, which cannot be resulted from sedimentary differentiation of the Pearl and Red river sediments. And the correlation analysis

  14. Laboratory studies on the retention and release of some radioisotopes by clay minerals and fresh water stream biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, M.Y.; Abdel-Gawad, A.S.; Misak, N.Z.; Abdelmalik, W.E.; Mitry, E.; Maghrawy, H.B.

    1982-01-01

    The subject of long-lived radioactive waste disposal and its implications on human environment is of prime importance. The disposal of liquid waste into ground or surface water constitutes one of the main approaches to this subject. The present survey comprises two main parts. The first one deals with the sorption of long-lived radioactive waste by some clays collected from localities in the vicinity of Cairo, the Reactor Centre at Inshas and Borg El-Arab site. The second part describes the behaviour of some long-lived radioelements in aquaria containing bottom sediments of Ismailia Canal, Canal water and aquatic biota. (author)

  15. Review of Studies of Clay Minerals as Significant Component of Potential Host Rocks or Engineering Barriers for Radioactive Waste Disposals Performed at Comenius University in Bratislava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, Uhlik; Vladimir, Sucha; Maria, Caplovicova; Igor, Stricek

    2013-01-01

    About 50 % of electric power is produced by nuclear power plants in Slovakia. In spite of the significant production of nuclear waste, Slovakia has not defined basic strategy of radioactive-waste isolation. However, some pilot projects and studies have been carried out. Five areas were determined as prospective sites for construction of deep geological repository (DGR). Two of them are situated in the south of Slovakia. Szecseny schlier (mixture of siltstones and Clay-stones) of Lucenec Formation (Egerian) is one of the most prospective host rocks from lithological, structural and spatial perspective. Besides the investigation of potential host rock for DGR the studies of bentonite properties as important part of engineering barriers for radioactive waste disposals were performed. Detailed mineral and structural analyses of smectites from the bentonitic material exposed to laboratory Mock-Up test were realised. Particular interest has been focused on interaction between Fe and smectites. Other field of interest is investigation of sorption of Cs and Sr on natural and modified bentonites, including irradiation. Purpose of this work is to present a short review of other studies done by our group with partial focusing to interaction of organic dye (Rhoda-mine 6G) with smectite that is connected with changes of layer charge after treatment; possibilities to measure preferential orientation of clays after compaction by TEM and to effort to use X-ray micro-tomography for inner structure of sediments. (authors)

  16. Influence of Thermal Preparation Method on Mineral Composition of Shrimps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Valentin GORAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study goal was to evaluate the effects of 3 different cooking methods (boiling, roasting, and microwaving on mineral concentrations of shrimps from the Bucharest market. Mineral content in shrimp samples was evaluated by ICP-OES, and relative humidity was assessed by thermogravimetry. Cooking method insignificantly influenced the level of Fe. Ca and K levels were higher in cooked samples compared to raw shrimps, independent of cooking method. Essential (Cu, Se, and Zn, and non-essential and toxic (Al, Cd, Ni, and Pb elements levels were significantly increased in boiled shrimps, compared to raw and the other 2 types of cooked samples. Generally, after cooking the lowest values of essential trace elements concentration was registered in roasted samples. The highest percentage of water loss was found in boiled samples. In general, thermal preparation increased mineral concentrations in cooked samples compared to raw shrimps.

  17. A review of zinc oxide mineral beneficiation using flotation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejtemaei, Majid; Gharabaghi, Mahdi; Irannajad, Mehdi

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, extraction of zinc from low-grade mining tailings of oxidized zinc has been a matter of discussion. This is a material which can be processed by flotation and acid-leaching methods. Owing to the similarities in the physicochemical and surface chemistry of the constituent minerals, separation of zinc oxide minerals from their gangues by flotation is an extremely complex process. It appears that selective leaching is a promising method for the beneficiation of this type of ore. However, with the high consumption of leaching acid, the treatment of low-grade oxidized zinc ores by hydrometallurgical methods is expensive and complex. Hence, it is best to pre-concentrate low-grade oxidized zinc by flotation and then to employ hydrometallurgical methods. This paper presents a critical review on the zinc oxide mineral flotation technique. In this paper, the various flotation methods of zinc oxide minerals which have been proposed in the literature have been detailed with the aim of identifying the important factors involved in the flotation process. The various aspects of recovery of zinc from these minerals are also dealt with here. The literature indicates that the collector type, sulfidizing agent, pH regulator, depressants and dispersants types, temperature, solid pulp concentration, and desliming are important parameters in the process. The range and optimum values of these parameters, as also the adsorption mechanism, together with the resultant flotation of the zinc oxide minerals reported in the literature are summarized and highlighted in the paper. This review presents a comprehensive scientific guide to the effectiveness of flotation strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A method for the determination of gas diffusion coefficients in undisturbed Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacops, E.; Volckaert, G.; Maes, N.; Weetjens, E.; Maes, T.; Vandervoort, F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The main mechanisms by which gas will be generated in deep geological repositories are: anaerobic corrosion of metals in wastes and packaging; radiolysis of water and organic materials in the packages, and microbial degradation of various organic wastes. Corrosion and radiolysis yield mainly hydrogen while microbial degradation leads to methane and carbon dioxide. The gas generated in the near field of a geological repository in clay will dissolve in the ground water and be transported away from the repository by diffusion as dissolved species. However if the gas generation rate is larger than the diffusive flux, the pore water will get over-saturated and a free gas phase will be formed. This will lead to a gas pressure build-up and finally to an advective gas flux. The latter might influence the performance of the repository. Therefore it is important to assess whether or not gas production rates can exceed the capacity of the near field to store and dissipate these gases by dissolution and diffusion only. The current available gas diffusion parameters for hydrogen in Boom Clay, obtained from the MEGAS project, suffer from an uncertainty of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. Sensitivity calculations performed by Weetjens et al. (2006) for the disposal of vitrified high-level waste showed that with this uncertainty on the diffusion coefficient, the formation of a free gas phase cannot be excluded. Furthermore, recent re-evaluations of the MEGAS experiments by Krooss (2008) and Aertsens (2008) showed that the applied technique does not allow precise determination of the diffusion coefficient. Therefore a new method was developed to determine more precisely the gas diffusion coefficient for dissolved gases (especially dissolved hydrogen) in Boom Clay. This should allow for a more realistic assessment of the gas flux evolution of a repository as function of the estimated gas generation rates. The basic idea is to perform a

  19. Mineralogical analysis of clays in hardsetting soil horizons, by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction using Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prandel, L.V.; Saab, S.C.; Brinatti, A.M.; Giarola, N.F.B.; Leite, W.C.; Cassaro, F.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction and spectroscopic techniques have been shown to be suitable for obtaining physical and mineralogical properties in polycrystalline soil samples, and also in their precursor compounds. For instance, the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy allows obtaining the elemental composition of an investigated sample, while the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique permits obtaining qualitative and quantitative composition of the soil minerals through the Rietveld method (RM). In this study Yellow Latosol (Oxisol), Yellow Argisol (Ultisol) and Gray Argisol (Ultisol) soil samples, classified as “hardsetting soils”, extracted from areas located at Northeast and Southeast of Brazilian coast were investigated. The soils and their fractions were analyzed in an EDX-700 and an XRD-6000 (Cu K α radiation). XRF results indicate high percentages of Si and Al, and small percentage of Fe and Ti in the investigated samples. The DRX data and RM indicate that there was a predominance of kaolinite and halloysite minerals (kaolin group minerals) in the clay fractions, which are presumably responsible for the formation of kaolinitic plasma in these soils. Also, the obtained results showed that the XRF, XRD techniques and RM were very helpful for investigating the mineralogical composition of a hardsetting soil. - Highlights: ► Elemental composition of soil samples through X-Ray fluorescence. ► Mineralogical quantification through X-ray diffraction and Rietveld method. ► Oxisol and Ultisol, Brazil ‘Barreiras’ formation. ► High amounts of Si and Al oxides and low amounts of Fe and Ti oxides. ► Predominance of kaolinite in the clay fraction

  20. Modelling of the physico-chemical behaviour of clay minerals with a thermo-kinetic model taking into account particles morphology in compacted material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sali, D.; Fritz, B.; Clément, C.; Michau, N.

    2003-04-01

    Modelling of fluid-mineral interactions is largely used in Earth Sciences studies to better understand the involved physicochemical processes and their long-term effect on the materials behaviour. Numerical models simplify the processes but try to preserve their main characteristics. Therefore the modelling results strongly depend on the data quality describing initial physicochemical conditions for rock materials, fluids and gases, and on the realistic way of processes representations. The current geo-chemical models do not well take into account rock porosity and permeability and the particle morphology of clay minerals. In compacted materials like those considered as barriers in waste repositories, low permeability rocks like mudstones or compacted powders will be used : they contain mainly fine particles and the geochemical models used for predicting their interactions with fluids tend to misjudge their surface areas, which are fundamental parameters in kinetic modelling. The purpose of this study was to improve how to take into account the particles morphology in the thermo-kinetic code KINDIS and the reactive transport code KIRMAT. A new function was integrated in these codes, considering the reaction surface area as a volume depending parameter and the calculated evolution of the mass balance in the system was coupled with the evolution of reactive surface areas. We made application exercises for numerical validation of these new versions of the codes and the results were compared with those of the pre-existing thermo-kinetic code KINDIS. Several points are highlighted. Taking into account reactive surface area evolution during simulation modifies the predicted mass transfers related to fluid-minerals interactions. Different secondary mineral phases are also observed during modelling. The evolution of the reactive surface parameter helps to solve the competition effects between different phases present in the system which are all able to fix the chemical

  1. Substantiation of the hydrodynamic disintegration of hydraulic fluid’s mineral component of high-clay sand in precious metals placers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Khrunina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available General regularities and theoretical approaches determining hydroimpulsive effects on the mineral component of the hydraulic fluid are analyzed, with reference to the disintegration of high-clay sands of gold-bearing placers. Theoretical conclusions on the hydrodynamic effect on the solid component of the hydraulic fluid give insight into emerging processes in multicomponent media under hydrodynamic influences initiated by various sources of physical and mechanical influence. It is noted that the theoretical justification of the structurally complex hydrodynamic effect on the hydraulic fluid with the formation of phenomena arising from the collision of solid components with each other and obstacles includes the consideration of changes in such force characteristics as speed, pressure, flow power, and also changes in design parameters and characteristics of the environment. A conceptual approach is given to the theoretical substantiation of the disintegration of the hydraulic fluid’s mineral component using the example of the proposed installation. Calculation of economic indicators for the use of a hydrodynamic generator in comparison with processes based on known technologies has shown significant advantages of using the proposed installation, which can increase productivity and quality production indicators.

  2. Physicochemical characterization of modified clay based composites obtained by a novel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Swati; Dudi, D.; Singh, G. P.; Verma, S. K.; Bhojak, N.

    2018-05-01

    Material science is one of the important fields where, absorption spectra of lanthanide ions have been a subject of several investigations because of their possible use as laser materials, diagnostic tools and sensors. Study of absorption spectra in visible and near infrared regions yields useful information regarding energy and intensity parameters, and nature and probabilities of transitions. Chemical physics provides fundamental tool to develop lanthanide chemistry, which has been increasingly significant in the last few years due to the wide variety of potential applications of their complexes in many important areas of biology and medicines. The present work describes the development of a novel method of composite preparation based on clay and its physiochemical characterization. Simultaneous measurement of some thermal properties has made study more useful. Results match with accepted models.

  3. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  4. Ab-Initio Modelling Of Surface Site Reactivity And Fluid Transport In Clay Minerals Case Study: Pyrophyllite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churakov, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    Pyrophyllite, Al 2 [Si 4 O 10 ](OH) 2 , is the simplest structural prototype for 2:1 dioctahedral phyllosilicate. Because the net electric charge in pyrophyllite is zero, it is the best candidate for investigating the non electrostatic contribution to sorption and transport phenomena in clays. Using ab-initio simulations, we have investigated the reactivity and structure of the water-solid interface on the basal plane and edge sites of pyrophyllite. The calculations predict slightly hydrophobic behaviour of the basal plane. For the high water coverage (100), (110) and (-110), lateral facets have a lower energy than for the (010), (130) and (-130) surfaces. Analysis of the surface reactivity reveals that the =Al-OH groups are most easily protonated on the (010), (130) and (-130) facets. The =Al-O-Si= sites will be protonated on the (100), (130), (110), (-110) and (-130) surfaces. The =Al-OH 2 complexes are more easily de-protonated than the =Si-OH and =Al-OH sites. A spontaneous, reversible exchange of the protons between the solution and the edge sites has been observed in ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations at 300 K. Such near-surface proton diffusion may result in a significant contribution to the diffusion coefficients measured in neutron scattering experiments. (author)

  5. Clay Modeling as a Method to Learn Human Muscles: A Community College Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoike, Howard K.; O'Kane, Robyn L.; Lenchner, Erez; Haspel, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of clay modeling compared with cat dissection for human muscle identification was examined over two semesters at LaGuardia Community College in Queens, NY. The 181 students in 10 sections in this study were randomly distributed into control (cat dissection) and experimental (clay modeling) groups, and the results of the muscle…

  6. Methods of improving the production structure and quality of clay powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabchenko, V I; Lityayeva, Z A

    1981-01-01

    Results are generalized of scientific research work in relation to the quality of argillaceous raw material and powders made of it to prepare drilling fluids. The output of the solution of definite effective viscosity is adopted as the criterion for the quality of clay powders. Recommendations are made for the use of jet grinding of clays and the technology of plasticizing.

  7. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  8. Exposure emanation methods of prospecting for mineral deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titov, V.L.; Venkov, V.A.; Avdeeva, T.Ya.; Kuvshinnikova, E.I.

    1985-01-01

    Fundamentals of the theory and practice of new methods for prospecting of mineral deposits-exposure emanation surveys are stated. Different modifications of these methods are considered: emanation track method, electron alphametry, technique based on the recording of alpha radiation of radon daughter products and thermoluminescent dosemeters. Advanatges of these methods as compared with the conventional emanation survey using emanometers and methods based on the recording of gamma radiation intensity are shown. Problems of the theory and practical aspects of the concrete modifications application as well as systems for data acquisition and processing fields of the methods application, technique of works performance and survey data interpretation are considered in detail; methods sensitivity, probable mechanisms of radon transport in bowels, role of a depth component of the radiactive emanation concentration field are evaluated. Examples of the method application in practice are given, emanation anomalies and their evaluation methods are classified

  9. Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aren't minerals something you find in the earth, like iron and quartz? Well, yes, but small ... canned salmon and sardines with bones leafy green vegetables, such as broccoli calcium-fortified foods — from orange ...

  10. Influence of Thermal Preparation Method on Mineral Composition of Mussels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Valentin GORAN

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on evaluation of the effects of 3 different thermal preparation methods (boiling, roasting, microwaving on mineral concentrations of mussels from Bucharest market. The mineral content in raw and cooked mussel samples was evaluated by ICP-OES and relative humidity of raw and cooked mussels by thermogravimetry. Se level in microwaved samples was significantly decreased compared to raw and the other 2 cooked mussel samples. Zn concentration in raw samples was not significantly different compared to those in roasted samples. Fe level was insignificantly different between boiled and roasted samples and significantly lowers in microwaved samples. Ni, Pb, and Se levels were significantly higher in boiled samples, and Cd levels were insignificantly different reported to cooking method. The percentage of water loss during roasting was lower than the other 2 thermal preparation methods. Potassium concentrations in cooked mussels were higher compared to raw ones. Mineral concentrations were highest in roasted samples and heavy metal concentrations in boiled mussels.

  11. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    This research studies Latvia originated Devon (Tūja, Skaņkalne), quaternary (Ceplīši), Jurassic, (Strēļi) and Triassic (Vadakste) deposit clays as well as Lithuania originated Triassic (Akmene) deposit clays. Thixotropic properties of clay were researched by measuring relative viscosity of clay in water suspensions. Relative viscosity is measured with a hopper method. It was detected that, when concentration of suspension is increased, clay suspension’s viscosity also increases. It happens un...

  12. A method for permanent CO2 mineral carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, David C.; O' Connor, William K.; Nilsen, David N.; Rush, G.E.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of mineral carbonation as a method for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. The research is part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the Office of Fossil Energy in DOE. Other participants in this Program include DOE?s Los Alamos National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory, Arizona State University, and Science Applications International Corporation. The research has focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC reacts a slurry of magnesium silicate mineral with supercritical CO2 to produce a solid magnesium carbonate product. To date, olivine and serpentine have been used as the mineral reactant, but other magnesium silicates could be used as well. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and consequently, these results may also be applicable to strategies for in-situ geological sequestration. Baseline tests were begun in distilled water on ground products of foundry-grade olivine. Tests conducted at 150 C and subcritical CO2 pressures (50 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to carbonate. Increasing the partial pressure of CO2 to supercritical (>73 atm) conditions, coupled with agitation of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, resulted in significant improvement in the extent of reaction in much shorter reaction times. A change from distilled water to a bicarbonate/salt solution further improved the rate and extent of reaction. When serpentine, a hydrated mineral, was used instead of olivine, extent of reaction was poor until heat treatment was included prior to the carbonation reaction. Removal of the chemically bound water resulted in conversion to carbonate similar to those obtained with olivine. Recent results have shown that conversions of nearly 80 pct are achievable after 30 minutes

  13. Study of alteration in the mechanical properties in hybrid nanocomposite of polypropylene/sisal fibers/mineral clay irradiated with gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Nilson C.; Terence, Mauro C.; Miranda, Leila F., E-mail: nilpereira@mackenzie.com.b [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Curso de Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    A new material class formed with reinforced filler, hybrid of organic and inorganic materials provides the technological development of materials with modified properties. And among great numbers of properties that can be modified by presence of hybrid filler to stand out the tension resistance. Polymer shows behavior of tensions and deformation that are not related of simple form. The answer of this material at mechanicals solicitations depends of structural factors and externals variables. As structural factors can be, for example, molecular weight, ramifications and crosslink. As external variables can be, for example, temperature, time or velocity of deformation, kind of solicitation and others. This work was possible to verify as nanostructures materials behavior, mechanically, after were submitted gamma radiation. This work utilized as polymeric matrix, recycled polypropylene, and as hybrid filler, a mixture of montimorillonite mineral clay with natural sisal fibers. It is known that form to magnify the tensile resistance is increase the number of crosslink of principal chain for gamma radiation. After irradiation the polypropylene was crosslinked structures that are result recombination of radicals formed during process of irradiation. It.s known that radicals formed occur preferentially in the amorphous region of polymer. Considering that polymeric matrix polypropylene, without addition fillers suffer strong structural influence when irradiated, was possible verify change in the extension, tensile strength and also maxim tensile in rupture, when this matrix was incorporated with fillers hybrids. (author)

  14. Study of alteration in the mechanical properties in hybrid nanocomposite of polypropylene/sisal fibers/mineral clay irradiated with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Nilson C.; Terence, Mauro C.; Miranda, Leila F.

    2009-01-01

    A new material class formed with reinforced filler, hybrid of organic and inorganic materials provides the technological development of materials with modified properties. And among great numbers of properties that can be modified by presence of hybrid filler to stand out the tension resistance. Polymer shows behavior of tensions and deformation that are not related of simple form. The answer of this material at mechanicals solicitations depends of structural factors and externals variables. As structural factors can be, for example, molecular weight, ramifications and crosslink. As external variables can be, for example, temperature, time or velocity of deformation, kind of solicitation and others. This work was possible to verify as nanostructures materials behavior, mechanically, after were submitted gamma radiation. This work utilized as polymeric matrix, recycled polypropylene, and as hybrid filler, a mixture of montimorillonite mineral clay with natural sisal fibers. It is known that form to magnify the tensile resistance is increase the number of crosslink of principal chain for gamma radiation. After irradiation the polypropylene was crosslinked structures that are result recombination of radicals formed during process of irradiation. It.s known that radicals formed occur preferentially in the amorphous region of polymer. Considering that polymeric matrix polypropylene, without addition fillers suffer strong structural influence when irradiated, was possible verify change in the extension, tensile strength and also maxim tensile in rupture, when this matrix was incorporated with fillers hybrids. (author)

  15. Impact of medicated feed along with clay mineral supplementation on Escherichia coli resistance to antimicrobial agents in pigs after weaning in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhsh, Seyedehameneh; Kabore, Kiswendsida Paul; Fravalo, Philippe; Letellier, Ann; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) phenotype and virulence and AMR gene profiles in Escherichia coli from pigs receiving in-feed antimicrobial medication following weaning and the effect of feed supplementation with a clay mineral, clinoptilolite, on this dynamic. Eighty E. coli strains isolated from fecal samples of pigs receiving a diet containing chlortetracycline and penicillin, with or without 2% clinoptilolite, were examined for antimicrobial resistance to 15 antimicrobial agents. Overall, an increased resistance to 10 antimicrobials was observed with time. Supplementation with clinoptilolite was associated with an early increase but later decrease in blaCMY-2, in isolates, as shown by DNA probe. Concurrently, a later increase in the frequency of blaCMY-2 and the virulence genes iucD and tsh was observed in the control pig isolates, being significantly greater than in the supplemented pigs at day 28. Our results suggest that, in the long term, supplementation with clinoptilolite could decrease the prevalence of E. coli carrying certain antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrogeochemical methods for studying uranium mineralization in sedimentary rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsin, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The role of hydrogeochemical studies of uranium deposits is considered, which permits to obtain data on ore forming role of water solutions. The hydrogeochemistry of ore formation is determined as a result of physicochemical analysis of mineral paragenesis. Analysis results of the content of primary and secondary gaseous - liquid inclusions into the minerals are of great importance. Another way to determine the main features of ore formation hydrogeochemistry envisages simultaneous analysis of material from a number of deposits of one genetic type but in different periods of their geochemical life: being formed, formed and preserved, and being destructed. Comparison of mineralogo-geochemical zonation and hydrogeochemical one in water-bearing horizon is an efficient method, resulting in the objective interpretation of the facts. The comparison is compulsory when determining deposit genesis

  17. Improvements of marine clay slurries using chemical–physical combined method (CPCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effectiveness, applicability and validity of chemical–physical combined methods (CPCMs for treatment of marine clay (MC slurries were evaluated. The method CPCM1 combines chemical stabilization and vacuum preloading (VP, while CPCM2 is similar to CPCM1 but includes both the application of surcharge and use of geo-bags to provide confinement during surcharge preloading. The key advantage of CPCM2 using geo-bags is that the surcharge can be immediately applied on the chemically stabilized slurries. Two types of geo-bags were investigated under simulated land filling and dyke conditions, respectively. The test results show that the shear strength (cu of treated slurry by CPCM2 is generally much higher than that by CPCM1. Besides, the use of CPCM2 can significantly reduce the treatment time due to the short drainage paths created by geo-bags. Overall, CPCM2 allows faster consolidation and higher preloading that help to achieve higher mechanical properties of the stabilized slurry. There are consistent relationships between cU and water content of slurries treated by CPCM2. Several important observations were also made based on comparisons of experimental data.

  18. Proceedings of the NEA Clay Club Workshop on Clay characterisation from nanoscopic to microscopic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A wide spectrum of argillaceous media are being considered in Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) member countries as potential host rocks for the final, safe disposal of radioactive waste, and/or as major constituent of repository systems in which wastes will be emplaced. In this context, the NEA established the Working Group on the 'Characterisation, the Understanding and the Performance of Argillaceous Rocks as Repository Host Formations' in 1990, informally known as the 'Clay Club'. The Clay Club examines various argillaceous rocks that are being considered for the underground disposal of radioactive waste, ranging from soft clays to indurated shales. Very generally speaking, these clay rocks are composed of fine-grained minerals showing pore sizes from < 2 nm (micropores) up to > 50 nm (macro-pores). The water flow, solute transport and mechanical properties are largely determined by this microstructure, the spatial arrangement of the minerals and the chemical pore water composition. Examples include anion accessible ('geochemical') porosity and macroscopic membrane effects (chemical osmosis, hyper-filtration), geomechanical properties and the characteristics of two-phase flow properties (relevant for gas transport). At the current level of knowledge, there is a strong need to improve the nanoscale description of the phenomena observed at a more macroscopic scale. However, based on the scale of individual clay-minerals and pore sizes, for most of the imaging techniques this resolution is a clear challenge. The workshop, hosted by the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in the Akademiehotel Karlsruhe (Germany) from 6 to 8 September 2011, was intended to give, inter alia, a discussion platform on: - The current state-of-the-art of different spectro-microscopic methods - New developments addressing the above mentioned knowledge gaps in clays. - The perception of the interplay between geometry

  19. Electrokinetic Stabilisation Method of Soft Clay in Pure System using Electrokinetic Geosynthetic Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Jefferson, I.; Madun, A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Rogers, C. D. F.

    2018-04-01

    Electrokinetic stabilisation (EKS) method has the ability to solve the problems of soft highly compressibility soil. This study will present the results from an experimental study of EKS on soft soils using inactive kaolinite clay, inert electrode and distilled water (DW) as a pure system mechanism before any chemical stabilisers being used in this research. Therefore, this will provide a baseline study to improve the efficiency of EKS approach. The test model was using inert electrode of Electrokinetic Geosythentic (EKG) developed at the Newcastle University to apply a constant voltage gradient of 50 V/m across a soil sample approximately 400 mm. Distilled water was used at the pore electrolyte fluid compartments supplied under zero hydraulic gradient conditions for the periods of 3, 7 and 14 days. Throughout the monitoring, physical and chemical characteristics were measured. Results from the monitoring data, physical and chemical properties of the pure system showed the development of pH gradient, the changes of electrical conductivity and chemical concentrations with regards to the distance from anode and treatment periods due to the electrochemical effects even though there was no chemical stabilisers were introduced or released from the degradation of electrodes.

  20. Pb-Zn mineralization of Ali ou Daoud area (Central High Atlas, Morocco: characterisation of deposit and relationship with the clay assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoudi, L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Zn-Pb-Fe ores in the Ali ou Daoud deposit (Central High Atlas are found as stratiform levels and as karst fillings in carbonate platforms facies of Bajocian age. Tectonic structures (e.g., synsedimentary faults played a relevant role in the ore emplacement. The dolomitic ore-related host-rock levels are characterized by the presence of kaolinite enrichment in clay levels in amounts directly related to the proportion of the clay minerals. The latter is evidenced by correlation between kaolinite and sulphide contents, suggesting that the installation of kaolinite and mineralisations would result from the same hydrothermal fluid.[Français] Dans les séries sédimentaires carbonatées d’Ali ou Daoud (Haut Atlas Central, les minéralisations à Zn, Pb et Fe en amas stratiformes forment les faciès de remplissage des karsts d’une plateforme carbonatée bajocienne. Le contrôle structural joue un rôle capital dans la localisation du gîte en bordure de plateforme sur des failles synsédimentaires. Dans les niveaux dolomitiques encaissants des minéralisations, les assemblages argileux sont caractérisés par la présence de kaolinite dont la teneur varie parallèlement avec celle du minerai. Ceci suggère que la mise en place de la kaolinite et des minéralisations résulterait du même fluide hydrothermal. [Español] En las series sedimentarias carbonatadas de Ali ou Daoud (Alto Atlas Central, las mineralizaciones de Zn, Pb y Fe aparecen en niveles estratiformes como facies de reemplazamiento de los karsts de una plataforma carbonatada Bajociense. El control estructural desempeña un papel crucial en la localización del yacimiento a lo largo de la plataforma sobre fallas sinsedimentarias. En los niveles dolomíticos que incluyen las mineralizaciones, las asociaciones arcillosas se caracterizan por la presencia de caolinita, cuyo contenido varía paralelamente al de la mineralización. Esto sugiere que la creación de caolinita y de la

  1. Method for strontium isolation from high-mineralized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evzhanov, Kh.; Andriyasova, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method to isolate strontium from high-mineralized waters containing sodium, magnesium, calcium and strontium chlorides, which differ from the prototype method in a considerable decrease in energy consumption with the preservation of a high degree of Sr, Mg and Ca isolation selectivity, has been suggested. According to the method suggested mineralized waters are treated with alkali (NaOH) in the amount of 95-97% of stoichiometry by magnesium, then after separation of magnesium hydroxide precipitate mother liquor is treated with sodium carbonate in the amount of 50-60% of stoichiometry by calcium. After separation of calcium carbonate precipitate mother liquor is treated with NaOH in the amount of 130-135% of stoichiometry by calcium. After separation of calcium hydroxide precipitate from mother liquor by means of sodium carbonate introduction strontium carbonate is isolated. The degree of strontium extraction in the form of SrCO 3 constitutes 90.5% of its content in the initial solution. The method presented can be used for strontium separation from natural and waste waters

  2. Treatment of Petroleum Drill Cuttings Using Stabilization/Solidification Method by Cement and Modified Clay Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Ghasemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High organic content in petroleum drill cuttings is a substantial obstacle which hinders cement hydration and subsequently decreases the clean-up efficiency of the stabilization/solidification (S/S process. In this study, a modified clayey soil (montmorillonite with low to moderate polarity was used as an additive to cement. Because of its high adsorption capacity, the clay is capable of mitigating the destructive role of organic materials and preventing their interference with the hydration process. Mixes containing different ratios of cement, waste and modified clay were prepared and tested for their mechanical and chemical characteristics. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH and Pb content of the samples were analyzed as well. For this purpose, the mixes were subjected to unconfined compressive strength (UCS and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP tests. The results indicated that the specimens with 28-day curing time at a cement/waste ratio of 25% or higher (w/w and 10% modified clay (w/w met the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA criterion for compressive strength. Moreover, a reduction of 94% in the leaching of TPH was observed with the specimens undergoing the TCLP with a cement/waste ratio of 30% (w/w and a clay/waste ratio of 30% (w/w. Finally, the specimens with 30% cement/waste and 10% clay/waste ratios showed the least concentration (6.14% of leached Pb.

  3. Use of x-ray radiographic methods in the study of clay liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, P.G.; May, J.H.; Brown, K.W.; Thomas, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray radiography has been widely used in soil investigation to study the distribution of layers in soil cores and the effects of changing conditions (loading or impact) on soil structure. X-ray radiographic techniques also can be useful in studying clays or clay soils used in liners. Laboratory investigations were undertaken to demonstrate that X-ray radiographic techniques could be used to detect density and soil structure changes that usually accompany variations in hydraulic conductivity of clay liners. An example of a real-time test of a simulated bentonite and sand, liner attacked with acid lead nitrate and examples of radiographic examination of clay soil (non-calcareous smectite) samples that have been permeated by lead acetate or lead nitrate are presented. The changes in density and structure can be related to changes observed in hydraulic conductivity during permeation. X-ray radiography easily can be applied to field samples of soil or clay liner materials to detect density and structural changes that occur as the liner and permeating fluid interact. X-ray techniques have applications in both understanding failure mechanisms and forecasting liner performance

  4. Thermal Transmittance of Porous Hollow Clay Brick by Guarded Hot Box Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonsoo

    2018-03-01

    The thermal property of a porous hollow clay brick was determined by measuring the thermal transmittance of the wall made of porous hollow clay bricks. Prior to the production of porous hollow clay bricks, nonporous and porous tiny clay bricks were prepared to determine the physico-mechanical properties by modifying the amount of wood flour and firing temperature. The bricks were produced by uniaxial pressing and then fired in an electric furnace. Their physico-mechanical properties were measured by water absorption, apparent porosity, bulk density, and compressive strength. The porous tiny clay bricks were produced with three types of wood flour: coarse wood flour (1-0.36 mm), medium-sized wood flour (0.36-0.15 mm), and fine wood flour (cement bricks. The two walls had a thermal transmittance of 1.42 and 2.72 W\\cdot m^{-2}\\cdot K^{-1}, respectively. The difference in thermal transmittance was due to the pores created with fine wood flour (< 0.08 mm) as a pore-forming agent.

  5. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  6. Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaquero, M. P.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible changes in the mineral composition of food during frying could be the consequence of losses by leaching, or changes in concentrations caused by exchanges between the food and culinary fat of other compounds. The net result depends on the type of food, the frying fat used and the frying process. Moreover, the modifications that frying produces in other nutrients could indirectly affect the availability of dietary minerals. The most outstanding ones are those that can take place in the fat or in the protein. With respect to the interactions between frying oils and minerals, we have recent knowledge concerning the effects of consuming vegetable oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without turnover, on the nutritive utilization of dietary minerals. The experiments have been carried out in pregnant and growing rats, which consumed diets containing, as a sole source of fat, the testing frying oils or unused oils. It seems that the consumption of various frying oils, with a polar compound content lower or close to the maximum limit of 25% accepted for human consumption, does not alter the absorption and metabolism of calcium, phosphorous, iron or copper. Magnesium absorption from diets containing frying oils tends to increase but the urinary excretion of this element increases, resulting imperceptible the variations in the magnesium balance. The urinary excretion of Zn also increased although its balance remained unchanged. Different studies referring to the effects of consuming fried fatty fish on mineral bioavailability will also be presented. On one hand, frying can cause structural changes in fish protein, which are associated with an increase in iron absorption and a decrease in body zinc retention. The nutritive utilization of other elements such as magnesium, calcium and copper seems to be unaffected. On the other hand; it has been described that an excess of fish fatty acids in the diet produces iron depletion, but when fatty

  7. Sorption of metal ions on clay minerals. 2: Mechanism of Co sorption on hectorite at high and low ionic strength and impact on the sorbent stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, M.L.; Charlet, L.; Manceau, A.

    1999-12-15

    The mechanism of Co uptake from aqueous solution onto hectorite (a magnesian smectite) and its impact on the stability of this clay mineral were investigated as a function of Co concentration (TotCo = 20 to 200 {micro}M, 0.3 M NaNO{sub 3}) and ionic strength (0.3 and 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3}, TotCo = 100 {micro}M) by combining kinetics measurements and Co K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The morphology of the sorbent phase was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and consists of lath-type particles bounded by large basal planes and layer edges. Time-dependent isotherms for Co uptake at high ionic strength indicated the existence of several sorption mechanisms having distinct equilibration times. The dissolution of hectorite was monitored before and after Co addition. Spectral simulations revealed the occurrence of {approximately} 2 Mg and {approximately} 2 Si neighboring cations at interatomic distances characteristic of edge-sharing linkages between Co and Mg octahedra and corner-sharing linkages between Co octahedra and Si tetrahedra, respectively. This local structure is characteristic of inner sphere mononuclear surface complexes at layer edges of hectorite platelets. The occurrence of these complexes even at low ionic strength apparently conflicts with kinetics results, as exchangeable divalent cations are known to form outer sphere surface complexes. To clarify this issue, the amount of Co adsorbed on exchange sites was calculated from the solute Co concentration, assuming that cation exchange was always at equilibrium. These calculations showed that sorbed Co was transferred within 48 h from exchange sites to edge sorption sites.

  8. Influence of Clay Content, Mineralogy and Fabric On Radar Frequency Response of Aquifer Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    High frequency electromagnetic methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) are widely employed to measure water saturation in the vadose zone and water filled porosity in the saturated zone. However, previous work has shown that radar frequency dielectric properties are strongly influenced by clay as well as by water content. They have also shown that that the dielectric response of clay minerals is strongly frequency dependent, and that even a small proportion of clay such as that present in many sandstone aquifers can have a large effect at typi- cal GPR frequencies (around 100MHz). Hence accurate water content/porosity deter- mination requires clay type and content to be taken into account. Reported here are dielectric measurements on clay-sand mixtures, aimed at investigating the influence of clay mineralogy, particle shape, and the geometrical arrangement of the mixture constituents on GPR and TDR response. Dielectric permittivity (at 50-1000MHz) was measured for mixtures of Ottawa Sand and various clay minerals or clay size quartz rock flour, using a specially constructed dielectric cell. Both homogeneous and layered mixtures were tested. The influence of pore water salinity, clay type, and particle arrangement on the dielectric response is interpreted in terms of dielectric dispersion mechanisms. The appropriateness of var- ious dielectric mixing rules such as the Complex Refractive Index Method (CRIM) for determination of water content or porosity from field GPR and TDR data are dis- cussed.

  9. Clay Caterpillar Whodunit: A Customizable Method for Studying Predator-Prey Interactions in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Rachel; Klemens, Jeffrey A.; Agosta, Salvatore J.; Bartlow, Andrew W.; Wood, Steve; Carlson, Jason A.; Stratford, Jeffrey A.; Steele, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Predator-prey dynamics are an important concept in ecology, often serving as an introduction to the field of community ecology. However, these dynamics are difficult for students to observe directly. We describe a methodology that employs model caterpillars made of clay to estimate rates of predator attack on a prey species. This approach can be…

  10. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intrinsic mineral labeling of edible plants: methods and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The fate of minerals can be conveniently studied through intrinsic labeling techniques. The mineral of interest is biologically incorporated into the food in a form that can be distinguished analytically from the natural form of the element. Radiolabels have traditionally been used to study such problems as the uptake of minerals by plants, the gross and subcellular mineral distribution in plant tissues, the form and associations of the deposited mineral, and the bioavailability of minerals to animals and humans. The use of stable (nonradioactive) isotopes as a label offers the potential of safely studying bioavailability of minerals from individual foods in human population groups of all ages using foods processed in normal food handling and processing facilities. 114 references

  12. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method; Compositos nanoestruturados carbono/argila obtidos por metodo hidotermico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S., E-mail: gabriela.borin@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Souza Filho, A.G. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm{sup -1} in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  13. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  14. Homogeneity vs. Heterogeneity of Porosity in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemes, Susanne; Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.; De Craen, Mieke; Honty, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural investigations on Boom Clay at nano- to micrometer scale, using BIB-SEM methods, result in porosity characterization for different mineral phases from direct observations on high resolution SE2-images of representative elementary areas (REAs). High quality, polished surfaces of cross-sections of ∼ 1 mm 2 size were produced on three different samples from the Mol-Dessel research site (Belgium). More than 33,000 pores were detected, manually segmented and analyzed with regard to their size, shape and orientation. Two main pore classes were defined: Small pores (< 500 nm (ED)) within the clay matrices of samples and =big' pores (> 500 nm (ED)) at the interfaces between clay and non-clay mineral (NCM) grains. Samples investigated show similar porosities regarding the first pore-class, but differences occur at the interfaces between clay matrix and NCM grains. These differences were interpreted to be due to differences in quantitative mineralogy (amount of non-clay mineral grains) and grain-size distributions between samples investigated. Visible porosities were measured as 15 to 17 % for samples investigated. Pore-size distributions of pores in clay are similar for all samples, showing log-normal distributions with peaks around 60 nm (ED) and more than 95 % of the pores being smaller than 500 nm (ED). Fitting pore-size distributions using power-laws with exponents between 1.56 and 1.7, assuming self-similarity of the pore space, thus pores smaller than the pore detection resolution following the same power-laws and using these power-laws for extrapolation of pore-size distributions below the limit of pore detection resolution, results in total estimated porosities between 20 and 30 %. These results are in good agreement with data known from Mercury Porosimetry investigations (35-40 % porosity) and water content porosity measurements (∼ 36 %) performed on Boom Clay. (authors)

  15. Imaging techniques in clay sciences: a key tool to go a step further

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, J.C.; Michau, N.; Schaefer, T.

    2012-01-01

    the need to study microstructure of clay-rocks and clay based materials from multi-scale techniques and multiple scientific disciplines. Nevertheless at the end of the 90's, several scientific and/or technological bottlenecks, like the imaging the clays in 3D, limited our capacity to bridge small scale processes to macro-scale behaviors and properties. Over the last decade, R and D programs on nuclear waste disposal have tackled many issues to go further in our understanding of clays. Through different results and current studies, we have reviewed various developments and improvements on imaging techniques and their applications on clay-rocks and clay based materials currently under investigations. The presentation will address successively the different questions asked at each step, from the acquisition to the use of the data: - improvement and development of sampling and microstructure preservation methods to image undisturbed samples, - emergence of 3D techniques (X-ray microtomography, FIB/SEM...) and their application to clay based materials and clay rocks, - improvement of image acquisition and treatment of 2D/3D images, - development of multi-scale methodologies, - cross-cutting between imaging and analytical techniques to get quantitative information on pore and mineral spatial distribution, - imaging in 2D/3D the microstructure of clay materials under THMC conditions and environmental conditions, - extraction of quantitative information from image analysis using statistical approaches or cross-correlation to quantitative techniques, - correlation between microstructure characteristic parameters and macroscopic properties, - modeling of multi-scale THMC processes using data extracted from images. Conclusions drawn up from this review show up that imaging techniques have progressively turned into an essential tool to support THMC experimental or numerical studies in a sense that they have gradually evolved from a qualitative observation mean to a quantitative

  16. Nuclear medical methods for determination of bone mineral content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Kempers, B.; Tschepke, H.D.; Spitz, J.

    1988-01-01

    Osteoporosis is becoming recognized as a major social and economical health problem. Bone mineral content (BMC) depends on many hormonal and metabolic factors. The pathophysiological mechanism of the loss of bone mass is still unclear. For preventive diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, quantitative technology is required that will measure BMC with high precision and reproducibility. Nuclear medical methods permit the BMC of the appendicular skeleton to be measured by single photon absorptiometry. Whole-body BMC, as well as spine and femur BMC, can be measured by dual photon absorptiometry. The results from both procedures are reasonably precise and correlate well with the ash weight of isolated bone. The radiation exposure level in both SPA and DPA is low. SPA and DPA may be used for cost-effective screening of high-risk patients to predict the likelihood of future fractures and control osteoporosis therapy. (orig.) [de

  17. Method of refining mineral and shale oils, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1950-12-06

    A method is described for refining mineral oils, shale oils, tar oil. The oil is preferably treated with concentrated sulphuric acid, of not less than 90% by weight concentration or with chloro-sulphonic acid in order to extract the more reactive components of the oil. The solution (extract phase) is separated from the treated oil (raffinate phase) by centrifuging, characterised by centrifugally separating the extract phase from the raffinate phase before any noticeable chemical reaction with subsequent solution of acid reaction products in the raffinate phase has taken place. The acid remaining in the raffinate phase is allowed to react chemically with the more reactive constituents. The sludge formed is removed from the raffinate phase by centrifuging.

  18. Utilization of Nkpuma-Akpatakpa clay in ceramics: characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nkpuma – Akpatakpa clay was analysed for its ceramics suitability. Chemical, mechanical and spectral characterization of the clay was carried out to obtain more information from this clay found in commercial quantity at Ebonyi State Nigeria. The XRD analysis showed that the principal minerals in the clay are quartz, ...

  19. The Composition and Physical Properties of Some Clays of Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and quartz as the main subsidiary non-clay mineral. The high plasticity index of the clays corresponds to the more transported clays of the tertiary- to –recent environment. The percentage of linear shrinkage varied from 11-16% with the lowest shrinkage (11%), having the coarsest features. Silica (SiO2) content of the clays ...

  20. Polymer-clay nanocomposites obtained by solution polymerization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Clay minerals can be found all over the world.1 Clay minerals have ... salts or covalent bonding with silanes at the OH edges of the clay. ..... Marras S I, Tsimpliaraki A, Zuburtikudis I and ... Mansoori Y, Roojaei K, Zamanloo M R and Imanzadeh.

  1. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI (aq) ) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. - Highlights: • Iodide sorption experiments were completed with a diverse array of clay minerals. • Iodide uptake trended with CEC and swamping electrolyte identity and concentration. • Results can be explained by considering the formation of ion pairs in clay interlayers

  2. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  3. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  4. Caracterização dos argilominerais usados em matéria-prima cerâmica, da formação Rio do Rasto, Bacia do Paraná, no município de Turvo, SC Characterization of clay minerals used in the ceramic industry, from Rio do Rasto formation, Paraná basin, exploitation in Turvo, SC, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Costa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available No sudeste de Santa Catarina existem inúmeras minas de exploração de argilas destinadas à indústria cerâmica da região. Para o conhecimento desta matéria prima foi realizada a caracterização em detalhe de uma frente de lavra em atividade. A exploração é realizada em terrenos sedimentares da Formação Rio do Rasto (Permiano Superior na Bacia do Paraná que afloram como morros testemunho. Foram coletadas quatorze amostras representativas dos níveis desta mina composta de argilitos com intercalação de siltitos de pequena espessura. As amostras foram analisadas por difratometria de raios X pelo método do pó na rocha total e na fração In the southeastern part of Santa Catarina state, Brazil, many mines of clays used as raw material for the ceramic industry are found. A detail study of this material was developed in a mine in activity. The exploitation of clays is held in sedimentary rocks of Rio do Rasto Formation (Upper Permian in the Paraná Basin. The outcrops are in hills testimonies. Fourteen samples were collected and represent the levels of this mine which consisted of argillites with intercalation of slim siltite layer. These samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction using the powder method and in the fraction < 4 µm. The chemical composition was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Petrographic observations in thin section were also performed. Scanning electron microscope images was obtained in samples fragments by secondary electron method. Electron microprobe microanalysis was performed in one thin section. The results showed large vertical variation in the mineralogy and it has been identified three different levels. Up to 2.00 m there is a predominance of smectite. Between 5.50 m 2.00 m the smectite is the main clay mineral, but with significant amounts of illite/mica and above 5.50 m occurs large increase in K-feldspar and detrital mica. Studies in detail by X-ray diffraction (determination of the b

  5. Effect of red clay on diesel bioremediation and soil bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Choi, Sungjong; Hong, Hyerim; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2014-08-01

    Red clay is a type of soil, the red color of which results from the presence of iron oxide. It is considered an eco-friendly material, with many industrial, cosmetic, and architectural uses. A patented method was applied to red clay in order to change its chemical composition and mineral bioavailability. The resulting product was designated processed red clay. This study evaluates the novel use of red clay and processed red clay as biostimulation agents in diesel-contaminated soils. Diesel biodegradation was enhanced in the presence of red clay and processed red clay by 4.9- and 6.7-fold, respectively, and the number of culturable bacterial cells was correlated with the amount of diesel biodegradation. The growth of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, and Cupriavidus necator was promoted by both types of red clays. Culture-independent community analysis determined via barcoded pyrosequencing indicated that Nocardioidaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Caulobacteraceae were enriched by diesel contamination. Bacterial strain isolation from naphthalene- and liquid paraffin-amended media was affiliated with enriched taxa based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity. We suggest that the biostimulating mechanism of red clay and processed red clay is able to support bacterial growth without apparent selection for specific bacterial species.

  6. Survey and critique of quantitative methods for the appraisal of mineral resources. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.P.

    1976-01-01

    Two major categories of appraisal methods (models) for regional mineral resources are identified by virtue of the manner in which mineral endowment is treated in the appraisal: implicit and explicit models. Implicit models do not identify nor specify the mineral endowment model. Mineral resources are inferred to exist as required to fulfill economic or secular relationships. Econometric models of mineral supply and Hubbert's time-rate trend projection are varieties of implicit models. Explicit mineral resource models separate the economic and endowment models and state the endowment model explicitly. Explicit models describe mineral endowment as a function of some physical aspect of the earth's crust, such as geology, volume of rock, density of mineral occurrences, and crustal abundance of an element. Economic factors are introduced subsequent to the appraisal of endowment either as an explicit model which interacts with the deposits inferred by the endowment model, or as a simple adjustment made directly on some aggregate measure of endowment

  7. Study of clays by means of Moessbauer spectoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marticorena, B.

    1982-01-01

    A Moessbauer spectroscopic method has been applied to study layers of clays originating from different places and ceramic from Pachacamac, an archeological site near Lima. We have performed a Moessbauer analysis of the samples mentioned above, submitting them to a thermal treatment in order to determine the influcence on the mineral ferrous compounds of the time and the baking atmoshere. The results obtained do not allow us to conclude that such a method is useful either in the case of clays and/or ceramics which are coming from different places or of archeological

  8. Preparation and characterization of polymer nanocomposites based on chitosan and clay minerals; Preparacao e caracterizacao de nanocompositos polimerico baseados em quitosana e argilo minerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiori, Ana Paula Santos de Melo; Gabiraba, Victor Parizio; Praxedes, Ana Paula Perdigao [Instituto Federal de Alagoas (IFAL), Marechal Deodoro, AL (Brazil); Nunes, Marcelo Ramon da Silva; Balliano, Tatiane L.; Silva, Rosanny Christhinny da; Tonholo, Josealdo; Ribeiro, Adriana Santos, E-mail: aribeiro@qui.ufal.br [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    In this work nanocomposites based on chitosan and different clays were prepared using polyethyleneglycol (PEG) as plasticizer. The samples obtained were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG) and by mechanical characterization (tensile test) with the aim of investigating the interactions between chitosan and clay. The nanocomposite films prepared using sodium bentonite (Ben) showed an increase of 81.2% in the maximum tensile stress values and a decrease of 16.0% in the Young’s modulus when compared to the chitosan with PEG (QuiPEG) films, evidencing that the introduction of the clay into the polymer matrix provided a more flexible and resistant film, whose elongation at break was 93.6% higher than for the QuiPEG film. (author)

  9. Comparative numerical study of kaolin clay with three drying methods: Convective, convective–microwave and convective infrared modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, I.; Mihoubi, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Modelling of drying of deformable media. • Theoretical study of kaolin clay with three drying methods: convective, convective–microwave and convective infrared mode. • The stresses generated during convective, microwave/convective drying and infrared/convective drying. • The combined drying decrease the intensity of stresses developed during drying. - Abstract: A mathematical model is developed to simulate the response of a kaolin clay sample when subjected to convective, convective–microwave and convective–infrared mode. This model is proposed to describe heat, mass, and momentum transfers applied to a viscoelastic medium described by a Maxwell model with two branches. The combined drying methods were investigated to examine whether these types of drying may minimize cracking that can be generated in the product and to know whether the best enhancement is developed by the use of infra-red or microwave radiation. The numerical code allowed us to determine, and thus, compare the effect of the drying mode on drying rate, temperature, moisture content and mechanical stress evolutions during drying. The numerical results show that the combined drying decrease the intensity of stresses developed during drying and that convective–microwave drying is the best method that gives a good quality of dried product

  10. New quantitative methods for mineral and porosity mapping in clayey materials: application to the compacted bentonites of engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pret, D.

    2003-12-01

    Clayey materials are well known for their non permeable properties and their textural changes between the dry and hydrated states. Their porous network is classically investigated in the dry state using bulk measurements. However, the relationship between porosity and mineral spatial heterogeneities in the hydrated state is poorly understood. The textural analysis limits induce some difficulties to understand the migration of solute species into compacted bentonites (as for nuclear waste repository). The goal of this work is to improve the analysis techniques for hydrated clayey materials in order to provide a multi-scale quantitative petrography. The bentonite samples are impregnated using a resin whose properties are close to water ones. The classical petrographic study reveals strong heterogeneities of spatial and size distributions of porosity and minerals. SEM images analysis allows a quantification and a simple mapping of pores and minerals into unaltered bentonites. Nevertheless, as alterations are suspected to happen in the repository context, two methods for the analysis of all types of materials have been also developed. Two specific softwares permits the treatments of autoradiographs and chemical element maps obtained using electron microprobe. The results are quantitative maps highlighting the spatial porosity heterogeneities from the decimetric to the micrometric scales. All pore sizes are taken into account including clay interlayer spaces. Moreover, an accurate mineral mapping is also supplied on millimetric areas with a spatial resolution close to the micrometer. In a widely point of view, this work provides new complementary tools for the textural analysis of fine grained materials and the improvement of migration modelling of solute species. (author)

  11. Effect of Nanocomposite Structures on Fracture Behavior of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Different Dispersion Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of organic modifier and processing method on morphology and mechanical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites were investigated. In this study, the preparation of nanocomposites by exfoliation-adsorption method involved an ultrasonic mixing procedure, and mechanical blending was used for in situ intercalative polymerization. The microstructure study revealed that the organoclay, which was ultrasonically mixed with the epoxy, partially exfoliated and intercalated. In contrast, organoclay remained in phase-separated and flocculated state after the mechanical blending process. Tensile stiffness increased significantly for the nanocomposite prepared by ultrasonic dispersion method through realizing the reinforcing potential of exfoliated silicate layers. Nanocomposites with exfoliated and intercalated nanoclay morphology were ineffective in enhancing the fracture toughness whereas nanocomposites with phase-separated and flocculated morphology have improved crack resistance predominantly by crack deflecting and pinning mechanisms.

  12. Characterization of clay used for red ceramic fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, P.S.; Morais, A.S.C.; Caldas, T.C.C.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize a clay used in the red ceramics fabrication, from Campos dos Goytacazes north of the State of Rio de Janeiro. The clay was submitted for physical, chemical and mineralogical tests. The results showed that the clay has a high content of clay minerals with kaolinitic predominance, high loss on ignition and low flux oxides. It is recommended that this clay is mixed with non-plastic materials. (author)

  13. ESTIMATE OF THE HEAVY MINERAL-CONTENT IN SAND AND ITS PROVENANCE BY RADIOMETRIC METHODS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; LESSCHER, HME; SCHUILING, RD; ELBURG, ME

    1990-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the traditional gravimetric method for measuring the heavy mineral mass fraction in sand with a method based on the emission of gamma-rays from the uranium and thorium series by radiogenic heavy-minerals. The comparision reveals that beach sand along the Dutch coast may

  14. The use of Rb-Sr and K-Ar dating methods as a stratigraphic tool applied to sedimentary rocks and minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhomme, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Rb-Sr and K-Ar methods can be used for direct numerical chronostratigraphy of sediments using the clay silicates they contain. The interpretation of the ages calculated depends on the satisfaction of the following requirements: (1) The series studied must include diagenetic clay sediments. Coarsely-detrital or slightly-metamorphic formations must be excluded. Studies in progress concerning decarbonatation may lead to the application of direct dating of sediments being extended to carbonate sediments. (2) Careful mineralogical study of the clay minerals must prove early diagenetic recrystallization or new formation. This part of the study must precede any isotopic work. (3) The isotopic study must involve the use of both Rb-Sr and K-Ar methods. The extreme sensibility of the K-Ar isotopic system to late diagenesis helps to choose between early or late diagenesis: a younger K-Ar age may generally be regarded as that of the late diagenesis, whereas the Rb-Sr age may be that of the early diagenesis. (4) The initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr isotopic ratio is not always a reliable criterion, owing to the effects of the dilution of the radiogenic 87 Sr by the great amounts of primary Sr contained in carbonates. (5) The regularly-decreasing succession of isotopic ages must follow the stratigraphic succession. When this condition is satisfied, there is a high probability that the calculated ages are indeed those of the deposition dates. (Auth.)

  15. Fabrication of Mineralized Collagen from Bovine Waste Materials by Hydrothermal Method as Promised Biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Macossay, Javier

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to produce mineralized-collagen by hydrothermal process. A simple method not depending on additional foreign chemicals has been employed to isolate the mineralized-collagen fibers from bovine waste. The process of extraction involves the use of hydrothermal method...... mineral content in the individual fibers. The X-ray diffraction showed the crystalline feature of the obtained nano-compounds. The thermo gravimetric analysis was used to differentiate between the collagen and mineral parts of obtained product. Overall, the results generously indicated production of well...

  16. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  17. Method for improving solution flow in solution mining of a mineral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method for the solution mining of a mineral from a subterranean formation containing same in which an injection and production well are drilled and completed within said formation, leach solution and an oxidant are injected through said injection well into said formation to dissolve said mineral, and said dissolved mineral is recovered via said production well, wherein the improvement comprises pretreating said formation with an acid gas to improve the permeabiltiy thereof

  18. In situ geochemical properties of clays subject to thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.A.

    1980-01-01

    Compositional variation and geochemical environment in an argillaceous unit are a function of age, depth of burial and mode of origin. This paper considers the variation limits likely to be encountered in potential repository host rocks and examines the significance of factors such as porosity, pore-fluid pressure, total fluid content, and major and accessory mineral component behaviors in controlling the geochemical environment in the neighbourhood of a thermally active waste canister. Particular attention is paid to the use of Eh-pH diagrams in assessing corrosion environments and nuclide speciation. The paper outlines the variables which must be considered when endeavouring to interpret such plots (e.g. temperature, concentration, concurrent reactions and probabilities) and uses the behavior of various iron minerals found in clay deposits under specific conditions to illustrate the complexities. The overall thermal stability of various clay and accessory minerals is discussed and extended to attempt to predict behavior under deep repository conditions, using available data on the diagenetic characteristics of clay-rich sediments. The physical behavior of fluids in plastic clays is considered and methods evaluated for deriving induced geochemical conditions in a thermally active repository. The latter section is particularly related to canister corrosion studies, in situ experiments, and waste dissolution parameters

  19. Pb-Zn mineralization of the Ali ou Daoud area (Central High Atlas, Morocco): characterisation of the deposit and relationships with the clay assemblages; Mineralisation Pb-Zn du type MVT de la region d'Ali ou Daoud (Haut Atlas Central, Maroc): caracterisations du gite et relations avec les corteges de mineraux argileux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouguina, E. M.; Daoudi, L.

    2008-07-01

    Zn-Pb-Fe ores in the Ali ou Daoud deposit (Central High Atlas) are found as stratiform levels and as karst fillings in carbonate platforms facies of Bajocian age. Tectonic structures (e.g., syn sedimentary faults) played a relevant role in the ore emplacement. The dolomitic ore-related host-rock levels are characterized by the presence of kaolinite enrichment in clay levels in amounts directly related to the proportion of the clay minerals. The latter is evidenced by correlation between kaolinite and sulphide contents, suggesting that the installation of kaolinite and mineralizations would result from the same hydrothermal fluid. (Author) 55 refs.

  20. Contrast in clay mineralogy and their effect on reservoir properties in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adigrat sandstone formation in the Blue Nile Basin is dominated by quartz arenite and subarkosic arenite, and cemented by carbonate, clay minerals and quartz overgrowths. Clay minerals in the Adigrat sandstone formation are dominated by kaolinite, illite and chlorite. Illite is the common grain-coating clay mineral.

  1. Quantitative analysis of iodine in thyroidin. I. Methods of ''dry'' and ''wet'' mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listov, S.A.; Arzamastsev, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    The relative investigations on the quantitative determination of iodine in thyroidin using different modifications of the ''dry'' and ''wet'' mineralization show that in using these methods the difficulties due to the characteristic features of the object of investigation itself and the mineralization method as a whole must be taken into account. The studies show that the most applicable method for the analysis of thyroidin is the method of ''dry'' mineralization with potassium carbonate. A procedure is proposed for a quantitative determination of iodine in thyroidin

  2. A REVIEW OF QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR STUDIES OF MINERAL-CONTENT OF INTRAORAL INCIPIENT CARIES LESIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBOSCH, JJ; ANGMARMANSSON, B

    Modern prospective caries studies require the measurement of small changes in tooth mineral content. Quantitative measurements of changes in mineral content in a single caries lesion is desirable. Quantitative methods can be either destructive or non-destructive. The latter type permits longitudinal

  3. An Evidence-Based Review on Medicinal Value of Clays in Traditional Persian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Ayda; Montaseri, Hashem; Hosamo, Ammar; Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    The use of earths and clays for medical purposes dates back to antiquity. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in researches on traditional remedies in the hope of discovering new drug. Iran is an ancient country with a medical backbone acquired from the experiences of ancient Persian scholars, who had made a great contribution to the development of the medical sciences. Many medical and pharmaceutical books by early Persian scientists still exist and may have the potential of leading researchers to new drug discoveries. Owing to the emergence of new and antimicrobial-resistant infections, present-day medicine has recently begun focusing on medicinal earths and clays especially as mineral antimicrobials. The current study is, therefore, aimed at gathering information regarding medicinal clays in traditional Persian medicine (TPM). Five main Persian materia medica with the key word 'tin' (clay) and current databases such as PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were searched by key words 'white, green, red, maroon, violet, black, grey and pink clays' and 'pharmacological effects'. Twenty three clays were found in Persian manuscripts. Although their mineralogical compositions are unknown, different pharmacological properties have been attributed to these mineral medicaments. Clay's properties were widely used in medieval times for the treatment of infections to poisoning. They were also used in compound formulations, possibly for their pharmaceutical formulation modifying effects. Modern scientific proofs have also been found in many of the medicinal clays reported in Persian manuscripts. Although many of the reported clays are still unknown, their characterization may lead to new medicinal developments. Novel analytical methods available today make it possible to elucidate the chemical compositions of these minerals as parameters responsible for their medicinal effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please

  4. clay nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work deals with the synthesis of specialty elastomer [fluoroelastomer and poly (styrene--ethylene-co-butylene--styrene (SEBS)]–clay nanocomposites and their structure–property relationship as elucidated from morphology studies by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray ...

  5. Development of a new test method for Mineral Based Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Orosz, Katalin

    2008-01-01

    The well-known wedge splitting test, often used for characterizing brittle materials has been modified and adapted to testing MBC-reinforced concrete under splitting load. MBC (Mineral Based Composites) is a newly developed strengthening system for existing concrete structures where FRPs, mainly...... CFRP grids are externally bonded to the concrete surface by means of cementitious bonding agents. Crack development, crack patterns, crack opening displacement (COD) versus splitting load and fracture energy are investigated and evaluated. Development of a suitable test specimen and test setup has been...

  6. Clay minerals and Sr-Nd isotopes of the sediments along the western margin of India and their implication for sediment provenance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kessarkar, P.M.; Rao, V.P.; Ahmad, S; Babu, G.A.

    - gion is occupied by Recent alluvium and the Warkala beds (ferruginised sand stones with inter- calated clays) of Tertiary age. Extensive laterisation of the parent rocks is a characteristic feature in western India. Bauxite- and laterite...^Nd isotopes of the sediments along the western margin of India and their implication for sediment provenance Pratima M. Kessarkar a , V. Purnachandra Rao a;C3 , S.M. Ahmad b , G. Anil Babu b a National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India...

  7. Analytical methods relating to mineral matter in coal and ash from coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A. [Ultra-Systems Technology Pty. Ltd., Indooroopilly, Qld. (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    The paper begins by describing the minerals that occur in coal, as well as trace elements. The testing methods that are then described include those that are in the main the standard tools for the examination and assessment of minerals in coal and ash. The techniques discussed include optical and beam techniques, X-ray methods and a variety of other useful methods. 12 refs.

  8. Comparative study of illite clay and illite-based geopolymer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperberga, I; Sedmale, G; Zeila, K; Ulme, D; Stinkulis, G

    2011-01-01

    Quaternary (Q-clay) clayey deposits are one of the dominating parts of mineral raw materials of the sedimentary cover at present area of Latvia. These clays can be characterised by illite content up to 75-80 %. Two ways for use of illite clays were studied: conventional and geopolymers method. Purpose of the second mentioned method was showing the influence of alkali (KOH) on the transformation of Q-clay/illite structure. Obtained products were investigated by IR-spectroscopy, DTA and XRD, pore size distribution was determined as well. Some ceramic properties and compressive strength were determined and compared. IR-spectrum showed the effect of alkali on the transformation of Q-clay/illite structure in three main absorption bands: 3620-3415 cm -1 which is related to the vibrational modes of adsorbed water between SiO 4 and AlO 6 layers; new stronger absorption bands at 1635 cm -1 and 1435 cm -1 indicate on the appearance of vibrations in Q-KOH and are related to the K-O-Si bonds; the most essential changes are vibrations at 850 cm -1 showing the changes in the coordination number of Al from 6 to 4 for Q-KOH. Investigations of the bulk density in dependence on temperature showed the small increase of bulk density for Q-clay while - the relatively remarkable decrease for Q-clay/KOH. Mentioned values correlate with the compressive strength of Q-clay and Q-KOH products.

  9. CONTRAST IN CLAY MINERALOGY AND THEIR EFFECT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Clay minerals reduced the porosity and permeability of the Permo-Triassic sandstones. .... Lower Triassic-Lias .... and show high birefringence around the grains. ..... It is a regime after effective burial depth in which the solubility of minerals.

  10. Effects of clay minerals and organic matter in formulated sediments on the bioavailability of sediment-associated uranium to the freshwater midge, Chironomus dilutus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Sarah E., E-mail: sarah.crawford@usask.ca [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Liber, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.liber@usask.ca [Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 44 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); School of Environment and Sustainability, 117 Science Place, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8 (Canada); Institute of Loess Plateau, 92 Wucheng Road, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that bioavailability influences metal toxicity in aquatic ecosystems. However, the factors and mechanisms that influence uranium (U) bioavailability and toxicity in sediment have not been thoroughly evaluated, despite evidence that suggests different sediment components can influence the sorption and interaction of some metals. Given that dissolved U is generally accepted as being the primary bioavailable fraction of U, it is hypothesized that adsorption and interaction of U with different sediment components will influence the bioavailability of U in sediment. We investigated the effects of key sediment physicochemical properties on the bioavailability of U to a model freshwater benthic invertebrate, Chironomus dilutus. Several 10-day spiked sediment bioaccumulation experiments were performed, exposing C. dilutus larvae to a variety of formulated sediments spiked with different concentrations of U (5, 50 and/or 200 mg U/kg d.w.). Mean accumulation of U in C. dilutus larvae decreased significantly from 1195 to 10 mg U/kg d.w. as kaolin clay content increased from 0% to 60% in sediment spiked with 50 mg U/kg d.w. Similarly, higher organic matter content also resulted in a significant reduction of U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae, indicating a reduction in U bioavailability. Concentrations of U in both the overlying water and sediment pore water displayed a strong positive relationship to U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae (r{sup 2} = 0.77, p < 0.001 and r{sup 2} = 0.57, p < 0.001, respectively) for all experiments, while total U concentrations in the sediment had a poor relationship to U bioaccumulation (r{sup 2} = 0.10, p = 0.028). Results from this research confirm that sediment clay and organic matter content play a significant role in altering U bioavailability, which is important in informing risk assessments of U contaminated sites and in the development of site-specific sediment quality guidelines for U. - Highlights: • We

  11. Structural evidence for the sorption of Ni(II) atoms on the edges of montmorillonite clay minerals: a polarized X-ray absorption fine structure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dähn, Rainer; Scheidegger, André M.; Manceau, Alain; Schlegel, Michel L.; Baeyens, Bart; Bradbury, Michael H.; Chateigner, Daniel

    The nature of surface complexes formed on Ni uptake onto montmorillonite (a dioctahedral smectite) has been investigated over an extended time period by polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure (P-EXAFS) spectroscopy. Self-supporting films of Ni-sorbed montmorillonite were prepared by contacting Ni and montmorillonite at pH 7.2, high ionic strength (0.3 M NaClO 4), and low Ni concentration ([Ni] initial = 19.9 μM) for 14- and 360-d reaction time. The resulting Ni concentration on the clay varied from 4 to 7 μmol/g. Quantitative texture analysis indicates that the montmorillonite particles were well orientated with respect to the plane of the film. The full width at half maximum of the orientation distribution of the c* axes of individual clay platelets about the normal to the film plane was 44.3° (14-d reaction time) and 47.1° (360-d reaction time). These values were used to correct the coordination numbers determined by P-EXAFS for texture effects. Ni K-edge P-EXAFS spectra were recorded at angles between the incident beam and the film normal equal to 10, 35, 55, and 80°. Spectral analysis led to the identification of three nearest cationic subshells containing 2.0 ± 0.5 Al at 3.0 Å and 2.0 ± 0.5 Si at 3.12 Å and 4.0 ± 0.5 Si at 3.26 Å. These distances are characteristic of edge-sharing linkages between Al and Ni octahedra and of corner-sharing linkages between Ni octahedra and Si tetrahedra, as in clay structures. The angular dependence of the Ni-Al and Ni-Si contributions indicates that Ni-Al pairs are oriented parallel to the film plane, whereas Ni-Si pairs are not. The study reveals the formation of Ni inner-sphere mononuclear surface complexes located at the edges of montmorillonite platelets and thus that heavy metals binding to edge sites is a possible sorption mechanism for dioctahedral smectites. Data analysis further suggests that either the number of neighboring Al atoms slightly increases from 1.6 to 2 or that the structural order

  12. Nature, distribution and origin of clay minerals in grain size fractions of sediments from manganese nodule field, Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nath, B.N.

    DT, IR and X-ray diffraction analyses have been carried out on 3 grain size fractions (1, 1-2 and 2-4 mu m) of sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin. Results indicate that there are 2 smectite minerals (montmorillonite and Fe...

  13. Multi Blending Technology (MBT): mineral processing method for increasing added value of marginal reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustinus, E. T. S.

    2018-02-01

    Indonesia's position on the path of ring of fire makes it rich in mineral resources. Nevertheless, in the past, the exploitation of Indonesian mineral resources was uncontrolled resulting in environmental degradation and marginal reserves. Exploitation of excessive mineral resources is very detrimental to the state. Reflecting on the occasion, the management and utilization of Indonesia's mineral resources need to be good in mining practice. The problem is how to utilize the mineral reserve resources effectively and efficiently. Utilization of marginal reserves requires new technologies and processing methods because the old processing methods are inadequate. This paper gives a result of Multi Blending Technology (MBT) Method. The underlying concept is not to do the extraction or refinement but processing through the formulation of raw materials by adding an additive and produce a new material called functional materials. Application of this method becomes important to be summarized into a scientific paper in a book form, so that the information can spread across multiple print media and become focused on and optimized. This book is expected to be used as a reference for stakeholder providing added value to environmentally marginal reserves in Indonesia. The conclusions are that Multi Blending Technology (MBT) Method can be used as a strategy to increase added values effectively and efficiently to marginal reserve minerals and that Multi Blending Technology (MBT) method has been applied to forsterite, Atapulgite Synthesis, Zeoceramic, GEM, MPMO, SMAC and Geomaterial.

  14. Testing the Multispecimen Absolute Paleointensity Method with Archaeological Baked Clays and Bricks: New Data for Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepp, Elisabeth; Leonhardt, Roman

    2014-05-01

    The domain-state corrected multiple-specimen paleointensity determination technique (MSP-DSC, Fabian & Leonhardt, EPSL 297, 84, 2010) has been tested for archaeological baked clays and bricks. The following procedure was applied: (1) Exclusion of secondary overprints using alternating field (AF) or thermal demagnetization and assignment of characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction. (2) Determination of magneto mineralogical alteration using anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) or temperature dependence of susceptibility. (3) Measurement of ARM anisotropy tensor, calculation of the ancient magnetic field direction. (4) Sister specimens were subjected to the MSP-DSC technique aligned (anti-)parallel to the ancient magnetic field direction. (5) Several checks were applied in order to exclude data points from further evaluation: (a) The accuracy of orientation (< 10°), (b) absence of secondary components (< 10°), (c) use of a considerable NRM fraction (20 to 80%), (d) weak alteration (smaller than for domain state change) and finally (e) domain state correction was applied. Bricks and baked clays from archaeological sites with ages between 645 BC and 2003 AD have been subjected to MSP-DSC absolute paleointensity (PI) determination. Aims of study are to check precision and reliability of the method. The obtained PI values are compared with direct field observation, the IGRF, the GUFM1 or Thellier results. The Thellier experiments often show curved lines and pTRM checks fail for higher temperatures. Nevertheless in the low temperature range straight lines have been obtained but they provide scattered paleointensity values. Mean paleointensites have relative errors often exceeding 10%, which are not considered as high quality PI estimates. MSP-DSC experiments for the structures older than 300 years are still under progress. The paleointensities obtained from the MSP-DSC experiments for the young materials (after 1700 AD) have small relative errors of a

  15. Recovery of mineral oil from waste emulsion using electrocoagulation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razali Mohd Najib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research to recover mineral oil from industrial waste emulsion. This research also evaluates the standard of water produced after the oil recovery. The ecosystem could be polluted if this waste is not treated prior to discharge. The equipment needed for this experiment is power supply (generator, connecting wire and metal plate for providing the coagulant. The chosen plates were aluminium and iron plate. The power supply will be connected to the plate producing anode (positive terminal and cathode (negative terminal. Both plates are immersed into a beaker containing waste emulsion. The charge supplied by the current will cause the aluminium or ferum to dissisipate and became ions. These ions will attract the oil to flock together and float at the surface. The water will then filter by using filter paper. Electrocoagulation was done without addition of chemical thus can prevent the hazard from the chemicals. The samples was sent for oil and grease test. The optimum time needed for recovery of oil was 3 hours. The percentage recovery reach constant trend of 95% afterwards. When the power consumption increases, the percentage recovery also increases. However, the current should be lower than 0.5 ampere as it is the limit that human body can withstand. Thus, power consumption of 27.5 Watt was chosen as optimum value. The oil recovery of at power consumption at 27.5W is 96%. The best plate in the process was the aluminium pair which can recover more than ferum plate. The present work concludes the promising future for waste water treatment by usage of electrocoagulation technique.

  16. A method for disaggregating clay concretions and eliminating formalin smell in the processing of sediment samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1989-01-01

    A complete handling procedure for processing sediment samples is described. It includes some improvements of conventional methods. The fixed sediment sample is mixed with a solution of the alkaline detergent AJAX® (Colgate-Palmolive). It is kept at 80-900 C for 20-40 min. This treatment facilitates...

  17. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  18. The modeling method of diffusion of radio activated materials in clay waste disposals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saberi, Reza; Sepanloo, Kamran [NSTRI, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alinejad, Majid [Engineering Research Institute of Natural Hazard, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mozaffari, Ali [KNT Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    New nuclear power plants are necessary to meet today's and future challenges of energy supply. Nuclear power is the only large-scale energy source that takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Nuclear wastes are particularly hazardous and hard to manage relative to different toxic industrial wastes. Three methods are presented and analysed to model the diffusion of the waste from the waste disposal to the bottom surface. For this purpose three software programmes such as ABAQUS, Matlab coding, Geostudio and ArcGIS have been applied.

  19. The modeling method of diffusion of radio activated materials in clay waste disposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saberi, Reza; Sepanloo, Kamran; Alinejad, Majid; Mozaffari, Ali

    2017-01-01

    New nuclear power plants are necessary to meet today's and future challenges of energy supply. Nuclear power is the only large-scale energy source that takes full responsibility for all its wastes. Nuclear wastes are particularly hazardous and hard to manage relative to different toxic industrial wastes. Three methods are presented and analysed to model the diffusion of the waste from the waste disposal to the bottom surface. For this purpose three software programmes such as ABAQUS, Matlab coding, Geostudio and ArcGIS have been applied.

  20. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-size particles, 21% silt and 27% clay. Analysis of the clay-sized particles and the bulk materials shows: specific gravity of 2.07 and 2.66, liquid limit of 91.0% and 33.0%, plastic limit of 27.5% and 14.3%, plasticity index of 63.5% and 18.7% and a linear shrinkage of 7.9% and 5.4%, for both clay-sized particles and bulk clay respectively. The activity value of the clay material (0.64 suggests the presence of Kaolinite and Ilite; and these were confirmed with X-Ray diffraction on the bulk sample and clay-sized particles. X-Ray diffraction patterns shows distinctive peaks which highlight the dominance of Kaolinite (with 8 peaks in the pottery clay sample for both clay-sized particles and bulk material; while traces of other clay minerals like Illite and Halloysite and rock minerals like Mica, Feldspar and Chrysotile were also found. These results suggest that the clay possesses high viability in the manufacturing of ceramics, refractory bricks, paper, fertilizer and paint. The clay material can be used as a subgrade in road construction, since it possesses low swelling characteristics.

  1. Genotoxic potential of montmorillonite clay mineral and alteration in the expression of genes involved in toxicity mechanisms in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Hercog, Klara; Filipic, Metka; Jos, Ángeles; Zegura, Bojana

    2016-03-05

    Montmorillonite, also known as Cloisite(®)Na(+) (CNa(+)), is a natural clay with a wide range of well-documented and novel applications, such as pharmaceutical products or food packaging. Although considered a low toxic product, the expected increased exposure to CNa(+) arises concern on the potential consequences on human and environmental health especially as its genotoxicity has scarcely been investigated so far. Thus, we investigated, for the first time, the influence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of CNa(+) (15.65, 31.25 and 62.5 μg/mL) on genomic instability of human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) by determining the formation of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) with the Cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay. Further on we studied the influence of CNa(+) on the expression of several genes involved in toxicity mechanisms using the real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that CNa(+) increased the number of MNi, while the numbers of NBUDs and NPBs were not affected. In addition it deregulated genes in all the groups studied, mainly after longer time of exposure. These findings provide the evidence that CNa(+) is potentially genotoxic. Therefore further studies that will elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in toxic activity of CNa(+) are needed for hazard identification and human safety assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of Clay Swelling and Mineral Neoformation in the Stabilization of High Plasticity Soils Treated with the Fly Ash- and Metakaolin-Based Geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Mahrous

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the southern U.S. states, expansive soils are frequently encountered, presenting an important hazard in geotechnical engineering. This research relies on mineralogical and geochemical clues to explain the swelling behavior of smectite-rich, high-plasticity soils, documented in a series of geomechanical swelling tests that were performed on the soils stabilized with the metakaolin (MKG and fly ash (FAG based geopolymers. These geopolymers were mixed with the soil at several concentration levels. The lowest swelling percentage was shown to correspond to the sample stabilized with 12% FAG and was attributed to the neoformation of calcium silicate hydrates that acted as a cementitious material, preventing the soil from expanding by occupying the pore space, thus binding the clay particles together. Conversely, the 12% MKG-stabilized soil exhibited enormous expansion, which was explained by montmorillonite swelling to the point that it gradually began to lose its structural periodicity. The relatively high abundance of the newly formed feldspathoids in MKG-treated samples is believed to have greatly contributed to the overall soil expansion. Finally, the cation exchange capacity tests showed that the percentage of Na+ and Ca2+, as well as the pH value, exercised strong control on the swelling behavior of smectitic soils.

  3. Study of clay soils swelling by the new method based on Laser Interferometry and the classical Odometer test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asselman Hassan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Geotechnical engineering participates in the act of construction, which means that it must meet a double concern for securityand economy. Therefore, an essential part of the engineer's responsibility rests on the recognition of soils in order to determine their nature and properties (taking into account the flow of water. In the present work, we measure the swelling and the permeability by detection of the swelling, by our new optical method based on the interferometry-laser, invented by Hassan Asselman, within the team of Optics and photonics of sciences faculty, Tetouan-Morocco. This new prototype allows us to directly measure the following parameters: the permeability k (m / s, the Young module Eand the swelling index Cs. For the latter parameter, the evolution of the strain as a function of the stresses ρ (Pa is measured for a given degree of saturation (Until saturation. Moreover, we will use the classical odometer test, which reproduces the conditions of deformation of the soils. Using the results of the latter by the graphic methods of Taylor and Gasagrande, it is possible to determine the value of the coefficient of consolidation of the soil Cv. According to the Darcy theoretical modelfor a saturated medium, Cv depends on the permeability, the compressibility coefficient mv (or the inverse of the model of Young odometric and the voluminal weight of the water γw. These tests will be carried out at the GEORET Geotechnical Laboratory in Tetouan. To perform this work, we chose a sample of claydistrubed, already characterized by X-ray diffraction (whose clay fraction is illite. It is extracted from the so-called "Teffalin" quarry of the Tetouan region, used in the manufacture of pottery. Finally we give a comparison between our new patented method and the classic Odometric test

  4. A new microenvironment for the formation of clay minerals: the example of authigenic halloysite-7Å and gibbsite in a stalactite from Agios Georgios Cave, Kilkis, north Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ifandi, University of Patras

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An unusual authigenic origin for halloysite and gibbsite is reported in a stalactite from Agios Georgios Cave, Kilkis. This speleothem includes mostly pure calcite whereas minor areas of Mg-rich calcite and scarce dolomite are present in four growth phases. Abundant pores are created due to imperfect coalescence of the calcite crystals. Several of them contain detrital muscovite, which was presumably transferred from the dripping water, during the formation of speleothem and has been variably altered to halloysite. Several pores in the stalactite contain different mineral assemblages that we interpret as in situ: halloysite-7Å, halloysite + silica, gibbsite + silica and gibbsite. The breakdown of the muscovite and the formation of halloysite require acidic conditions, which we suggest to have been established by potassium solubilising microorganisms. The silica minerals include spheroidal assemblages or needle-like and blade-like quartz and can be explained by further dissolution of halloysite, under the same acidic conditions in the presence of microorganisms. In our model, the precipitation of gibbsite is the result of direct formation from muscovite, promoted from abundant and undisturbed water percolation, at moderately low pH, also induced by the presence of bacteria. Given that microbial activities promote: (1 breakdown of muscovite and formation of halloysite, silica, and gibbsite, and (2 formation of Mg-calcite and dolomite after calcite, then it is likely that two or more different microbial communities may exist in the same speleothem. The first creates mild acidic conditions, aiming at the decomposition of muscovite in the microenvironment of the pores antagonising the second that produces alkaline microregimes and the local precipitation of Mg-rich carbonate minerals.

  5. Development of a method for the mineralization of coffee husk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every year, large quantities of husk resulting from the dry method of treatment of robusta coffee are dumped into nature. This generates multiple harmful ecological effects. The downward trend of coffee prices and the rise in the cost of manure has urged coffee farmers to better exploit the by-products of coffee transformation.

  6. Effect of Sonification Time on Synthesisi and Corrosion Resistance of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar Bahrami Panah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years many research works have been carried out on anti-corrosive nanocomposites coatings containing mineral reinforcements. The most important criteria in these attempts are polymerization method and the type of matrix and reinforcement of nanocomposites. In this regard, the physical and mechanical properties of the polymers in which a small amount of filler is used can be improved. In this research, an epoxy-clay nanocomposite was synthesized by in-situ polymerization method using a resin matrix based on bisphenol-A type epoxy and montmorillonite clay (Closite 15A. The treatment was used at different ultrasonic stirring times to disperse 1-4 weight percentages of clay particles into the matrix. The structure of synthesized epoxy-clay nanocomposite was studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The average size of clay particles was determined by X-ray diffraction measurement. Then, anti-corrosion properties of epoxy-clay coatings, prepared under different ultrasonic durations and applied on carbon steel panels, were investigated by Tafel and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. For this purpose, the carbon steel panels coated with these coatings were immersed in 3.5% sodium chloride solution and tested at different immersion times. The results indicated that a nanocomposite containing 1% clay, synthesized, stirred 60 min ultrasonically, produced smaller particle size, lower corrosion current density and higher coating corrosion resistance than the other composite formulations. This nanocomposite provided superior protection against corrosion in sodium chloride solution.

  7. Genotoxic potential of montmorillonite clay mineral and alteration in the expression of genes involved in toxicity mechanisms in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisanaba, Sara, E-mail: saramh@us.es [Area of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sevilla, Profesor García González no. 2, 41012 Seville (Spain); Hercog, Klara; Filipic, Metka [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jos, Ángeles [Area of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sevilla, Profesor García González no. 2, 41012 Seville (Spain); Zegura, Bojana [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Vecna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} has a wide range of well-documented and novel applications. • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} induces micronucleus, but not nuclear bridges or nuclear buds in HepG2 cells. • Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} induces changes in the gene expression. • Gene alteration is presented mainly after 24 h of exposure to Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +}. - Abstract: Montmorillonite, also known as Cloisite{sup ®}Na{sup +} (CNa{sup +}), is a natural clay with a wide range of well-documented and novel applications, such as pharmaceutical products or food packaging. Although considered a low toxic product, the expected increased exposure to CNa{sup +} arises concern on the potential consequences on human and environmental health especially as its genotoxicity has scarcely been investigated so far. Thus, we investigated, for the first time, the influence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of CNa{sup +} (15.65, 31.25 and 62.5 μg/mL) on genomic instability of human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) by determining the formation of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) with the Cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay. Further on we studied the influence of CNa{sup +} on the expression of several genes involved in toxicity mechanisms using the real-time quantitative PCR. The results showed that CNa{sup +} increased the number of MNi, while the numbers of NBUDs and NPBs were not affected. In addition it deregulated genes in all the groups studied, mainly after longer time of exposure. These findings provide the evidence that CNa{sup +} is potentially genotoxic. Therefore further studies that will elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in toxic activity of CNa{sup +} are needed for hazard identification and human safety assessment.

  8. Thermal volume changes in clays and clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Sulem, J.; Mohajerani, M.; Tang, A.M.; Monfared, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The disposal of high activity exothermic radioactive waste at great depth in clay host rocks will induce a temperature elevation that has been investigated in various underground research laboratories in Belgium, France and Switzerland through in-situ tests. Thermal effects are better known in clays (in particular Boom clay) than in clay-stone (e.g. Opalinus clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone). In terms of volume changes, Figure 1 confirms the findings of Hueckel and Baldi (1990) that volume changes depend on the over-consolidation ratio (OCR) of the clay. In drained conditions, normally consolidated clays exhibit plastic contraction when heated, whereas over-consolidated clay exhibit elastic dilation. The nature of thermal volume changes in heated clays obviously has a significant effect on thermally induced pore pressures, when drainage is not instantaneous like what occurs in-situ. Compared to clays, the thermal volume change behaviour of clay-stones is less well known than that of clays. clay-stone are a priori suspected to behave like over-consolidated clays. In this paper, a comparison of recent results obtained in the laboratory on the drained thermal volume changes of clay-stones is presented and discussed. It is difficult to run drained mechanical tests in clay-stones like the Opalinus clay and the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone because of their quite low permeability (10 -12 - 10 -13 m/s). This also holds true for thermal tests. Due to the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficient between minerals and water, it is necessary to adopt very slow heating rate (0.5 - 1 C/h) to avoid any thermal pressurization. To do so, a new hollow cylinder apparatus (100 mm external diameter, 60 mm internal diameter) with lateral drainages reducing the drainage length to half the sample thickness (10 mm) has been developed (Monfared et al. 2011). The results of a drained cyclic thermal test carried out on

  9. SUPERPIXEL BASED FACTOR ANALYSIS AND TARGET TRANSFORMATION METHOD FOR MARTIAN MINERALS DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Factor analysis and target transformation (FATT is an effective method to test for the presence of particular mineral on Martian surface. It has been used both in thermal infrared (Thermal Emission Spectrometer, TES and near-infrared (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, CRISM hyperspectral data. FATT derived a set of orthogonal eigenvectors from a mixed system and typically selected first 10 eigenvectors to least square fit the library mineral spectra. However, minerals present only in a limited pixels will be ignored because its weak spectral features compared with full image signatures. Here, we proposed a superpixel based FATT method to detect the mineral distributions on Mars. The simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC algorithm was used to partition the CRISM image into multiple connected image regions with spectral homogeneous to enhance the weak signatures by increasing their proportion in a mixed system. A least square fitting was used in target transformation and performed to each region iteratively. Finally, the distribution of the specific minerals in image was obtained, where fitting residual less than a threshold represent presence and otherwise absence. We validate our method by identifying carbonates in a well analysed CRISM image in Nili Fossae on Mars. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed method work well both in simulated and real data sets.

  10. Methods of modeling and optimization of work effects for chosen mineral processing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Niedoba

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The methods being used in the mineral processing modeling are reviewed in this paper. Particularly, the heuristic approach was presented. The new, modern techniques of modeling and optimization were proposed, including the least median squares method and genetic algorithms. The rules of the latter were described in details.

  11. Flotation of Mineral and Dyes: A Laboratory Experiment for Separation Method Molecular Hitchhikers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappon, Tim; Sylvestre, Jarrett A.; Rappon, Manit

    2016-01-01

    Flotation as a method of separation is widely researched and is applied in many industries. It has been used to address a wide range of environmental issues including treatment of wastewater, recovery of heavy metals for recycling, extraction of minerals in mining, and so forth. This laboratory attempts to show how such a simple method can be used…

  12. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  13. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  14. Assessment of firing conditions in old fired-clay bricks. The contribution of X-ray powder diffraction with the Rietveld method and small angle neutron scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Len, A.; Šašek, Petr; Ševčík, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 116, June (2016), s. 33-43 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : fired- clay brick * Rietveld method * small angle neutron scattering * X-ray diffraction * firing temperature Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1044580316300870

  15. Thermo Gravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis of Clay of Western Rajasthan (india)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, M. S.

    The paper presents the study of thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis of blended clay. Western part of Rajasthan (India) is rich resource of Ball clays and it is mainly used by porcelain, sanitary ware, and tile industry. The quality and grade of clay available in the region vary from one deposit to other. To upgrade the fired colour and strength properties, different variety of clays may be blended together. The paper compares the results of thermal analysis one of blended clay B2 with reference clay of Ukraine which is imported by industries owners. The result revealed that the blended clay is having mineral kaolinite while the Ukrainian clay is Halloysite.

  16. SUPPRESSION OF HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSES BY 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-p-DIOXIN INTERCALATED IN SMECTITE CLAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Stephen A.; Johnston, Cliff T.; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Teppen, Brian J.; Li, Hui; Khan, Bushra; Crawford, Robert B.; Kovalova, Natalia; Kim, Seong-Su; Shao, Hua; Gu, Cheng; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.

    2018-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a highly toxic environmental contaminant found in soils and sediments. Because of its exceptionally low water solubility, this compound exists predominantly in the sorbed state in natural environments. Clay minerals, especially expandable smectite clays, are one of the major component geosorbents in soils and sediments that can function as an effective adsorbent for environmental dioxins, including TCDD. In this study, TCDD was intercalated in the smectite clay saponite by an incipient wetness method. The primary goal of this study was to intercalate TCDD in natural K-saponite clay and evaluate its immunotoxic effects in vivo. The relative bioavailability of TCDD was evaluated by comparing the metabolic activity of TCDD administered in the adsorbed state as an intercalate in saponite and freely dissolved in corn oil. This comparison revealed nearly identical TCDD-induced suppression of humoral immunity, a well-established and sensitive sequela, in a mammalian (mouse) model. This result suggests that TCDD adsorbed by clays is likely to be available for biouptake and biodistribution in mammals, consistent with previous observations of TCDD in livestock exposed to dioxin-contaminated ball clays that were used as feed additives. Adsorption of TCDD by clay minerals does not appear to mitigate risk associated with TCDD exposure substantially. PMID:21994089

  17. Suppression of humoral immune responses by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin intercalated in smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Stephen A; Johnston, Cliff T; Pinnavaia, Thomas J; Kaminski, Norbert E; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui; Khan, Bushra; Crawford, Robert B; Kovalova, Natalia; Kim, Seong-Su; Shao, Hua; Gu, Cheng; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2011-12-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a highly toxic environmental contaminant found in soils and sediments. Because of its exceptionally low water solubility, this compound exists predominantly in the sorbed state in natural environments. Clay minerals, especially expandable smectite clays, are one of the major component geosorbents in soils and sediments that can function as an effective adsorbent for environmental dioxins, including TCDD. In this study, TCDD was intercalated in the smectite clay saponite by an incipient wetness method. The primary goal of this study was to intercalate TCDD in natural K-saponite clay and evaluate its immunotoxic effects in vivo. The relative bioavailability of TCDD was evaluated by comparing the metabolic activity of TCDD administered in the adsorbed state as an intercalate in saponite and freely dissolved in corn oil. This comparison revealed nearly identical TCDD-induced suppression of humoral immunity, a well-established and sensitive sequela, in a mammalian (mouse) model. This result suggests that TCDD adsorbed by clays is likely to be available for biouptake and biodistribution in mammals, consistent with previous observations of TCDD in livestock exposed to dioxin-contaminated ball clays that were used as feed additives. Adsorption of TCDD by clay minerals does not appear to mitigate risk associated with TCDD exposure substantially. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  18. Verification of substitution of bentonites by montmorillonitic clays summary report on Czech montmorillonitic clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, L.; Keto, P.

    2006-10-01

    Czech bentonites and smectite-rich clays were characterised in order to study if they could be used as buffer and backfill materials instead of non-Czech commercial bentonites. The characterisation work was orgnized by RAWRA (the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority) and the main part of the work was performed in the Czech Republic at Charles University and at Czech Technical University. Parallel and complementary characterisation was conducted in Finland in Sweden. This report was compiled with the aim to summarise the results, and to compare the methods and results gained in different testing laboratories. The characterisation included mineralogical, chemical and geotechnical investigations and experiments on thermal stability and sorption. There were some variations between the results gained in different laboratories. This was mainly due to differences between the testing methods used but also due to heterogeneity of the samples. The Czech bentonite-clays from Rokle and Strance clay deposits contained relatively high amount of swelling minerals and thus can be considered as potential buffer and backfill materials. (orig.)

  19. Induced polarization of clay-sand mixtures: experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okay, G.; Leroy, P.; Tournassat, C.; Ghorbani, A.; Jougnot, D.; Cosenza, P.; Camerlynck, C.; Cabrera, J.; Florsch, N.; Revil, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Frequency-domain induced polarization (IP) measurements consist of imposing an alternative sinusoidal electrical current (AC) at a given frequency and measuring the resulting electrical potential difference between two other non-polarizing electrodes. The magnitude of the conductivity and the phase lag between the current and the difference of potential can be expressed into a complex conductivity with the in-phase representing electro-migration and a quadrature conductivity representing the reversible storage of electrical charges (capacitive effect) of the porous material. Induced polarization has become an increasingly popular geophysical method for hydrogeological and environmental applications. These applications include for instance the characterization of clay materials used as permeability barriers in landfills or to contain various types of contaminants including radioactive wastes. The goal of our study is to get a better understanding of the influence of the clay content, clay mineralogy, and pore water salinity upon complex conductivity measurements of saturated clay-sand mixtures in the frequency range ∼1 mHz-12 kHz. The complex conductivity of saturated unconsolidated sand-clay mixtures was experimentally investigated using two types of clay minerals, kaolinite and smectite in the frequency range 1.4 mHz - 12 kHz. Four different types of samples were used, two containing mainly kaolinite (80% of the mass, the remaining containing 15% of smectite and 5% of illite/muscovite; 95% of kaolinite and 5% of illite/muscovite), and the two others containing mainly Na-smectite or Na-Ca-smectite (95% of the mass; bentonite). The experiments were performed with various clay contents (1, 5, 20, and 100% in volume of the sand-clay mixture) and salinities (distilled water, 0.1 g/L, 1 g/L, and 10 g/L NaCl solution). In total, 44 saturated clay or clay-sand mixtures were prepared. Induced polarization measurements

  20. Body composition and bone mineral density measurements by using a multi-energy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve, L.

    2003-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is a major technique to evaluate bone mineral density, thus allowing diagnosis of bone decalcification ( osteoporosis). Recently, this method has proved useful to quantify body composition (fat ratio). However, these measurements suffer from artefacts which can lead to diagnosis errors in a number of cases. This work has aimed to improve both the reproducibility and the accuracy of bone mineral density and body composition measurements. To this avail, the acquisition conditions were optimised in order to ameliorate the results reproducibility and we have proposed a new method to correct inaccuracies in the determination of bone mineral density. Experimental validations yield encouraging results on both synthetic phantoms and biological samples. (author)

  1. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    glacial time are characterised by the absence of this mussel. These deposits are named Aalborg Clay and Aalborg Sand. In the city of Aalborg, a fill layer superposes Aalborg Clay. This layer is at some places found to be 6m thick. This fill layer does not provide sufficient bearing capacity, which has...... resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...

  2. A comprehensive review of the use of computational intelligence methods in mineral exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Bazdar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Mineral exploration is a process by which it is decided whether or not continuing explorations at the end of each stage t will be cost-effective or not. This decision is dependent upon many factors including technical factors, economic, social and other related factors. All new methods used in mineral exploration are meant to make this decision making more simplified. In recent years, advanced computational intelligence methods for modeling along with many other disciplines of science, including the science of mineral exploration have been used. Although the results of the application of these methods show a good performance, it is essential to determine the mineral potential in terms of geology, mineralogy, petrology and other factors for a final decision. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive set of mineral exploration research and different applications of computational intelligence techniques in this respect during the last decades. Materials and methods Artificial neural network and its application in mineral exploration Artificial neural network (ANN is a series of communications between the units or nodes that try to function like neurons of the human brain (Jorjani et al., 2008. The network processing capability of communication between the units and the weights connection originates or comes from learning or are predetermined (Monjezi and Dehghani, 2008. The ANN method has been applied in different branches of mining exploration in the last decades (Brown et al., 2000; Leite and de Souza Filho, 2009; Porwal et al., 2003. Support vector machines (SVM and its application in mineral exploration SVM uses a set of examples with known class of information to build a linear hyperplane separating samples of different classes. This initial dataset is known as a training set and every sample within it is characterized by features upon which the classification is based (Smirnoff et al., 2008. The SVM classifier is a

  3. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  4. The use of clays as sorbents and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    The paper attempts to show the structural, physical and chemical properties of clay minerals relate to their laboratory, industrial and environmental uses as sorbents and catalysts. A brief review of the formulae and structures of clays and their relationship to their chemical and physical properties follows. Clay minerals are also useful in environmental protection as they can adsorb crude oils from spills and they are used, sometimes mixed into concrete, as containment barriers for radionuclides caesium 137 and strontium 90. Clay soils can also act as natural barriers to the migration of radionuclides in the environment

  5. Preparation and properties of recycled HDPE/clay hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong Lei; Qinglin Wu; Craig M. Clemons

    2007-01-01

    Hybrids based on recycled high density polyethylene (RHDPE) and organic clay were made by melt compounding. The influence of blending method, compatibilizers, and clay content on clay intercalation and exfoliation, RHDPE crystallization behavior, and the mechanical properties of RHDPE/clay hybrids were investigated. Both maleated polyethylene (MAPE) and titanate could...

  6. Studies of coherent/Compton scattering method for bone mineral content measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoko; Iwanami, Shigeru; Nakazawa, Keiji; Matsubayashi, Takashi; Imamura, Keiko.

    1980-01-01

    A measurement of bone mineral content by a coherent/Compton scattering method was described. A bone sample was irradiated by a collimated narrow beam of 59.6 keV gamma-rays emitted from a 300 mCi 241 Am source, and the scattered radiations were detected using a collimated pure germanium detector placed at 90 0 to the incident beam. The ratio of coherent to Compton peaks in a spectrum of the scattered radiations depends on the bone mineral content of the bone sample. The advantage of this method is that bone mineral content of a small region in a bone can be accurately measured. Assuming that bone consists of two components, protein and bone mineral, and that the mass absorption coefficient for Compton scattering is independent of material, the coherent to Compton scattering ratio is linearly related to the percentage in weight of bone mineral. A calibration curve was obtained by measuring standard samples which were mixed with Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and H 2 O. The error due to the assumption about the mass absorption coefficient for Compton scattering and to the difference between true bone and standard samples was estimated to be less than 3% within the range from 10 to 60% in weight of bone mineral. The fat in bone affects an estimated value by only 1.5% when it is 20% in weight. For the clinical application of this method, the location to be analyzed should be selected before the measurement with two X-ray images viewed from the source and the detector. These views would be also used to correct the difference in absorption between coherent and Compton scattered radiations whose energies are slightly different from each other. The absorbed dose to the analyzed region was approximately 150 mrad. The time required for one measurement in this study was about 10 minutes. (author)

  7. Integration of singularity and zonality methods for prospectivity map of blind mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    samaneh safari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Singularity based on fractal and multifractal is a technique for detection of depletion and enrichment for geochemical exploration, while the index of vertical geochemical zonality (Vz of Pb.Zn/Cu.Ag is a practical method for exploration of blind porphyry copper mineralization. In this study, these methods are combined for recognition, delineation, and enrichment of Vz in Jebal- Barez in the south of Iran. The studied area is located in the Shar-E-Babak–Bam ore field in the southern part of the Central Iranian volcano–plutonic magmatic arc. The region has a semiarid climate, mountainous topography, and poor vegetation cover. Seven hundreds samples of stream sedimentary were taken from the region. Geochemical data subset represent a total drainage basin area. Samples are analyzed for Cu, Zn, Ag, Pb, Au, W, As, Hg, Ba, Bi by atomic absorption method. Prospectivity map for blind mineralization is represented in this area. The results are in agreement with previous studies which have been focused in this region. Kerver is detected as the main blind mineralization in Jebal- Barz which had been previously intersected by drilled borehole for exploration purposes. In this research, it has been demonstrated that employing the singularity of geochemical zonality anomalies method, as opposed to using singularity of elements, improves mapping of mineral prospectivity.

  8. Pure and impure clays and their firing products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murad, E.; Wagner, U.

    1989-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is highly suited for the study of clays whose industrial uses depend on the iron content. Reactions that take place during clay firing can be readily monitored by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Following dehydroxylation of clay minerals, the quadrupole splitting of octahedrally coordinated iron (III) increases abruptly, but reverts to lower values upon the formation of new, better ordered phases at higher temperatures. It is also shown that iron oxides may account for a considerably higher proportion of the total iron content of many clays than is commonly recognized, and their existence must be taken into consideration for a correct interpretation of the Moessbauer spectra of clays. (orig.)

  9. Scientific basis of a new method for hydrophobic modification of mineral binders using peat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Misnikov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the issue of caking of mineral binding materials during storage and transportation. The author conducted a critical analysis of known methods for the protection of cement from exposure to moisture and water vapour. Common disadvantages of these methods are their low effectiveness and complexity of use in industrial and domestic environments. This article introduces a new method for hydrophobising construction materials using peat, which achieves high water repellency in the modified materials with relatively low expenditure on organic materials. The author proposes film coating of the mineral particles of dispersed hydrophilic materials as a protection mechanism against their undesirable exposure to moisture during storage. The insulating film consists of hydrophobic products (bitumens released during thermal decomposition of the organic matter in peat. The estimated thickness of the bitumen film is about 12 nm and it does not adversely affect the flow properties of the powder. A model of the formation of film coatings on mineral particles is provided and their elemental chemical composition is determined. It is shown experimentally that the modified hydrophobic cement is protected from exposure to liquid vapours, and optimal values of organic component concentrations in the dispersed mineral matter that do not reduce the strength of cement mortar are identified.

  10. Argilas bentoníticas de Cubati, Paraíba, Brasil: Caracterização física-mineralógica Bentonite clay from Cubati, Paraíba, Brazil: Physical and mineralogical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Menezes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O Estado da Paraíba possui jazidas de bentonitas utilizadas comercialmente em uma vasta gama de setores tecnológicos. No entanto, esses jazimentos estão se exaurindo após dezenas de anos de exploração. Assim, este trabalho tem por objetivo a caracterização físico-mineralógica de bentonitas recentemente descobertas no município de Cubati, PB. As amostras estudadas foram secas a 60 ºC e caracterizadas por meio de fluorescência de raios X, picnometria de He, determinação da distribuição de tamanho de partículas, difração de raios X, análise térmica diferencial e gravimétrica e microscopia eletrônica de varredura. Os resultados evidenciaram que as amostras são bentonitas policatiônicas, apresentando teores de MgO, CaO e K2O semelhantes aos de outras bentonitas sul-americanas e que são constituídas por argilomineral esmectítico e por quartzo e caulinita. As amostras apresentaram frações de partículas abaixo a 2 μm variando entre 31 e 41%, estando, no entanto, em elevado estado de aglomeração.The bentonites of the State of Paraíba, Brazil, are commercially uses in numerous technological sectors. However, these bentonite deposits are becoming exhausted due to several years of exploitation. Thus, the aim of this work was to characterize bentonite clays recently discovered in the Cubaty town, Paraíba. The samples were dried at 60ºC and characterized through X-ray fluorescence, He picnometry, determination of the particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction, thermal differential and gravimetric analyzes and scanning electronic microscopy. The results showed that the samples are polycationic bentonite clays containing amounts of MgO, CaO and K2O similar to those of other South American bentonites and are composed of smectite, kaolinite and quartz. The samples had particle-accumulated fractions under 2 μm ranging from 31 to 41%, however, the particles were in a very agglomerated state.

  11. A rapid in situ method for determining the ages of uranium oxide minerals: Evolution of the Cigar Lake deposit, Athabasca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayek, M.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Coath, C.D.

    2000-01-01

    The authors present a rapid and accurate technique for making in situ U-Pb isotopic measurements of uranium oxide minerals that utilizes both electron and ion microprobes. U and Pb concentrations are determined using an electron microprobe, whereas the isotopic composition of Pb for the same area is measured using a high-resolution ion microprobe. The advantages of this approach are: mineral separation and chemical digestion are unnecessary; homogeneous uranium oxide standards, which are difficult to obtain, are not required; and precise and accurate U-Pb ages on ∼10 microm spots can be obtained in a matter of hours. The authors have applied their method to study the distribution of U-Pb ages in complexly intergrown uranium oxides from the unconformity-type Cigar Lake uranium deposit, Saskatchewan, Canada. In situ U-Pb results from early formed uraninite define a well-correlated array on concordia with upper and lower intercepts of 1,467 ± 63 Ma and 443 ± 96 Ma (±1σ), respectively. The 1,467 Ma age is interpreted as the minimum age of mineralization and is consistent with the age of clay-mineral alteration (approximately1477 Ma) and magnetization of diagenetic hematite (1,650 to 1,450 Ma) that is associated with these unconformity-type uranium deposits and early diagenesis of the Athabasca Basin sediments. In situ U-Pb isotopic analysis of uraninite and coffinite can document the Pb*/U heterogeneities that can occur on a scale of 15 to 30 microm, thus providing relatively accurate information regarding the timing of fluid interactions associated with the evolution of these deposits

  12. Actual methods of nuclear physics in the analysis of the elemental composition of rocks and minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, M.; Tsipenyuk, Yu. M.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper two methods are described for the Nuclear Physical analysis of the elementary composition of ores, mineral rocks and principles, elementary particles and radiation sources. Some examples are given showing their applications, high sensibility, selectivity, quichness and economy in comparison with other analytical methods. They are classified by their sensibilities among other analytical techniques in the determination of a large quantity of elements. (author)

  13. Evaluation of the k0 method by its application to (n, γ)RNaa of geological, environmental and clay reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corte, F. de; Lin Xilei; Moens, L.; Wispelaere, A. de; Hoste, J.; Demeter, A.; Simonits, A.

    1984-01-01

    The k 0 standardization method, the state-of-the-art of which is shortly reviewed, has been applied to multi-element reactor neutron activation analysis of (standard) reference materials. The analyses have been performed independently at the Institute for Nuclear Sciences (Gent, Belgium) and the Central Research Institute for Physics (Budapest, Hungary). Results are given for USGS-2 (granite), NBS SRM-1633a (coal fly ash) and FCG (fired clay of Gent). Comparison with literature data shows that the k 0 method, while being experimentally simple, versatile and suited for computerization, offers a potential accuracy of better than 5%. (author)

  14. Interaction of Natural Organic Matter with Layered Minerals: Recent Developments in Computational Methods at the Nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A. Greathouse

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of mineral surfaces in the adsorption, transport, formation, and degradation of natural organic matter (NOM in the biosphere remains an active research area owing to the difficulties in identifying proper working models of both NOM and mineral phases present in the environment. The variety of aqueous chemistries encountered in the subsurface (e.g., oxic vs. anoxic, variable pH further complicate this field of study. Recently, the advent of nanoscale probes such as X-ray adsorption spectroscopy and surface vibrational spectroscopy applied to study such complicated interfacial systems have enabled new insight into NOM-mineral interfaces. Additionally, due to increasing capabilities in computational chemistry, it is now possible to simulate molecular processes of NOM at multiple scales, from quantum methods for electron transfer to classical methods for folding and adsorption of macroparticles. In this review, we present recent developments in interfacial properties of NOM adsorbed on mineral surfaces from a computational point of view that is informed by recent experiments.

  15. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine-grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  16. Argilas especiais: o que são, caracterização e propriedades Special clays: what they are, characterization and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Vieira Coelho

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Special clays are a group of clays different from the large volume of clay mineral products named "Industrial Clays": kaolins, ball clays, refractory clays, bentonites, fuller's earths, common clays. Two groups of special clays exist: rare, as in the case of hectorite and sepiolite and restricted areas, as in the case of white bentonite, halloysite and palygorskite (attapulgite. A review is given of the most important producers of the special clays and their properties in the Western World, as well as a discussion of the occurrence of these types of clays in Brazil.

  17. Prospecting for the ferromagnetic mineral accumulations using the magnetic method at the Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabeh, Taha

    2009-01-01

    In this study we delineate the subsurface structures within an area of about 145 000 km 2 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt (CED), using magnetic methods. The main goal is to establish the tectonic framework of the study area and to understand the role of tectonics in the mineralization process. Aeromagnetic data covering the study area were used, and also detailed land magnetic surveys were carried out along profiles. More than 300 rock samples were collected for laboratory measurements of magnetic susceptibility. The data set was processed using a series of techniques, namely trend analysis, 3D Euler deconvolution, Werner deconvolution and 2.5 direct modelling. Results indicate that the most predominant tectonic trends are E–W, N15°–25°W and N45°W. The depth to the basement estimates range from the surface to 1.8 km. These results agree with the drilled well data. The measured magnetic susceptibility values range between 0.0001 SI and 5 SI. The high susceptibility values strongly suggest that ferromagnetic minerals accompany the mafic metavolcanics along the shear zones at Barramiya, Hafafit, Dawi and Abu Swayel. We show a good correlation between the structures deduced from the magnetic analysis and the known mineral distributions. Most of these ore accumulations are restricted to the major tectonic shear zones with a NW–SE direction. We conclude that mineralization is structurally controlled by faulting, probably as a result of hydrothermal circulation along fault planes

  18. Production of polyol carbonates and their intercalation into Smectite clays

    OpenAIRE

    Shaheen, Uzma

    2017-01-01

    In hyper-saline conditions, clays in geosynthetic clay liners contract and fail to form a hydraulic barrier due to removal of water from the interlayer spaces of smectite, which is the swelling mineral component of bentonites used in geosynthetic clay liners. Five-membered cyclic carbonates such as propylene carbonate have been reported to form stable intercalated complexes with hydrated Na-smectite, which maintain swollen states at 1M). Glycerol carbonate was selected as an alternative c...

  19. Improvement Of The U-Th Method For Dating Of Impure Calcite Having A Large Amount Of Clay And Very Low Uranium Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Farkh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The U-Th method also called series method of uranium is improved by a new experimental protocol and successfully applied to the impure calcite with uranium concentration 005 dpmg which was previously difficult to be dated accurately. Our experiments performed on 15 calcite samples taken from France and Morocco have highlighted the importance of this methodological improvement by enabling i the elimination of 100 of clay residues ii the reduction of calcite quantity necessary to the chemical manipulation from 20g to 5g iii the analysis of calcite samples poor in uranium and on the other hand rich with clay and iiii the reduction of the lower limit of the U-Th method from 10 Kyrs to 6 Kyrs. The optimization of U-Th method in this work provided a better dating of the accurate age of calcite. Thus this technique is important for the chemical analysis of stalagmite floors of different caves in the region of the Near East.

  20. Overview of the Malaysian mineral industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahan, A.R.B. (Department of Mines (Malaysia))

    1992-08-01

    The article describes the status of the mining industry in Malaysia. Tin dominated the industry until a price fall caused closure of many mines in 1987-1990. Other minerals mined include copper, gold, iron ore, bauxite, barite, kaolin, limestone, clays, sand and gravel. Coal production in Malaysia resumed when an opencast mine was opened in July 1988 in Sarawak. Another started operation in early 1989 by the underground method. At the end of 1990 there was a total of 53 exploration rights granted for gold, coal, base metals and industrial minerals. A few coalfields have been identified. Generally the industry has suffered a decline because of lack of new investment. 1 fig.

  1. Recovery of Porosity and Permeability for High Plasticity Clays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    to be the case for high plasticity clays that are uncemented, and with a high content of clay minerals, especially smectite. Oedometer tests on samples from the Paleogene period show that 80% or more of the compaction will recover when unloaded, and if unloaded to a stress lower than in situ stress level...

  2. Assessment of firing conditions in old fired-clay bricks: The contribution of X-ray powder diffraction with the Rietveld method and small angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viani, Alberto, E-mail: viani@itam.cas.cz [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics AS CR, Centre of Excellence Telč, Batelovská 485, CZ-58856 Telč (Czech Republic); Sotiriadis, Konstantinos [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics AS CR, Centre of Excellence Telč, Batelovská 485, CZ-58856 Telč (Czech Republic); Len, Adél [Wigner Research Centre for Physics HAS, Konkoly-Thege 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Šašek, Petr; Ševčík, Radek [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics AS CR, Centre of Excellence Telč, Batelovská 485, CZ-58856 Telč (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-15

    Full characterization of fired-clay bricks is crucial for the improvement of process variables in manufacturing and, in case of old bricks, for restoration/replacement purposes. To this aim, five bricks produced in a plant in Czech Republic in the past have been investigated with a combination of analytical techniques in order to derive information on the firing process. An additional old brick from another brickyard was also used to study the influence of different raw materials on sample microstructure. The potential of X-ray diffraction with the Rietveld method and small angle neutron scattering technique has been exploited to describe the phase transformations taking place during firing and characterize the brick microstructure. Unit-cell parameter of spinel and amount of hematite are proposed as indicators of the maximum firing temperature, although for the latter, limited to bricks produced from the same raw material. The fractal quality of the surface area of pores obtained from small angle neutron scattering is also suggested as a method to distinguish between bricks produced from different raw clays. - Highlights: • Rietveld method helps in describing microstructure and physical properties of bricks. • XRPD derived cell parameter of spinel is proposed as an indicator of firing temperature. • SANS effectively describes brick micro and nanostructure, including closed porosity. • Fractal quality of pore surface is proposed as ‘fingerprint’ of brick manufacturing.

  3. Analysis of the influence of the complex structure of clay hollow bricks on the values of electric field intensity by using the FDTD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choroszucho Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the analysis of the effects occurring at the propagation of electromagnetic waves within an area containing non-ideal, non-homogenous and absorbing dielectric. The analysed models are connected with housing constructions and include single and double-layered walls made of clay hollow bricks. The influence of the size of holes, the contained clay mass percentage and conductivity of brick on the distribution of electric field is presented. Double-layered wall causes more heterogeneity in distribution of electric field and numerous maxima and minima to compare with singlelayered construction. The presented results refer to the electromagnetic field generated by a wireless communication system (Wi-Fi, operating within the standard frequencies (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz. A FDTD method was used to the analysis of electric field distribution. Also in this paper all formulations of difference method (FDTD is presented. The possibilities of modifying the described method are indicated too. The obtained values of electric field intensity allow to determining the attenuation coefficient for different variants of the walls. Detailed analysis of influence of different types of building construction will make it possible to better understand the wave phenomena and counteract local fading at planning of wireless networks systems.

  4. Aspects of clay/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, D.W.; Dixon, D.A.; Onofrei, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste management, both clay-based materials and concrete are proposed for use as barriers, seals or supporting structures. The main concern when clays and concrete are in proximity is the generation of a high-pH environment by concrete since clay minerals are relatively unstable at high pH. Here we examine the OH - -generating capacity of two high-performance concretes when in contact with several solutions. We also investigate various aspects of claylconcrete interactions. They are: (1) the alkalimetric titration of clay suspensions, (2) the effect of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite) on the swelling and hydraulic properties of compacted bentonite, and (3) the influence of cement grout on a backfill clay retrieved from the 900-d Buffer/Container Experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory of AECL. The results indicate that although high-performance concretes establish significantly lower poresolution pH (9 to 10) than does ordinary portland cement, the pH is still somewhat higher than that of clay/groundwater systems of about pH 8. Hence, even if high-performance concrete is used in a disposal vault, the potential still exists for clay minerals to alter over long periods of time if in contact with this concrete. The data show, however, that clays have a substantial buffering capacity, and clay-based barriers can thus neutralize much of the OH - potentially released from concrete in a vault. Moreover, even after reacting for 120 d at 85 o C with up to 5 wt.% Ca(OH) 2 , compacted bentonite (dry density = 1.2 Mg/m 3 ) retains much of its swelling capacity and has a permeability low enough (hydraulic conductivity ≤ 10 -11 m/s) to ensure that molecular diffusion will be the main transport mechanism through compacted clay-based barriers. Furthermore, according to X-ray diffractometry, the clay mineral component of backfill was not altered by contact with a cement grout for 900 d in the Buffer/Container Experiment

  5. Processes of cation migration in clay-rocks: Final Scientific Report of the CatClay European Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, S.; Aertsens, M.; Appelo, T.; Bruggeman, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Glaus, M.; Jacquier, P.; Kupcik, T.; Maes, N.; Montoya, V.; Rabung, T.; Robinet, J.-C.; Savoye, S.; Schaefer, T.; Tournassat, C.; Van Laer, L.; Van Loon, L.

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the feasibility studies on the radioactive waste disposal in deep argillaceous formations, it is now well established that the transport properties of solutes in clay rocks, i.e. parameter values for Fick's law, are mainly governed by the negatively charged clay mineral surface. While a good understanding of the diffusive behaviour of non-reactive anionic and neutral species is now achieved, much effort has to be placed on improving understanding of coupled sorption/diffusion phenomena for sorbing cations. Indeed, several cations known to form highly stable surface complexes with sites on mineral surfaces migrate more deeply into clay rock than expected. Therefore, the overall objective of the EC CatClay project is to address this issue, using a 'bottom-up' approach, in which simpler, analogous systems (here a compacted clay, 'pure' illite) are experimentally studied and modelled, and then the transferability of these results to more complex materials, i.e. the clay rocks under consideration in France, Switzerland and Belgium for hosting radioactive waste disposal facilities, is verified. The cations of interest were chosen for covering a representative range of cations families: from a moderately sorbing cation, the strontium, to three strongly sorbing cations, Co(II), Zn(II) and Eu(III). For the 4 years of this project, much effort was devoted to developing and applying specific experimental methods needed for acquiring the high precision, reliable data needed to test the alternative hypotheses represented by different conceptual-numerical models. The enhanced diffusion of the sorbing cations of interest was confirmed both in the simpler analogous illite system for Sr 2+ , Co(II) and Zn(II), but also in the natural clay rocks, except for Eu(III). First modelling approach including diffusion in the diffuse double layer (DDL) promisingly succeeded in reproducing the experimental data under the various conditions both in

  6. Fe(0)-clays interactions at 90°C under anoxic conditions: a comparative study between clay fraction of Callovo-Oxfordian and other purified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Villieras, F.; Barres, O.; Galmiche, M.; Ghanbaja, J.; Kohler, A.; Michau, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste it is of prime importance to understand the interactions between the saturated clay formation and steel containers. This can be achieved through an in-depth analysis of iron-clay interactions. Previous studies on the subject investigated the influence of solid/liquid ratio, iron/clay ratio, temperature and reaction time. The aim of the present study is to explain Callovo-Oxfordian-Fe(0) interactions by determining the role of each mineral phases present in the Callovo-Oxfordian (clay minerals, quartz, carbonates and pyrite) on the mechanisms of interaction between metal iron and clay particles. In that context, it is especially important to understand in detail the influence of clay nature and to obtain some insight about the relationships between interaction mechanisms at the molecular scale and crystallographic properties (particle size, TO or TOT layers, amount of edge faces...). The influence of the combination of different clays and the addition of other minerals must also be studied. In a first step, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Andra's underground research laboratory was purified to extract the clay fraction (illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and chlorite). Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) for durations of one, three or nine months in the presence of metallic iron powder. Experiments without iron were used as control. The iron/clay ratio was fixed at 1/3 with a solid/liquid ratio of 1/20. The above mentioned experiments were also carried out in parallel on other purified clays: two smectites (Georgia bentonite and SWy2 from the Clay Minerals Society), one illite (illite du Puy) and one kaolinite (KGa2, from the Clay Minerals society). At the end of the experiments, solid and liquid phases were

  7. Structures and properties of anionic clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Chr. Bender

    1998-01-01

    The Moessbauer spectra of pyroaurite-sjoegrenite-type compounds (PTC) (layered anion exchangers) are discussed with reference to the crystal structure, cation order, and crystallite morphology. It is shown that cation-ordered layers are produced in the synthesis of carbonate and sulphate types of green rust. In contrast, synthetic and natural pyroaurite only occurs as disordered types. The redox chemistry of Fe(III) within the metal hydroxide layer is illustrated with examples of electrochemical oxidation and reversible reduction by boiling glycerol. The chemistry of iron in the interlayer is exemplified by the intercalation of Fe-cyanide complexes in hydrotalcite. This reaction may be used as a probe for the charge distribution in the interlayer

  8. Thermal Behaviour of clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassoni, E.

    1985-01-01

    The programme carried out by ENEA to model the thermal-hydraulic-mechanical behaviour of the clay formations and to measure, in situ and in laboratory, the thermal properties of these rocks, is presented. An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The conclusions are as follows: - the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; - the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm -1 . 0 C -1 - the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is negligible. A laboratory automated method has been designed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in clay samples. A review of experimental data concerning thermomechanical effects in rocks as well as results of thermal experiments performed at ISMES on clays are presented. Negative thermal dilation has been found both in the elastic and plastic range under constant stress. Thermoplastic deformation appears ten times greater than the thermoelastic one. A mathematical model is proposed in order to simulate the above and other effects that encompass thermal-elastic-plastic-pore water pressure response of clays at high temperature and effective pressure with undrained and transient drainage conditions. Implementation of the two versions into a finite element computer code is described

  9. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  10. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  11. Studies on thermal reactions and sintering behaviour of red clays by irreversible dilatometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Asha; Misra, S. N.; Misra, N. M.

    2018-05-01

    Thermal behavior of clays strongly influences that of ceramic bodies made thereof and hence, its study is must for assessing its utility in ceramic products as well as to set the body composition. Irreversible dilatometry is an effective thermal analysis tool for evaluating thermal reactions as well as sintering behavior of clays or clay based ceramic bodies. In this study, irreversible dilatometry of four red clay samples (S, M, R and G) of Gujarat region, which vary in their chemical and mineralogical compositions was carried out using a Dilatometer and compared. Chemical analysis and XRD of red clays were carried out. XRD showed that major clay minerals in S, M and R clays are kaolinite. However, clay marked R and G showed presence of both kaolinite and illite and /muscovite. Presence of non-clay minerals such as hematite, quartz, anatase were also observed in all clays. XRD results were in agreement with chemical analyses results. Rational analyses showed variation in amount of clay and non-clay minerals in red clay samples. Evaluation of dilatometric curves showed that clay marked as S, M and R exhibit patterns typical for kaolinitic clays. Variation in linear expansion (up to 550°C) and shrinkage (above 550°C) between these three clays was found to be related to difference in amount of quartz and kaolinite respectively. However, dilatometric curve of G exhibit a pattern similar to that for an illitic clay. This study confirmed that sintering of investigated kaolinitic and illitic and / muscovitic red clays initiates at above 1060°C and 860°C respectively and this behaviour strongly depends upon type and amount of minerals and their chemical compositions.

  12. Method for Transformation of Weakly Magnetic Minerals (Hematite, Goethite into Strongly Magnetic Mineral (Magnetite to Improve the Efficiency of Technologies for Oxidized Iron Ores Benefication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarenko, O.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A new method for relatively simple transformation of weakly magnetic minerals (goethite (α-FeOOH and hematite (α-Fe2O3 into strongly magnetic mineral (magnetite (Fe3O4 was developed. It was shown, that transformation of structure and magnetic characteristics of go ethite and hematite are realized in the presence of starch at relatively low temperatures (in the range of 300—600 °С. Obtained results open up new possibilities for development of effective technologies for oxidized iron ore beneficiation.

  13. Method for obtaining a varnish with a base of mineral oil obtained by distillation of bituminous schists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchionni, A

    1945-07-24

    A method for obtaining a varnish is described characterized by the fact that the following ingredients are being used; mineral oil from the distillation of bituminous schists in the proportions already cited in the description, diluted with benzene or turpentine, with admixture of coloring matter. Varnish with a base of mineral oil from the distillation of bituminous schists is obtained.

  14. Risk assessment for mineral oil : development of standardized analitical methods in soil and soil-like materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, J.; Hutter, J.W.; Win, T.; Barnabas, I.; Whittle, P.; Hansen, N.; Sakai, H.

    2005-01-01

    The present standard methods for the determination of mineral oil in environmental matrices give a total concentration. This concentration is not found to be a good estimate for ecotoxicological, human and agricultural risks. It is shown that the existing ISO standards for mineral oil and volatile

  15. Methodical comparison of neutron depth probes and long-term soil moisture measurements on loess, sandy loess, and boulder clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neue, H.U.

    1980-01-01

    Three measuring instruments were tested: 0.05 mCi Cf-252, 100 mCi Am-241/Be, 500 mCi Am-241/Be. The advantages - measurement in undisturbed soil profiles, large depths of measurement, reproducibility of measurements in the same place over several years - and the disadvantages - radiation protection, resolution, variations of measured volume in dependence of moisture, background influences etc. - have been critically checked by experiment. In addition, annual soil moisture curves have been measured over two years by parallel use of the free probes on a loess, sandy loess, and boulder clay site. The results were compared and discussed with a view to the soil water dynamics of these sites. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Heap leaching of clay ish uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, E.; Sedano, A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental facility, built near El Lobo mine. In it we study the beneficiation of low-grade uranium ore. The mineral has a great amount of clay and fines. The flow-sheet used has four steps: head leaching, ph-ajustement, ion-exchange and participation. We show, also, the most interesting results. (Author)

  17. Importância das espécies minerais no potássio total da fração argila de solos do Triângulo Mineiro Importance of mineral species in total potassium content of clay fraction in soils of the Triângulo Mineiro, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Melo

    2003-10-01

    arenito da Formação Uberaba, migmatito/micaxisto do Grupo Araxá e basalto da Formação Serra Geral.Few studies relate the K reserve in soils developed in a humid tropic climate with the minerals found in the clay fraction. Nineteen soils were collected for this purpose in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, developed from different parent materials and different weathering degrees. Due to the greater occurrence, a larger number of samples of the Bauru Group was collected, comprising all the geological formations found in the region. The total K content in soil and the sand, silt, and clay fractions were determined after the digestion of the soil samples by HF, HNO3 and H2SO4. To quantify the contribution of each mineral species to the total K content, Na-saturated clay samples were submitted by a sequential and selective mineral extraction procedure, following the order: amorphous Al and Fe oxides; crystalline Fe oxides; kaolinite and gibbsite; mica and other 2:1 minerals and; feldspar and resistant minerals. The clay mineralogy composition reflects the high weathering and leaching degree in soils of the Triângulo Mineiro, with low contents of amorphous minerals, a predominant proportion of kaolinite and the presence of other secondary resistant minerals. In spite of this mineral composition, the clay fraction presented the highest total K content, mainly in the most weathered soils. Due to the high proportion of kaolinite in the clay fraction, this mineral was an important source of non-exchangeable K forms. On the other hand, the contribution of amorphous Fe and Al oxides and crystalline Fe oxides to the total K content of the clay fraction was negligible. In general, easily weathered primary minerals (mica and feldspar contributed largely to the total K of the clay fraction, principally to the youngest soils developed from the Uberaba (sandstone and Serra Geral (basalt Formations, and the Araxá Group (migmatite/micaschist.

  18. A method for evaluating basement exhumation histories from closure age distributions of detrital minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovera, Oscar M.; Grove, Marty; Kimbrough, David L.; Abbott, Patrick L.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional, thermokinetic model that predicts the closure age distributions of detrital minerals from pervasively intruded and differentially exhumed basement. Using this model, we outline a method to determine the denudation history of orogenic regions on the basis of closure age distributions in synorogenic to postorogenic forearc strata. At relatively high mean denudation rates of 0.5 km m.y.-1 sustained over millions of years, magmatic heating events have minimal influence upon the age distributions of detrital minerals such as K-feldspar that are moderately retentive of radiogenic Ar. At lower rates, however, the effects of batholith emplacement may be substantial. We have applied the approach to detrital K-feldspars from forearc strata derived from the deeply denuded Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB). Agreement of the denudation history deduced from the detrital K-feldspar data with thermochronologic constraints from exposed PRB basement lead us to conclude that exhumation histories of magmatic arcs should be decipherable solely from closure age distributions of detrital minerals whose depositional age is known. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union

  19. Analysis of force variance for a continuous miner drum using the Design of Experiments method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Somanchi; V.J. Kecojevic; C.J. Bise [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Continuous miners (CMs) are excavating machines designed to extract a variety of minerals by underground mining. The variance in force experienced by the cutting drum is a very important aspect that must be considered during drum design. A uniform variance essentially means that an equal load is applied on the individual cutting bits and this, in turn, enables better cutting action, greater efficiency, and longer bit and machine life. There are certain input parameters used in the drum design whose exact relationships with force variance are not clearly understood. This paper determines (1) the factors that have a significant effect on the force variance of the drum and (2) the values that can be assigned to these factors to minimize the force variance. A computer program, Continuous Miner Drum (CMD), was developed in collaboration with Kennametal, Inc. to facilitate the mechanical design of CM drums. CMD also facilitated data collection for determining significant factors affecting force variance. Six input parameters, including centre pitch, outer pitch, balance angle, shift angle, set angle and relative angle were tested at two levels. Trials were configured using the Design of Experiments (DoE) method where 2{sup 6} full-factorial experimental design was selected to investigate the effect of these factors on force variance. Results from the analysis show that all parameters except balance angle, as well as their interactions, significantly affect the force variance.

  20. An improved method for the immunological detection of mineral bound protein using hydrofluoric acid and direct capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, O E; Collins, M J

    2000-03-06

    Immunological detection of proteins adsorbed to mineral and ceramic surfaces has proved not only difficult but controversial. Unlike the immunological detection of proteins associated with carbonate or phosphate minerals (e.g. shells and bones) proteins adsorbed to siliceous minerals cannot readily be removed by dissolution of the mineral phase. We have previously examined alternative extraction methodologies which claim to bring the protein into solution, but found none of these to be effective. Here we report a novel strategy for immuno-detection of proteins adsorbed to siliceous minerals, the Digestion and Capture Immunoassay (DACIA). The method involves the use of cold, concentrated (4M) hydrofluoric acid (HF) with the simultaneous capture of liberated protein onto a solid phase. The combination of low temperatures and surface stabilisation enables us to detect epitopes from even partially degraded proteins. The method may have a wide application in forensic, archaeological, soil and earth sciences.

  1. Quantitative approach on SEM images of microstructure of clay soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施斌; 李生林; M.Tolkachev

    1995-01-01

    The working principles of Videolab Image Processing System (VIPS), the examining methods of orientation of microstructural units of clay soils and analysing results on SEM images of some typical microstructures of clay soils using the VIPS are introduced.

  2. Enrichment and activation of smectite-poor clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarcevica, Inese; Kostjukovs, Juris; Actint, Andris, E-mail: inese.sarcevicha@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Latvia, Kr. Valdemara street 48, Riga (Latvia)

    2011-06-23

    A new method of smectite clay enrichment has been developed. The method is based on dispersing clay in a phosphate solution and sequential coagulation. The product of enrichment is characterized with X-ray powder diffraction, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetry. Sorption of methylene blue and hexadecylpyridinium bromide on raw and purified clays was studied.

  3. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  4. Transformações mineralógicas e cristaloquímicas decorrentes dos ensaios termais em argilas cauliníticas ferruginosas Mineralogical and crystalochemical transformations originated from thermal essays on ferruginous kaolinitic clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Ferreira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Transformações mineralógicas e cristaloquímicas foram investigadas em amostras de argilas cauliníticas ferruginosas aquecidas a temperaturas de 800, 1000 e 1200 °C. As análises de difração de raios X e térmica diferencial e gravimétrica mostraram ser a caulinita o argilomineral predominante nas amostras naturais. Os resultados da espectroscopia Mössbauer mostraram que o alto conteúdo em Fe (22,5% em peso, determinado por fluorescência de raios X, é relacionado à presença de goethita (18% em peso e hematita (16% em peso. Entretanto um resíduo deste elemento (Fe3+ e Fe2+ foi constatado após a extração do ferro usando solução de ditionito-citrato-bicarbonato, e possivelmente se deve à presença de ferro na estrutura da caulinita. O processo de sinterização mostra uma desestruturação da caulinita, assim como a transformação da goethita em hematita, cujo tamanho dos cristais cresce com o incremento da temperatura. O tamanho do cristal de hematita a 1200 °C é 5 vezes maior do que na amostra natural. A mulita formada a 1000 °C é constituída da solução sólida de Fe2O3, com Al2O3, o que resulta em produto resistente e de maior estabilidade térmica.Mineralogical and crystallochemical transformations of representative ferruginous kaolinitic clay samples were investigated in specimens burned at 800, 1000 and 1200 °C. X-ray diffraction and differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses showed that kaolinite was the predominant mineral in the raw samples. The Mössbauer spectroscopy results showed that the high iron content (22.5 wt.%, as determined by X-ray fluorescence, is related to the presence of goethite (18 wt.% and hematite (16 wt.%. However, after Fe was extracted using a dithionite-citrate system buffered with sodium bicarbonate, a residue of this element (Fe3+ and Fe2+ was found in the structure of the kaolinite. The sintering process showed the destruction of kaolinite, as well as the transformation of

  5. Method of removing paraffin from mineral oils, shale oils, tar oils, and their fractions or residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmquist, F T.E.

    1949-09-08

    A method is described for removing paraffin from mineral oils, shale oils, tar oils, and their fractions or residues by centrifuging in the presence of oil-dissolving and paraffin-precipitating solvents, by which the precipitated paraffin is made to pass through an indifferent auxiliary liquid, in which a removal of oil takes place, characterized in that as auxiliary liquid is used a liquid or mixture of liquids whose surface tension against the oil solution is sufficiently low for the paraffin to pass the layer of auxiliary liquid in the form of separate crystals.

  6. Nanoporous polymer--clay hybrid membranes for gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defontaine, Guillaume; Barichard, Anne; Letaief, Sadok; Feng, Chaoyang; Matsuura, Takeshi; Detellier, Christian

    2010-03-15

    Nanohybrid organo-inorgano clay mineral-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes were prepared by the reaction of pure and/or modified natural clay minerals (Sepiolite and montmorillonite) with PDMS in hexane, followed by evaporation of the solvent at 70 degrees C. The membranes were characterized by means of XRD, SEM, ATD-TG and solid state (29)Si magic angle spinning (MAS) and cross-polarization (CP) CP/MAS NMR. The morphology of the membranes depends on the content loading of clay mineral. For low content, the membrane composition is homogeneous, with well dispersed nanoparticles of clay into the polymer matrix, whereas for higher clay content, the membranes are constituted also of a mixture of well dispersed nanoparticles into the polymer, but in the presence of agglomerations of small clay particles. Quantitative (29)Si MAS NMR demonstrated a strong correlation between the clay content of the membrane and the average length of the PDMS chain, indicating that the nanohybrid material is made of clay particles covalently linked to the PDMS structure. This is particularly the case for Sepiolite with has a high density of Q(2) silanol sites. The separation performances of the prepared membranes were tested for CO(2)/CH(4) and O(2)/N(2) mixtures. The observed separation factors showed an increase of the selectivity in the case of CO(2)/CH(4) in comparison with membranes made from PDMS alone under the same conditions. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. OPTICAL-ELECTRONIC SYSTEM FOR EXPRESS ANALYSIS OF ORE DRESSABILITY FOR MINERAL RAW MATERIALS BY OPTICAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Alekhin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with creation results of experimental prototype of optical-electronic complex, designed to assess ore dressability of mineral raw materials by optical sorting method.

  8. Survey and analysis of deep water mineral deposits using nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staehle, C.M.; Noakes, J.E.; Spaulding, J.

    1991-01-01

    Present knowledge of the location, quality, quantity and recoverability of sea floor minerals is severely limited, particularly in the abyssal depths and deep water within the 200 mile Exclusion Economic Zone (EEZ) surrounding the U.S. Pacific Islands. To improve this understanding and permit exploitation of these mineral reserves much additional data is needed. This paper will discuss a sponsored program for extending existing proven nuclear survey methods currently used on the shallow continental margins of the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico into the deeper waters of the Pacific. This nuclear technology can be readily integrated and extended to depths of 2000 m using the existing RCV-150 remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and the PISCESE V manned deep submersible vehicle (DSV) operated by The University of Hawaii's, Hawaii Underseas Research Laboratory (HURL). Previous papers by the authors have also proposed incorporating these nuclear analytical methods for survey of the deep ocean through the use of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUX). Such a vehicle could extend the use of passive nuclear instrument operation, in addition to conventional analytical methods, into the abyssal depths and do so with speed and economy not otherwise possible. The natural radioactivity associated with manganese nodules and crustal deposits is sufficiently above normal background levels to allow discrimination and quantification in near real time

  9. Characterisation of some Clays Used for Whiteware Ceramics I. Mineralogical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Benea

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain a semiquantitative mineralogical composition of raw materials used for whiteware ceramics, four different clay types were analysed by X-ray diffraction. Studies were carried out by using a combination of analyses of the bulk sample, and of the fine fraction. Using a well-established pre-treatment methodology (use of chemicals, ultrasonic treatment, dispersion procedures, clay mineral concentration by centrifugation and sedimentation, oriented and random powder preparation, cation saturation, expansion/dehydration methods, 12 X-ray diffractometer traces were obtained from each sample. Based on these informations it was possible to establish the qualitative mineralogical composition, and also a semiquantitative one using peak intensities and peak area corrected by various factors. Scanning electron microscopy was also used in order to illustrate the identified mineral phases.

  10. Comparison of Three Analytical Methods for Separation of Mineral and Chelated Fraction from an Adulterated Zn-EDTA Fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.S.; Qazi, M.A.; Khan, N.A.; Mian, S.M.; Ahmed, N.; Ahmed, N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Different analytical procedures are being employed in the world to quantify the chelated portion in a Zn-EDTA fertilizer. Agriculture Department, Government of the Punjab is following Shahid's analytical method in this regard. This method is based on Ion-chromatography (IC) that separates the mineral zinc (Zn) from an adulterated Zn-EDTA fertilizer sample i.e. mixture of mineral and chelated Zn fractions. To find out its effectiveness and suitability, this comparative study was carried out by analyzing adulterated, non-adulterated Zn-EDTA standard and Zn-EDTA samples taken from market in thrice following three methods namely Shahid's (IC) analytical method, Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric (AAS) method based on the principle of precipitating the mineral Zn fraction at high pH value by using alkali solution of suitable concentration and analysis of filtrate containing only chelated fraction and Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) method FM-841 respectively. Adulterated Zn-EDTA samples were prepared by mixing of known quantity of mineral Zn with chelated Zn-EDTA standard. The results showed that Shahid's analytical method and AAS method, both successfully estimated the chelated fraction. The AOAC FM-841 method was insensitive to put a ceiling on the mineral fraction hence did not furnish the reliable results. The Shahid's analytical method was selected being equallyeffective to produce reliable results both for solid and liquid Zn-EDTA samples. The AAS method was comparable in only liquid samples. (author)

  11. Comparative study of mineral composition of beef steak and pork chops depending on the thermal preparation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goran, Gheorghe Valentin; Tudoreanu, Liliana; Rotaru, Elena; Crivineanu, Victor

    2016-08-01

    This study focuses on the effects of three different thermal preparation methods (roasting, boiling, and microwave cooking) on the mineral concentrations of beef and pork, as well as on the comparison of mineral levels between these two types of meat. In this study, raw and cooked beef and pork samples were selected and analyzed by ICP-OES in order to determine mineral concentrations. In general, thermal preparation clearly increased mineral concentrations in cooked samples compared to raw meat. The highest mineral concentration was identified in the roasted samples. Trace element concentrations in beef were significantly higher compared to pork. In pork, Na concentration decreased in all samples, suggesting that Na is lost with water. Zn mean content in cooked beef samples registered significant differences compared to pork cooked samples. The percentage of water loss during the microwave thermal preparation for beef samples was higher than the other two treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reply to Comment by Xu et al. on "Sr-Nd isotope composition and clay mineral assemblages in eolian dust from the central Philippine Sea over the last 600 kyr: Implications for the transport mechanism of Asian dust" by Seo et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Inah; Lee, Yong Il; Yoo, Chan Min; Kim, Hyung Jeek; Hyeong, Kiseong

    2016-12-01

    Against Xu et al. (2016), who argued that East Asian Desert (EAD) dust that traveled on East Asian Winter Monsoon winds dominates over Central Asian Desert (CAD) dust in the Philippine Sea with presentation of additional data, we reconfirm Seo et al.'s (2014) conclusion that CAD dust carried on the Prevailing Westerlies and Trade Winds dominates over EAD dust in overall dust budget of the central Philippine Sea. The relative contribution of dust from EADs and CADs using clay mineral composition should be evaluated with elimination of mineralogical contribution from the volcanic end-member which is enriched in kaolinite and overestimate the contribution of EAD dust.

  13. Potential of the PIGE method in the analysis of biological and mineral materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havranek, V.

    2006-01-01

    A possible application of the PIGE method for the analysis of the biological and mineral samples has been tested using a 3.5 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator. The limits of detection of 4 mg/kg for fluorine, 10 mg/kg for aluminium and 200 mg/kg for phosphorus were achieved with a 3.15 MeV proton beam (8 mm in diameter, 20 nA current and 1000 s irradiation time). The PIGE method was found to be a suitable method for the determination of fluorine in the samples analyzed. With this technique, total fluorine in the sample can be quantitated without any chemical treatment. In the analysis of the phosphorus in thick biological samples, PIGE can compete with PIXE and is probably less sensitive to matrix effects and spectra fitting, which may bring about a higher accuracy of the results

  14. Characterization of clay used for red ceramic fabrication; Caracterizacao de argila utilizada para fabricacao de ceramica vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, P.S.; Morais, A.S.C.; Caldas, T.C.C.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (LAMAV/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais Avancados; Ribeiro, M.M., E-mail: patriciasp_@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal Fluminense (IFF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize a clay used in the red ceramics fabrication, from Campos dos Goytacazes north of the State of Rio de Janeiro. The clay was submitted for physical, chemical and mineralogical tests. The results showed that the clay has a high content of clay minerals with kaolinitic predominance, high loss on ignition and low flux oxides. It is recommended that this clay is mixed with non-plastic materials. (author)

  15. In vitro biological performance of minerals substituted hydroxyapatite coating by pulsed electrodeposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopi, Dhanaraj, E-mail: dhanaraj_gopi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Karthika, Arumugam; Nithiya, Subramani [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Kavitha, Louis [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-03-01

    The present study deals with the optimization of minerals (Sr, Mg and Zn) substituted hydroxyapatite coatings (M-HAP) at different pulse on and off time (1 s, 2 s, 3 s and 4 s) by pulsed electrodeposition method. The formation of M-HAP coating was investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction studies (XRD). The morphological features and the content of Sr, Mg and Zn ions in M-HAP coated Ti–6Al–4V were investigated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). The electrochemical studies were performed for M-HAP coated Ti–6Al–4V in simulated body fluid which exhibited better corrosion resistance at the prolonged pulse off time. The in vitro cell adhesion test revealed that the M-HAP coating is found appropriate for the formation of new cell growth which proves the enhanced biocompatible nature of the coating. Thus the M-HAP coating will serve as a potential candidate in orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • We successfully achieved minerals substituted HAP coatings on Ti alloy by PED method. • The M-HAP coated Ti alloy exhibited better bioresistivity in SBF. • The as-coated sample showed antimicrobial activity and better cell viability. • The in vitro test displayed the formation of new cell growth. • The M-HAP coating can serve as a better candidate in orthopedic applications.

  16. Mineralogical characterization of a highly-weathered soil by the Rietveld Method Caracterização mineralógica de um solo altamente intemperizado pelo Método de Rietveld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Maurício Brinatti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The mineralogical characterization through mineral quantification of Brazilian soils by X-ray diffraction data using the Rietveld Method is not common. A mineralogical quantification of an Acric Ferralsol from the Ponta Grossa region, state of Paraná, Brazil, was carried out using this Method with X-Ray Diffraction data to verify if this method was suitable for mineral quantification of a highly-weathered soil. The A, AB and B3 horizons were fractioned to separate the different particle sizes: clay, silt, fine sand (by Stokes Law and coarse sand fractions (by sieving, with the procedure free of chemical treatments. X-ray Fluorescence, Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry, Infrared Spectroscopy and Mössbauer Spectroscopy were used in order to assist the mineral identification and quantification. The Rietveld Method enabled the quantification of the present minerals. In a general way, the quantitative mineralogical characterization by the Rietveld Method revealed that quartz, gibbsite, rutile, hematite, goethite, kaolinite and halloysite were present in the clay and silt fractions of all horizons. The silt fractions of the deeper horizons were different from the more superficial ones due to the presence of large amounts of quartz. The fine and the coarse sand fractions are constituted mainly by quartz. Therefore, a mineralogical quantification of the finer fraction (clay and silt by the Rietveld Method was successful.A caracterização mineralógica por meio da quantificação dos minerais presentes em solos brasileiros por difração de raios X usando o Método de Rietveld é, ainda, pouco comum. Neste trabalho foi realizada a quantificação mineralógica de um Latossolo Vermelho ácrico da região de Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brasil, utilizando o Método de Rietveld com dados de Difração de Raios X e também verificado se o método foi adequado na quantificação mineral de um solo altamente intemperizado. Os horizontes A

  17. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharpenseel, H. W. [Institut fuer Bodenkunde der Universitaet Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Kerpen, W. [Arbeitsgruppe, Institut fuer Landwirtschaft der KFA Juelich, Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1967-11-15

    {sup 55}Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the B{sub t}-development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of {sup 55}Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for {sup 55}Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  18. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpenseel, H.W.; Kerpen, W.

    1967-01-01

    55 Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the B t -development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of 55 Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for 55 Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  19. Characterization of organophilic attapulgite clay from state of Piaui

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.C. dos Santos; Alves, T.S.; Barbosa, R.

    2011-01-01

    The attapulgite is mineral clay typically fibrous. It owns a superficial area around 125 to 210 m²/g, cationics transfer capacity from 20 to 30 mill equivalents per 100g of clay, high capacity of sorption, considerable decolourizer capacity, chemical inertia and maintenance of thixotropics properties in the presence of electrolytes. The objective of this work was to perform the chemical modification of attapulgite original from state of Piaui - Brazil, for applications in polymeric nanocomposites. The chemical composition of clay without modification was determined by X-Ray Diffraction. The natural clay and organophilizated one were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), by Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR), and Foster's swelling. The obtained results indicated the presence of characteristics groups of the salt in the clay, alteration in its chemical composition, evidencing that the chemical modification in the clay was efficient, could the same be applied in preparation of polymeric nanocomposites. (author)

  20. What Makes a Natural Clay Antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (clay minerals in the bactericidal process is to buffer the aqueous pH and oxidation state to conditions that promote Fe2+ solubility. Chemical analyses of E. coli killed by aqueous leachates of an antibacterial clay show that intracellular concentrations of Fe and P are elevated relative to controls. Phosphorus uptake by the cells supports a regulatory role of polyphosphate or phospholipids in controlling Fe2+. Fenton reaction products can degrade critical cell components, but we deduce that extracellular processes do not cause cell death. Rather, Fe2+ overwhelms outer membrane regulatory proteins and is oxidized when it enters the cell, precipitating Fe3+ and producing lethal hydroxyl radicals. PMID:21413758

  1. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  2. Technetium migration in natural clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebke, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  3. Influence of leachate on the Oligocene-Miocene clays of the İstanbul area, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTOPRAK, SADIK; LAÇİN, DAVUT

    2018-01-01

    Oligo-Miocene clay outcrops on the European side (west and northwest part) of İstanbul were analysed. Formerly, a landfill and sanitary landfill were built on the clay. Mineral liners of the current and extending parts of the İstanbul landfill consist of these clays, since they include a considerable amount of smectite, illite, and kaolinite. With this feature, these clays are also an important candidate for the buffer material of repositories for nuclear wastes of newly planned nuclear power...

  4. Application of iron-rich natural clays in Camlica, Turkey for boron sorption from water and its determination by fluorimetric-azomethine-H method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyhan, Serap; Seki, Yoldas; Yurdakoc, Mueruevvet; Merdivan, Melek

    2007-01-01

    In this study, iron-rich natural Camlica Bentonites, CB1 and CB2, were used for the sorption of boron in water samples. Boron was determined by newly progressed fluorimetric azomethine-H method. The optimum conditions found using factorial designs are pH 10, 45 deg. C, 0.250 g of clay and 20 mL of sample volume. It was found that 180 min is enough time for the equilibrium state to be reached in boron adsorption. At these conditions, boron sorption percentage was 80% for CB1 and 30% for CB2. The adsorption isotherms are well described by linear Freundlich model. Various geothermal waters in our country were also studied for boron sorption

  5. Practical selection and method of operation of the sedimentation settling tanks in the clay mining industry; Praktische Auswahl und Betriebsart der Sedimentationsklaerbecken im Tonbergbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groborz, Withold-Simon [Sibelco Deutschland GmbH, Ransbach-Baumbach (Germany)

    2009-10-22

    The application of the ''linear principles as optimisation basis for the technical planning of the sedimentation tanks in the clay mining industry'' described in GLUeCKAUF 143 (2007), No. 10 permits rapid and simplified planning of the settling tanks required for this purpose, which is fully dependent on the size of the dirty water pump used. The geometrical tank size is specified in advance. The course of the sedimentation process can be clearly improved, if there is more than one settling tank in operation, whereby selection of the method of operation of the tanks can basically be left to the mine operator. Nevertheless practical experience in this field has proved that connection of the tanks in series can be regarded as more effective for the sedimentation process. (orig.)

  6. Method of the Aquatic Environment Image Processing for Determining the Mineral Suspension Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Antonenkov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article features the developed method to determine the mineral suspension characteristics by obtaining and following processing of the aquatic environment images. This method is capable of maintaining its performance under the conditions of considerable dynamic activity of the water masses. The method feature consists in application of the developed computing algorithm, simultaneous use of morphological filters and histogram methods for image processing, and in a special calibration technique. As a whole it provides a possibility to calculate size and concentration of the particles on the images obtained. The developed technical means permitting to get the environment images of the required quality are briefly described. The algorithm of the developed software operation is represented. The examples of numerical and weight distribution of the particles according to their sizes, and the totals of comparing the results obtained by the standard and developed methods are represented. The developed method makes it possible to obtain the particle size data in the range of 50–1000 μm and also to determine the suspension concentration with ~12 % error. This method can be technically implemented for the instruments intended for in situ measurements using the gauges, allowing obtaining exposure time short values, such as applying the electron-optical converter, which acts as the image intensifier, and the high-speed electronic shutter. The completed method testing in the laboratory makes possible to obtain the results similar in accuracy with the results of the in situ measurements.

  7. Moessbauer firing study of Peruvian clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, R.; Wagner, U.; Wagner, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    In connection with work on ancient ceramics Moessbauer studies of the firing behaviour of six Peruvian clays have been performed in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. For two clays, one of them is poor, the other one is rich in oxides, the change of the Moessbauer parameters on firing between 100 and 1350 0 C was measured in detail, both with and without preceding reduction. The minerals present at characteristic temperatures are determined by X-ray diffraction and an attempt is made to discuss the physical and chemical processes occurring in the different temperature ranges. (author)

  8. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  9. Vitrification and neomineralisation of bentonitic and kaolinitic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... metamorphic and/or igneous rocks. Resultant fired mineral phases depicted mineral compositions of ceramic bodies, and the study suggested that these clays could be gainfully utilized in the making of ceramic wares, subject to selected beneficiation processes. Keywords: kaolin, bentonite, vitrification, neomineralization, ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of clays: swelling, sedimentation, dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey; Furo, Istvan

    2010-05-01

    While most magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications concern medical research, there is a rapidly increasing number of MRI studies in the field of environmental science and technology. In this presentation, MRI will be introduced from the latter perspective. While many processes in these areas are similar to those addressed in medical applications of MRI, parameters and experimental implementations are often quite different and, in many respects, far more demanding. This hinders direct transfer of existing methods developed for biomedical research, especially when facing the challenging task of obtaining spatially resolved quantitative information. In MRI investigation of soils, clays, and rocks, mainly water signal is detected, similarly to MRI of biological and medical samples. However, a strong variation of water mobility and a wide spread of water spin relaxation properties in these materials make it difficult to use standard MRI approaches. Other significant limitations can be identified as following: T2 relaxation and probe dead time effects; molecular diffusion artifacts; varying dielectric losses and induced currents in conductive samples; limited dynamic range; blurring artifacts accompanying drive for increasing sensitivity and/or imaging speed. Despite these limitations, by combining MRI techniques developed for solid and liquid states and using independent information on relaxation properties of water, interacting with the material of interest, true images of distributions of both water, material and molecular properties in a wide range of concentrations can be obtained. Examples of MRI application will be given in the areas of soil and mineral research where understanding water transport and erosion processes is one of the key challenges. Efforts in developing and adapting MRI approaches to study these kinds of systems will be outlined as well. Extensive studies of clay/water interaction have been carried out in order to provide a quantitative

  11. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundie, P.; McLeod, N.

    1997-01-01

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation

  12. Archeointensity study on baked clay samples taken from the reconstructed ancient kiln: implication for validity of the Tsunakawa-Shaw paleointensity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuhji; Torii, Masayuki; Natsuhara, Nobuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In 1972, a reconstruction experiment of a kiln had been done to reproduce an excavated kiln of the seventh century in Japan. Baked clay samples were taken from the floor surface and -20 cm level, and they have been stored after determinations of the paleomagnetic directions by partial alternating field demagnetizations. We recently applied the Tsunakawa-Shaw method to the samples to assess how reliable archeointensity results are obtained from the samples. A suite of the rock magnetic experiments and the scanning electron microscope observations elucidate that dominant magnetic carriers of the floor surface samples are Ti-poor titanomagnetite grains in approximately 10 nm size with single-domain and/or super-paramagnetic states, whereas contributions of multi-domain grains seem to be relatively large for the -20-cm level samples. From the floor surface samples, six out of the eight successful results were obtained and they give an average of 47.3 μT with a standard deviation of 2.2 μT. This is fairly consistent with the in situ geomagnetic field of 46.4 μT at the time of the reconstruction. They are obtained with a built-in anisotropy correction using anhysteretic remanent magnetization and without any cooling rate corrections. In contrast, only one out of four was successful from the -20-cm level samples. It yields an archeointensity of 31.6 μT, which is inconsistent with the in situ geomagnetic field. Considering from the in situ temperature record during the firing of the kiln and the unblocking temperature spectra of the samples, the floor surface samples acquired full thermoremanent magnetizations (TRMs) as their natural remanent magnetizations whereas the -20-cm level samples only acquired partial TRMs, and these differences probably cause the difference in the archeointensity results between the two sample groups. For archeointensity researches, baked clay samples from a kiln floor are considered to be ideal materials.

  13. Effect of different cooking methods on minerals, vitamins and nutritional quality indices of kutum roach (Rutilus frisii kutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hedayat; Mahmoudzadeh, Maryam; Rezaei, Masoud; Mahmoudzadeh, Leila; Khaksar, Ramin; Khosroshahi, Nader Karimian; Babakhani, Aria

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the influence of four cooking methods (baking, boiling, microwaving and frying) was evaluated on the nutritional value of kutum roach. Proximate, fatty acid composition, vitamin and mineral contents and also nutritional quality indices (NQI) of kutum roach were investigated before and after cooking treatment. All treated samples showed increase in protein, ash and lipid contents and decrease in the content of total omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) in comparison to raw fish fillets (control group). Cooking methods had no significant effect on omega-6 fatty acids (n-6) except for frying that increased it. Nonetheless, all of the cooking methods reduced vitamin B1, A and D contents. Boiling significantly decreased mineral contents including Na, K, P and Zn. Considering the overall nutritional quality indices, vitamin and mineral contents, baking is the best cooking method among other applied methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Value and depreciation of mineral resources over the very long run: An empirical contrast of different methods

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio Varas, M. del Mar

    2005-01-01

    The paper contrasts empirically the results of alternative methods for estimating the value and the depreciation of mineral resources. The historical data of Mexico and Venezuela, covering the period 1920s-1980s, is used to contrast the results of several methods. These are the present value, the net price method, the user cost method and the imputed income method. The paper establishes that the net price and the user cost are not competing methods as such, but alternative adjustments to diff...

  15. Laboratory of minerals purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The laboratory of minerals purification was organized in 1962 where with application of modern physical and chemical methods were investigated the mechanism of flotation reagents interaction with minerals' surface, was elaborated technologies on rising complexity of using of republic's minerals

  16. Analytical methods manual for the Mineral Resource Surveys Program, U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Belinda F.

    1996-01-01

    The analytical methods validated by the Mineral Resource Surveys Program, Geologic Division, is the subject of this manual. This edition replaces the methods portion of Open-File Report 90-668 published in 1990. Newer methods may be used which have been approved by the quality assurance (QA) project and are on file with the QA coordinator.This manual is intended primarily for use by laboratory scientists; this manual can also assist laboratory users to evaluate the data they receive. The analytical methods are written in a step by step approach so that they may be used as a training tool and provide detailed documentation of the procedures for quality assurance. A "Catalog of Services" is available for customer (submitter) use with brief listings of:the element(s)/species determined,method of determination,reference to cite,contact person,summary of the technique,and analyte concentration range.For a copy please contact the Branch office at (303) 236-1800 or fax (303) 236-3200.

  17. preparation of beryllia n concentrate from beryllium minerals by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoukry, M.M.; Atrees, M. Sh.; Hashem, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the preparation of pure Beryllia concentrate from Zabara beryl mineralization in the mica schist of Wadi El Gemal area in the eastern desert. This has been possible through application of ion exchange techniques to selectively concentrate. This method is based on the fact that the beryllium complex of ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) at a ph of about 3.5, is much weaker than the corresponding complexes of iron and aluminum. It was, therefore, possible to effect a complete separation of beryllium from the latter on a cation exchange resin, the studied optimum conditions of separation include a contact time of 3 minute and ph of 3.5 for the selective separation of beryllium from its EDTA solution after a prior separation of alum

  18. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  19. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  20. Evaluation of kaolinite clays of Moa for the production of cement based clinker-calcined clay-limestone (LC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Almenares-Reyes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clay materials from two outcrops of the Moa region were analyzed to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious material in the production of ternary cements based on limestone-calcined clay. The clays were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (ATG. These methods revealed high aluminum in clays, moderate kaolinite content, a disordered structure and the presence of impurities. The solubility of aluminum and silicon in alkali and the compressive strength of LC3 systems is proportional to their content in clay, being higher for the one with higher kaolinite content and greater structural disorder (outcrop D1, although the clay of both outcrops may constitute supplementary cementitious materials in the production of ternary cements based clinker-calcined clay-limestone. The suitable thermal activation range for both clays is between 650 ° C and 850 ° C.

  1. Comparing uranyl sorption complexes on soil and reference clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Berg, J.M.; Conradson, S.D.; Morris, D.E.; McKinley, J.P.; Zachara, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Clay minerals and other components in natural soils may play a key role in limiting the mobility of uranium in the environment through the formation of sorption complexes. Reference clays are frequently used as models to study sorption processes because they have well-known chemical and physical properties, but they may differ chemically and morphologically from clays derived from natural soils. Therefore, inferences based on reference clay data have been questioned. The authors have used luminescence and x-ray absorption spectroscopies to characterize the sorption complexes of aqueous uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) species on two soil smectites from the Kenoma and Ringold formations, and compared these results to those obtained on reference smectite clays. The pH dependence of uptake suggests that the ratio of sorption on amphoteric edge sites is greater for the soil smectites than for reference clays such as Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-1). The luminescence spectra for uranyl sorbed to the soil clays are very similar to those for uranyl sorbed principally to the edge sites of SWy-1. This observation supports the solution data suggesting that adsorption to amphoteric sites is a more important mechanism for soil clays. However, the spectral data indicate that the sorption complexes on natural and reference clays are quite similar. Furthermore, as with the reference clays, the authors have found that the chemistry of the solution plays a greater role in defining the sorption complex than does the clay matrix. Thus, if differences in surface properties are adequately taken into account, the reference clays may serve as useful analogs for soil clays in investigations of metal-ion sorption

  2. Using X-ray methods to evaluate the combustion sulfur minerals and graphitic carbon in coals and ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertz, D.L.; Collins, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    Coals are complex mixtures of vastly different materials whose combustion kinetics may well exhibit symbiotic effects. Although the sulfur oxide gases produced during the combustion of coals may have a variety of sources, they are frequently caused by the thermal degradation of inorganic minerals to produce ''acid rain''. Since many of the minerals involved either as reactants or products in coal combustion produce well defined x-ray power diffraction (XRPD) patterns, the fate of these minerals may be followed by measuring the XRPD patterns of combustion products. Coal 1368P, a coal with an unusually high pyrite (FeS/sub 2/) fraction, has been the subject materials in our investigations of the fate of the inorganic minerals during combustion. These studies include measuring the fate of pyrite and of graphitic carbon in coal 1368P under varying combustion conditions. The results discussed in this paper were obtained by standard XRPD methods

  3. Methods of improvement of forecasting of development of mineral deposits' power supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Putilov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mineral deposits (among which non-ferrous metals take a leading place are situated on the territory of our planet rather unevenly, and often in out-of-the-way places. Nuclear power (particularly, transportable nuclear power plants provides the new possibilities of power supply, which is very important for deposits' development. This article shares the economic aspects of forecasting in the field of power development (in particular, nuclear power on the basis of transportable nuclear power plants. Economic barriers of development of innovative nuclear technologies are considered on the example of transportable nuclear power plants. At the same time, there are given the ways of elimination of such barrier to development of this technology as methodical absence of investigation of a question of distribution of added cost between producers of innovative equipment and final product. Addition of new analytical tool (“business diagonal” is offered for a method of definition of economically efficient distribution of added cost (received as a result of introduction of innovative technologies between participants of production and consumption of atomic energy within the “economic cross” model. There is offered the order of use of method of cash flows discounting at calculations between nuclear market participants. Economic methods, offered in this article, may be used in forecasting of development of other energy technologies and introduction of prospective energy equipment.

  4. Assessing the interactions of a natural antibacterial clay with model Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono, S. C.; Williams, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and increasing accumulations of antibiotics in reclaimed water, drive the quest for new natural antimicrobials. We are studying the antibacterial mechanism(s) of clays that have shown an ability to destroy bacteria or significantly inhibit their growth. One possible mode of action is from soluble transition metal species, particularly reduced Fe, capable of generating deleterious oxygen radical species. Yet another possibility is related to membrane damage as a consequence of physical or electrostatic interaction between clay and bacteria. Both mechanisms could combine to produce cell death. This study addresses a natural antibacterial clay from the NW Amazon basin, South America (AMZ clay). Clay mineralogy is composed of disordered kaolinite (28.9%), halloysite (17.8%) illite (12%) and smectite (16.7%). Mean particle size is 1.6μm and total and specific surface area 278.82 and 51.23 m2/g respectively. The pH of a suspension (200mg/ml) is 4.1 and its Eh is 361mV after 24h of equilibration. The ionic strength of the water in equilibrium with the clay after 24 h. is 6 x10-4M. These conditions, affect the element solubility, speciation, and interactions between clay and bacteria. Standard microbiological methods were used to assess the viability of two model bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) after incubation with clay at 37 degC for 24 hrs. A threefold reduction in bacterial viability was observed upon treatment with AMZ clay. We separated the cells from the clay using Nycodenz gradient media and observed the mounts under the TEM and SEM. Results showed several membrane anomalies and structural changes that were not observed in the control cells. Additionally, clay