WorldWideScience

Sample records for methane neon nitrogen

  1. GASP: A computer code for calculating the thermodynamic and transport properties for ten fluids: Parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. [enthalpy, entropy, thermal conductivity, and specific heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Baron, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV subprogram called GASP is discussed which calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties for 10 pure fluids: parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. The pressure range is generally from 0.1 to 400 atmospheres (to 100 atm for helium and to 1000 atm for hydrogen). The temperature ranges are from the triple point to 300 K for neon; to 500 K for carbon monoxide, oxygen, and fluorine; to 600 K for methane and nitrogen; to 1000 K for argon and carbon dioxide; to 2000 K for hydrogen; and from 6 to 500 K for helium. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature and density as input conditions along with pressure, and either entropy or enthalpy. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. The subprogram design is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to the calculations.

  2. Photo-stimulated desorption from water and methane clusters on the surface of solid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa Ichiri; Matsumoto Dairo; Takekuma Shinichi; Tamura Reimi; Miura Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Photo-stimulated desorption of ions from methane and water heterocluster on the surface of solid neon was studied. The desorption yields of the variety of photo-desorbed species showed strong dependence on the composition and the size of the mother cluster. It was found that the presence of a water molecule in the cluster significantly enhanced, or was almost essential for, the desorption of any species observed. Systematic investigation of the correlation between the cluster size and the desorption yield of each ion has revealed the mother cluster which yields the each desorbed ion.

  3. Methane, Ethane, and Nitrogen Stability on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J.; Grundy, W. M.; Thompson, G.; Dustrud, S.; Pearce, L.; Lindberg, G.; Roe, H. G.; Tegler, S.

    2017-12-01

    Many outer solar system bodies are likely to have a combination of methane, ethane and nitrogen. In particular the lakes of Titan are known to consist of these species. Understanding the past and current stability of these lakes requires characterizing the interactions of methane and ethane, along with nitrogen, as both liquids and ices. Our cryogenic laboratory setup allows us to explore ices down to 30 K through imaging, and transmission and Raman spectroscopy. Our recent work has shown that although methane and ethane have similar freezing points, when mixed they can remain liquid down to 72 K. Concurrently with the freezing point measurements we acquire transmission or Raman spectra of these mixtures to understand how the structural features change with concentration and temperature. Any mixing of these two species together will depress the freezing point of the lake below Titan's surface temperature, preventing them from freezing. We will present new results utilizing our recently acquired Raman spectrometer that allow us to explore both the liquid and solid phases of the ternary system of methane, ethane and nitrogen. In particular we will explore the effect of nitrogen on the eutectic of the methane-ethane system. At high pressure we find that the ternary creates two separate liquid phases. Through spectroscopy we determined the bottom layer to be nitrogen rich, and the top layer to be ethane rich. Identifying the eutectic, as well as understanding the liquidus and solidus points of combinations of these species, has implications for not only the lakes on the surface of Titan, but also for the evaporation/condensation/cloud cycle in the atmosphere, as well as the stability of these species on other outer solar system bodies. These results will help interpretation of future observational data, and guide current theoretical models.

  4. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-01-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12 keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250 to 1400 hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations

  5. Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee [Marysville, OH; Qiu, Dongming [Dublin, OH; Dritz, Terence Andrew [Worthington, OH; Neagle, Paul [Westerville, OH; Litt, Robert Dwayne [Westerville, OH; Arora, Ravi [Dublin, OH; Lamont, Michael Jay [Hilliard, OH; Pagnotto, Kristina M [Cincinnati, OH

    2007-07-31

    The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

  6. Ab initio calculation of the interaction potentials of helium, neon, and methane as well as theoretical studies on their thermophysical properties and those of water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmann, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of the pure gases helium, neon, methane and water vapor were calculated for low densities over wide temperature ranges. Statistical thermodynamics was used for the determination of the pressure virial coefficients. The kinetic theory of gases was utilized for the calculation of the transport and relaxation properties. So far kinetic theory was limited to linear molecules and has now been extended to molecules of arbitrary geometry to enable calculations on methane and water vapor. The interaction potentials, which are needed for all computations, were determined for helium, neon and methane from the supermolecular approach using quantum chemical ab initio methods. For water the interaction potentials were taken from the literature. The calculated values of the thermophysical properties for the four gases show very good agreement with the best experimental data. At very low and very high temperatures the theoretical values are more accurate than experimental data. (orig.)

  7. COREDIV modelling of JET ILW discharges with different impurity seeding: nitrogen, neon, argon and krypton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova-Stanik Irena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations with the COREDIV code of JET H-mode discharges with 25 MW of auxiliary heating in the ITER-like wall (ILW configuration with different impurity seedings – nitrogen (N, neon (Ne, argon (Ar and krypton (Kr – are presented. All simulations have been performed with the same transport model and input discharge parameters like auxiliary heating, volume average plasma density, confinement factor. Only the seeded impurity puff rate was changed in the calculations. It appears that for the considered heating power of 25 MW and relatively low volume electron average density = 6.2 × 1019 m−3, impurity seeding is necessary. It has been found that for every gas at the maximum level of the seeding rate, allowed by the code convergence, the power to the plate is reduced up to 2–4 MW, with electron temperature at the plate of about 2 eV, indicating semi-detached conditions in the divertor region. It should be noted, however, that in cases with low and medium Z impurity (N, Ne and Ar, tungsten radiation is a significant part of radiation losses and stays above 22–32% of the total energy losses, but for high Z impurity (Kr it is reduced up to 10% of the total losses. The maximum of the Kr radiation is between the pedestal region and separatrix, showing that radiative mantle can be created, which might have a strong influence on the plasma parameters in the pedestal region.

  8. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in

  9. Ab initio calculation of the interaction potentials of helium, neon, and methane as well as theoretical studies on their thermophysical properties and those of water vapor; Ab initio-Berechnung der Wechselwirkungspotentiale von Helium, Neon und Methan sowie theoretische Untersuchungen zu ihren thermophysikalischen Eigenschaften und denen von Wasserdampf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellmann, Robert

    2009-06-16

    Thermophysical properties of the pure gases helium, neon, methane and water vapor were calculated for low densities over wide temperature ranges. Statistical thermodynamics was used for the determination of the pressure virial coefficients. The kinetic theory of gases was utilized for the calculation of the transport and relaxation properties. So far kinetic theory was limited to linear molecules and has now been extended to molecules of arbitrary geometry to enable calculations on methane and water vapor. The interaction potentials, which are needed for all computations, were determined for helium, neon and methane from the supermolecular approach using quantum chemical ab initio methods. For water the interaction potentials were taken from the literature. The calculated values of the thermophysical properties for the four gases show very good agreement with the best experimental data. At very low and very high temperatures the theoretical values are more accurate than experimental data. (orig.)

  10. Toroidally symmetric/asymmetric effect on the divertor flux due to neon/nitrogen seeding in LHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tanaka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Toroidal distributions of divertor particle flux during neon (Ne and nitrogen (N2 seeded discharges were investigated in the Large Helical Device (LHD. By using 14 toroidally distributed divertor probe arrays, which were positioned at radially inner side where the divertor flux concentrates in the inward-shifted magnetic axis configuration, it is found that Ne puffing leads to toroidally quasi-uniform reduction of divertor particle fluxes; whereas toroidally localized reductions were observed with N2 puffing. The toroidally asymmetric reduction pattern with N2 puffing is strongly related to the magnetic field structure around the N2 puffing port. Assuming that nitrogen particles do not recycle, EMC3-EIRENE simulation shows similar reduction pattern with the experiment around the N2 puffing port.

  11. Carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from Matrimid® polyimide for nitrogen/methane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Xue; Koros, William J.

    2014-01-01

    A commercial polyimide, Matrimid® 5218, was pyrolyzed under an inert argon atmosphere to produce carbon molecular sieve (CMS) dense film membranes for nitrogen/methane separation. The resulting CMS dense film separation performance was evaluated

  12. The formation of nitrogeneous compounds in the γ-radiolyses of liquid nitrogen solutions of hydrogen, methane, and ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horigome, Keiichi; Hirokami, Shun-ichi; Sato, Shin

    1978-01-01

    The γ-radiolyses of liquid nitrogen solutions of hydrogen, methane, and ethane have been reinvestigated. A complete survey of nitrogen-containing products has been attempted. The nitrogeneous compounds observed were ammonia (0.7) and hydrogen azide (0.02) in the case of hydrogen, ammonia (0.3), hydrogen cyanide (0.1), methyl azide (0.01), and a polymer in the case of methane, and ammonia (0.3), hydrogen cyanide (0.05), acetonitrile (0.04), ethyl azide (0.01), and a polymer in the case of ethane. The values in parentheses are the G-values obtained at optimum conditions. The hydrolysis of the polymer obtained with methane gave formaldehyde in amounts which correspond to the fact that the G-value of the nitrogen atoms which were converted into the polymer is about 1.0. In order to explain these results, possible reaction mechanisms are discussed. (auth.)

  13. Methods for applying microchannels to separate methane using liquid absorbents, especially ionic liquid absorbents from a mixture comprising methane and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Dublin, OH; Litt, Robert D [Westerville, OH; Dongming, Qiu [Dublin, OH; Silva, Laura J [Plain City, OH; Lamont, Micheal Jay [Plain City, OH; Fanelli, Maddalena [Plain City, OH; Simmons, Wayne W [Plain city, OH; Perry, Steven [Galloway, OH

    2011-10-04

    Methods of using microchannel separation systems including absorbents to improve thermal efficiency and reduce parasitic power loss. Energy is typically added to desorb methane and then energy or heat is removed to absorb methane using a working solution. The working solution or absorbent may comprise an ionic liquid, or other fluids that demonstrate a difference in affinity between methane and nitrogen in a solution.

  14. Manufacturing cycle for pure neon-helium mixture production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batrakov, B.P.; Kravchenko, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The manufacturing cycle for pure neon-helium mixture production with JA-300 nitrogen air distributing device has been developed. Gas mixture containing 2-3% of neon-helium mixture (the rest is mainly nitrogen 96-97%) is selected out of the cover of the JA-300 column condensator and enters the deflegmator under the 2.3-2.5 atm. pressure. The diflegmator presents a heat exchange apparatus in which at 78 K liquid nitrogen the condensation of nitrogen from the mixture of gases entering from the JA-300 column takes place. The enriched gas mixture containing 65-70% of neon-helium mixture and 30-35% of nitrogen goes out from the deflegmator. This enriched neon-helium mixture enters the gasgoeder for impure (65-70%) neon-helium mixture. Full cleaning of-neon helium mixture of nitrogen is performed by means of an adsorber. As adsorbent an activated coal has been used. Adsorption occurs at the 78 K temperature of liquid nitrogen and pressure P=0.1 atm. As activated coal cooled down to nitrogen temperature adsorbs nitrogen better than neon and helium, the nitrogen from the mixture is completely adsorbed. Pure neon-helium mixture from the adsorber comes into a separate gasgolder. In one campaign the cycle allows obtaining 2 m 3 of the mixture. The mixture contains 0.14% of nitrogen, 0.01% of oxygen and 0.06% of hydrogen

  15. Methane emissions from a freshwater marsh in response to experimentally simulated global warming and nitrogen enrichment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flury, Sabine; McGinnis, Daniel Frank; Gessner, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    We determined methane (CH4) emissions in a field enclosure experiment in a littoral freshwater marsh under the influence of experimentally simulated warming and enhanced nitrogen deposition. Methane emissions by ebullition from the marsh composed of Phragmites australis were measured with funnel ...... to the atmosphere, even when they occupy only relatively small littoral areas. More detailed investigations are clearly needed to assess whether global warming and nitrogen deposition can have climate feedbacks by altering methane fluxes from these wetlands.  ......We determined methane (CH4) emissions in a field enclosure experiment in a littoral freshwater marsh under the influence of experimentally simulated warming and enhanced nitrogen deposition. Methane emissions by ebullition from the marsh composed of Phragmites australis were measured with funnel...... traps deployed in a series of enclosures for two 3 week periods. Diffusive fluxes were estimated on the basis of measured CH4 concentrations and application of Fick's law. Neither diffusive nor ebullitive fluxes of methane were significantly affected by warming or nitrate enrichment, possibly because...

  16. Phase Equilibria of Three Binary Mixtures: Methanethiol + Methane, Methanethiol + Nitrogen, and Methanethiol + Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awan, Javeed; Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Coquelet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    New vapor–liquid equilibrium (VLE) data for methanethiol (MM) + methane (CH4), methanethiol (MM) + nitrogen (N2), and methanethiol (MM) + carbon dioxide (CO2) is reported for temperatures of (304, 334, and 364) K in the pressure range (1 to 8) MPa. A “static–analytic” method was used for performing...

  17. Nitrogen recycling and methane production using Gracilaria tikvahiae: a closed system approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; Andrews, D.A.; Ryther, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The macroalga Gracilaria tikvahiae (Rhodophyta) was used in a closed system of materials to study methane production and nitrogen recycling. Twenty liter carboys served as digesters. The performance of these digesters mirrors results obtained with two- and four litre Gracilaria digesters with respect to optimal retention times for biogas production, methane content, and bioconversion efficiency to methane. Three groups of Gracilaria were cultivated in 850-L vaults to compare growth performance under three different enrichment treatments. These treatments consisted of an unfertilized group, a group raised on a typical commercial enrichment regime, and a group raised on the residues removed from the digester when additional substrate was loaded into the digester. The results indicate that growth of Gracilaria on the digester residue enrichment scheme is statistically similar to growth using a commercial enrichment mixture. In addition, the nitrogen content of the digester residue is described, along with nitrogen assimilation by Gracilaria and nitrogen recycling efficiencies. Both nitrogen assimilation and recycling efficiency closely parallel the ammonium content of the residue enrichment media. (Refs. 18).

  18. Extreme nitrogen deposition can change methane oxidation rate in moist acidic tundra soil in Arctic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Kang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, extreme nitrogen(N) deposition events are observed in Arctic regions where over 90% of the annual N deposition occurred in just a few days. Since Arctic ecosystems are typically N-limited, input of extremely high amount of N could substantially affect ecosystem processes. CH4 is a potent greenhouse gas that has 25 times greater global warming potential than CO2 over a 100-year time frame. Ammonium is known as an inhibitor of methane oxidation and nitrate also shows inhibitory effect on it in temperate ecosystems. However, effects of N addition on Arctic ecosystems are still elusive. We conducted a lab-scale incubation experiment with moist acidic tundra (MAT) soil from Council, Alaska to investigate the effect of extreme N deposition events on methane oxidation. Zero point five % methane was added to the head space to determine the potential methane oxidation rate of MAT soil. Three treatments (NH4NO3-AN, (NH4)2SO4-AS, KNO3-PN) were used to compare effects of ammonium, nitrate and salts. All treatments were added in 3 levels: 10μg N gd.w-1(10), 50μg N gd.w-1(50) and 100μg N gd.w-1(100). AN10 and AN50 increased methane oxidation rate 1.7, 6% respectively. However, AN100 shows -8.5% of inhibitory effect. In AS added samples, all 3 concentrations (AN10, AN50, AN100) stimulated methane oxidation rate with 4.7, 8.9, 4%, respectively. On the contrary, PN50 (-9%) and PN100 (-59.5%) exhibited a significant inhibitory effect. We also analyzed the microbial gene abundance and community structures of methane oxidizing bacteria using a DNA-based fingerprinting method (T-RFLP) Our study results suggest that NH4+ can stimulate methane oxidation in Arctic MAT soil, while NO3- can inhibit methane oxidation significantly.

  19. Liquid neon heat intercept for superconducting energy storage magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.; McIntosh, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    Previous analyses of heat intercept solutions are extended to include both insulation and strut heat leaks. The impact of using storable, boiling cryogens for heat intercept fluids, specifically liquid neon and nitrogen, is also examined. The selection of fluid for the heat intercepts is described. Refrigeration power for 1000 and 5000 MWhr SMES units is shown with optimum refrigeration power for each quantity shown in tables. Nitrogen and Neon cooled intercept location for minimum total refrigeration power for a 5000 MWhr SMES are each shown, as well as the location of nitrogen and neon cooled intercepts for minimum total refrigeration power for 5000 MWhr SMES. Cost comparisons are itemized and neon cost and availability discussed. For a large energy storage magnet system, liquid neon is a more effective heat intercept fluid than liquid nitrogen. Reasons and application of the conclusion are amplified

  20. Coal Matrix Deformation and Pore Structure Change in High-Pressure Nitrogen Replacement of Methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Ji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal matrix deformation is one of the main controlling factors for coal reservoir permeability changes in nitrogen foam fracturing. The characteristics and mechanism of coal matrix deformation during the process of adsorption/desorption were studied by isothermal adsorption/desorption experiments with methane and nitrogen. Based on the free-energy theories, the Langmuir equation, and elastic mechanics, mathematical models of coal matrix deformation were developed and the deformation characteristics in adsorption/desorption processes were examined. From the study, we deduced that the coal matrix swelling, caused by methane adsorption, was a Langmuir-type relationship with the gas pressure, and exponentially increased as the adsorption quantity increased. Then, the deformation rate and amplitude of the coal matrix decreased gradually with the increase of the pressure. At the following stage, where nitrogen replaces methane, the coal matrix swelling continued but the deformation amplitude decreased, which was only 19.60% of the methane adsorption stage. At the mixed gas desorption stage, the coal matrix shrank with the reduction of pressure and the shrinkage amount changed logarithmically with the pressure, which had the hysteresis effect when compared with the swelling in adsorption. The mechanism of coal matrix deformation was discussed through a comparison of the change of micropores, mesopores, and also part macropores in the adsorption process.

  1. A microbial biogeochemistry network for soil carbon and nitrogen cycling and methane flux: model structure and application to Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Song, C.; Wang, Y.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Lipson, D.; Shi, X.; Zona, D.; Song, X.; Yuan, F.; Oechel, W. C.; Thornton, P. E.

    2017-12-01

    A microbial model is introduced for simulating microbial mechanisms controlling soil carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycling and methane fluxes. The model is built within the CN (carbon-nitrogen) framework of Community Land Model 4.5, named as CLM-Microbe to emphasize its explicit representation of microbial mechanisms to biogeochemistry. Based on the CLM4.5, three new pools were added: bacteria, fungi, and dissolved organic matter. It has 11 pools and 34 transitional processes, compared with 8 pools and 9 transitional flow in the CLM4.5. The dissolve organic carbon was linked with a new microbial functional group based methane module to explicitly simulate methane production, oxidation, transport and their microbial controls. Comparing with CLM4.5-CN, the CLM-Microbe model has a number of new features, (1) microbial control on carbon and nitrogen flows between soil carbon/nitrogen pools; (2) an implicit representation of microbial community structure as bacteria and fungi; (3) a microbial functional-group based methane module. The model sensitivity analysis suggests the importance of microbial carbon allocation parameters on soil biogeochemistry and microbial controls on methane dynamics. Preliminary simulations validate the model's capability for simulating carbon and nitrogen dynamics and methane at a number of sites across the globe. The regional application to Asia has verified the model in simulating microbial mechanisms in controlling methane dynamics at multiple scales.

  2. Methanization, new opportunities for territories. National technical day - 13 May 2014, Paris. Collection of interventions. The Methanization Autonomy Nitrogen energy plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastide, Guillaume; Guilet, Marie; Banville, Sandrine; Rocher, Franck; Brosset, Denis; Chapelat, Nicolas; Le Roy, Philippe; Leboucher, Anne; Boucher, Sophie; Bolduan, Rainer; Pislor, Emilie; Desbles, Matthieu; Garoche, David; Decoopman, Bertrand; Deshayes, Odile; Mazzenga, Anthony; Quaak, Mauritz; Berthelot, Corinne

    2014-05-01

    This publication contains proceedings of a conference on methanization projects and techniques, notably in rural areas (there were 140 rural installations in France in 2014 and 20 centralised ones). Contributions thus give an overview of the present development of this sector, and of its perspectives over the medium to long term. A first set of contributions addressed the performance of a panel of farm-based and centralised methanization installations with technical, energy, environmental, agronomic and social assessments for 8 units (lessons learned from installation follow-up, recommendations for operation optimisation of 2 units), and a profitability study performed on 21 installations (lessons learned, profitability evolution for 2 installations). The second set of contributions addressed development perspectives of the methanization sector over the medium to long term. Contributions addressed the following issues: how to mobilise and process bio-wastes from big producers, other possible sources (energetic crops, intermediate crops for energy purposes or CIVE or crop residues), the use of digestate to reduce the use of mineral fertilizers, and emerging energetic valorisations of biogas. A last part presents the Methanization Autonomy Nitrogen Energy Plan (the EMAA plan) which aims at managing and valorising nitrogen (notably from breeding effluents), at developing a French model of agricultural methanization. The stakes of methanization for energy transition are outlined, and the operation of a methanization installation is described

  3. The Effect of Nitrogen Enrichment on C1-Cycling Microorganisms and Methane Flux in Salt Marsh Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Catherine Irvine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 flux from ecosystems is driven by C1-cycling microorganisms – the methanogens and the methylotrophs. Little is understood about what regulates these communities, complicating predictions about how global change drivers such as nitrogen enrichment will affect methane cycling. Using a nitrogen addition gradient experiment in three Southern California salt marshes, we show that sediment CH4 flux increased linearly with increasing nitrogen addition (1.23 µg CH4 m-2 d-1 for each g N m-2 yr-1 applied after seven months of fertilization. To test the reason behind this increased CH4 flux, we conducted a microcosm experiment altering both nitrogen and carbon availability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis appeared to be both nitrogen and carbon (acetate limited. N and C each increased methanogenesis by 18%, and together by 44%. In contrast, methanotrophy was stimulated by carbon (methane addition (830%, but was unchanged by nitrogen addition. Sequence analysis of the sediment methylotroph community with the methanol dehydrogenase gene (mxaF revealed three distinct clades that fall outside of known lineages. However, in agreement with the microcosm results, methylotroph abundance (assayed by qPCR and composition (assayed by T-RFLP did not vary across the experimental nitrogen gradient in the field. Together, these results suggest that nitrogen enrichment to salt marsh sediments increases methane flux by stimulating the methanogen community.

  4. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann Pirez, M.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N 2 , in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO 3 , on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  5. Data and prediction of water content of high pressure nitrogen, methane and natural gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Froyna, E.W.; Lovland, J.

    2007-01-01

    New data for the equilibrium water content of nitrogen, methane and one natural gas mixture are presented. The new binary data and existing binary sets were compared to calculated values of dew point temperature using both the CPA (Cubic-Plus-Association) EoS and the GERG-water EoS. CPA is purely...... predictive (i.e. all binary interaction parameters are set equal to 0), while GERG-water uses a temperature dependent interaction parameter fitted to published data. The GERG-water model is proposed as an ISO standard for determining the water content of natural gas. The data sets for nitrogen cover...... conclusion is that GERG-water must be used with caution outside its specified working range. For some selected natural gas mixtures the two models also perform very much alike. The water content of the mixtures decreases with increasing amount of heavier components, and it seems that both models slightly...

  6. Inhibition of methane oxidation in slurry surface crust by inorganic nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Yun-Feng; Elsgaard, Lars; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-01-01

    Livestock slurry is an important source of methane (CH4). Depending on dry matter content, a floating crust may form where methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and CH4 oxidation activity have been found, suggesting that surface crusts may reduce CH4 emissions from slurry. However, it is not known how...... MOB in this environment interact with inorganic nitrogen (N). We studied inhibitory effects of ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3–) and nitrite (NO2–) on potential CH4 oxidation in a cattle slurry surface crust. Methane oxidation was assayed at salt concentrations up to 500 mM at 100 and 10,000 ppmv...... headspace CH4. First-order rate constants were used to evaluate the strength of inhibition. Nitrite was the most potent inhibitor, reducing methanotrophic activity by up to 70% at only 1 mM NO2–. MOB were least sensitive to NO3–, tolerating up to 30 mM NO3– at 100 ppmv CH4 and 50 mM NO3– at 10,000 ppmv CH4...

  7. Plasma Wind Tunnel Investigation of European Ablators in Nitrogen/Methane Using Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda Wernitz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For atmospheric reentries at high enthalpies ablative heat shield materials are used, such as those for probes entering the atmosphere of Saturn’s moon Titan, such as Cassini-Huygens in December, 2004. The characterization of such materials in a nitrogen/methane atmosphere is of interest. A European ablative material, AQ60, has been investigated in plasma wind tunnel tests at the IRS plasma wind tunnel PWK1 using the magnetoplasma dynamic generator RD5 as plasma source in a nitrogen/methane atmosphere. The dimensions of the samples are 45 mm in length with a diameter of 39 mm. The actual ablator has a thickness of 40 mm. The ablator is mounted on an aluminium substructure. The experiments were conducted at two different heat flux regimes, 1.4 MW/m2 and 0.3 MW/m2. In this paper, results of emission spectroscopy at these plasma conditions in terms of plasma species’ temperatures will be presented, including the investigation of the free-stream species, N2 and N2+, and the major erosion product C2, at a wavelength range around 500 nm–600 nm.

  8. Nitrogen as a regulatory factor of methane oxidation in soils and sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    The oxidation of methane by methane-oxidising microorganisms is an important link in the global methane budget. Oxic soils are a net sink while wetland soils are a net source of atmospheric methane. It has generally been accepted that the consumption of methane in upland as well as lowland systems

  9. Potential roles of anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation in the nitrogen cycle of wetland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guibing; Jetten, Mike S M; Kuschk, Peter; Ettwig, Katharina F; Yin, Chengqing

    2010-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME coupled to denitrification) with nitrite as electron acceptor are two of the most recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle. Currently the anammox process has been relatively well investigated in a number of natural and man-made ecosystems, while ANME coupled to denitrification has only been observed in a limited number of freshwater ecosystems. The ubiquitous presence of anammox bacteria in marine ecosystems has changed our knowledge of the global nitrogen cycle. Up to 50% of N(2) production in marine sediments and oxygen-depleted zones may be attributed to anammox bacteria. However, there are only few indications of anammox in natural and constructed freshwater wetlands. In this paper, the potential role of anammox and denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in natural and artificial wetlands is discussed in relation to global warming. The focus of the review is to explore and analyze if suitable environmental conditions exist for anammox and denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in nitrogen-rich freshwater wetlands.

  10. Effects of nitrogen fertilisation rate and maturity of grass silage on methane emission by lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, D.; Hatew, B.; Podesta, S.C.; Klop, G.; Gastelen, van S.; Laar, van H.; Dijkstra, J.; Bannink, A.

    2016-01-01

    Grass silage is typically fed to dairy cows in temperate regions. However, in vivo information on methane (CH4) emission from grass silage of varying quality is limited. We evaluated the effect of two rates of nitrogen (N) fertilisation of grassland (low fertilisation (LF), 65 kg of N/ha; and high

  11. Methane oxidation in soil profiles of Dutch and Finnish coniferous forests with different soil texture and atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saari, A.; Martikainen, P.J.; Ferm, A.; Ruuskanen, J.; Boer, W. de; Troelstra, S.R.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    We studied methane oxidation capacity in soil profiles of Dutch and Finnish coniferous forests. The Finnish sites (n = 9) had nitrogen depositions from 3 to 36 kg N ha⁻¹ a⁻¹. The deposition of N on the Dutch sites (n = 13) was higher ranging from 50 to 92 kg N ha⁻¹ a⁻¹. The Dutch sites had also

  12. Methane oxidation in soil profiles of Dutch and Finnish coniferous forests with different soil texture and atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saari, A.; Martikainen, P.J.; Ferm, A.; Ruuskanen, J.; De Boer, W.; Troelstra, S.R.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    We studied methane oxidation capacity in soil profiles of Dutch and Finnish coniferous forests. The Finnish sites (n = 9) had nitrogen depositions from 3 to 36 kg N ha(-1) a(-1). The deposition of N on the Dutch sites (n = 13) was higher ranging from 50 to 92 kg N ha(-1) a(-1). The Dutch sites had

  13. Effects of solid-liquid separation on recovering residual methane and nitrogen from digested dairy cow manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Rintala, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of optimizing methane and nitrogen recovery of samples obtained from farm biogas digester (35 degrees C) and post-storage tank (where digested material is stored for 9-12 months) was studied by separating the materials into different fractions using 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.25 mm sieves...

  14. chemical kinetic study of nitrogen oxides formation in methane flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado T, Pedro N; Cadavid S, Francisco; Mondragon, P Fanor; Ruiz, Wilson

    2009-01-01

    The present paper deals with the nitrogen oxides formation in a flameless combustion process characterized for using air highly diluted and preheated at high temperatures. The combustion model used in this study was the one dimensional counterflow methane air diffusion flame. The NOx production rate analysis showed that the thermal and prompt mechanisms are the most important for the formation and consumption of NO under dilution conditions for the oxidant in N 2 and combustion products. These mechanisms are related since the starting reaction for NO formation (N2 molecular dissociation) belongs to the prompt mechanism while the NO formation is reported mainly for the thermal mechanism reactions. On the other hand, the NO - NO 2 equilibrium showed that the reaction rates are comparable to that obtained by the thermal and prompt mechanisms, but its global contribution to NO formation are almost insignificant due to the oxidation reaction with radicals HO 2 .

  15. Interactions between nitrogenous fertilizers and methane cycling in wetland and upland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent dynamics and uncertainties in global methane budgets necessitate research of controls of sources and sinks of atmospheric methane. Production of methane by methanogenic archaea in wetlands is a major source while consumption by methane oxidizing bacteria in upland soils is a major sink.

  16. NEON VISUALIZATION ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    being able to present unique, separate views of that data. The Neon server is written in Groovy (a Java VM language), but can be accessed by any tool...between MongoDB, Spark SQL, and Postgres. The results from a single machine showed that MySQL and PostgreSQL took 5-15 seconds for aggregation queries

  17. Effects of hydrogen addition and nitrogen dilution on the laminar flame characteristics of premixed methane-air flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahtouh, T.; Halter, F.; Mounaim-Rousselle, C. [Institut PRISME, Universite d' Orleans, 8 rue Leonard de Vinci-45072, Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Samson, E. [PSA Peugeot Citroen (France)

    2009-10-15

    The effect of hydrogen addition and nitrogen dilution on laminar flame characteristics was investigated. The spherical expanding flame technique, in a constant volume bomb, was employed to extract laminar flame characteristics. The mole fraction of hydrogen in the methane-hydrogen mixture was varied from 0 to 1 and the mole fraction of nitrogen in the total mixture (methane-hydrogen-air-diluent) from 0 to 0.35. Measurements were performed at an initial pressure of 0.1 MPa and an initial temperature of 300 K. The mixtures investigated were under stoichiometric conditions. Based on experimental measurements, a new correlation for calculating the laminar burning velocity of methane-hydrogen-air-nitrogen mixtures is proposed. The laminar burning velocity was found to increase linearly with hydrogen mass fraction for all dilution ratios while the burned gas Markstein length decreases with the increase in hydrogen amount in the mixture except for high hydrogen mole fractions (>0.6). Nitrogen dilution has a nonlinear reducing effect on the laminar burning velocity and an increasing effect on the burned gas Markstein length. The experimental results and the proposed correlation obtained are in good agreement with literature values. (author)

  18. Carbon molecular sieve membranes derived from Matrimid® polyimide for nitrogen/methane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Xue

    2014-01-01

    A commercial polyimide, Matrimid® 5218, was pyrolyzed under an inert argon atmosphere to produce carbon molecular sieve (CMS) dense film membranes for nitrogen/methane separation. The resulting CMS dense film separation performance was evaluated using both pure and mixed N2/CH4 permeation tests. The effects of final pyrolysis temperature on N 2/CH4 separation are reported. The separation performance of all CMS dense films significantly exceeds the polymer precursor dense film. The CMS dense film pyrolyzed at 800 C shows very attractive separation performance that surpasses the polymer membrane upper bound line, with N 2 permeability of 6.8 Barrers and N2/CH4 permselectivity of 7.7 from pure gas permeation, and N2 permeability of 5.2 Barrers and N2/CH4 permselectivity of 6.0 from mixed gas permeation. The temperature dependences of permeabilities, sorption coefficients, and diffusion coefficients of the membrane were studied, and the activation energy for permeation and diffusion, as well as the apparent heats of sorption are reported. The high permselectivity of this dense film is shown to arise from a significant entropic contribution in the diffusion selectivity. The study shows that the rigid \\'slit-shaped\\' CMS pore structure can enable a strong molecular sieving effect to effectively distinguish the size and shape difference between N2 and CH4. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of nitrogen fertiliser rate and crop rotation on soil methane flux in rain-fed potato fields in Wuchuan County, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Pan, Zhihua; Xu, Hui; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Lin; Zhao, Peiyi; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Cui, Guohui; Wang, Sen; Han, Guolin; Zhao, Hui

    2015-12-15

    As one of the important greenhouse gases, the characteristics and principles of methane exchange characteristics in cultivated lands have become hot topics in current climate change research. This study examines the influences of nitrogen fertilisation, temperature and soil water content on methane exchange characteristic and methane exchange functional gene-pmoA gene abundance based on experimental observations of methane exchange fluxes using the static chamber-gas chromatographic method and measurements of methanotroph gene copy numbers in three growing periods by real-time PCR in rain-fed potato fields. The results indicate that the rain-fed potato fields were a CH4 sink with an average annual methane absorption (negative emission) of 940.8±103.2 g CH4-C/ha/year. The cumulative methane absorption first exhibited flat and subsequently increasing trend with the increase of nitrogen fertilisation from 0~135 kg N·ha(-1). Methane cumulative absorption significantly increased with the increase of temperature when temperatures were below 19.6 °C. Methane oxidation capacity (methanotroph pmoA gene copy numbers) showed an increasing and subsequently decreasing trend with the increase of soil moisture. Crop rotation was observed to increase the methane absorption in rain-fed potato fields and nearly one time higher than that under continuous cropping. A mechanism concept model of the methane exchange in rain-fed potato fields was advanced in this paper. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interactions between methane and the nitrogen cycle in light of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Steenbergh, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Next to carbon dioxide, methane is the most important greenhouse gas which predominantly is released from natural wetlands and rice paddies. Climate change predictions indicate enhanced methane emission from global ecosystems under elevated CO2 and temperature. However, the extent of this positive

  1. Interactions between methane and nitrogen cycling; current metagenomics studies and future trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Steenbergh, A.K.; Marco, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands, lakes, soils and sediments are the most important biological sources as well sinks of the greenhouse gas methane. However, the dynamics, variability and uncertainty in methane emission models from these systems is high necessitating better knowledge of the underlying microbial processes.

  2. The influence of nitrogen fertiliser rate and crop rotation on soil methane flux in rain-fed potato fields in Wuchuan County, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liwei; Pan, Zhihua; Xu, Hui; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Lin; Zhao, Peiyi; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Cui, Guohui; Wang, Sen; Han, Guolin; Zhao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    As one of the important greenhouse gases, the characteristics and principles of methane exchange characteristics in cultivated lands have become hot topics in current climate change research. This study examines the influences of nitrogen fertilisation, temperature and soil water content on methane exchange characteristic and methane exchange functional gene-pmoA gene abundance based on experimental observations of methane exchange fluxes using the static chamber–gas chromatographic method and measurements of methanotroph gene copy numbers in three growing periods by real-time PCR in rain-fed potato fields. The results indicate that the rain-fed potato fields were a CH_4 sink with an average annual methane absorption (negative emission) of 940.8 ± 103.2 g CH_4-C/ha/year. The cumulative methane absorption first exhibited flat and subsequently increasing trend with the increase of nitrogen fertilisation from 0 ~ 135 kg N·ha"−"1. Methane cumulative absorption significantly increased with the increase of temperature when temperatures were below 19.6 °C. Methane oxidation capacity (methanotroph pmoA gene copy numbers) showed an increasing and subsequently decreasing trend with the increase of soil moisture. Crop rotation was observed to increase the methane absorption in rain-fed potato fields and nearly one time higher than that under continuous cropping. A mechanism concept model of the methane exchange in rain-fed potato fields was advanced in this paper. - Highlights: • Rain-fed potato fields were a CH_4 sink. • Increased nitrogen fertilisation and temperature led to higher CH_4 absorption. • CH_4 oxidation capacity showed a parabolic trend with soil moisture increased. • Crop rotation increased CH_4 absorption one time higher than continuous cropping. • A mechanism concept model of the CH_4 exchange in potato fields was advanced.

  3. The influence of nitrogen fertiliser rate and crop rotation on soil methane flux in rain-fed potato fields in Wuchuan County, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liwei [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); College of Agronomy, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110866 (China); Wuchuan Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Agro-Environment, Ministry of Agriculture Wuchuan 011700 (China); Pan, Zhihua, E-mail: panzhihua@cau.edu.cn [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Wuchuan Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Agro-Environment, Ministry of Agriculture Wuchuan 011700 (China); Xu, Hui [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Cheng [College of Agricultural and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Gao, Lin [School of Resources and Environmental, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Zhao, Peiyi [Institute of Resources Environmental and Detection Technology, Inner Mongolia Academy of Agricultural and Animal Husbandry Sciences, Huhhot 010031 (China); Wuchuan Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Agro-Environment, Ministry of Agriculture Wuchuan 011700 (China); Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Cui, Guohui; Wang, Sen; Han, Guolin; Zhao, Hui [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Wuchuan Scientific Observing and Experimental Station of Agro-Environment, Ministry of Agriculture Wuchuan 011700 (China)

    2015-12-15

    As one of the important greenhouse gases, the characteristics and principles of methane exchange characteristics in cultivated lands have become hot topics in current climate change research. This study examines the influences of nitrogen fertilisation, temperature and soil water content on methane exchange characteristic and methane exchange functional gene-pmoA gene abundance based on experimental observations of methane exchange fluxes using the static chamber–gas chromatographic method and measurements of methanotroph gene copy numbers in three growing periods by real-time PCR in rain-fed potato fields. The results indicate that the rain-fed potato fields were a CH{sub 4} sink with an average annual methane absorption (negative emission) of 940.8 ± 103.2 g CH{sub 4}-C/ha/year. The cumulative methane absorption first exhibited flat and subsequently increasing trend with the increase of nitrogen fertilisation from 0 ~ 135 kg N·ha{sup −1}. Methane cumulative absorption significantly increased with the increase of temperature when temperatures were below 19.6 °C. Methane oxidation capacity (methanotroph pmoA gene copy numbers) showed an increasing and subsequently decreasing trend with the increase of soil moisture. Crop rotation was observed to increase the methane absorption in rain-fed potato fields and nearly one time higher than that under continuous cropping. A mechanism concept model of the methane exchange in rain-fed potato fields was advanced in this paper. - Highlights: • Rain-fed potato fields were a CH{sub 4} sink. • Increased nitrogen fertilisation and temperature led to higher CH{sub 4} absorption. • CH{sub 4} oxidation capacity showed a parabolic trend with soil moisture increased. • Crop rotation increased CH{sub 4} absorption one time higher than continuous cropping. • A mechanism concept model of the CH{sub 4} exchange in potato fields was advanced.

  4. Collaborative Project: Building improved optimized parameter estimation algorithms to improve methane and nitrogen fluxes in a climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2016-11-29

    Soils in natural and managed ecosystems and wetlands are well known sources of methane, nitrous oxides, and reactive nitrogen gases, but the magnitudes of gas flux to the atmosphere are still poorly constrained. Thus, the reasons for the large increases in atmospheric concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide since the preindustrial time period are not well understood. The low atmospheric concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide, despite being more potent greenhouse gases than carbon dioxide, complicate empirical studies to provide explanations. In addition to climate concerns, the emissions of reactive nitrogen gases from soils are important to the changing nitrogen balance in the earth system, subject to human management, and may change substantially in the future. Thus improved modeling of the emission fluxes of these species from the land surface is important. Currently, there are emission modules for methane and some nitrogen species in the Community Earth System Model’s Community Land Model (CLM-ME/N); however, there are large uncertainties and problems in the simulations, resulting in coarse estimates. In this proposal, we seek to improve these emission modules by combining state-of-the-art process modules for emissions, available data, and new optimization methods. In earth science problems, we often have substantial data and knowledge of processes in disparate systems, and thus we need to combine data and a general process level understanding into a model for projections of future climate that are as accurate as possible. The best methodologies for optimization of parameters in earth system models are still being developed. In this proposal we will develop and apply surrogate algorithms that a) were especially developed for computationally expensive simulations like CLM-ME/N models; b) were (in the earlier surrogate optimization Stochastic RBF) demonstrated to perform very well on computationally expensive complex partial differential equations in

  5. Fluxes of methane and nitrogen oxides in various boreal mire ecosystems. Effects of land-use activities and environmental changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martikainen, P.J.; Nykaenen, H.; Regina, K.; Alm, J.; Silvola, J.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric impact of peatlands is a sum of their gas fluxes. In contrast to carbon dioxide, peatlands are net sources for methane (CH 4 ). Methane is an end product in the anaerobic decomposition processes and it has greater capacity to absorb infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Most of the data on the CH 4 release from northern peatlands is from North America. The total amount of methane released from wetlands is calculated to be 110 Tg yr -1 of which 34 percent (38 Tg yr -1 ) is estimated to be emitted from the northern peatlands. Peat with high content of nitrogen is a potential source for gaseous nitrogen oxides, i.e. nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and nitric oxide (NO). However, the importance of peatlands in producing these trace gases is poorly known. Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide are important components in the atmospheric chemistry and N 2 O also is an effective greenhouse gas. Land-use activities and environmental changes can affect the atmospheric impacts of peatlands by modifying their biogeochemistry. This article presents a short summary of the studies whose objectives were: (1) to measure fluxes of CH 4 and N 2 O on wide range of natural mires in Finland, (2) to study the short- and long-term changes in fluxes of CH 4 , N 2 O and NO on boreal peatlands after lowering their water table. Peatlands used for agriculture, forestry and peat mining were included in the studies. The results from mires drained for forestry may reflect the possible changes in the trace gas fluxes if water table will drop in the northern peatlands as a result of drier climate, (3) to study the effects of nitrogen load on the fluxes of CH 4 , N 2 O and NO, (4) to identify the microbiological processes important for the fluxes of N 2 O, NO and CH 4 , and to study the environmental factors regulating these microbial processes

  6. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  7. Anaerobic co-digestion of perennials: Methane potential and digestate nitrogen fertilizer value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller-Stover, Dorette Sophie; Sun, Guotao; Kroff, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Co-digestion of crop biomass improves the traditional manure-based biogas yield due to an increased content of easily degradable carbon compounds. In this study, the methane potential of three perennials (grass, legumes, and grass+legume) was determined using various amounts together with animal ...

  8. Liquid methane gelled with methanol and water reduces rate of nitrogen absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwall, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Dilution of gelant vapor with inert carrier gas accomplishes gelation. Mixture is injected through heated tube and orifice into liquid methane for immediate condensation within bulk of liquid. Direct dispersion of particles in liquid avoids condensation on walls of vessel and eliminates additional mixing.

  9. The Effect of Nitrogen and Argon Dilution on Methane Oxidation in Laminar Flames

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozubková, M.; Kozubek, E.; Nevrlý, V.; Bitala, P.; Štěpánek, O.; Dlabka, J.; Vašinek, M.; Bojko, M.; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Kubát, Pavel; Grigorová, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 0 (2012), s. 1826-1839 E-ISSN 1877-7058. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2012 /20./. Prague, 25.08.2012-29.08.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12020 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : dilution * methane oxidation * global chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  10. Fluxes of methane and nitrogen oxides in various boreal mire ecosystems. Effects of land-use activities and environmental changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martikainen, P.J.; Nykaenen, H.; Regina, K. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Lab. of Environmental Microbiology; Alm, J.; Silvola, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric impact of peatlands is a sum of their gas fluxes. In contrast to carbon dioxide, peatlands are net sources for methane (CH{sub 4}). Methane is an end product in the anaerobic decomposition processes and it has greater capacity to absorb infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Most of the data on the CH{sub 4} release from northern peatlands is from North America. The total amount of methane released from wetlands is calculated to be 110 Tg yr{sup -1} of which 34 percent (38 Tg yr{sup -1}) is estimated to be emitted from the northern peatlands. Peat with high content of nitrogen is a potential source for gaseous nitrogen oxides, i.e. nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitric oxide (NO). However, the importance of peatlands in producing these trace gases is poorly known. Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide are important components in the atmospheric chemistry and N{sub 2}O also is an effective greenhouse gas. Land-use activities and environmental changes can affect the atmospheric impacts of peatlands by modifying their biogeochemistry. This article presents a short summary of the studies whose objectives were: (1) to measure fluxes of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O on wide range of natural mires in Finland, (2) to study the short- and long-term changes in fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO on boreal peatlands after lowering their water table. Peatlands used for agriculture, forestry and peat mining were included in the studies. The results from mires drained for forestry may reflect the possible changes in the trace gas fluxes if water table will drop in the northern peatlands as a result of drier climate, (3) to study the effects of nitrogen load on the fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO, (4) to identify the microbiological processes important for the fluxes of N{sub 2}O, NO and CH{sub 4}, and to study the environmental factors regulating these microbial processes

  11. Fluxes of methane and nitrogen oxides in various boreal mire ecosystems. Effects of land-use activities and environmental changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martikainen, P J; Nykaenen, H; Regina, K [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Lab. of Environmental Microbiology; Alm, J; Silvola, J [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1997-12-31

    Atmospheric impact of peatlands is a sum of their gas fluxes. In contrast to carbon dioxide, peatlands are net sources for methane (CH{sub 4}). Methane is an end product in the anaerobic decomposition processes and it has greater capacity to absorb infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Most of the data on the CH{sub 4} release from northern peatlands is from North America. The total amount of methane released from wetlands is calculated to be 110 Tg yr{sup -1} of which 34 percent (38 Tg yr{sup -1}) is estimated to be emitted from the northern peatlands. Peat with high content of nitrogen is a potential source for gaseous nitrogen oxides, i.e. nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitric oxide (NO). However, the importance of peatlands in producing these trace gases is poorly known. Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide are important components in the atmospheric chemistry and N{sub 2}O also is an effective greenhouse gas. Land-use activities and environmental changes can affect the atmospheric impacts of peatlands by modifying their biogeochemistry. This article presents a short summary of the studies whose objectives were: (1) to measure fluxes of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O on wide range of natural mires in Finland, (2) to study the short- and long-term changes in fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO on boreal peatlands after lowering their water table. Peatlands used for agriculture, forestry and peat mining were included in the studies. The results from mires drained for forestry may reflect the possible changes in the trace gas fluxes if water table will drop in the northern peatlands as a result of drier climate, (3) to study the effects of nitrogen load on the fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO, (4) to identify the microbiological processes important for the fluxes of N{sub 2}O, NO and CH{sub 4}, and to study the environmental factors regulating these microbial processes

  12. Nitrogen source effects on the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation culture and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria enrichment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-05-01

    The co-culture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) has a potential application in wastewater treatment plant. This study explored the effects of permutation and combination of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium on the culture enrichment from freshwater sediments. The co-existence of NO 3 - , NO 2 - , and NH 4 + shortened the enrichment time from 75 to 30 days and achieved a total nitrogen removal rate of 106.5 mg/L/day on day 132. Even though ammonium addition led to Anammox bacteria increase and a higher nitrogen removal rate, DAMO bacteria still dominated in different reactors with the highest proportion of 64.7% and the maximum abundance was 3.07 ± 0.25 × 10 8 copies/L (increased by five orders of magnitude) in the nitrite reactor. DAMO bacteria showed greater diversity in the nitrate reactor, and one was similar to M. oxyfera; DAMO bacteria in the nitrite reactor were relatively unified and similar to M. sinica. Interestingly, no DAMO archaea were found in the nitrate reactor. This study will improve the understanding of the impact of nitrogen source on DAMO and Anammox co-culture enrichment.

  13. Study on cryogenic adsorption capability of trace nitrogen and methane by activated carbon for cooIant helium purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Hua; Wu Zongxin

    2014-01-01

    A fixed-bed apparatus with dynamic two-route proportional gas mixing system was designed to investigate the cryogenic adsorption behavior of nitrogen and methane on activated carbon for designing the helium purification system of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR). With helium as carrier gas and at the impurity partial pressure of tens Pa, experiments were performed at near atmospheric pressure and by dynamic column breakthrough method at -196°C. The breakthrough curves and desorption curves were measured. By analyzing the breakthrough curve, both the equilibrium adsorption capacity and the kinetic adsorption capacity at breakthrough point were determined. Based on mass-transfer zone model, the experimental breakthrough curves were analyzed. (author)

  14. Activity of type i methanotrophs dominates under high methane concentration: Methanotrophic activity in slurry surface crusts as influenced by methane, oxygen, and inorganic nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Yun Feng; Reinsch, Sabine; Ambus, Per

    2017-01-01

    Livestock slurry is a major source of atmospheric methane (CH4), but surface crusts harboring methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) could mediate against CH4 emissions. This study examined conditions for CH4 oxidation by in situ measurements of oxygen (O2) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as a proxy for inorg......Livestock slurry is a major source of atmospheric methane (CH4), but surface crusts harboring methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) could mediate against CH4 emissions. This study examined conditions for CH4 oxidation by in situ measurements of oxygen (O2) and nitrous oxide (N2O), as a proxy...... for inorganic N transformations, in intact crusts using microsensors. This was combined with laboratory incubations of crust material to investigate the effects of O2, CH4, and inorganic N on CH4 oxidation, using 13CH4 to trace C incorporation into lipids of MOB. Oxygen penetration into the crust was 2 to 14 mm...

  15. Raman spectrum of methane in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, ethane, and propane environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, D. V.

    2018-02-01

    Using binary CH4 - mixtures with varied concentrations of H2, N2, CO2, C2H6 and C3H8 and a fixed ambient pressure of 25 bar, the influence of the environment on spectral characteristics (Raman shift, half-width, peak intensity) of Q-branches of the ν1, ν2, ν3, and 2ν4 methane Raman bands are investigated. It is found that depending on the environment these bands demonstrate different changes in their Raman shifts and half-widths. It is shown that the ratios of peak intensities I(ν2)/I(ν1), I(ν3)/I(ν1) and I(2ν4)/I(ν1) are very sensitive to the environment. The Raman shifts and half-widths of CH4 bands are assumed to depend on the absolute concentration of molecules in the analyzed medium. The data obtained would be useful in Raman diagnostics of natural gas.

  16. Characterizing the Upper Atmosphere of Titan using the Titan Global Ionosphere- Thermosphere Model: Nitrogen and Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H.; Bar-Nun, A.; Bougher, S. W.; Ridley, A. J.; Magee, B.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a great deal of effort has been put forth to explain the Cassini Ion-Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Waite et al [2004]) in-situ measurements of Titan's upper atmosphere (e.g. Muller-Wodarg [2008], Strobel [2008], Yelle et al [2008]). Currently, the community seems to agree that large amounts of CH4 are escaping from Titan's upper atmosphere at a rate of roughly 2.0 x 1027 molecules of CH4/s (3.33 x 1028 amu/s), representing a significant mass source to the Kronian Magnetosphere. However, such large escape fluxes from Titan are currently not corroborated by measurements onboard the Cassini Spacecraft. Thus, we posit another potential scenario: Aerosol depletion of atmospheric methane. Using the three-dimensional Titan Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (T-GITM) (Bell et al [2008]), we explore the possible removal mechanisms of atmospheric gaseous constituents by these aerosols. Titan simulations are directly compared against Cassini Ion-Neutral Mass Spectrometer in-situ densities of N2 and CH4. From this work, we can then compare and contrast this aerosol depletion scenario against the currently posited hydrodynamic escape scenario, illustrating the merits and shortcomings of both.

  17. Effect of Elevated CO2 Concentration, Elevated Temperature and No Nitrogen Fertilization on Methanogenic Archaeal and Methane-Oxidizing Bacterial Community Structures in Paddy Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongyan; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Tokida, Takeshi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Usui, Yasuhiro; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Susumu

    2016-09-29

    Elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) enhance the production and emission of methane in paddy fields. In the present study, the effects of elevated [CO2], elevated temperature (ET), and no nitrogen fertilization (LN) on methanogenic archaeal and methane-oxidizing bacterial community structures in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experimental paddy field were investigated by PCR-DGGE and real-time quantitative PCR. Soil samples were collected from the upper and lower soil layers at the rice panicle initiation (PI) and mid-ripening (MR) stages. The composition of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was not markedly affected by the elevated [CO2], ET, or LN condition. The abundance of the methanogenic archaeal community in the upper and lower soil layers was also not affected by elevated [CO2] or ET, but was significantly increased at the rice PI stage and significantly decreased by LN in the lower soil layer. In contrast, the composition of the methane-oxidizing bacterial community was affected by rice-growing stages in the upper soil layer. The abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was significantly decreased by elevated [CO2] and LN in both soil layers at the rice MR stage and by ET in the upper soil layer. The ratio of mcrA/pmoA genes correlated with methane emission from ambient and FACE paddy plots at the PI stage. These results indicate that the decrease observed in the abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria was related to increased methane emission from the paddy field under the elevated [CO2], ET, and LN conditions.

  18. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  19. In vitro rumen gas and methane production of grass silages differing in plant maturity and nitrogen fertilisation, compared to in vivo enteric methane production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macome, F. M.; Pellikaan, Wilbert F; Schonewille, J. Th; Bannink, A.; Laar, H.; Hendriks, W. H.; Warner, D.; Cone, John W

    2017-01-01

    The potential of an in vitro gas production (GP) system to predict the in vivo enteric methane (CH4) production for various ryegrass-based silages was evaluated, using adapted rumen fluid from cows. Rumen fluid from 12 lactating rumen-cannulated Holstein-Friesian cows were used for in vitro

  20. Optimizing feeding composition and carbon-nitrogen ratios for improved methane yield during anaerobic co-digestion of dairy, chicken manure and wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojiao; Yang, Gaihe; Feng, Yongzhong; Ren, Guangxin; Han, Xinhui

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the possibilities of improving methane yield from anaerobic digestion of multi-component substrates, using a mixture of dairy manure (DM), chicken manure (CM) and wheat straw (WS), based on optimized feeding composition and the C/N ratio. Co-digestion of DM, CM and WS performed better in methane potential than individual digestion. A larger synergetic effect in co-digestion of DM, CM and WS was found than in mixtures of single manures with WS. As the C/N ratio increased, methane potential initially increased and then declined. C/N ratios of 25:1 and 30:1 had better digestion performance with stable pH and low concentrations of total ammonium nitrogen and free NH(3). Maximum methane potential was achieved with DM/CM of 40.3:59.7 and a C/N ratio of 27.2:1 after optimization using response surface methodology. The results suggested that better performance of anaerobic co-digestion can be fulfilled by optimizing feeding composition and the C/N ratio. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Azolla planting reduces methane emission and nitrogen fertilizer application in double rice cropping system in southern China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Heshui; Zhu, Bo; Liu, Jingna

    2017-01-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of methane. How to reduce the methane emission in the paddy field without decreasing the yield has become a major concern of scientists, environmental groups, and agricultural policymakers worldwide. Azolla, used as a dual crop in rice cultivation, has multiple agr...

  2. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  3. Comprehensive evaluation of nitrogen removal rate and biomass, ethanol, and methane production yields by combination of four major duckweeds and three types of wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Tadashi; Hanaoka, Tsubasa; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Morikawa, Masaaki; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2018-02-01

    To assess the potential of duckweeds as agents for nitrogen removal and biofuel feedstocks, Spirodela polyrhiza, Lemna minor, Lemna gibba, and Landoltia punctata were cultured in effluents of municipal wastewater, swine wastewater, or anaerobic digestion for 4 days. Total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (T-DIN) of 20-50 mg/L in effluents was effectively removed by inoculating with 0.3-1.0 g/L duckweeds. S. polyrhiza showed the highest nitrogen removal (2.0-10.8 mg T-DIN/L/day) and biomass production (52.6-70.3 mg d.w./L/day) rates in all the three effluents. Ethanol and methane were produced from duckweed biomass grown in each effluent. S. polyrhiza and L. punctata biomass showed higher ethanol (0.168-0.191, 0.166-0.172 and 0.174-0.191 g-ethanol/g-biomass, respectively) and methane (340-413 and 343-408 NL CH 4 /kg VS, respectively) production potentials than the others, which is related to their higher carbon and starch contents and calorific values. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of bioreactor landfill for nitrogen removal to enhance methane production through ex situ simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and in situ denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojie; Zhang, Hongxia; Cheng, Zhaowen

    2017-08-01

    High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3 - -N) derived from ex situ nitrification phase can inhibit methane production during ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification bioreactor landfill. A combined process comprised of ex situ simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) in an aged refuse bioreactor (ARB) and in situ denitrification in a fresh refuse bioreactor (FRB) was conducted to reduce the negative effect of high concentrationsof NO 3 - -N. Ex situ SND can be achieved because NO 3 - -N concentration can be reduced and the removal rate of ammonium-nitrogen (NH 4 + -N) remains largely unchanged when the ventilation rate of ARB-A2 is controlled. The average NO 3 - -N concentrations of effluent were 470mg/L in ex situ nitrification ARB-A1 and 186mg/L in ex situ SND ARB-A2. The average NH 4 + -N removal rates of ARB-A1 and ARB-A2 were 98% and 94%, respectively. Based on the experimental data from week 4 to week 30, it is predicted that NH 4 + -N concentration in FRB-F1 of the ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification process would reach 25mg/L after 63weeks, and about 40weeks for the FRB-F2 of ex situ SND and in situ denitrification process . Ex situ SND and in situ denitrification process can improve themethane production of FRB-F2. The lag phase time of methane production for the FRB-F2 was 11weeks. This phase was significantly shorter than the 15-week phases of FRB-F1 in ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification process. A seven-week stabilizationphase was required to increase methane content from 5% to 50% for FRB-F2. Methane content in FRB-F1 did not reach 50% but reached the 45% peak after 20weeks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmental controls over methane emissions from bromeliad phytotelmata: The role of phosphorus and nitrogen availability, temperature, and water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotowska, Martyna M.; Werner, Florian A.

    2013-12-01

    bromeliads are common epiphytic plants throughout neotropical forests that store significant amounts of water in phytotelmata (tanks) formed by highly modified leafs. Methanogenic archaea in these tanks have recently been identified as a significant source of atmospheric methane. We address the effects of environmental drivers (temperature, tank water content, sodium phosphate [P], and urea [N] addition) on methane production in anaerobically incubated bromeliad slurry and emissions from intact bromeliad tanks in montane Ecuador. N addition ≥ 1 mg g-1 had a significantly positive effect on headspace methane concentrations in incubation jars while P addition did not affect methane production at any dosage (≤ 1 mg g-1). Tank bromeliads (Tillandsia complanata) cultivated in situ showed significantly increased effluxes of methane in response to the addition of 26 mg N addition per tank but not to lower dosage of N or any dosage of P (≤ 5.2 mg plant-1). There was no significant interaction between N and P addition. The brevity of the stimulatory effect of N addition on plant methane effluxes (1-2 days) points at N competition by other microorganisms or bromeliads. Methane efflux from plants closely followed within-day temperature fluctuations over 24 h cycles, yet the dependency of temperature was not exponential as typical for terrestrial wetlands but instead linear. In simulated drought, methane emission from bromeliad tanks was maintained with minimum amounts of water and regained after a short lag phase of approximately 24 h. Our results suggest that methanogens in bromeliads are primarily limited by N and that direct effects of global change (increasing temperature and seasonality, remote fertilization) on bromeliad methane emissions are of moderate scale.

  6. Small scale demand type neon liquefaction plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dube, W.P.; Slifka, A.J.; Bitsy, R.M.; Sparks, L.L.; Johnson, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    Low-temperature measurement of the thermal conductivity of insulating materials is generally made using a boil-off calorimetry technique involving liquid hydrogen (LH2). Liquid neon (LNe) has nearly the same normal boiling point as LH2, but has a much larger heat of vaporization, allowing extended run times. The main drawback of using LNe has been its excessive cost; $170.00 versus $1.50/l for LH2 (1989 prices). A neon liquefaction plant has been designed and constructed to capture, purify, and refrigerate the neon boil-off from calorimetry experiments. Recycling the neon reduces operating costs to approximately $20/l. The system consists of a purification section, a heat exchanger, LNe and LH2 storage dewars, and a fully automated control system. After purification, neon is liquified in the heat exchanger by LH2 flowing countercurrently through stainless steel cooling coils. Hydrogen flow is automatically adjusted to keep the neon at its normal saturation temperature, 27 K. The liquid neon is then stored in a dewar placed directly below the heat exchanger

  7. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  8. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Gardiner, L. S.; Ward, D.; Gram, W.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of "human sensors." As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include "citizens" or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. Phenology was

  9. Flickering light a history of neon

    CERN Document Server

    Ribbat, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Without neon, Las Vegas might still be a sleepy desert town in Nevada and Times Square merely another busy intersection in New York City. Transformed by the installation of these brightly colored signs, these destinations are now world-famous, representing the vibrant heart of popular culture. But for some, neon lighting represents the worst of commercialism. Energized by the conflicting love and hatred people have for neon, Flickering Light explores its technological and intellectual history, from the discovery of the noble gas in late nineteenth-century London to its fading popul

  10. Coupled effects of methane monooxygenase and nitrogen source on growth and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    The coupled effects of nitrogen source and methane monooxygenase (MMO) on the growth and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulation capacity of methanotrophs were explored. The ammonia-supplied methanotrophs expressing soluble MMO (sMMO) grew at the highest rate, while N 2 -fixing bacteria expressing particulate MMO (pMMO) grew at the lowest rate. Further study showed that more hydroxylamine and nitrite was formed by ammonia-supplied bacteria containing pMMO, which might cause their slightly lower growth rate. The highest PHB content (51.0%) was obtained under nitrogen-limiting conditions with the inoculation of nitrate-supplied bacteria containing pMMO. Ammonia-supplied bacteria also accumulated a higher content of PHB (45.2%) with the expression of pMMO, while N 2 -fixing bacteria containing pMMO only showed low PHB production capacity (32.1%). The maximal PHB contents of bacteria expressing sMMO were low, with no significant change under different nitrogen source conditions. The low MMO activity, low cell growth rate and low PHB production capacity of methanotrophs continuously cultivated with N 2 with the expression of pMMO were greatly improved in the cyclic NO 3 - N 2 cultivation regime, indicating that long-term deficiency of nitrogen sources was detrimental to the activity of methanotrophs expressing pMMO. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A strategy to sample nutrient dynamics across the terrestrial-aquatic interface at NEON sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckley, E. S.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.; Meier, C. L.; Luo, H.; Ayres, E.; Parnell, J.; Krause, K.; Fox, A. M.; SanClements, M.; Fitzgerald, M.; Barnett, D.; Loescher, H. W.; Schimel, D.

    2012-12-01

    The construction of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) across the U.S. creates the opportunity for researchers to investigate biogeochemical transformations and transfers across ecosystems at local-to-continental scales. Here, we examine a subset of NEON sites where atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic observations will be collected for 30 years. These sites are located across a range of hydrological regimes, including flashy rain-driven, shallow sub-surface (perched, pipe-flow, etc), and deep groundwater, which likely affect the chemical forms and quantities of reactive elements that are retained and/or mobilized across landscapes. We present a novel spatial and temporal sampling design that enables researchers to evaluate long-term trends in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus biogeochemical cycles under these different hydrological regimes. This design focuses on inputs to the terrestrial system (atmospheric deposition, bulk precipitation), transfers (soil-water and groundwater sources/chemistry), and outputs (surface water, and evapotranspiration). We discuss both data that will be collected as part of the current NEON design, as well as how the research community can supplement the NEON design through collaborative efforts, such as providing additional datasets, including soil biogeochemical processes and trace gas emissions, and developing collaborative research networks. Current engagement with the research community working at the terrestrial-aquatic interface is critical to NEON's success as we begin construction, to ensure that high-quality, standardized and useful data are not only made available, but inspire further, cutting-edge research.

  12. Solar helium and neon in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, M.; Mcdougall, I.; Patterson, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Neon isotopic compositions in mantle-derived samples commonly are enriched in (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to (22)Ne compared with atmospheric neon ((20)Ne/(22)Ne and (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios in atmospheric neon are 9.8 and 0.029, respectively), together with significant primordial (3)He. Such results have been obtained on MORB's, intraplate plume-related oceanic island basalts, backarc basin basalts, mantle xenoliths, ancient diamonds and CO2 well gases (e.g., 1 - 8). The highest (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio observed in MORB glasses (= 13.6 plus or minus 1.3 is close to the solar value (= 13.6, as observed in solar wind). In order to explain the enrichment of (20)Ne and (21)Ne relative to atmospheric neon for samples derived from the mantle, it is necessary to postulate the presence of at least two distinct non-atmospheric components. The two most likely candidates are solar and nucleogenic ((20)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 13.6 (21)Ne/(22)Ne solar = 0.032, (20)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 2.5 and (21)Ne/(22)Ne nucleogenic = 32). This is because solar neon is the only known component with a (20)Ne/(22)Ne ratio greater than both the atmospheric value and that observed in samples derived from the mantle. Nucleogenic neon is well known to elevate (21)Ne/(22)Ne ratios. Neon isotopic signatures observed in mantle-derived samples can be accounted for by mixing of the three neon end members: solar, nucleogenic and atmospheric.

  13. Nitrous oxide and methane fluxes vs. carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous burial in new intertidal and saltmarsh sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.A., E-mail: christopher.adams@uea.ac.uk; Andrews, J.E.; Jickells, T.

    2012-09-15

    Carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) burial rates were determined within natural saltmarsh (NSM) and 'managed realignment' (MR) sediments of the Blackwater estuary, UK. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) fluxes were measured along with their ability to offset a portion of the C burial to give net C sequestration. C and N densities (C{rho} and N{rho}) of NSM sediments (0.022 and 0.0019 g cm{sup -3}) are comparable to other UK NSM sediments. Less vegetationally developed MR sediments have lower C{rho} and N{rho} (0.012 and 0.0011 g cm{sup -3}) while the more vegetationally developed sites possess higher C{rho} and N{rho} (0.023 and 0.0030 g cm{sup -3}) than NSM. Both NSM and MR areas were small CH{sub 4} (0.10-0.40 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}) and N{sub 2}O (0.03-0.37 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}) sources. Due to their large Global Warming Potentials, even these relatively small greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes reduced the net C sequestration within MR marshes by as much as 49%, but by only 2% from NSM. Potential MR areas within the Blackwater estuary (29.5 km{sup 2} saltmarsh and 23.7 km{sup 2} intertidal mudflat) could bury 5478 t C yr{sup -1} and 695.5 t N yr{sup -1}, with a further 476 t N yr{sup -1} denitrified. The saltmarsh MR would also sequester 139.4 t P yr{sup -1}. GHG fluxes would reduce the C burial benefit by 24% giving a C sequestration rate of 4174 t C yr{sup -1}. Similar areas within the Humber estuary (74.95 km{sup 2}) could bury 3597 t C yr{sup -1} and 180 t N yr{sup -1}, with a further 442 t N yr{sup -1} denitrified. GHG fluxes would reduce the C burial benefit by 31% giving a C sequestration rate of 2492 t C yr{sup -1}. Overall, MR sites provide sustainable coastal defence options with significant biogeochemical value and, despite being net sources of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, can sequester C and reduce estuarine nutrient loads. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated C, N, P, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes

  14. NEON Citizen Science: Planning and Prototyping (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be a national resource for ecological research and education. NEON citizen science projects are being designed to increase awareness and educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecological processes as well as expand NEON data collection capacity by enabling laypersons to collect geographically distributed data. The citizen science area of the NEON web portal will enable citizen scientists to collect, contribute, interpret, and visualize scientific data, as well as access training modules, collection protocols and targeted learning experiences related to citizen science project topics. For NEON, citizen science projects are a means for interested people to interact with and contribute to NEON science. Investigations at vast spatial and temporal scales often require rapid acquisition of large amounts of data from a geographically distributed population of “human sensors.” As a continental-scale ecological observatory, NEON is uniquely positioned to develop strategies to effectively integrate data collected by non-scientists into scientific databases. Ultimately, we plan to work collaboratively to transform the practice of science to include “citizens” or non-scientists in the process. Doing science is not limited to scientists, and breaking down the barriers between scientists and citizens will help people better understand the power of using science in their own decision making. In preparation for fully developing the NEON citizen science program, we are partnering with Project BudBurst (PBB), a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology. The educational goals of PBB are to: (1) increase awareness of climate change, (2) educate citizen scientists about the impacts of climate change on plants and the environment, and (3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process

  15. The First NEON School in La Silla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennefeld, M.; Melo, C.; Selman, F.

    2016-06-01

    The NEON Observing Schools have long provided PhD students with practical experience in the preparation, execution and reduction of astronomical observations, primarily at northern observatories. The NEON School was held in Chile for the first time, with observations being conducted at La Silla. The school was attended by 20 students, all from South America, and observations were performed with two telescopes, including the New Technology Telescope. A brief description of the school is presented and the observing projects and their results are described.

  16. Water regime-nitrogen fertilizer incorporation interaction: Field study on methane and nitrous oxide emissions from a rice agroecosystem in Harbin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjun; Guo, Jia; Xu, Lijun; Song, Zhifeng; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Ao; Zhang, Xijuan; Leng, Chunxu; Liu, Youhong; Wang, Lianmin; Wang, Lizhi; Yu, Yang; Yang, Zhongliang; Yu, Yilei; Meng, Ying; Lai, Yongcai

    2018-02-01

    Water regime and nitrogen (N) fertilizer are two important factors impacting greenhouse gases (GHG) emission from paddy field, whereas their effects have not been well studied in cold region. In this study, we conducted a two-year field experiment to study the impacts of water regime and N fertilizer on rice yields and GHG emissions in Harbin, China, a cold region located in high latitudes. Our results showed that intermittent irrigation significantly decreased methane (CH 4 ) emission compared with continuous flooding, however, the decrement was far lower than the global average level. The N 2 O emissions were very small when flooded but peaked at the beginning of the disappearance of floodwater. The N fertilizer treatments increased CH 4 emissions at low level (75kgN/ha). But both CH 4 and N 2 O emissions were uninfluenced at the levels of 150kgN/ha and 225kgN/ha. Rice yields increased under intermittent irrigation and were highest at the level of 150kgN/ha. From our results, we recommended that the intermittent irrigation and 150kgN/ha as the ideal water regime-nitrogen fertilizer incorporation for this area to achieve low GHG emissions without impacting rice yields. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Silicon compounds of neon and argon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roithová, J.; Schröder, Detlef

    -, č. 46 (2009), s. 8788-8790 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1223 Grant - others: ERC (XE) Adg HORIZOMS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : argon * bond formation * dications * neon Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 11.829, year: 2009

  18. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  19. NEON, Establishing a Standardized Network for Groundwater Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, M.; Schroeter, N.; Goodman, K. J.; Roehm, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is establishing a standardized set of data collection systems comprised of in-situ sensors and observational sampling to obtain data fundamental to the analysis of environmental change at a continental scale. NEON will be collecting aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric data using Observatory-wide standardized designs and methods via a systems engineering approach. This approach ensures a wealth of high quality data, data algorithms, and models that will be freely accessible to all communities such as academic researchers, policy makers, and the general public. The project is established to provide 30 years of data which will enable prediction and forecasting of drivers and responses of ecological change at scales ranging from localized responses through regional gradients and up to the continental scale. The Observatory is a distributed system of sites spread across the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, which is subdivided into 20 statistically unique domains, based on a set of 18 ecologically important parameters. Each domain contains at least one core aquatic and terrestrial site which are located in unmanaged lands, and up to 2 additional sites selected to study domain specific questions such as nitrogen deposition gradients and responses of land use change activities on the ecosystem. Here, we present the development of NEON's groundwater observation well network design and the timing strategy for sampling groundwater chemistry. Shallow well networks, up to 100 feet in depth, will be installed at NEON aquatic sites and will allow for observation of localized ecohydrologic site conditions, by providing basic spatio-temporal near-real time data on groundwater parameters (level, temperature, conductivity) collected from in situ high-resolution instrumentation positioned in each well; and biannual sampling of geochemical and nutrient (N and P) concentrations in a subset of wells for each

  20. Linking carbon and nitrogen cycling: Environmental transcription of mmoX, pmoA, and nifH by methane oxidizing Proteobacteria in a Sub-Arctic palsa peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Susanne; Svenning, Mette M.

    2013-04-01

    Sub-Arctic terrestrial ecosystems are currently affected by climate change which causes degradation of stored organic carbon and emissions of greenhouse gases from microbial processes. Methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) mitigate methane emissions and perform an important function in the soil-atmosphere interaction. In this study we investigated presence and environmental transcription of functional genes of MOB along the degradation of permafrost in a Sub-Arctic palsa peatland using molecular approaches. The acidic and oligotrophic peatland hosts a small number of active MOB among a seemingly specialized community. The methanotrophic community displayed a broad functional potential by transcribing genes for key enzymes involved in both carbon and nitrogen metabolisms including particulate and soluble methane monoogygenase (pMMO and sMMO) as well as nitrogenase. Transcription of mmoX that encodes for a subunit of the sMMO suggests an ecological importance of sMMO with a broad substrate range in this peatland. In situ transcripts of mmoX were tracked mainly to Methylocella related Beijerinckiaceae, and to relatives of Methylomonas while Methylocystis constituting the dominant group which utilizes pMMO. These results address interesting questions concerning in-situ substrate preferences of MOB, and the general importance of species that lack a pMMO for mitigating methane emissions. The importance of MOB for the nitrogen budget in this low pH, nitrogen limited habitat was identified by nifH transcripts of native methanotrophs. Hence, methane oxidizing Proteobacteria show an extended functional repertoire and importance for the biogeochemical cycling in this dynamic ecosystem of degrading permafrost.

  1. A DFT-D study of the interaction of methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen with cation-exchanged SAPO-34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Kristallographie; University College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Bell, Robert G. [University College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-07-01

    Density-functional theory calculations including a semi-empirical dispersion correction (DFT-D) are employed to study the interaction of small guest molecules (CH{sub 4}, CO, N{sub 2}) with the cation sites in the silicoaluminophosphate SAPO-34. Eight different cations from three different groups (alkali cations, alkaline earth cations, transition metals) are included in the study. For each case, the total interaction energy as well as the non-dispersive contribution to the interaction are analysed. Electron density difference plots are used to investigate the nature of this non-dispersive contribution in more detail. Despite a non-negligible contribution of polarisation interactions, the total interaction remains moderate in systems containing main group cations. In SAPOs exchanged with transition metals, orbital interactions between the cations and CO and N{sub 2} lead to a very strong interaction, which makes these systems attractive as adsorbents for the selective adsorption of these species. A critical comparison with experimental heats of adsorption shows reasonable quantitative agreement for CO and N{sub 2}, but a pronounced overestimation of the interaction strength for methane. While this does not affect the conclusions regarding the suitability of TM-exchanged SAPO-34 materials for gas separations, more elaborate computational approaches may be needed to improve the quantitative accuracy for this guest molecule.

  2. A DFT-D study of the interaction of methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen with cation-exchanged SAPO-34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Michael; University College London; Bell, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Density-functional theory calculations including a semi-empirical dispersion correction (DFT-D) are employed to study the interaction of small guest molecules (CH 4 , CO, N 2 ) with the cation sites in the silicoaluminophosphate SAPO-34. Eight different cations from three different groups (alkali cations, alkaline earth cations, transition metals) are included in the study. For each case, the total interaction energy as well as the non-dispersive contribution to the interaction are analysed. Electron density difference plots are used to investigate the nature of this non-dispersive contribution in more detail. Despite a non-negligible contribution of polarisation interactions, the total interaction remains moderate in systems containing main group cations. In SAPOs exchanged with transition metals, orbital interactions between the cations and CO and N 2 lead to a very strong interaction, which makes these systems attractive as adsorbents for the selective adsorption of these species. A critical comparison with experimental heats of adsorption shows reasonable quantitative agreement for CO and N 2 , but a pronounced overestimation of the interaction strength for methane. While this does not affect the conclusions regarding the suitability of TM-exchanged SAPO-34 materials for gas separations, more elaborate computational approaches may be needed to improve the quantitative accuracy for this guest molecule.

  3. Response of soil methane uptake to simulated nitrogen deposition and grazing management across three types of steppe in Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglan; He, Hong; Yuan, Wenping; Li, Linghao; Xu, Wenfang; Liu, Wei; Shi, Huiqiu; Hou, Longyu; Chen, Jiquan; Wang, Zhiping

    2018-01-15

    The response of soil methane (CH 4 ) uptake to increased nitrogen (N) deposition and grazing management was studied in three types of steppe (i.e., meadow steppe, typical steppe, and desert steppe) in Inner Mongolia, China. The experiment was designed with four simulated N deposition rates such as 0, 50, 100, and 200kgNha -1 , respectively, under grazed and fenced management treatments. Results showed that the investigated steppes were significant sinks for CH 4 , with an uptake flux of 1.12-3.36kgha -1 over the grass growing season and that the magnitude of CH 4 uptake significantly (Prates. The soil CH 4 uptake rates were highest in the desert steppe, moderate in the typical steppe, and lowest in the meadow steppe. Compared with grazed plots, fencing increased the CH 4 uptake by 4.7-40.2% with a mean value of 20.2% across the three different steppe types. The responses of soil CH 4 uptake to N deposition in the continental steppe varied depending on the N deposition rate, steppe type, and grazing management. A significantly positive correlation between CH 4 uptake and soil temperature was found in this study, whereas no significant relationship between soil moisture and CH 4 uptake occurred. Our results may contribute to the improvement of model parameterization for simulating biosphere-atmosphere CH 4 exchange processes and for evaluating the climate change feedback on CH 4 soil uptake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Elucidation of rice rhizosphere metagenome in relation to methane and nitrogen metabolism under elevated carbon dioxide and temperature using whole genome metagenomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Das, M; Ray, S; Balachandar, D; Karthikeyan, S; Nayak, A K; Mohapatra, T

    2016-01-15

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mineralization is one of the key processes of biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystem in general and rice ecology in particular. Rice rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbial diversity influenced by change in atmospheric temperature and concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Structural changes in microbial communities in rhizosphere influence the nutrient cycling. In the present study, the bacterial diversity and population dynamics were studied under ambient CO2 (a-CO2) and elevated CO2+temperature (e-CO2T) in lowland rice rhizosphere using whole genome metagenomic approach. The whole genome metagenomic sequence data of lowland rice exhibited the dominance of bacterial communities including Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes. Interestingly, four genera related to methane production namely, Methanobacterium, Methanosphaera, Methanothermus and Methanothermococcus were absent in a-CO2 but noticed under e-CO2T. The acetoclastic pathway was found as the predominant pathway for methanogenesis, whereas, the serine pathway was found as the principal metabolic pathway for CH4 oxidation in lowland rice. The abundances of reads of enzymes in the acetoclastic methanogenesis pathway and serine pathways of methanotrophy were much higher in e-CO2T (328 and 182, respectively) as compared with a-CO2 (118 and 98, respectively). Rice rhizosphere showed higher structural diversities and functional activities in relation to N metabolism involving nitrogen fixation, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction and denitrification under e-CO2T than that of a-CO2. Among the three pathways of N metabolism, dissimilarity pathways were predominant in lowland rice rhizosphere and more so under e-CO2T. Consequently, under e-CO2T, CH4 emission, microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and dehydrogenase activities were 45%, 20% and 35% higher than a-CO2, respectively. Holistically, a high bacterial diversity and

  5. Backward particle production in neutrino neon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsinos, E.; Simopoulou, E.; Giannakopoulos, N.; Vayaki, A.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Allport, P.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Sansum, R.A.; Berggren, M.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Coghen, T.; Jones, G.T.; O'Neale, S.O.; Varvell, K.; Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Apeldoorn, G.W. van

    1989-01-01

    Backward proton and pion production is studied in ν and anti ν charged current interactions in neon. The results are compared with other experiments and theory. The complete backward proton data are compatible with protons produced by reinteractions in the nucleus. However in events with only one proton, muon variables appear correlated to those for the backward proton, as expected by the two-nucleon correlation model. (orig.)

  6. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of μ -p atoms in each target. The rates λ ppμ and λ pd can be extracted

  7. The neon gas field ion source-a first characterization of neon nanomachining properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livengood, Richard H.; Tan, Shida; Hallstein, Roy; Notte, John; McVey, Shawn; Faridur Rahman, F.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    At the Charged Particle Optics Conference (CPO7) in 2006, a novel trimer based helium gas field ion source (GFIS) was introduced for use in a new helium ion microscope (HIM), demonstrating the novel source performance attributes and unique imaging applications of the HIM (Hill et al., 2008 ; Livengood et al., 2008 ). Since that time there have been numerous enhancements to the HIM source and platform demonstrating resolution scaling into the sub 0.5 nm regime (Scipioni et al., 2009 ; Pickard et al., 2010 ). At this Charged Particle Optics Conference (CPO8) we will be introducing a neon version of the trimer-GFIS co-developed by Carl Zeiss SMT and Intel Corporation. The neon source was developed as a possible supplement to the gallium liquid metal ion source (LMIS) used today in most focused ion beam (FIB) systems (Abramo et al., 1994 ; Young et al.,1998 ). The neon GFIS source has low energy spread (∼1 eV) and a small virtual source size (sub-nanometer), similar to that of the helium GFIS. However neon does differ from the helium GFIS in two significant ways: neon ions have high sputtering yields (e.g. 1 Si atom per incident ion at 20 keV); and have relatively shallow implant depth (e.g. 46 nm in silicon at 20 keV). Both of these are limiting factors for helium in many nanomachining applications. In this paper we will present both simulation and experimental results of the neon GFIS used for imaging and nanomachining applications.

  8. Ultramicroporous carbon with extremely narrow pore distribution and very high nitrogen doping for efficient methane mixture gases upgrading

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Kexin

    2017-06-24

    It is notably challenging to fabricate heavily heteroatom-doped porous carbonaceous materials with narrow ultramicropore size distributions for highly effective mixed-gas separation. In this study, new carbon-based materials with narrow ultramicropore size (<7 Å) distributions (>95%) and high N doping contents (>10 at%) are fabricated through the pyrolysis of a perchloro-substituted porous covalent triazine-based framework (ClCTF). In particular, the sample prepared at 650 °C (ClCTF-1-650) possesses the highest ultramicropores content (98%) and large N content (12 at%) and demonstrates a very high CH and CO capacity, as well as a low N uptake under ambient conditions. The extraordinarily high CH/N and CO/N selectivities correlate with both the ideal adsorption solution theory (IAST) method and performed dynamic separation experiments (breakthrough experiments). The results reported in this study far exceed the CH/N and CO/N selectivities of previously reported carbon-based adsorbents including various nitrogen-doped ones. These results are believed to be associated with the unusually high N content, as well as the suitably narrow ultramicropore size distribution. This report introduces a new pathway to design porous absorbents with precisely controlled ultramicropores for gas separation.

  9. INFRARED AND ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF METHANE DILUTED IN SOLID NITROGEN AND IRRADIATED WITH ELECTRONS DURING DEPOSITION AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Chen, Sian-Cong; Liu, Meng-Chen; Huang, Tzu-Ping; Wu, Yu-Jong

    2016-01-01

    We recorded the infrared and ultraviolet absorption spectra of CH 4 :N 2 matrix samples that underwent electron bombardment during deposition in the temperature range of 10–44 K. In contrast to a previous experiment on the IR spectroscopy of electron-bombarded icy samples, methyl and azide radicals became the main products upon electron bombardment during deposition; furthermore, reduced production of nitrile species was observed for deposition at 10 and 20 K. On the other hand, for deposition above 33 K, the observed bands of the radical species (such as methyl and azide) decreased, and bands of large nitriles appeared. This observation may suggest that radical species easily diffuse and recombine to form more complex molecules in solid nitrogen at higher temperatures. Further measurements of similar samples at 10–33 K in the UV region revealed the intense band of azide radicals at 272.5 nm and weak, broad, overlapping features of methyl and azide radicals in the 225–197 nm region. For deposition at 44 K, only a broad feature centered at 219.4 nm was observed, and the possible carriers of nitrile species were proposed based on the corresponding IR spectrum and theoretical predictions of excitation energy. This band is similar to the observed absorption feature of Pluto’s surface recorded by the Hubble telescope in terms of both band position and bandwidth. Our findings therefore further support the suggestion that complex nitrile species may exist on the surface of Pluto.

  10. Committee report on visual appearance of neon lights. Neon no hikari no miekata ni kansuru tokubetsu kenkyu iinkai hokoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansaku, H. (Chukyo University, Nagoya (Japan). Faculty of Letters)

    1991-04-25

    Were summarized the results of experiments and literature searches, conducted by the Commettee on Visual Appearance of Neon Lights,'' which was set up to provide scientific and basic data for understanding of relationship between neon lights and psychological reaction of human, and for realizing of neon sign advertisements with playing a role as neon lights and without any environmental problems. Analytical results of influences of six colors, such as red, yellow, green, blue, violet, and white, brightnesses, and flickering frequencies to the psycological reaction of human on the direct observations of neon lights were described. Results of influences of the neon light incidence into the room to the psychology of residents were also introduced. Furthermore, evaluation of neon lights as an aspect was discussed. Consequently, based on the combination of activity and estimativity, some attentions to be payed on the setting-up of neon lights were pointed out. A red flickering neon light'' was given as clearly a bad example. 2 figs.

  11. National evaluation of Naesudden 2, NEON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunell, G. [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Andersson, Anders; Olsson, Goeran [Vattenfall AB, Klintehamn (Sweden); Ronsten, G. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden, Bromma (Sweden); Ganander, H. [Teknikgruppen AB, Sollentuna (Sweden); Goeransson, Bengt [Kvaerner Turbin AB, Kristinehamn (Sweden); Simonsson, B. [KM Akustikbyraan, Solna (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Vattenfall, the main electric utility in Sweden, is operating the Naesudden II turbine (3 MW, diam. 80 m) which was erected in October 1992 on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. An evaluation program (National Evaluation of Naesudden II, NEON) is carried out by Vattenfall in co-operation with FFA, Teknikgruppen, Kvaerner Turbin and others. This paper presents results from the evaluation of power production, availability, power performance, structural behaviour, sub-system performance, and noise emission. Comparisons with the `sister` machine Aeolus II in Wilhelmshaven, Germany, are carried out in a research program CAN (Comparison Aeolus II - Naesudden II) within WEGA II. 7 refs, 14 figs, 4 tabs

  12. NEON terrestrial field observations: designing continental scale, standardized sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. H. Kao; C.M. Gibson; R. E. Gallery; C. L. Meier; D. T. Barnett; K. M. Docherty; K. K. Blevins; P. D. Travers; E. Azuaje; Y. P. Springer; K. M. Thibault; V. J. McKenzie; M. Keller; L. F. Alves; E. L. S. Hinckley; J. Parnell; D. Schimel

    2012-01-01

    Rapid changes in climate and land use and the resulting shifts in species distributions and ecosystem functions have motivated the development of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). Integrating across spatial scales from ground sampling to remote sensing, NEON will provide data for users to address ecological responses to changes in climate, land use,...

  13. Effect of irrigation, nitrogen application, and a nitrification inhibitor on nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an olive (Olea europaea L.) orchard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, S.C., E-mail: stefania@macs.udl.cat [University of Lleida, Environment and Soil Science Department, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, E-25198 Lleida (Spain); Teira-Esmatges, M.R. [University of Lleida, Environment and Soil Science Department, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, E-25198 Lleida (Spain); Arbonés, A.; Rufat, J. [Programa Ús Eficient de l’Aigua, Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroalimentàries (IRTA), Parc Científic i Tecnològic Agroalimentari de Lleida (PCiTAL). Parc de Gardeny, Edifici Fruitcentre, E-2503 Lleida (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Drip irrigation combined with nitrogen (N) fertigation is applied in order to save water and improve nutrient efficiency. Nitrification inhibitors reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A field study was conducted to compare the emissions of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) associated with the application of N fertiliser through fertigation (0 and 50 kg N ha{sup −1}), and 50 kg N ha{sup −1} + nitrification inhibitor in a high tree density Arbequina olive orchard. Spanish Arbequina is the most suited variety for super intensive olive groves. This system allows reducing production costs and increases crop yield. Moreover its oil has excellent sensorial features. Subsurface drip irrigation markedly reduced N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} emissions compared with surface drip irrigation. Fertiliser application significantly increased N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2}, but not N{sub 2}O emissions. Denitrification was the main source of N{sub 2}O. The N{sub 2}O losses (calculated as emission factor) ranging from − 0.03 to 0.14% of the N applied, were lower than the IPCC (2007) values. The N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} losses were the largest, equivalent to 1.80% of the N applied, from the 50 kg N ha{sup −1} + drip irrigation treatment which resulted in water filled pore space > 60% most of the time (high moisture). Nitrogen fertilisation significantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions in 2011, but only for the subsurface drip irrigation strategies in 2012. The olive orchard acted as a net CH{sub 4} sink for all the treatments. Applying a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), the cumulative N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} emissions were significantly reduced with respect to the control. The DMPP also inhibited CO{sub 2} emissions and significantly increased CH{sub 4} oxidation. Considering global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity, cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions and oil production, it can be concluded that applying DMPP with 50 kg N ha{sup −1

  14. Diffusion of neon in white dwarf stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentation of the neutron rich isotope 22Ne may be an important source of gravitational energy during the cooling of white dwarf stars. This depends on the diffusion constant for 22Ne in strongly coupled plasma mixtures. We calculate self-diffusion constants D(i) from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon, oxygen, and neon mixtures. We find that D(i) in a mixture does not differ greatly from earlier one component plasma results. For strong coupling (coulomb parameter Γ> few), D(i) has a modest dependence on the charge Z(i) of the ion species, D(i)∝Z(i)(-2/3). However, D(i) depends more strongly on Z(i) for weak coupling (smaller Γ). We conclude that the self-diffusion constant D(Ne) for 22Ne in carbon, oxygen, and neon plasma mixtures is accurately known so that uncertainties in D(Ne) should be unimportant for simulations of white dwarf cooling.

  15. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  16. Using NEON Data to Test and Refine Conceptual and Numerical Models of Soil Biogeochemical and Microbial Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, S. R.; Stanish, L.; Ayers, E.

    2017-12-01

    Recent conceptual and numerical models have proposed new mechanisms that underpin key biogeochemical phenomena, including soil organic matter storage and ecosystem response to nitrogen deposition. These models seek to explicitly capture the ecological links among biota, especially microbes, and their physical and chemical environment to represent belowground pools and fluxes and how they respond to perturbation. While these models put forth exciting new concepts, their broad predictive abilities are unclear as some have been developed and tested against only small or regional datasets. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) presents new opportunities to test and validate these models with multi-site data that span wide climatic, edaphic, and ecological gradients. NEON is measuring surface soil biogeochemical pools and fluxes along with diversity, abundance, and functional potential of soil microbiota at 47 sites distributed across the United States. This includes co-located measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen concentrations and stable isotopes, net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification rates, soil moisture, pH, microbial biomass, and community composition via 16S and ITS rRNA sequencing and shotgun metagenomic analyses. Early NEON data demonstrates that these wide edaphic and climatic gradients are related to changes in microbial community structure and functional potential, as well as element pools and process rates. Going forward, NEON's suite of standardized soil data has the potential to advance our understanding of soil communities and processes by allowing us to test the predictions of new soil biogeochemical frameworks and models. Here, we highlight several recently developed models that are ripe for this kind of data validation, and discuss key insights that may result. Further, we explore synergies with other networks, such as (i)LTER and (i)CZO, which may increase our ability to advance the frontiers of soil biogeochemical modeling.

  17. Investigations of Townsend discharges in neon by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielis, J.W.H.

    1979-01-01

    The decay frequency of Ne( 3 P 2 )-atoms has been determined at 77 K and 295 K as a function of gas density from time sampling analysis of a N + 2 -ion impurity in the afterglow of a Townsend discharge in neon. From the sampling spectra of ions in the afterglow of a Townsend discharge, mobilities of positive ions in neon have been determined as a function of the reduced electric field strength at 77 K and 295 K. From mobility data the interaction potential as a function of intermolecular distance between a N + 2 -ion and a neon atom is evaluated. (Auth.)

  18. Isotopic separation in a rotating neon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, J.B.S.

    1976-01-01

    The background to the use of rotating plasma as element and isotope separators is briefly reviewed. The principles of the process are outlined. The rotation in a plasma centrifuge is produced by passing a radial current across an axial magnetic field. The different mass spheres, if under the influence of azimuthal forces, may be separated by crossing the field. Details are given of the Vortex II experiment in which 22 Ne is separated from neon in a fully ionized rotating plasma. It was demonstrated that 22 Ne enrichments of approximately 15% could be achieved with the possibility of higher values when the design and operation of the plasma centrifuge have been optimised. (U.K.)

  19. Surface-subsurface flow modeling: an example of large-scale research at the new NEON user facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, H.; McKnight, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to alter surface-subsurface interactions in freshwater ecosystems. These interactions are hypothesized to control nutrient release at diel and seasonal time scales, which may then exert control over epilithic algal growth rates. The mechanisms underlying shifts in complex physical-chemical-biological patterns can be elucidated by long-term observations at sites that span hydrologic and climate gradients across the continent. Development of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will provide researchers the opportunity to investigate continental-scale patterns by combining investigator-driven measurements with Observatory data. NEON is a national-scale research platform for analyzing and understanding the impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on ecology. NEON features sensor networks and experiments, linked by advanced cyberinfrastructure to record and archive ecological data for at least 30 years. NEON partitions the United States into 20 ecoclimatic domains. Each domain hosts one fully instrumented Core Aquatic site in a wildland area and one Relocatable site, which aims to capture ecologically significant gradients (e.g. landuse, nitrogen deposition, urbanization). In the current definition of NEON there are 36 Aquatic sites: 30 streams/rivers and 6 ponds/lakes. Each site includes automated, in-situ sensors for groundwater elevation and temperature; stream flow (discharge and stage); pond water elevation; atmospheric chemistry (Tair, barometric pressure, PAR, radiation); and surface water chemistry (DO, Twater, conductivity, pH, turbidity, cDOM, nutrients). Groundwater and surface water sites shall be regularly sampled for selected chemical and isotopic parameters. The hydrologic and geochemical monitoring design provides basic information on water and chemical fluxes in streams and ponds and between groundwater and surface water, which is intended to support investigator-driven modeling studies

  20. SAES St 909 pilot scale methane cracking tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J. E.; Sessions, H. T.

    2008-01-01

    Pilot scale (0.5 kg) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted for potential tritium process applications. Up to 1400 hours tests were done at 700 deg.C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 0.03 sLPM feed of methane plus impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. Carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered, but equating nitrogen to an equivalent amount of methane was nitrogen feed composition dependent. A decreased hydrogen feed increased methane getter rates while a 30 deg.C drop in one furnace zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate. (authors)

  1. Does an electron form a bubble in liquid neon?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, V.G.; Brewer, J.H.; Morris, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    Muon spin relaxation measurements in liquid neon in electric fields up to 35 kV/cm reveal the existence of a delocalized electron state which is responsible for delayed muonium atom formation. Other fraction of radiolysis electrons created in the positive muon's ionization track is believed to be localized inside bubbles and therefore possesses low mobility. Bubble formation in liquid neon is discussed in detail

  2. Collisional interaction between metastable neon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drunen, Wouter Johannes van

    2008-07-07

    In this thesis, the study of cold gases of neon atoms in different metastable states is described. It contains measurements of the collisional parameters for both the 3s[3/2]{sub 2} and the 3s'[1/2]{sub 0} metastable state and the dependence of the inelastic loss on external fields. Furthermore, the investigation of frequency dependent laser-induced collisions, and the possibility to excite photoassociation resonances is presented. For the measurements described here, neon atoms have been confined in a magnetooptical trap, in a magnetostatic trap, or in an optical dipole trap, respectively. By laser cooling inside the magnetic trap, atomic samples with more than 95 percent occupation of the magnetic substate m{sub J} = +2 could be prepared. They have a typical temperature of 0.5 mK, central densities up to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, and a central phase-space density of up to 2.2.10{sup -7}. After loading the optical dipole trap from the magnetic trap, 2.5.10{sup 6} atoms with typical temperatures of 0.1 mK, and central densities up to 5.10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} were trapped. By evaporative cooling of the atoms in the magnetic trap we could increase the phase-space density by a factor of 200 to 5.10{sup -5}. Investigating the frequency dependence of laser-induced collisions did not reveal an experimental signature for the excitation of photoassociation resonances. For the {sup 3}D{sub 3} line a frequency dependence of laser enhanced Penning ionization was observed. Measurement of the two-body loss coefficient as function of the magnetic field showed a field dependence of the inelastic loss. These losses increase towards both small and large offset fields. The implementation of an optical dipole trap allowed us to trap the {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable state. From the trap loss measurements we determined the two-body loss coefficient of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable state for both bosonic isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne. For {sup 20}Ne we obtained {beta}=6{sup +5}{sub

  3. Collisional interaction between metastable neon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drunen, Wouter Johannes van

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, the study of cold gases of neon atoms in different metastable states is described. It contains measurements of the collisional parameters for both the 3s[3/2] 2 and the 3s'[1/2] 0 metastable state and the dependence of the inelastic loss on external fields. Furthermore, the investigation of frequency dependent laser-induced collisions, and the possibility to excite photoassociation resonances is presented. For the measurements described here, neon atoms have been confined in a magnetooptical trap, in a magnetostatic trap, or in an optical dipole trap, respectively. By laser cooling inside the magnetic trap, atomic samples with more than 95 percent occupation of the magnetic substate m J = +2 could be prepared. They have a typical temperature of 0.5 mK, central densities up to 10 11 cm -3 , and a central phase-space density of up to 2.2.10 -7 . After loading the optical dipole trap from the magnetic trap, 2.5.10 6 atoms with typical temperatures of 0.1 mK, and central densities up to 5.10 10 cm -3 were trapped. By evaporative cooling of the atoms in the magnetic trap we could increase the phase-space density by a factor of 200 to 5.10 -5 . Investigating the frequency dependence of laser-induced collisions did not reveal an experimental signature for the excitation of photoassociation resonances. For the 3 D 3 line a frequency dependence of laser enhanced Penning ionization was observed. Measurement of the two-body loss coefficient as function of the magnetic field showed a field dependence of the inelastic loss. These losses increase towards both small and large offset fields. The implementation of an optical dipole trap allowed us to trap the 3 P 0 metastable state. From the trap loss measurements we determined the two-body loss coefficient of the 3 P 0 metastable state for both bosonic isotopes 20 Ne and 22 Ne. For 20 Ne we obtained β=6 +5 -4 .10 -10 cm 3 /s and for 22 Ne β = 11 +7 -6 .10 -10 cm 3 /s. (orig.)

  4. Methane mitigation with corn oil and calcium sulfate, responses on whole animal energy and nitrogen balance in dairy cattle consuming reduced-fat distillers grains plus solubles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addition of fat and calcium sulfate to diets fed to ruminants has been shown to reduce methane production, but these factors have not shown effects on energy balance. A study using 16 multiparous (8 Holstein and 8 Jersey) (78 ± 15 DIM) (mean ± SD) lactating dairy cows was conducted to determine how ...

  5. Reaction of methane with coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, K.; Batts, B.D.; Wilson, M.A.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Maa, P.S.; Long, M.A.; He, S.J.X.; Attala, M.I. [Macquarie University, Macquarie, NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    A study of the reactivities of Australian coals and one American coal with methane or methane-hydrogen mixtures, in the range 350-400{degree}C and a range of pressures (6.0-8.3 MPa, cold) is reported. The effects of aluminophosphates (AIPO) or zeolite catalysts, with and without exchanged metals, on reactivity have also been examined. Yields of dichloromethane extractable material are increased by using a methane rather than a nitrogen atmosphere and different catalysts assist dissolution to various extends. It appears that surface exchanged catalysts are effective, but incorporating metals during AIPO lattice formation is detrimental. Aluminium phosphate catalysts are unstable to water produced during coal conversion, but are still able to increase extraction yields. For the American coal, under methane-hydrogen and a copper exchanged zeolite, 51.5% conversion was obtained, with a product selectivity close to that obtained under hydrogen alone, and with only 2% hydrogen consumption. The conversion under methane-hydrogen was also to that obtained under hydrogen alone, while a linear dependence of conversion on proportion of methane would predict a 43% conversion under methane-hydrogen. This illustrates a synergistic effect of the methane-hydrogen atmosphere for coal liquefaction using this catalyst systems. 31 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Methane in German hard coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, P.N.; Den Drijver, J.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide, hard coal mining is being carried out at ever increasing depth, and has, therefore, to cope with correspondingly increasing methane emissions are caused by coal mining. Beside carbon dioxide, chloro-fluoro-carbons (CFCs) and nitrogen oxides, methane is one of the most significant 'greenhouse' gases. It is mainly through the release of such trace gases that the greenhouse effect is brought about. Reducing methane emissions is therefore an important problem to be solved by the coal mining industry. This paper begins by highlighting some of the fundamental principles of methane in hard coal mining. The methane problem in German hard coal mining and the industry's efforts to reduce methane emissions are presented. The future development in German hard coal mining is illustrated by an example which shows how large methane volumes can be managed, while still maintaining high outputs at increasing depth. (author). 7 tabs., 10 figs., 20 refs

  7. Effect of neon ions on synchronized Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.; Carpenter, S.G.; Tokita, N.; Howard, J.

    1985-01-01

    The variation in radiosensitivity across the cell cycle after exposure to neon ions and 60 Co γ-rays is reported for cultured hamster cells. The cells were first synchronized by mitotic selection, then resynchronized in the region of the G 1 /S boundary by treatment with 10 -3 M hydroxyurea. Although the use of hydroxyurea improves the synchrony, it does sensitize cells at the G 1 /S boundary to some degree. The cells were exposed at the plateau and the distal peak position of a neon ion beam modified by a 10 cm wide ridge filter. The results indicate that the variation (ratio of maximum to minimum survival after fixed doses of radiation that are approximately matched to produce similar cell killing) was approximately 80 to 100-fold for 60 Co γ-rays and neon ions at the plateau, and 25-fold for distal peak neon ions. While the r.b.e. of distal peak neon ions decreased rapidly with increasing dose for cells in late S-phase, the r.b.e. is independent of dose for cells at the G 1 /S boundary. (author)

  8. Effect of neon ions on synchronized Chinese hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.; Carpenter, S.G.; Tokita, N. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Howard, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1985-08-01

    The variation in radiosensitivity across the cell cycle after exposure to neon ions and /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays is reported for cultured hamster cells. The cells were first synchronized by mitotic selection, then resynchronized in the region of the G/sub 1//S boundary by treatment with 10/sup -3/ M hydroxyurea. Although the use of hydroxyurea improves the synchrony, it does sensitize cells at the G/sub 1//S boundary to some degree. The cells were exposed at the plateau and the distal peak position of a neon ion beam modified by a 10 cm wide ridge filter. The results indicate that the variation (ratio of maximum to minimum survival after fixed doses of radiation that are approximately matched to produce similar cell killing) was approximately 80 to 100-fold for /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays and neon ions at the plateau, and 25-fold for distal peak neon ions. While the r.b.e. of distal peak neon ions decreased rapidly with increasing dose for cells in late S-phase, the r.b.e. is independent of dose for cells at the G/sub 1//S boundary.

  9. Investigations on afterglows of neon gas discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenhuysen, L.W.G.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations on afterglows of neon gas discharges are described. The investigated pressure range extends from 0.5 torr to 100 torr; the discharge currents lie between about 1 mA and 100 mA. The decay of the 1s atom densities has been determined experimentally as function of the time elapsed in the afterglow. From the measured decay of metastable 1s 5 atom densities at gas pressure 5 atoms as well as the coefficinets of atomic collisional transfer between the 1s 5 and 1s 4 level are determined. To obtain more insight in the mutual influences of the various loss and production processes of 1s atoms and charge carriers in the afterglow a numerical model has been formed. The behaviour of the afterglow radiation intensity has been measured on discharges with a gas pressure of 1, 10, 20, 50 and 100 torr and a discharge current of 22, 24 and 50 mA. From the results the recombination distribution fractions of the 1s levels are determined and the electron densities at the start of the afterglow of 20, 50 and 100 torr discharges. With the help of the selective excitation spectroscopy the coefficients of atomic transfer between the 2p levels have been measured in the afterglow of discharge with a gas pressure of 1, 10, 20, 50 and 100 torr and a discharge current of 22 mA. From these results and the measured intensities of the various spectral lines in the afterglow the partial recombination coefficients for the 2p levels are calculated. (Auth. )

  10. Heat transfer in pool boiling liquid neon, deuterium and hydrogen, and critical heat flux in forced convection of liquid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astruc, J.M.

    1967-12-01

    In the first part, free-convection and nucleate pool boiling heat transfer (up to burn-out heat flux) between a platinum wire of 0.15 mm in diameter in neon, deuterium and hydrogen has been studied at atmospheric pressure. These measurements were continued in liquid neon up to 23 bars (Pc ≅ 26.8 b). Film boiling heat transfer coefficients have been measured in pool boiling liquid neon at atmospheric pressure with three heating wires (diameters 0.2, 0.5, 2 mm). All the results have been compared with existing correlations. The second part is devoted to measurements of the critical heat flux limiting heat transfer with small temperature differences between the wall and the liquid neon flowing inside a tube (diameters 3 x 3.5 mm) heated by joule effect on 30 cm of length. Influences of flow stability, nature of electrical current, pressure, mass flow rate and subcooling are shown. In conclusion, the similarity of the heat transfer characteristics in pool boiling as well as in forced convection of liquid neon and hydrogen is emphasized. (author) [fr

  11. Plasma performance improvement with neon gas puffing in HT-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, X.; Wan, B.; Li, J.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zhu, Y.; Wu, Z.; Liu, H.; Qian, J.

    2005-01-01

    The neon gas puffing for the production of a radiative layer near the plasma edge with the improved energy and particle confinement has been investigated in HT-7 during the 2003 campaign. Plasma characteristics of these discharges in HT-7 are similar to the TEXTOR RI-mode discharges. The peaked electron temperature and the broadened density profiles were formed in these discharges with the combination of LHCD and IBW heating. The central electron temperature was increased by nearly 50%, compared those discharges with the same plasma parameters and injected power without the neon gas puffing. These discharges also exhibited relatively higher plasma inductance. (author)

  12. Study of the 21Ne Nuclear Structure by capture of thermal neutrons in natural neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopa, C.R.S.

    1979-01-01

    Energy levels of 21 Ne up to 6.76 MeV are studied by measuring the thermal neutron capture gama rays from natural neon. A Ge(Li) detector is used. Energies and intensities are measured relative to calibration lines of nitrogen. The Q-value and the cross section of the reaction 20 Ne(n,γ) 21 Ne are calculated. The proposed level scheme is discussed in terms of the Nilsson model, considering the coupling of one particle to the 20 Ne core. Coriolis coupling is taken into account for the three positive parity bands, K sup(π)=3/2 + , 1/2 + and 5/2 + . Measurements are made using the research reactor of the Instituto de Energia Atomica [pt

  13. Optimization of mNeonGreen for Homo sapiens increases its fluorescent intensity in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida-Miyake, Emiko; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Tanida, Isei

    2018-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is tremendously useful for investigating many cellular and intracellular events. The monomeric GFP mNeonGreen is about 3- to 5-times brighter than GFP and monomeric enhanced GFP and shows high photostability. The maturation half-time of mNeonGreen is about 3-fold faster than that of monomeric enhanced GFP. However, the cDNA sequence encoding mNeonGreen contains some codons that are rarely used in Homo sapiens. For better expression of mNeonGreen in human cells, we synthesized a human-optimized cDNA encoding mNeonGreen and generated an expression plasmid for humanized mNeonGreen under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The resultant plasmid was introduced into HEK293 cells. The fluorescent intensity of humanized mNeonGreen was about 1.4-fold higher than that of the original mNeonGreen. The humanized mNeonGreen with a mitochondria-targeting signal showed mitochondrial distribution of mNeonGreen. We further generated an expression vector of humanized mNeonGreen with 3xFLAG tags at its carboxyl terminus as these tags are useful for immunological analyses. The 3xFLAG-tagged mNeonGreen was recognized well with an anti-FLAG-M2 antibody. These plasmids for the expression of humanized mNeonGreen and mNeonGreen-3xFLAG are useful tools for biological studies in mammalian cells using mNeonGreen.

  14. A W−Ne interatomic potential for simulation of neon implantation in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, Marie; Juslin, Niklas; Huang, Guiyang [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Wirth, Brian D., E-mail: bdwirth@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); P.O. Box 2008, MS-6003, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    An interatomic pair potential for W−Ne is developed for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of neon implantation in tungsten. The new potential predicts point defect energies and binding energies of small clusters that are in good agreement with electronic structure calculations. Molecular dynamics simulations of small neon clusters in tungsten show that trap mutation, in which an interstitial neon cluster displaces a tungsten atom from its lattice site, occurs for clusters of three or more neon atoms. However, near a free surface, trap mutation can occur at smaller sizes, including even a single neon interstitial in close proximity to a (100) or (110) surface.

  15. 21 CFR 868.1670 - Neon gas analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... patient. The device may use techniques such as mass spectrometry or thermal conductivity. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neon gas analyzer. 868.1670 Section 868.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL...

  16. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy probed heterogeneous xenon/neon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokapanich, Wandared; Björneholm, Olle; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Tchaplyguine, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Binary rare gas clusters; xenon and neon which have a significant contrariety between sizes, produced by a co-expansion set up and have been studied using synchrotron radiation based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Concentration ratios of the heterogeneous clusters; 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% were controlled. The core level spectra were used to determine structure of the mixed cluster and analyzed by considering screening mechanisms. Furthermore, electron binding energy shift calculations demonstrated cluster aggregation models which may occur in such process. The results showed that in the case of low mixing ratios of 3% and 5% of xenon in neon, the geometric structures exhibit xenon in the center and xenon/neon interfaced in the outer shells. However, neon cluster vanished when the concentration of xenon was increased to 10%. - Highlights: • Co-expansion setup is suitable for producing binary Xe/Ne clusters. • Appropriate temperature, pressure, and mixing ratios should be strictly controlled. • Low mixing ratio, Xe formed in the core and Xe/Ne interfacing in the outer shell. • High mixing ratio, only pure Xe clusters were detected.

  17. Energy saved neon sign lighting power supply for photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanitteerapan, T.; Dokpikul, S.; Arunrungrasmi, S. [King Mongkut Univ. of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Electrical Technology Education, Faculty of Industrial Education

    2007-07-01

    Petroleum oil, natural gas and fossil fuels are commonly used in power plants for electrical power generation. However, because of their negative environmental impacts, energy and environmental savings from renewable energy resources are necessary choices. Solar energy can be converted to the electrical voltage by using solar arrays. This process can be used in many electrical applications. This paper introduced a neon sign lighting power supply for a small photovoltaic powered stand-alone commercial advertising board for a remote area in Thailand. The circuit implementation was very simple, consisting of an active switch device, a resonant capacitor and high frequency transformer. The control also operated as a fixed frequency and fixed duty ratio controller. The paper discussed the principle of neon sign lighting, power circuit operation, and control circuit operation. To verify the proposed power supply, the circuit experiment of the proposed power supply for the neon sign lighting was applied to a 10 foot long, 10 millimeter diameter bulb. The neon sign was ignited smoothly with little power consumption. 2 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  18. Recent results from neutrino interactions in heavy neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cnops, A.M.; Connolly, P.L.; Kahn, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Recent results presented from a study of muon neutrinos interacting in heavy neon include dilepton production, strange particle rates, the D 0 →K 0 π + π - decay, the lack of observation of new particles, and the cross section for nu/sub e/ + e elastic scattering. 8 references

  19. Molecular Iodine Fluorescence Using a Green Helium-Neon Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Excitation of molecular iodine vapor with a green (543.4 nm) helium-neon laser produces a fluorescence spectrum that is well suited for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Application of standard evaluation techniques to the spectrum yields ground electronic-state molecular parameters in good agreement with literature…

  20. Agricultural methanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After having briefly outlined the interest of the development of methanization of agricultural by-products in the context of struggle against climate change, and noticed that France is only now developing this sector as some other countries already did, this publication describes the methanization process also called anaerobic digestion, which produces a digestate and biogas. Advantages for the agriculture sector are outlined, as well as drawbacks and recommendations (required specific technical abilities, an attention to the use of energetic crops, an improved economic balance which still depends on public subsidies, competition in the field of waste processing). Actions undertaken by the ADEME are briefly evoked

  1. Effect of calf age and dam breed on intake, energy expenditure, and excretion of nitrogen, phosphorus, and methane of beef cows with calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estermann, B L; Sutter, F; Schlegel, P O; Erdin, D; Wettstein, H R; Kreuzer, M

    2002-04-01

    The effects of calf age and dam breeds of different milk yield potential on turnover of energy and nutrients were followed in 16 Simmental and 16 Angus beef cows with Angus-sired calves. Calf ages investigated were 1, 4, 7, and 10 mo. The forage offered for ad libitum access consisted of hay for the calves and of a constant mixture of grass silage, meadow hay, and straw (1:0.7:0.3 on a DM basis) for the cows. Calves of 10 mo of age received an additional 2.6 kg DM/d of crushed barley. The animals were kept in groups of four cows and four calves except in the respiration chambers, where only one cow (tethered) and her calf (loose) were grouped together. Indicator techniques were applied to obtain individual data on feces and urine volumes during group housing. In the Simmental cows, heavier on average by 22 kg, voluntary DMI was higher than in the Angus cows (14.0 vs 12.3 kg/d). In calves, DMI from supplementary feeds was 1.6, 3.9, and 6.3 kg/d, on average, at 4, 7, and 10 mo of age, respectively. Dam breed had no significant effect on DMI and ADG of calves and on BW changes of cows. System retention of energy, N, and P showed a curvilinear development with calf age. System energy expenditure, which linearly increased with calf age, was higher with Simmental than with Angus dams (11%), even when adjusted for metabolic BW (8%). Energy loss through methane linearly increased with NDF intake and, consequently, with calf age from 18 to 30 MJ/d (446 to 751 L/d) for cows and calves together. Similarly, fecal and urinary N excretion and fecal P excretion steadily increased with calf age. In calves, the easily volatile N percentage of manure N rapidly decreased from very high levels in young calves. The resulting changes in inclination to gaseous N loss during manure storage for 8 wk were more than compensated by alterations in N intake of the calves, resulting in an increased total system N loss with progressing lactation. Overall, the present results indicate a difference

  2. Landfill Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill methane (CH4) accounts for approximately 1.3% (0.6 Gt) of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions relative to total emissions from all sectors of about 49 Gt CO2-eq yr-1. For countries with a history of controlled landfilling, landfills can be one of the larger national sources of ant...

  3. Paradox reconsidered: Methane oversaturation in well-oxygenated lake waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Kam W.; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Frindte, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The widely reported paradox of methane oversaturation in oxygenated water challenges the prevailing paradigm that microbial methanogenesis only occurs under anoxic conditions. Using a combination of field sampling, incubation experiments, and modeling, we show that the recurring mid-water methane...... peak in Lake Stechlin, northeast Germany, was not dependent on methane input from the littoral zone or bottom sediment or on the presence of known micro-anoxic zones. The methane peak repeatedly overlapped with oxygen oversaturation in the seasonal thermocline. Incubation experiments and isotope...... analysis indicated active methane production, which was likely linked to photosynthesis and/or nitrogen fixation within the oxygenated water, whereas lessening of methane oxidation by light allowed accumulation of methane in the oxygen-rich upper layer. Estimated methane efflux from the surface water...

  4. Cryopumping by liquid neon in 105...10-1 Pa range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batrakov, B.P.; Kravchenko, V.A.; Volkov, Yu.N.

    1982-01-01

    For forevacuum cryocondensation pumps conic pumping-out elements are suggested. The range of pumping out of angles at the conic top optimum from the point of view of specific quickness. Conic pUmping-out elements with ducted and external cooling are created; the dUcted pumping-out element can serve as a module when creatipg forevacuum condensation pumps of different efficiency. Specific quicknesses of pumping-out these elements when cooling them with liquid neon are measured. It is shown that in the case of durable pumping-out in the liquid phase a considerable role is played by components of the air condensed in the solid phase. Solid condensate that appears on cryosurface is net completely removed by streaming liquid condensate and brings about the decrease in the specific quickness of pumping-out. It is shown that an appropriate choice of the method of treating the internal surface of pumping out element affect the specific quickness of pumping out. The method of treatment is suggested and experimentally tested which permits to increase the specific fastness of pumping out. Experiments on the condensation of nitrogen and air in the solid phase on the surface cooled by liquid neon under conditions of transition and viseous regimes of the flow of pumped-out gas, are performed. It is shown that a considerable effect during pumping-out under these conditions is played by the thickness of the condensate layer and the presence of non-condensed admixtures in the pumped-out gas. In this case the specific quickness of pumping-out is much less than maximum theoretical

  5. A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Junxia; Luo Haiyun; Wang Xinxin

    2011-01-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure is investigated with electrical measurement and fast photography. It is found that a stable diffuse discharge can be easily generated in a gap with a gap space of 0.5-6 mm and is identified with a glow discharge. The first breakdown voltage of the gap is considerably higher than that of the same gap working in a stable diffuse discharge mode, which indicates that Penning ionization of neon metastables from the previous discharge with inevitable gas impurities plays an important role in the decrease in the breakdown voltage. Discharge patterns are observed in a gap shorter than 1 mm. From the experiments with a wedge-like gap, it is found that the discharge patterns are formed in the area with a higher applied electric field, which suggests that a higher applied electric field may cause a transition from a diffuse glow to discharge patterns.

  6. Simulations of Neon Pellets for Plasma Disruption Mitigation in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosviel, Nicolas; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Numerical studies of the ablation of neon pellets in tokamaks in the plasma disruption mitigation parameter space have been performed using a time-dependent pellet ablation model based on the front tracking code FronTier-MHD. The main features of the model include the explicit tracking of the solid pellet/ablated gas interface, a self-consistent evolving potential distribution in the ablation cloud, JxB forces, atomic processes, and an improved electrical conductivity model. The equation of state model accounts for atomic processes in the ablation cloud as well as deviations from the ideal gas law in the dense, cold layers of neon gas near the pellet surface. Simulations predict processes in the ablation cloud and pellet ablation rates and address the sensitivity of pellet ablation processes to details of physics models, in particular the equation of state.

  7. Quenching of the OH and nitrogen molecular emission by methane addition in an Ar capacitively coupled plasma to remove spectral interference in lead determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, T., E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, M., E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, A.I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, E., E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.r [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, M., E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, E., E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.co [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2010-07-15

    A new method is proposed to remove the spectral interference on elements in atomic fluorescence spectrometry by quenching of the molecular emission of the OH radical (A{sup 2{Sigma}+} {yields} X{sup 2{Pi}}) and N{sub 2} second positive system (C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} {yields} B{sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}) in the background spectrum of medium power Ar plasmas. The experiments were carried out in a radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma (275 W, 27.12 MHz) by CH{sub 4} addition. The quenching is the result of the high affinity of OH radical for a hydrogen atom from the CH{sub 4} molecule and the collisions of the second kind between nitrogen excited molecules and CH{sub 4}, respectively. The decrease of the emission of N{sub 2} second positive system in the presence of CH{sub 4} is also the result of the deactivation of the metastable argon atoms that could excite the nitrogen molecules. For flow rates of 0.7 l min{sup -1} Ar with addition of 7.5 ml min{sup -1} CH{sub 4}, the molecular emission of OH and N{sub 2} was completely removed from the plasma jet spectrum at viewing heights above 60 mm. The molecular emission associated to CH and CH{sub 2} species was not observed in the emission spectrum of Ar/CH{sub 4} plasma in the ultraviolet range. The method was experimented for the determination of Pb at 283.31 nm by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrodeless discharge lamp and a multichannel microspectrometer. The detection limit was 35 ng ml{sup -1}, 2-3 times better than in atomic emission spectrometry using the same plasma source, and similar to that in hollow cathode lamp microwave plasma torch atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  8. Coherent rho+ production in neutrino-neon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagh, H.C.; Bingham, H.H.; Lawry, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Coherent rho + production on neon nuclei has been observed in charged-current events in a neutrino bubble-chamber experiment. The incident neutrino energy was 10--320 GeV, with a median event energy of 80 GeV. The rate per charged-current event was (0.28 +- 0.10)%. Comparison was made to vector-meson-dominance predictions; agreement with the overall rate, but disagreement at high neutrino energies and at high Q 2 , was found

  9. Biological effects of accelerated boron, carbon, and neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryev, Yu.G.; Ryzhov, N.I.; Popov, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of accelerated boron, carbon, and neon ions on various biological materials were determined. The accelerated ions included 10 B, 11 B, 12 C, 20 Ne, 22 Ne, and 40 Ar. Gamma radiation and x radiation were used as references in the experiments. Among the biological materials used were mammalian cells and tissues, yeasts, unicellular algae (chlorella), and hydrogen bacteria. The results of the investigation are given and the biophysical aspects of the problem are discussed

  10. Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John T.; Stanley, Emily H.; Spawn, Seth A.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Stream and river carbon dioxide emissions are an important component of the global carbon cycle. Methane emissions from streams could also contribute to regional or global greenhouse gas cycling, but there are relatively few data regarding stream and river methane emissions. Furthermore, the available data do not typically include the ebullitive (bubble-mediated) pathway, instead focusing on emission of dissolved methane by diffusion or convection. Here, we show the importance of ebullitive methane emissions from small streams in the regional greenhouse gas balance of a lake and wetland-dominated landscape in temperate North America and identify the origin of the methane emitted from these well-oxygenated streams. Stream methane flux densities from this landscape tended to exceed those of nearby wetland diffusive fluxes as well as average global wetland ebullitive fluxes. Total stream ebullitive methane flux at the regional scale (103 Mg C yr−1; over 6400 km2) was of the same magnitude as diffusive methane flux previously documented at the same scale. Organic-rich stream sediments had the highest rates of bubble release and higher enrichment of methane in bubbles, but glacial sand sediments also exhibited high bubble emissions relative to other studied environments. Our results from a database of groundwater chemistry support the hypothesis that methane in bubbles is produced in anoxic near-stream sediment porewaters, and not in deeper, oxygenated groundwaters. Methane interacts with other key elemental cycles such as nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, which has implications for ecosystem changes such as drought and increased nutrient loading. Our results support the contention that streams, particularly those draining wetland landscapes of the northern hemisphere, are an important component of the global methane cycle.

  11. Neon dewar for the X-ray spectrometer onboard Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, R. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara 229-8510 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujimoto@isas.jaxa.jp; Mitsuda, K. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara 229-8510 (Japan); Hirabayashi, M. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI), 5-2 Sobiraki-cho, Niihama 792-8588 (Japan); Narasaki, K. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI), 5-2 Sobiraki-cho, Niihama 792-8588 (Japan); Breon, S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Boyle, R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Di Pirro, M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Volz, S.M. [NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546-0001 (United States); Kelley, R.L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The X-ray spectrometer (XRS) onboard Suzaku is the first X-ray microcalorimeter array in orbit. The sensor array is operated at 60mK, which is attained by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and superfluid liquid helium. The neon dewar is a vacuum-insulated container for the XRS. The requirements for the XRS dewar are to maintain the detector and the cryogenic system under the mechanical environment at launch ({approx}15G), and to attain a lifetime of 3 years in a near-earth orbit. It is characterized with adoptions of solid neon as the second cryogen and a mechanical cooler, design optimization of the support straps for the neon tank to reduce the heat load as much as possible, and shock absorbers to mitigate the mechanical environment at launch. Microphonics from the mechanical cooler was one of the concerns for the detector performance, but the ground test results proved that they do not interfere with the detector. After about 1 month in orbit, its thermal performance showed that the dewar potentially achieves its design goals.

  12. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A Resource for Community Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2017-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction of the five NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the near future. Additionally, we include information (i.e. timelines and procedures) on requesting MDPs for PI led projects. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs are designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs are comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach. More specifically, the MDPs include the capability to make tower based measures of ecosystem exchange, radiation, and precipitation in conjunction with baseline soils data such as CO2 flux, and soil temperature and moisture. An aquatics module is also available with the MDP to facilitate research integrating terrestrial and aquatic processes. Ultimately, the NEON MDPs provide a tool for linking PI led research to the continental scale data sets collected by NEON.

  13. Effects of dehydrated lucerne and soya bean meal on milk production and composition, nutrient digestion, and methane and nitrogen losses in dairy cows receiving two different forages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreau, M; Ferlay, A; Rochette, Y; Martin, C

    2014-03-01

    Dehydrated lucerne is used as a protein source in dairy cow rations, but little is known about the effects of lucerne on greenhouse gas production by animals. Eight Holstein dairy cows (average weight: 582 kg) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. They received diets based on either maize silage (M) or grass silage (G) (45% of diet on dry matter (DM) basis), with either soya bean meal (15% of diet DM) completed with beet pulp (15% of diet DM) (SP) or dehydrated lucerne (L) (30% of diet DM) as protein sources; MSP, ML, GSP and GL diets were calculated to meet energy requirements for milk production by dairy cows and degradable protein for rumen microbes. Dry matter intake (DMI) did not differ among diets (18.0 kg/day DMI); milk production was higher with SP diets than with L diets (26.0 v. 24.1 kg/day), but milk production did not vary with forage type. Milk fatty-acid (FA) composition was modified by both forage and protein sources: L and G diets resulted in less saturated FA, less linoleic acid, more trans-monounsaturated FA, and more linolenic acid than SP and M diets, respectively. Enteric methane (CH4) production, measured by the SF6 tracer method, was higher for G diets than for M diets, but did not differ with protein source. The same effects were observed when CH4 was expressed per kg milk. Minor effects of diets on rumen fermentation pattern were observed. Manure CH4 emissions estimated from faecal organic matter were negatively related to diet digestibility and were thus higher for L than SP diets, and higher for M than G diets; the resulting difference in total CH4 production was small. Owing to diet formulation constraints, N intake was higher for SP than for L diets; interaction between forage type and protein source was significant for N intake. The same statistical effects were found for N in milk. Faecal and urinary N losses were determined from total faeces and urine collection. Faecal N output was lower for M than for G diets but

  14. Low pressure broadening and shift of the 540.06 nm line of neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielski, A.; Dokurno, W.; Szudy, J.; Wolnikowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    The collision broadening and shift of the 540.06 nm line of neon emitted from a low pressure glow discharge in pure neon and a neon-helium mixture have been measured. The values of the broadening and shift coefficients were determined and compared with the results of calculations based on the Lindholm-Foley impact theory assuming a Lennard-Jones potential. The results for pure neon demonstrate the inadequacy of the Lennard-Jones potential for the Ne-Ne interaction. (orig.)

  15. Coalbed Methane Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coalbed Methane Outreach Program, voluntary program seeking to reduce methane emissions from coal mining activities. CMOP promotes profitable recovery/use of coal mine methane (CMM), addressing barriers to using CMM instead of emitting it to atmosphere.

  16. Effect of nitrogen fertilizer and/or rice straw amendment on methanogenic archaeal communities and methane production from a rice paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qiongli; Huang, Yizong; Wang, Fenghua; Nie, Sanan; Nicol, Graeme W; Yao, Huaiying; Ding, Longjun

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen fertilization and returning straw to paddy soil are important factors that regulate CH4 production. To evaluate the effect of rice straw and/or nitrate amendment on methanogens, a paddy soil was anaerobically incubated for 40 days. The results indicated that while straw addition increased CH4 production and the abundances of mcrA genes and their transcripts, nitrate amendment showed inhibitory effects on them. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis based on mcrA gene revealed that straw addition obviously changed methanogenic community structure. Based on mcrA gene level, straw-alone addition stimulated Methanosarcinaceaes at the early stage of incubation (first 11 days), but nitrate showed inhibitory effect. The relative abundance of Methanobacteriaceae was also stimulated by straw addition during the first 11 days. Furthermore, Methanosaetaceae were enriched by nitrate-alone addition after 11 days, while Methanocellaceae were enriched by nitrate addition especially within the first 5 days. The transcriptional methanogenic community indicated more dynamic and complicated responses to straw and/or nitrate addition. Based on mcrA transcript level, nitrate addition alone resulted in the increase of Methanocellaceae and the shift from Methanosarcinaceae to Methanosaetaceae during the first 5 days of incubation. Straw treatments increased the relative abundance of Methanobacteriaceae after 11 days. These results demonstrate that nitrate addition influences methanogens which are transcriptionally and functionally active and can alleviate CH4 production associated with straw amendment in paddy soil incubations, presumably through competition for common substrates between nitrate-utilizing organisms and methanogens.

  17. CYANOBACTERIA FOR MITIGATING METHANE EMISSION FROM SUBMERGED PADDY FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upasana Mishra; Shalini Anand [Department of Environmental Studies, Inderprastha Engineering College, Sahibabad, Ghaziabad (India)

    2008-09-30

    Atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas with high absorption potential for infrared radiation, is responsible for one forth of the total anticipated warming. It is forming a major part of green house gases, next after carbon dioxide. Its concentration has been increasing alarmingly on an average at the rate of one percent per year. Atmospheric methane, originating mainly from biogenic sources such as paddy fields, natural wetlands and landfills, accounts for 15-20% of the world's total anthropogenic methane emission. With intensification of rice cultivation in coming future, methane emissions from paddy fields are anticipated to increase. India's share in world's rice production is next after to China and likewise total methane emission from paddy fields also. Methane oxidation through planktophytes, particularly microalgae which are autotrophic and abundant in rice rhizospheres, hold promise in controlling methane emission from submerged paddy fields. The present study is focused on the role of nitrogen fixing, heterocystous cyanobacteria and Azolla (a water fern harboring a cyanobacterium Anabaena azollae) as biological sink for headspace concentration of methane in flooded soils. In this laboratory study, soil samples containing five potent nitrogen fixer cyanobacterial strains from paddy fields, were examined for their methane reducing potential. Soil sample without cyanobacterial strain was tested and taken as control. Anabaena sp. was found most effective in inhibiting methane concentration by 5-6 folds over the control. Moist soil cores treated with chemical nitrogen, urea, in combination with cyanobacteria mixture, Azolla microphylla or cyanobacteria mixture plus Azolla microphylla exhibited significance reduction in the headspace concentration of methane than the soil cores treated with urea alone. Contrary to other reports, this study also demonstrates that methane oxidation in soil core samples from paddy fields was stimulated by

  18. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  19. Computer modeling of a small neon gas-puff pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullschmied, J.

    1996-01-01

    The macroscopic dynamics of a cylindrical gas-puff pinch and conditions of radiation plasma collapse are studied by using a one-dimensional ('mechanical') computer model. Besides the Joule plasma heating, compressional heating, magnetic field freezing in a plasma and recombination losses, also the real temperature- and density-dependences of radiation plasma loss are taken into account. The results of calculations are compared with experimental data taken from a small neon-puff z-pinch experiment operated at the Institute of Plasma Physics in Prague. (author). 7 figs., 11 refs

  20. Optimizing Sampling Efficiency for Biomass Estimation Across NEON Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, H. H.; Meier, C. L.; Spencer, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the course of 30 years, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will measure plant biomass and productivity across the U.S. to enable an understanding of terrestrial carbon cycle responses to ecosystem change drivers. Over the next several years, prior to operational sampling at a site, NEON will complete construction and characterization phases during which a limited amount of sampling will be done at each site to inform sampling designs, and guide standardization of data collection across all sites. Sampling biomass in 60+ sites distributed among 20 different eco-climatic domains poses major logistical and budgetary challenges. Traditional biomass sampling methods such as clip harvesting and direct measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI) involve collecting and processing plant samples, and are time and labor intensive. Possible alternatives include using indirect sampling methods for estimating LAI such as digital hemispherical photography (DHP) or using a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. These LAI estimations can then be used as a proxy for biomass. The biomass estimates calculated can then inform the clip harvest sampling design during NEON operations, optimizing both sample size and number so that standardized uncertainty limits can be achieved with a minimum amount of sampling effort. In 2011, LAI and clip harvest data were collected from co-located sampling points at the Central Plains Experimental Range located in northern Colorado, a short grass steppe ecosystem that is the NEON Domain 10 core site. LAI was measured with a LI-COR 2200 Plant Canopy Analyzer. The layout of the sampling design included four, 300 meter transects, with clip harvests plots spaced every 50m, and LAI sub-transects spaced every 10m. LAI was measured at four points along 6m sub-transects running perpendicular to the 300m transect. Clip harvest plots were co-located 4m from corresponding LAI transects, and had dimensions of 0.1m by 2m. We conducted regression analyses

  1. Multiple pulse traveling wave excitation of neon-like germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, J. C.; Nilsen, J.; Silva, L. B. da

    1995-01-01

    Traveling wave excitation has been shown to significantly increase the output intensity of the neon-like germanium x-ray laser. The driving laser pulse consisted of three 100 ps Gaussian laser pulses separated by 400 ps. Traveling wave excitation was employed by tilting the wave front of the driving laser by 45 degrees to match the propagation speed of the x-ray laser photons along the length of the target. We show results of experiments with the traveling wave, with no traveling wave, and against the traveling wave and comparisons to a numerical model. Gain was inferred from line intensity measurements at two lengths

  2. Methane uptake in urban forests and lawns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter M. Groffman; Richard V. Pouyat

    2009-01-01

    The largest natural biological sink for the radiatively active trace gas methane (CH4) is bacteria in soils that consume CH4 as an energy and carbon source. This sink has been shown to be sensitive to nitrogen (N) inputs and alterations of soil physical conditions. Given this sensitivity, conversion of native ecosystems to...

  3. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacox, Marilyn E. [Optical Technology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  4. Opacity test using a neon-seeded theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, D.B.

    1980-02-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission from a neon-seeded high-density theta-pinch has been observed for comparison with theoretical radiation emission calculations. The plasma was created in a 25-cm-long theta-coil with 90-kG field having a 3.0-μs quarter period. A gas fill of 1 torr of helium + 2% neon was used. Observation of the HeII 4686 line/continuum ratio gave an electron temperature of 25 +- 4 eV. Shadowgraphs of the plasma radius, taken with a ruby laser, gave an electron density of 0.9 +- 0.09 x 10 18 cm -3 . The VUV emission was observed in radial view and with time resolution with a 2.2-m grazing-incidence monochromator equipped with a photomultiplier and p-terphenyl scintillator. Thin foils of carbon and aluminum were used as filters to absorb stray light and pass emission in the 44- to 100-A region

  5. Atomic kinetics of a neon photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Daniel C.; Mancini, Roberto; Bailey, James E.; Loisel, Guillaume; Rochau, Gregory; ZAPP Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    We discuss an experimental effort to study the atomic kinetics in astrophysically relevant photoionized plasmas via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted at the collapse of a Z-pinch to heat and backlight a photoionized plasma contained within a cm-scale gas cell placed at a variable distance from the Z-pinch and filled with neon gas pressures in the range from 3.5 to 30 Torr. The experimental platform affords an order of magnitude range in the ionization parameter characterizing the photoionized plasma at the peak of the x-ray drive from about 5 to 80 erg*cm/s. Thus, the experiment allows for the study of trends in ionization distribution as a function of the ionization parameter. An x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of time-integrated and/or time-gated configurations is used to collect absorption spectra. The spectra show line absorption by several ionization stages of neon, including Be-, Li-, He-, and H-like ions. Analysis of these spectra yields ion areal densities and charge state distributions, which can be compared with simulation results from atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature is extracted from level population ratios of nearby energy levels in Li- and Be-like ions, which can be used to test heating models of photoionized plasmas.

  6. NEON: Transforming Environmental Data into Free, Open Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, B.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. NEON is a project of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with many other U.S. agencies and NGOs cooperating. The Observatory’s construction plans call for 60 sites distributed across 20 ecoclimatic Domains. Data will be collected from strategically selected sites within each Domain and synthesized into information products that can be used to describe changes in the nation’s ecosystem through space and time. Sites are arrayed across different land-use types in order to understand large-scale environmental drivers affect biodiversity, ecohydrology, biogeochemistry, and disease ecology across the US continent. NEON is an instrument that listens to the pulse of the US continental ecosystem: infrastructure deployed at these sites will collect an average of over 500 primary measurements at each site, including annual high-resolution airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data. These primary measurements will be transformed by a state-of-the-art cyberinfrastruture into over 100 higher-order data products. All measurements, data products, algorithms used to compute the data products, and protocols used to collect the primary measurements will be freely available to the public and assessable over the internet. The information products, including selected socio-economic datasets from cooperating Federal agencies, will be served in standard formats, grid-sizes, and geographical projections. This type of information is anticipated to have a wide range of uses, including ecological forecasting, education, public engagement, socio-economic analyses, decision support for climate-change adaptation and mitigation, resource management, and environmental risk management. Open data, interoperability, an open and integrated observation infrastructure, public engagement, and a

  7. Gd-123 bulk field pole magnets cooled with condensed neon for axial-gap type synchronous motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, T.; Kimura, Y.; Sugyo, D.; Yamaguchi, K.; Izumi, M.; Ida, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Miki, M.

    2008-01-01

    We have conducted to develop an axial-gap type synchronous propulsion motor with Gd-bulk HTS field pole magnets. It has been established on the fundamental technology upon the liquid nitrogen cooling. In the present study, we aimed an output improvement of the motor by the magnetic flux density enhancement of the bulk HTS, in a word, the trapped magnetic flux density on the HTS bulk. The output of the motor depends on the physics of the motor, the magnetic flux density, and the electric current density flowing through the armature. We have employed a condensed neon with a helium GM refrigerator. The bulk HTS placed on the rotor disk inside the motor frame was successfully cooled down with circulating condensed neon. The temperature at the bulk HTS surface reached 38 K. Upon magnetization, we developed controlled magnetic field density distribution coil (CMDC) composed of a couple of pulsed copper armature coil. In the magnetization procedure, with decreasing magnetization temperature, minute by minute, after Sander and Kamijyo that the step cooling magnetization method was used. In addition, the CMDC coil has enabled to control the applied flux distribution. Three parameters as the temperature, the applied magnetic field, and the effective applied flux density distribution were changed within eight times pulsed magnetizations in total. Up to 4th pulsed magnetization, we kept (1st step) high temperature, and subsequent pulsed magnetizations were done at low temperature. As a result, the highest maximum trapped magnetic flux density was reached 1.31 T, about 2.5 times compared to the value obtained upon cooling with liquid nitrogen. Consequently, the output of the motor has been enhanced to 25 kW from 10 kW taken in the previous operation

  8. Non-oxidative conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons over ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SOURABH MISHRA

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... (Syn-gas, CO+H2) formation via steam reforming, dry reforming or partial oxidation of methane ... Micromeritics ASAP 2010 apparatus at liquid nitrogen tem- perature. Nitrogen (N2) was the adsorbate ... some runs were carried out in triplicate and mass balance for all the runs was measured. Runs with a ...

  9. Isotopic effects in the neon fixed point: uncertainty of the calibration data correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steur, Peter P. M.; Pavese, Franco; Fellmuth, Bernd; Hermier, Yves; Hill, Kenneth D.; Seog Kim, Jin; Lipinski, Leszek; Nagao, Keisuke; Nakano, Tohru; Peruzzi, Andrea; Sparasci, Fernando; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, Anna; Tamura, Osamu; Tew, Weston L.; Valkiers, Staf; van Geel, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The neon triple point is one of the defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). Although recognizing that natural neon is a mixture of isotopes, the ITS-90 definition only states that the neon should be of ‘natural isotopic composition’, without any further requirements. A preliminary study in 2005 indicated that most of the observed variability in the realized neon triple point temperatures within a range of about 0.5 mK can be attributed to the variability in isotopic composition among different samples of ‘natural’ neon. Based on the results of an International Project (EUROMET Project No. 770), the Consultative Committee for Thermometry decided to improve the realization of the neon fixed point by assigning the ITS-90 temperature value 24.5561 K to neon with the isotopic composition recommended by IUPAC, accompanied by a quadratic equation to take the deviations from the reference composition into account. In this paper, the uncertainties of the equation are discussed and an uncertainty budget is presented. The resulting standard uncertainty due to the isotopic effect (k = 1) after correction of the calibration data is reduced to (4 to 40) μK when using neon of ‘natural’ isotopic composition or to 30 μK when using 20Ne. For comparison, an uncertainty component of 0.15 mK should be included in the uncertainty budget for the neon triple point if the isotopic composition is unknown, i.e. whenever the correction cannot be applied.

  10. Interchannel interactions in high-energetic radiationless transitions of neon-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsche, S.; Zschornack, G.; Musiol, G.; Soff, G.

    1990-07-01

    Relativistic K-LL Auger transition rates in intermediate coupling including interchannel interactions are presented for nine ions in the neon-isoelectronic sequence up to uranium. For neutral neon a comparison with experimental data is given. We demonstrate for the first time, that intercontinuum interactions result in a remarkable redistribution of individual transition rates even in high-energetic transitions. For instance, channel mixing shifts the K-L 1 L 1 rate by about 4% and the K-L 3 L 3 (J = 0) rate by about 11% in neon-like uranium, while total Auger rates are almost not affected. (orig.)

  11. Color Appearance of the Neon Color Spreading Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Vusić

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As a part of this paper, the influence of various parameters within the target process of graphic reproduction on the color appearance of the neon color spreading effect was investigated. The shift in a color appearance qualitatively is determined through the calculation of changes in perceptual attributes of color, i.e. differences in lightness, chroma and hue. The influence of different media (printed images, and LCD display in the “cross-media” system was examined, as well as the role of the inserted segment color choice and background of the primary stimulus as an element of design solutions. These parameters were evaluated in a variety of ambient conditions and under the observation of three CIE standard light sources and illuminants. It was found that it was mostly the changes of the chroma and lightness. The change in the color hue is the lowest.

  12. Spectroscopic data for highly charged neon-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shichang; Sun Yongsheng; Han Guoxiang; Yang Hanyang

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to provide the immense amount of atomic data needed for applications to the ICF and X-ray laser research work in our institute and for the compilation-evaluation work in Chinese Research Association for Atomic and Molecular Data. Using the non-relativistic Hartree-Fock self-consistent field method including the relativistic mass-velocity and Darwin terms in the Hamiltonian (HFR) proposed by Dr.R.Cowan, we have calculated atomic structure data and spectroscopic data for the Neon-like Fe X VII, Ni X IX, Cu XX Ge XX III and Se XX V ions. In the calculations the configuration-interaction effects were taken into account. The centrifugation average energies, 88 energy levels, all possible electric dipole transition wavelengths, oscillator strengths are presented, and in order to discuss the accuracy of the present results we have also compared them with other works

  13. Green's function calculation of the satellite spectrum of neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheifets, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    The single-hole Green's function with the lowest-order self-energy part has been used to calculate energies and spectroscopic factors of the neon ion ground and excited states which originated from the removal of the 2s and 2p valence electrons. The simplest two-hole-one-electron ion sates were included explicitly to the self-energy. More complex (m+l)-hole-m-electron states were treated implicitly by using the experimental energy of the two holes in the simplest ion states. The results of the calculation are found to be consistent with experimental satellite line positions and intensities obtained from recent photoionization and electron impact ionization measurements. 20 refs., 5 tabs

  14. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A Resource for Community Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2015-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction and validation of the NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the future. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs will be designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to ~ 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs will be comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach.

  15. Recent results from neutrino interactions in heavy neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltay, C.; Caroumbalis, D.; French, H.

    1978-01-01

    We report recent results from an analysis of 100,000 pictures from the Fermilab 15 ft. bubble chamber filled with heavy neon and exposed to the double horn focused, wideband ν/sub μ/ beam. We have found 164 dilepton (μ - e + ) events with 33 vees, in good agreement with the GIM model of charm production. We have also observed the production of the charmed D 0 meson, followed by the decay D 0 → K 0 π + π - , at a rate of (0.7 +- 0.2)% of all charged current events. We have carried out searches for charm changing neutral current processes and for heavy lepton production, both with negative results; the upper limits obtained in these searches are given

  16. Recent results from neutrino interactions in heavy neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalelkar, M.; Baltay, C.; Caroumbalis, D.

    1978-01-01

    Recent results are reported from an analysis of 100,000 pictures of the Fermilab 15 ft bubble chamber filled with heavy neon and exposed to the double horn focused, wideband ν/sub μ/ beam. There were 164 dilepton (μ - e + ) events with 33 vees, in good agreement with the GIM model of charm production. Also observed were the production of the charmed D 0 meson, followed by the decay D 0 → K 0 π + π - , at a rate of (0.7 +- 0.2)% of all charged current events. From a subsample of film, four events of the purely leptonic neutrino--electron elastic scattering process were found. 3 references

  17. Recent results from neutrino interactions in heavy neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltay, C.; Caroumbalis, D.; French, H.

    1978-01-01

    Recent results are reported from an analysis of 100,000 pictures of the Fermilab 15 ft. bubble chamber filled with heavy neon and exposed to the double horn focused, wideband ν/sub μ/ beam. There were 164 dilepton (μ - e + ) events with 33 vees, in good agreement with the GIM model of charm production. Also the production of the charmed D 0 meson, followed by the decay D 0 → K 0 π + π - , at a rate of (0.7 +- 0.2)% of all charged current events were observed. Searches were carried out for charm changing neutral current processes and for heavy lepton production, both with negative results; the upper limits obtained in these searches are given

  18. Global Methane Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Global Methane Initiative promotes cost-effective, near-term methane recovery through partnerships between developed and developing countries, with participation from the private sector, development banks, and nongovernmental organizations.

  19. Fragmentation dynamics of ionized neon trimer inside helium nanodroplets: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhommeau, David; Viel, Alexandra; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2004-06-22

    We report a theoretical study of the fragmentation dynamics of Ne(3) (+) inside helium nanodroplets, following vertical ionization of the neutral neon trimer. The motion of the neon atoms is treated classically, while transitions between the electronic states of the ionic cluster are treated quantum mechanically. A diatomics-in-molecules description of the potential energy surfaces is used, in a minimal basis set consisting of three effective p orbitals on each neon atom for the missing electron. The helium environment is modeled by a friction force acting on the neon atoms when their speed exceeds the Landau velocity. A reasonable range of values for the corresponding friction coefficient is obtained by comparison with existing experimental measurements. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Improved energy confinement with neon injection in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, G.M.; Jackson, G.L.; West, W.P. Groebner, R.J.; Schaffer, M.J.; Allen, S.L.; Whyte, D.G.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors will report the first direct measurements of the fully stripped neon 10 + density profile in a plasma with enhanced energy confinement due to neon injection. This is made with a calibrated charge exchange recombination (CER) system. It is found that the neon 10 + density is peaked like the electron density with a slightly higher concentration towards the edge. The good news is that the neon 10 + fraction is less than 1% (normalized to the electron density). The radial electric field can also be computed from the CER measurements on DIII-D. The shear in the E x B velocity is found to exceed the maximum growth rate of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode over part of the profile, a condition for the suppression of turbulent transport. This agrees with the reduced power balance thermal diffusivities near the magnetic axis

  1. Laser optogalvanic wavelength calibration with a commercial hollow cathode iron - neon discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinming; Nur, Abdullahi H.; Misra, Prabhakar

    1994-01-01

    351 optogalvanic transitions have been observed in the 337 - 598 nm wavelength region using an iron - neon hollow cathode discharge lamp and a pulsed tunable dye laser. 223 of these have been identified as transitions associated with neon energy levels. These optogalvanic transitions have allowed, in conjunction with interference fringes recorded concomitantly with an etalon, the calibration of the dye laser wavelength with 0.3/cm accuracy.

  2. Coherent production of ρ - mesons in charged current antineutrino-neon interactions in BEBC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marage, P.; Aderholz, M.; Allport, P.; Armenise, N.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F. W.; Burkot, W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Guy, J.; Hamisi, F.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Katz, U. F.; Klein, H.; Matsinos, E.; Middleton, R. P.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Schmitz, N.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallée, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.; Wittek, W.

    1987-09-01

    Coherent production of ρ - mesons in charged current antineutrino interactions on neon nuclei is studied in the BEBC bubble chamber exposed to the CERN SPS wide band beam. The cross section is measured to be (95±25)·10-40 cm2 per neon nucleus, averaged over the beam energy spectrum. The distributions of kinematical variables and the absolute value of the cross section are in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the CVC hypothesis and the vector meson dominance model.

  3. Coherent production of ρ- mesons in charged current antineutrino-neon interactions in BEBC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marage, P.; Bertrand, D.; Sacton, J.; Aderholz, M.; Katz, U.F.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.; Varvell, K.; Wells, J.; Baton, J.P.; Kasper, P.; Neveu, M.; Clayton, E.F.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Matsinos, E.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.

    1987-01-01

    Coherent production of ρ - mesons in charged antineutrino interactions on neon nuclei is studied in the BEBC bubbler chamber exposed to the CERN SPS wide band beam. The cross section is measured to be (95±25).10 -40 cm 2 per neon nucleus, averaged over the beam energy spectrum. The distributions of kinematical variables and the absolute value of the cross section are in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the CVC hypothesis and the vector meson dominance model. (orig.)

  4. Development of a sodium-pump/neon-lasant photopumped soft X-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephanakis, S.J.; Apruzese, J.P.; Burkhalter, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Resonant photopumping of heliumlike neon by heliumlike sodium is investigated to extend this potentially efficient technique for inversion and lasing to shorter wavelengths. Properties of the sodium-pump plasma and the neon-lasant plasma required to optimize fluorescence and lasing are determined. The implosion of a sodium-bearing plasma with a megampere pulsed-power driver (Gamble II) is used to produce a linear Z-pinch with up to 25 GW of sodium-pump-line radiation. A separate neon plasma, driven by part of the return current form the imploding sodium plasma, is created parallel to the sodium line source at a distance of 5 cm. Implosion requirements for the neon plasma and its dynamics in the Gamble II return-current geometry are described. Evidence for population inversion is indicated by fluorescence enhancement of the 11-A resonance line from the n = 4 level of neon when pumped by sodium. The neon spectra are in qualitative agreement with calculations based on the sodium-pump power. Improvements in the experiment required to achieve lasing are discussed

  5. High-pressure oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Gersen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Methane oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures was investigated in a laminar flow reactor and in a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor experiments were conducted at 700–900 K and 100 bar for fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) ranging from 0.06 to 19.7, all highly...... diluted in nitrogen. It was found that under the investigated conditions, the onset temperature for methane oxidation ranged from 723 K under reducing conditions to 750 K under stoichiometric and oxidizing conditions. The RCM experiments were carried out at pressures of 15–80 bar and temperatures of 800......–1250 K under stoichiometric and fuel-lean (Φ=0.5) conditions. Ignition delays, in the range of 1–100 ms, decreased monotonically with increasing pressure and temperature. A chemical kinetic model for high-pressure methane oxidation was established, with particular emphasis on the peroxide chemistry...

  6. Intercomparison of Remotely Sensed Vegetation Indices, Ground Spectroscopy, and Foliar Chemistry Data from NEON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulslander, D.; Warren, J. N.; Weintraub, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Hyperspectral imaging systems can be used to produce spectral reflectance curves giving rich information about composition, relative abundances of materials, mixes and combinations. Indices based on just a few spectral bands have been used for over 40 years to study vegetation health, mineral abundance, and more. These indices are much simpler to visualize and use than a full hyperspectral data set which may contain over 400 bands. Yet historically, it has been difficult to directly relate remotely sensed spectral indices to quantitative biophysical properties significant to forest ecology such as canopy nitrogen, lignin, and chlorophyll. This linkage is a critical piece in enabling the detection of high value ecological information, usually only available from labor-intensive canopy foliar chemistry sampling, to the geographic and temporal coverage available via remote sensing. Previous studies have shown some promising results linking ground-based data and remotely sensed indices, but are consistently limited in time, geographic extent, and land cover type. Moreover, previous studies are often focused on tuning linkage algorithms for the purpose of achieving good results for only one study site or one type of vegetation, precluding development of more generalized algorithms. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a unique system of 47 terrestrial sites covering all of the major eco-climatic domains of the US, including AK, HI, and Puerto Rico. These sites are regularly monitored and sampled using uniform instrumentation and protocols, including both foliar chemistry sampling and remote sensing flights for high resolution hyperspectral, LiDAR, and digital camera data acquisition. In this study we compare the results of foliar chemistry analysis to the remote sensing vegetation indices and investigate possible sources for variance and difference through the use of the larger hyperspectral dataset as well as ground based spectrometer measurements of

  7. Enhancing continental-scale understanding of agriculture: Integrating the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) with existing research networks to address global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, G.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the sustainability of the world's food system and its contributions to feeding the world's population as well as to ensuring environmental sustainability of the planet. The elements of this grand challenge are by now well known. Analysis of agricultural sustainability is made more challenging by the fact that the local responses to these global drivers of change are extremely variable in space and time due to the biophysical and geopolitical heterogeneity across the United States, and the world. Utilizing research networks allows the scientific community to leverage existing knowledge, models and data to develop a framework for understanding the interplay between global change drivers, regional, and continental sustainability of US agriculture. For example, well-established instrumented and calibrated research networks will allow for the examination of the potential tradeoffs between: 1) crop production, 2) land use and carbon emissions and sequestration, 3) groundwater depletion, and 4) nitrogen dynamics. NEON represents a major investment in scientific infrastructure in support of ecological research at a continental scale and is intended to address multiple ecological grand challenges. NEON will collect data from automated sensors and sample organisms and ecological variables in 20 eco-climatic domains. We will provide examples of how NEON's full potential can be realized when these data are combined with long term experimental results and other sensor networks [e.g., Ameriflux, Fluxnet, the Long-term Ecological Research Program (LTER), the Long-term Agroecosystem Research Network (LTAR)], Critical Zone Observatory (CZO).

  8. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons by helium, neon, argon and molecular nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, R.H.J.; De Heer, F.J.; Luyken, H.J.; Van Wingerden, B.

    1976-01-01

    An electron spectrometer has been constructed for the study of elastic and inelastic electron scattering processes. Up to now the apparatus has been used to measure differential cross sections of electrons elastically scattered by He, Ne, Ar and N 2 . Direct absolute cross section measurements were performed on N 2 at 500 eV impact energy and at scattering angles between 5 0 and 9 0 . Relative cross section measurements were done on He, Ne, Ar and N 2 at impact energies between 100 and 3000 eV and scattering angles between 5 0 and 55 0 . The relative cross sections were put on an absolute scale by means of the apparatus calibration factor derived from the absolute measurements on N 2 . The experimental apparatus and procedure are described in detail. The results are discussed and compared with those of other experimental and theoretical groups. Analysis of the exponential behaviour of the differential cross section as a function of momentum transfer yielded apparent polarizabilities of the target. (author)

  9. Quantum scattering of neon from a nanotextured surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, A C; Huang, C; Allison, W; MacLaren, D A

    2009-01-01

    Phonon exchange is the usual cause of decoherence in atom-surface scattering. By including quantum effects in the treatment of Debye-Waller scattering, we show that phonon exchange becomes ineffective when the relevant phonon frequencies are high. The result explains the surprising observation of strong elastic scattering of Ne from a Cu(100) surface nanotextured with a c(2 x 2) Li adsorbate structure. We extend a previous model to describe the phonon spectra by an Einstein oscillator component with an admixture of a Debye spectrum. The Einstein oscillator represents the dominant, high frequency vibration of the adsorbate, normal to the surface, while the Debye spectrum represents the substrate contribution. Neon scattering is so slow that exciting the adsorbate mode has a low probability and is impossible if the incident energy is below the threshold. Thus, adsorbate vibrations are averaged out. A theoretical discussion and calculation shows that under such circumstances the vibrations of a light adsorbate do not contribute to the Debye-Waller effect, with the result that Ne scattering at thermal energies is quantum mechanical and largely elastic, explaining the high reflectivity and the diffraction peaks observed experimentally.

  10. Strange particle production in ν and anti ν neon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosetti, P.; Fritze, P.; Graessler, H.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Mermikides, M.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Butterworth, I.; Chima, J.S.; Clayton, E.; Iaselli, G.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Petrides, A.; Albajar, C.; Wells, J.

    1982-01-01

    The inclusive production of K 0 's and ν's has been investigated in neutrino and antineutrino interactions in BEBC, filled with a neon-hydrogen mixture. The inclusive rates for the 3083 (1022) ν(anti ν) induced charged current events are (23.0 +- 1.7)% ((21.9 +- 2.8)%) for K 0 's and (5.7 +- 0.7)% ((6.5 +- 1.2)%) for ν's. The general behaviour of the K 0 's and ν's is found to be similar to that in νp interactions and π + p interactions at lower . In the hadronic c.m.s. K 0 's are produced mostly forwards. ν's predominantly in the backward hemisphere. The data indicate that the K 0 's produced in anti ν interactions on average carry a larger fraction of the total available momentum than those in ν induced reactions. The dependences of the average transverse momentum on the variables Q 2 , W 2 and Bjorken x are presented. (orig.)

  11. Primordial atmosphere incorporation in planetary embryos and the origin of Neon in terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaupart, Etienne; Charnoz, Sebatien; Moreira, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    The presence of Neon in terrestrial planet mantles may be attributed to the implantation of solar wind in planetary precursors or to the dissolution of primordial solar gases captured from the accretionary disk into an early magma ocean. This is suggested by the Neon isotopic ratio similar to those of the Sun observed in the Earth mantle. Here, we evaluate the second hypothesis. We use general considerations of planetary accretion and atmospheric science. Using current models of terrestrial planet formation, we study the evolution of standard planetary embryos with masses in a range of 0.1-0.2 MEarth, where MEarth is the Earth's mass, in an annular region at distances between 0.5 and 1.5 Astronomical Units from the star. We determine the characteristics of atmospheres that can be captured by such embryos for a wide range of parameters and calculate the maximum amount of Neon that can be dissolved in the planet. Our calculations may be directly transposed to any other planet. However, we only know of the amount of Neon in the Earth's solid mantle. Thus we use Earth to discuss our results. We find that the amount of dissolved Neon is too small to account for the present-day Neon contents of the Earth's mantle, if the nebular gas disk completely disappears before the largest planetary embryos grow to be ∼0.2 MEarth. This leaves solar irradiation as the most likely source of Neon in terrestrial planets for the most standard case of planetary formation models.

  12. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  13. Transition rate diagrams and excitation of titanium in a glow discharge in argon and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Zdeněk; Steers, Edward B. M.; Pickering, Juliet C.

    2018-06-01

    Emission spectra of titanium in a Grimm-type glow discharge in argon and neon were studied using the formalism of transition rate diagrams. Ti I spectra in argon and neon discharges are similar, without signs of selective excitation, and populations of Ti I levels exhibit a decreasing trend as function of energy, except for some scatter. A major excitation process of Ti II in argon discharge is charge transfer from argon ions to neutral titanium. In neon discharge, a strong selective excitation was observed of Ti II levels at ≈13.3-13.4 eV relative to the Ti I ground state. It was attributed to charge transfer from doubly charged titanium ions to neutral titanium, while the Ti++ ions are produced by charge transfer and ionization of neutral titanium by neon ions. Cascade excitation is important for Ti II levels up to an energy of ≈13 eV relative to the Ti I ground state, both in argon and neon discharges.

  14. Study of reverse Brayton cryocooler with Helium-Neon mixture for HTS cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, A. K.; Ghosh, P.

    2017-12-01

    As observed in the earlier studies, helium is more efficient than neon as a refrigerant in a reverse Brayton cryocooler (RBC) from the thermodynamic point of view. However, the lower molecular weight of helium leads to higher refrigerant inventory as compared to neon. Thus, helium is suitable to realize the high thermodynamic efficiency of RBC whereas neon is appropriate for the compactness of the RBC. A binary mixture of helium and neon can be used to achieve high thermodynamic efficiency in the compact reverse Brayton cycle (RBC) based cryocooler. In this paper, an attempt has been made to analyze the thermodynamic performance of the RBC with a binary mixture of helium and neon as the working fluid to provide 1 kW cooling load for high temperature superconductor (HTS) power cables working with a temperature range of 50 K to 70 K. The basic RBC is simulated using Aspen HYSYS V8.6®, a commercial process simulator. Sizing of each component based on the optimized process parameters for each refrigerant is performed based on a computer code developed using Engineering Equation Solver (EES-V9.1). The recommendation is provided for the optimum mixture composition of the refrigerant based on the trade-off factors like thermodynamic efficiency such as the exergy efficiency and equipment considerations. The outcome of this study may be useful for recommending a suitable refrigerant for the RBC operating at a temperature level of 50 K to 70 K.

  15. Effect of combined misonidazole and accelerated neon ions on a human melanoma transplanted into nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, M.; Tenforde, T.; Curtis, S.; Malaise, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    The response to accelerated neon ions of human Nall melanomas growing in nude mice was measured by an in vitro colony-forming assay following in situ tumor irradiation in the midposition of a 10-cm extended-peak ionization region. Values of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for peak neon ions compared with 60 Coγ radiation were 3.2 and 3.4, respectively, at the 1% and 10% survival levels. Following irradiation with peak neon ions, the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was comparable to that observed after γ irradiation. When misonidazole (1 mg/g intraperitoneal dose) was administered in combination with extended-peak neon ions, the drug enhancement ratio (ER) at the 1% survival level was 1.5 if the tumors were removed and plated in vitro immediately following irradiation, and 1.9 if tumor excision and plating were delayed for greater than or equal to 6 hours. Administration of misonidazole completely inhibited PLD repair following either γ irradiation or extended peak neon-ion irradiation

  16. An experimental study on turbulent lifted flames of methane in coflow jets at elevated temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the effects of initial temperature variation on the stabilization characteristics of turbulent nonpremixed flames in coflow jets of methane fuel diluted by nitrogen. The typical behavior seen in the study

  17. Dew Frequency across the NEON Network from Infrared Radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, F.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Beysens, D.

    2017-12-01

    The surface energy budget is more difficult to close at night because of the absence of strong atmospheric turbulence, central in the eddy-covariance calculations. One approach to assessing the direction of the nocturnal latent heat flux is through studying the frequency and magnitude of dew formation in different ecosystems. However, most former dew studies on dew dynamics utilized artificial surfaces to collect dew, and did not have access to the surface temperature of natural surfaces in an ecosystem to provide a continuous whole-plot approach to constrain dew formation. Hourly in-situ measurements recently made available by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) of the radiometric surface temperature and the meteorological variables provide a unique opportunity to make continuous estimates of dew formation across 19 ecosystems (9 grasslands and 10 forests) at the plot-scale. Here, dew duration was calculated for each night based on the difference between the surface temperature and the dew point temperature of the air. The results from this analysis show that dew duration is limited by wind speed during the night, with a maximum dew yield at 1.1 m/s and no dew occurrence when the wind speed exceeds 7 m/s. This observation is consistent with previous studies but has been expanded here across multiple biomes to produce a well-defined turbulent limit on dew formation. The sensitivity of dew to wind speed arises because of the exhaustion of the water vapor supply close to the surface of the leaf at very low wind speed, and because the enhanced thermal exchange between the air and the surface counteracts dewfall at high wind speed. This well-defined wind speed limit that persists across sites and seasons could help to estimate the surface energy budget at night by constraining the latent heat flux.

  18. Utilization of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, J.B. [Gustavson Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in capturing coalbed methane (CBM gas), which constitutes a valuable source of clean burning energy. It is of importance to study the various potential uses of coalbed methane and to understand the various technologies required, as well as their economics and any institutional constraints. In industrialised countries, the uses of coalbed methane are almost solely dependent on microeconomics; coalbed methane must compete for a market against natural gas and other energy sources - and frequently, coalbed methane is not competitive against other energy sources. In developing countries, on the other hand, particularly where other sources of energy are in short supply, coalbed methane economics yield positive results. Here, constraints to development of CBM utilization are mainly lack of technology and investment capital. Sociological aspects such as attitude and cultural habits, may also have a strong negative influence. This paper outlines the economics of coalbed methane utilization, particularly its competition with natural gas, and touches upon the many different uses to which coalbed methane may be applied. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Sun, Miao; Caps, Valerie; Pelletier, Jeremie; Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2013-01-01

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin

  20. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of

  1. Challenges of fabricating plasmonic and photonic structures with Neon ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Fiutowski, Jacek; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    -established electron beam lithography and focussed ion beam milling (FIB) using Gallium ions. These techniques, however, are to some extend limited in their resolution, and in addition Gallium and Carbon are implanted and deposited into the plasmonic structures during FIB process, potentially changing plasmonic...... properties. We are currently studying the capabilities of focussed Helium and Neon ion beam milling for the fabricating of plasmonic and photonic devices. We found that Neon ion beam milling enables us to prepare plasmonic structures, such as trenches (see Fig. 1) and V-grooves without doping and alloying...... effects specific to Galium FIB. Neon FIB milling is superior to Helium FIB milling in terms of the processing speed and smaller levels of implanted ions. From our perspective it is the most promising technique for the fabrication of individual plasmonic devices with a few nanometers precision. The main...

  2. Photochemistry of the ozone-water complex in cryogenic neon, argon, and krypton matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Masashi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-12

    The photochemistry of ozone-water complexes and the wavelength dependence of the reactions were studied by matrix isolation FTIR spectrometry in neon, argon, and krypton matrixes. Hydrogen peroxide was formed upon the irradiation of UV light below 355 nm. Quantitative analyses of the reactant and product were performed to evaluate the matrix cage effect of the photoreaction. In argon and krypton matrixes, a bimolecular O((1)D) + H2O → H2O2 reaction was found to occur to form hydrogen peroxide, where the O((1)D) atom generated by the photolysis of ozone diffused in the cryogenic solids to encounter water. In a neon matrix, hydrogen peroxide was generated through intracage photoreaction of the ozone-water complex, indicating that a neon matrix medium is most appropriate to study the photochemistry of the ozone-water complex.

  3. NEON: the first continental-scale ecological observatory with airborne remote sensing of vegetation canopy biochemistry and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas U. Kampe; Brian R. Johnson; Michele Kuester; Michael. Keller

    2010-01-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ecological observation platform for discovering, understanding and forecasting the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on continental-scale ecology. NEON will operate for 30 years and gather long-term data on ecological response changes and on feedbacks with the geosphere, hydrosphere...

  4. Nuclear effect study on nucleon structure functions, in comparison with antineutrino interactions on neon and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, C.

    1984-03-01

    We have studied the nuclear effects on high energy antineutrino charged current interactions by comparing the data which were taken in the Bubble Chamber BEBC filled with Neon and Deuterium. On the one hand, the study of nuclear reinteractions gave us the possibility to estimate the formation time of hadrons. On the other hand, the comparison of structure functions does not show any significant difference between Neon and Deuterium. Though this result does not contradict the effects observed with charged leptons by the EMC and SLAC experiments, it is strongly incompatible with certain theoretical interpretations which implied a stronger effect in antineutrino interactions [fr

  5. Resonant photopumping of a neon lasant plasma by a sodium pump plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, F.C.; Apruzese, J.P.; Burkhalter, P.G.; Cooperstein, G.; Davis, J.; Mosher, D.; Ottinger, P.F.; Scherrer, V.E.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Mehlman, C.; Welch, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    Resonant photopumping of heliumlike neon by helium like sodium is being investigated to extend this pumping technique to the soft x-ray region. In the Na-pump/Ne-lasant system, the 1s 2 -1s2p 1 P 1 line of Na X at 11.0027 A differs by 2 parts in 10 4 from the 1s 2 -1s 4 p 1 P 1 line of Ne 1X at 11.0003 A. This wavelength difference corresponds to about one Doppler width at the sodium plasma temperatures (200-500 eV) required for strong Na X pump radiation. Sodium line radiation of sufficient power irradiating a properly prepared neon plasma will cause overpopulation of the Ne 1X n = 4 singlet level leading to lasing in the 4-3, 4-2, and possibly 3-2 singlet transitions. Experimentally, the current pulse from the NRL Gamble-II generator is used to produce side-by-side z-pinch plasmas of sodium fluoride (NaF) and neon. The discharges are viewed radially with x-ray diagnostics including time-integrated pinhole cameras, time-resolved x-ray diodes, and a time-integrated curved-crystal spectrograph. Measurements of the neon plasma indicate that a discharge current of about 200 kA is required to produce a neon lasant with a dominant heliumlike ground-state population. For fluorescence experiments, appropriate neon lasant conditions (density of about 10 18 cm -3 and temperature of 50-100 eV) must be produced at the time of the intense sodium pump-line radiation. Fluorescence is demonstrated by observing enhancement of the 4-1 line (He-γ) from the neon plasma relative to the 3-1 line (He-γ) when the neon is pumped by sodium. An increase in this γ-to-β ratio of 25% has been observed when the sodium pump radiation is present. The results of recent experiments are reported, and their implications for future experiments are discussed

  6. LCLS in—photon out: fluorescence measurement of neon using soft x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Razib; Buth, Christian; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Beerwerth, Randolf; Holmes, Michael; Aldrich, Jeff; Lin, Ming-Fu; Minitti, Michael; Osipov, Timur; Schlotter, William; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Fritzsche, Stephan; Berrah, Nora

    2018-02-01

    We measured the fluorescence photon yield of neon upon soft x-ray ionization (∼1200 eV) from the x-ray free-electron laser at Linac Coherent Light Source, and demonstrated the usage of a grazing incidence spectrometer with a variable line spacing grating to perform x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on a gas phase system. Our measurements also allowed us to estimate the focal size of the beam from the theoretical description developed, in terms of the rate equation approximation accounting for photoionization shake off of neutral neon and double auger decay of single core holes.

  7. Isotopic composition of neon in the galactic cosmic rays: a high resolution measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, D.E.; Wiedenbeck, M.E.; Bieser, F.S.; Crawford, H.J.; Heckman, H.H.; Lindstrom, P.J.

    1979-06-01

    A measurement of the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic ray neon in the energy range 70 to 260 MeV/amu has been made using the U.C. Berkeley HKH instrument aboard ISEE-3. A combination of high resolution and good statistical accuracy makes possible a precise determination of the local interplanetary neon composition. We find 22 Ne/ 20 Ne = 0.64 +- 0.07 and 21 Ne/ 20 Ne < 0.30 in local interplanetary space. These ratios, when interpreted in using standard galactic propagation and solar modulation models, yield cosmic ray source abundances which are inconsistent with a solar-like source composition

  8. Polarizability of Helium, Neon, and Argon: New Perspectives for Gas Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiser, Christof; Fellmuth, Bernd

    2018-03-01

    With dielectric-constant gas thermometry, the molar polarizability of helium, neon, and argon has been determined with relative standard uncertainties of about 2 parts per million. A series of isotherms measured with the three noble gases and two different experimental setups led to this unprecedented level of uncertainty. These data are crucial for scientists in the field of gas metrology, working on pressure and temperature standards. Furthermore, with the new benchmark values for neon and argon, theoretical calculations, today about 3 orders of magnitude larger in uncertainty, can be checked and improved.

  9. Nitrous oxide and methane fluxes in south Brazilian gleysol as affected by nitrogen fertilizers Fluxos de óxido nitroso e de metano em gleissolo influenciados pela aplicação de fertilizantes nitrogenados no sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiléia Acordi Zanatta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilizers increase the nitrous oxide (N2O emission and can reduce the methane (CH4 oxidation from agricultural soils. However, the magnitude of this effect is unknown in Southern Brazilian edaphoclimatic conditions, as well as the potential of different sources of mineral N fertilizers in such an effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different mineral N sources (urea, ammonium sulphate, calcium nitrate, ammonium nitrate, Uran, controlled- release N fertilizer, and urea with urease inhibitor on N2O and CH4 fluxes from Gleysol in the South of Brazil (Porto Alegre, RS, in comparison to a control treatment without a N application. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block with three replications, and the N fertilizer was applied to corn at the V5 growth stage. Air samples were collected from a static chambers for 15 days after the N application and the N2O and CH4 concentration were determined by gas chromatography. The topmost emissions occurred three days after the N fertilizer application and ranged from 187.8 to 8587.4 µg m-2 h-1 N. The greatest emissions were observed for N-nitric based fertilizers, while N sources with a urease inhibitor and controlled release N presented the smallest values and the N-ammonium and amidic were intermediate. This peak of N2O emissions was related to soil NO3--N (R² = 0.56, p Fertilizantes nitrogenados incrementam os fluxos de óxido nitroso (N2O e podem deprimir a oxidação de metano (CH4 em solos agrícolas. Entretanto, não existem resultados da magnitude desses efeitos nas condições edafoclimáticas do Sul do Brasil, tampouco do potencial de algumas fontes de N em mitigar esses efeitos. O presente estudo objetivou avaliar o impacto da aplicação de fertilizantes nitrogenados (ureia, sulfato de amônio, nitrato de cálcio, nitrato de amônio, Uran, N de liberação lenta e ureia com inibidor de urease nos fluxos de N2O e CH4 em um Gleissolo no Sul do Brasil

  10. Mechanics of coalbed methane production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creel, J C; Rollins, J B [Crawley, Gillespie and Associates, Inc. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Understanding the behaviour of coalbed methane reservoirs and the mechanics of production is crucial to successful management of coalbed methane resources and projects. This paper discusses the effects of coal properties and coalbed methane reservoir characteristics on gas production rates and recoveries with a review of completion techniques for coalbed methane wells. 4 refs., 17 figs.

  11. Non-oxidative conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons over ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SOURABH MISHRA

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... ... in the Design and Development of Catalysts and their Applications ... of methane (natural gas) into transportable chemicals ... molybdenum (Mo) catalyst under non-oxidative condi- ... Micromeritics ASAP 2010 apparatus at liquid nitrogen tem- ... fixed-bed tubular reactor (500 mm length & 15 mm ID) at.

  12. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/μm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to 137 Cs γ-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/μm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/μm showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among γ-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not

  13. Neon Abundances from a Spitzer/IRS Survey of Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ignace, R.; Cassinelli, J.P.; Tracy, G.; Churchwell, E.B.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on neon abundances derived from Spitzer high resolution spectral data of eight Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars using the forbidden line of [Ne III] 15.56 μm. Our targets include four WN stars of subtypes 4-7, and four WC stars of subtypes 4-7. We derive ion fraction abundances γ of Ne2+ for the

  14. Comparison of boron and neon damage effects in boron ion-implanted resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIver, B.A.

    1975-01-01

    Boron and neon damage implants were used in fabricating integrated-circuit resistors in silicon. Resistor properties were studied as functions of damaging ion species and dose. Sheet resistances in the 10 000 Ω/square range were obtained with low temperature and voltage sensitivities and d.c. isolation. (author)

  15. Improved discovery of NEON data and samples though vocabularies, workflows, and web tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, C. M.; Elmendorf, S.; Flagg, C.; Harris, T.; Lunch, C. K.; Gulbransen, T.

    2017-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale ecological observation facility sponsored by the National Science Foundation and operated by Battelle. NEON supports research on the impacts of invasive species, land use change, and environmental change on natural resources and ecosystems by gathering and disseminating a full suite of observational, instrumented, and airborne datasets from field sites across the U.S. NEON also collects thousands of samples from soil, water, and organisms every year, and partners with numerous institutions to analyze and archive samples. We have developed numerous new technologies to support processing and discovery of this highly diverse collection of data. These technologies include applications for data collection and sample management, processing pipelines specific to each collection system (field observations, installed sensors, and airborne instruments), and publication pipelines. NEON data and metadata are discoverable and downloadable via both a public API and data portal. We solicit continued engagement and advice from the informatics and environmental research communities, particularly in the areas of data versioning, usability, and visualization.

  16. Thomson scattering in a low-pressure neon mercury positive column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.P.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    2001-01-01

    The electron density and the electron temperature in a low-pressure neon mercury positive column are determined using Thomson scattering. Special attention has been given to the stray light reduction in the Thomson scattering setup. The results are obtained in a discharge tube with a 26 mm diam, 10

  17. Feasibility of evaluating possible 85Kr environmental contamination from neon lamp production line to be installed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangzuo

    1989-01-01

    Using a simplified method, the concentrations of 85 Kr leaking into the air of a workshop and its surroundings, where a neon lamp production line was to be installed, were calculated. The doses to the workers and inhabitants nearby were also estimated. Thus, the evaluation of 85 Kr enviromental contamination caused by imported equipments was made feasible

  18. Methane monitoring from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, C.; Alpers, M.; Millet, B.; Ehret, G.; Flamant, P.

    2017-11-01

    Methane is one of the strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gases. It contributes by its radiative forcing significantly to the global warming. For a better understanding of climate changes, it is necessary to apply precise space-based measurement techniques in order to obtain a global view on the complex processes that control the methane concentration in the atmosphere. The MERLIN mission is a joint French-German cooperation, on a micro satellite mission for space-based measurement of spatial and temporal gradients of atmospheric methane columns on a global scale. MERLIN will be the first Integrated Path Differential Absorption LIDAR for greenhouse gas monitoring from space. In contrast to passive methane missions, the LIDAR instrument allows measurements at alllatitudes, all-seasons and during night.

  19. Methane prediction in collieries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the project was to assess the current status of research on methane emission prediction for collieries in South Africa in comparison with methods used and advances achieved elsewhere in the world....

  20. NEON Collaborative Data Collection Campaign at Pacific South West Site in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Musinsky, J.; Petroy, S. B.; Wasser, L. A.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Schaaf, C.; Strahler, A. H.; Serbin, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a continental-scale observatory that will collect biological, chemical and geophysical data over the continental United States in order to study biodiversity, landcover change, climate change and invasive species. In June 2013, a large-scale data collection took place over NEON's Pacific South West (PSW) site 17 in CA, USA. Data were collected in the San Joaquin Experimental Range and the Sierra National Forest. NEON's AOP (Airborne Observation Platform) acquired high spatial resolution hyperspectral data (~1m pixels), waveform lidar, discrete lidar, and RGB imagery over all three sites. A field team simultaneously collected atmospheric and vegetation inventory data, including tree locations, height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), species, and spectral data. The NEON collect was centered within a collaboration of multiple research entities, including NASA, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), University of Massachusetts (Boston; UMB, and Lowell; UML), Boston University (BU), and the University of Wisconsin, Madison (UWM). NASA's AVIRIS and MASTER sensors were flown over a wider area encompassing the NEON sites, with AVIRIS acquiring hyperspectral data (224 bands) at approximately 30m spatial resolution, and MASTER acquiring multispectral thermal data (50 bands) at approximately 50m spatial resolution. These data will be downscaled to approximate theoretical HyspIRI data (60m spatial resolution) as part of a large collection of preparatory research. Concurrently, a variety of university teams were active in the field: RIT collected ground-based lidar, leaf area index (LAI), herbaceous biomass measurements, wide-angle photographs, and spectral measurements. Data were collected over 20 80x80m sites, centered on existing 20x20m NEON sites. This data set will be used to inform synthetic scene design and to study the impact of sub-pixel structural variation on pixel-level spectral response; The BU, UMB, and UML

  1. RBE of heavy ions (carbon, neon, helium, proton) for acute cell death of pancreatic islet cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubouchi, Susumu; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Itsukaichi, Hiromi

    2003-01-01

    At this fiscal year, only two times irradiation experiments with neon and helium beams were performed to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of heavy ions (carbon, neon, helium, proton) for acute cell death of pancreatic islet cells in vivo. First of all this project was designed to obtain RBE of 290 MeV carbon and 400 MeV neon beams in the high linear energy transfer (LET) region for acute cell death of pancreatic islets of golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) in the condition of in both in vivo and in vitro systems. As mentioned in previous report, in vitro system, however, resulted in ill success. This in vitro experiment was tentatively shelved for the time being. In return in vivo experiments for low LET region of neon beams (32.5 KeV/u), carbon beams (15.0 KeV/u) and helium beams (2 KeV/u) were performed in these two years. Last year these results together with those previously obtained for 200 KeV X-ray, 70 MeV proton, 290 MeV carbon (60 KeV/u), and neon (100 KeV/u) beams were reconsidered. At this year dose response relations (25, 50, 100, 150, and 200 Gy respectively) in acute cell death of pancreatic islets studied histologically after whole body irradiation of 3 weeks young male golden hamster with lower LET helium beams (2 KeV/u) and neon beams (32.5 KeV/u). Results indicated that mean cell lethal dose (Do) of helium beams (2 KeV/u) and neon beams (32.5 KeV/u) were 38 Gy and 49 Gy, respectively. Previously obtained Do data for 200 KeV x-ray, 70 MeV proton, 290 MeV carbon (15 KeV/u), 400 MeV neon (32.5 KeV/u), 290 MeV carbon (60 KeV/u), and 400 MeV neon (100 KeV/u) beams were 37 Gy, 38 Gy, 38 Gy, 49 Gy, 75 Gy, and 200 Gy, respectively. From these data estimated RBE of neon (100 KeV/u and 32.5 KeV/u), carbon (60 KeV/u and 15.0 KeV/u), 70 MeV proton and 150 MeV helium (2 KeV/u) beams were 0.19, 0.76, 0.49, 0.97, 0.97, 0.97, respectively. Therefore the order of RBE (or radiosensitivities) of islets cells with these various heavy ion beams was

  2. Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    REPORT Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have transformed a plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, with the...298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Mar-2012 Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane Report Title ABSTRACT We have transformed a...DD882) Scientific Progress See attachment Technology Transfer 1    Final Report for DARPA project W911NF1010027  Phytoremediation  of Atmospheric

  3. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  4. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere has been linked to global warming. Carbon dioxide's (CO2) one of the most abundant greenhouse gases. Natural gas, mainly methane, is the cleanest fossil fuel for electricity production helping meet the United States ever growing energy needs. The methanation of CO2 has the potential to address both of these problems if a catalyst can be developed that meets the activity, economic and environmental requirements to industrialize the process. ...

  5. Effects of different nitrogen forms, ammonia gas and wet deposited ammonium and nitrate, on methane and nitrous oxide emissions from an ombrotrophic bog, Whim Moss, in the Scottish Borders

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, L. J.; Leith, I. D.; Field, C.; van Dijk, N.; Rung, M.; Skiba, U.

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced reactive nitrogen deposition may compromise the sustainability and functioning of bogs, with respect to carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas production. Since 2002, three N forms have been applied to an ombrotrophic bog growing Calluna, Sphagnum capillifolium and Eriophorum vaginatum in order to test this. Significant changes in species cover and soil chemistry, especially in response to elevated ammonia concentrations, have been recorded. Ammonia deposition has also increased nit...

  6. Positron annihilation in low-temperature rare gases. II. Argon and neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canter, K.F.; Roellig, L.O.

    1975-01-01

    Lifetime measurements of slow-positron and ortho-positronium (o-Ps) annihilation were made in argon and neon gases at room temperature and below. The argon experiments cover the temperature range 115 to 300 0 K and the density range 0.0356 to 0.0726 g/cm 3 (approximately equal to 20 to 40 amagat). The slow-positron spectra in argon exhibit a departure from free-positron annihilation below 200 0 K. The departure becomes more marked as the temperature is lowered. No deviation from free o-Ps pickoff annihilation is observed in argon at low temperatures. The neon measurements cover the temperature range 30 to 300 0 K and the density range 0.032 to 0.89 g/cm 3 (approximately equal to 35 to 980 amagat). No effect of temperature on the slow-positron spectra throughout the temperature and density ranges investigated in neon is observed. The spectra are very exponential with a corresponding decay rate which is temperature as well as time independent and is directly proportional to density over the ranges investigated. The o-Ps data are more eventful in that the o-Ps lifetime at near-liquid densities is approximately 20 nsec, a factor of nearly 4 greater than the value obtained using the pickoff-annihilation coefficient obtained at lower densities. This is evidence for positronium-induced cavities in low-temperature neon. A brief discussion of the argon and neon results is given in the context of the explanations offered for the low-temperature effects observed in helium gas

  7. NEON's eddy-covariance: interoperable flux data products, software and services for you, now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, S.; Desai, A. R.; Durden, D.; Hartmann, J.; Li, J.; Luo, H.; Durden, N. P.; Sachs, T.; Serafimovich, A.; Sturtevant, C.; Xu, K.

    2017-12-01

    Networks of eddy-covariance (EC) towers such as AmeriFlux, ICOS and NEON are vital for providing the necessary distributed observations to address interactions at the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface. NEON, close to full operation with 47 tower sites, will represent the largest single-provider EC network globally. Its standardized observation and data processing suite is designed specifically for inter-site comparability and analysis of feedbacks across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Furthermore, NEON coordinates EC with rich contextual observations such as airborne remote sensing and in-situ sampling bouts. In January 2018 NEON enters its operational phase, and EC data products, software and services become fully available to the science community at large. These resources strive to incorporate lessons-learned through collaborations with AmeriFlux, ICOS, LTER and others, to suggest novel systemic solutions, and to synergize ongoing research efforts across science communities. Here, we present an overview of the ongoing product release, alongside efforts to integrate and collaborate with existing infrastructures, networks and communities. Near-real-time heat, water and carbon cycle observations in "basic" and "expanded", self-describing HDF5 formats become accessible from the NEON Data Portal, including an Application Program Interface. Subsequently, they are ingested into the AmeriFlux processing pipeline, together with inclusion in FLUXNET globally harmonized data releases. Software for reproducible, extensible and portable data analysis and science operations management also becomes available. This includes the eddy4R family of R-packages underlying the data product generation, together with the ability to directly participate in open development via GitHub version control and DockerHub image hosting. In addition, templates for science operations management include a web-based field maintenance application and a graphical user interface to simplify

  8. Modeling of simultaneous anaerobic methane and ammonium oxidation in a membrane biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueming; Guo, Jianhua; Shi, Ying; Hu, Shihu; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2014-08-19

    Nitrogen removal by using the synergy of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) microorganisms in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) has previously been demonstrated experimentally. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the simultaneous anaerobic methane and ammonium oxidation by DAMO and Anammox microorganisms in an MBfR for the first time. In this model, DAMO archaea convert nitrate, both externally fed and/or produced by Anammox, to nitrite, with methane as the electron donor. Anammox and DAMO bacteria jointly remove the nitrite fed/produced, with ammonium and methane as the electron donor, respectively. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using the long-term (over 400 days) dynamic experimental data from the MBfR, as well as two independent batch tests at different operational stages of the MBfR. The model satisfactorily describes the methane oxidation and nitrogen conversion data from the system. Modeling results show the concentration gradients of methane and nitrogen would cause stratification of the biofilm, where Anammox bacteria mainly grow in the biofilm layer close to the bulk liquid and DAMO organisms attach close to the membrane surface. The low surface methane loadings result in a low fraction of DAMO microorganisms, but the high surface methane loadings would lead to overgrowth of DAMO bacteria, which would compete with Anammox for nitrite and decrease the fraction of Anammox bacteria. The results suggest an optimal methane supply under the given condition should be applied not only to benefit the nitrogen removal but also to avoid potential methane emissions.

  9. Effects of different nitrogen sources on the biogas production - a lab-scale investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Andreas Otto; Hohlbrugger, Peter; Lins, Philipp; Illmer, Paul

    2012-12-20

    For anaerobic digestion processes nitrogen sources are poorly investigated although they are known as possible process limiting factors (in the hydrolysis phase) but also as a source for fermentations for subsequent methane production by methanogenic archaea. In the present study different complex and defined nitrogen sources were investigated in a lab-scale experiment in order to study their potential to build up methane. The outcome of the study can be summarised as follows: from complex nitrogen sources yeast extract and casamino acids showed the highest methane production with approximately 600 ml methane per mole of nitrogen, whereas by the use of skim milk no methane production could be observed. From defined nitrogen sources L-arginine showed the highest methane production with almost 1400 ml methane per mole of nitrogen. Moreover it could be demonstrated that the carbon content and therefore C/N-ratio has only minor influence for the methane production from the used substrates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Coalbed methane: new frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, S.

    2003-02-01

    There are large numbers of stacked coal seams permeated with methane or natural gas in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, and approximately 20 coalbed methane pilot projects are operating in the area, and brief descriptions of some of them were provided. Coalbed methane reserves have a long life cycle. A definition of coalbed methane can be a permeability challenged reservoir. It is not uncommon for coalbed methane wells to flow water for periods varying from 2 to 6 months after completion before the production of natural gas. A made-in-Canada technological solution is being developed by CDX Canada Inc., along with its American parent company. The techniques used by CDX are a marriage between coal mining techniques and oil and gas techniques. A brief description of coalification was provided. Nexen is participating in the production of gas from an Upper Mannville coal at 1 000-metres depth in a nine-well pilot project. The Alberta Foothills are considered prime exploration area since older coal is carried close to the surface by thrusting. CDX Canada uses cavitation completion in vertical wells. Cavitation consists in setting the casing above the coal seam and drilling ahead under balanced. The design of wells for coalbed methane gas is based on rock and fluid mechanics. Hydraulic fracturing completions is also used, as are tiltmeters. An enhanced coalbed methane recovery pilot project is being conducted by the Alberta Research Council at Fenn-Big Valley, located in central Alberta. It injects carbon dioxide, which shows great potential for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. 1 figs.

  11. Anaerobic Oxidization of Methane in a Minerotrophic Peatland: Enrichment of Nitrite-Dependent Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Baoli; van Dijk, Gijs; Fritz, Christian; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Pol, Arjan; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) as a methane sink in freshwater systems is largely unexplored, particularly in peat ecosystems. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and reported to be catalyzed by the bacterium “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” which is affiliated with the NC10 phylum. So far, several “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” enrichment cultures have been obtained using a limited number of freshwater sediments or wastewater treatment sludge as the inoculum. In this study, using stable isotope measurements and porewater profiles, we investigated the potential of n-damo in a minerotrophic peatland in the south of the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water. Methane and nitrate profiles suggested that all methane produced was oxidized before reaching the oxic layer, and NC10 bacteria could be active in the transition zone where countergradients of methane and nitrate occur. Quantitative PCR showed high NC10 bacterial cell numbers at this methane-nitrate transition zone. This soil section was used to enrich the prevalent NC10 bacteria in a continuous culture supplied with methane and nitrite at an in situ pH of 6.2. An enrichment of nitrite-reducing methanotrophic NC10 bacteria was successfully obtained. Phylogenetic analysis of retrieved 16S rRNA and pmoA genes showed that the enriched bacteria were very similar to the ones found in situ and constituted a new branch of NC10 bacteria with an identity of less than 96 and 90% to the 16S rRNA and pmoA genes of “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” respectively. The results of this study expand our knowledge of the diversity and distribution of NC10 bacteria in the environment and highlight their potential contribution to nitrogen and methane cycles. PMID:23042166

  12. Flue gas injection into gas hydrate reservoirs for methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jinhai; Okwananke, Anthony; Tohidi, Bahman; Chuvilin, Evgeny; Maerle, Kirill; Istomin, Vladimir; Bukhanov, Boris; Cheremisin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Flue gas was injected for both methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. • Kinetics of methane recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration was investigated. • Methane-rich gas mixtures can be produced inside methane hydrate stability zones. • Up to 70 mol% of carbon dioxide in the flue gas was sequestered as hydrates. - Abstract: Flue gas injection into methane hydrate-bearing sediments was experimentally investigated to explore the potential both for methane recovery from gas hydrate reservoirs and for direct capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide from flue gas as carbon dioxide hydrate. A simulated flue gas from coal-fired power plants composed of 14.6 mol% carbon dioxide and 85.4 mol% nitrogen was injected into a silica sand pack containing different saturations of methane hydrate. The experiments were conducted at typical gas hydrate reservoir conditions from 273.3 to 284.2 K and from 4.2 to 13.8 MPa. Results of the experiments show that injection of the flue gas leads to significant dissociation of the methane hydrate by shifting the methane hydrate stability zone, resulting in around 50 mol% methane in the vapour phase at the experimental conditions. Further depressurisation of the system to pressures well above the methane hydrate dissociation pressure generated methane-rich gas mixtures with up to 80 mol% methane. Meanwhile, carbon dioxide hydrate and carbon dioxide-mixed hydrates were formed while the methane hydrate was dissociating. Up to 70% of the carbon dioxide in the flue gas was converted into hydrates and retained in the silica sand pack.

  13. Methane oxidation in anoxic lake waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guangyi; Zopfi, Jakob; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater habitats such as lakes are important sources of methante (CH4), however, most studies in lacustrine environments so far provided evidence for aerobic methane oxidation only, and little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 (AOM) in anoxic lake waters. In marine environments, sulfate reduction coupled to AOM by archaea has been recognized as important sinks of CH4. More recently, the discorvery of anaerobic methane oxidizing denitrifying bacteria represents a novel and possible alternative AOM pathway, involving reactive nitrogen species (e.g., nitrate and nitrite) as electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen. We investigate anaerobic methane oxidation in the water column of two hydrochemically contrasting sites in Lake Lugano, Switzerland. The South Basin displays seasonal stratification, the development of a benthic nepheloid layer and anoxia during summer and fall. The North Basin is permanently stratified with anoxic conditions below 115m water depth. Both Basins accumulate seasonally (South Basin) or permanently (North Basin) large amounts of CH4 in the water column below the chemocline, providing ideal conditions for methanotrophic microorganisms. Previous work revealed a high potential for aerobic methane oxidation within the anoxic water column, but no evidence for true AOM. Here, we show depth distribution data of dissolved CH4, methane oxidation rates and nutrients at both sites. In addition, we performed high resolution phylogenetic analyses of microbial community structures and conducted radio-label incubation experiments with concentrated biomass from anoxic waters and potential alternative electron acceptor additions (nitrate, nitrite and sulfate). First results from the unamended experiments revealed maximum activity of methane oxidation below the redoxcline in both basins. While the incubation experiments neither provided clear evidence for NOx- nor sulfate-dependent AOM, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the

  14. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    transfer depended on the reactivity of the emitted material. At the lower extreme of reactivity are the noble gases, neon and argon. Most neon and argon emitted during the degassing of the newly formed Earth is still in the atmosphere, and essentially none has been transferred to the hydrosphere or crust. At the other extreme are carbon and sulfur. Over 99% of the carbon and sulfur emitted during degassing are no longer in the atmosphere, but reside in the hydrosphere or the crust. Nitrogen is intermediate. Of the ˜6×106 TgN in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and crust, ˜2/3 is in the atmosphere as N2 with most of the remainder in the crust. The atmosphere is a large nitrogen reservoir primarily, because the triple bond of the N2 molecule requires a significant amount of energy to break. In the early atmosphere, the only sources of such energy were solar radiation and electrical discharges.At this point we had an earth with mostly N2 and devoid of life. How did we get to an earth with mostly N2 and teeming with life? First, N2 had to be converted into reactive N (Nr). (The term reactive nitrogen (Nr) includes all biologically active, photochemically reactive, and radiatively active nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere and biosphere of the Earth. Thus, Nr includes inorganic reduced forms of nitrogen (e.g., NH3 and NH4+), inorganic oxidized forms (e.g., NOx, HNO3, N2O, and NO3-), and organic compounds (e.g., urea, amines, and proteins).) The early atmosphere was reducing and had limited NH3. However, NH3 was a necessary ingredient in forming early organic matter. One possibility for NH3 generation was the cycling of seawater through volcanics (Holland, 1984). Under such a process, NH3 could then be released to the atmosphere where, when combined with CH4, H2, H2O, and electrical energy, organic molecules including amino acids could be formed (Miller, 1953). In essence, electrical discharges and UV radiation can convert mixtures of reduced gases into mixtures of organic

  15. NEON: Contributing continental-scale long-term environmental data for the benefit of society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, B.; Aulenbach, S.

    2011-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a NSF funded national investment in physical and information infrastructure. Large-scale environmental changes pose challenges that straddle environmental, economic, and social boundaries. As we develop climate adaptation strategies at the Federal, state, local, and tribal levels, accessible and usable data are essential for implementing actions that are informed by the best available information. NEON's goal is to enable understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on continental-scale ecology by providing physical and information infrastructure. The NEON framework will take standardized, long-term, coordinated measurements of related environmental variables at each of its 62 sites across the nation. These observations, collected by automated instruments, field crews, and airborne instruments, will be processed into more than 700 data products that are provided freely over the web to support research, education, and environmental management. NEON is envisioned to be an integral component of an interoperable ecosystem of credible data and information sources. Other members of this information ecosystem include Federal, commercial, and non-profit entities. NEON is actively involved with the interoperability community via forums like the Foundation for Earth Science Information Partners and the USGS Community for Data Integration in a collective effort to identify the technical standards, best practices, and organizational principles that enable the emergence of such an information ecosystem. These forums have proven to be effective innovation engines for the experimentation of new techniques that evolve into emergent standards. These standards are, for the most part, discipline agnostic. It is becoming increasingly evident that we need to include socio-economic and public health data sources in interoperability initiatives, because the dynamics of coupled

  16. NEON's Eddy-Covariance Storage Exchange: from Tower to Data Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, N. P.; Luo, H.; Xu, K.; Metzger, S.; Durden, D.

    2017-12-01

    NEON's eddy-covariance storage exchange system (ECSE) consists of a suite of sensors including temperature sensors, a CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, and isotopic CO2 and H2O analyzers. NEON's ECSE was developed to provide the vertical profile measurements of temperature, CO2 and H2O concentrations, the stable isotope ratios in CO2 (δ13C) and H2O (δ18O and δ2H) in the atmosphere. The profiles of temperature and concentrations of CO2 and H2O are key to calculate storage fluxes for eddy-covariance tower sites. Storage fluxes have a strong diurnal cycle and can be large in magnitude, especially at temporal scales less than one day. However, the storage term is often neglected in flux computations. To obtian accurate eddy-covariance fluxes, the storage fluxes are calculated and incorporated into the calculations of net surface-atmosphere ecosystem exchange of heat, CO2, and H2O for each NEON tower site. Once the ECSE raw data (Level 0, or L0) is retrieved at NEON's headquarters, it is preconditioned through a sequence of unit conversion, time regularization, and plausibility tests. By utilizing NEON's eddy4R framework (Metzger et al., 2017), higher-level data products are generated including: Level 1 (L1): Measurement-level specific averages of temperature and concentrations of CO2 and H2O. Level 2 (L2): Time rate of change of temperature and concentrations of CO2 and H2O over 30 min at each measurement level along the vertical tower profile. Level 3 (L3): Time rate of change of temperature and concentrations of CO2 and H2O over 30 min (L2), spatially interpolated along the vertical tower profile. Level 4 (L4): Storage fluxes of heat, CO2, and H2O calculated from the integrated time rate of change spatially interpolated profile (L3). The L4 storage fluxes are combined with turbulent fluxes to calculate the net surface-atmosphere ecosystem exchange of heat, CO2, and H2O. Moreover, a final quality flag and uncertainty budget are produced individually for each data stream

  17. Measurement of the (pressure, density, temperature) relation of two (methane + nitrogen) gas mixtures at temperatures between 240 and 400 K and pressures up to 20 MPa using an accurate single-sinker densimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamorro, C.R. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: cescha@eis.uva.es; Segovia, J.J. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Martin, M.C. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Villamanan, M.A. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47071 Valladolid (Spain); Estela-Uribe, J.F. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Javeriana-Cali, Calle 18, 118-250 Cali (Colombia); Trusler, J.P.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    Comprehensive (p, {rho}, T) measurements on two gas mixtures of (0.9CH{sub 4} + 0.1N{sub 2}) and (0.8CH{sub 4} + 0.2N{sub 2}) have been carried out at six temperatures between 240 and 400 K and at pressures up to 20 MPa. A total of 108 (p, {rho}, T) data for the first mixture and 134 for the second one are given. These measurements were performed using a compact single-sinker densimeter based on Archimedes' buoyancy principle. The overall uncertainty in density {rho} is estimated to be (1.5 . 10{sup -4} . {rho} + 2 . 10{sup -3} kg . m{sup -3}) (coverage factor k = 2), the uncertainty in temperature T is estimated to be 0.006 K (coverage factor k = 2), and the uncertainty in pressure p is estimated to be 1 . 10{sup -4}.p (coverage factor k = 2). The equipment has been previously checked with pure nitrogen over the whole temperature and pressure working ranges and experimental results (35 values) are given and a comparison with the reference equation of state for nitrogen is presented.

  18. Measurement of the (pressure, density, temperature) relation of two (methane + nitrogen) gas mixtures at temperatures between 240 and 400 K and pressures up to 20 MPa using an accurate single-sinker densimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamorro, C.R.; Segovia, J.J.; Martin, M.C.; Villamanan, M.A.; Estela-Uribe, J.F.; Trusler, J.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive (p, ρ, T) measurements on two gas mixtures of (0.9CH 4 + 0.1N 2 ) and (0.8CH 4 + 0.2N 2 ) have been carried out at six temperatures between 240 and 400 K and at pressures up to 20 MPa. A total of 108 (p, ρ, T) data for the first mixture and 134 for the second one are given. These measurements were performed using a compact single-sinker densimeter based on Archimedes' buoyancy principle. The overall uncertainty in density ρ is estimated to be (1.5 . 10 -4 . ρ + 2 . 10 -3 kg . m -3 ) (coverage factor k = 2), the uncertainty in temperature T is estimated to be 0.006 K (coverage factor k = 2), and the uncertainty in pressure p is estimated to be 1 . 10 -4 .p (coverage factor k = 2). The equipment has been previously checked with pure nitrogen over the whole temperature and pressure working ranges and experimental results (35 values) are given and a comparison with the reference equation of state for nitrogen is presented

  19. Transformational principles for NEON sampling of mammalian parasites and pathogens: a response to Springer et al. (2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Environmental Observatory Network (NEON) has recently released a series of protocols presented with apparently broad community support for studies of small mammals and parasites. Sampling designs were outlined outlined, collectively aimed at understanding how changing environmental cond...

  20. New determination of the vapour pressures of the isotopes of neon; Nouvelles determinations des tensions de vapeur des isotopes du neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-03-15

    We have undertaken an experimental reinvestigation of the vapor pressures of the neon isotopes over the temperature range 16.30-30.1 deg. K. Measurements were made by differential manometry in a Giauque-Johnston type cryostat modified for temperature stability. The New sample contained 99.9 % Ne{sup 20} and the Ne{sup 22} sample contained 72,2 % Ne{sup 22}. Extrapolation to pure Ne{sup 20} and Ne{sup 22} can be made with sufficient accuracy by the use of Raoult's law. Our results are in substantial agreement with those of Keesom and Haantjes. At 20 deg. K, where the scatter in our data is an order of magnitude smaller than in the data of Keesom and Haantjes, we find In P{sub Ne{sup 2}{sup 0}}/P{sub Ne{sup 2}{sup 2}} is 6 % larger than the smoothed line given by them. For solid neon, our data can be represented to a high accuracy by a Debye harmonic lattice with {theta}{sub D} (Ne{sup 20}) = 74.6 deg. K. The result may be compared with the value obtained by Henshaw from the Debye-Waller temperature factor, {theta}{sub D} = 73 deg. K, and with the recent calculation of the zero point energy of Ne by Bernardes, from which he obtains {theta}{sub D} 8E{sub {theta}}/9R = 73 deg.. K. (author) [French] On a construit un appareillage dont le principe est derive de celui des instruments decrits par GIAUQUE et EGAN ou par H.L. JOHNSTON qui a permis d'etendre le domaine des mesures de tension de vapeur des isotopes du Neon entre 16,30 et 32 deg. K environ. Le rapport des pressions extremes atteintes est ainsi multiplie par plus de 40 pour le neon ordinaire qui servait de reference et de thermometre. L'appareil, adapte en particulier au travail sous pressions elevees, permet, de plus, de travailler sur de relativement petites quantites totales de gaz - environ 500 cm{sup 3} suffisent dans l'intervalle de pression evoque. La stabilite de temperature obtenue peut etre tres bonne surtout lorsque l'on travaille dans la phase liquide; dans ce cas, les variations totales de

  1. New determination of the vapour pressures of the isotopes of neon; Nouvelles determinations des tensions de vapeur des isotopes du neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-03-15

    We have undertaken an experimental reinvestigation of the vapor pressures of the neon isotopes over the temperature range 16.30-30.1 deg. K. Measurements were made by differential manometry in a Giauque-Johnston type cryostat modified for temperature stability. The New sample contained 99.9 % Ne{sup 20} and the Ne{sup 22} sample contained 72,2 % Ne{sup 22}. Extrapolation to pure Ne{sup 20} and Ne{sup 22} can be made with sufficient accuracy by the use of Raoult's law. Our results are in substantial agreement with those of Keesom and Haantjes. At 20 deg. K, where the scatter in our data is an order of magnitude smaller than in the data of Keesom and Haantjes, we find In P{sub Ne{sup 2}{sup 0}}/P{sub Ne{sup 2}{sup 2}} is 6 % larger than the smoothed line given by them. For solid neon, our data can be represented to a high accuracy by a Debye harmonic lattice with {theta}{sub D} (Ne{sup 20}) = 74.6 deg. K. The result may be compared with the value obtained by Henshaw from the Debye-Waller temperature factor, {theta}{sub D} = 73 deg. K, and with the recent calculation of the zero point energy of Ne by Bernardes, from which he obtains {theta}{sub D} 8E{sub {theta}}/9R = 73 deg.. K. (author) [French] On a construit un appareillage dont le principe est derive de celui des instruments decrits par GIAUQUE et EGAN ou par H.L. JOHNSTON qui a permis d'etendre le domaine des mesures de tension de vapeur des isotopes du Neon entre 16,30 et 32 deg. K environ. Le rapport des pressions extremes atteintes est ainsi multiplie par plus de 40 pour le neon ordinaire qui servait de reference et de thermometre. L'appareil, adapte en particulier au travail sous pressions elevees, permet, de plus, de travailler sur de relativement petites quantites totales de gaz - environ 500 cm{sup 3} suffisent dans l'intervalle de pression evoque. La stabilite de temperature obtenue peut etre tres bonne surtout lorsque l'on travaille dans la phase liquide; dans ce cas, les

  2. Inelastic collisions of neon-22 nuclei with nuclei in photoemulsion at 90 GeV/c momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokalova, A.; Krasnov, S.A.; Tolstov, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental data obtained according to the analysis of 4303 inelastic interactions of the relativistic neon-22 nuclei with the nuclei in photoemulsion are presented. The multiplicities and angular distributions are shown as the functions of the disintegration degree of the colliding nuclei. It is shown that the same number of interacting nucleons of the projectile neon and carbon nuclei are connected with the different impact parameters with the target nucleus

  3. Methane of the coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, H.

    1997-01-01

    In the transformation process of the vegetable material to the coal (Carbonization), the products that are generated include CH 4, CO2, N2 and H2. The methane is generated by two mechanisms: below 50 centigrade degree, as product of microbial decomposition, the methanogenic is generated; and above 50 centigrade degree, due to the effects of the buried and increase of the range of the coal, the thermogenic methane is detachment, as a result of the catagenic. The generated methane is stored in the internal surfaces of the coal, macro and micro pores and in the natural fractures. The presence of accumulations of gas of the coal has been known in the entire world by many years, but only as something undesirable for its danger in the mining exploitation of the coal

  4. Catalytic aromatization of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, James J; Hutchings, Graham

    2014-02-07

    Recent developments in natural gas production technology have led to lower prices for methane and renewed interest in converting methane to higher value products. Processes such as those based on syngas from methane reforming are being investigated. Another option is methane aromatization, which produces benzene and hydrogen: 6CH4(g) → C6H6(g) + 9H2(g) ΔG°(r) = +433 kJ mol(-1) ΔH°(r) = +531 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction show that benzene formation is insignificant below ∼600 °C, and that the formation of solid carbon [C(s)] is thermodynamically favored at temperatures above ∼300 °C. Benzene formation is insignificant at all temperatures up to 1000 °C when C(s) is included in the calculation of equilibrium composition. Interestingly, the thermodynamic limitation on benzene formation can be minimized by the addition of alkanes/alkenes to the methane feed. By far the most widely studied catalysts for this reaction are Mo/HZSM-5 and Mo/MCM-22. Benzene selectivities are generally between 60 and 80% at methane conversions of ∼10%, corresponding to net benzene yields of less than 10%. Major byproducts include lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight substituted aromatics. However, carbon formation is inevitable, but the experimental findings show this can be kinetically limited by the use of H2 or oxidants in the feed, including CO2 or steam. A number of reactor configurations involving regeneration of the carbon-containing catalyst have been developed with the goal of minimizing the cost of regeneration of the catalyst once deactivated by carbon deposition. In this tutorial review we discuss the thermodynamics of this process, the catalysts used and the potential reactor configurations that can be applied.

  5. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-07-15

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin structure: H.sub.4SiW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.3PW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.4SiMo.sub.12O.sub.40, or H.sub.3PMo.sub.12O.sub.40, can be when supported on silica.

  6. Methanization - Technical sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastide, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    This document explains fundamentals of methanization such as biological reactions and conditions suitable for biogas production (temperature, pH, anaerobic medium, and so on). It also proposes an overview of available techniques, of the present regulation, of environmental impacts, and of costs and profitability of methanization installations. Examples of installations are provided, as well as a set of questions and answers. Perspectives of development are finally discussed in terms of sector development potential, of regulatory evolution, of new perspectives for gas valorisation, of need of acquisition of reference data due to the relatively low number of existing installations, and of research and development

  7. Australian methane fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates are provided for the amount of methane emitted annually into the atmosphere in Australia for a variety of sources. The sources considered are coal mining, landfill, motor vehicles, natural gas suply system, rice paddies, bushfires, termites, wetland and animals. This assessment indicates that the major sources of methane are natural or agricultural in nature and therefore offer little scope for reduction. Nevertheless the remainder are not trival and reduction of these fluxes could play a significant part in any Australian action on the greenhouse problem. 19 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  8. Abrupt changes in neon discharge plasma detected via the optogalvanic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Xianming L., E-mail: xhan@butler.edu [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Butler University, Indianapolis, IN 46208 (United States); Blosser, Michael C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Butler University, Indianapolis, IN 46208 (United States); Misra, Prabhakar [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Howard University, Washington DC 20059 (United States); Chandran, Haridass [Dept. of Physical Science, Belfry School, Belfry, KY 41514 (United States)

    2012-10-30

    When a laser is tuned between two excited energy levels of a gas in a Direct Current discharge lamp, the discharge current will experience a temporary disturbance lasting tens or hundreds of microseconds known as the optogalvanic effect. We have carried out extensive studies of optogalvanic effects in neon discharge plasmas for transitions at 621.7 nm, 630.5 nm, 638.3 nm, 650.7 nm and 659.9 nm. A nonlinear least-squares Monte Carlo technique has been used to determine the relevant amplitude coefficients, decay rates and the instrumental time constant. We discovered an abrupt change in the neon discharge plasma at a discharge current of about 6 mA.

  9. Study of neon adsorption on carbon nanocones using molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, R.; Ghafoori Tabrizi, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulation to study Ne adsorption on carbon nanocones. Adsorption isotherms were obtained at several temperatures between 22.67 and 49.82 K. Adsorption coverage, isosteric heat, and binding energy were calculated. Adsorption was observed both inside and outside of an individual carbon nanocone. The results indicate that the saturation coverage and saturation pressure depend on temperature. At saturation conditions, the maximum values of interior and exterior coverages are 0.17 and 0.39 neon per carbon, respectively. The results are compared to Ne adsorption on open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes. It is found that adsorption coverages on carbon nanocones are greater than those on carbon nanotubes. The isosteric heat and binding energy of neon adsorption on nanocones indicate that nanocones and nanotubes have highly desirable characteristics as an adsorbent.

  10. Study of neon adsorption on carbon nanocones using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, R. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafoori Tabrizi, K., E-mail: k-tabrizi@sbu.ac.i [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We have used molecular dynamics simulation to study Ne adsorption on carbon nanocones. Adsorption isotherms were obtained at several temperatures between 22.67 and 49.82 K. Adsorption coverage, isosteric heat, and binding energy were calculated. Adsorption was observed both inside and outside of an individual carbon nanocone. The results indicate that the saturation coverage and saturation pressure depend on temperature. At saturation conditions, the maximum values of interior and exterior coverages are 0.17 and 0.39 neon per carbon, respectively. The results are compared to Ne adsorption on open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes. It is found that adsorption coverages on carbon nanocones are greater than those on carbon nanotubes. The isosteric heat and binding energy of neon adsorption on nanocones indicate that nanocones and nanotubes have highly desirable characteristics as an adsorbent.

  11. Beam-foil study of neon in the EUV with foils of carbon, silver and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarest, J.A.; Watson, R.L.; Texas A and M Univ., College Station

    1988-01-01

    A beam-foil study of 40 MeV neon was conducted in the EUV with a 1-meter grazing incidence spectrometer configured with a position sensitive microchannel plate detector. A number of new lines of Ne IX, mainly from transitions to n = 3 levels, were detected in the wavelength region covering 50-350 A. Comparison of the spectra obtained using the different foils revealed that the average charge state of the neon projectiles was nearly one unit higher with carbon than with either of the two metals. Measurements of line intensities versus distance from the foils showed that cascade contributions were greatly reduced for the metals. It was also found that n = 3 states of low l were overpopulated relative to a statistical distribution, irrespective of the foil material. (orig.)

  12. Soft X-ray spectroscopic investigation of a plasma focus operated in pure neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presura, R.; Zoita, V.; Paraschiv, I.

    1996-01-01

    The soft X-ray emission of the medium-energy plasma focus device IPF-2/20 operated in pure neon was studied with spectral resolution. The spectra of H- and He-like Ne ions were recorded by means of a de Broglie spectrograph for initial filling pressures in the range 1.3 to 7 torr. Both the soft X-ray emission characteristics and the plasma parameters are strongly dependent on the working gas pressure. The intensity of the He-like neon ions lines increases when the working gas pressure is raised, while for the H-like ions it has a maximum for about 5 torr filling. The electron density has values of the order of 10 20 cm -3 . The electron temperature ranges between 300 and 350 eV. Both the plasma density and the plasma temperature decrease when the initial gas pressure is increased. (author). 2 figs., 9 refs

  13. Trapping hydrogen atoms from a neon-gas matrix: a theoretical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, S; Zhang, P; Kharchenko, V; Dalgarno, A

    2009-08-07

    Hydrogen is of critical importance in atomic and molecular physics and the development of a simple and efficient technique for trapping cold and ultracold hydrogen atoms would be a significant advance. In this study we simulate a recently proposed trap-loading mechanism for trapping hydrogen atoms released from a neon matrix. Accurate ab initio quantum calculations are reported of the neon-hydrogen interaction potential and the energy- and angular-dependent elastic scattering cross sections that control the energy transfer of initially cold atoms are obtained. They are then used to construct the Boltzmann kinetic equation, describing the energy relaxation process. Numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation predict the time evolution of the hydrogen energy distribution function. Based on the simulations we discuss the prospects of the technique.

  14. Neutrino results from the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber using neon-hydrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, T.H.

    1977-01-01

    Neutrino results from the FNAL 15-foot bubble chamber, using two different neon-hydrogen mixtures are reviewed. Included are the measurements from four different experiments of the dilepton, or μe rate, which appear to be consistent with the charm production interpretation for this process. Also mentioned is a study of the scaling variable distributions for antineutrinos, which shows no anomalous threshold, consistent with the usual four-quark model, but indicates a slight scale breaking. The ratio of anti νn to anti νp cross sections has been extracted from the same data and is also consistent with the quark model. A study of the hadronic state produced by electron (anti)neutrinos in neon is summarized, with the conclusion that nuclear rescattering effects are the same as for hadron interactions. (orig.) [de

  15. Soft X-ray spectroscopic investigation of a plasma focus operated in pure neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presura, R; Zoita, V; Paraschiv, I [Inst. of Physics and Technology of Radiation Devices, Bucharest (Romania)

    1997-12-31

    The soft X-ray emission of the medium-energy plasma focus device IPF-2/20 operated in pure neon was studied with spectral resolution. The spectra of H- and He-like Ne ions were recorded by means of a de Broglie spectrograph for initial filling pressures in the range 1.3 to 7 torr. Both the soft X-ray emission characteristics and the plasma parameters are strongly dependent on the working gas pressure. The intensity of the He-like neon ions lines increases when the working gas pressure is raised, while for the H-like ions it has a maximum for about 5 torr filling. The electron density has values of the order of 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The electron temperature ranges between 300 and 350 eV. Both the plasma density and the plasma temperature decrease when the initial gas pressure is increased. (author). 2 figs., 9 refs.

  16. A study of the EMC effect using neutrino and antineutrino interactions in neon and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Venus, W.; Apeldoorn, G. van; Jongejans, B.; Tenner, A.; Eijndhoven, N. van; Berggren, M.; Hulth, P.O.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Bobisut, F.; Sconza, A.; Brisson, V.; Petiau, P.; Vallee, C.; Capiluppi, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Rossi, A.M.; Cirio, R.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Romero, A.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Coghen, T.; Frodesen, A.G.; Gerbier, G.; Kasper, P.; Neveu, M.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Faccini-Turluer, M.L.; Vignaud, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nearly 40000 neutrino and antineutrino interactions in BEBC are compared to measure the differences between neon and deuterium in the quark and antiquark distributions and in the nucleon structure functions. The ratio of Ne to D cross sections indicates some decrease between x ≅ 0.2 and x ≅ 0.6. The y distributions show there is no significant increase in the neon sea, but prefer a small decrease. Taken altogether the x and y distributions and the measured total cross-sections indicate some change in the shape of the valence distributions. No significant dependence on A is observed for either the shape of the sea or the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross-sections. (orig.)

  17. A study of the EMC effect using neutrino and antineutrino interactions in neon and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, J.; Saitta, B.; van Apeldoorn, G.; Allport, P.; Angelini, C.; Armenise, N.; Baldini, A.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bobisut, F.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F.; Calicchio, M.; Capiluppi, P.; Cirio, R.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Faccini-Turluer, M. L.; Fitch, P.; Frodesen, A. G.; Gerbier, G.; Giacomelli, G.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Jongejans, B.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Mandrioli, G.; Marage, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Miller, D. B.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Mobayyen, M. M.; O'Neale, S. W.; Neveu, M.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Romero, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, A.; Sconza, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Schmitz, N.; Tenner, A.; Vallee, C.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Vignaud, D.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.

    1987-09-01

    Nearly 40000 neutrino and antineutrino interactions in BEBC are compared to measure the differences between neon and deuterium in the quark and antiquark distributions and in the nucleon structure functions. The ratio of Ne to D cross sections indicates some decrease between x˜0.2 and x˜0.6. The y distributions show there is no significant increase in the neon sea, but prefer a small decrease. Taken altogether, the x and y distributions and the measured total cross-sections indicate some change in the shape of the valence distributions. No significant dependence on A is observed for either the shape of the sea or the ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross-sections.

  18. Experimentation in the teaching of Modern Physics: Photoelectric Effect with neon lamp and LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Eberhardt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an experiment aimed at the teaching of Physics in High School, specifically the Photoelectric Effect, and it aims to support the teacher or serve as an inspiration for the proposition of other didactic activities. The experimentation consists on the exposure of a neon lamp to the lights of different wavelengths emitted by varied LEDs. The photoelectric current is measured on electrodes of the neon lamp, verifying that it has definite direction; the effect occurs when the wavelength of the applied light is less than a certain limit, and; the intensity of the photoelectric current depends on the intensity of the light applied, in agreement with the current scientific model of the phenomenon. This text also includes many decisive moments of the history of the Photoelectric Effect, characteristics of similar experiments using ultraviolet light, the electron work function of the metals of the electrodes and the ionization energy of the gases inside the lamp.

  19. Methane and compost from straw. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijkens, B A

    1982-01-01

    A concept is developed in which the farmer collects the straw and ferments it anaerobically to compost and methane at the farm. The methane can be used for heating and for production of mechanical energy, while the compost can be returned to the land at any suitable moment. This way of processing conserves part of the energy, present in the straw, that would otherwise be lost by the field-burning or the ploughing-in. In the meantime it solves the field-burning and environmental problems and it provides the possibility to recycle the organic matter in the humus, as well as all the fertilizing compounds K, P, Mg and nitrogen. There are indications that the arable land will need a restocking with humus that has been lost during many years of (modern) farming, leading to loss in structure and production capacity. This study collects the global technical and economical data, enabling us to indicate under which circumstances and local conditions the methane and compost concept would be feasible and would be an alternative to field-burning, ploughing-in or to the purely energetic use of the straw.

  20. Destruction of fast H(2S) atoms in collisions with neon, krypton, xenon, and molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, F.; Pradel, P.; Spiess, G.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements are reported for the total quenching of metastable hydrogen atoms by neon, krypton, xenon, and molecular hydrogen, in the energy range 0.052--3 keV. The cross sections are found to be on the order of 5 x 10 -15 cm 2 at the lowest energies, and decrease to approximately 2 x 10 -15 cm 2 at the highest energies. The data at low energy are analyzed using a simple theoretical model

  1. A Monte Carlo simulation of neon isotope separation in a DC discharge through a narrow capillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niroshi Akatsuka; Masaaki Suzuki

    1999-01-01

    A numerical simulation was undertaken on the neon isotope separation in a DC arc discharge through a narrow capillary. The mass transport phenomenon of neutral particles as well as ions was treated by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The numerical results qualitatively agreed with existing experimental ones concerning not only the isotope separation phenomena, but also the pressure difference between the region of the anode and that of the cathode [ru

  2. Effect of helium-neon laser radiation on conventionally - pathogenous microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shesterina, M.V.; Kalyuk, A.N.; Maliev, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported of single and multiple irradiation with low-energy helium-neon lasers (different doses and regimens) on growth and properties of conventionally-pathogenous microflora isolated from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and cultures of standard microorganisms. The above mentioned laser radiation produced an inhibitory effect on some strains of conventionally-pathogenous microflora manifested in inhibition of the growth properties of cultures as the energy dose increased

  3. Peculiarities of spectroscopic determination of the isotopic hydrogen composition in a mixture with neon and argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemets, V.M.; Petrov, A.A.; Solov'ev, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of the relative intensity of atomic lines of hydrogen isotopes in the mixture with neon and argon during excitation in a high-frequency discharge under medium and high pressures is investigated. A physical model is suggested for processes determining the isotopic effects in the atomic hydrogen spectrum due to isotopic differences in velocity constants of dissociation-association, transfer and ionic-molecular reactions in a gas discharge plasma

  4. Translating the Science of Measuring Ecosystems at a National Scale: NEON's Online Learning Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    "Big Data" are becoming increasingly common in many fields. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data over the 30 years, using consistent, standardized methods across the United States. These freely available new data provide an opportunity for increased understanding of continental- and global scale processes such as changes in vegetation structure and condition, biodiversity and landuse. However, while "big data" are becoming more accessible and available, working with big data is challenging. New and potentially unfamiliar data types and associated processing methods, required to work with a growing diversity of available data take time and resources to learn. Analysis of these big datasets may further present a challenge given large file sizes, and uncertainty regarding best methods to properly statistically summarize and analyze results. Finally, resources that support learning these concepts and approaches, are distributed widely across multiple online spaces and may take time to find. This presentation will overview the development of NEON's collaborative University-focused online education portal. It will also cover content testing, community feedback and results from workshops using online content. Portal content is hosted in github to facilitate community input, accessibility version control. Content includes 1) videos and supporting graphics that explain key concepts related to NEON and related big spatio-temporal and 2) data tutorials that include subsets of spatio-temporal data that can be used to learn key big data skills in a self-paced approach, or that can be used as a teaching tool in the classroom or in a workshop. All resources utilize free and open data processing, visualization and analysis tools, techniques and scripts. All NEON materials are being developed in collaboration with the scientific community and are being tested via in-person workshops. Visit the portal online: www.neondataskills.org.

  5. Translating the Science of Measuring Ecosystems at a National Scale: Developing NEON's Online Learning Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, L. A.; Gram, W.; Goehring, L.

    2014-12-01

    "Big Data" are becoming increasingly common in many fields. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be collecting data over the 30 years, using consistent, standardized methods across the United States. These freely available new data provide an opportunity for increased understanding of continental- and global scale processes such as changes in vegetation structure and condition, biodiversity and landuse. However, while "big data" are becoming more accessible and available, integrating big data into the university courses is challenging. New and potentially unfamiliar data types and associated processing methods, required to work with a growing diversity of available data, may warrant time and resources that present a barrier to classroom integration. Analysis of these big datasets may further present a challenge given large file sizes, and uncertainty regarding best methods to properly statistically summarize and analyze results. Finally, teaching resources, in the form of demonstrative illustrations, and other supporting media that might help teach key data concepts, take time to find and more time to develop. Available resources are often spread widely across multi-online spaces. This presentation will overview the development of NEON's collaborative University-focused online education portal. Portal content will include 1) videos and supporting graphics that explain key concepts related to NEON data products including collection methods, key metadata to consider and consideration of potential error and uncertainty surrounding data analysis; and 2) packaged "lab" activities that include supporting data to be used in an ecology, biology or earth science classroom. To facilitate broad use in classrooms, lab activities will take advantage of freely and commonly available processing tools, techniques and scripts. All NEON materials are being developed in collaboration with existing labs and organizations.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Amirkabir Plasma Focus (APF) Device for Neon and Argon Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknam Sharak, M.; Goudarzi, S.; Raeisdana, A.; Jafarabadi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the experimental results in different working conditions in Amirkabir Plasma Focus (APF) Device have been compared with the numerical results of a two-dimensional simulation code based on Lee's model. The experiments were done with pure Neon and Argon as operating gases over a wide range of working conditions (gas pressures and discharge voltages). It is observed that by a proper choice for values of the efficiency factors, comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a good agreement.

  7. Some characteristics of the digitization pulses from high pressure neon-helium flash tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, D.S.K.; Leung, S.K.; Ng, L.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of the digitization output pulses from high pressure neon-helium flash tubes were studied under various operation conditions using square ultra-high voltage pulses. Properties reported by previous workers were compared. Two discharge mechanisms, the Townsend avalanche discharge and the streamer discharge, were observed to occur in sequence in some events. The output waveforms for both discharge mechanisms were studied in detail. The charge induced on a detecting probe was also estimated from the measured data. (Auth.)

  8. Observation of coherent diffractive charged current interactions of antineutrinos on neon nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marage, P.; Aderholz, M.; Armenise, N.; Azemoon, T.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Bartley, J. H.; Baton, J. P.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Cooper, A. M.; Chwastowski, J.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Gerbier, G.; Guy, J.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Kochowski, C.; Leighton-Davies, S.; Middleton, R. P.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; Nuzzo, S.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Ruggieri, F.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; Talebzadeh, M.; Vallee, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wells, J.; Wernhard, K. L.; Wittek, W.; Zevgolatakos, E.; WA59 Collaboration

    1984-05-01

    First observation is reported of semi-inclusive coherent diffractive charged current interactions of antineutrinos on neon nuclei. A sharp peaking towards zero is observed in the | t| distribution of interactions for which the final state charge is 0 and from which only one negative hadron is emitted, unaccompanied by any evidence of nuclear fragmentation or reinteraction. This peak is correlated with high momentum of the outgoing charged hadron and with small values of Q2 and x.

  9. Observation of coherent diffractive charged current interactions of antineutrino on neon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Bertrand, D.; Aderholz, M.; Wernhard, K.L.; Wittek, W.; Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Nuzzo, S.; Ruggieri, F.; Azemoon, T.; Bartley, J.H.; Bullock, F.W.; Fitch, P.J.; Leighton-Davies, S.; Sansum, R.A.; Baton, J.P.; Gerbier, G.; Kochowski, C.; Neveu, M.; Brisson, V.; Petiau, P.; Vallee, C.; Chwastowski, J.; Coghen, T.; Guy, J.; Kasper, P.; Venus, W.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Varvell, K.; Wells, J.

    1984-01-01

    First observation is reported of semi-inclusive coherent diffractive charged current interactions of antineutrinos on neon nuclei. A sharp peaking towards zero is observed in the vertical stroketvertical stroke distribution of interactions for which the final state charge is 0 and from which only one negative hadron is emitted, unaccompanied by any evidence of nuclear fragmentation or reinteraction. This peak is correlated with high momentum of the outgoing charged hadron and with small values of Q 2 and chi. (orig.)

  10. Coherent production of a1- mesons and (ρπ)- systems by antineutrinos on neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Willocq, S.; Aderholz, M.; Wittek, W.; Allport, P.P.; Baton, J.P.; Neveu, M.; Burtovoy, V.; Clayton, E.F.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Wainstein, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Jones, G.T.; O'Neale, S.; Varvell, K.; Matsinos, E.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Wachsmuth, H.; Sansum, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The coherent production of 3π systems by charged current antineutrino interactions on neon nuclei is studied in the bubble chamber BEBC exposed to the CERN SPS wide band beam. The coherent signal is attributed mainly to (ρπ) production, where the (ρπ) system is either non-resonant or comes from the decay of a 1 mesons. The kinematical variables and the total cross section are compared with the predictions of the meson dominance model. (orig.)

  11. Photoelectron and ICD electron angular distributions from fixed-in-space neon dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnke, T; Czasch, A; Schoeffler, M; Schoessler, S; Kaesz, M; Titze, J; Kreidi, K; Grisenti, R E; Staudte, A; Jagutzki, O; Schmidt, L Ph H; Semenov, S K; Cherepkov, N A; Schmidt-Boecking, H; Doerner, R

    2007-01-01

    We report on molecular frame angular distributions of 2s photoelectrons and electrons emitted by interatomic Coulombic decay from neon dimers. We found that the measured angular distribution of the photoelectron strongly depends on the environment of the cluster. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with frozen core Hartree-Fock calculations. The ICD electrons show slight variations in their angular distribution for different kinetic energies

  12. A MAUT APPROACH FOR REUSING DOMAIN ONTOLOGIES ON THE BASIS OF THE NeOn METHODOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    A. JIMÉNEZ; M. C. SUÁREZ-FIGUEROA; A. MATEOS; A. GÓMEZ-PÉREZ; M. FERNÁNDEZ-LÓPEZ

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge resource reuse is becoming a widespread approach in the ontology engineering field because it can speed up the ontology development process. In this context, the NeOn Methodology specifies some guidelines for reusing different types of knowledge resources (ontologies, nonontological resources, and ontology design patterns). These guidelines prescribe how to perform the different activities involved in any of the diverse types of reuse processes. One such activity is to select the be...

  13. A novel microalgal system for energy production with nitrogen cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minowa, T.; Sawayama, S. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    A microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, could grow in the recovered solution from the low temperature catalytic gasification of itself, by which methane rich fuel gas was obtained. All nitrogen in the microalga was converted to ammonia during the gasification, and the recovered solution, in which ammonia was dissolved, could be used as nitrogen nutrient. The result of the energy evaluation indicated that the novel microalgal system for energy production with nitrogen cycling could be created. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Photobiological effects of helium neon laser on hematologic and biochemical factors of rabbit blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rahmani Kahnamoei

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Low-level helium neon laser has many applications due to its photobiostimulatory effects. Although the therapeutic effects of low-level laser radiation of different wavelengths and doses are well known, but the exact mechanism of action of the laser radiation on living cells is not yet determined. The present study is designed to evaluate the photobiological effects of 2 mw helium neon laser with wavelength of 632.8 nm on hematologic and biochemical factors of rabbit blood for this purpose, 30 male New Zealand white rabbits with the body weight of 1/5-2 kg were randomly allocated into two groups of control and laser treatment. Animals of both groups were anesthetized and those of laser treatment group were subjected to irradiation with helium neon laser at a                        wavelength of 632.8 nm and output 2 mw for 30 minutes. Finally blood samples were collected from all animals and the biochemical and hematologic factors evaluated. Significant difference (p

  15. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A research tool for integrating ecological processes across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2016-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction of the five NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the near future. Additionally, we include information (i.e. timelines and procedures) on requesting MDPs for PI led projects. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs are designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs are comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach. More specifically, the MDPs include the capability to make tower based measures of ecosystem exchange, radiation, and precipitation in conjunction with baseline soils data such as CO2 flux, and soil temperature and moisture. An aquatics module is also available with the MDP to facilitate research integrating terrestrial and aquatic processes. Ultimately, the NEON MDPs provides a tool for linking PI led research to the continental scale data sets collected by NEON.

  16. Data Collection, Access and Presentation Technologies in the National Ecological Observatory (NEON) Design (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulenbach, S. M.; Berukoff, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on ecosystem functions and biodiversity. In-situ sampling and distributed sensor networks, linked by an advanced cyberinfrastructure, will collect site-based data on a variety of organisms, soils, aquatic systems, atmosphere and climate. Targeted airborne remote sensing observations made by NEON as well as geographical data sets and satellite resources produced by Federal agencies will provide data at regional and national scales. The resulting data streams, collected over a 30-year period, will be synthesized into fully traceable information products that are freely and openly accessible to all users. We provide an overview of several collection, access and presentation technologies evaluated for use by observatory systems throughout the data product life cycle. Specifically, we discuss smart phone applications for citizen scientists as well as the use of handheld devices for sample collection and reporting from the field. Protocols for storing, queuing, and retrieving data from observatory sites located throughout the nation are highlighted as are the application of standards throughout the pipelined production of data products. We discuss the automated incorporation of provenance information and digital object identifiers for published data products. The use of widgets and personalized user portals for the discovery and dissemination of NEON data products are also presented.

  17. Current sheath curvature correlation with the neon soft x-ray emission from plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T; Lin, X; Chandra, K A; Tan, T L; Springham, S V; Patran, A; Lee, P; Lee, S; Rawat, R S

    2005-01-01

    The insulator sleeve length is one of the major parameters that can severely affect the neon soft x-ray yield from a plasma focus. The effect of the insulation sleeve length on various characteristic timings of plasma focus discharges and hence the soft x-ray emission characteristics has been investigated using a resistive divider. The pinhole images and laser shadowgraphy are used to explain the observed variation in the average soft x-ray yield (measured using a diode x-ray spectrometer) with variation of the insulator sleeve length. We have found that for a neon filled plasma focus device the change in insulator sleeve length changes the current sheath curvature angle and thus the length of the focused plasma column. The optimized current sheath curvature angle is found to be between 39 0 and 41 0 , at the specific axial position of 6.2-9.3 cm from the cathode support plate, for our 3.3 kJ plasma focus device. A strong dependence of the neon soft x-ray yield on the current sheath curvature angle has thus been reported

  18. Permafrost slowly exhales methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.

    2018-04-01

    Permafrost soils store vast quantities of organic matter that are vulnerable to decomposition under a warming climate. Recent research finds that methane release from thawing permafrost may outpace carbon dioxide as a major contributor to global warming over the next century.

  19. Methane pellet moderator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.; Carpenter, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A methane pellet moderator assembly consisting of a pelletizer, a helium cooled sub-cooling tunnel, a liquid helium cooled cryogenic pellet storage hopper and a 1.5L moderator cell has been constructed for the purpose demonstrating a system for use in high-power spallation sources. (orig.)

  20. Methane emissions from grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol - van Dasselaar, van den A.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction

    Methane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has been increasing since pre-industrial times, mainly due to human activities. This increase gives concern,

  1. Direct Aromaization of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Marcelin

    1997-01-15

    The thermal decomposition of methane offers significant potential as a means of producing higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of reaction is limited. Work in the literature previous to this project had shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds would significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon or heavier (Clo+) materials. This project studied the effect and optimization of the quenching process as a means of increasing the amount of value added products during the pyrolysis of methane. A reactor was designed to rapidly quench the free-radical combustion reaction so as to maximize the yield of aromatics. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts were studied as a means of lowering the reaction temperature. A lower reaction temperature would have the benefits of more rapid quenching as well as a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. It was the goal of the project to identify promising routes from methane to higher hydrocarbons based on the pyrolysis of methane.

  2. Methane emissions from natural wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.L. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Burke, R.A. Jr. [Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1993-09-01

    Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

  3. Combined gas-phase oxidation of methane and ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogosyan, N.M.; Pogosyan, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    It is established that depending on the reaction conditions combined oxidation of methane and ethylene may result in ethylene and propylene oxides with high selectivity with respect to the process, where in the initial reaction mixture methane is replaced by the same quantity of nitrogen. The formed additional methyl radicals increase the yield of all reaction products except CO. At low temperatures methyl radicals react with oxygen resulting in methyl peroxide radicals, which in turn, reacting with ethylene provide its epoxidation and formation of other oxygen-containing products. At high temperatures as a result of addition reaction between methyl radicals and ethylene, propyl radicals are formed that, in turn yield propylene. Alongside with positive influence on the yield of reaction products, methane exerts negative influence upon the conversion, that is it decreases the rate of ethylene and oxygen conversion, simultaneously decreasing significantly the yield of CO

  4. Quantum-cascade laser photoacoustic detection of methane emitted from natural gas powered engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, M. V.; Sthel, M. S.; Silva, M. G.; Paiva, L. B.; Pinheiro, F. W.; Miklòs, A.; Vargas, H.

    2012-03-01

    In this work we present a laser photoacoustic arrangement for the detection of the important greenhouse gas methane. A quantum-cascade laser and a differential photoacoustic cell were employed. A detection limit of 45 ppbv in nitrogen was achieved as well as a great selectivity. The same methodology was also tested in the detection of methane issued from natural gas powered vehicles (VNG) in Brazil, which demonstrates the excellent potential of this arrangement for greenhouse gas detection emitted from real sources.

  5. Microbial conversion of higher hydrocarbons to methane in oil and coal reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Martin; Beckmaann, Sabrina; Siegert, Michael; Grundger, Friederike; Richnow, Hans [Geomicrobiology Group, Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, oil production has increased enormously but almost half of the oil now remaining is heavy/biodegraded and cannot be put into production. There is therefore a need for new technology and for diversification of energy sources. This paper discusses the microbial conversion of higher hydrocarbons to methane in oil and coal reservoirs. The objective of the study is to identify microbial and geochemical controls on methanogenesis in reservoirs. A graph shows the utilization of methane for various purposes in Germany from 1998 to 2007. A degradation process to convert coal to methane is shown using a flow chart. The process for converting oil to methane is also given. Controlling factors include elements such as Fe, nitrogen and sulfur. Atmospheric temperature and reservoir pressure and temperature also play an important role. From the study it can be concluded that isotopes of methane provide exploration tools for reservoir selection and alkanes and aromatic compounds provide enrichment cultures.

  6. Methane cycling. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T; Gruen, Danielle S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C; Holden, James F; Hristov, Alexander N; Pohlman, John W; Morrill, Penny L; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B; Reeves, Eoghan P; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N; Ritter, Daniel J; Seewald, Jeffrey S; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Hemond, Harold F; Kubo, Michael D; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-24

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted "clumped" isotopologues (for example, (13)CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane's clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on (13)CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Methane from dairy waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-10-22

    This short article describes a facility which will incorporate features to allow for the recovery of the methane gas that is produced in the manufacture of cheese and spray-dried whey powder at the site. The dairy plant is expected to produce about 1,385 m/sup 3//day of methane which will supplement the operation of oil burners and replace the annual consumption of 4,000 bbl of heavy fuel oil. In addition, development of the treatment system would eliminate the consumption of 7,200 kWh/day of electrical energy that would otherwise be required to operate an aerobic disposal system. Total annual energy savings, when the project is fully operational in the spring of 1984, are expected to reach $321,000.

  8. Methanation: reality or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses whether it is possible to partly replace oil and natural gas by electricity-based gas, i.e. to produce methane from water by electrolysis, or by using molecule cracking in dedicated nuclear reactors, and carbon dioxide. He outlines the benefits of this perspective in terms of reduction of imports, and of national electricity production optimisation. He also discusses the drawbacks: it will be difficult to produce the huge required quantity of CO 2 ; it will be even more difficult to produce the required quantity of electricity; the e-methane production cost is much higher than that of the currently imported natural gas. In appendix, the author discusses some key figures related to energy in France (consumption, shares, imports, crucial role of nuclear energy for the future)

  9. Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M.; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) accumulation rates in peatland ecosystems indicate significant biological atmospheric N2 fixation associated with Sphagnum mosses. Here, we show that the linkage between methanotrophic carbon cycling and N2 fixation may constitute an important mechanism in the rapid accumulation of N during the primary succession of peatlands. In our experimental stable isotope enrichment study, previously overlooked methane-induced N2 fixation explained more than one-third of the new N input in the younger peatland stages, where the highest N2 fixation rates and highest methane oxidation activities co-occurred in the water-submerged moss vegetation. PMID:24379382

  10. Project identification for methane reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  11. Effect of Mineral Nutrients on the Kinetics of Methane Utilization by Methanotrophs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiesen, Anette; Arvin, Erik; Broholm, Kim

    1993-01-01

    The effect of different mineral nutrients on the kinetics of methane biodegradation by a mixed culture of methanotrophic bacteria was studied. The substrate factors examined were ammonia, iron, copper, manganese, phosphate, and sulphide. The presence of iron in the growth medium had a strong effect...... was the only nitrogen source. The observed Monod constant for methane utilization increased with increasing concentration of ammonia. This shows that ammonia is a weak competitive inhibitor as observed by other researchers. Relatively high levels of both ammonia (70 mg/l) and copper (300 mu-g/l) inhibited...... the methane degradation, probably due to the toxic effect of copper-amine complexes....

  12. Photofragment imaging of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, A.J.; Zare, R.N.; Chandler, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The photolysis of methane is studied using photofragment imaging techniques. Our study reveals that the photolysis of methane proceeds via many different pathways. The photofragment imaging technique is used to resolve and characterize these various pathways and provides therefore unique insight into the dynamical processes that govern this photodissociation. The formation of H-atom photofragments following absorption of a Lyman-α photon, and H 2 photofragments following absorption of two ultraviolet photons (λ=210 endash 230 nm) are studied. The measured H-atom photofragment images reveal that a channel that produces fast H atoms concomitant with methyl fragments is dominant in the Lyman-α photolysis of methane. This channel leads to an anisotropic recoil of the fragments. A secondary channel is observed leading to the formation of somewhat slower H atoms, but an unique identification of this second channel is not possible from the data. At least part of these slower H atoms are formed via a channel that produces H atoms concomitant with CH and H 2 photofragments. The recoil of these slower H atoms appears to be isotropic. The measured, state-resolved H 2 (v,J), photofragment images reveal that two channels lead to H 2 photofragments from the two-photon photolysis of methane: a channel that leads to H 2 products concomitant with methylene fragments; and a channel that leads to H 2 products concomitant with CH and H fragments. H 2 (v,J) rotational and vibrational distributions are measured for each of these two channels separately. The H 2 products formed via the H 2 +CH 2 channel are rotationally and vibrationally highly excited, whereas those formed via the H 2 +CH+H channel are rotationally and vibrationally cooler. Rotational distributions of H 2 formed via the H 2 +CH+H channel are well reproduced by Boltzmann distributions. (Abstract Truncated)

  13. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  14. Investigation of intense XUV emission of nitrogen-puff Z-pinch with small energy input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raus, J.; Krejci, A.; Piffl, V.

    1992-01-01

    Light elements like nitrogen or carbon are suggested as optimum working media for small Z-pinches (several kJ energy input). It is shown that such elements can be ionized up to K-shell ionization stages not only in hot-spots, but also in the bulk plasma. The yield of nitrogen K-shell radiation (about 10 J/shot) is therefore substantially higher than that of the conventionally used neon. In addition to pinch physics and radiation dynamics, such radiation could be of interest for applications in the 'water window' spectral region. (author) 1 tab., 4 figs., 8 refs

  15. Methane distribution and oxidation around the Lena Delta in summer 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Ingeborg; Hackbusch, Steffen; Schaal, Patrick; Wichels, Antje

    2017-11-01

    methanotrophic population that is well adapted to the cold and methane-poor polar environment but limited by a lack of nitrogen. The diffusive methane flux into the atmosphere ranged from 4 to 163 µmol m2 d-1 (median 24). The diffusive methane flux accounted for a loss of 8 % of the total methane inventory of the investigated area, whereas the methanotrophic bacteria consumed only 1 % of this methane inventory. Our results underscore the importance of measuring the methane oxidation activities in polar estuaries, and they indicate a population-level differentiation between riverine and polar water methanotrophs.

  16. Experimental study of X-ray emission yield in a Filippov-type Plasma Focus operating in neon and neon-krypton mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babazadeh, A.R.; Kiai, S.M.S.; Roshan, M.V.; Emami, M.

    2002-01-01

    Since the installation of PF-DENA at AEOI about one year ago, we performed quantitative studies of variation of X-ray radiations from a new Filippov-type plasma focus device: Dena (90 kJ, 25 kV, 288 μF). The operating gas was neon at a constant pressure of 1 torr and different pressures of krypton admixture (up to 0.3 torr), with the discharge voltage up to 18 kV. For charging voltage of 17 kV with 41 kJ stored energy and spark gap pressure of 1.2x 10 -2 torr, the maximum soft and little hard X-ray (SXR-HXR) emission is found for the neon, resulting in a total SXR yield of 2 V/shot measured by silicon semiconductor diode detectors. Concerning the effect of krypton admixture, a maximum intensity of SXR radiation has been observed at low krypton pressure that is about 1 V/shot. At higher pressure, the quality of SXR emission decreases down to zero. However, the maximum intensity of the HXR radiation yield in the same pressure range was found to be 2.5 V/shot. By increasing the pressure of krypton up tp 0.3 torr, the results show that the krypton admixture gas generally causes, a decrease of the SXR radiation yield down to zero, whereas, the HXR emission yield carries a maximum value at the optimum pressure of krypton that is about 0.1 torr. Nevertheless, the pressure increments of krypton lead to decreasing in the discharge voltage for the maximum X-ray production. (author)

  17. Assessment of free-living nitrogen fixing microorganisms for commercial nitrogen fixation. [economic analysis of ammonia production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, B. O.; Wallace, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Ammonia production by Klebsiella pneumoniae is not economical with present strains and improving nitrogen fixation to its theoretical limits in this organism is not sufficient to achieve economic viability. Because the value of both the hydrogen produced by this organism and the methane value of the carbon source required greatly exceed the value of the ammonia formed, ammonia (fixed nitrogen) should be considered the by-product. The production of hydrogen by KLEBSIELLA or other anaerobic nitrogen fixers should receive additional study, because the activity of nitrogenase offers a significant improvement in hydrogen production. The production of fixed nitrogen in the form of cell mass by Azotobacter is also uneconomical and the methane value of the carbon substrate exceeds the value of the nitrogen fixed. Parametric studies indicate that as efficiencies approach the theoretical limits the economics may become competitive. The use of nif-derepressed microorganisms, particularly blue-green algae, may have significant potential for in situ fertilization in the environment.

  18. Genomic selection for methane emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Haas, Yvette; Pryce, Jennie E; Wall, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a growing area of international concern, and it is well established that the release of greenhouse gases (GHG) is a contributing factor. Of the various GHG produced by ruminants, enteric methane (CH4 ) is the most important contributor. One mitigation strategy is to reduce methane...... emission through genetic selection. Our first attempt used beef cattle and a GWAS to identify genes associated with several CH4 traits in Angus beef cattle. The Angus population consisted of 1020 animals with phenotypes on methane production (MeP), dry matter intake (DMI), and weight (WT). Additionally......, two new methane traits: residual genetic methane (RGM) and residual phenotypic methane (RPM) were calculated by adjusting CH4 for DMI and WT. Animals were genotyped using the 800k Illumina Bovine HD Array. Estimated heritabilities were 0.30, 0.19 and 0.15 for MeP, RGM and RPM respectively...

  19. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 107 gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m−2 per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution. PMID:24616523

  20. Methanization of industrial liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederic, S.; Lugardon, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a first part, this work deals with the theoretical aspects of the methanization of the industrial effluents; the associated reactional processes are detailed. The second part presents the technological criteria for choosing the methanization process in terms of the characteristics of the effluent to be treated. Some of the methanization processes are presented with their respective advantages and disadvantages. At last, is described the implementation of an industrial methanization unit. The size and the main choices are detailed: the anaerobic reactor, the control, the valorization aspects of the biogas produced. Some examples of industrial developments illustrate the different used options. (O.M.)

  1. Methane emissions from coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.M.; Kelafant, J.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Manger, K.C.; Kruger, D.

    1990-09-01

    The report estimates global methane emissions from coal mining on a country specific basis, evaluates the technologies available to degasify coal seams and assesses the economics of recovering methane liberated during mining. 33 to 64 million tonnes were liberated in 1987 from coal mining, 75 per cent of which came from China, the USSR, Poland and the USA. Methane emissions from coal mining are likely to increase. Emission levels vary between surface and underground mines. The methane currently removed from underground mines for safety reasons could be used in a number of ways, which may be economically attractive. 55 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs

  2. Quantum density fluctuations in liquid neon from linearized path-integral calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Jens Aage; Scheers, Johan; Nyman, Gunnar; Rossky, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    The Feynman-Kleinert linearized path-integral [J. A. Poulsen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 119, 12179 (2003)] representation of quantum correlation functions is applied to compute the spectrum of density fluctuations for liquid neon at T=27.6 K, p=1.4 bar, and Q vector 1.55 Aa -1 . The calculated spectrum as well as the kinetic energy of the liquid are in excellent agreement with the experiment of Cunsolo et al. [Phys. Rev. B 67, 024507 (2003)

  3. Results of presowing helium-neon-laser irradiation of sunflower seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetanova, K.

    1989-01-01

    In the period of 1983-1985 under non-irrigation, on calcareous chernozem a trial was carried out with the Start hybrid through single-, double-and triple irradiation of the seeds being stored for 1.8 and 16 days prior to sowing. It is found that the presowing helium-neon-laser irradiation of the sunflower seeds of the Start hybrid exerts a negative effect on the seed yield. Laser use does not stimulate the following: emerged seeds and percentage of the plants being in blossom in the beginning of the phase and after 7 days, seed moisture in harvesting and oil content in them

  4. Experimental study of the effects of helium-neon laser radiation on repair of injured tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong-Qing; Li, Zhu-Yi; Weng, Long-Jiang; An, Mei; Li, Kai-Yun; Chen, Shao-Rong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Lu, Yu

    1993-03-01

    Despite extensive research into the biology of tendon healing, predictably restoring normal function to a digit after a flexor tendon laceration remains one of the most difficult problems facing the hand surgeon. The challenge of simultaneously achieving tendon healing while minimizing the peritendinous scar formation, which limits tendon gliding, has captured the attention of investigators for many years. It has been said that low-power density helium-neon laser radiation had effects on anti-inflammation, detumescence, progressive wound healing, and reducing intestinal adhesions. This experimental study aims at whether helium-neon laser can reduce injured tendon adhesions and improve functional recovery of the injured tendon. Fifty white Leghorn hens were used. Ten were randomly assigned as a normal control group, the other forty were used in the operation. After anesthetizing them with Amytal, a half of the profundus tendons of the second and third foretoes on both sides of the feet were cut. Postoperatively, the hens moved freely in the cages. One side of the toes operated on were randomly chosen as a treatment group, the other side served as an untreated control group. The injured tendon toes in the treatment group were irradiated for twenty minutes daily with a fiber light needle of helium-neon laser therapeutic apparatus (wavelength, 6328 angstroms) at a constant power density of 12.74 mW/cm2, the first exposure taking place 24 hours after the operation. The longest course of treatment was 3 weeks. The control group was not irradiated. At 3 days, 1, 2, 3, and 5 weeks after surgery, 8 hens were sacrificed and their tendons were examined. The experimental results: (1) active, passive flexion and tendon gliding functional recovery were significantly better in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (2) width and thickness of the tendon at the cut site were significantly smaller in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (3) degrees of tendon adhesions were significantly lighter

  5. Finite-temperature random-phase approximation for spectroscopic properties of neon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, J.; Collins, L. A.; Fontes, C. J.; Csanak, G.

    2007-01-01

    A finite-temperature random-phase approximation (FTRPA) is applied to calculate oscillator strengths for excitations in hot and dense plasmas. Application of the FTRPA provides a convenient, self-consistent method with which to explore coupled-channel effects of excited electrons in a dense plasma. We present FTRPA calculations that include coupled-channel effects. The inclusion of these effects is shown to cause significant differences in the oscillator strength for a prototypical case of 1 P excitation in neon when compared with single-channel and with average-atom calculations. Trends as a function of temperature and density are also discussed

  6. Helium-neon laser used to stimulate regeneration of the skeletal muscle damaged by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, M.F.; Bulyakova, N.V.; Azarova, V.S.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the therapeutic effects of transplantation of the regenerating muscular tissue and helium-neon lazer rays on the skeletal muscle received 20 Gy x radiation. The results of four series of experiments showed that the effect of lazer rays on the irradiated transversely cut musculus gastrocnemius is simular to that of transplantation of the minced muscular tissue to the defect of the muscle. Regeneration of the muscle in both cases is normalized so that the regenerating muscular organ slightly differs from the control regenerate of unirradiated muscle

  7. Spin alignment of ρ0 mesons produced in antineutrino and neutrino neon charged-current interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, W.; Guy, J.; Adeholz, M.; Allport, P.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Bullock, F. W.; Burkot, W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Marage, P.; Middleton, R. P.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Petiau, P.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Schmitz, N.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallee, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.

    1987-03-01

    In a bubble chamber experiment with BEBC the spin alignment parameter η=1/2 (2ϱ00 - ϱ11 - ϱ-1-1) is measured for ϱ0 mesons produced in deep inelastic charged-current antineutrino and neutrono interactions on neon. In the current fragmentation region η is found to be ηv=0.48+/-0.27 (stat.)+/-0.15 (syst.) for vNe and ηv=0.12+/-0.20 (stat.)+/-0.10 (syst.) for vNe interactions Present address: University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

  8. Spin alignment of ρ0 mesons produced in antineutrino and neutrino neon charged-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittek, W.; Aderholz, M.; Schmitz, N.; Guy, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Venus, W.; Brisson, V.; Petiau, P.; Vallee, C.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M.T.; Jones, G.T.; Middleton, R.P.; O'Neale, S.W.; Varvell, K.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Vayaki, A.

    1987-01-01

    In a bubble chamber experiment with BEBC the spin alignment parameter η=1/2(2ρ 00 -ρ 11 -ρ -1-1 ) is measured for ρ 0 mesons produced in deep inelastic charged-current antineutrino and neutrino interactions on neon. In the current fragmentation region η is found to be η ν =0.48±0.27(stat.)±0.15(syst.) for anti νNe and η ν =0.12±0.20(stat.)±0.10(syst.) for νNe interactions. (orig.)

  9. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Atwani, Osman; Huynh, Chuong; Norris, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope was used to irradiated GaSb surfaces with 5 keV neon. • In-situ imaging using helium beam and ex-situ imaging using an electron beam were performed. • Differences in imaging output between the helium and the electron beam were observed. • Transition occurred in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. • Collision cascade simulations suggested a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms. - Abstract: Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  10. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atwani, Osman, E-mail: oelatwan25@gmail.com [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Huynh, Chuong [Carl Zeiss Microscopy, LLC, One Corporation Way, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Norris, Scott [Department of Mathematics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope was used to irradiated GaSb surfaces with 5 keV neon. • In-situ imaging using helium beam and ex-situ imaging using an electron beam were performed. • Differences in imaging output between the helium and the electron beam were observed. • Transition occurred in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. • Collision cascade simulations suggested a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms. - Abstract: Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  11. Effects of filling ratio and condenser temperature on the thermal performance of a neon cryogenic oscillating heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Li, Yi; Wang, Qiuliang

    2018-01-01

    A cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (OHP) made of a bended copper capillary tube is manufactured. The lengths of the condenser section, adiabatic section and evaporator section are 100, 280 and 100 mm, respectively. Neon is used as the working fluid. Effects of liquid filling ratio and condenser temperature on the thermal performance of the OHP are studied. A correlation based on the available experimental data sets is proposed to predict the thermal performance of the neon cryogenic OHP with different filling ratios and condenser temperature. Compared with the experimental data, the average standard deviation of the correlation is about 15.0%, and approximately 92.4% of deviations are within ±30%.

  12. Methane from wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S

    2005-07-15

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  13. Methane from wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S.

    2005-07-01

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  14. Methanogenesis and methane genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, J.N.; Shref, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the pathways leading to methane biosynthesis is presented. The steps investigated to date by gene cloning and DNA sequencing procedures are identified and discussed. The primary structures of component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase encoded by mcr operons in different methanogens are compared. Experiments to detect the primary structure of the genes encoding F420 reducing hydrogenase (frhABG) and methyl hydrogen reducing hydrogenase (mvhDGA) in methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain H are compared with each other and with eubacterial hydrogenase encoding genes. A biotechnological use for hydrogenases from hypermorphillic archaebacteria is suggested. (author)

  15. Methane adsorption on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perl, Andras; Koopman, Folkert; Jansen, Peter; de Rooij, Marietta; van Gemert, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Methane storage in adsorbed form is a promising way to effectively and safely store fuel for vehicular transportation or for any other potential application. In a solid adsorbent, nanometer wide pores can trap methane by van der Waals forces as high density fluid at low pressure and room

  16. First principles study of inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) interactions with hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Xiang-Shan [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Hou, Jie [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Li, Xiang-Yan [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Xuebang, E-mail: xbwu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, C.S., E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-15

    We have systematically evaluated binding energies of hydrogen with inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) defects, including interstitial clusters and vacancy-inert-gas complexes, and their stable configurations using first-principles calculations. Our calculations show that these inert-gas defects have large positive binding energies with hydrogen, 0.4–1.1 eV, 0.7–1.0 eV, and 0.6–0.8 eV for helium, neon, and argon, respectively. This indicates that these inert-gas defects can act as traps for hydrogen in tungsten, and impede or interrupt the diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten, which supports the discussion on the influence of inert-gas on hydrogen retention in recent experimental literature. The interaction between these inert-gas defects and hydrogen can be understood by the attractive interaction due to the distortion of the lattice structure induced by inert-gas defects, the intrinsic repulsive interaction between inert-gas atoms and hydrogen, and the hydrogen-hydrogen repelling in tungsten lattice.

  17. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s –1 , we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s –1 , Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  18. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Von Steiger, Rudolf [International Space Science Institute, Hallerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s{sup –1}, we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s{sup –1}, Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  19. Disalignment rate coefficient of neon excited atoms due to helium atom collisions at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, M; Shimamura, T; Furutani, T; Hasuo, M; Bahrim, C; Fujimoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Disalignment of neon excited atoms in the fine-structure 2p i levels (in Paschen notation) of the 2p 5 3p configuration is investigated in a helium-neon glow discharge at temperatures between 15 and 77 K. At several temperatures, we plot the disalignment rate as a function of the helium atom density for Ne* (2p 2 or 2p 7 ) + He(1s 2 ) collisions. The slope of this dependence gives the disalignment rate coefficient. For both collisions, the experimental data for the disalignment rate coefficient show a more rapid decrease with the decrease in temperature below 40 K than our quantum close-coupling calculations based on the model potential of Hennecart and Masnou-Seeuws (1985 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 18 657). This finding suggests that the disalignment cross section rapidly decreases below a few millielectronvolts, in disagreement with our theoretical quantum calculations which predict a strong increase below 1 meV. The disagreement suggests that the long-range electrostatic potentials are significantly more repulsive than in the aforementioned model

  20. Positive column of a glow discharge in neon with charged dust grains (a review)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, D. N., E-mail: cryolab@ihed.ras.ru; Shumova, V. V.; Vasilyak, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The effect of charged micron-size dust grains (microparticles) on the electric parameters of the positive column of a low-pressure dc glow discharge in neon has been studied experimentally and numerically. Numerical analysis is carried out in the diffusion-drift approximation with allowance for the interaction of dust grains with metastable neon atoms. In a discharge with a dust grain cloud, the longitudinal electric field increases. As the number density of dust grains in an axisymmetric cylindrical dust cloud rises, the growth of the electric field saturates. It is shown that the contribution of metastable atoms to ionization is higher in a discharge with dust grains, in spite of the quenching of metastable atoms on dust grains. The processes of charging of dust grains and the dust cloud are considered. As the number density of dust grains rises, their charge decreases, while the space charge of the dust cloud increases. The results obtained can be used in plasma technologies involving microparticles.

  1. Positive column of a glow discharge in neon with charged dust grains (a review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, D. N.; Shumova, V. V.; Vasilyak, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of charged micron-size dust grains (microparticles) on the electric parameters of the positive column of a low-pressure dc glow discharge in neon has been studied experimentally and numerically. Numerical analysis is carried out in the diffusion-drift approximation with allowance for the interaction of dust grains with metastable neon atoms. In a discharge with a dust grain cloud, the longitudinal electric field increases. As the number density of dust grains in an axisymmetric cylindrical dust cloud rises, the growth of the electric field saturates. It is shown that the contribution of metastable atoms to ionization is higher in a discharge with dust grains, in spite of the quenching of metastable atoms on dust grains. The processes of charging of dust grains and the dust cloud are considered. As the number density of dust grains rises, their charge decreases, while the space charge of the dust cloud increases. The results obtained can be used in plasma technologies involving microparticles.

  2. Microscopic distribution functions, structure, and kinetic energy of liquid and solid neon: Quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Martin; Zoppi, Marco

    2002-01-01

    We have performed extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations of liquid and solid neon, in order to derive the kinetic energy as well as the single-particle and pair distribution functions of neon atoms in the condensed phases. From the single-particle distribution function n(r) one can derive the momentum distribution and thus obtain an independent estimate of the kinetic energy. The simulations have been carried out using mostly the semiempirical HFD-C2 pair potential by Aziz et al. [R. A. Aziz, W. J. Meath, and A. R. Allnatt, Chem. Phys. 79, 295 (1983)], but, in a few cases, we have also used the Lennard-Jones potential. The differences between the potentials, as measured by the properties investigated, are not very large, especially when compared with the actual precision of the experimental data. The simulation results have been compared with all the experimental information that is available from neutron scattering. The overall agreement with the experiments is very good

  3. Experimental investigation of neon seeding in the snowflake configuration in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H., E-mail: holger.reimerdes@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Canal, G.P.; Duval, B.P.; Labit, B. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); Lunt, T. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, Garching (Germany); Nespoli, F.; Vijvers, W.A.J. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Lausanne (Switzerland); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Lowry, C. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Tal, B. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, Budapest (Hungary); Wischmeier, M. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Recent TCV experiments have examined the effect of the poloidal field strength in the vicinity of the x-point of diverted configurations on their ability to radiate a large fraction of the exhaust power. A larger region of low poloidal field is a key characteristic of the “snowflake” configuration, which has been proposed as an alternative divertor solution that decreases the power flux to the targets in a DEMO-size tokamak. In the investigated Ohmic discharges, increasing the plasma density and seeding neon both increased the radiated exhaust fraction up to 60–70%. In all cases, the highest radiation fraction was determined by the onset of MHD rather than a radiation instability. The experiments indicate that, while the conventional single-null configuration leads to more radiation (+10%) at higher densities, the snowflake configuration radiates more when seeding neon impurities (+15%). Extrapolation of these modest, but systematic, dependencies on the divertor geometry to reactor-relevant higher heating power and larger device size must be based on a physics model.

  4. Chromosome aberrations induced by 135 MeV of carbon and neon beams by PRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Hiroshi; Minamihisamatu, Masako; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Itsukaichi, Hiromi; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Yatagai, Fumio; Sato, Kohki.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosome aberration can be an indicator of the radiation lesions in irradiated cells. Many studies on chromosome aberration induced by X-ray and γ - ray have indicated that the dose response of the aberration can be fitted to a quadratic equation, Y = αD + βD 2 , and it becomes linear as the LET of beams increases. The main subject of this study was some quantification of chromosomal aberration induced by 135 MeV/n carbon and neon beams produced by the RRC, the operation of which increasingly became useful for the studies on heavy ion biology. The results will meet with some of the radiobiological features connected to the specific action of charged particles. The materials used, the experimental method and the results are reported. Four curves of the dose response for the production of dicentric and ring types of aberration induced by carbon and neon beams and four different dose average LETs are given. Aberration production rate became higher as LET increased. Chromosome aberration can be quantified as an indicator of radiation lesions in the case of high LET particle radiation. (K.I.)

  5. New determination of the vapour pressures of the isotopes of neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, R.

    1960-03-01

    We have undertaken an experimental reinvestigation of the vapor pressures of the neon isotopes over the temperature range 16.30-30.1 deg. K. Measurements were made by differential manometry in a Giauque-Johnston type cryostat modified for temperature stability. The New sample contained 99.9 % Ne 20 and the Ne 22 sample contained 72,2 % Ne 22 . Extrapolation to pure Ne 20 and Ne 22 can be made with sufficient accuracy by the use of Raoult's law. Our results are in substantial agreement with those of Keesom and Haantjes. At 20 deg. K, where the scatter in our data is an order of magnitude smaller than in the data of Keesom and Haantjes, we find In P Ne 20 /P Ne 22 is 6 % larger than the smoothed line given by them. For solid neon, our data can be represented to a high accuracy by a Debye harmonic lattice with θ D (Ne 20 ) = 74.6 deg. K. The result may be compared with the value obtained by Henshaw from the Debye-Waller temperature factor, θ D = 73 deg. K, and with the recent calculation of the zero point energy of Ne by Bernardes, from which he obtains θ D 8E θ /9R = 73 deg.. K. (author) [fr

  6. Analysis of neon soft x-ray spectra from short-pulse laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abare, A.C.; Keane, C.J.; Crane, J.K.; DaSilva, L.B.; Lee, R.W.; Perry, M.D.; Falcone, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    We report preliminary results from the analysis of streaked soft x-ray neon spectra a gas jet target. In obtained from the interaction of a picosecond Nd:glass laser with these experiments streaked spectra show prompt harmonic emission followed by longer time duration soft x-ray line emission. The majority of the line emission observed was found to originate from Li- and Be-like Ne and the major transitions in the observed spectra have been identified. Li-like emission lines were observed to decay faster in time than Be-like transitions, suggesting that recombination is taking place. Line ratios of n=4-2 and n=3-2 transitions supported the view that these lines were optically thin and thick, respectively. The time history of Li-like Ne 2p-4d and 2p-3d lines is in good agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model coupled to a time dependent collisional-radiative code. Further x-ray spectroscopic analysis is underway which is aimed at diagnosing plasma conditions and assessing the potential of this recombining neon plasma as a quasi-steady-state recombination x-ray laser medium

  7. Optimization of a condensed-neon cooling system for a HTS synchronous motor with Gd-bulk HTS field-pole magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felder, B; Miki, M; Tsuzuki, K; Izumi, M [Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchujima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Hayakawa, H, E-mail: d082028@kaiyodai.ac.j [Kitano Seiki Co. Ltd., 7-17-3, Chuo, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143-0024 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    The axial-gap synchronous machine developed in our laboratory is based on Gd-bulk HTS field-pole magnets, able to trap a part of the magnetic flux they are submitted to when cooled down below T{sub c}. At the liquid nitrogen temperature, by the Pulsed-Field Magnetization (PFM), 1.04 T was trapped in 60 mm-diameter and 20 mm-thickness magnets, leading to an output power of the motor of 10 kW at 720 rpm. To enhance this performance, we have to increase the total amount of trapped flux in the bulk, the shortest way being to decrease the temperature of the bulk HTS. Thus, we focused on the improvement of the condensed-neon cooling system, a closed-cycle thermosyphon, so that it provided enough cooling power to lead the rotor plate enclosing the magnets to a low temperature. The present study implied coming out with a new fin-oriented design of the condensation chamber; hence, the numeric calculations and FEM software (ANSYS) heat transfer simulations were conducted for various shapes and positions of the fins. The trapezoidal design offering the best efficiency was then manufactured for testing in a heat-load test configuration, leading to cooling times divided by three and a maximum heat load endured of 55 W.

  8. Optimization of a condensed-neon cooling system for a HTS synchronous motor with Gd-bulk HTS field-pole magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, B.; Miki, M.; Tsuzuki, K.; Izumi, M.; Hayakawa, H.

    2010-06-01

    The axial-gap synchronous machine developed in our laboratory is based on Gd-bulk HTS field-pole magnets, able to trap a part of the magnetic flux they are submitted to when cooled down below Tc. At the liquid nitrogen temperature, by the Pulsed-Field Magnetization (PFM), 1.04 T was trapped in 60 mm-diameter and 20 mm-thickness magnets, leading to an output power of the motor of 10 kW at 720 rpm. To enhance this performance, we have to increase the total amount of trapped flux in the bulk, the shortest way being to decrease the temperature of the bulk HTS. Thus, we focused on the improvement of the condensed-neon cooling system, a closed-cycle thermosyphon, so that it provided enough cooling power to lead the rotor plate enclosing the magnets to a low temperature. The present study implied coming out with a new fin-oriented design of the condensation chamber; hence, the numeric calculations and FEM software (ANSYS) heat transfer simulations were conducted for various shapes and positions of the fins. The trapezoidal design offering the best efficiency was then manufactured for testing in a heat-load test configuration, leading to cooling times divided by three and a maximum heat load endured of 55 W.

  9. Effects of nitrogen load on the function and diversity of methanotrophs in the littoral wetland of a boreal lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri MP Siljanen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. A major part of the total methane emissions from lake ecosystems are emitted from littoral wetlands. Methane emissions are significantly reduced by methanotrophs as they use methane as the sole energy and carbon source. Function of methanotrophs can be either activated or suppressed by nitrogen. However, the effects of nitrogen on methanotrophs in littoral wetlands are unknown. Here we report how nitrogen loading in situ affected the function and diversity of methanotrophs in a littoral wetland. Methanotrophic community composition and functional diversity were analyzed with particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA gene targeted microarray. Nitrogen load had no effects on methane oxidation potential and methane fluxes. Nitrogen load activated pmoA gene transcription of type I (Methylobacter, Methylomonas and LW21-freshwater phylotypes methanotrophs, but decreased the relative abundance of type II (Methylocystis, Methylosinus trichosporium and Methylosinus phylotypes methanotrophs. Hence, the overall activity of a methanotroph community in littoral wetlands is unlikely to be affected by nitrogen leached from the catchment area.

  10. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  11. Search for interstellar methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knacke, R.F.; Kim, Y.H.; Noll, K.S.; Geballe, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers searched for interstellar methane in the spectra of infrared sources embedded in molecular clouds. New observations of several lines of the P and R branches of the nu 3 band of CH4 near 3.3 microns give column densities in the range N less than 1(-2) times 10 to the minus 16th power cm(-2). Resulting abundance ratios are (CH4)/(CO) less than 3.3 times 10 to the minus 2nd power toward GL961 in NGC 2244 and less than 2.4 times 10 to the minus 3rd power toward GL989 in the NGC 2264 molecular cloud. The limits, and those determined in earlier observations of BN in Orion and GL490, suggest that there is little methane in molecular clouds. The result agrees with predictions of chemical models. Exceptions could occur in clouds where oxygen may be depleted, for example by H2O freezing on grains. The present observations probably did not sample such regions

  12. Conference on authorisation procedures and territorial integration of methanation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, Katharina; Furois, Timothee; Molinie, Lea; Fuseliez, Sabrina; Stolpp, Sebastian; Lavoue, Fannie; Grosse, Andreas; Charbeaux, Veronique; Chapelat, Nicolas; Merigout, Patricia; Stinner, Walter; Trommler, Marcus; Jacobi, H. Fabian; Mauky, E.; Weinrich, S.

    2014-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on the authorisation procedures and the territorial integration of methanation projects. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, participants exchanged views on the situation of methanation industry in both countries, on the legal framework of authorization procedures, and on the different local strategies for the integration of methanation facilities. A series of presentations deal with the use of digestates and put forward the differences between France and Germany in the use and valorization of methanation digestates. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Bioenergy in the energy system of the future - Policy framework, new biogas regulations in the EEG 2014 German law (Katharina Boettcher); 2 - The energy Transition for Green Growth law and its role for the French biogas (Timothee Furois); 3 - The 'EMAA' (Energy Methanation Autonomy Nitrogen) plan - Progress status (Lea Molinie); 4 - Biogas in France: current status and outlooks, structuration of a developing industry and its role in the energy transition (Sabrina Fuseliez); 5 - Biogas market in Germany and potentials for development (Sebastian Stolpp); 6 - Authorization procedures in France, and the new unique authorization (Fannie Lavoue); 7 - Approval procedures for biogas plants and the protection of neighbours' rights in Germany (Andreas Grosse); 8 - Regional strategy of methanation development in Ile-de-France (Veronique Charbeaux) 9 - Renewable region and biogas integration: the Brittany biogas plan (Nicolas Chapelat); 10 - Bioenergy regions and the role of biogas - Good examples for sustainable bio-energy use (Birger Kerckow); 11 - Evaluation for registration in france of digestates produced by anaerobic digestion (Patricia Merigout); 12 - Treatment and Conditioning of Fermentation Residues from Biogas Plants (Marcus Trommler); 13

  13. Methane. A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amstel, van A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's atmosphere is changing because of emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases. Carbon dioxide emissions are important and result in half of the warming of the atmosphere. Pollutants from burning like black carbon (soot), nitrogen oxides and sulphur oxides have adverse health effects and

  14. Methane production and methane consumption: a review of processes underlying wetland methane fluxes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Potential rates of both methane production and methane consumption vary over three orders of magnitude and their distribution is skew. These rates are weakly correlated with ecosystem type, incubation temperature, in situ aeration, latitude, depth and distance to oxic/anoxic interface. Anaerobic

  15. Methane Recycling During Burial of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    We quantitatively investigate the integral processes of methane hydrate formation from local microbial methane generation, burial of methane hydrate with sedimentation, and methane recycling at the base of the hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) with a multiphase multicomponent numerical model. Methane recycling happens in cycles, and there is not a steady state. Each cycle starts with free gas accumulation from hydrate dissociation below the BHSZ. This free gas flows upward under buoyancy, elevates the hydrate saturation and capillary entry pressure at the BHSZ, and this prevents more free gas flowing in. Later as this layer with elevated hydrate saturation is buried and dissociated, the large amount of free gas newly released and accumulated below rapidly intrudes into the hydrate stability zone, drives rapid hydrate formation and creates three-phase (gas, liquid and hydrate) equilibrium above the BHSZ. The gas front retreats to below the BHSZ until all the free gas is depleted. The shallowest depth that the free gas reaches in one cycle moves toward seafloor as more and more methane is accumulated to the BHSZ with time. More methane is stored above the BHSZ in the form of concentrated hydrate in sediments with relatively uniform pore throat, and/or with greater compressibility. It is more difficult to initiate methane recycling in passive continental margins where the sedimentation rate is low, and in sediments with low organic matter content and/or methanogenesis reaction rate. The presence of a permeable layer can store methane for significant periods of time without recycling. In a 2D system where the seafloor dips rapidly, the updip gas flow along the BHSZ transports more methane toward topographic highs where methane gas and elevated hydrate saturation intrude deeper into the hydrate stability zone within one cycle. This could lead to intermittent gas venting at seafloor at the topographic highs. This study provides insights on many phenomenon associated with

  16. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  17. Titan's methane clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of the 12C/13C and D/H isotopic ratios in Titan's methane show intriguing differences from the values recorded in the giant planets. This implies that either (1) the atmosphere was differently endowed with material at the time of formation, or (2) evolutionary processes are at work in the moon's atmosphere - or some combination of the two. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Instrument (GCMS) found 12CH4/13CH4 = 82 +/- 1 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 7% lower than the giant planets' value of 88 +/- 7 (Sada et al. 1996), which closely matches the terrestrial inorganic standard of 89. The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has previously reported 12CH4/13CH4 of 77 +/-3 based on nadir sounding, which we now revise upwards to 80 +/- 4 based on more accurate limb sounding. The CIRS and GCMS results are therefore in agreement about an overall enrichment in 13CH4 of ~10%. The value of D/H in Titan's CH4 has long been controversial: historical measurements have ranged from about 8-15 x 10-5 (e.g. Coustenis et al. 1989, Coustenis et al. 2003). A recent measurement based on CIRS limb data by Bezard et al. (2007) puts the D/H in CH4 at (13 +/- 1) x 10-5, very much greater than in Jupiter and Saturn, ~2 x 10-5 (Mahaffy et al. 1998, Fletcher et al. 2009). To add complexity, the 12C/13C and D/H vary among molecules in Titan atmosphere, typically showing enhancement in D but depletion in 13C in the daughter species (H2, C2H2, C2H6), relative to the photochemical progenitor, methane. Jennings et al. (2009) have sought to interpret the variance in carbon isotopes as a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), whilst an explanation for the D/H in all molecules remains elusive (Cordier et al. 2008). In this presentation we argue that evolution of isotopic ratios in Titan's methane over time forms a ticking 'clock', somewhat analogous to isotopic ratios in geochronology. Under plausible assumptions about the initial values and subsequent replenishment, various

  18. Polarization transfer between oriented metastable helium atoms and neon atoms. A comparison of even and odd isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, D M; Wang, H T.M.

    1983-11-01

    Collision-induced polarization transfer from optically pumped helium to excited states of neon is studied using various combinations of even and odd isotopes. It is found that, within our experimental accuracy of 10%, the resultant polarization is independent of the isotopic composition of the binary mixture. Possible applications using this mechanism are discussed.

  19. Inelastic collisions of neon 22 nuclei with photoemulsion at 4.1 A GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstov, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    Inelastic collisions of neon-22 nuclei accelerated at the JINR synchrophasotron with BR-2 photoemulsion nuclei are investigated. Colliding nuclei fragmentation including their total disintegration, pion production, correlation ratios are studied. There are particular cases of 22 Ne-emulsion collisions, i.e. manifestation of collective effects in inelastic collisions of relativistic nuclei

  20. Feasibility of evaluating possible sup 85 Kr environmental contamination from neon lamp production line to be installed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guangzuo, Li [Chengdu Sanitary-Epidemiological Station, Chengdu, SC (China)

    1989-12-01

    Using a simplified method, the concentrations of {sup 85}Kr leaking into the air of a workshop and its surroundings, where a neon lamp production line was to be installed, were calculated. The doses to the workers and inhabitants nearby were also estimated. Thus, the evaluation of {sup 85}Kr enviromental contamination caused by imported equipments was made feasible.

  1. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    by the competition between three reaction paths from CH3 to CH2O. A direct high temperature path (A), a two-step NO2 enhanced low temperature path (B) and a slow three step NO enhanced path (C), which may produce NO2 to activate path B. The negative temperature coefficient behaviour was explained by a competition...

  2. Emissions of methane and nitrogen oxides from peatland ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martikainen, P.J.; Nykaenen, H.; Laang, K.; Alm, J.; Silvola, J.

    1994-01-01

    Climatic change may cause drier, warmer summer in the high latitudes and cause remarkable changes in gas fluxes on peatlands. Drained peatlands can be used as models to predict the long-term effects of increased peat aeration on trace gas fluxes. Results are presented from studies about emissions of CH 4 , N 2 O and NO in both virgin and drained Finnish peatlands, and give some information about the factors regulating the production and consumption of these trace gases

  3. Investigation of combustion characteristics of methane-hydrogen fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetkin, A. V.; Suris, A. L.; Litvinova, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical investigations of combustion characteristics of methane-hydrogen fuel used at present in tube furnaces of some petroleum refineries are carried out and possible problems related to change-over of existing furnaces from natural gas to methane-hydrogen fuel are analyzed. The effect of the composition of the blended fuel, associated temperature and emissivity of combustion products, temperature of combustion chamber walls, mean beam length, and heat release on variation in the radiation heat flux is investigated. The methane concentration varied from 0 to 100%. The investigations were carried out both at arbitrary given gas temperatures and at effective temperatures determined based on solving a set of equations at various heat-release rates of the combustion chamber and depended on the adiabatic combustion temperature and the temperature at the chamber output. The approximation dependence for estimation of the radiation heat exchange rate in the radiant chamber of the furnace at change-over to fuel with a greater hydrogen content is obtained. Hottel data were applied in the present work in connection with the impossibility to use approximated formulas recommended by the normative method for heat calculation of boilers to determine the gas emissivity, which are limited by the relationship of partial pressures of water steam and carbon dioxide in combustion products . The effect of the methane-hydrogen fuel on the equilibrium concentration of nitrogen oxides is also investigated.

  4. Recent advances in methane activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuska, M; Kataja, K [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Considerable work has been done in the research and development of methane conversion technologies. Although some promising conversion processes have been demonstrated, further advances in engineering and also in the chemistry are needed before these technologies become commercial. High-temperature processes, e.g. the oxidative coupling of methane, studied thoroughly during the last 15 years, suffer from severe theoretical yield limits and poor economics. In the long term, the most promising approaches seem to be the organometallic and, especially, the biomimetic activation of methane. (author) (22 refs.)

  5. Recent advances in methane activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuska, M.; Kataja, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Considerable work has been done in the research and development of methane conversion technologies. Although some promising conversion processes have been demonstrated, further advances in engineering and also in the chemistry are needed before these technologies become commercial. High-temperature processes, e.g. the oxidative coupling of methane, studied thoroughly during the last 15 years, suffer from severe theoretical yield limits and poor economics. In the long term, the most promising approaches seem to be the organometallic and, especially, the biomimetic activation of methane. (author) (22 refs.)

  6. Methane hydroxylation: a biomimetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, Aleksandr E; Shteinman, Al'bert A

    2012-01-01

    The review addresses direct methane oxidation — an important fundamental problem, which has attracted much attention of researchers in recent years. Analysis of the available results on biomimetic and bio-inspired methane oxygenation has demonstrated that assimilating of the experience of Nature on oxidation of methane and other alkanes significantly enriches the arsenal of chemistry and can radically change the character of the entire chemical production, as well as enables the solution of many material, energetic and environmental problems. The bibliography includes 310 references.

  7. Global Methane Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeburgh, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Methane (CH4) has been studied as an atmospheric constituent for over 200 years. A 1776 letter from Alessandro Volta to Father Campi described the first experiments on flammable "air" released by shallow sediments in Lake Maggiore (Wolfe, 1996; King, 1992). The first quantitative measurements of CH4, both involving combustion and gravimetric determination of trapped oxidation products, were reported in French by Boussingault and Boussingault, 1864 and Gautier (1901), who reported CH4 concentrations of 10 ppmv and 0.28 ppmv (seashore) and 95 ppmv (Paris), respectively. The first modern measurements of atmospheric CH4 were the infrared absorption measurements of Migeotte (1948), who estimated an atmospheric concentration of 2.0 ppmv. Development of gas chromatography and the flame ionization detector in the 1950s led to observations of vertical CH4 distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere, and to establishment of time-series sampling programs in the late 1970s. Results from these sampling programs led to suggestions that the concentration of CH4, as that of CO2, was increasing in the atmosphere. The possible role of CH4 as a greenhouse gas stimulated further research on CH4 sources and sinks. Methane has also been of interest to microbiologists, but findings from microbiology have entered the larger context of the global CH4 budget only recently.Methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere. It plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry and the radiative balance of the Earth. Stratospheric oxidation of CH4 provides a means of introducing water vapor above the tropopause. Methane reacts with atomic chlorine in the stratosphere, forming HCl, a reservoir species for chlorine. Some 90% of the CH4 entering the atmosphere is oxidized through reactions initiated by the OH radical. These reactions are discussed in more detail by Wofsy (1976) and Cicerone and Oremland (1988), and are important in controlling the oxidation state of the atmosphere

  8. Impacts of Human Alteration of the Nitrogen Cycle in the U.S. on Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen cycling processes affect radiative forcing directly through emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and indirectly because emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO x ) and ammonia (NH3) affect atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor (H2O), ozone (O...

  9. Stratification of Diversity and Activity of Methanogenic and Methanotrophic Microorganisms in a Nitrogen-Fertilized Italian Paddy Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaksmaa, A.; Alen, T. van; Ettwig, K.F.; Valè, G.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Lüke, C.

    2017-01-01

    Paddy fields are important ecosystems, as rice is the primary food source for about half of the world’s population. Paddy fields are impacted by nitrogen fertilization and are a major anthropogenic source of methane. Microbial diversity and methane metabolism were investigated in the upper 60cm of a

  10. Biogas crops grown in energy crop rotations: Linking chemical composition and methane production characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Christiane; Idler, Christine; Heiermann, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Methane production characteristics and chemical composition of 405 silages from 43 different crop species were examined using uniform laboratory methods, with the aim to characterise a wide range of crop feedstocks from energy crop rotations and to identify main parameters that influence biomass quality for biogas production. Methane formation was analysed from chopped and over 90 days ensiled crop biomass in batch anaerobic digestion tests without further pre-treatment. Lignin content of crop biomass was found to be the most significant explanatory variable for specific methane yields while the methane content and methane production rates were mainly affected by the content of nitrogen-free extracts and neutral detergent fibre, respectively. The accumulation of butyric acid and alcohols during the ensiling process had significant impact on specific methane yields and methane contents of crop silages. It is proposed that products of silage fermentation should be considered when evaluating crop silages for biogas production. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial and temporal distribution of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria in an intertidal zone of the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaqi; Shen, Lidong; He, Zhanfei; Hu, Jiajie; Cai, Zhaoyang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Baolan

    2017-11-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO), which couples anaerobic methane oxidation and nitrite reduction, is a recently discovered bioprocess coupling microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. The discovery of this microbial process challenges the traditional knowledge of global methane sinks and nitrogen losses. In this study, the abundance and activity of N-DAMO bacteria were investigated and their contributions to methane sink and nitrogen loss were estimated in different seasons and different partitions of an intertidal zone of the East China Sea. The results showed that N-DAMO bacteria were extensively and continuously present in the intertidal zone, with the number of cells ranging from 5.5 × 10 4 to 2.8 × 10 5 copy g -1 soil and the potential activity ranging from 0.52 to 5.7 nmol CO 2  g -1 soil day -1 , contributing 5.0-36.6% of nitrite- and sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation in the intertidal zone. The N-DAMO activity and its contribution to the methane consumption were highest in the spring and in the low intertidal zone. These findings showed that the N-DAMO process is an important methane and nitrogen sink in the intertidal zone and varies with the seasons and the partitions of the intertidal zone.

  12. The watercolor illusion and neon color spreading: a unified analysis of new cases and neural mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Baingio; Grossberg, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    Coloration and figural properties of neon color spreading and the watercolor illusion are studied using phenomenal and psychophysical observations. Coloration properties of both effects can be reduced to a common limiting condition, a nearby color transition called the two-dot limiting case, which clarifies their perceptual similarities and dissimilarities. The results are explained by the FACADE neural model of biological vision. The model proposes how local properties of color transitions activate spatial competition among nearby perceptual boundaries, with boundaries of lower-contrast edges weakened by competition more than boundaries of higher-contrast edges. This asymmetry induces spreading of more color across these boundaries than conversely. The model also predicts how depth and figure-ground effects are generated in these illusions.

  13. Numerical studies of neon gas-puff Z-pinch dynamic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Cheng; Yang Zhenhua; Ding Ning

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic processes of neon gas-puff Z-pinch are studied numerically in this paper. A high temperature plasma with a high density can be generated in the process. Based on some physical analysis and assumption, a set of equations of one-dimensional Lagrangian radiation magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) and its code are developed to solve the problem. Spatio-temporal distributions of plasma parameters in the processes are obtained, and their dynamic variations show that the major results are self-consistent. The duration for the plasma pinched to centre, as well as the width and the total energy of the x-ray pulse caused by the Z-pinch are in reasonable agreement with experimental results of GAMBLE-II. A zipping effect is also clearly shown in the simulation

  14. Electrical Versus Optical: Comparing Methods for Detecting Terahertz Radiation Using Neon Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, L. L.; Lewis, R. A.

    2018-05-01

    Terahertz radiation impinging on a lit neon tube causes additional ionization of the encapsulated gas. As a result, the electrical current flowing between the electrodes increases and the glow discharge in the tube brightens. These dual phenomena suggest two distinct modes of terahertz sensing. The electrical mode simply involves measuring the electrical current. The optical mode involves monitoring the brightness of the weakly ionized plasma glow discharge. Here, we directly compare the two detection modes under identical experimental conditions. We measure 0.1-THz radiation modulated at frequencies in the range 0.1-10 kHz, for lamp currents in the range 1-10 mA. We find that electrical detection provides a superior signal-to-noise ratio while optical detection has a faster response. Either method serves as the basis of a compact, robust, and inexpensive room-temperature detector of terahertz radiation.

  15. Heterodyne detection at 300 GHz using neon indicator lamp glow discharge detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon Akram, Avihai; Rozban, Daniel; Kopeika, Natan S; Abramovich, Amir

    2013-06-10

    A miniature neon indicator lamp, also known as a glow discharge detector (GDD), costing about 50 cents, was found to be an excellent room temperature terahertz radiation detector. Proof-of-concept 300 GHz heterodyne detection using GDD is demonstrated in this paper. Furthermore, a comparison to direct detection was carried out as well. Previous results with the GDD at 10 GHz showed 40 times better sensitivity using heterodyne detection compared to direct detection. Preliminary results at 300 GHz showed better sensitivity by a factor of 20 with only 56 μW local-oscillator power using heterodyne compared to direct detection. The higher the local-oscillator power (P(lo)), the better the sensitivity of the detector. Further improvement can be achieved by employing better quasi-optical design.

  16. Angular Correlation between Photoelectrons and Auger Electrons from K-Shell Ionization of Neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landers, A. L.; Robicheaux, F.; Bhandary, A.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Titze, J.; Akoury, D.; Doerner, R.; Osipov, T.; Lee, S. Y.; Adaniya, H.; Hertlein, M.; Weber, Th.; Prior, M. H.; Belkacem, A.; Ranitovic, P.; Bocharova, I.; Cocke, C. L.

    2009-01-01

    We have used cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy to study the continuum correlation between the photoelectron of core-photoionized neon and the subsequent Auger electron. We observe a strong angular correlation between the two electrons. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations agree quite well with the photoelectron energy distribution that is shifted due to the potential change associated with Auger decay. However, a striking discrepancy results in the distribution of the relative angle between Auger and photoelectron. The classical model predicts a shift in photoelectron flux away from the Auger emission direction, and the data strikingly reveal that the flux is lost rather than diverted, indicating that the two-step interpretation of photoionization followed by Auger emission is insufficient to fully describe the core-photoionization process.

  17. Guiding of slow neon and molecular hydrogen ions through nanocapillaries in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Hellhammer, R.; Sobocinski, P.; Pesic, Z.D.; Bundesmann, J.; Sulik, B.; Shah, M.B.; Dunn, K.; Pedregosa, J.; McCullough, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    The transmission profiles of atomic 3keV Ne 7+ ions and molecular 1keV H 2 + and H 3 + ions passing through nanocapillaries were studied. Capillaries with a diameter of 100nm and a length of 10μm in insulating PET polymers were used. The high aspect ratio of 100 is achieved by the method of etching ion tracks produced by high-energy xenon impact. The angular distributions of the transmitted projectiles show that the majority of ions are transported in their initial charge state along the capillary axis even when the capillaries are tilted with respect to the incident beam direction. This result indicates ion-guiding, which is produced by charge-up effects influencing the ion trajectories in a self-supporting manner. The guiding effects are found to be different for highly charged neon and singly charged molecular hydrogen. Negligible fragmentation of the molecular ions was observed

  18. Double photoionization: 2. Analysis of experimental triple differential cross sections in helium and neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malegat, L.; Selles, P.; Mazeau, J.; Huetz, A.; Lablanquie, P.

    1997-01-01

    We use the general formalism established in the companion paper 1 to analyse recent measurements of the triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of He and Ne, for equal energy sharing and for 1 S e symmetry of the residual ion. A dynamical factor, which depends on the energy and on the mutual angle between the two electrons, is extracted from the experiments without relying on nay dynamical approximation. This factor is expanded with respect to the one-electron angular momentum l, up to a maximum value l max , which measures the degree of angular correlation attained by the electron pair. We discuss the physical meaning of l max , and the dependence of the dynamical factor on the target, which is observed when comparing helium and neon results. (author)

  19. Solar flare neon and solar cosmic ray fluxes in the past using gas-rich meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nautiyal, C.M.; Rao, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed earlier to deduce the composition of solar flare neon and to determine the solar cosmic ray proton fluxes in the past using etched lunar samples and at present, these techniques are extended to gas rich meteorites. By considering high temperature Ne data points for Pantar, Fayetteville and other gas rich meteorites and by applying the three component Ne-decomposition methods, the solar cosmic ray and galactic cosmic ray produced spallation Ne components from the trapped SF-Ne was resolved. Using appropiate SCR and GCR production rates, in the case of Pantar, for example, a GCR exposure age of 2 m.y. was estimated for Pantar-Dark while Pantar-Light yielded a GCR age of approx. 3 m.y. However the SCR exposure age of Pantar-Dark is two orders of magnitude higher than the average surface exposure ages of lunar soils. The possibility of higher proton fluxes in the past is discussed

  20. Measurements of ion mobility in argon and neon based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00507268

    2017-01-01

    As gaseous detectors are operated at high rates of primary ionisation, ions created in the detector have a considerable impact on the performance of the detector. The upgraded ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will operate during LHC Run$\\,3$ with a substantial space charge density of positive ions in the drift volume. In order to properly simulate such space charges, knowledge of the ion mobility $K$ is necessary. To this end, a small gaseous detector was constructed and the ion mobility of various gas mixtures was measured. To validate the corresponding signal analysis, simulations were performed. Results are shown for several argon and neon based mixtures with different $\\textrm{CO}_2$ fractions. A decrease of $K$ was measured for increasing water content.

  1. Integrating continental-scale ecological data into university courses: Developing NEON's Online Learning Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, L. A.; Gram, W.; Lunch, C. K.; Petroy, S. B.; Elmendorf, S.

    2013-12-01

    'Big Data' are becoming increasingly common in many fields. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will be collecting data over the 30 years, using consistent, standardized methods across the United States. Similar efforts are underway in other parts of the globe (e.g. Australia's Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network, TERN). These freely available new data provide an opportunity for increased understanding of continental- and global scale processes such as changes in vegetation structure and condition, biodiversity and landuse. However, while 'big data' are becoming more accessible and available, integrating big data into the university courses is challenging. New and potentially unfamiliar data types and associated processing methods, required to work with a growing diversity of available data, may warrant time and resources that present a barrier to classroom integration. Analysis of these big datasets may further present a challenge given large file sizes, and uncertainty regarding best methods to properly statistically summarize and analyze results. Finally, teaching resources, in the form of demonstrative illustrations, and other supporting media that might help teach key data concepts, take time to find and more time to develop. Available resources are often spread widely across multi-online spaces. This presentation will overview the development of NEON's collaborative University-focused online education portal. Portal content will include 1) interactive, online multi-media content that explains key concepts related to NEON's data products including collection methods, key metadata to consider and consideration of potential error and uncertainty surrounding data analysis; and 2) packaged 'lab' activities that include supporting data to be used in an ecology, biology or earth science classroom. To facilitate broad use in classrooms, lab activities will take advantage of freely and commonly available processing tools, techniques and scripts. All

  2. Infrared spectroscopy and photochemistry of NCCN+ and CNCN+ trapped in solid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.; Thompson, Warren E.

    2007-01-01

    When a Ne:NCCN sample is codeposited at 4.3 K with neon atoms that have been excited in a microwave discharge, the infrared and near infrared spectra of the resulting deposit include a prominent peak at 1799.5 cm -1 , previously assigned to ν 3 of NCCN + , and several new absorptions at higher frequencies which are contributed by combination bands of ground-state NCCN + . The exposure of the deposit to near infrared and red light results in the appearance of two new absorptions which are attributed to CNCN + . The reverse isomerization occurs when the sample is exposed to near ultraviolet radiation, but the two new absorptions are regenerated upon subsequent irradiation with near infrared and red light

  3. Synthetic methane for power storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botta, G.; Barankin, Michael; Walspurger, S.

    2013-01-01

    With increased share of energy generated from variable renewable sources, storage becomes a critical issue to ensure constantly balanced supply/demand. Methane is a promising vector for energy storage and transport.

  4. Methane flux from boreal peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crill, P.; Bartlett, K.; Roulet, N.

    1992-01-01

    The peatlands in the boreal zone (roughly 45 deg - 60 degN) store a significant reservoir of carbon, much of which is potentially available for exchange with the atmosphere. The anaerobic conditions that cause these soils to accumulate carbon also makes wet, boreal peatlands significant sources of methane to the global troposphere. It is estimated that boreal wetlands contribute approximately 19.5 Tg methane per year. The data available on the magnitude of boreal methane emissions have rapidly accumulated in the past twenty years. This paper offers a short review of the flux measured (with range roughly 1 - 2000 mg methane/m2d), considers environmental controls of the flux and briefly discusses how climate change might affect future fluxes

  5. Enteric Methane Emission from Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henry; Theil, Peter Kappel; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2011-01-01

    per kg meat produced is increased (Fernández et al. 1983; Lekule et al. 1990). The present chapter will summarise our current knowledge concerning dietary and enteric fermentation that may influence the methane (CH4) emission in pigs. Enteric fermentation is the digestive process by which.......3 % of the worlds pig population. The main number of pigs is in Asia (59.6 %) where the main pig population stay in China (47.8 % of the worlds pig population). The objective of the chapter is therefore: To obtain a general overview of the pigs’ contribution to methane emission. Where is the pigs’ enteric gas...... produced and how is it measured. The variation in methane emission and factors affecting the emission. Possibility for reducing the enteric methane emission and the consequences....

  6. Methane-bomb natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    About 50% of the so-called 'greenhouse-effect' is not caused by CO 2 , but by more dangerous gases, among them is methane. Natural gas consists to about 98% of methane. In Austria result about 15% of the methane emissions from offtake, storage, transport (pipelines) and distribution from natural gas. A research study of the Research Centre Seibersdorf points out that between 2.5% and 3.6% of the employed natural gas in Austria emits. The impact of this emitted methane is about 29 times worse than the impact of CO 2 (caused for examples by petroleum burning). Nevertheless the Austrian CO 2 -commission states that an increasing use of natural gas would decrease the CO 2 -emissions - but this statement is suspected to be based on wrong assumptions. (blahsl)

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet's characterization and surface wettability driven by neon transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfa, R. R.; Nafarizal, N.; Ahmad, M. K.; Sahdan, M. Z.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma driven by Neon transformer power supply argon is presented in this paper. Atmospheric pressure plasma system has attracted researcher interest over low pressure plasma as it provides a flexibility process, cost-efficient, portable device and vacuum-free device. Besides, another golden key of this system is the wide promising application in the field of work cover from industrial and engineering to medical. However, there are still numbers of fundamental investigation that are necessary such as device configuration, gas configuration and its effect. Dielectric barrier discharge which is also known as atmospheric pressure plasma discharge is created when there is gas ionization process occur which enhance the movement of atom and electron and provide energetic particles. These energetic particles can provide modification and cleaning property to the sample surface due to the bombardment of the high reactive ion and radicals to the sample surface. In order to develop atmospheric pressure plasma discharge, a high voltage and high frequency power supply is needed. In this work, we used a neon transformer power supply as the power supply. The flow of the Ar is feed into 10 mm cylinder quartz tube with different treatment time in order to investigate the effect of the plasma discharge. The analysis of each treatment time is presented by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and water contact angle (WCA) measurement. The increase of gas treatment time shows increases intensity of reactive Ar and reduces the angle of water droplets in water contact angle. Treatment time of 20 s microslide glass surface shows that the plasma needle discharges have modified the sample surface from hydrophilic surface to superhydrophilic surface. Thus, this leads to another interesting application in reducing sample surface adhesion to optimize productivity in the industry of paintings, semiconductor and more.

  8. Neon and xenon isotopes in MORB: Implications for the earth-atmosphere evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, B.

    1989-01-01

    The isotopic composition of neon and xenon measured in MORB glasses confirm significant deviations from atmospheric values. There are 1. 21 Ne excesses with are attributed to nucleogenic reactions in the mantle; 2. 20 Ne/ 22 Ne ratios higher than the air ratio interpreted as an evidence for the occurrence of solar-type Ne at depth; 3. 129 Xe and 131-136 Xe excesses, attributed to both extinct ( 129 I and 244 Pu) and present ( 238 U) radioactivities. Ne and Xe isotopic signatures in the mantle can hardly be explained in the framework of classical models for the atmospheric evolution (which postulate a mantle origin for atmospheric gases) and appeal for at least two sources of gases. Ne isotopic differences between air and MORB appear too large to be accounted for by any reasonable fractionation process in the mantle. They imply either fractionation of neon during hydrodynamic escape of a primary atmosphere or different degrees of mixing between primordial Ne components, which, in turn imply isolation of the surface reservoir (air) and deep reservoir (mantle) from the accretional period (except for mantle outgassing through volcanism, the contribution of which is 41% at best for 20 Ne). 129 I- 129 Xe, 244 Pu- 238 U- 136 Xe systematics for atmospheric and MORB-type xenon suggest that either atmospheric gases derived from a source whose formation was delayed (≥ 17 Ma) with respect to the mean accretion time of the mantle source and/or atmospheric gases and MORB-type gases derived from chemically distinct sources. These features are consistent with heterogeneous accretion models for the Earth. Volatile degassing was probably contemporaneous to accretional events, following impact degassing, and might have been most efficient during the late stages of Earth formation. (orig.)

  9. Photobiomodulation by helium neon and diode lasers in an excisional wound model: A single blinded trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehil Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of different kinds of lasers in clinical and experimental studies causes photobiomodulation that works at localized cellular and humoral level on various biological systems. Increased numbers of fibroblasts, myofibroblast, and degranulation of mast cells have been the observed benefits post-irradiation. Objective: Was to find out the effect of irradiation with energy densities of 3.38 J/cm 2 , 8 J/cm 2 , and 18 J/cm 2 on animal tissue (albino wistar rats in an excisional wound model and to assess changes in biochemical (hydroxyproline and histopathological levels in excisional wound model. Materials and Methods: The animals were divided into 4 groups, which were labeled as L1, diode laser (18 J/cm 2 , L2 Helium-neon (He-Ne, 8 J/cm 2 , L3 diode laser (3.38 J/cm 2 , and sham treatment for control was depicted by C, respectively. Histological and hydroxyproline analysis was performed on 7, 14, 21 days of post-wounding. One-way analysis of variance, ANOVA and Bonferroni′s multiple comparison tests were done for tissue hydroxyproline levels. Results: There was no significant increase in the hydroxyproline content (P < 0.005 when observed in study group and compared to controls. Whereas significant epithelizations was seen in group treated with He-Ne laser of intensity of 8 J/cm 2 . Conclusion: The experimental observations suggest that low intensity helium-neon laser of 8 J/cm 2 intensity facilitated photo stimulation by tissue repair, but failed to show significant tissue hydroxyproline levels in excisional wound model.

  10. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, K.-U., E-mail: heyer@ifas-hamburg.de; Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD

  11. Methane gas from cow dung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The Khadi and Village Industries Commission offers a gobar gas (methane gas) production scheme. The gas plant, available in sizes of 60 to 3000 cu ft, requires only low maintenance expenditures. The cow dung, which is at present being wasted or burned as domestic fuel, can be used for manufacturing methane for fuel gas. The residue will be a good fertilizer for increasing food production. There are now about 4000 gobar gas plants in India.

  12. Prediction of vapour-liquid and vapour-liquid-liquid equilibria of nitrogen-hydrocarbon mixtures used in J-T refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vineed; Venkatarathnam, G.

    2018-03-01

    Nitrogen-hydrocarbon mixtures are widely used as refrigerants in J-T refrigerators operating with mixtures, as well as in natural gas liquefiers. The Peng-Robinson equation of state has traditionally been used to simulate the above cryogenic process. Multi parameter Helmholtz energy equations are now preferred for determining the properties of natural gas. They have, however, been used only to predict vapour-liquid equilibria, and not vapour-liquid-liquid equilibria that can occur in mixtures used in cryogenic mixed refrigerant processes. In this paper the vapour-liquid equilibrium of binary mixtures of nitrogen-methane, nitrogen-ethane, nitrogen-propane, nitrogen-isobutane and three component mixtures of nitrogen-methane-ethane and nitrogen-methane-propane have been studied with the Peng-Robinson and the Helmholtz energy equations of state of NIST REFPROP and compared with experimental data available in the literature.

  13. Methane production from cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, J Q; Liao, P H; Lo, K V

    1988-01-01

    Cheese whey was treated in a 17.5-litre laboratory-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor operated over a range of hydraulic retention times and organic loading rates. The reactor performance was determined in terms of methane production, volatile fatty acids conversion and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction. At a constant influent strength, the methane production rate decreased with decreasing hydraulic retention time. At constant hydraulic retention time the methane production rate increased as the influent strength was increased up to a concentration of 28.8 g COD litre/sup -1/. The methane production rate was similar for two influent concentrations studied at hydraulic retention times longer than 10 days. The effect of short hydraulic retention times on methane production rate was more pronounced for the higher influent concentration than for the lower influent concentration. The highest methane production rate of 9.57 litres CH/sub 4/ litre/sup -1/ feed day/sup -1/ was obtained at a loading rate of 5.96 g/sup -1/ COD litre/sup -1/ and an influent concentration of 28.8 g COD litre/sup -1/. A high treatment efficiency in terms of chemical oxygen demand reduction was obtained. In general, over 98% removal of chemical oxygen demand was achieved. The results indicated that anaerobic digestion of cheese whey using an upflow sludge blanket reactor could reduce pollution strength and produce energy for a cheese plant.

  14. The California Baseline Methane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, R. M.; Thorpe, A. K.; Hopkins, F. M.; Rafiq, T.; Bue, B. D.; Prasad, K.; Mccubbin, I.; Miller, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    The California Baseline Methane Survey is the first systematic, statewide assessment of methane point source emissions. The objectives are to reduce uncertainty in the state's methane budget and to identify emission mitigation priorities for state and local agencies, utilities and facility owners. The project combines remote sensing of large areas with airborne imaging spectroscopy and spatially resolved bottom-up data sets to detect, quantify and attribute emissions from diverse sectors including agriculture, waste management, oil and gas production and the natural gas supply chain. Phase 1 of the project surveyed nearly 180,000 individual facilities and infrastructure components across California in 2016 - achieving completeness rates ranging from 20% to 100% per emission sector at < 5 meters spatial resolution. Additionally, intensive studies of key areas and sectors were performed to assess source persistence and variability at times scales ranging from minutes to months. Phase 2 of the project continues with additional data collection in Spring and Fall 2017. We describe the survey design and measurement, modeling and analysis methods. We present initial findings regarding the spatial, temporal and sectoral distribution of methane point source emissions in California and their estimated contribution to the state's total methane budget. We provide case-studies and lessons learned about key sectors including examples where super-emitters were identified and mitigated. We summarize challenges and recommendations for future methane research, inventories and mitigation guidance within and beyond California.

  15. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  16. Photofragmentation spectra of halogenated methanes in the VUV photon energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartoni, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.cartoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, Roma 00185 (Italy); Bolognesi, Paola; Fainelli, Ettore; Avaldi, Lorenzo [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Rm) 00015 (Italy)

    2014-05-14

    In this paper an investigation of the photofragmentation of dihalomethanes CH{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and chlorinated methanes (CH{sub n}Cl{sub 4−n} with n = 0–3) with VUV helium, neon, and argon discharge lamps is reported and the role played by the different halogen atoms is discussed. Halogenated methanes are a class of molecules used in several fields of chemistry and the study of their physical and chemical proprieties is of fundamental interest. In particular their photodissociation and photoionization are of great importance since the decomposition of these compounds in the atmosphere strongly affects the environment. The results of the present work show that the halogen-loss is the predominant fragmentation channel for these molecules in the VUV photon energy range and confirm their role as reservoir of chlorine, bromine, and iodine atoms in the atmosphere. Moreover, the results highlight the peculiar feature of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} as a source of both fluorine and hydrogen atoms and the characteristic formation of I{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}{sup +} ions from the photofragmentation of the CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} molecule.

  17. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste...

  18. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the exact mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects is required to be further elucidated. Methane can cross the membrane and is easy to collect due to its abundance in natural gas. Although methane is flammable, saline rich in methane can be prepared for clinical use. These seem to be good news in application of methane as a therapeutic gas. Conclusion Several problems should be resolved before its wide application in clinical practice.

  19. Methane: Fuel or Exhaust at the Emergence of Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Michael J; Nitschke, Wolfgang

    2017-10-01

    As many of the methanogens first encountered at hydrothermal vents were thermophilic to hyperthermophilic and comprised one of the lower roots of the evolutionary tree, it has been assumed that methanogenesis was one of the earliest, if not the earliest, pathway to life. It being well known that hydrothermal springs associated with serpentinization also bore abiotic methane, it had been further assumed that emergent biochemistry merely adopted and quickened this supposed serpentinization reaction. Yet, recent hydrothermal experiments simulating serpentinization have failed to generate methane so far, thus casting doubt on this assumption. The idea that the inverse view is worthy of debate, that is, that methanotrophy was the earlier, is stymied by the "fact" that methanotrophy itself has been termed "reverse methanogenesis," so allotting the methanogens the founding pedigree. Thus, attempting to suggest instead that methanogenesis might be termed reverse methanotrophy would require "unlearning"-a challenge to the subconscious! Here we re-examine the "impossibility" of methanotrophy predating methanogenesis as in what we have termed the "denitrifying methanotrophic acetogenic pathway." Advantages offered by such thinking are that methane would not only be a fuel but also a ready source of reduced carbon to combine with formate or carbon monoxide-available in hydrothermal fluids-to generate acetate, a target molecule of the first autotrophs. And the nitrate/nitrite required for the putative oxidation of methane with activated NO would also be a ready source of fixed nitrogen for amination reactions. Theoretical conditions for such a putative pathway would be met in a hydrothermal green rust-bearing exhalative pile and associated chimneys subject to proton and electron counter gradients. This hypothesis could be put to test in a high-pressure hydrothermal reaction chamber in which a cool carbonate/nitrate/nitrite-bearing early acidulous ocean simulant is juxtaposed

  20. Use of helium-neon laser for the prevention of acute radiation reaction of the skin in neutron-beam therapy of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovich, V.I.; Musabaeva, L.I.; Kitsmanyuk, Z.D.; Lavrenkov, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary data on helium-neon laser usage to prevent acute radiation skinresponse in patients with head and neck neoplasm were presented in case of fast neutrons therapy with average energy of ≅ 6.3 MeV. Irradiation was performed by 2 fractions a week with single absorbed focal dose of 1.2-1.4 Gy and the dose for the skin was 2-2.2 Gy. RBE of the fast neutrons comprised ∼ 3. Some patients were subjected to neutron therapy in combination with helium-neon laser treatment, the others underwent only neutron therapy. Combination of neutron and helium-neon laser therapy increased skin resistance to neutron irradiation. Combined treatment with neutrons and helium-neon laser decreased development of humid epidermitis by half than in case of neutron treatment alone

  1. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  2. Permeability of sediment cores from methane hydrate deposit in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Egawa, K.; Ito, T.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Nagao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Effective and absolute permeability are key parameters for gas production from methane-hydrate-bearing sandy sediments. Effective and/or absolute permeability have been measured using methane-hydrate-bearing sandy cores and clayey and silty cores recovered from Daini Atsumi Knoll in the Eastern Nankai Trough during the 2012 JOGMEC/JAPEX Pressure coring operation. Liquid-nitrogen-immersed cores were prepared by rapid depressurization of pressure cores recovered by a pressure coring system referred to as the Hybrid PCS. Cores were shaped cylindrically on a lathe with spraying of liquid nitrogen to prevent hydrate dissociation. Permeability was measured by a flooding test or a pressure relaxation method under near in-situ pressure and temperature conditions. Measured effective permeability of hydrate-bearing sediments is less than tens of md, which are order of magnitude less than absolute permeability. Absolute permeability of clayey cores is approximately tens of μd, which would perform a sealing function as cap rocks. Permeability reduction due to a swelling effect was observed for a silty core during flooding test of pure water mimicking hydrate-dissociation-water. Swelling effect may cause production formation damage especially at a later stage of gas production from methane hydrate deposits. This study was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) that carries out Japan's Methane Hydrate R&D Program conducted by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  3. Retention of neon in graphite after ion beam implantation or exposures to the scrape-off layer plasma in the TEXTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.M.; Philipps, V.; Rubel, M.; Vietzke, E.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Unterberg, B.; Jaspers, R.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of neon ions with graphite was investigated for targets either irradiated with ion beams (2-10 keV range) or exposed to the scrape-off layer plasma in the TEXTOR tokamak during discharges with neon edge cooling. The emphasis was on the influence of the target temperature (300-1200 K) and the implantation dose on the neon retention and reemission. The influence of deuterium impact on the retention of neon implanted into graphite has also been addressed. In ion beam experiments saturation is observed above a certain ion dose with a saturation level, which decreases with increasing target temperature. The temperature dependence of the thermal desorption corresponds to an apparent binding energy of about 2.06 eV. The retention of neon (C Ne /C C ) decreases with increasing ion energy with values from 0.55 to 0.15 following irradiation with 2 and 10 keV ions, respectively. The reemission yield during the irradiation increases with target temperature and above 1200 K all impinging ions are reemitted instantaneously. The retention densities measured using the sniffer probe at the TEXTOR tokamak are less than 1% of the total neon fluence and are over one order of magnitude smaller than those observed in ion beam experiments. The results are discussed in terms of different process decisive for ion deposition and release under the two experimental conditions

  4. Correlation of measured neon soft X-ray pulses of the INTI plasma focus with the reflected shock phase at 12KV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Federico A. Jr; Chong, Perk Lin; Saw, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    The six-phase Lee Model Code is used to fit the computed current waveform to the measured waveform of the INTI Plasma Focus (PF;2.2 kJ at 12 kV), a T2 PF device, operated as a source of Neon soft X-ray (SXR) with optimum yield around 2.5 - 3 Torr of neon. The characteristic He-like and H-like neon line SXR pulse is measured using a pair of SXR detectors with selected filters that, by subtraction, have a photon energy window of 900 to 1550 eV covering the region of the characteristic neon SXR lines. The aim of this paper is to investigate the correlation between the time histories of the measured Neon soft X-ray pulse and the reflected shock phase of the computed current waveform which has been fitted to the measured current waveform. Results shows that the characteristic neon SXR measured at 3.17 J with a pulse duration of 249 ns starts typically after the radial inward shock phase and increases in magnitude few ns before the pinch phase. It tails unto the first anomalous resistance, and decays at the second anomalous resistance. (author)

  5. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  6. Niche differentiation in nitrogen metabolism among methanotrophs within an operational taxonomic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefman, Sven; van der Ha, David; Boon, Nico; Vandamme, Peter; De Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim

    2014-04-04

    The currently accepted thesis on nitrogenous fertilizer additions on methane oxidation activity assumes niche partitioning among methanotrophic species, with activity responses to changes in nitrogen content being dependent on the in situ methanotrophic community structure Unfortunately, widely applied tools for microbial community assessment only have a limited phylogenetic resolution mostly restricted to genus level diversity, and not to species level as often mistakenly assumed. As a consequence, intragenus or intraspecies metabolic versatility in nitrogen metabolism was never evaluated nor considered among methanotrophic bacteria as a source of differential responses of methane oxidation to nitrogen amendments. We demonstrated that fourteen genotypically different Methylomonas strains, thus distinct below the level at which most techniques assign operational taxonomic units (OTU), show a versatile physiology in their nitrogen metabolism. Differential responses, even among strains with identical 16S rRNA or pmoA gene sequences, were observed for production of nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate or ammonium, nitrogen fixation and tolerance to high levels of ammonium, nitrate, and hydroxylamine. Overall, reduction of nitrate to nitrite, nitrogen fixation, higher tolerance to ammonium than nitrate and tolerance and assimilation of nitrite were general features. Differential responses among closely related methanotrophic strains to overcome inhibition and toxicity from high nitrogen loads and assimilation of various nitrogen sources yield competitive fitness advantages to individual methane-oxidizing bacteria. Our observations proved that community structure at the deepest phylogenetic resolution potentially influences in situ functioning.

  7. Study of the noncylindrical Z-pinch during discharges in neon using electro-optical transducer of the AGAT type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.B.; Orlov, M.M.; Saulevich, S.V.; Terent'ev, A.R.; Khrabrov, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Results of investigation into running away current-plasma sheath (CPS) of noncylindrical Z-pinch are given. Experimental chamber was filled with neon up to 3 torr pressure. Store of energy was equal to 20 kJ. CPS radiation spectrum scanning was recorded in the phase of its convergence to the system axis by means of an electron-optical converter of the AGAT type. Electron temperature in the inflection region on CPS constituted 3 eV. Possibilities of magnetic field diffusion through neon CPS and appearance of CPS running away mode are shown. CPS plasma spectra indicated that radiation can be recorded only from a CPS head near-anode part and its external peripheral regions moving from the axis and emitting considerably less quantity of radiation

  8. Methane as a climate gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsdottir, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Methane is a key component in the atmosphere where its concentration has increased rapidly since pre-industrial time. About 2/3 of it is caused by human activities. Changes in methane will affect the concentrations of other gases, and a model is a very important tool to study sensitivity due to changes in concentration of gases. The author used a three-dimensional global chemistry transport model to study the effect of changes in methane concentration on other trace gases. The model includes natural and anthropogenic emissions of NOx, CO, CH{sub 4} and non-methane hydrocarbons. Wet and dry deposition are also included. The chemical scheme in the model includes 49 compounds, 101 reactions, and 16 photolytic reactions. The trace gas concentrations are calculated every 30 min, using a quasi steady state approximation. Model calculations of three cases are reported and compared. Enhanced methane concentration will have strongest effect in remote regions. In polluted areas local chemistry will have remarked effect. The feedback was always positive. Average atmospheric lifetime calculated in the model was 7.6 years, which agrees with recent estimates based on observations. 8 refs.

  9. Vapor-liquid equilibrium prediction with pseudo-cubic equation of state for binary mixtures containing hydrogen, helium, or neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, M.; Tanaka, H. (Nihon Univ.,Fukushima, (Japan). Faculty of Enineering)

    1990-03-01

    As an equation of state of vapor-liquid equilibrium, an original pseudo-cubic equation of state was previously proposed by the authors of this report and its study is continued. In the present study, new effective critical values of hydrogen, helium and neon were determined empirically from vapor-liquid equilibrium data of literature values against their critical temperatures, critical pressures and critical volumes. The vapor-liquid equilibrium relations of binary system quantum gas mixtures were predicted combining the conventinal pseudo-cubic equation of state and the new effective critical values, and without using binary heteromolecular interaction parameter. The predicted values of hydrogen-ethylene, helium-propane and neon-oxygen systems were compared with literature values. As a result, it was indicated that the vapor-liquid relations of binary system mixtures containing hydrogen, helium and neon can be predicted with favorable accuracy combining the effective critical values and the three parameter pseudo-cubic equation of state. 37 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. The Biological Effectiveness of Four Energies of Neon Ions for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kerry; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to neon ions at energies of 64, 89, 142, or 267. The corresponding LET values for these energies of neon ranged from 38-103 keV/micrometers and doses delivered were in the 10 to 80 cGy range. Chromosome exchanges were assessed in metaphase and G2 phase cells at first division after exposure using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes and dose response curves were generated for different types of chromosomal exchanges. The yields of total chromosome exchanges were similar for the 64, 89, and 142 MeV exposures, whereas the 267 MeV/u neon with LET of 38 keV/micrometers produced about half as many exchanges per unit dose. The induction of complex type chromosome exchanges (exchanges involving three or more breaks and two or more chromosomes) showed a clear LET dependence for all energies. The ratio of simple to complex type exchanges increased with LET from 18 to 51%. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The RBE(sub max) values for total chromosome exchanges for the 64 MeV/u was around 30.

  11. Challenges and Opportunities to Developing Synergies Among Diverse Environmental Observatories: FSML, NEON, and GLEON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, C. E.; Weathers, K. C.; Knoll, L. B.; Brentrup, J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent rapid advances in sensor technology and cyberinfrastructure have enabled the development of numerous environmental observatories ranging from local networks at field stations and marine laboratories (FSML) to continental scale observatories such as the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) to global scale observatories such as the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON). While divergent goals underlie the initial development of these observatories, and they are often designed to serve different communities, many opportunities for synergies exist. In addition, the use of existing infrastructure may enhance the cost-effectiveness of building and maintaining large scale observatories. For example, FSMLs are established facilities with the staff and infrastructure to host sensor nodes of larger networks. Many field stations have existing staff and long-term databases as well as smaller sensor networks that are the product of a single or small group of investigators with a unique data management system embedded in a local or regional community. These field station based facilities and data are a potentially untapped gold mine for larger continental and global scale observatories; common ecological and environmental challenges centered on understanding the impacts of changing climate, land use, and invasive species often underlie these efforts. The purpose of this talk is to stimulate a dialog on the challenges of merging efforts across these different spatial and temporal scales, as well as addressing how to develop synergies among observatory networks with divergent roots and philosophical approaches. For example, FSMLs have existing long-term databases and facilities, while NEON has sparse past data but a well-developed template and closely coordinated team working in a coherent format across a continental scale. GLEON on the other hand is a grass-roots network of experts in science, information technology, and engineering with a common goal

  12. Methane layering in bord and pillar workings.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available This report reviews the state of knowledge on the occurrence, investigation, detection, monitoring, prevention and dispensation of methane layers in coal mines. Mining practice throughout the world in respect of methane layering is generally reliant...

  13. A Possible Sink for Methane on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nørnberg, P.; Jensen, S. J. K.; Skibsted, J.; Jakobsen, H. J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Merrison, J. P.; Finster, K.; Bak, E.; Iversen, J. J.; Kondrup, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical simulated wind activation of mineral surfaces act as a trap for Methane through formation of covalent Si-C bonds stable up to temperatures above 250 C. This mechanism is proposed as a Methane sink on Mars.

  14. IPNS grooved, solid methane moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.; Schulke, A.W.; Scott, T.L.; Wozniak, D.G.; Benson, B.E.; Leyda, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    There are two motives for using cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources, to provide higher fluxes of long-wavelength neutrons, and to extend the epithermal range with its short pulse structure to lower energies. For both these purposes solid methane, operated at the lowest possible temperatures, is the best material we know of. Two problems accompany the use of solid methane in high power sources, namely heat transport in view of the low thermal conductivity of solid methane, and deterioration due to radiation damage. We have designed a system suitable to operate in IPNS, subject to nuclear heating of about 25 W, which incorporates an aluminum foam matrix to conduct the heat from within the moderator. We report the results of the first few months' operation and of a few tests that we have performed

  15. METHANE INCORPORATION BY PROCARYOTIC PHOTOSYNTHETICMICROORGANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, Charles J.; Kirk, Martha; Calvin, Melvin

    1970-08-01

    The procaryotic photosynthetic microorganisms Anacystis nidulans, Nostoc and Rhodospirillum rubrum have cell walls and membranes that are resistant to the solution of methane in their lipid components and intracellular fluids. But Anacystis nidulans, possesses a limited bioxidant system, a portion of which may be extracellularly secreted, which rapidly oxidizes methane to carbon dioxide. Small C{sup 14} activities derived from CH{sub 4} in excess of experimental error are detected in all the major biochemical fractions of Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc. This limited capacity to metabolize methane appears to be a vestigial potentiality that originated over two billion years ago in the early evolution of photosynthetic bacteria and blue-green algae.

  16. Uncertainty assessment of the breath methane concentration method to determine methane production of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Liansun; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W.G.; Ogink, Nico

    2018-01-01

    The breath methane concentration method uses the methane concentrations in the cow's breath during feed bin visits as a proxy for the methane production rate. The objective of this study was to assess the uncertainty of a breath methane concentration method in a feeder and its capability to measure

  17. Fluxed of nitrous oxide and methane in a lake border ecosystem in northern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusch, H.; Rembges, D.; Papke, H.; Rennenberg, H. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Methane and nitrous oxide are radiatively active trace gases. This accounts for approximately 20 % of the total anticipated greenhouse effect. The atmospheric mixing ratio of both gases has increased significantly during the last decades at a rate of 0.25 % yr{sup -l} for N{sub 2}O and a rate of 1 % yr{sup -1} for CH{sub 4}. Whether this increase is caused by enhanced biogenic production of both gases or is due to decreased global sinks, has not been definitely elucidated. Soils are an important source of methane and nitrous oxide. Natural wetlands, e.g., have a similar global source strength of methane as rice paddies. On the other hand, well aerated grasslands have been shown to be a sink for atmospheric methane due to methane oxidation. Nitrous oxide is emitted by a wide range of soil types. Its rate of emission is strongly enhanced by nitrogen fertilization. In the present study, fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide were determined in a lake border ecosystem along a toposequence from reed to dry pasture. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of soil type, land use and season on the flux rates of these greenhouse gases. (author)

  18. Fluxed of nitrous oxide and methane in a lake border ecosystem in northern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusch, H; Rembges, D; Papke, H; Rennenberg, H [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Methane and nitrous oxide are radiatively active trace gases. This accounts for approximately 20 % of the total anticipated greenhouse effect. The atmospheric mixing ratio of both gases has increased significantly during the last decades at a rate of 0.25 % yr{sup -l} for N{sub 2}O and a rate of 1 % yr{sup -1} for CH{sub 4}. Whether this increase is caused by enhanced biogenic production of both gases or is due to decreased global sinks, has not been definitely elucidated. Soils are an important source of methane and nitrous oxide. Natural wetlands, e.g., have a similar global source strength of methane as rice paddies. On the other hand, well aerated grasslands have been shown to be a sink for atmospheric methane due to methane oxidation. Nitrous oxide is emitted by a wide range of soil types. Its rate of emission is strongly enhanced by nitrogen fertilization. In the present study, fluxes of methane and nitrous oxide were determined in a lake border ecosystem along a toposequence from reed to dry pasture. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of soil type, land use and season on the flux rates of these greenhouse gases. (author)

  19. Handbook methane potential; Handbok metanpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My (AnoxKaldnes AB (Sweden)); Schnurer, Anna (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-07-15

    Before using a organic material for biogas production it is essential to evaluate the methane production potential. The methane potential is one important tool possible to use during planning of new plants but also when new materials are considered for already running biogas plants. The chemical composition of different organic material varies extensively and this will have an impact on both the degradability and the methane potential. Information about the methane potential of a specific material can sometimes be found in the literature or can be calculated after a chemical/ physical or biological characterization. Here, the BMP test (Biochemical Methane Potential) is a commonly used method. Today the BMP test is a commonly used method to determine the methane potential. Many national and international research groups, consultants as well as personal at biogas plants are using this method and there is a lot of data available in the literature from such tests. In addition there are several protocols giving guidelines on how to execute a BMP-test. The BMP-test is performed in many different ways, not always under optimized conditions, and there is a lack of information on how to interpret the obtained data. This report summarizes knowledge from the literature and the experience from a Swedish referee group, consisting of persons being active performers of BMP-tests. The report does not include a standardized protocol as the procedure can be performed in different ways depending on available equipment and on the type of material to be tested. Instead the report discusses different factors of great importance for a successful test giving reliable results. The report also summarizes important information concerning the interpretation and how to present results in order to allow comparison of data from different test.

  20. Methane-fueled vehicles: A promising market for coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deul, M.

    1993-01-01

    The most acceptable alternative fuel for motor vehicles is compressed natural gas (CNG). An important potential source of such gas is coalbed methane, much of which is now being wasted. Although there are no technological impediments to the use of CNG it has not been adequately promoted for a variety of reasons: structural, institutional and for coalbed gas, legal. The benefits of using CNG fuel are manifold: clean burning, low cost, abundant, and usable in any internal combustion engine. Even though more than 30,000 CNG vehicles are now in use in the U.S.A., they are not readily available, fueling stations are not easily accessible, and there is general apathy on the part of the public because of negligence by such agencies as the Department of Energy, the Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency. The economic benefits of using methane are significant: 100,000 cubic feet of methane is equivalent to 800 gallons of gasoline. Considering the many millions of cubic feet methane wasted from coal mines conservation and use of this resource is a worthy national goal

  1. Experimental study of methanic fermentation of straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopter, P; Beerens, H

    1952-12-03

    The amount of liquid manure obtainable was a limiting factor in methanic fermentation of wheat straw. An equal volume of 0.2% aqueous solution of Na formate could be substituted for 90% of the normal requirements of liquid manure. This shortened the preliminary stages of cellulosic fermentation when no methane was produced and slightly increased the subsequent yield of methane.

  2. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  3. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methane (LNG). 154.703 Section 154.703 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... and Temperature Control § 154.703 Methane (LNG). Unless a cargo tank carrying methane (LNG) can...

  4. Methane emission reduction: an application of FUND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, R.S.J.; Heintz, R.J.; Lammers, P.E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Methane is, after carbon dioxide, the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Governments plan to abate methane emissions. A crude set of estimates of reduction costs is included in FUND, an integrated assessment model of climate change. In a cost-benefit analysis, methane emission reduction is

  5. Extension - Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2008-08-11

    The need for cost effective technologies for upgrading coal mine methane to pipeline quality natural gas is becoming ever greater. The current work presents and investigates a new approach to reduce the impact of the most costly step in the conventional technology, nitrogen rejection. The proposed approach is based on the Velocys microchannel platform, which is being developed to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this separation, ultra fast thermal swing sorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat and mass transfer inherent in microchannel processing. In a first phase of the project solid adsorbents were explored. Feasibility of ultrafast thermal swing was demonstrated but the available adsorbents had insufficient differential methane capacity to achieve the required commercial economics. In a second phase, ionic liquids were adopted as absorbents of choice, and experimental work and economic analyses, performed to gauge their potential, showed promise for this novel alternative. Final conclusions suggest that a combination of a required cost target for ionic liquids or a methane capacity increase or a combination of both is required for commercialization.

  6. Methane oxidation and methane fluxes in the ocean surface layer and deep anoxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B. B.; Kilpatrick, K. A.; Novelli, P. C.; Scranton, M. I.

    1987-01-01

    Measured biological oxidation rates of methane in near-surface waters of the Cariaco Basin are compared with the diffusional fluxes computed from concentration gradients of methane in the surface layer. Methane fluxes and oxidation rates were investigated in surface waters, at the oxic/anoxic interface, and in deep anoxic waters. It is shown that the surface-waters oxidation of methane is a mechanism which modulates the flux of methane from marine waters to the atmosphere.

  7. Shock Compression Response of the Light Noble Gases: Neon and Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth; Shulenburger, Luke; Cochrane, Kyle; Lopez, Andrew; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Understanding material behavior at extreme conditions is important to a wide range of processes in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Modeling the high pressure - high temperature processes requires robust equations of state (EOS). For many materials, EOS models have been developed using low-pressure Hugoniot data. Assumptions are made to extrapolate the EOS models to Mbar pressure regimes, leading to different model behavior at extreme conditions. In this work, we examine the high pressure response of the light noble gases: neon and helium in the multi-Mbar regime. We perform a series of shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine on cryogenically cooled liquids of Ne (26 K) and He (2.2 K) to measure the Hugoniot and reshock states. In parallel, we use density functional theory methods to calculate the Hugoniot and reshock states. The experiments validated the DFT simulations and the combined experimental and simulation results are used to assess the EOS models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Characteristics of x-rays from a plasma focus operated with neon gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaullah, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Alamgir, K [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Shafiq, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Hassan, S M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Sharif, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Hussain, S [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Waheed, A [PINSTECH, PO Box 2151, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2002-11-01

    The x-ray emission from a low-energy (2.3 kJ) plasma focus is investigated with neon as the filling gas. Two anode configurations are used in the experiment: the conventional cylindrical anode, and tapered anode slightly toward the open end. The latter geometry enhances soft x-ray emission by an order of magnitude. The emission is pressure dependent and, in both cases, the highest emission is observed at 3-3.5 mbar. For the cylindrical anode, the soft x-ray emission is up to 7 J per shot, which is from a pinched plasma column, 5-6 mm long. For the tapered anode, up to 80 J per shot soft x-ray yield in 4{pi} geometry is recorded, which corresponds to 4% wall plug efficiency. The diameter of the x-ray emission filament is much larger compared with the cylindrical anode. The bulk of emitted radiation is of energy 1.2-1.3 keV, which is thought to arise from recombination of hydrogen-like (Ne x) ions with the low-energy electrons.

  9. Characteristics of x-rays from a plasma focus operated with neon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaullah, M; Alamgir, K; Shafiq, M; Hassan, S M; Sharif, M; Hussain, S; Waheed, A

    2002-01-01

    The x-ray emission from a low-energy (2.3 kJ) plasma focus is investigated with neon as the filling gas. Two anode configurations are used in the experiment: the conventional cylindrical anode, and tapered anode slightly toward the open end. The latter geometry enhances soft x-ray emission by an order of magnitude. The emission is pressure dependent and, in both cases, the highest emission is observed at 3-3.5 mbar. For the cylindrical anode, the soft x-ray emission is up to 7 J per shot, which is from a pinched plasma column, 5-6 mm long. For the tapered anode, up to 80 J per shot soft x-ray yield in 4π geometry is recorded, which corresponds to 4% wall plug efficiency. The diameter of the x-ray emission filament is much larger compared with the cylindrical anode. The bulk of emitted radiation is of energy 1.2-1.3 keV, which is thought to arise from recombination of hydrogen-like (Ne x) ions with the low-energy electrons

  10. Connoted hazard and perceived importance of fluorescent, neon, and standard safety colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, O A; Mayhorn, C B; Wogalter, M S

    2017-11-01

    The perceived hazard and rated importance of standard safety, fluorescent, and neon colors are investigated. Colors are used in warnings to enhance hazard communication. Red has consistently been rated as the highest in perceived hazard. Orange, yellow, and black are the next highest in connoted hazard; however, there is discrepancy in their ordering. Safety standards, such as ANSI Z535.1, also list colors to convey important information, but little research has examined the perceived importance of colors. In addition to standard safety colors, fluorescent colors are more commonly used in warnings. Understanding hazard and importance perceptions of standard safety and fluorescent colors is necessary to create effective warnings. Ninety participants rated and ranked a total of 33 colors on both perceived hazard and perceived importance. Rated highest were the safety red colors from the American National Standard Institute (ANSI), International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) together with three fluorescent colors (orange, yellow, and yellow-green) from 3 M on both dimensions. Rankings were similar to ratings except that fluorescent orange was the highest on perceived hazard, while fluorescent orange and safety red from the ANSI were ranked as the highest in perceived importance. Fluorescent colors convey hazard and importance levels as high as the standard safety red colors. Implications for conveying hazard and importance in warnings through color are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The x-ray laser coherence experiments in neon-like yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimkaveg, G.M.; Carter, M.R.; Walling, R.S.; Ticehurst, J.M.; Koch, J.A.; Mrowka, S.; Trebes, J.E.; MacGowan, B.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; London, R.A.; Stewart, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    We present recent results from neon-like x-ray laser experiments conducted at the Nova laser's Two-Beam Facility. This begins a series of experiments aimed at the characterization and control of the degree of spatial coherece in our soft x-ray laser beams, important to planned applications areas susch as microscopy and holography. New instrumentation developed for this effort include a fully time-resolved coherence diagnostic (which records a multiple-slit diffraction pattern) and wide-angle extreme ultraviolet spectrographs and beam divergence cameras. We present new measurements of beam profiles and gain, as well as spatial coherence data such as time-resolved multi-slit diffraction patterns. This new time-resolved coherence data exhibit aperture functions which increase in size during the time of the lasing. Also, some preliminary data is given from the first ''double-foil'' experiments, involving two x-ray amplifiers spatially separated by 29 cm and shot sequentially, in an ''oscillator-amplifier'' configuration

  12. Transport properties of electron swarms in gaseous neon at low values of E/N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, G J; Casey, M J E; White, R D; Cheng, Y; Mitroy, J

    2014-01-01

    A detailed analysis of electron swarm transport through neon gas at applied reduced electric fields of E/N < 2 Td is presented. The root mean square difference of transport parameters calculated from a recent all-order many-body perturbation theory treatment (Cheng et al 2014 Phys. Rev. A 89 012701) with drift velocity measurements by the Australian National University group (Robertson 1972 J. Phys. B 5 648) is less than 1%. Differences of about 3% exist with characteristic energies, D T /μ, (Koizumi et al 1984 J. Phys. B 17 4387) indicating an incompatibility at the 3% level between drift velocity and transverse diffusion coefficient measurements. Multi-term solutions of the Boltzmann equation indicate that the two-term approximation gives transport parameters accurate to better than 0.01%. The diffusion constant at thermal energies is found to be sensitive to the numerical representation of the cross section. A recommended elastic momentum transfer cross section has been constructed that has a maximum difference of 0.5% with all ANU drift velocity data for E/N < 1.6 Td and a root mean square difference that is about a factor of 2 smaller. (paper)

  13. Spawning pattern of the neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida around the Hawaiian Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmamony Vijai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii, is an oceanic squid species that is widely distributed in the North Pacific, with the winter-spring cohort spawning around the Hawaiian Islands. Here, we investigated the spawning characteristics of O. bartramii by analyzing various reproductive parameters of individuals (622 males, 108 females collected in this region. Female spawning status was determined from the somatic indices and histological characteristics of the ovaries. At all developmental stages, the ovaries of spawned females contained oocytes, and oviduct fullness was not correlated with body size. Thus, because the eggs mature asynchronously, with multiple filling and evacuation events, this species is considered an intermittent spawner. Mature males with developed accessory glands were also present within the distribution range of healthy spawned females, indicating that mating occurs between spawning events. Our data indicate that the first spawning event occurs at a mantle length of ~520-540 mm for Hawaiian O. bartramii. Subsequently, the squid forage and grow, and refill the oviducts, before the second spawning event occurs.

  14. Electron impact excitation of fine-structure levels of neon-like titanium (Ti XIII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.P.; Deb, N.C.; Msezane, A.Z.

    1999-01-01

    The authors present results of a Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation for the electron impact excitation of neon-like titanium, in which the 27 lowest fine-structure target levels arising out of the 4 lowest configurations 2s 2 2p 6 , 2s 2 2p 5 3s, 2s 2 2p 5 3p, and 2s 2 2p 5 3d are included. These target levels are represented by configuration interaction wave functions using the 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, and 3d basic orbitals. The relativistic effects are included in the Breit-Pauli approximation via one-body mass correction, Darwin, and spin-orbit interaction terms in the scattering equations. For many transitions, complex resonance structures are found in the excitation cross sections. The excitation cross sections are integrated over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies to give electron excitation rate coefficients over a wide temperature range from 150 to 600 eV. The relative populations for different electron densities and temperatures are also presented

  15. Molar excess volumes of liquid hydrogen and neon mixtures from path integral simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challa, S.R.; Johnson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    Volumetric properties of liquid mixtures of neon and hydrogen have been calculated using path integral hybrid Monte Carlo simulations. Realistic potentials have been used for the three interactions involved. Molar volumes and excess volumes of these mixtures have been evaluated for various compositions at 29 and 31.14 K, and 30 atm. Significant quantum effects are observed in molar volumes. Quantum simulations agree well with experimental molar volumes. Calculated excess volumes agree qualitatively with experimental values. However, contrary to the existing understanding that large positive deviations from ideal mixtures are caused due to quantum effects in Ne - H 2 mixtures, both classical as well as quantum simulations predict the large positive deviations from ideal mixtures. Further investigations using two other Ne - H 2 potentials of Lennard - Jones (LJ) type show that excess volumes are very sensitive to the cross-interaction potential. We conclude that the cross-interaction potential employed in our simulations is accurate for volumetric properties. This potential is more repulsive compared to the two LJ potentials tested, which have been obtained by two different combining rules. This repulsion and a comparatively lower potential well depth can explain the positive deviations from ideal mixing. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. Study on a neon cryogenic oscillating heat pipe with long heat transport distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Li, Yi; Wang, Qiuliang

    2017-12-01

    An experimental study is carried out to study the heat transfer characteristics of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (OHP) with long heat transport distance. The OHP is made up of a capillary tube with an inner diameter of 1.0 mm and an outer diameter of 2.0 mm. The working fluid is neon, and the length of the adiabatic section is 480 mm. Tests are performed with the different heat inputs, liquid filling ratios and condenser temperature. For the cryogenic OHP with a liquid filling ratio of 30.7% at the condenser temperature of 28 K, the effective thermal conductivity is 3466-30,854 W/m K, and the maximum transfer power is 35.60 W. With the increment of the heat input, the effective thermal conductivity of the cryogenic OHP increases at the liquid filling ratios of 30.7% and 38.5%, while it first increases and then decreases at the liquid filling ratios of 15.2% and 23.3%. Moreover, the effective thermal conductivity increases with decreasing liquid filling ratio at the small heat input, and the maximum transfer power first increases and then decreases with increasing liquid filling ratio. Finally, it is found that the thermal performance of the cryogenic OHP can be improved by increasing the condenser temperature.

  17. High resolution n = 3 to n = 2 spectra of neon-like silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.

    1986-04-01

    Spectra of the n = 3 to n = 2 transitions in neon-like silver emitted from the Princeton Large Torus have been recorded with a high-resolution Bragg-crystal spectrometer. The measurements cover the wavelength region 3.3 to 4.1 A and include the forbidden 3p → 2p electric quadrupole lines. Transitions in the adjacent sodium-like, and aluminum-like charge states of silver have also been observed and identified. The Ly-α spectra of hydrogen-like argon and iron, the Kα spectra of helium-like argon, potassium, manganese, and iron, and the Kβ spectrum of helium-like argon fall in the same wavelength region in first or second order and have been measured concurrently. These spectra provide a coherent set of wavelength reference data obtained with the same spectrometer and from the same tokamak. This set is used as a basis to compare wavelength predictions for one- and two-electron systems to each other and to determine the transition energies of the silver lines with great accuracy

  18. 20neon ion- and x-ray-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Baum, J.W.; Holtzman, S.; Stone, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    One of the proposed uses of heavy ion irradiation is to image lesions of the human female breast. The rat model system was chosen to assess the carcinogenic potential of heavy ion irradiation in the belief that data obtained from rat studies would have a qualitatively predictive value for the human female. Accordingly, female rats were exposed to 20 Ne ions at the BEVALAC and studied for the development of mammary neoplasia for 312 +- 2 days at Brookhaven along with rats exposed concurrently to x-irradiation or to no irradiation. As the dose of either type of radiation was increased the percent of rats with mammary adenocarcinomas, and the percent of rats with mammary fibroadenomas, tended to increase. At a prevalence of 20%, the RBE for 20 Neon ions for mammary adenocarcinomas was estimated to be larger than 5 and for mammary fibroadenomas the RBE was estimated to be less than 2. No conclusion was reached concerning whether or not the RBE might vary with dose. We suggest that 20 Ne ions do have a carcinogenic potential for rat mammary tissue and that this carcinogenic potential is likely to be greater than for x-irradiation. (DT)

  19. Short wavelength laser calculations for electron pumping in neon-like krypton (Kr XXVII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Bhatia, A. K.; Suckewer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of electron impact collision strengths and spontaneous radiative decay rates are made for neon-like krypton (Kr XXVII) for the 2s2 2p6, 2s2 2p5 3s, 2s2 2p5 3p, and 2s2 2p5 3d configurations. From these atomic data, the level populations as a function of the electron density are calculated at two temperatures, 1 x 10 to the 7th K and 3 x 10 to the 7th K. An analysis of level populations reveals that a volume of krypton in which a significant number of the ions are in the Kr XXVII degree of ionization can produce a significant gain in transition between the 2s2 2p5 3s and 2s2 2p5 3p configurations. At an electron density of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm the plasma length has to be of the order of 1 m; at a density of 1 x 10 to the 21st/cu cm the length is reduced to approximately 0.5 cm; and at an electron density of 1 x 10 to the 22nd/cu cm the length of the plasma is further reduced to approximately 1 mm.

  20. Effect of annealing on photoluminescence properties of neon implanted GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, Abdul [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Ali, Akbar [Advance Materials Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zhu, J J [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Y T [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, W [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Lu, G J [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, W B [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, L Q [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Z S [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, D G [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, S M [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, D S; Yang, H [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-01-21

    The effect of thermal annealing on the luminescence properties of neon implanted GaN thin films was studied. Low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out on the samples implanted with different doses ranging from 10{sup 14} to 9 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} and annealed isochronally at 800 and 900 deg. C. We observed a new peak appearing at 3.44 eV in the low temperative PL spectra of all the implanted samples after annealing at 900 deg. C. This peak has not been observed in the PL spectra of implanted samples annealed at 800 deg. C except for the samples implanted with the highest dose. The intensity of the yellow luminescence (YL) band noticed in the PL spectra measured after annealing was observed to decrease with the increase in dose until it was completely suppressed at a dose of 5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The appearance of a new peak at 3.44 eV and dose dependent suppression of the YL band are attributed to the dissociation of V{sub Ga}O{sub N} complexes caused by high energy ion implantation.

  1. Thermodynamic design of hydrogen liquefaction systems with helium or neon Brayton refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Ryu, Ki Nam; Baik, Jong Hoon

    2018-04-01

    A thermodynamic study is carried out for the design of hydrogen liquefaction systems with helium (He) or neon (Ne) Brayton refrigerator. This effort is motivated by our immediate goal to develop a small-capacity (100 L/h) liquefier for domestic use in Korea. Eight different cycles are proposed and their thermodynamic performance is investigated in comparison with the existing liquefaction systems. The proposed cycles include the standard and modified versions of He Brayton refrigerators whose lowest temperature is below 20 K. The Brayton refrigerator is in direct thermal contact with the hydrogen flow at atmospheric pressure from ambient-temperature gas to cryogenic liquid. The Linde-Hampson system pre-cooled by a Ne Brayton refrigerator is also considered. Full cycle analysis is performed with the real properties of fluids to estimate the figure of merit (FOM) under an optimized operation condition. It is concluded that He Brayton refrigerators are feasible for this small-scale liquefaction, because a reasonably high efficiency can be achieved with simple and safe (low-pressure) operation. The complete cycles with He Brayton refrigerator are presented for the development of a prototype, including the ortho-to-para conversion.

  2. Effect of helium-neon laser irradiation on hair follicle growth cycle of Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S; Sahu, K; Verma, Y; Rao, K D; Dube, A; Gupta, P K

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a study carried out to investigate the effect of helium-neon (He-Ne) laser (632.8 nm) irradiation on the hair follicle growth cycle of testosterone-treated and untreated mice. Both histology and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used for the measurement of hair follicle length and the relative percentage of hair follicles in different growth phases. A positive correlation (R = 0.96) was observed for the lengths of hair follicles measured by both methods. Further, the ratios of the lengths of hair follicles in the anagen and catagen phases obtained by both methods were nearly the same. However, the length of the hair follicles measured by both methods differed by a factor of 1.6, with histology showing smaller lengths. He-Ne laser irradiation (at approximately 1 J/cm(2)) of the skin of both the control and the testosterone-treated mice was observed to lead to a significant increase (p alopecia. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Strange particle production in ν and overlineν neon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, P.; Fritze, P.; Grässler, H.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, K.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Glimpf, W.; Nellen, B.; Wünsch, B.; Grant, A.; Hulth, P. O.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Pape, L.; Wachsmuth, H.; Mermikides, M.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Butterworth, I.; Chima, J. S.; Clayton, E.; Iaselli, G.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Petrides, A.; Albajar, C.; Wells, J.; Bloch, M.; Bolognese, T.; Velasco, J.; Aachen-Bonn-CERN-Demokritos Athens-I. C. London-Oxford-Saclay Collaboration

    1982-12-01

    The inclusive production of K 0's and Λ's has been investigated in neutrino and antineutrino interactions in BEBC, filled with a neon-hydrogen mixture. The inclusive rates for the 3083 (1022) ν ( overlineν) induced charged current events are (23.0 ± 1.7)% ((21.9 ± 2.8)%) for K 0's and (5.7 ± 0.7)% ((6.5 ± 1.2)%) for Λ's. The general behaviour of the K 0's and Λ's is found to be similar to that in νp interactions and π+p interactions at lower . In the hadronic c.m.s. K 0's are produced mostly forwards, Λ's predominantly in the backward hemisphere. The data indicate that K 0's produced in overlineν interactions on average carry a larger fraction of the total available momentum than those in ν induced reactions. The dependences of the average transverse momentum on the variables Q2, W2 and Bjorken x are presented.

  4. Effect of annealing on photoluminescence properties of neon implanted GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, Abdul; Ali, Akbar; Zhu, J J; Wang, Y T; Liu, W; Lu, G J; Liu, W B; Zhang, L Q; Liu, Z S; Zhao, D G; Zhang, S M; Jiang, D S; Yang, H

    2008-01-01

    The effect of thermal annealing on the luminescence properties of neon implanted GaN thin films was studied. Low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out on the samples implanted with different doses ranging from 10 14 to 9 x 10 15 cm -2 and annealed isochronally at 800 and 900 deg. C. We observed a new peak appearing at 3.44 eV in the low temperative PL spectra of all the implanted samples after annealing at 900 deg. C. This peak has not been observed in the PL spectra of implanted samples annealed at 800 deg. C except for the samples implanted with the highest dose. The intensity of the yellow luminescence (YL) band noticed in the PL spectra measured after annealing was observed to decrease with the increase in dose until it was completely suppressed at a dose of 5 x 10 15 cm -2 . The appearance of a new peak at 3.44 eV and dose dependent suppression of the YL band are attributed to the dissociation of V Ga O N complexes caused by high energy ion implantation

  5. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    synthesis of ammonia, NH{sub 3}, from its elements, H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, via the venerable Haber-Bosch process is one of the most significant technological achievements of the past century. Our research program seeks to discover new transition metal reagents and catalysts to disrupt the strong N {triple_bond} N bond in N{sub 2} and create new, fundamental chemical linkages for the construction of molecules with application as fuels, fertilizers and fine chemicals. With DOE support, our group has discovered a mild method for ammonia synthesis in solution as well as new methods for the construction of nitrogen-carbon bonds directly from N{sub 2}. Ideally these achievements will evolve into more efficient nitrogen fixation schemes that circumvent the high energy demands of industrial ammonia synthesis. Industrially, atmospheric nitrogen enters the synthetic cycle by the well-established Haber-Bosch process whereby N{sub 2} is hydrogenated to ammonia at high temperature and pressure. The commercialization of this reaction represents one of the greatest technological achievements of the 20th century as Haber-Bosch ammonia is responsible for supporting approximately 50% of the world's population and serves as the source of half of the nitrogen in the human body. The extreme reaction conditions required for an economical process have significant energy consequences, consuming 1% of the world's energy supply mostly in the form of pollution-intensive coal. Moreover, industrial H{sub 2} synthesis via the water gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of methane is fossil fuel intensive and produces CO{sub 2} as a byproduct. New synthetic methods that promote this thermodynamically favored transformation ({Delta}G{sup o} = -4.1 kcal/mol) under milder conditions or completely obviate it are therefore desirable. Most nitrogen-containing organic molecules are derived from ammonia (and hence rely on the Haber-Bosch and H{sub 2} synthesis processes) and direct synthesis from

  6. Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megonigal, Patrick [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Pitz, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This exploratory research on Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems was motivated by evidence that upland ecosystems emit 36% as much methane to the atmosphere as global wetlands, yet we knew almost nothing about this source. The long-term objective was to refine Earth system models by quantifying methane emissions from upland forests, and elucidate the biogeochemical processes that govern upland methane emissions. The immediate objectives of the grant were to: (i) test the emerging paradigm that upland trees unexpectedly transpire methane, (ii) test the basic biogeochemical assumptions of an existing global model of upland methane emissions, and (iii) develop the suite of biogeochemical approaches that will be needed to advance research on upland methane emissions. We instrumented a temperate forest system in order to explore the processes that govern upland methane emissions. We demonstrated that methane is emitted from the stems of dominant tree species in temperate upland forests. Tree emissions occurred throughout the growing season, while soils adjacent to the trees consumed methane simultaneously, challenging the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycling in the rate of methane emissions, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for methane transport. We propose the forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Stem emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration, resolving differences between models and measurements. The methods we used can be effectively implemented in order to determine if the phenomenon is widespread.

  7. Fungal degradation of coal as a pretreatment for methane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; SanFilipo, John R.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Akhtar, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Coal conversion technologies can help in taking advantage of huge low rank coal reserves by converting those into alternative fuels like methane. In this regard, fungal degradation of coal can serve as a pretreatment step in order to make coal a suitable substrate for biological beneficiation. A fungal isolate MW1, identified as Penicillium chrysogenum on the basis of fungal ITS sequences, was isolated from a core sample of coal, taken from a well drilled by the US. Geological Survey in Montana, USA. The low rank coal samples, from major coal fields of Pakistan, were treated with MW1 for 7 days in the presence of 0.1% ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source and 0.1% glucose as a supplemental carbon source. Liquid extracts were analyzed through Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) to obtain qualitative estimates of solubilized coal; these analyses indicated the release of complex organic functionalities. In addition, GC–MS analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of single ring aromatics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic nitrogen compounds and aliphatics. Subsequently, the released organics were subjected to a bioassay for the generation of methane which conferred the potential application of fungal degradation as pretreatment. Additionally, fungal-mediated degradation was also prospected for extracting some other chemical entities like humic acids from brown coals with high huminite content especially from Thar, the largest lignite reserve of Pakistan.

  8. Methane generation from waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Zohrab A.; Hanson, Adrian T.; Macias-Corral, Maritza

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  9. Methane Dynamics in Flooded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with a heat trapping capacity 34 times greater than that of carbon dioxide on a100 year time scale. Known anthropogenic CH4 sources include livestock production, rice agriculture, landfills, and natural gas m...

  10. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  11. Coal Mine Methane in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses coal mine methane emissions (CMM) in the Russian Federation and the potential for their productive utilisation. It highlights specific opportunities for cost-effective reductions of CMM from oil and natural gas facilities, coal mines and landfills, with the aim of improving knowledge about effective policy approaches.

  12. Analyzing the Effects of Nitrogen Deficiency on the PHB Production of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyauk, E.

    2011-12-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a biodegradable thermoplastic that is produced by various microorganisms. Because of its potential to replace conventional plastics, it has been closely researched in the past few years. Methanotrophic bacteria, bacteria that consume methane, produce this bioplastic when it lacks certain nutrients. The utilization of methane to produce PHB shows much promise as methane is a cheap, plentiful gas. In this study, we observed the methanotroph, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b , and its yield of PHB in the absence of nitrogen. The optical density of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was measured in order to observe cell growth and PHB production patterns over a 48 hour period.

  13. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: II. A review of manure management mitigation options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montes, F.; Meinen, R.; Dell, C.; Rotz, A.; Hristov, A.N.; Oh, J.; Waghorn, G.; Gerber, P.J.; Henderson, B.L.; Makkar, H.P.S.; Dijkstra, J.

    2013-01-01

    This review analyzes published data on manure management practices used to mitigate methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from animal operations. Reducing excreted nitrogen (N) and degradable organic carbon (C) by diet manipulation to improve the balance of nutrient inputs with production

  14. Methane emissions and microbial communities as influenced by dual cropping of Azolla along with early Rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jingna; Xu, Heshui; Jiang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Azolla caroliniana Willd. is widely used as a green manure accompanying rice, but its ecological importance remains unclear, except for its ability to fix nitrogen in association with cyanobacteria. To investigate the impacts of Azolla cultivation on methane emissions and environmental variables...... in paddy fields, we performed this study on the plain of Dongting Lake, China, in 2014. The results showed that the dual cropping of Azolla significantly suppressed the methane emissions from paddies, likely due to the increase in redox potential in the root region and dissolved oxygen concentration...... at the soil-water interface. Furthermore, the floodwater pH decreased in association with Azolla cultivation, which is also a factor significantly correlated with the decrease in methane emissions. An increase in methanotrophic bacteria population (pmoA gene copies) and a reduction in methanogenic archaea (16...

  15. Brittany invents the cantonal methanation; La Bretagne invente la methanisation cantonale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-05-01

    In the canton of Lannilis (Finistere, Brittany, France), a methanation unit will be built for the valorization of the organic wastes from local animal husbandry and food industries. The amount of wastes to be processed represents about 100000 tons/year, i.e. two thirds of the organic matter in excess of the canton. The natural methanation process developed by Schwarting Umwelt company (Germany) will be used in association with a complementary biological process for nitrogen developed by Zenon company (Canada). This paper details the organization of wastes collection and the different steps of the methanation process (mesophilic digestion (37 deg. C), thermophilic digestion (55 deg. C)). The biogas is transformed into electricity and hot water through a cogeneration unit. (J.S.)

  16. Tightening the nitrogen cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, B.T.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of nitrogen to crop plants is a universally important aspect of soil quality, and often nitrogen represents the immediate limitation to crop productivity in modern agriculture. Nitrogen is decisive for the nutritive value of plant products and plays a key role in the environmental impact of agricultural production. The fundamental doctrine of nitrogen management is to optimise the nitrogen use efficiency of both introduced and native soil nitrogen by increasing the temporal a...

  17. Response of the Black Sea methane budget to massive short-term submarine inputs of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmale, O.; Haeckel, M.; McGinnis, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    A steady state box model was developed to estimate the methane input into the Black Sea water column at various water depths. Our model results reveal a total input of methane of 4.7 Tg yr(-1). The model predicts that the input of methane is largest at water depths between 600 and 700 m (7......% of the total input), suggesting that the dissociation of methane gas hydrates at water depths equivalent to their upper stability limit may represent an important source of methane into the water column. In addition we discuss the effects of massive short-term methane inputs (e. g. through eruptions of deep......-water mud volcanoes or submarine landslides at intermediate water depths) on the water column methane distribution and the resulting methane emission to the atmosphere. Our non-steady state simulations predict that these inputs will be effectively buffered by intense microbial methane consumption...

  18. Improved methane removal in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process using immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng-Ting; Yang, Zhi-Man; Fu, Shan-Fei; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2018-05-01

    Methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process, which is a greenhouse gas, could cause global warming. The biofilter with immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) is a promising approach for methane removal, and the selections of inoculated MOB culture and support material are vital for the biofilter. In this work, five MOB consortia were enriched at different methane concentrations. The MOB-20 consortium enriched at the methane concentration of 20.0% (v/v) was then immobilized on sponge and two particle sizes of volcanic rock in biofilters to remove methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process. Results showed that the immobilized MOB performed more admirable methane removal capacity than suspended cells. The immobilized MOB on sponge reached the highest methane removal efficiency (RE) of 35%. The rough surface, preferable hydroscopicity, appropriate pore size and particle size of support material might favor the MOB immobilization and accordingly methane removal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Methane clathrates in the solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousis, Olivier; Chassefière, Eric; Holm, Nils G; Bouquet, Alexis; Waite, Jack Hunter; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Picaud, Sylvain; Aikawa, Yuri; Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form into the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined. In the case of Titan, most of its methane probably originates from the protosolar nebula, where it would have been trapped in the clathrates agglomerated by the satellite's building blocks. Methane clathrates are still believed to play an important role in the present state of Titan. Their presence is invoked in the satellite's subsurface as a means of replenishing its atmosphere with methane via outgassing episodes. The internal oceans of Enceladus and Europa also provide appropriate thermodynamic conditions that allow formation of methane clathrates. In turn, these clathrates might influence the composition of these liquid reservoirs. Finally, comets and Kuiper Belt Objects might have formed from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure ices in the nebula. The methane observed in comets would then result from the destabilization of clathrate layers in the nuclei concurrent with their approach to perihelion. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations show that methane-rich clathrate

  20. Methane distribution and oxidation around the Lena Delta in summer 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bussmann

    2017-11-01

    postulate the presence of a riverine methanotrophic population that is limited by sub-optimal temperatures and substrate concentrations and a polar methanotrophic population that is well adapted to the cold and methane-poor polar environment but limited by a lack of nitrogen. The diffusive methane flux into the atmosphere ranged from 4 to 163 µmol m2 d−1 (median 24. The diffusive methane flux accounted for a loss of 8 % of the total methane inventory of the investigated area, whereas the methanotrophic bacteria consumed only 1 % of this methane inventory. Our results underscore the importance of measuring the methane oxidation activities in polar estuaries, and they indicate a population-level differentiation between riverine and polar water methanotrophs.

  1. Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

  2. Biomass-derived carbon composites for enrichment of dilute methane from underground coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jun-Seok; Jin, Yonggang; Huynh, Chi; Su, Shi

    2018-07-01

    Ventilation air methane (VAM), which is the main source of greenhouse gas emissions from coal mines, has been a great challenge to deal with due to its huge flow rates and dilute methane levels (typically 0.3-1.0 vol%) with almost 100% humidity. As part of our continuous endeavor to further improve the methane adsorption capacity of carbon composites, this paper presents new carbon composites derived from macadamia nut shells (MNSs) and incorporated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). These new carbon composites were fabricated in a honeycomb monolithic structure to tolerate dusty environment and to minimize pressure drop. This paper demonstrates the importance of biomass particle size distributions when formed in a composite and methane adsorption capacities at low pressures relevant to VAM levels. The selectivity of methane over nitrogen was about 10.4 at each relevant partial pressure, which was much greater than that (6.5) obtained conventionally (at very low pressures), suggesting that capturing methane in the presence of pre-adsorbed nitrogen would be a practical option. The equilibrium and dynamic performance of biomass-derived carbon composites were enhanced by 30 and 84%, respectively, compared to those of our previous carbon fiber composites. In addition, the presence of moisture in ventilation air resulted in a negligible effect on the dynamic VAM capture performance of the carbon composites, suggesting that our carbon composites have a great potential for site applications at coal mines because the cost and performance of solid adsorbents are critical factors to consider. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characteristic of lipids and fatty acid compositions of the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The lipids and fatty acids of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) were an-alyzed to clarify its lipid physiology and health benefit as marine food. Triacylglycerols were the only major component in the digestive gland (liver). In all other organs (mantle, arm, integument, and ovary), sterols and phospholipids were the major components with noticeable levels of ceramide aminoethyl phosphonate and sphingomyelin. The significant levels of sphingolipids suggest the O. bartramii lipids is a useful source for cosmetics. Although the lipid content between the liver and all other tissues markedly differed from each other, the same nine dominant fatty acids in the triacylglycerols were found in all organs; 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 20:1n-9, 20:1n-11, 22:1n-11, 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid, EPA), and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA). Unusually high 20:1n-11 levels in the O. bartramii triacylglycerols were probably characteristic for western Pacific animal depot lipids, compared with non-detectable levels of 20:1n-11 reported in other marine animals. O. bartramii concurrently has high levels of DHA in their triacylglycerols. The major fatty acids in the phospholipids were 16:0, 18:0, 20:1n-9, EPA, and DHA without 20:1n-11. Markedly high levels of both EPA and DHA were observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, while only DHA was found as the major one in phosphatidylcholine. In particular, high levels of DHA were found both in its depot triacylglycerols and tissue phospholipids in all organs of O. bartramii, similar to that in highly migratory fishes. The high DHA levels in all its organs suggest that O. bartramii lipids is a healthy marine source for DHA supplements.

  4. Numerical investigation of depth profiling capabilities of helium and neon ions in ion microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Philipp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polymers by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS has been a topic of interest for many years. In recent years, the primary ion species evolved from heavy monatomic ions to cluster and massive cluster primary ions in order to preserve a maximum of organic information. The progress in less-damaging sputtering goes along with a loss in lateral resolution for 2D and 3D imaging. By contrast the development of a mass spectrometer as an add-on tool for the helium ion microscope (HIM, which uses finely focussed He+ or Ne+ beams, allows for the analysis of secondary ions and small secondary cluster ions with unprecedented lateral resolution. Irradiation induced damage and depth profiling capabilities obtained with these light rare gas species have been far less investigated than ion species used classically in SIMS. In this paper we simulated the sputtering of multi-layered polymer samples using the BCA (binary collision approximation code SD_TRIM_SP to study preferential sputtering and atomic mixing in such samples up to a fluence of 1018 ions/cm2. Results show that helium primary ions are completely inappropriate for depth profiling applications with this kind of sample materials while results for neon are similar to argon. The latter is commonly used as primary ion species in SIMS. For the two heavier species, layers separated by 10 nm can be distinguished for impact energies of a few keV. These results are encouraging for 3D imaging applications where lateral and depth information are of importance.

  5. Measurement of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, A.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Gonçalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo, 01303-050 São Paulo (Brazil); Mangiarotti, A. [Instituto de Física - Universidade de São Paulo, Cidade Universitária, 05508-080 São Paulo (Brazil); Botelho, S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Bueno, C.C., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-21

    Tissue-equivalent gases (TEGs), often made of a hydrocarbon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, have been employed in microdosimetry for decades. However, data on the first Townsend ionization coefficient (α) in such mixtures are scarce, regardless of the chosen hydrocarbon. In this context, measurements of α in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas (CH{sub 4} – 64.4%, CO{sub 2} – 32.4%, and N{sub 2} – 3.2%) were performed in a uniform field configuration for density-normalized electric fields (E/N) up to 290 Td. The setup adopted in our previous works was improved for operating at low pressures. The modifications introduced in the apparatus and the experimental technique were validated by comparing our results of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane with those from the literature and Magboltz simulations. The behavior of α in the methane-based TEG was consistent with that observed for pure methane. All the experimental results are included in tabular form in the .

  6. A novel methanotroph in the genus Methylomonas that contains a distinct clade of soluble methane monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Loi; Yu, Woon-Jong; Yang, Hye-Young; Kim, Jong-Geol; Jung, Man-Young; Park, Soo-Je; Roh, Seong-Woon; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2017-10-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation is a key process in the global carbon cycle that acts as a major sink of methane. In this study, we describe a novel methanotroph designated EMGL16-1 that was isolated from a freshwater lake using the floating filter culture technique. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, the isolate was found to be closely related to the genus Methylomonas in the family Methylococcaceae of the class Gammaproteobacteria with 94.2-97.4% 16S rRNA gene similarity to Methylomonas type strains. Comparison of chemotaxonomic and physiological properties further suggested that strain EMGL16-1 was taxonomically distinct from other species in the genus Methylomonas. The isolate was versatile in utilizing nitrogen sources such as molecular nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, urea, and ammonium. The genes coding for subunit of the particulate form methane monooxygenase (pmoA), soluble methane monooxygenase (mmoX), and methanol dehydrogenase (mxaF) were detected in strain EMGL16-1. Phylogenetic analysis of mmoX indicated that mmoX of strain EMGL16-1 is distinct from those of other strains in the genus Methylomonas. This isolate probably represents a novel species in the genus. Our study provides new insights into the diversity of species in the genus Methylomonas and their environmental adaptations.

  7. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  8. Fragmentation dynamics of ionized neon clusters (Ne(n), n=3-14) embedded in helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhommeau, David; Halberstadt, Nadine; Viel, Alexandra

    2006-01-14

    We report a theoretical study of the nonadiabatic fragmentation dynamics of ionized neon clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets for cluster sizes up to n=14 atoms. The dynamics of the neon atoms is modeled using the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions method of Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)] with the nuclei treated classically and transitions between electronic states quantum mechanically. The potential-energy surfaces are derived from a diatomics-in-molecules model to which induced dipole-induced dipole interactions are added. The effect of the spin-orbit interaction is also discussed. The helium environment is modeled by a friction force acting on charged atoms whose speed exceeds the critical Landau velocity. The dependence of the fragment size distribution on the friction strength and on the initial nanodroplet size is investigated. By comparing with the available experimental data obtained for Ne3+ and Ne4+, a reasonable value for the friction coefficient, the only parameter of the model, is deduced. This value is then used to predict the effect of the helium environment on the dissociation dynamics of larger neon clusters, n=5-14. The results show stabilization of larger fragments than in the gas phase, but fragmentation is not completely caged. In addition, two types of dynamics are characterized for Ne4+: fast and explosive, therefore leaving no time for friction to cool down the process when dynamics starts on one of the highest electronic states, and slower, therefore leading to some stabilization by helium when it starts on one of the lowest electronic states.

  9. EXPANDING THE CATALOG: CONSIDERING THE IMPORTANCE OF CARBON, MAGNESIUM, AND NEON IN THE EVOLUTION OF STARS AND HABITABLE ZONES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truitt, Amanda; Young, Patrick A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Building on previous work, we have expanded our catalog of evolutionary models for stars with variable composition; here we present models for stars of mass 0.5–1.2 M {sub ⊙}, at scaled metallicities of 0.1–1.5 Z {sub ⊙}, and specific C/Fe, Mg/Fe, and Ne/Fe values of 0.58–1.72 C/Fe{sub ⊙}, 0.54–1.84 Mg/Fe{sub ⊙}, and 0.5–2.0 Ne/Fe{sub ⊙}, respectively. We include a spread in abundance values for carbon and magnesium based on observations of their variability in nearby stars; we choose an arbitrary spread in neon abundance values commensurate with the range seen in other low Z elements due to the difficult nature of obtaining precise measurements of neon abundances in stars. As indicated by the results of Truitt et al., it is essential that we understand how differences in individual elemental abundances, and not just the total scaled metallicity, can measurably impact a star’s evolutionary lifetime and other physical characteristics. In that work, we found that oxygen abundances significantly impacted the stellar evolution; carbon, magnesium, and neon are potentially important elements to individually consider due to their relatively high (but also variable) abundances in stars. We present 528 new stellar main-sequence models, and we calculate the time-dependent evolution of the associated habitable zone boundaries for each based on mass, temperature, and luminosity. We also reintroduce the 2 Gyr “Continuously Habitable Zone” (CHZ{sub 2}) as a useful tool to help gauge the habitability potential for a given planetary system.

  10. Experimental study on the supercritical startup and heat transport capability of a neon-charged cryogenic loop heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yuandong; Lin, Guiping; He, Jiang; Bai, Lizhan; Zhang, Hongxing; Miao, Jianyin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A neon-charged CLHP integrated with a G-M cryocooler was designed and investigated. • The CLHP can realize the supercritical startup with an auxiliary heat load of 1.5 W. • Maximum heat transport capability of the CLHP was 4.5 W over a distance of 0.6 m. • There existed an optimum auxiliary heat load to expedite the supercritical startup. • There existed an optimum charged pressure to reach the largest heat transfer limit. - Abstract: Neon-charged cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP) can realize efficient cryogenic heat transport in the temperature range of 30–40 K, and promises great application potential in the thermal control of future space infrared exploration system. In this work, extensive experimental studies on the supercritical startup and heat transport capability of a neon-charged CLHP integrated with a G-M cryocooler were carried out, where the effects of the auxiliary heat load applied to the secondary evaporator and charged pressure of the working fluid were investigated. Experimental results showed that the CLHP could successfully realize the supercritical startup with an auxiliary heat load of 1.5 W, and there existed an optimum auxiliary heat load and charged pressure of the working fluid respectively, to achieve the maximum temperature drop rate of the primary evaporator during the supercritical startup. The CLHP could reach a maximum heat transport capability of 4.5 W over a distance of 0.6 m corresponding to the optimum charged pressure of the working fluid; however, the heat transport capability decreased with the increase of the auxiliary heat load. Furthermore, the inherent mechanisms responsible for the phenomena observed in the experiments were analyzed and discussed, to provide a better understanding from the theoretical view.

  11. Fluid-bed methane proposed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The first full scale plant for the production of methane from organic waste could be built in the next few years believes M.J. Nyns of the University of Louvain, Belgium, utilizing either expanded bed or fluidised bed systems, with more than one stage, in a continuous flow arrangement. Up to 8.0 m cubed gas/m cubed digester/day could be produced with residence times reduced to 34 hours.

  12. Methane emissions from coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.; Mitchell, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper outlines some of the problems associated with the prediction of levels of methane emission from underground and surface coal mines. Current knowledge of coal mining emissions sources is outlined. On the basis of this information the methodology proposed by the IPCC/OECD Programme on National Inventories is critically examined and alternatives considered. Finally, the technical options for emissions control are examined together with their feasibility. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Microwave Hydrogen Production from Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    combustion NOx control of reciprocating engine exhaust and fuel cell application of biogas . Our target is to obtain the methane conversion efficiency...demonstration of MW technology removing and destroying hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and siloxanes from biogas produced by Sacramento Regional Wastewater...running on biogas and is currently conducting the field demonstration of the unit at Tollenaar Dairy in Elk Grove, CA. SMUD, California Air Resources

  14. Collision strengths and oscillator strengths for excitation to the n = 3 and 4 levels of neon-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Sampson, D.H.; Clark, R.E.H.; Mann, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Collision strengths are given for the 88 possible fine-structure transitions between the ground level and the n = 3 and 4 levels in 20 neon-like ions with nuclear charge number Z in the range 18 ≤Z≤74. The results are given for the nine impact-electron energies in threshold units X = 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 1.9, 2.5, 4.0, 6.0, 10.0, and 15.0. In addition, electric dipole oscillator strengths obtained by various methods are given. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc

  15. Extreme UV observation of 3-3 transitions of niobium in near neon-like charge states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchet-Poulizac, M.C. E-mail: marie-claude.buchet-poulizac@lasim.univ-lyon1.fr; Cassimi, A.; Cremer, G.; Grandin, J.-P.; Hennecart, D.; Husson, X.; Jacquet, E.; Wyart, J.-F

    2003-05-01

    The emission spectra of highly ionised niobium ions generated by beam-foil excitation in the range 7-21 nm show most 3-3 transitions belonging to the neon-like ions and neighbouring Na-, Mg- and F- sequences. Wavelengths have been determined in reference to {delta}n=1 transitions between Rydberg states. Line identification have been made by comparison to extra- or interpolation of wavenumbers along isoelectronic sequences when data were available and to ab initio atomic structure calculations, using either a Cowan code or a fully relativistic parametric code for Ne- and F-sequences.

  16. Evidence for nonstatistical population of configurations in Li-like neon following Cl/sup 13+/ → Ne collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.L.; Fortner, R.J.; Schneider, D.; Moore, C.F.

    1976-01-01

    Recent measurements of the x-ray and Auger line strengths in Li-like neon produced by 45-MeV Cl/sup 13+/ → Ne collisions are compared with theoretical values. We assume that in the collision there is a statistical population of configurations and multiplet states. An overpopulation of the 1s2s 2 and 1s2s2p configurations (relative to the 1s2p 2 ) is observed. We suggest cascade feeding as a likely mechanism for producing this effect

  17. Neon dense plasma focus point x-ray source for ≤ 0.25 μm lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, R.R.; Krishnan, M.; Berg, K.; Conlon, D.; Mangano, J.

    1994-01-01

    A discharge driven, dense plasma focus (DPF) in neon has been developed at SRL as a point x-ray source for sub-micron lithography. This source is presently capable of delivering ∼25 J/pulse of neon K-shell x-rays (8--14 angstrom) into 4 π steradians with a ∼1.4% wall plug efficiency at a 20 Hz repetition rate. The discharge is produced by a capacitor bank circuit (8 kV, 1.8 kJ) which has a fixed inductance of 11 nH and drives ∼ 320 kA currents into the DPF load, with ∼1 μs rise-times. X-rays are produced when a dense pinch of neon is formed along the axis of the DPF electrodes. The dense neon pinch has been found to be a cigar shaped object, ∼0.3 mm in diameter at the waist and ∼8 mm long on a singe shot. This source wanders slightly from shot to shot in an overall envelope which is ∼0.5--0.75 mm in diameter and ∼8 mm long. The spectrum of x-rays emitted by the pinch has been extensively studied. It has been found that 60% of the total x-ray output is radiated in the H-like and He-like lines centered at 12.9 angstrom and 40% of the output is radiated in the H-like and He-like continuum, centered at 9.8 angstrom. More than 4 x 10 5 discharges using a cooled DPF head have been fired producing x-rays. The variation in the measured x-ray output, over several hundreds of thousands of shots, corresponds to a variation in the dose delivered to a resist 40 cm from the source, of less than 1%. Data showing the measurement of the x-ray output, dose delivered to a resist, spectra of the source output, novel beam line concepts and potential lithographic applications will be presented

  18. The helium neon laser radiation use in the profilaxy of post surgical complication on the surgical gynecologic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, I.; Sofroni, M.; Potapova, L.; Sohotchi, V.

    1997-01-01

    The subject of the report consists of complex application of the helium-neon laser irradiation on all surgery stage treatment of the gynecologic patients. For laser therapy of the surgical field pre- and during surgery intervention was used 10 mW laser; for intra blood vessels laser therapy was used 0,5 mW laser. Utilisation of complex laser irradiation of surgery treatment of the neoplasms gynecologic patients permit to decrease the post surgical complication and increase the time of post surgical heal up

  19. Nuclear attenuation of fast hadrons produced in charged-current ν and anti ν interactions in neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkot, W.; Coghen, T.; Czyzewski, J.

    1996-01-01

    The production of hadrons in charged-current (anti)neutrino interactions is studied with the bubble chamber BEBC exposed to the CERN (anti)neutrino wide-band beam. Fast-hadron production in a neon target is found to be attenuated as compared to that in a hydrogen target. This feature is discussed within theoretical models based on the idea of a hadron formation length. The experimental results favour the 'constituent' over the 'yo-yo' length concept, and suggest a quark cross section in the order of 3 mb. (orig.)

  20. Titan's Methane Cycle is Closed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Doppler tracking of the Cassini spacecraft determined a polar moment of inertia for Titan of 0.34 (Iess et al., 2010, Science, 327, 1367). Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, one interpretation is that Titan's silicate core is partially hydrated (Castillo-Rogez and Lunine, 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L20205). These authors point out that for the core to have avoided complete thermal dehydration to the present day, at least 30% of the potassium content of Titan must have leached into an overlying water ocean by the end of the core overturn. We calculate that for probable ammonia compositions of Titan's ocean (compositions with greater than 1% ammonia by weight), that this amount of potassium leaching is achievable via the substitution of ammonium for potassium during the hydration epoch. Formation of a hydrous core early in Titan's history by serpentinization results in the loss of one hydrogen molecule for every hydrating water molecule. We calculate that complete serpentinization of Titan's core corresponds to the release of more than enough hydrogen to reconstitute all of the methane atoms photolyzed throughout Titan's history. Insertion of molecular hydrogen by double occupancy into crustal clathrates provides a storage medium and an opportunity for ethane to be converted back to methane slowly over time--potentially completing a cycle that extends the lifetime of methane in Titan's surface atmosphere system by factors of several to an order of magnitude over the photochemically-calculated lifetime.

  1. Production of hydrogen via methane reforming using atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, Mariusz; Dors, Miroslaw [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Mizeraczyk, Jerzy [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Department of Marine Electronics, Gdynia Maritime University, Morska 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, results of hydrogen production via methane reforming in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma are presented. A waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type microwave plasma source (MPS) was used to convert methane into hydrogen. Important advantages of the presented waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type MPS are: stable operation in various gases (including air) at high flow rates, no need for a cooling system, and impedance matching. The plasma generation was stabilized by an additional swirled nitrogen flow (50 or 100 l min{sup -1}). The methane flow rate was up to 175 l min{sup -1}. The absorbed microwave power could be changed from 3000 to 5000 W. The hydrogen production rate and the corresponding energy efficiency in the presented methane reforming by the waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type MPS were up to 255 g[H{sub 2}] h{sup -1} and 85 g[H{sub 2}] kWh{sup -1}, respectively. These parameters are better than those typical of the conventional methods of hydrogen production (steam reforming of methane and water electrolysis). (author)

  2. Effect of the chlortetracycline addition method on methane production from the anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yongde; Ma, Baohua; Liao, Xindi; Liang, Juanboo; Wu, Yinbao

    2014-10-01

    Effects of antibiotic residues on methane production in anaerobic digestion are commonly studied using the following two antibiotic addition methods: (1) adding manure from animals that consume a diet containing antibiotics, and (2) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics. This study used chlortetracycline (CTC) as a model antibiotic to examine the effects of the antibiotic addition method on methane production in anaerobic digestion under two different swine wastewater concentrations (0.55 and 0.22mg CTC/g dry manure). The results showed that CTC degradation rate in which manure was directly added at 0.55mg CTC/g (HSPIKE treatment) was lower than the control values and the rest of the treatment groups. Methane production from the HSPIKE treatment was reduced (pdigesters, and the total nitrogen of the 0.55mg CTC/kg manure collected from mediated swine was significantly higher than the other values. Therefore, different methane production under different antibiotic addition methods might be explained by the microbial activity and the concentrations of antibiotic intermediate products and metabolites. Because the primary entry route of veterinary antibiotics into an anaerobic digester is by contaminated animal manure, the most appropriate method for studying antibiotic residue effects on methane production may be using manure from animals that are given a particular antibiotic, rather than adding the antibiotic directly to the anaerobic digester. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A post-Cassini view of Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2018-05-01

    The methane-based hydrologic cycle on Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is an extreme analogue to Earth's water cycle. Titan is the only planetary body in the Solar System, other than Earth, that is known to have an active hydrologic cycle. With a surface pressure of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90 to 95 K, methane and ethane condense out of a nitrogen-based atmosphere and flow as liquids on the moon's surface. Exchange processes between atmospheric, surface and subsurface reservoirs produce methane and ethane cloud systems, as well as erosional and depositional landscapes that have strikingly similar forms to their terrestrial counterparts. Over its 13-year exploration of the Saturn system, the Cassini-Huygens mission revealed that Titan's hydrocarbon-based hydrology is driven by nested methane cycles that operate over a range of timescales, including geologic, orbital (for example, Croll-Milankovitch cycles), seasonal and that of a single convective storm. In this Review Article, we describe the dominant exchange processes that operate over these timescales and present a post-Cassini view of Titan's methane-based hydrologic system.

  4. Evidence for methane in Martian meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, Nigel J F; Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean; Mark, Darren F; Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin; Shivak, Jared; Izawa, Matthew R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Flemming, Roberta L

    2015-06-16

    The putative occurrence of methane in the Martian atmosphere has had a major influence on the exploration of Mars, especially by the implication of active biology. The occurrence has not been borne out by measurements of atmosphere by the MSL rover Curiosity but, as on Earth, methane on Mars is most likely in the subsurface of the crust. Serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks, to yield hydrogen that may further react with carbon-bearing species, has been widely invoked as a source of methane on Mars, but this possibility has not hitherto been tested. Here we show that some Martian meteorites, representing basic igneous rocks, liberate a methane-rich volatile component on crushing. The occurrence of methane in Martian rock samples adds strong weight to models whereby any life on Mars is/was likely to be resident in a subsurface habitat, where methane could be a source of energy and carbon for microbial activity.

  5. Methane generated from graphite--tritium interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    When hydrogen isotopes are separated by cryogenic distillation, as little as 1 ppM of methane will eventually plug the still as frost accumulates on the column packings. Elemental carbon exposed to tritium generates methane spontaneously, and yet some dry transfer pumps, otherwise compatible with tritium, convey the gas with graphite rotors. This study was to determine the methane production rate for graphite in tritium. A pump manufacturer supplied graphite samples that we exposed to tritium gas at 0.8 atm. After 137 days we measured a methane synthesis rate of 6 ng/h per cm 2 of graphite exposed. At this rate methane might grow to a concentration of 0.01 ppM when pure tritium is transferred once through a typical graphite--rotor transfer pump. Such a low methane level will not cause column blockage, even if the cryogenic still is operated continuously for many years

  6. Microbial nitrogen sinks in the water column of a large coastal hypoxic area, the Gulf of Mexico "Dead Zone"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogener, M. K.; Roberts, B. J.; Rabalais, N. N.; Stewart, F. J.; Joye, S. B.

    2016-02-01

    Excess nitrogen in coastal environments leads to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, habitat loss, oxygen depletion and reductions in biodiversity. As such, biological nitrogen (N) removal through the microbially-mediated process of denitrification is a critical ecosystem function that can mitigate the negative consequences of excess nitrogen loading. However, denitrification can produce nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas, as a byproduct under some environmental conditions. To understand how excess nitrogen loading impacts denitrification, we measured rates of this process in the water column of the Gulf of Mexico "Dead Zone" three times over the summer of 2015. The Dead Zone is generated by excessive nitrogen loading from the Mississippi River co-occurring with strong water column stratification, which leads to a large summer-time hypoxic/anoxic area at the mouth of the river and along the coast of Louisiana. Rates of denitrification ranged from 31 to 153 nmol L-1 d-1. Dead Zone waters are also enriched in methane and aerobic methane oxidation rates ranged from 0.1 to 4.3 nmol L-1 d-1. Maximal denitrification rates were observed at stations with the lowest oxygen concentrations and highest methane oxidation rates, suggesting a potential coupling between nitrate reduction and methane oxidation which both scrubs reactive N and methane from the system, thus performing a duel ecosystem service.

  7. Ammonia production in nitrogen seeded plasma discharges in ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohde, V., E-mail: Volker.Rohde@ipp.mpg.de; Oberkofler, M.

    2015-08-15

    In present tokamaks nitrogen seeding is used to reduce the power load onto the divertor tiles. Some fraction of the seeded nitrogen reacts with hydrogen to form ammonia. The behaviour of ammonia in ASDEX Upgrade is studied by mass spectrometry. Injection without plasma shows strong absorption at the inner walls of the vessel and isotope exchange reactions. During nitrogen seeding in H-mode discharges the onset of a saturation of the nitrogen retention is observed. The residual gas consists of strongly deuterated methane and ammonia with almost equal amounts of deuterium and protium. This confirms the role of surface reactions in the ammonia formation. The results are consistent with findings in previous investigations. A numerical decomposition of mass spectra is under development and will be needed for quantitative evaluation of the results obtained.

  8. International Methane Partnership Fighting Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Due to the growth of international attention on the problem of climate change combined with the attractiveness of methane mitigation technologies, the capture and use of methane in agriculture, coal mines, landfills, and the oil and gas sector has increasingly become popular over the past few years. Highlighting this, several countries hosted the international 'Methane to Market' Partnership Conference and Exposition in October 2007 in Beijing, China.

  9. Evaluation of methane emissions from Taiwanese paddies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.-W.; Wu, C.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    The main greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. Methane is the most important because the warming effect of methane is 21 times greater than that of carbon dioxide. Methane emitted from rice paddy fields is a major source of atmospheric methane. In this work, a methane emission model (MEM), which integrates climate change, plant growth and degradation of soil organic matter, was applied to estimate the emission of methane from rice paddy fields in Taiwan. The estimated results indicate that much methane is emitted during the effective tillering and booting stages in the first crop season and during the transplanting stage in the second crop season in a year. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the temperature is the most important parameter that governs the methane emission rate. The order of the strengths of the effects of the other parameters is soil pH, soil water depth (SWD) and soil organic matter content. The masses of methane emitted from rice paddy fields of Taiwan in the first and second crop seasons are 28,507 and 350,231 tons, respectively. The amount of methane emitted during the second crop season is 12.5 times higher than that emitted in the first crop season. With a 12% reduction in planted area during the second crop season, methane emission could be reduced by 21%. In addition, removal of rice straw left from the first crop season and increasing the depth of flooding to 25 cm are also strategies that could help reduce annual emission by up to 18%

  10. Methane hydrates in quaternary climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennett, J. P.; Hill, T. M.; Behl, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrate reservoir in marine sediments is known to contain a large volume of exchangeable carbon stored as solid methane hydrate and associated free gas. This reservoir has been shown to be potentially unstable in response to changing intermediate water temperature and sea level (pressure). Evidence continues to grow for past episodes of major methane release at times of climatic warming. Yet few studies of late Quaternary climate change include methane hydrates as an integral part of the global climate system, in spite of the largest known oscillations at this time in sea level and upper ocean temperature changes for the Cenozoic or earlier, conditions that favor instability of the methane hydrate reservoir. Abrupt increases in atmospheric methane recorded in polar ice cores are widely believed to have resulted, not from ocean-floor methane degassing, but instead from continental wetland activation, a hypothesis thus far unsupported by geological data. Furthermore, as part of this Wetland Methane Hypothesis, the abrupt methane increases have been seen as a response to climatic warming rather than contributing significantly to the change. An alternative view (formulated as the Clathrate Gun Hypothesis) is that the speed, magnitude and timing of abrupt climate change in the recent geologic past are consistent with the process of major degassing of methane hydrates. We summarize aspects of this hypothesis here and needs to test this hypothesis. (Author)

  11. Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganendra, G; De Muynck, W; Ho, A.; Hoefman, S.; De Vos, P.; Boeckx, P.; Boon, N.

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) immobilized on six porous carrier materials have been used to mitigate methane emission. Experiments were performed with different MOB inoculated in building materials at high (similar to 20 % (v/v)) and low (similar to 100 ppmv) methane

  12. Quantification of the methane concentration using anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to extracellular electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biofilm anode acclimated with acetate, acetate+methane, and methane growth media for over three years produced a steady current density of 1.6-2.3 mA/m^2 in a microbial electrochemical cell (MxC) fed with methane as the sole electron donor. Geobacter was the dominant genus for...

  13. MethaneSat: Detecting Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, A. M.; Benmergui, J. S.; Turner, A. J.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the new information that will be provided by MethaneSat, a proposed satellite that will measure the total column dry-air mole fraction of methane at 1x1 km or 2x2 km spatial resolution with 0.1-0.2% random error. We run an atmospheric model to simulate MethaneSat's ability to characterize methane emissions from the Barnett Shale, a natural gas province in Texas. For comparison, we perform observation system simulation experiments (OSSEs) for MethaneSat, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric administration (NOAA) surface and aircraft network, and Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The results demonstrate the added benefit that MethaneSat would provide in our efforts to monitor and report methane emissions. We find that MethaneSat successfully quantifies total methane emissions in the region, as well as their spatial distribution and steep gradients. Under the same test conditions, both the NOAA network and GOSAT fail to capture this information. Furthermore, we find that the results for MethaneSat depend far less on the prior emission estimate than do those for the other observing systems, demonstrating the benefit of high sampling density. The results suggest that MethaneSat would be an incredibly useful tool for obtaining detailed methane emission information from oil and gas provinces around the world.

  14. Attribution of changes in global wetland methane emissions from pre-industrial to present using CLM4.5-BGC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paudel, Rajendra; Mahowald, Natalie M; Hess, Peter G M; Meng, Lei; Riley, William J

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of potential factors controlling methane emissions from natural wetlands is important to accurately project future atmospheric methane concentrations. Here, we examine the relative contributions of climatic and environmental factors, such as precipitation, temperature, atmospheric CO 2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, wetland inundation extent, and land-use and land-cover change, on changes in wetland methane emissions from preindustrial to present day (i.e., 1850–2005). We apply a mechanistic methane biogeochemical model integrated in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5), the land component of the Community Earth System Model. The methane model explicitly simulates methane production, oxidation, ebullition, transport through aerenchyma of plants, and aqueous and gaseous diffusion. We conduct a suite of model simulations from 1850 to 2005, with all changes in environmental factors included, and sensitivity studies isolating each factor. Globally, we estimate that preindustrial methane emissions were higher by 10% than present-day emissions from natural wetlands, with emissions changes from preindustrial to the present of +15%, −41%, and −11% for the high latitudes, temperate regions, and tropics, respectively. The most important change is due to the estimated change in wetland extent, due to the conversion of wetland areas to drylands by humans. This effect alone leads to higher preindustrial global methane fluxes by 33% relative to the present, with the largest change in temperate regions (+80%). These increases were partially offset by lower preindustrial emissions due to lower CO 2 levels (10%), shifts in precipitation (7%), lower nitrogen deposition (3%), and changes in land-use and land-cover (2%). Cooler temperatures in the preindustrial regions resulted in our simulations in an increase in global methane emissions of 6% relative to present day. Much of the sensitivity to these perturbations is mediated in the model by

  15. Carbon monoxide and methane adsorption of crude oil refinery using activated carbon from palm shells as biosorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Afdhol, M. K.; Sanal, Alristo

    2018-03-01

    Carbon monoxide and methane gas are widely present in oil refineries. Off-potential gas is used as raw material for the petrochemical industry. In order for this off-gas to be utilized, carbon monoxide and methane must be removed from off-gas. This study aims to adsorb carbon monoxide and methane using activated carbon of palm shells and commercial activated carbon simultaneously. This research was conducted in 2 stages: 1) Preparation and characterization of activated carbon, 2) Carbon monoxide and methane adsorption test. The activation experiments using carbon dioxide at a flow rate of 150 ml/min yielded a surface area of 978.29 m2/g, Nitrogen at flow rate 150 ml/min yielded surface area 1241.48 m2/g, and carbon dioxide and nitrogen at a flow rate 200 ml/min yielded a surface area 300.37 m2/g. Adsorption of carbon monoxide and methane on activated carbon of palm shell systems yielded results in the amount of 0.5485 mg/g and 0.0649 mg/g and using commercial activated carbon yielded results in the amount of 0.5480 mg/g and 0.0650 mg/g

  16. Electron excitation cross sections of the 2p53s levels of neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    The electron excitation cross sections of the four 2p 5 3s levels of neon are measured by means of a new technique using laser induced fluorescenc. The values of both the apparent and direct excitatiuon cross sections are given as a function of incident electron energy (0-100eV for 1s 3 and 1s 5 metastable levels and 0-300 eV for the 1s 2 and 1s 4 resonance levels). The metastable levels are triplet states and their cross sections are sharply peaked. At the peak, 30 eV, the measured values of the cross sections are 0.59 x 10 -18 cm 2 for the 1s 3 level and 3.2 x 10 -18 cm 2 for the 1s 5 level. The 1s 2 and 1s 4 levels are mixtures of singlet and triplet states, and the cross sections are broad and peak at 60 eV. The apparent cross sections at 60 eV are 13.5 x 10 -18 cm 2 for the 1s 2 level and 2.9 x 10 -18 cm 2 for the 1s 4 level. Measurement of the atomic number density of each of the 1s levels is performed using the pulsed laser induced fluorescence. The measured values of the number density and the excitation cross section are used to obtain the lifetime of each level. The measured value of the reciprocal of the 1s 3 and 1s 5 lifetime is 1 x 10 5 s -1 . The 1s 2 and 1s 4 levels are radiation trapped, and the reciprocals of their lifetimes are 4 x 10 5 s -1 and 3 x 10 5 s -1 respectively. The electron excitation cross sections of the magnetic sublevels of each 1s level are obtained by measuring the polarization of the laser induced fluorescence as a function of laser polarization. The excitation cross sections of each of the magnetic sublevels within a particular 1s level are equal within experimental uncertainty

  17. Diffuse and constricted modes of a dc discharge in neon: Simulation of the hysteresis transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkurenkov, I. A.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Rakhimova, T. V.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented from theoretical studies of high-pressure (∼100 Torr) dc discharges in neon. The diffuse and constricted discharge modes are studied using a model including the equation of balance for charged and excited particles, heat conduction equations for the neutral gas and plasma electrons, and Poisson's equation for the radial electric field at a fixed total discharge current. A specific feature of the constricted mode in the investigated range of low fields and high degrees of ionization is that the excitation and ionization rates in the center of the discharge tube and at the periphery differ by several orders of magnitude. This implies that, in the constricted mode, the region where the electron energy distribution function is Maxwellian due to electron-electron collisions may adjoin the region (beyond the constriction zone) where the high-energy part of the distribution function is depleted. The hysteresis transition between the diffuse and constricted modes is analyzed. A transition from the constricted to the diffuse mode can be regarded as a manifestation of the nonlocal character of the formation of the electron distribution function, specifically, the diffusion of high-energy electrons capable of producing gas ionization from the central (constricted) region toward the periphery. The nonlocal formation of the distribution function is described by a nonlocal kinetic equation accounting for electron-electron collisions and electron transport along the radius of the discharge tube. Since only high-energy electrons produce gas ionization, the effect of the nonlocal formation of the electron distribution function is taken into account by introducing the effective temperature of the high-energy part of the distribution function and solving the equation for the radial profile of the high-energy part of the distribution function. This approach allows one to approximately take into account the nonlocal character of the electron distribution

  18. Spectral broadening of 25 fs laser pulses via self-phase modulation in a neon filled hollow core fibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichert, Stefan

    2017-05-15

    The goal of this work was the realisation of a setup for spectral broadening and subsequent compression of 25 fs laser pulses provided by a commercial Ti:Sapphire based CPA laser system by means of the hollow core fibre chirped mirror compressor technique. For the spectral broadening a vessel containing the hollow waveguide filled with a noble gas serving as the nonlinear medium was set up and an alignment procedure was developed. Neon was chosen as the nonlinear medium for the self-phase modulation of the pulses. With this setup spectral broadening, sufficient for supporting sub 5 fs pulses, was observed. The spectra at different input energies and neon gas pressures were measured and the stability of these and their respective Fourier transform-limited pulses determined in order to find an operating point. For the compression of the self-phase modulated pulses a chirped mirror compressor was designed and set up, but not tested yet. The layout of a single-shot intensity autocorrelator capable of estimating the pulse duration of sub 10 fs pulses was given.

  19. Spectral broadening of 25 fs laser pulses via self-phase modulation in a neon filled hollow core fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichert, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    The goal of this work was the realisation of a setup for spectral broadening and subsequent compression of 25 fs laser pulses provided by a commercial Ti:Sapphire based CPA laser system by means of the hollow core fibre chirped mirror compressor technique. For the spectral broadening a vessel containing the hollow waveguide filled with a noble gas serving as the nonlinear medium was set up and an alignment procedure was developed. Neon was chosen as the nonlinear medium for the self-phase modulation of the pulses. With this setup spectral broadening, sufficient for supporting sub 5 fs pulses, was observed. The spectra at different input energies and neon gas pressures were measured and the stability of these and their respective Fourier transform-limited pulses determined in order to find an operating point. For the compression of the self-phase modulated pulses a chirped mirror compressor was designed and set up, but not tested yet. The layout of a single-shot intensity autocorrelator capable of estimating the pulse duration of sub 10 fs pulses was given.

  20. Measurement of total cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino charged-current interactions in hydrogen and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderholz, M.; Corrigan, G.; Hoffmann, E.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Schmid, P.; Schmitz, N.; Shotton, P. N.; Towers, S. J.; Wittek, W.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Baton, J. P.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bullock, F. W.; Calicchio, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Guy, J. G.; Hamisi, F.; Hulth, P. O.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Lagraa, M.; Marage, P.; Middleton, R. P.; O'Neale, S. W.; Parker, M. A.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallée, C.; Varvell, K.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W.; Wachmuth, H.; Wells, J.

    1986-06-01

    BEBC filled in turn with hydrogen, and with a neon-hydrogen mixture, was exposed to the CERN SPS wide band neutrino and antineutrino beams. The ratios of the charged-current cross sections per nucleon, σ(νH2)/σ(νNe) and σ(νH2)/σ(νNe), between 20 and 300 GeV were found to be 0.656 +/- 0.020 and 1.425 +/- 0.052, respectively. Multiplying these ratios by the revised cross sections in neon, σ(νNe)/E = (0.723 +/- 0.038) × 10-38 cm2/GeV per nucleon and σ(νNe)/E = (0.351 +/- 0.019) × 10-38 cm2/GeV per nucleon, and their ratio, σ(νNe)/σ(νNe) = 0.485 +/- 0.020,, yields values for the total charged-current cross sections on protons, σ(νp)/E and σ(νp)/E, of (0.474 +/- 0.029) × 10-38 cm2/GeV and (0.500 +/- 0.032) × 10-38 cm2/GeV. respectively, and a value for the ratio σ(νp)/σ(νp) of 1.053 +/- 0.066. Present address: University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.

  1. Measurement of total cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino charged-current interactions in hydrogen and neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderholz, M.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Shotton, P.N.; Towers, S.J.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Schmid, P.; Barnham, K.W.J.; Clayton, E.F.; Hamisi, F.; Baton, J.P.; Lagraa, M.; Bullock, F.W.; Fitch, P.J.; Sansum, R.A.; Coghen, T.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Guy, J.G.; Kasper, P.; Venus, W.; Middleton, R.P.; O'Neale, S.W.; Varvell, K.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Vallee, C.; Wells, J.

    1986-01-01

    BEBC filled in turn with hydrogen, and with a neon-hydrogen mixture, was exposed to the CERN SPS wide band neutrino and antineutrino beams. The ratios of the charged-current cross sections per nucleon, sigma(νH 2 )/sigma(νNe) and sigma(anti νH 2 )/sigma(anti νNe), between 20 and 300 GeV were found to be 0.656+-0.020 and 1.425+-0.052, respectively. Multiplying these ratios by the revised cross sections in neon, sigma(νNe)/E=(0.723+-0.038)x10 -38 cm 2 /GeV per nucleon and sigma(anti νNe)/E=(0.351+-0.019)x10 -38 cm 2 /GeV per nucleon, and their ratio, sigma(anti νNe)/sigma(νNe)=0.485+-0.020, yields values for the total charged-current cross sections on protons, sigma(νp)/E and sigma(anti νp)/E, of (0.474+-0.029)x10 -38 cm 2 /GeV and (0.500+-0.032)x10 -38 cm 2 /GeV, respectively, and a value for the ratio sigma(anti νp)/sigma(νp) of 1.053+-0.066. (orig.)

  2. Plasma catalytic reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Alexeev, N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Baikov Inst. of Metallurgy

    1998-08-01

    Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This paper describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius) and high degree of dissociation and substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (50% H{sub 2}, 17% CO and 33% N{sub 2}, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2--3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H{sub 2} with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content ({approximately} 1.5%) with power densities of {approximately} 30 kW (H{sub 2} HHV)/liter of reactor, or {approximately} 10 m{sup 3}/hr H{sub 2} per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

  3. The nitrogen cycle in anaerobic methanotrophic mats of the Black Sea is linked to sulfate reduction and biomass decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Michael; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen-Tomm, Martin; Basen, Mirko; Bastida, Felipe; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) mats host methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. Little is known about the nitrogen cycle in these communities. Here, we link the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) to the nitrogen cycle in microbial mats of the Black Sea by using stable isotope probing. We used four different (15)N-labeled sources of nitrogen: dinitrogen, nitrate, nitrite and ammonium. We estimated the nitrogen incorporation rates into the total biomass and the methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR). Dinitrogen played an insignificant role as nitrogen source. Assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction occurred. High rates of nitrate reduction to dinitrogen were stimulated by methane and sulfate, suggesting that oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds such as sulfides was necessary for AOM with nitrate as electron acceptor. Nitrate reduction to dinitrogen occurred also in the absence of methane as electron donor but at six times slower rates. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was independent of AOM. Ammonium was used for biomass synthesis under all conditions. The pivotal enzyme in AOM coupled to sulfate reduction, MCR, was synthesized from nitrate and ammonium. Results show that AOM coupled to sulfate reduction along with biomass decomposition drive the nitrogen cycle in the ANME mats of the Black Sea and that MCR enzymes are involved in this process. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Methanization takes countryside by storm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Guerny, St.

    2011-01-01

    A new plant is operating in Brittany: it transforms cattle effluents and slaughterhouse wastes into electric power through natural fermentation. Thus, every year, 75.000 tons of organic wastes will produce methane and 1.5 MW. Other projects exist in the same region. One faced the opposition of the population. Therefore, the idea is now to develop smaller projects. France is very late compared to Germany and the Netherlands. The Grenelle de l'Environnement seems to have boosted these projects, notably due to the increase of the electricity purchase price proposed by EDF. Another issue is discussed: the development of this industrial sector in France

  5. Selective conversion of methane to synthetic fuels using dielectric barrier discharge contacting liquid film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Goujard, Valentin; Yuzawa, Shuhei; Moriyama, Shota; Okazaki, Ken [Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 1528552 (Japan); Agiral, Anil, E-mail: tnozaki@mech.titech.ac.jp [Mesoscale Chemical Systems, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-07-13

    This paper presents the reaction mechanism of single-step methane partial oxidation to methanol at room temperature using non-thermal plasma microreactor. Macroscopic quantities of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and methyl hydroperoxide (CH{sub 3}OOH) are produced when methane is partially oxidized at room temperature (about 5 {sup 0}C). CH{sub 3}OOH is known to be the principle intermediate of incomplete methane oxidation product such as CH{sub 3}OH and HCHO, but has not been demonstrated experimentally so far. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} promotes post-plasma oxidation of oxygenates in the condensed plasma-synthesized liquid. At an early stage of in-liquid oxidation, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidizes HCHO into HCOOH preferentially; subsequently, HCOOH is fully oxidized to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Depending upon the concentration of oxygenates and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, electrical conductivity of the plasma solution dramatically increased, which detrimentally influences plasma properties. Methane partial oxidation with air was also investigated from a practical viewpoint. Generation of active nitrogen species (ANS) is the key to promoting overall methane conversion in the presence of oxygen; however, fragile oxygenates were also decomposed by ANS, thus selectivity for useful oxygenates was degraded in the presence of nitrogen. When oxygen is fully consumed, CH{sub 4} conversion is also terminated and water gas shift reaction (CO + H{sub 2}O = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}) becomes predominant.

  6. Modeling of methane bubbles released from large sea-floor area: Condition required for methane emission to the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, A.; Yamanaka, Y.; Tajika, E.

    2009-01-01

    Massive methane release from sea-floor sediments due to decomposition of methane hydrate, and thermal decomposition of organic matter by volcanic outgassing, is a potential contributor to global warming. However, the degree of global warming has not been estimated due to uncertainty over the proportion of methane flux from the sea-floor to reach the atmosphere. Massive methane release from a large sea-floor area would result in methane-saturated seawater, thus some methane would reach the atm...

  7. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  8. Estimation of methane and nitrous oxide emission from paddy fields and uplands during 1990-2000 in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shangshyng Yang; Chungming Liu; Yenlan Liu; Chaoming Lai

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the greenhouse gases emissions from paddy fields and uplands, methane and nitrous oxide emissions were estimated from local measurement and the IPCC guidelines during 1990-2000 in Taiwan. Annual methane emission from 182 807 to 242 298 ha of paddy field in the first crop season ranged from 8062 to 12 066 ton, and it was between 16 261 and 25 007 ton for 144 178-211 968 ha in the second crop season with local measurement. The value ranged from 12 132 to 17 465 ton, and from 16 046 to 24 762 ton of methane in the first and second crop season with the IPCC guidelines for multiple aeration treatments, respectively. Annual nitrous oxide emission was between 472 and 670 ton and between 236 and 359 ton in the first and second crop season, respectively. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from uplands depend on crop, growth season, fertilizer application and environmental conditions. Annual methane emission from upland crops, vegetable, fruit, ornamental plants, forage crops and green manure crops was 138-252, 412-460, 97-100, 3-5, 4-5 and 3-51 ton, respectively. Annual nitrous oxide emission was 1080-1976, 1784-1994, 2540-2622, 31-54, 43-53 and 38-582 ton, respectively. Annual nitrous oxide emission ranged from 91 to 132 ton for 77 593-112 095 ton of nitrogen-fixing crops, from 991 to 1859 ton for 325 9731-6 183 441 ton of non-nitrogen-fixing crops, and from 1.77 to 2.22 Gg for 921 169-1 172 594 ton of chemical fertilizer application. In addition, rice hull burning emitted 19.3-24.2 ton of methane and 17.2-21.5 ton of nitrous oxide, and corn stalk burning emitted 2.1-4.2 ton of methane and 1.9-3.8 ton of nitrous oxide. Methane emission from the agriculture sector was 26 421-37 914 ton, and nitrous oxide emission was 9810-11 649 ton during 1990-2000 in Taiwan. Intermittent irrigation in paddy fields reduces significantly methane emission; appropriate application of nitrogen fertilization and irrigation in uplands and paddy fields also decreases nitrous oxide

  9. METHANE GAS STABILIZES SUPERCOOLED ETHANE DROPLETS IN TITAN'S CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chia C.; Lang, E. Kathrin; Signorell, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Strong evidence for ethane clouds in various regions of Titan's atmosphere has recently been found. Ethane is usually assumed to exist as ice particles in these clouds, although the possible role of liquid and supercooled liquid ethane droplets has been recognized. Here, we report on infrared spectroscopic measurements of ethane aerosols performed in the laboratory under conditions mimicking Titan's lower atmosphere. The results clearly show that liquid ethane droplets are significantly stabilized by methane gas which is ubiquitous in Titan's nitrogen atmosphere-a phenomenon that does not have a counterpart for water droplets in Earth's atmosphere. Our data imply that supercooled ethane droplets are much more abundant in Titan's clouds than previously anticipated. Possibly, these liquid droplets are even more important for cloud processes and the formation of lakes than ethane ice particles.

  10. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  11. Mechanistic insights into heterogeneous methane activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, Allegra A.; Aljama, Hassan; Kakekhani, Arvin; Yoo, Jong Suk; Kulkarni, Ambarish

    2017-01-01

    While natural gas is an abundant chemical fuel, its low volumetric energy density has prompted a search for catalysts able to transform methane into more useful chemicals. This search has often been aided through the use of transition state (TS) scaling relationships, which estimate methane activation TS energies as a linear function of a more easily calculated descriptor, such as final state energy, thus avoiding tedious TS energy calculations. It has been shown that methane can be activated via a radical or surface-stabilized pathway, both of which possess a unique TS scaling relationship. Herein, we present a simple model to aid in the prediction of methane activation barriers on heterogeneous catalysts. Analogous to the universal radical TS scaling relationship introduced in a previous publication, we show that a universal TS scaling relationship that transcends catalysts classes also seems to exist for surface-stabilized methane activation if the relevant final state energy is used. We demonstrate that this scaling relationship holds for several reducible and irreducible oxides, promoted metals, and sulfides. By combining the universal scaling relationships for both radical and surface-stabilized methane activation pathways, we show that catalyst reactivity must be considered in addition to catalyst geometry to obtain an accurate estimation for the TS energy. Here, this model can yield fast and accurate predictions of methane activation barriers on a wide range of catalysts, thus accelerating the discovery of more active catalysts for methane conversion.

  12. Methane from the East Siberian Arctic shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrenko...[], Vasilii V.; Etheridge, David M.

    2010-01-01

    In their Report “Extensive methane venting to the atmosphere from sediments of the East Siberian Arctic Shelf” (5 March, p. 1246), N. Shakhova et al. write that methane (CH4) release resulting from thawing Arctic permafrost “is a likely positive feedback to climate warming.” They add...

  13. Methane emission from wetland rice fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    1996-01-01


    Methane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas and plays a key role in tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Wetland rice fields are an important source of methane, accounting for approximately 20% of the global anthropogenic

  14. Trading coalbed methane for carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberger, L.S.

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses a proposal for reducing methane emissions in coal mining activities and at the same time reducing the burden on utilities to cut carbon dioxide emissions. Emission credits would be issued to mines that recover the methane for use. These credits could then be bought by utilities and exchanged for the right to emit carbon dioxide

  15. Reducing methane emissions from ruminant animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathison, G.W.; Okine, E.K.; McAllister, T.A.; Dong, Y.; Galbraith, J.; Dmytruk, O.I.N. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Science

    1998-09-01

    In 1992 it was estimated that 30 x 10{sup 12}g more methane was emitted into the atmosphere than was removed, with animals being considered the largest single anthropogenic source. Ruminants produce 97% of the methane generated in enteric fermentation by animals. Estimates for methane emissions from animal wastes vary between 6 and 31% of that produced directly by the animal, with the most likely value being between 5 and 10% globally. Methane inhibitors can reduce methane emissions to zero in the short term but due to microbial adaptation the effects of these compounds are quickly neutralized and feed intake is often depressed. Methane emissions per unit of feed consumed from sheep and cattle fed hay diets appear to be quite similar but differences between other ruminants have been measured. The most practical way of influencing methane emissions per unit product is to increase productivity level since the proportion of feed energy required to just maintain the animal will be reduced, methane production falls with increased intake level, and the animal may go to market sooner. The most promising avenues for future research for reducing methanogenesis are the development of new products for reducing protozoal numbers in the rumen and the use of bacterocins or other compounds which specifically target methanogenic bacteria.

  16. Small Molecule Catalysts for Harvesting Methane Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ceron-Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oakdale, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lau, E. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-06

    As the average temperature of the earth increases the impact of these changes are becoming apparent. One of the most dramatic changes to the environment is the melting of arctic permafrost. The disappearance of the permafrost has resulted in release of streams of methane that was trapped in remote areas as gas hydrates in ice. Additionally, the use of fracking has also increased emission of methane. Currently, the methane is either lost to the atmosphere or flared. If these streams of methane could be brought to market, this would be an abundant source of revenue. A cheap conversion of gaseous methane to a more convenient form for transport would be necessary to economical. Conversion of methane is a difficult reaction since the C-H bond is very stable (104 kcal/mole). At the industrial scale, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction can be used to convert gaseous methane to liquid methanol but is this method is impractical for these streams that have low pressures and are located in remote areas. Additionally, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction results in over oxidation of the methane leading to many products that would need to be separated.

  17. Reaction between infusion water and methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettinger, I L

    1977-09-01

    This paper discusses the effect of infused water on the initial gas emission rate and on the pore structure of the coal. Water traps methane in micro-pores, so that lengthy periods are needed for the methane to penetrate large voids and cavities.

  18. Methane storage in porous activated carbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    András Perl; prof. dr. Wim van Gemert

    2014-01-01

    Locally produced methane, - either as biomethane or power-to-gas product, has to be stored to provide a reliable gas source for the fluctuating demand of any local gas distribution network. Additionally, methane is a prominent transportation fuel but its suitability for vehicular application depends

  19. Abiotic production of methane in terrestrial planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Marmolejo, Andrés; Segura, Antígona; Escobar-Briones, Elva

    2013-06-01

    On Earth, methane is produced mainly by life, and it has been proposed that, under certain conditions, methane detected in an exoplanetary spectrum may be considered a biosignature. Here, we estimate how much methane may be produced in hydrothermal vent systems by serpentinization, its main geological source, using the kinetic properties of the main reactions involved in methane production by serpentinization. Hydrogen production by serpentinization was calculated as a function of the available FeO in the crust, given the current spreading rates. Carbon dioxide is the limiting reactant for methane formation because it is highly depleted in aqueous form in hydrothermal vent systems. We estimated maximum CH4 surface fluxes of 6.8×10(8) and 1.3×10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) for rocky planets with 1 and 5 M⊕, respectively. Using a 1-D photochemical model, we simulated atmospheres with volume mixing ratios of 0.03 and 0.1 CO2 to calculate atmospheric methane concentrations for the maximum production of this compound by serpentinization. The resulting abundances were 2.5 and 2.1 ppmv for 1 M⊕ planets and 4.1 and 3.7 ppmv for 5 M⊕ planets. Therefore, low atmospheric concentrations of methane may be produced by serpentinization. For habitable planets around Sun-like stars with N2-CO2 atmospheres, methane concentrations larger than 10 ppmv may indicate the presence of life.

  20. Determination of soil-entrapped methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, M.C.R.; Neue, H.U.; Lantin, R.S.; Aduna, J.B. [Soil and Water Sciences Division, Manila (Philippines)

    1996-12-31

    A sampling method was developed and modified to sample soil from paddy fields for entrapped methane determination. A 25-cm long plexiglass tube (4.4-cm i.d.) fitted with gas bag was used to sample soil and entrapped gases to a depth of 15-cm. The sampling tube was shaken vigorously to release entrapped gases. Headspace gas in sampling tube and gas bag was analyzed for methane. The procedure was verified by doing field sampling weekly at an irrigated ricefield in the IRRI Research Farm on a Maahas clay soil. The modified sampling method gave higher methane concentration because it eliminated gas losses during sampling. The method gave 98% {+-} 5 recovery of soil-entrapped methane. Results of field sampling showed that the early growth stage of the rice plant, entrapped methane increased irrespective of treatment. This suggests that entrapped methane increased irrespective of treatment. This suggests that entrapped methane was primarily derived from fermentation of soil organic matter at the early growth stage. At the latter stage, the rice plant seems to be the major carbon source for methane production. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Kinetic study on anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hou; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Regan, John M; Hussain, Abid; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2017-09-01

    Monod kinetic parameters provide information required for kinetic analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification (AOM-D). This information is critical for engineering AOM-D processes in wastewater treatment facilities. We first experimentally determined Monod kinetic parameters for an AOM-D enriched culture and obtained the following values: maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) 0.121/d, maximum substrate-utilization rate (q max ) 28.8mmol CH 4 /g cells-d, half maximum-rate substrate concentration (K s ) 83μΜ CH 4 , growth yield (Y) 4.76gcells/mol CH 4 , decay coefficient (b) 0.031/d, and threshold substrate concentration (S min ) 28.8μM CH 4 . Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA and mcrA gene fragments suggested that AOM-D reactions might have occurred via the syntrophic interaction between denitrifying bacteria (e.g., Ignavibacterium, Acidovorax, and Pseudomonas spp.) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanobacterium spp.), supporting reverse methanogenesis-dependent AOM-D in our culture. High μ max and q max , and low K s for the AOM-D enrichment imply that AOM-D could play a significant role in mitigating atmospheric methane efflux. In addition, these high kinetic features suggest that engineered AOM-D systems may provide a sustainable alternative to nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  3. Influence of dust particles on the neon spectral line intensities at the uniform positive column of dc discharge at the space apparatus “Plasma Kristall-4”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usachev, A. D.; Zobnin, A. V.; Shonenkov, A. V.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Pustyl'nik, M. Y.; Fink, M. A.; Thoma, M. A.; Thomas, H. M.; Padalka, G. I.

    2018-01-01

    Influence of the elongated dust cloud on the intensities of different neon spectral lines in visible and near ir spectral ranges in the uniform positive column has been experimentally investigated using the Russian-European space apparatus “Plasma Kristall-4” (SA PK-4) on board of the International Space Station (ISS). The investigation was performed in the low pressure (0.5 mbar) direct current (dc, 1 mA) gas discharge in neon. Microgravity allowed us to perform experiments with a large dust cloud in the steady-state regime. To avoid the dust cloud drift in the dc electric field a switching dc polarity discharge mode has been applied. During the experiment a dust cloud of 9 mm in diameter in the discharge tube of 30 mm in diameter with the length of about 100 mm has been observed in the steady-state regime. In this regard, the intensities of neon spectral lines corresponding to 3p → 3s electronic transitions have increased by a factor of 1.4 times, while the intensities of neon spectral lines corresponding to 3d → 3p electronic transitions have increased by a factor of 1.6 times. The observed phenomenon is explained on the basis of the Schottky approach by a self-consistent rising dc electric field in the dusty plasma cloud resulting in an increase of the electron temperature.

  4. Modeling of carbon and nitrogen gaseous emissions from cattle manure compost windrows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windrow composting of cattle manure is a significant source of gaseous emissions, which include ammonia (NH3) and the greenhouse gases (GHGs) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). A manure compost model was developed to simulate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) processes includ...

  5. Quantifying impacts of nitrogen use in European agriculture on global warming potential.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Kros, J.; Reinds, G.J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes current knowledge on the impacts of changes of nitrogen (Nr) use in agriculture on the global warming potential (GWP) by its impact on carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emissions from agricultural and terrestrial nonagricultural systems and from

  6. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  7. Enteric methane emissions from German dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammgen, U; Rosemann, C; Haenel, H D

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, the German agricultural emission inventory used a model for the assessment of methane emissions from enteric fermentation that combined an estimate of the energy and feed requirements as a function of performance parameters and diet composition, with the constant methane conversion rate......, as stated by IPCC. A methane emission model was selected here that is based on German feed data. It was combined with the hitherto applied model describing energy requirements. The emission rates thus calculated deviate from those previously obtained. In the new model, the methane conversion rate is back......-calculated from emission rates and gross energy intake rates. For German conditions of animal performance and diet composition, the national means of methane conversion rates range between 71 kJ MJ(-1) and 61 kJ MJ(-1) for low and high performances (4700 kg animal(-1) a(-1) in 1990 to 7200 kg animal(-1) a(-1...

  8. Greenhouse effect contributions of US landfill methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augenstein, D.

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect has recently been receiving a great deal of scientific and popular attention. The term refers to a cause-and-effect relationship in which ''heat blanketing'' of the earth, due to trace gas increases in the atmosphere, is expected to result in global warming. The trace gases are increasing as the result of human activities. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the trace gas contributing most importantly to the ''heat blanketing'' and currently receives the most attention. Less widely recognized has been the high importance of methane (CH 4 ). Methane's contribution to the increased heat blanketing occurring since 1980 is estimated to be over a third as much as that of carbon dioxide. Gas from landfills has in turn been recognized to be a source of methane to the atmospheric buildup. However the magnitude of the landfill methane contribution, and the overall significance of landfill methane to the greenhouse phenomenon has been uncertain and the subject of some debate. (Author)

  9. Decarbonisation of fossil energy via methane pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreysa, G.; Agar, D.W.; Schultz, I. [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Despite the rising consumption of energy over the last few decades, the proven reserves of fossil fuels have steadily increased. Additionally, there are potentially tremendous reserves of methane hydrates available, which remain to be exploited. The use of fossil energy sources is thus increasingly being dictated less by supply than by the environmental concerns raised by climate change. In the context of the decarbonisation of the global energy system that this has stimulated, new means must be explored for using methane as energy source. Noncatalytic thermal pyrolysis of methane is proposed here as a promising concept for utilising methane with low to zero carbon dioxide emissions. Following cracking, only the energy content of the hydrogen is used, while the carbon can be stored safely and retrievably in disused coal mines. The thermodynamics and different process engineering concepts for the technical realisation of such a carbon moratorium technology are discussed. The possible contribution of methane pyrolysis to carbon negative geoengineering is also addressed. (orig.)

  10. Carbon and hydrogen isotope composition and C-14 concentration in methane from sources and from the atmosphere: Implications for a global methane budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlen, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: biogenic methane studies; forest soil methane uptake; rice field methane sources; atmospheric measurements; stratospheric samples; Antarctica; California; and Germany.

  11. The direct aromatization of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelin, G.; Oukaci, R.; Migone, R.A.; Kazi, A.M. [Altamira Instruments, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The thermal decomposition of methane shows significant potential as a process for the production of higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of the reaction is limited. Thermodynamic calculations have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds can significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon and heavier (C{sub 10+}) materials. Much work remains to be done in optimizing the quenching process and this is one of the goals of this program. Means to lower the temperature of the reaction are being studied as this result in a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts will be investigated as a means of lowering the reaction temperature thus allowing faster quenching. It is highly likely that such studies will lead to a successful direct methane to higher hydrocarbon process.

  12. Methane measurements manual; Handbok metanmaetningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmgren, Magnus Andreas (SP Technical research institute of Sweden, Boraas (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    Emissions to air in different parts of the system may arise in biogas plants, where there is biological treatment of organic matter by anaerobic degradation, and during upgrading of biogas to vehicle fuel. There are mainly four reasons why these emissions must be minimized. These are safety, greenhouse gas emissions, economy and smell. This manual gathers experience of several years of work with measurement of methane emissions from biogas and upgrading facilities. This work has been done mainly in the context of Swedish Waste Management's system of voluntary commitment. The purpose of this manual is to standardize methods and procedures when methane measurements are carried out so that the results are comparable between different providers. The main target group of the manual is measurement consultants performing such measurements. Calculation template in Excel is part of the manual, which further contributes to the measurements evaluated in a standardized way. The manual contains several examples which have been calculated in the accompanying Excel template. The handbook also contains a chapter mainly intended for facility staff, in which implementation of accurate leak detection is described, and where there are hints of a system of so-called intermediate inspections to detect leaks in time

  13. Methane emission from natural wetlands: interplay between emergent macrophytes and soil microbial processes. A mini-review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2010-01-01

    Background According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007, natural wetlands contribute 20–39 % to the global emission of methane. The range in the estimated percentage of the contribution of these systems to the total release of this greenhouse gas is large due to differences in the nature of the emitting vegetation including the soil microbiota that interfere with the production and consumption of methane. Scope Methane is a dominant end-product of anaerobic mineralization processes. When all electron acceptors except carbon dioxide are used by the microbial community, methanogenesis is the ultimate pathway to mineralize organic carbon compounds. Emergent wetland plants play an important role in the emission of methane to the atmosphere. They produce the carbon necessary for the production of methane, but also facilitate the release of methane by the possession of a system of interconnected internal gas lacunas. Aquatic macrophytes are commonly adapted to oxygen-limited conditions as they prevail in flooded or waterlogged soils. By this system, oxygen is transported to the underground parts of the plants. Part of the oxygen transported downwards is released in the root zone, where it sustains a number of beneficial oxidation processes. Through the pores from which oxygen escapes from the plant into the root zone, methane can enter the plant aerenchyma system and subsequently be emitted into the atmosphere. Part of the oxygen released into the root zone can be used to oxidize methane before it enters the atmosphere. However, the oxygen can also be used to regenerate alternative electron acceptors. The continuous supply of alternative electron acceptors will diminish the role of methanogenesis in the anaerobic mineralization processes in the root zone and therefore repress the production and emission of methane. The role of alternative element cycles in the inhibition of methanogenesis is discussed. Conclusions The role of the nitrogen

  14. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  15. Setting-up of the Laser Induced Fluorescence diagnostic. Measurements of Cr density in a neon glow discharge; Puesta a punto del diagnstico de fluorescencia inducida por laser. Medidas de densidad de Cr en Glow discharg de Neon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tafalla, D.; Cal, E. de la; Tabares, F. L.

    1994-07-01

    A plasma diagnostic based on the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique has been set up in the Fusion Division at the CIEMAT. In a preliminary experiment, the density of sputtered chromium atoms produced in a neon glow discharge was measured. Firstly, the laser beam was characterized by calibration of its wavelength, bandwidth and energy profile and Rayleigh scattering in N2 was used for the optical system calibration. An absolute density of Cr atoms of n {approx} 5x10 cm was obtained in discharges at 100 mA and pressure of 15 mTorr and a linear dependence of the LIF signal us. current was found. These values are in agreement with those expected from the tabulated sputtering yields and the thermalization and diffusion of the sputtered atoms into the Ne plasma. (Author) 19 refs.

  16. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in agriculture without the risk of polluting soil, underground water or crops. In this sense, treatment of vinasse combines the elimination of organic waste with the formation of methane. Biogas is considered as a promising renewable energy source. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum organic loading rate for operating a modified UASB reactor to treat vinasse generated in the production of hydrous ethanol from sugar cane molasses. Results The study showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was 69% at an optimum organic loading rate (OLR) of 17.05 kg COD/m3-day, achieving a methane yield of 0.263 m3/kg CODadded and a biogas methane content of 84%. During this stage, effluent characterization presented lower values than the vinasse, except for potassium, sulfide and ammonia nitrogen. On the other hand, primers used to amplify the 16S-rDNA genes for the domains Archaea and Bacteria showed the presence of microorganisms which favor methane production at the optimum organic loading rate. Conclusions The modified UASB reactor proposed in this study provided a successful treatment of the vinasse obtained from hydrous ethanol production. Methanogen groups (Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales) detected by PCR during operational optimum OLR of the modified UASB reactor, favored methane production. PMID:23167984

  17. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España-Gamboa, Elda I; Mijangos-Cortés, Javier O; Hernández-Zárate, Galdy; Maldonado, Jorge A Domínguez; Alzate-Gaviria, Liliana M

    2012-11-21

    A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in agriculture without the risk of polluting soil, underground water or crops. In this sense, treatment of vinasse combines the elimination of organic waste with the formation of methane. Biogas is considered as a promising renewable energy source. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum organic loading rate for operating a modified UASB reactor to treat vinasse generated in the production of hydrous ethanol from sugar cane molasses. The study showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was 69% at an optimum organic loading rate (OLR) of 17.05 kg COD/m3-day, achieving a methane yield of 0.263 m3/kg CODadded and a biogas methane content of 84%. During this stage, effluent characterization presented lower values than the vinasse, except for potassium, sulfide and ammonia nitrogen. On the other hand, primers used to amplify the 16S-rDNA genes for the domains Archaea and Bacteria showed the presence of microorganisms which favor methane production at the optimum organic loading rate. The modified UASB reactor proposed in this study provided a successful treatment of the vinasse obtained from hydrous ethanol production.Methanogen groups (Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales) detected by PCR during operational optimum OLR of the modified UASB reactor, favored methane production.

  18. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    España-Gamboa Elda I

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in agriculture without the risk of polluting soil, underground water or crops. In this sense, treatment of vinasse combines the elimination of organic waste with the formation of methane. Biogas is considered as a promising renewable energy source. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum organic loading rate for operating a modified UASB reactor to treat vinasse generated in the production of hydrous ethanol from sugar cane molasses. Results The study showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD removal efficiency was 69% at an optimum organic loading rate (OLR of 17.05 kg COD/m3-day, achieving a methane yield of 0.263 m3/kg CODadded and a biogas methane content of 84%. During this stage, effluent characterization presented lower values than the vinasse, except for potassium, sulfide and ammonia nitrogen. On the other hand, primers used to amplify the 16S-rDNA genes for the domains Archaea and Bacteria showed the presence of microorganisms which favor methane production at the optimum organic loading rate. Conclusions The modified UASB reactor proposed in this study provided a successful treatment of the vinasse obtained from hydrous ethanol production. Methanogen groups (Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales detected by PCR during operational optimum OLR of the modified UASB reactor, favored methane production.

  19. Determining the flux of methane into Hudson Canyon at the edge of methane clathrate hydrate stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinsten, A.; Navarrete, L; Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Weber, T.C.; Leonte, M.; Kellermann, M.; Arrington, E.; Valentine, D.L.; Scranton, M.L; Kessler, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Methane seeps were investigated in Hudson Canyon, the largest shelf-break canyon on the northern US Atlantic Margin. The seeps investigated are located at or updip of the nominal limit of methane clathrate hydrate stability. The acoustic identification of bubble streams was used to guide water column sampling in a 32 km2 region within the canyon's thalweg. By incorporating measurements of dissolved methane concentration with methane oxidation rates and current velocity into a steady-state box model, the total emission of methane to the water column in this region was estimated to be 12 kmol methane per day (range: 6 – 24 kmol methane per day). These analyses suggest this methane is largely retained inside the canyon walls below 300 m water depth, and that it is aerobically oxidized to near completion within the larger extent of Hudson Canyon. Based on estimated methane emissions and measured oxidation rates, the oxidation of this methane to dissolved CO2 is expected to have minimal influences on seawater pH. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Amplification of spontaneous emission of neon-like argon in a fast gas-filled capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolacek, K.; Schmidt, J.; Bohacek, V.; Ripa, M.; Frolov, O.; Vrba, P.; Straus, J.; Prukner, V.; Rupasov, A. A.; Shikanov, A. S.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of the CAPEX facility and its basic diagnostics are described. The experiments carried out in the last modification of this facility accomplished with the demonstration of amplified spontaneous emission of neon-like argon (Ar 8+ ) at the wavelength 46.88 nm. The first version of the facility, CAPEX1, operated with a plastic capillary and had a short high-power passive prepulse and an imperfect gas-filling system. In the second version, CAPEX2, a ceramic capillary was used, the prepulse amplitude was lowered, and the gas-filling system was improved. In the third, most successful version, CAPEX3, the capillary bending was reduced, a longer external prepulse was used, and the gas-filling system was further optimized. For each version, results of X-ray measurements are presented and interpreted