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Sample records for metastatic extradural spinal

  1. Non-traumatic spinal extradural haematoma: magnetic resonance findings

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    Law, E.M.; Smith, P.J.; Fitt, G.; Hennessy, O.F. [St. Vincent`s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia). University of Melbourne, Department of Medical Imaging

    1999-05-01

    Non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma is an uncommon condition that is usually associated with a poor outcome. It may present acutely with signs and symptoms of major neurological dysfunction secondary to cord compression, or subacutely over a number of days or weeks with fluctuating symptoms. The exact aetiology of this condition is incompletely understood, but it is believed that the blood is venous in origin, as distinct from the arterial origin of intracranial extradural haematomas. Causes of non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma include anticoagulation, vasculitis such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and spinal arteriovenous malformations. Conditions that may mimic an acute spinal haematoma include extradural abscess and extradural metastatic infiltration. It is important to make a diagnosis of extradural compression because surgery may offer the best hope in restoring neurological function in these patients. Imaging modalities used for the investigation of extradural haematomas include myelography, CT myelography (CTM) and MRI with or without gadolinium enhancement. The MR appearances of acute extradural abscess and extradural tumour can mimic an extradural haematoma. In subacute haematoma, owing to the magnetic properties of blood degradation products, MR is more specific in diagnosing and ageing of the haematoma. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 11 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts

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    Abolfazl Rahimizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Extradural arachnoid cysts (EACs are rare causes of spinal cord compression and cauda equina. These benign lesions appear in the literature mainly as single case reports. In this article, we present the largest series found in literature, with four new cases of spinal extradural arachnoid cysts. The characteristic imaging features, details of surgical steps and strategies to prevent postoperative kyphosis in this cystic pathology will be discussed.

  3. Imaging of extradural spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Naumann, N.; Reith, W.; Nabhan, A.

    2006-01-01

    There is a wide variety of spinal extradural tumors. In addition to real neoplasms, degenerative diseases, congenital abnormalities and inflammatory disorders can be causes of extradural masses. Due to the bony boundary of the spinal canal, both benign as well as malignant masses can cause progressive neurological deficits including paraplegia. Most of the spinal tumors are benign (hemangioma of the vertebral body, degenerative diseases). In younger patients congenital abnormalities and primary tumors of the spine have to be considered, whereas in adults the list of differential diagnoses should include secondary malignancies such as metastases and lymphomas as well as metabolic disorders such as osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture and Paget's disease. Cross-sectional imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the spine often help to make a specific diagnosis of extradural spinal lesions and represent important tools for tumor staging and preoperative evaluation. (orig.) [de

  4. Metastatic spinal epidural leiomyoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yoo Na; Kim, Yong Woo; Park, Yeong Mi; Cha, Seong Sook; Bae, Jae Ik; Eun, Choong Ki; Lee, Seon Joo; Lee, Gyung Kyu

    2006-01-01

    We report here on a case of a spinal extradural leiomyoma in a 67-year-old woman, and this tumor was in a very unusual location for a leiomyoma. Because the patient underwent hysterectomy for a uterine leiomyoma 20 years ago, we can speculate that the spinal lesion was a metastatic leiomyoma

  5. Metastatic spinal epidural leiomyoma: a case report

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    Seo, Yoo Na; Kim, Yong Woo; Park, Yeong Mi; Cha, Seong Sook; Bae, Jae Ik; Eun, Choong Ki [College of Medicine, Inje University, Sangye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seon Joo [College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyung Kyu [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    We report here on a case of a spinal extradural leiomyoma in a 67-year-old woman, and this tumor was in a very unusual location for a leiomyoma. Because the patient underwent hysterectomy for a uterine leiomyoma 20 years ago, we can speculate that the spinal lesion was a metastatic leiomyoma.

  6. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

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    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu; Roh, Sung Woo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our cli...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of malignant extradural tumors with acute spinal cord compression

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    Lien, H.H.; Blomlie, V.; Heimdal, K.; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-six cancer patients with extradural spinal metastatic disease and acute symptoms of spinal cord compression underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T. Cord involvement was found in all 36, 7 of whom had lesions at 2 different sites. Vertebral metastases in addition to those corresponding to the cord compressions were detected in 27 patients, and 18 of these had widespread deposits. MR displayed the extent of the tumors in the craniocaudal and lateral directions. The ability to identify multiple sites of cord and vertebral involvement and to delineate tumor accurately makes MR the examination of choice in cancer patients with suspected spinal cord compression. It obviates the need for myelography and postmyelography CT in this group of patients. (orig.)

  8. Delayed spinal extradural hematoma following thoracic spine surgery and resulting in paraplegia: a case report

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    Parthiban Chandra JKB

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Postoperative spinal extradural hematomas are rare. Most of the cases that have been reported occured within 3 days of surgery. Their occurrence in a delayed form, that is, more than 72 hours after surgery, is very rare. This case is being reported to enhance awareness of delayed postoperative spinal extradural hematomas. Case presentation We report a case of acute onset dorsal spinal extradural hematoma from a paraspinal muscular arterial bleed, producing paraplegia 72 hours following surgery for excision of a spinal cord tumor at T8 level. The triggering mechanism was an episode of violent twisting movement by the patient. Fresh blood in the postoperative drain tube provided suspicion of this complication. Emergency evacuation of the clot helped in regaining normal motor and sensory function. The need to avoid straining of the paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period is emphasized. Conclusion Most cases of postoperative spinal extradural hematomas occur as a result of venous bleeding. However, an arterial source of bleeding from paraspinal muscular branches causing extradural hematoma and subsequent neurological deficit is underreported. Undue straining of paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period after major spinal surgery should be avoided for at least a few days.

  9. Imaging of thoracic and lumbar spinal extradural arachnoid cysts: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmelin, A.; Clouet, P.L.; Salatino, S.; Kehrli, P.; Maitrot, D.; Stephan, M.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Extradural arachnoid cysts are uncommon expanding lesions in the spinal canal which may communicate with the subarachnoid space. Usually in the lower thoracic spine, they may cause symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots. We report cases of thoracic and lumbar arachnoid cysts studied by cystography, myelography, CT and MRI. These techniques showed extradural cystic lesions containing cerebrospinal fluid, with variable communication with the subarachnoid space, causing anterior displacement and flattening of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  10. Imaging of extradural spinal lesions; Bildgebung extraduraler Raumforderungen

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    Ahlhelm, F.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Naumann, N.; Reith, W. (Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar); Nabhan, A. (Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar, Klinik fuer Allgemeine und Spezielle Neurochirurgie)

    2006-12-15

    There is a wide variety of spinal extradural tumors. In addition to real neoplasms, degenerative diseases, congenital abnormalities and inflammatory disorders can be causes of extradural masses. Due to the bony boundary of the spinal canal, both benign as well as malignant masses can cause progressive neurological deficits including paraplegia. Most of the spinal tumors are benign (hemangioma of the vertebral body, degenerative diseases). In younger patients congenital abnormalities and primary tumors of the spine have to be considered, whereas in adults the list of differential diagnoses should include secondary malignancies such as metastases and lymphomas as well as metabolic disorders such as osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture and Paget's disease. Cross-sectional imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the spine often help to make a specific diagnosis of extradural spinal lesions and represent important tools for tumor staging and preoperative evaluation. (orig.) Das Spektrum der spinalen extraduralen Tumoren ist sehr gross. Neben echten Neoplasien koennen auch degenerative Veraenderungen und Anlagestoerungen sowie entzuendliche Veraenderungen Ursachen einer extraduralen Raumforderung sein. Aufgrund der knoechernen Begrenzung des Spinalkanals koennen neben Malignomen auch benigne Tumoren und degenerative spinale Veraenderungen zu progredienten neurologischen Ausfallsymptomen (einschliesslich Querschnittsymptomatik) fuehren. Die ueberwiegende Mehrzahl der extraduralen Raumforderungen der Wirbelsaeule ist benigne (Haemangiom des Wirbelkoerpers, degenerative Erkrankungen). Bei jungen Patienten sind Anlagestoerungen und primaere Wirbelsaeulentumoren zu beruecksichtigen, wogegen beim Erwachsenen an sekundaere Malignome, wie Metastasen und Lymphome sowie eine metabolische Erkrankung, wie die osteoporotische Wirbelkoerpersinterungsfraktur oder der Morbus Paget, differenzialdiagnostisch gedacht werden

  11. Extradural spinal schwannoma at cervical spine in 12 year old child

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    Madoori Srinivas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal schwannomas are benign tumors arising from spinal nerve root sheaths. It is a primary spinal tumor which are rare in children. We report a case of a 12 year old girl who presented with weakness of all limbs and unable to walk. Imaging studies demonstrated an extradural spinal tumor at cervical spine. The patient was operated and tumor was totally removed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. After surgery there was improvement in signs and symptoms. After two months of operation, child could able to walk normally.

  12. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

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    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  13. Results of radiotherapy for metastatic extradural tumors of the spine

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    Akagi, Yukio; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Kashiwado, Kouzo

    1991-01-01

    From April 1984 through March 1989, 30 patients were treated with radiation therapy for metastatic extradural tumors of the spine associated with spinal cord compression. This is a retrospective analysis of therapeutic results in the 30 patients followed up for two months or more. The total dose was 25.0-52.5 Gy with an average dose of 42.5 Gy. The intervals between the occurrence of paralysis symptoms to the beginning of radiation therapy varied widely from 5 days to 70 days with an average of 38.2 days; it took a long time in spite of emergency candidates for radiation therapy. Therapeutic results were classified as extremely improved (++) when transverse paralysis was completely resolved, as improved (+) when subjective or objective paralysis symptoms were improved, and as unchanged (-). Five patients were evaluated as (++), 8 as (+), and unchanged (-); the effective rate was 43% (13/30). According to primary cancer, (++) was seen in one patient each with cancer of the liver, lung, prostate, and nasopharynx, and one patient with cancer of unknown origin. In addition, (+) was seen in two each with lung and breast cancer, and in single patients with lung cancer, malignant lymphoma, prostatic cancer, and multiple myeloma. The effective rate was lower as prolonging the time after the occurrence of paralysis symptoms. The effective rate was not significantly related to the severity of paralysis; 39% for complete paralysis (7/18) vs 50% for incomplete paralysis (6/12). It is important to determine the method and candidates of palliative radiation therapy to maintain the quality of life in terminal cancer. (N.K.)

  14. Non-communicating extradural arachnoid cyst: a rare case report with review of literature

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    Gupta Asheesh Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Extradural arachnoid cysts in the spine are uncommon causes of spinal cord compression in the paediatric population that are thought to arise from congenital defects in the duramater. In most literatures it is describe that such cysts communicating with the intrathecal subarachnoid space through a small defect in the dura. In this case report we describe a case of a child who presented with spinal cord compression caused by a large spinal extradural arachnoid cyst that did not communicate with the intradural subarachnoid space. An 9 year-old girl presented with progressive lower-extremity weakness, myelopathy, and severe gait ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated a large extradural arachnoid cyst extending from T4 to T9. The patient underwent a thoracic laminectomy for en bloc resection of the spinal extradural arachnoid cyst. Intra-operatively, the dura was intact and there was no evidence of communication into the intradural subarachnoid space. Postoperatively, the patient’s motor strength and ambulation improved immediately, and no subsequent cerebrospinal fluid leak occurred.

  15. Extradural lipomatosis presenting with paraplegia.

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    Deogaonkar M

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available An unusual case with spinal extradural lipomatosis in a non-obese and otherwise healthy man is reported. The patient presented with a history of weakness of legs which progressed to paraplegia over a 40 day period.

  16. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Akio; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Taniguchi, Shuji; Sakai, Kazuaki

    2000-01-01

    The results of radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors were evaluated in terms of pain relief, improvement of neurological impairment, and survival. Between 1986 and 1995, 52 symptomatic patients with metastatic spinal tumors treated with radiation therapy were evaluated. The patients all received irradiation of megavoltage energy. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in terms of pain relief and improvement of neurological impairment. Pain relief was observed in 29 (61.7%) of 47 patients with pain. Therapy was effective for 17 (70.8%) of 24 patients without neurological impairment, and efficacy was detected in 12 (52.2%) of 23 patients with neurological impairment. Improvement of neurological symptoms was obtained in seven (25.0%) of 28 patients with neurological impairment. Radiation therapy was effective for pain relief in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. In patients with neurological impairment, less pain relief was observed than in those without impairment. Improvement of neurological impairment was restricted, but radiation therapy was thought to be effective in some cases in the early stage of neurological deterioration. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors contraindicated for surgery was considered effective for improvement of patients' activities of daily living. (author)

  17. Approaches to radiotherapy in metastatic spinal cord compression.

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    Suppl, Morten Hiul

    2018-04-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is caused by the progression of metastatic lesions within the vicinity of the spinal cord. The consequences are very severe with loss of neurological function and severe pain. The standard treatment is surgical intervention followed by radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. However, the majority of patients are treated with radiotherapy only due to contraindications to surgery and technical inoperability. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a technology to deliver higher radiation dose to the radiotherapy target with the use of spatial coordinates. This modality has shown positive results in treating lesions in brain and lungs. Hence, it could prove beneficial in metastatic spinal cord compression. We designed and planned a trial to investigate this method in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. The method was usable but the trial was stopped prematurely due to low accrual that made comparison with surgery impossible. Low accrual is a known problem for trials evaluating new approaches in radiotherapy. Target definition in radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression is defined by patient history, examination and imaging. Functional imaging could provide information to guide target definition with the sparring of normal tissue e.g. spinal cord and hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow. In future trials this may be used for dose escalation of spinal metastases. The trial showed that PET/MRI was feasible in this group of patients but did not change the radiotherapy target in the included patients. Neurological outcome is similar irrespective of course length and therefore single fraction radiotherapy is recommended for the majority of patients. In-field recurrence is a risk factor of both short and long fractionation schemes and re-irradiation have the potential risk of radiation-induced myelopathy. In a retrospective study of re-irradiation, we investigated the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy. In our study

  18. Symptomatic Thoracic Nerve Root Herniation into an Extradural Arachnoid Cyst : Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Shanbhag, Nagesh C.; Duyff, Ruurd F.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs) are relatively rare and usually asymptomatic. They preferentially are situated in the thoracic extradural space and almost always dorsal. SEACs may present with back pain and/or cord compression symptoms. Needle aspiration, needle fenestration,

  19. Bilateral parietal extradural metastatic ewing's sarcoma simulating acute epidural hematoma

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    Aslam, E.; Imran, M.; Faridi, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Sarcomas usually metastasize to lugs. The following case report describes an unusual metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma to extradural parietal region bilaterally. The primary was found at lower end of ulna. (author)

  20. Dumbbell-shaped intrathoracic-extradural haemangioma of the thoracic spine.

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    Doyle, P M; Abou-Zeid, A; Du Plessis, D; Herwadkar, A; Gnanalingham, K K

    2008-04-01

    Spinal haemangiomas are benign vasoproliferative lesions that are typically intra-osseous and generally asymptomatic, although localized pain can be a symptom. Capillary and cavernous variants have been described. We describe a rare case of a dumbbell-shaped haemangioma of the thoracic spine with both an intraspinal-extradural and intrathoracic component.

  1. Partial lateral corpectomy associated with pediculectomy to treat extradural chondroma in a dog: technique description

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    P.V.T. Marinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe in detail the surgical technique of partial lateral corpectomy (PLC associated with pediculectomy to treat an in vitro extradural chondroma. A 12-year old female Cocker Spaniel was seen in the hospital with proprioceptive ataxia of hind limbs associated with extradural compression between the 1st and 2nd lumbar vertebrae. The owner opted for euthanasia since the patient's condition changed due to simultaneous illnesses that culminated in a poor prognosis. The patient's body was formally ceded to perform experimental spinal decompression. The technique was effective to completely remove the epidural mass with minimal manipulation of the spinal cord.

  2. Effectiveness of radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors producing neurologic impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Nomoto, Satoshi; Imada, Hajime; Nakata, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) for treating neurological impairment and improving quality of life (QOL) in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. From 1985 through 2001, 75 patients with metastatic spinal tumors were treated with RT. Neurologic status and Karnofsky performance status were assessed before and after RT. The rate of neurologic improvement was significantly higher in patients with radio-sensitive tumors (75%) than in patients with radio-resistant tumors (37%). Few patients with Karnofsky performance status less than 40% before RT had good QOL after RT. The response to RT did not differ significantly on the basis of duration of paralysis before RT. RT is useful for treating neurologic impairment caused by metastatic spinal tumors, particularly those that are radiosensitive. To have good QOL after RT, treatment should be started in the early stage of neurological impairment. (author)

  3. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  4. Spinal meningeal cyst: analysis with low-field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hongzhou; Chen Yejia; Chen Ronghua; Chen Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of spinal meningeal cyst in low-field MRI and to discuss its classification, subtype, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. Methods: Forty-two patients (20 male, 22 female) were examined with sagittal T 1 -and T 2 -, axial T 2 -weighted MR imaging. Twelve patients were also examined with contrast-enhanced MRI. Results: The cysts were classified using Nakors' classification as type Ia extradural meningeal cysts (4 patients), type Ib sacral meningeal cysts (32), type II extradural meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers (4), and type III spinal intradural meningeal cysts (2). All 42 spinal meningeal cysts had well-defined boundaries with low T 1 and high T 2 signal intensities similar to cerebral spinal fluid. In type Ia, the lesions were often on the dorsum of mid-lower thoracic spinal cord compressing the spinal cord and displacing the extradural fat. In type Ib, the lesions were in the sacral canal with fat plane between the cyst and dural sac. In type II, the lesions contained nerve roots and were lateral to the dural sac. In type III, the lesions were often on the dorsum of spinal cord compressing and displacing the spinal cord anteriorly. Conclusion: Low-field MRI can clearly display the spinal meningeal cyst. Types Ia and Ib spinal meningeal cysts had typical features and can be easily diagnosed. Types II and III should be differentiated from cystic schwannomas and enterogenous cysts, respectively. (authors)

  5. Preoperative embolization in surgical treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression.

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    Clausen, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    An increasing number of patients develop symptomatic spinal metastasis and increasing evidence supports the benefit of surgical decompression and spinal stabilization combined with radiation therapy. However, surgery for metastatic spinal disease is known to be associated with a risk of substantial intraoperative blood loss and perioperative allogenic blood transfusion. Anemia is known to increase morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing surgery, but studies also indicate that transfusion with allogenic red blood cells (RBC) may lead to worse outcomes. To reduce intraoperative bleeding preoperative embolization has been used in selected cases suspected for hypervascular spinal metastases, but no randomized trial has examined the effect. The final decision on whether preoperative embolization should be performed is based on the preoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) tumor blush, and as such considered the "gold standard" for determining the vascularity of spinal metastases. Reliability studies evaluating vascularity ratings of DSA tumor blush have not been published before. This PhD thesis is based on three studies with the following aims: I. To assess whether perioperative allogenic blood transfusions in patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases independently influence patient survival (Study 1). II. To assess whether preoperative transcatheter arterial embolization of spinal metastases reduces blood loss, the need for transfusion with allogenic RBC and surgery time in the surgical treatment of patients with symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression (Study 2). III. To describe the vascularity of metastasis causing spinal cord compression (Study 2). IV. To evaluate inter- and intra-observer agreement in the assessment of the vascularity of spinal metastases using DSA tumor blush (Study 3). In conclusion the findings of this thesis demonstrate that preoperative embolization in patients with symptomatic spinal metastasis

  6. P12.01 Epidemiology in spinal tumors treated surgically at the South Central Hospital of High Specialty from PEMEX in Mexico

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    Hernandez Resendiz, R.; Cordoba Mosqueda, M.; Guerra Mora, J.; Loya Aguilar, I.; Garcia Gonzalez, U.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The spinal tumors are rare neoplasms, they can be primary or metastatic; in the literature they are divided in extradural and intradural, extramedullary and intramedullary, from which extradural tumors are the most frequent and are usually metastatic, the intramedullary are generally gliomas. From the primary tumors up to 78% are benign and 22% malign, the histological stripe and the involvement to the spinal compartments are of great importance for the results and the treatment which is mainly surgical, individualized and meticulously planned with the support of technological resources such as the electrophysiological monitoring during the surgery. Methods and Materials: Observational study with a range of patients from March 1999- March 2016 to whom surgical resection of the spinal tumor was performed and reported on the Electronic Files of the South Central Hospital of High Specialty PEMEX. A Statistical analysis is made with the SPSS Statistic of disease of the Institution program. Results: 23 patients with spinal tumor surgical resection were found. The median age was 53 ± 10 years. The most common clinical manifestation was radiculopathy (65%). The Karnofsky scale was used for initial evaluation where a 43% of patients had a 90 score at the moment of the diagnosis, while 65% had an ECOG 1. The most frequent tumor was the Spinal Shwannoma (39%), followed in prevalence by the Condroid Cordoma (17%), where the intradural extramedullary location was the most prevalent (78%). The medium rate of survival after the surgical procedure was from 11 months. Conclusions: Our cases and the international statistics coincide. Radiculopathy as high prevalence initial manifestation conceals us to dismiss in the sixth decade of life any possibility for spinal tumor presentation. Most of spinal tumor patients do not have any clinical deterioration in their basal state, which indicates that performing a successful surgical procedure and the right

  7. The effect of body position on the 'hanging drop' method for identifying the extradural space in anaesthetized dogs.

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    Naganobu, Kiyokazu; Hagio, Mitsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    To assess the accuracy of the 'hanging drop method' for identifying the extradural space in anaesthetized dogs positioned in sternal or lateral recumbency. Prospective randomized-experimental study. Seventeen clinically healthy adult dogs, 10 females and seven males weighing 8.4-26.2 kg. Dogs were positioned in either sternal (n = 8) or lateral (n = 9) recumbency under general anaesthesia. A 20 SWG spinal needle pre-filled with 0.9% saline was advanced through the skin into the lumbosacral extradural space and the response of the saline drop recorded, i.e. whether it: 1) was aspirated from the hub into the needle; 2) remained within the hub, or 3) moved synchronously with i) spontaneous respiration, ii) heart beat or iii) manual lung inflation. The position of the needle tip was ultimately determined by positive contrast radiography. One dog positioned in lateral recumbency was excluded from the study because bleeding occurred from the needle hub. Saline was aspirated into the needle in seven of eight dogs held in sternal recumbency but in none of the dogs positioned in lateral recumbency. Accurate needle tip placement in the extradural space was confirmed by positive contrast radiography in all dogs. The 'hanging drop' method, when performed with a spinal needle, appears to be a useful technique for identifying the location of the extradural space in anaesthetized medium-sized dogs positioned in sternal, but not in lateral recumbency. The technique may yield 'false negative' results when performed in dogs positioned in sternal recumbency.

  8. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

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    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Occipital Condyle Fracture with Accompanying Meningeal Spinal Cysts as a result of Cervical Spine Injury in 15-Year-Old Girl

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    Łukasz Wiktor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The occipital condyle fracture is rare injury of the craniocervical junction. Meningeal spinal cysts are rare tumors of the spinal cord. Depending on location, these lesions may be classified as extradural and subdural, but extradural spinal cysts are more common. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl who suffered from avulsion occipital condyle fracture treated with use of “halo-vest” system. We established that clinical effect after completed treatment is very good. Control MRI evaluation was performed 12 months after removal of “halo-vest” traction, and clinically silent extradural meningeal spinal cysts were detected at the ventral side of the spinal cord in the cervical segment of the spine. Due to clinically silent course of the disease, we decided to use the conservative treatment. The patient remains under control of our department.

  10. Patient Profile and Outcomes of Traumatic Extradural Haematomas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: An extradural haematoma (EDH) also referred to as epidural haematoma is a collection of blood between the skull and the dura. Extradural haematomas are present in 1-2% of all head injury patients. In those who present in coma, extradural haematomas are present in 10% of them. Mortality rates have been ...

  11. Computed tomography of traumatic extradural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukamachi, Akira; Wakao, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Masami; Kunimine, Hideo; Wada, Hirochiyo

    1981-01-01

    Since the introduction of CT in February, 1977, 64 cases with 67 traumatic extradural hematomas were experienced. These cases were analysed, especially with regard to CT findings of the hematomas, small extradural hematomas, and combined intracerebral hematomas, and the correlation between CT gradings and clinical outcomes. From these analyses, the following results were obtained. In 64 out of 66 hematomas, except for a case of sagittal sinus hematoma, shapes were biconvex on CT scans. The other two were planconvex and crescent. One sagittal sinus hematoma could not be diagnosed by CT alone because the highest parietal slice was not taken. In 60 acute hematomas, densities of 59 were high. The other one was hypo- or iso-dense. In six subacute hematomas, two were hypo- and iso-dense respectively. These two cases showed a marked dural enhancement for contrast material. Initial admission CT scans disclosed 35 large hematomas (> 20 mm in thickness) and 29 small ones (<= 20 mm). The other three were not clear in the initial CT scans. Among 12 small hematomas for which initial CT scans were performed within 6 hours after injury and sequential CT scans were carried out, six were shown to become larger. Three of these were operated on thereafter. Eleven cases with small hematomas on the initial CT scans were operated on. Their bleeding sources were the middle meningeal arteries in three cases, dural vein in one, fracture sites in four, and unclear in three. In 16 combined intradural lesions, ten were traumatic intracerebral hematomas. Four of these intracerebral hematomas were found simultaneously with extradural ones in CT scans. Six were obviously found later than the latter. Two cases with multiple extradural hematomas were reported. After evacuation of one extradural hematoma, additional extradural and intracerebral hematomas developed at other sites in these cases. (author)

  12. Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Ureter Metastatic to the Thoracic Spine Presenting as a Spinal Cord Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Larkin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a left nephroureterectomy for a gentleman with transitional cell carcinoma of the upper ureter. Histological analysis revealed it to be a T1 lesion, but to be highly mitotically active. The gentleman defaulted on adjuvant therapy and defaulted on follow-up. He represented with symptoms of acute spinal cord compression and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a lesion at T6/7. Neurosurgical resection of the lesion showed it to be a metastatic deposit from the ureteric primary. Despite surgical debulking and subsequent radiotherapy to the lesion, the patient died secondary to metastatic complications. This case report is of interest to the surgeon as it demonstrates both the high metastatic potential of upper tract carcinomas and educates the surgeon on the presentation of acute spinal cord compression.

  13. Extradural anterior clinoidectomy: Technical nuances from a learner's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shashwat; Leão, Baltazar; Rosito, Diego Mendez

    2017-01-01

    Background: Extradural removal of the anterior clinoid process (ACP) is a crucial step in the proper surgical exposure of various pathologies in and around the central skull base. Since the pioneering description by Dolenc, the technique of extradural clinoidectomy has undergone several refinements in the light of improved understanding of microsurgical anatomy and maturation of neurosurgical techniques. Mastery of the surgical nuances involved in performing this surgical exercise will allow the young neurosurgeon to execute this step without undue reluctance and trepidation. Objective: This paper is an attempt to describe in detail, from a learner's viewpoint, the sequence of maneuvers involved in extradural removal of the ACP. Materials and Methods: The standard pterional approach and extradural anterior clinoidectomy was performed on four sides of two formalin fixed and latex injected cadaver heads. Important steps were photographed through the surgical microscope. Conclusion: An accurate understanding of the microsurgical anatomy of this region and the surgical nuances relevant to extradural clinoidectomy helps simplify the complexity of this surgical step. PMID:28484528

  14. Diagnosis of non-osseous spinal metastatic disease: the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batouli, Ali; Braun, John; Singh, Kamal; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Casagranda, Bethany U; Alavi, Abass

    2018-06-01

    The spine is the third most common site for distant metastasis in cancer patients with approximately 70% of patients with metastatic cancer having spinal involvement. Positron emission tomography (PET), combined with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has been deeply integrated in modern clinical oncology as a pivotal component of the diagnostic work-up of patients with cancer. PET is able to diagnose several neoplastic processes before any detectable morphological changes can be identified by anatomic imaging modalities alone. In this review, we discuss the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in the diagnostic management of non-osseous metastatic disease of the spinal canal. While sometimes subtle, recognizing such disease on FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI imaging done routinely in cancer patients can guide treatment strategies to potentially prevent irreversible neurological damage.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative temporal evolution of gadolinium enhancement of spinal lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, G.; Krol, G.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy gadolinium-enhanced studies of spinal lesions were reviewed, and 34 were selected for analysis of the temporal quantitative and qualitative aspects of enhancement. Thirteen patients had intradural extramedullary lesions, eight had intramedullary lesions, and 13 had extradural lesions. Data analysis was conducted by measuring intensities of normal and pathologic tissues on short repetition-time (TR) scans. The evolution of enhancement of spinal tumors was found to differ, depending on which compartment the tumor was located. Intradural extramedullary nodules showed their most prominent enhancement on immediate postcontrast scans. Extradural lesions varied in behavior. Some demonstrated an increase in enhancement, while others showed a decrease. Intramedullary tumors usually showed an increase in enhancement on delayed scans. In most cases, however, the quantitative increase was minor. The exception occurred in a case of necrotic cord glioma. Immediate postcontrast short-TR scans will nearly always be sufficient for the evaluation of suspected spinal lesions. Only the very occasional case may benefit from delayed scans

  16. Pediatric spinal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The infections of the spinal axis in children are rare when compared with adults. They encompass a large spectrum of diseases ranging from relatively benign diskitis to spinal osteomyleitis and to the rapidly progressive, rare, and potentially devastating spinal epidural, subdural, and intramedullary spinal cord infections. We present a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to these uncommon entities, in light of our experience from northern India. The most prevalent pediatric spinal infection in Indian scenario is tuberculosis, where an extradural involvement is more common than intradural. The craniovertebral junction is not an uncommon site of involvement in children of our milieu. The majority of pyogenic infections of pediatric spine are associated with congenital neuro-ectodermal defects such as congenital dermal sinus. The clinico-radiological findings of various spinal infections commonly overlap. Hence the endemicity of certain pathogens should be given due consideration, while considering the differential diagnosis. However, early suspicion, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment are the key factors in avoiding neurological morbidity and deformity in a growing child.

  17. Spinal cord compression secondary to bone metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Bhatia, Komal; Vaid, Ashok Kumar; Pavithran, Keechelat; Sharma, Jai Bhagwan; Hazarika, Digant; Jena, Amarnath

    2006-01-01

    Bone metastases are rare in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Spinal cord compression (SCC) due to bone metastases occur commonly in patients with lung and breast carcinomas, and metastatic HCC is an unusual cause of SCC. Spinal cord compression is an oncologic emergency and treatment delays can lead to irreversible consequences. Thus, the awareness that SCC could be a potential complication of bone metastases due to HCC is of significance in initiation of early treatment that can improve the quality of life and survival of the patients, if diagnosed earlier. This paper describes four cases of primary HCC with varied manifestations of SCC due to bone metastases. The first patient presented primarily with the symptoms of bone pains corresponding to the bone metastases sites rather than symptoms of associated hepatic pathology and eventually developed SCC. The second patient, diagnosed as having HCC, developed extradural SCC leading to paraplegia during the course of illness, for which he underwent emergency laminectomy with posterior fixation. The third patient developed SCC soon after the primary diagnosis and had to undergo emergency laminectomy. Post laminectomy he had good neurological recovery. The Fourth patient presented primarily with radicular pains rather than frank paraplegia as the first manifestation of SCC. PMID:16937544

  18. Infiltrative lipoma compressing the spinal cord in 2 large-breed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobert, Marc K; Brauer, Christina; Dziallas, Peter; Gerhauser, Ingo; Algermissen, Dorothee; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M

    2013-01-01

    Two cases of infiltrative lipomas compressing the spinal cord and causing nonambulatory paraparesis in 2 large-breed dogs are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed severe extradural spinal cord compression by inhomogenous masses that infiltrated the adjacent tissues and the muscles of the spine in both dogs. The presumptive clinical diagnoses were infiltrative lipomas, which were confirmed by histopathology. In rare cases infiltrative lipomas are able to compress the spinal cord by the agressive growth of invasive adipocytes causing neurological deficits.

  19. Treatment of extradural paraspinal neuroblastoma with an intraspinal component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.S.Y.; Wara, W.M.; Ablin, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Neuroblastoma originates from neural crest cells and can be found wherever sympathetic neural tissue is normally located. When the tumor arises from a paraspinal sympathetic ganglion, it has a propensity to extend through the intervertebral foramina, producing an extradural paraspinal neuroblastoma with an interspinal component (''dumbell'' neuroblastoma) which may result in spinal cord compression. The records of all children with neuroblastomas referred to the UCSF Department of Radiation Oncology and the Division of Pediatric Oncology from January 1, 1970, to December 31, 1979, are reviewed in this report. Patients who at initial presentation had a ''dumbell'' neuroblastoma were selected for study. Neuroblastoma was diagnosed histologically in all patients except one. Disease-free interval and length of survival was measured from the date of completion of radiotherapy, mostly after surgery. The results of diagnostic X-rays and laboratory studies are shown. Radiotherapeutic doses and results are tabulated. (Auth.)

  20. Spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkol Gokhan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinal myoclonus is a rare disorder characterized by myoclonic movements in muscles that originate from several segments of the spinal cord and usually associated with laminectomy, spinal cord injury, post-operative, lumbosacral radiculopathy, spinal extradural block, myelopathy due to demyelination, cervical spondylosis and many other diseases. On rare occasions, it can originate from the peripheral nerve lesions and be mistaken for peripheral myoclonus. Careful history taking and electrophysiological evaluation is important in differential diagnosis. The aim of this report is to evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics and treatment results of a case with spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury without any structural lesion.

  1. Tumoral calcinosis presenting as an extradural mass: MR findings and pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, A.; Arias, M.; Brasa, J. [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica (MEDTEC), Hospital Xeral-Cies, 36204 Vigo (Spain); Gonzalez, A. [Servicio de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Xeral-Cies, 36204 Vigo (Spain); Conde, C. [Servicio de Neurocirugia, Hospital Xeral-Cies, 36204 Vigo (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    Two cases of idiopathic tumoral calcinosis presenting as an extradural mass are reported. There are few reports in the literature of this pathological process presenting as extradural masses, so both cases represent very unusual locations for tumoral calcinosis. Magnetic resonance imaging features and pathological correlation of these two cases are presented. Tumoral calcinosis might be considered as a rare but possible cause of extradural mass. (orig.)

  2. Tumoral calcinosis presenting as an extradural mass: MR findings and pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, A.; Arias, M.; Brasa, J.; Gonzalez, A.; Conde, C.

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of idiopathic tumoral calcinosis presenting as an extradural mass are reported. There are few reports in the literature of this pathological process presenting as extradural masses, so both cases represent very unusual locations for tumoral calcinosis. Magnetic resonance imaging features and pathological correlation of these two cases are presented. Tumoral calcinosis might be considered as a rare but possible cause of extradural mass. (orig.)

  3. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  4. Non-surgical management of extradural haematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tysvaer, A.T.; Oedegaard, H.

    1987-01-01

    The widespread use of computed tomographic (CT) scanning has shown that not all extradural haematomas require surgical evacuation. Eleven patients with epidural haematomas, 8-113 ml in volume, were treated successfully non-surgically. Seven were diagnosed later than four days after the head injury. The haematomas showed complete resolution over a period of 5-12 weeks. As some epidural haematomas have been shown to undergo considerable enlargement during the first weeks of treatment, conservative management of those greather than 35-40 ml initially is not advisable. In patients showing a decreasing level of consciousness and neurological deficits, even smaller haematomas must be evacuated. Extradural haematomas of the posterior fossa are high risk lesion and therefore unsuitable for conservative management

  5. Effect of extradural blockage upon glucose and urea kinetics in surgical patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J.H.; Galler, L.; Holdaway, I.M.; Holdaway, C.M.

    1987-09-01

    We have determined the metabolic effects induced by the use of extradural blockage with 0.5 per cent bupivacaine hydrochloride in a group of surgical patients. Turnover rates of glucose and urea were determined isotopically using radioisotopes and studies were performed both in the basal state and during total parenteral nutrition. In the basal state, extradural blockade resulted in a decrease in the turnover rates of both glucose and urea. In addition, when extradural blockade was instituted while the patients were receiving total parenteral nutrition, there was also a significant fall in glucose turnover. We conclude that the use of extradural blockade is effective as a means of conserving bodily resources in surgical patients both in the basal state and during total parenteral nutrition.

  6. Effect of extradural blockage upon glucose and urea kinetics in surgical patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, J.H.; Galler, L.; Holdaway, I.M.; Holdaway, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have determined the metabolic effects induced by the use of extradural blockage with 0.5 per cent bupivacaine hydrochloride in a group of surgical patients. Turnover rates of glucose and urea were determined isotopically using radioisotopes and studies were performed both in the basal state and during total parenteral nutrition. In the basal state, extradural blockade resulted in a decrease in the turnover rates of both glucose and urea. In addition, when extradural blockade was instituted while the patients were receiving total parenteral nutrition, there was also a significant fall in glucose turnover. We conclude that the use of extradural blockade is effective as a means of conserving bodily resources in surgical patients both in the basal state and during total parenteral nutrition

  7. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma located in the epidural space of the dorsal spinal cord. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, M.J.; Domingo, J.M.; Palomera, L.; Pina, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma located in the extradural space of the dorsal spinal cord, causing spinal cord compression: the presenting sign was back pain. The MR findings are described and the differential diagnosis with respect to other processes that affect the epidural space is discussed. (Author) 9 refs

  8. Frequency of extradural haematoma in patients with linear skull fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb, A.; Afridi, E.A.K.; Khan, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Apparently normal looking patients after traumatic brain injury can have serious neurological deterioration, and one of the common causes of such deterioration is extradural haematomas. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of extradural hematoma and common types of trauma leading to it among patients presenting with skull fracture due to head injury. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Neurosurgery Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from June 2011 to June 2012. All patients who were suspected to have Skull fracture on X-ray skull, during the study period, were included in study after informed consent and later on CT-Scan brain was done to see for extradural hematoma. Findings were recorded on a predesigned proforma including demographic data, radiological findings and the type of head trauma. Results: Out of 114 patients 85 (74.5%) were males and 29 (225.4%) were females. Age ranged from 2 to 70 years (18.23 ± 16.5 years). Among these patients the most important cause of head injury was fall from height in 65(57%), followed by road traffic accidents in 39 (34.2%), and assault in 10 (8.8%) patients. The most common site of fracture was parietal in 49 (43%) of patients, followed by frontal bone in 28 (24.6%) of patients, occipital bone in 24 (21.1%) of patients, and temporal bone in 23 (20.2%) of patients. Frequency of extradural hematoma among linear skull fracture was in 34 (29.8%) patients. Extradural hematoma was most common with parietotemporal linear skull fractures (73.5%). Conclusion: Extradural haematoma occurs commonly with linear skull fractures, so patients with linear skull fracture should be properly evaluated with CT brain. (author)

  9. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-01-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain. (orig.)

  10. Anterolateral meningioma of the foramen magnum and high cervical spine presenting intradural and extradural growth in a child: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Alkinoos; Magras, Ioannis; Sarlis, Panagiotis; Spyridopoulos, Evangelos; Polyzoidis, Konstantinos

    2015-12-01

    We report a rare case of anterolateral meningioma of the foramen magnum (FMM) and high cervical spine presenting both intradural and extradural growth in a 7.5-year-old boy. We also performed a review of the relevant peer-reviewed literature. The patient presented with progressive tetraparesis and gait instability. Neuroimaging revealed an anterolateral tumor of the foramen magnum, C1 and C2 cervical spine level. The patient was treated in two stages: During the first operation, the extradural part was resected while the intradural part was removed in a second operation. Following the second operation, the patient showed almost complete neurological recovery as a result of cervical spinal cord and brainstem decompression but was complicated with cerebrospinal fluid leakage and infection by Acinetobacter. He sustained two further operations for dural sealing and external ventricular drainage and was treated with intraventricular administration of antibiotics. Histopathology of the tumor confirmed a meningotheliomatous meningioma. At the 6-month post-op follow-up examination, the patient exhibited complete neurological recovery and no radiological tumor recurrence. To the authors' best knowledge, we report the third case of sporadic pediatric meningioma of the foramen magnum and high cervical compartments with an extradural growth. Accurate pre-operative estimation of possible extradural growth is crucial towards surgical planning and sufficient treatment. Treatment of choice is total resection in a single operating session to avoid re-operations and increased risk of complications. If not possible, a re-operation should always attempt to secure the desired result.

  11. Effect of extradural morphine on somatosensory evoked potentials to dermatomal stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C; Selmar, P; Hansen, O B

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the extradural (L2-3) administration of morphine 6 mg on early (less than 0.5 s) somatosensory evoked cortical potentials (SEP) to electrical stimulation of the L1- and S1-dermatomes was examined in eight patients. Extradural morphine did not influence SEP amplitude. SEP latency did...

  12. Primary intraspinal extradural primitive neuroectodermal tumor: A rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, Shrikant V; Tadghare, Jitendra; Patil, Harshad; Narayan, Sharadendu

    2016-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are aggressive childhood malignancies and are difficult to treat. Primary intraspinal PNETs are rare. These patients have poor prognosis with short survival time even after surgery and chemoradiation. As there are no standard guidelines exist for the management of these tumors, a multidisciplinary approach has been employed with varying success. According to the review of literature, only few cases of primary intraspinal extradural PNETs have been reported. Herein, author has described a case of intraspinal, extradural PNET.

  13. Endoscopic extradural supraorbital approach to the temporal pole and adjacent area: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Fuminari; Imai, Masaaki; Shigematsu, Hideaki; Aoki, Rie; Oda, Shinri; Shimoda, Masami; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2017-08-25

    The authors' initial experience with the endoscopic extradural supraorbital approach to the temporal pole and adjacent area is reported. Fully endoscopic surgery using the extradural space via a supraorbital keyhole was performed for tumors in or around the temporal pole, including temporal pole cavernous angioma, sphenoid ridge meningioma, and cavernous sinus pituitary adenoma, mainly using 4-mm, 0° and 30° endoscopes and single-shaft instruments. After making a supraorbital keyhole, a 4-mm, 30° endoscope was advanced into the extradural space of the anterior cranial fossa during lifting of the dura mater. Following identification of the sphenoid ridge, orbital roof, and anterior clinoid process, the bone lateral to the orbital roof was drilled off until the dura mater of the anterior aspect of the temporal lobe was exposed. The dura mater of the temporal lobe was incised and opened, exposing the temporal pole under a 4-mm, 0° endoscope. Tumors in or around the temporal pole were safely removed under a superb view through the extradural corridor. The endoscopic extradural supraorbital approach was technically feasible and safe. The anterior trajectory to the temporal pole using the extradural space under endoscopy provided excellent visibility, allowing minimally invasive surgery. Further surgical experience and development of specialized instruments would promote this approach as an alternative surgical option.

  14. Spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lindsay M; Skeen, Todd M

    2013-03-15

    An 11-year-old spayed female Siberian Husky was evaluated because of a 2-week history of progressive paraparesis. Results of neurologic examination were consistent with a T3-L3 myelopathy. There were no abnormalities on CBC, and hypercalcemia was noted on serum biochemical analysis. Several hypoechoic splenic nodules were evident on abdominal ultrasonography, and results of fine-needle aspiration cytology were consistent with splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Two compressive, extradural masses in the dorsal epidural space of the thoracolumbar region of the spinal cord were seen on MRI images. A dorsal laminectomy was performed to remove the extradural spinal masses. Results of histologic examination of tissue samples were consistent with EMH. Following surgery, clinical signs of paraparesis resolved, and there was no recurrence of the masses 24 months after surgery. Extramedullary hematopoesis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs in which results of diagnostic imaging indicate a epidural mass. In human patients, spinal EMH usually occurs secondary to an underlying hematologic disease, but it can also occur spontaneously. Treatment options reported for humans include surgical decompression, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and blood transfusion. The dog of this report responded favorably to surgical decompression and was clinically normal 2 years after surgery.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in the management of suspected spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loughrey, Gareth J.; Collins, Conor D.; Todd, Susan M.; Brown, Nicola M.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and fifty-five patients underwent a total of 159 spinal MRI examinations over a three-year period. Patients were examined using a 1.0T magnet and a phased array surface spine coil. Sagittal T1 weighted spin echo and STIR sequences were routinely employed. Axial T1 and T2 weighted spin echo images were obtained at sites of identified pathology. Contrast enhanced sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin echo images were acquired when the unenhanced appearances did not correlate with the clinical findings or when the images suggested intradural or intramedullary disease. RESULTS: Malignant disease affecting the spinal cord or cauda equina was noted in 104/159 (65%) patients (extradural n= 78, intradural n= 20, intramedullary n= 7); one patient had evidence of both intradural and intramedullary deposits. Multiple levels of extradural cord/cauda equina compression were present in 18/78 patients (23%). The thoracic spine was the most frequently affected (74%). Bone elements were the major component of extradural compression in 11/78 patients (14%). Intradural metastases were multiple in 15/20 patients (75%). Four of the six solitary intramedullary metastases were situated in the conus medullaris. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging of the entire spine is the investigation of choice in patients with known malignancy and suspected spinal canal disease. Contrast-enhanced images should be acquired when the unenhanced appearances do not correlate with the clinical findings or when they suggest intradural or intramedullary disease. Loughrey, G.J. (2000)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in the management of suspected spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughrey, Gareth J.; Collins, Conor D.; Todd, Susan M.; Brown, Nicola M.; Johnson, Richard J

    2000-11-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of spinal canal disease in patients with known malignancy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and fifty-five patients underwent a total of 159 spinal MRI examinations over a three-year period. Patients were examined using a 1.0T magnet and a phased array surface spine coil. Sagittal T1 weighted spin echo and STIR sequences were routinely employed. Axial T1 and T2 weighted spin echo images were obtained at sites of identified pathology. Contrast enhanced sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin echo images were acquired when the unenhanced appearances did not correlate with the clinical findings or when the images suggested intradural or intramedullary disease. RESULTS: Malignant disease affecting the spinal cord or cauda equina was noted in 104/159 (65%) patients (extradural n= 78, intradural n= 20, intramedullary n= 7); one patient had evidence of both intradural and intramedullary deposits. Multiple levels of extradural cord/cauda equina compression were present in 18/78 patients (23%). The thoracic spine was the most frequently affected (74%). Bone elements were the major component of extradural compression in 11/78 patients (14%). Intradural metastases were multiple in 15/20 patients (75%). Four of the six solitary intramedullary metastases were situated in the conus medullaris. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging of the entire spine is the investigation of choice in patients with known malignancy and suspected spinal canal disease. Contrast-enhanced images should be acquired when the unenhanced appearances do not correlate with the clinical findings or when they suggest intradural or intramedullary disease. Loughrey, G.J. (2000)

  17. Analysis of the Relationship Between the Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (ESCC) Scale and Paralysis Caused by Metastatic Spine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uei, Hiroshi; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Maseda, Masafumi

    2018-04-15

    A retrospective, single-institute, and radiographic study. To evaluate the relationship between the epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC) scale and the severity of metastatic spine tumor-induced paralysis. The ESCC scale is used to evaluate the grade of spinal cord compression on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, few studies have investigated the relationship between such MRI findings and paralysis. The subjects were 467 patients with metastatic spine tumors and grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression according to the ESCC scale. Evaluations using this scale were performed by three spine surgeons, and results that were obtained by two or more surgeons were adopted. We also examined patients whose spinal cord compression deteriorated by one grade or more to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade C or worse within the first 3 weeks after MRI. The kappa coefficients for inter- and intraexaminer variability were 0.90 and 0.95, respectively. ASIA grade D or worse paralysis developed in at least 50% of the patients with ESCC grade 1b or worse spinal cord compression at the C1-T2 and at least 50% of those with ESCC grade 1c or worse spinal cord compression at the T3-L5. The frequency of ASIA grade C or worse paralysis was high among the patients with ESCC grade 2 or worse spinal cord compression at the C7-L1. Nineteen patients experienced rapid deterioration of one grade or more to ASIA grade C or worse paralysis within the first 3 weeks after MRI. Of these, paralysis occurred in at least 30% of the patients with anterolateral or circumferential cord compression combined with ESCC grade 2 or 3 compression at the C7-L1. The severity of paralysis was not correlated with the ESCC scale. Patients with anterolateral or circumferential ESCC grade 2 or 3 cord compression at the C7-L1 are at high risk of rapidly progressive paralysis. 4.

  18. A 2011 Updated Systematic Review and Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Malignant Extradural Spinal Cord Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loblaw, D. Andrew, E-mail: andrew.loblaw@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Mitera, Gunita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Ford, Michael [Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Laperriere, Normand J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To update the 2005 Cancer Care Ontario practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of extradural malignant spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods: A review and analysis of data published from January 2004 to May 2011. The systematic literature review included published randomized control trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and prospective/retrospective studies. Results: An RCT of radiation therapy (RT) with or without decompressive surgery showed improvements in pain, ambulatory ability, urinary continence, duration of continence, functional status, and overall survival. Two RCTs of RT (30 Gy in eight fractions vs. 16 Gy in two fractions; 16 Gy in two fractions vs. 8 Gy in one fraction) in patients with a poor prognosis showed no difference in ambulation, duration of ambulation, bladder function, pain response, in-field failure, and overall survival. Retrospective multicenter studies reported that protracted RT schedules in nonsurgical patients with a good prognosis improved local control but had no effect on functional or survival outcomes. Conclusions: If not medically contraindicated, steroids are recommended for any patient with neurologic deficits suspected or confirmed to have MESCC. Surgery should be considered for patients with a good prognosis who are medically and surgically operable. RT should be given to nonsurgical patients. For those with a poor prognosis, a single fraction of 8 Gy should be given; for those with a good prognosis, 30 Gy in 10 fractions could be considered. Patients should be followed up clinically and/or radiographically to determine whether a local relapse develops. Salvage therapies should be introduced before significant neurologic deficits occur.

  19. A 2011 Updated Systematic Review and Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Malignant Extradural Spinal Cord Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loblaw, D. Andrew; Mitera, Gunita; Ford, Michael; Laperriere, Normand J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To update the 2005 Cancer Care Ontario practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of extradural malignant spinal cord compression (MESCC). Methods: A review and analysis of data published from January 2004 to May 2011. The systematic literature review included published randomized control trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and prospective/retrospective studies. Results: An RCT of radiation therapy (RT) with or without decompressive surgery showed improvements in pain, ambulatory ability, urinary continence, duration of continence, functional status, and overall survival. Two RCTs of RT (30 Gy in eight fractions vs. 16 Gy in two fractions; 16 Gy in two fractions vs. 8 Gy in one fraction) in patients with a poor prognosis showed no difference in ambulation, duration of ambulation, bladder function, pain response, in-field failure, and overall survival. Retrospective multicenter studies reported that protracted RT schedules in nonsurgical patients with a good prognosis improved local control but had no effect on functional or survival outcomes. Conclusions: If not medically contraindicated, steroids are recommended for any patient with neurologic deficits suspected or confirmed to have MESCC. Surgery should be considered for patients with a good prognosis who are medically and surgically operable. RT should be given to nonsurgical patients. For those with a poor prognosis, a single fraction of 8 Gy should be given; for those with a good prognosis, 30 Gy in 10 fractions could be considered. Patients should be followed up clinically and/or radiographically to determine whether a local relapse develops. Salvage therapies should be introduced before significant neurologic deficits occur.

  20. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-03-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain.

  1. Preoperative trans-arterial embolization for spinal tumor: embolization techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Haibin; Xu Daizhe

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the technique and to evaluate the safety and value of preoperative trans-arterial embolization of hypervascular spinal tumors. Methods: Eighteen patients with hypervascular spinal tumors underwent trans-arterial embolization before surgery. They arose intradural in six patients and extradural in 12. Thirty-one arteries were embolized with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles (150-500 μm), of which 18 with additional pieces of gelatin sponge for proximal pedicular embolization. The criteria for judging the effectiveness of embolization were the completeness of tumor removal and estimated blood loss during surgery. Results: Tumor embolization with total occlusion was obtained in eight patients, second to total in seven, subtotal in one, and partial in two. There were no symptomatic complications associated with embolization. Tumors were totally removed in 17 patients and nearly totally removed in one. The average estimated blood loss during surgery was 1100 ml (range, 200-6000 ml) for all 18 patients, and 1540 ml in patients with extradural tumors. Conclusions: Preoperative embolization of hypervascular spinal tumors is safe and effective. It can make complete resection of a tumor possible and can make an unresectable tumor resectable. Superselection or flow control is necessary to achieve effective devascularization and avoid complications

  2. Unilateral proptosis and extradural hematoma in a child with scurvy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Sumit; Sivanandan, Sindhu; Seth, Rachna; Kabra, Shushil [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Pediatrics, New Delhi (India); Aneesh, Mangalasseril K.; Gupta, Vaibhav [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India)

    2007-09-15

    We report a 3-year-old boy with unilateral proptosis, painful swelling of the right thigh and aphasia. He had radiographic evidence of scurvy in the limbs and bilateral frontal extradural hematomas with a mass lesion in the left orbit on MRI. He was treated with vitamin C and on follow-up 8 weeks later had recovered with no evidence of the orbital mass on clinical or radiological study. Scurvy manifesting as proptosis and extradural hematoma is rare. (orig.)

  3. Extradural cold block for selective neurostimulation of the bladder: development of a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, S; Bross, S; Scheepe, J R; Seif, C; Jünemann, K P; Alken, P

    1999-03-01

    Cryotechnique for selective block of the urethral sphincter and simultaneous activation of the bladder was developed to achieve physiological micturition during sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS). In ten foxhounds SARS of S2 was carried out while extradurally both spinal nerves S2 were cooled down from positive 25C in a stepwise fashion until a sphincter block was observed. Subsequently, SARS of S2 was performed while the pudendal nerves were cooled down from + 15C. The effects of spinal and pudendal nerve cold block on the urethral sphincter and bladder during SARS and the recovery time were monitored by urodynamic investigation. A complete cold block of the urethral sphincter during spinal nerve cooling was achieved in all cases. During pudendal nerve cooling, the sphincter was completely blocked in two, and incompletely blocked in four dogs. Cold block temperature of the spinal nerves averaged +11.7C and of the pudendal nerves +6.2C. During SARS and spinal nerve cooling, an increase in intravesical pressure up to 13 cm. water was recognized, and recovery time was on average 6.6 minutes. Intravesical pressure remained unchanged during pudendal nerve cooling, with recovery time being less than 1 minute. The cold block was always reversible. Cryotechnique is an excellent method for selective and reversible block of the urethral sphincter during SARS to avoid detrusor-sphincter-dyssynergia. The application of cryotechnique in functional electrical stimulation leads to an improvement of quality of life in para- or tetraplegic patients because of selective nerve stimulation with optimization of micturition, standing, walking and grasping and does so without the necessity of surgical dorsal root rhizotomy.

  4. Primary ectopic frontotemporal extradural craniopharyngioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pourkhalili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of primary ectopic frontotemporal extradural craniopharyngioma. Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas are very rare and have been reported involving the fourth ventricle, infrasellar region, lateral ventricle, temporal area, cerebellopontine angle, clivus, corpus callosum, and prepontine cistern. There was just 1 case of craniopharyngioma previously presented in the literature, with nearly same location as the presenting case.

  5. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated with spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yukiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Endo, Norio

    1985-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy developed spinal cord compression during remission of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Metrizamide myelography disclosed complete block at the level of the 8th thoracic vertebra. Subsequent metrizamide CT clearly showed the subarachnoid space compressed and stenosed from the 8th thoracic vertebra to the 2nd lumber verbetra, and an extradural mass compressing the spinal cord. The function in the lower extremities was almost completely recovered by radiation therapy with a total dose of 10 Gy from the 6th thoracic vertebra to the 4th lumbar vertebra. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. How to distinguish between bleeding and coagulated extradural hematomas on the plain CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, O.F.; Espersen, J.O.

    1984-01-01

    Four types of extradural hematoma could be separated at examination of the plain CT scan in 54 extradural hematomas. Two major groups appear: the still bleeding hematoma showing either generally low attenuation values of ''holes'', and a coagulated homogenous type with generally high attenuation values. The attenuation values of the bleeding-liquid part of hematoma - were correlated to hemoglobin concentration in blood, to which clots were not related. Seven extradural hematomas grew and coagulated on repeated preoperative CT scans. In two cases intravenous contrast was given to the bleeding type of hematoma, and the contrast media appeared in ''holes'', but not in areas of high attenuation value. It is easy to distinguish between the different types of hematoma on the plain CT scan, and the separation by eye between the still bleeding and the coagulated extradural hematoma seems reliable. (orig.)

  7. Primary extradural meningioma arising from the calvarium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ravi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are the most common intracranial tumours. Meningiomas arising at other locations are termed primary extradural meningiomas (EDM and are rare. Here we report a case of EDM arising from the calvarium – a primary calvarial meningioma (PCM.

  8. Metastatic spinal tumor. Assessment with fat-saturation T1-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Toshifumi; Sugimura, Kazuro; Uchida, Nobue; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Komatsu, Akio; Okui, Shouji; Kimino, Katsuji.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1-WI) and chemical shift fat-saturation T1-weighted imaging (fat-sat T1-WI) by a diagnosis of the bone metastases. Thirty-two patients (143 vertebrae) with non-neoplastic lesions (normal group) and 32 patients (82 vertebrae) with spinal metastases (metastatic group) were evaluated using both images. The signal intensity (SI) distribution of both groups regarding T1-WI provided various patterns, and the SI measurements were not significantly different between the two groups ; however, the metastases which were mixed, showed a low SI. Regarding fat-sat T1-WI, all non-neoplastic lesions had a low-intensity homogeneous appearance ; however, the metastases were mixed to a high SI. The SI measurement data of the metastatic group was significantly higher than that of the normal group. In conclusion, fat-sat T1-WI was useful for evaluating the vertebral metastases. When fat-sat T1-WI demonstrated a mixed to high SI in patients suspected of having vertebral metastasis, Gd-DTPA enhancement was thought to be the problem. (author)

  9. Traumatic Extradural Hematoma in Enugu, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute extradural (epidural) hematoma (EDH) is a neurosurgical emergency and timely surgical intervention for significant EDH is the accepted standard for treatment. Acute (EDH) occurs in approximately 1-3% of patients with head injuries and in 5 to. 15% of patients with severe head injuries.[1] It is rare before the age of 2 ...

  10. Re-irradiation of metastatic spinal cord compression: A feasibility study by volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for in-field recurrence creating a dosimetric hole on the central canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Bignardi, Mario; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Lattuada, Paola; Santoro, Armando; Urso, Gaetano; Vigorito, Sabrina; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-01-01

    When local recurrences arise within an irradiated region involving metastatic spinal cord compression, the dose limit to the spinal cord reduces the chance to re-treat the patient by 3D-conformational RT technique. The possibility of using volumetric modulated arc RT by RapidArc was evaluated for dose sparing at spinal cord level and preserving target coverage. A clinically satisfactory PTV coverage and dose sparing to the spinal cord were obtained. An upcoming trial on patients will provide clinical outcomes.

  11. Mirror image extradural hematoma in elderly population: management strategy with surgical bilateral or unilateral evacuation or conservative treatment modality with literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta; Yada Rajpur; Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael; Agrawal Amit

    2017-01-01

    Extradural hematomas (EDH) represent one of common imaging findings in cases sustaining traumatic brain injury. Bilateral extradural haematoma is considered rare and even rarer in elder people male. Bilateral extradural hematoma is usually acute, and generally associated with severe traumatic head injury. Mirror-image extradural hematomas (MEDH) constitute a special type of bilateral extradural hamatomas, which is placed anatomically symmetrically on both the sides of the intracranial compart...

  12. Cost-effectiveness of surgery plus radiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Nosyk, Bohdan; Fisher, Charles G.; Dvorak, Marcel; Patchell, Roy A.; Regine, William F.; Loblaw, Andrew; Bansback, Nick; Guh, Daphne; Sun, Huiying; Anis, Aslam

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A recent randomized clinical trial has demonstrated that direct decompressive surgery plus radiotherapy was superior to radiotherapy alone for the treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. The current study compared the cost-effectiveness of the two approaches. Methods and Materials: In the original clinical trial, clinical effectiveness was measured by ambulation and survival time until death. In this study, an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective. Costs related to treatment and posttreatment care were estimated and extended to the lifetime of the cohort. Weibull regression was applied to extrapolate outcomes in the presence of censored clinical effectiveness data. Results: From a societal perspective, the baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was found to be $60 per additional day of ambulation (all costs in 2003 Canadian dollars). Using probabilistic sensitivity analysis, 50% of all generated ICERs were lower than $57, and 95% were lower than $242 per additional day of ambulation. This analysis had a 95% CI of -$72.74 to 309.44, meaning that this intervention ranged from a financial savings of $72.74 to a cost of $309.44 per additional day of ambulation. Using survival as the measure of effectiveness resulted in an ICER of $30,940 per life-year gained. Conclusions: We found strong evidence that treatment of metastatic epidural spinal cord compression with surgery in addition to radiotherapy is cost-effective both in terms of cost per additional day of ambulation, and cost per life-year gained

  13. MRI of infections and neoplasms of the spine and spinal cord in 55 patients with AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, M.M. [Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Post, M.J.D. [Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroimaging Research, Department of Radiology, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Our purpose was to describe the range of MRI findings in infectious and neoplastic involvement of the spine and spinal cord in symptomatic patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). MRI studies in 55 patients with AIDS and neurological signs and symptoms thought to be related to the spine or spinal cord were reviewed. We categorized the findings according to the spinal compartment involved. There were 29 patients with extradural, 11 with intradural-extramedullary and 9 with intramedullary disease. In 6 patients more than one compartment was involved simultaneously, and patients presented with multiple lesions in the same compartment. The most common causes of extradural disease were bone lesions (28); an epidural mass was seen in 14 and spondylodiscitis in 4 patients. Cytomegalovirus polyradiculitis was the most common cause of intradural-extramedullary disease (in 10 cases); herpes radiculitis was seen in two, and tuberculous infection in another two. In three cases leptomeningeal contrast enhancement was due to lymphoma. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) myelitis was seen in two patients, presumed vacuolar myelopathy in two, toxoplasma myelitis in four, intramedullary lymphoma in one, and herpes myelitis in one. Familiarity with the various potential pathological entities that can affect the spine and spinal cord in the AIDS population and their imaging characteristics is crucial for initiation of further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical or surgical treatment. (orig.)

  14. MRI of infections and neoplasms of the spine and spinal cord in 55 patients with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurnher, M.M.; Post, M.J.D.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to describe the range of MRI findings in infectious and neoplastic involvement of the spine and spinal cord in symptomatic patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). MRI studies in 55 patients with AIDS and neurological signs and symptoms thought to be related to the spine or spinal cord were reviewed. We categorized the findings according to the spinal compartment involved. There were 29 patients with extradural, 11 with intradural-extramedullary and 9 with intramedullary disease. In 6 patients more than one compartment was involved simultaneously, and patients presented with multiple lesions in the same compartment. The most common causes of extradural disease were bone lesions (28); an epidural mass was seen in 14 and spondylodiscitis in 4 patients. Cytomegalovirus polyradiculitis was the most common cause of intradural-extramedullary disease (in 10 cases); herpes radiculitis was seen in two, and tuberculous infection in another two. In three cases leptomeningeal contrast enhancement was due to lymphoma. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) myelitis was seen in two patients, presumed vacuolar myelopathy in two, toxoplasma myelitis in four, intramedullary lymphoma in one, and herpes myelitis in one. Familiarity with the various potential pathological entities that can affect the spine and spinal cord in the AIDS population and their imaging characteristics is crucial for initiation of further diagnostic tests and appropriate medical or surgical treatment. (orig.)

  15. Combined spinal intramedullary arteriovenous malformation and lipomyelomeningocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weon, Y.C.; Roh, H.G.; Byun, H.S. [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Chung, J.I. [Medimoa Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Eoh, W. [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-10-01

    Combined spinal arteriovenous malformation and lipomyelomeningocele are extremely rare. We present a rare combined case of a lipomyelomeningocele with an intramedullary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) occurred at the L3-L4 level in a 30-year-old man who suffered from low back pain radiating to the lower extremities, dysuria, and frequency for 5 years. The MR studies showed an intradural mass with high-signal intensity on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images, intermingled with multiple signal-void structures. The mass extended extradurally toward a subcutaneously forming fatty mass on the patient's back. Spinal angiography showed an AVM supplied by the radiculopial branches of the lumbar arteries and drained by tortuous, dilated, perimedullary veins. Endovascular embolization and surgical resection were performed. (orig.)

  16. Primary extradural meningioma arising from the calvarium | Ravi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meningiomas are the most common intracranial tumours. Meningiomas arising at other locations are termed primary extradural meningiomas (EDMs) and are rare. Here we report a case of EDM arising from the calvarium – a primary calvarial meningioma (PCM).

  17. Effects of extradural bupivacaine on the haemostatic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henny, C. P.; Odoom, J. A.; ten Cate, H.; ten Cate, J. W.; Oosterhoff, R. J.; Dabhoiwala, N. F.; Sih, I. L.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty consecutive patients undergoing elective transurethral resection of the prostate were allocated randomly to one of two groups. Group I (n = 10) received lumbar extradural analgesia with 0.5% bupivacaine. Group II (n = 10) received general anaesthesia with spontaneous respiration, using 60%

  18. Influence of timing on the effect of continuous extradural analgesia with bupivacaine and morphine after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Hansen, B L; Hjortsø, N C

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the effect of continuous extradural analgesia with bupivacaine and morphine, initiated before or after colonic surgery, in a double-blind, randomized study. Thirty-two patients were allocated randomly to receive an identical extradural block initiated 40 min before surgical incision...... (n = 16) or at closure of the surgical wound (n = 16). The extradural regimen consisted of a bolus of 7 ml of plain bupivacaine 7.5 mg ml-1 plus morphine 2 mg and continuous extradural infusion of a mixture of bupivacaine 7.5 mg ml-1 plus morphine 0.05 mg ml-1, 4 ml h-1 for 2 h, followed...... by a continuous extradural infusion of a mixture of bupivacaine 2.5 mg ml-1 plus morphine 0.05 mg ml-1, 4 ml h-1, continued for 72 h after operation. In addition, all patients received similar general anaesthesia. There was no significant difference in request for additional morphine and no significant...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of a metastatic chemodectoma in a dog : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Naudé

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year-old, male, Collie-cross was presented with a non-weight bearing right thoracic limb lameness, right m.deltoideus, m.infraspinatus and m.supraspinatus atrophy, and severe neck pain with spasm of the cervical epaxial muscles. MRI revealed complete destruction of the 5th and 6th cervical vertebral bodies with lateral extradural spinal cord compression at the level of the 4th and 5th cervical vertebrae. These lesions were very clearly demonstrated on magnetic resonance images, while only subtle changes were seen on survey radiographs. Post mortem investigation revealed a large heart base chemodectoma with multiple smaller tumours in the cranial mediastinum and a single tumour nodule on the thoracic aorta. The 5th cervical vertebral body had necrotic, haemorrhagic and lytic changes. Histopathology of the heart base tumour, the nodules in the cranial mediastinum and on the thoracic aorta and samples from the 5th cervical vertebra confirmed the presence of a malignant aortic or carotid body tumour originating from the chemoreceptor organs. Diagnostic imaging features and post mortem findings are described. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the magnetic resonance features of a metastatic chemodectoma in a dog.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of metastatic spinal photon treatment techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Marvene M., E-mail: mewing@iuhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Carnes, Samuel M.; Henderson, Mark A.; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Traditional palliative treatment of metastatic cancer to the vertebral bodies often results in doses to the spinal cord that are higher than the dose prescribed to the target, or gross tumor volume (GTV). This study compares traditional techniques of spine palliation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of the study is 2-fold: first, the study demonstrates the benefits of using IMRT to lower the dose to the organs at risk (OAR), particularly for the spinal cord and other nonspecified normal tissues; second, the article provides information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used conventional techniques for treating the vertebral bodies based on patient anatomy. Because the use of IMRT or other advanced techniques may be prohibitive because of insurance issues, treatment plans were created that compared optimal coverage vs. optimal sparing for single-field, wedged-pair, and opposed-beam arrangements. Fifty-five patients were selected and divided by location of target (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine) and also by the measured separation between the anterior and posterior surface of the patient at the level of mid-GTV. Within each anatomic category the patients again were divided into the categories of small, medium, and large based on separation. The patient dataset that most closely represented the average separation within each category was selected, resulting in a total of 9 patients, and the appropriate treatment plan techniques were calculated for each of the 9 patients. The results of the study do show that the use of IMRT is far superior when compared with other techniques, both for coverage and for sparing of the surrounding tissue, regardless of patient size and the section of spine being treated. Based on a combination of both target coverage and sparing of normal tissues, the conventional plan of choice may vary by both the section of spine to be treated and by the size of the patient.

  1. Mirror image extradural hematoma in elderly population: management strategy with surgical bilateral or unilateral evacuation or conservative treatment modality with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extradural hematomas (EDH represent one of common imaging findings in cases sustaining traumatic brain injury. Bilateral extradural haematoma is considered rare and even rarer in elder people male. Bilateral extradural hematoma is usually acute, and generally associated with severe traumatic head injury. Mirror-image extradural hematomas (MEDH constitute a special type of bilateral extradural hamatomas, which is placed anatomically symmetrically on both the sides of the intracranial compartment, requires prompt diagnosis and emergent surgical intervention as it carry high mortality if evacuation of hematoma is not carried out expeditely. The mortality rate still remains higher in comparison to unilateral single extradural hematomas. The postoperative outcome depends on preoperative neurological status, total volume of blood, accurate diagnosis and prompt shifting to neurosurgical facility, expatiation of surgical procedure, pre- hospital care. Authors report a case of a - 65-year-old man who presented with acute simultaneous bilateral extradural haematomas following road traffic accident, underwent bilateral trephine craniotomy and simultaneous evacuation on both side led to good recovery.

  2. Factors Influencing the Outcomes in Extradural Haematoma Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neurosurgical emergencies and are one of the most common causes of mortality and disability after traumatic brain injury. This study aimed at evaluating the current management and factors that influence outcome in patients treated for extradural hematoma in an African setting. Methods: A total of 224 consecutive patients ...

  3. Health-related Quality of Life in Patients with Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Søren S; Engelholm, Svend A; Larsen, Claus F

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Improvements in cancer treatment have resulted in an increased number of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Because patients with MSCC often have a limited expected survival time, maintenance of a high functional level and quality of life are important. However......, there is limited information about health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with MSCC. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of routine assessment of HRQoL based on the Euroqol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire in a cohort of patients consecutively admitted for evaluation of acute...... symptoms of MSCC. Methods: From 1 January to 31 December 2011, 544 patients diagnosed with acute symptoms of MSCC were consecutively enrolled in a cohort study. All patients were evaluated through a centralized referral system at one treatment facility. Data were prospectively registered, the variables age...

  4. CT-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with 125I-seed implantation for metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal: analysis of 23 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Xiaoxi; Lu Yinxiang; Ji Yong; Wang Xiaowei; Zhang Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) combined with 125 I-seed implantation for the treatment of metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal. Methods: A total of 28 involved vertebrae were detected in 23 patients with metastatic vertebral carcinoma. Each patient had 1-2 diseased vertebrae. The lesions included cervical vertebra (n=4), thoracic vertebra (n=13) and lumbar vertebra (n=11). Destroyed posterior vertebral wall was seen in all involved vertebrae. Thirteen vertebrae found in 12 patients showed involvement of the epidural space. According to treatment planning system (TPS) CT-guided implantation of 125 I seeds was carried out first for cervical lesions, which was followed by PVP. For the thoracic and lumbar lesions, unilateral or bilateral puncturing with several particle needles was employed to implant the 125 I seeds, then, PVP with bone cement injection was performed. The complications and the clinical efficacy were analyzed. Results: Successful operation was obtained in all patients. The number of implanted 125 I seeds ranged from 4 to 30 per vertebra, and the volume of injected bone cement was 1-6 ml per vertebra. After the operation the pain relief rate was 86.9% (n=20). The incidence of bone cement leakage was 17.8% (5/28). One patient had radicular pain caused by neuropore leakage, which was relieved after medication. No serious complications, such as spinal cord injury or radiation myelitis, occurred. Conclusion: CT-guided PVP combined with 125 I-seed implantation is effective and safe for the treatment of metastatic vertebral carcinoma involving the spinal canal. This therapy can effectively relieve the pain and control the deterioration of tumor, besides, the incidence of bone cement leakage is very low. (authors)

  5. The recovery of 5-HT transporter and 5-HT immunoreactivity in injured rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruhashi, Yasuo; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2009-09-01

    Experimental spinal cord injury. To determine the role of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-HT transporter in recovery from spinal cord injury. We examined 5-HT and 5-HT transporter of spinal cord immunohistologically and assessed locomotor recovery after extradural compression at the thoracic (T8) spinal cord in 21 rats. Eighteen rats had laminectomy and spinal cord injury, while the remaining three rats received laminectomy only. All rats were evaluated every other day for 4 weeks, using a 0-14 point scale open field test. Extradural compression markedly reduced mean hindlimbs scores from 14 to 1.5 +/- 2.0 (mean +/- standard error of mean). The rats recovered apparently normal walking by 4 weeks. The animals were perfused with fixative 1-3 days, 1, 2 and 4 weeks (three rats in each) after a spinal cord injury. The 5-HT transporter immunohistological study revealed a marked reduction of 5-HT transporter-containing terminals by 1 day after injury. By 4 weeks after injury, 5-HT transporter immunoreactive terminals returned to the control level. The 5-HT immunohistological study revealed a reduction of 5-HT-containing terminals by 1 week after injury. By 4 weeks after injury, 5-HT immunoreactive fibers and terminals returned to the control level. We estimated the recovery of 5-HT transporter and 5-HT neural elements in lumbosacral ventral horn by ranking 5-HT transporter and 5-HT staining intensity and counting 5-HT and 5-HT transporter terminals. The return of 5-HT transporter and 5-HT immunoreactivity of the lumbosacral ventral horn correlated with locomotor recovery, while 5-HT transporter showed closer relationship with locomotor recovery than 5-HT. The presence of 5-HT transporter indicates that the 5-HT fibers certainly function. This study shows that return of the function of 5-HT fibers predict the time course and extent of locomotory recovery after thoracic spinal cord injury.

  6. Acute extradural haematomas in children: A 12-year experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute extradural haematomas (AEDHs) occur infrequently in children. This study was undertaken to review our experience with management and outcomes of this condition in children treated in the Neurosurgery Unit at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of ...

  7. MR imaging of spine and spinal canal neoplasms: value of Gd-DTPA contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paprzycki, W.; Gradzki, J.; Sosnowski, P.; Stajgis, M.

    1994-01-01

    Value of Gadolinium-DTPA contrast enhancement in diagnosis of neoplastic diseases of spinal canal was estimated on the basis of retrospective analysis of MR examinations performed in 75 patients. The analyzed material consisted of 15 cases of intramedullary tumors (group 1.), 38 of subdural extramedullary (group 2.) and 22 extradural ones (group 3.). Contrast enhanced MR contributed significant information to the final diagnosis in all groups. The utmost significance of Gd-DTPA contrast enhancement was ascertained in group 1. Authors conclude that contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA is indispensable in all these cases of spinal canal neoplasms, where non-contrast MR did not reveal pathologic changes in optimal manner. (author)

  8. Metastatic spinal cord compression from basal cell carcinoma of the skin treated with surgical decompression and vismodegib: case report and review of Hedgehog signalling pathway inhibition in advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, J; Carswell, S; Talbot, T

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old man with locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) causing spinal cord compression, which was treated with spinal surgery and subsequent vismodegib. The patient presented with a large fungating chest wall lesion and a metastasis in T8 that was causing cord compression. He had neurosurgical decompression of the T8 lesion and fixation of the spine. Punch biopsy from the fungating chest wall lesion showed a BCC with some malignant squamous differentiation (basosquamous). Histopathological examination of the metastatic lesion in T8 at the time of surgical decompression identified features identical to the punch biopsy. The patient was referred to the oncology clinic for adjuvant treatment. In light of his metastatic disease and the large area over his chest wall that could not fully be covered by radiotherapy, he was treated with the novel oral Hedgehog signalling pathway (HHSP) inhibitor vismodegib, which led to marked improvement. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Nontraumatic spinal epidural hematomas. MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Baumgartner, R.W.; Zambaz, B.D.; Remonda, L.; Ozdoba, C.; Schroth, G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare clinical entity with a bleak outcome. The aim of our study was to establish the value of MR findings in the diagnosis of nontraumatic SEH. Material and Methods: Seven patients with nontraumatic SEH were examined by MR at 1.5 T. Two patients were under anticoagulation therapy with heparin, and 2 others were taking salicylic acid. One patient had lupus erythematodes with a marked thrombocytopenia. One patient had a spinal arteriovenous malformation. Results: MR imaging permitted the accurate localization of extradural intraspinal expansive lesions which exhibited the characteristic signal intensities of blood. Five patients underwent laminectomy and evacuation of the hematoma. In the acute phase, the hematomas appeared isointense when compared with the spinal cord on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Later the hematomas were hyperintense on T1-weighted images and showed signals identical to those of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on T2-weighted images. Conclusion: MR imaging established the exact diagnosis and localization of SEH in all cases. MR also can provide useful information about the age of the hematomas. (orig.)

  10. A fatal case of spinal tuberculosis mistaken for metastatic lung cancer: recalling ancient Pott's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchna Hans-Werner

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculous spondylitis (Pott's disease is an ancient human disease. Because it is rare in high-income, tuberculosis (TB low incidence countries, misdiagnoses occur as sufficient clinical experience is lacking. Case presentation We describe a fatal case of a patient with spinal TB, who was mistakenly irradiated for suspected metastatic lung cancer of the spine in the presence of a solitary pulmonary nodule of the left upper lobe. Subsequently, the patient progressed to central nervous system TB, and finally, disseminated TB before the accurate diagnosis was established. Isolation and antimycobacterial chemotherapy were initiated after an in-hospital course of approximately three months including numerous health care related contacts and procedures. Conclusion The rapid diagnosis of spinal TB demands a high index of suspicion and expertise regarding the appropriate diagnostic procedures. Due to the devastating consequences of a missed diagnosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis should be considered early in every case of spondylitis, intraspinal or paravertebral abscess. The presence of certain alarm signals like a prolonged history of progressive back pain, constitutional symptoms or pulmonary nodules on a chest radiograph, particularly in the upper lobes, may guide the clinical suspicion.

  11. Ambulation and survival following surgery in elderly patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itshayek, Eyal; Candanedo, Carlos; Fraifeld, Shifra; Hasharoni, Amir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E; Cohen, José E

    2017-12-28

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) is a disabling consequence of disease progression. Surgery can restore/preserve physical function, improving access to treatments that increase duration of survival; however, advanced patient age may deter oncologists and surgeons from considering surgical management. Evaluate the duration of ambulation and survival in elderly patients following surgical decompression of MESCC. Retrospective file review of a prospective database, under IRB waiver of informed consent, of consecutive patients treated in an academic tertiary care medical center from 8/2008-3/2015. Patients ≥65 years presenting neurological and/or radiological signs of cord compression due to metastatic disease, who underwent surgical decompression. Duration of ambulation and survival. Patients underwent urgent multidisciplinary evaluation and surgery. Ambulation and survival were compared with age, pre- and postoperative neurological (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale [AIS]) and performance status (Karnofsky Performance Status [KPS], and Tokuhashi Score using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, Pearson correlation coefficient, Cox regression model, log rank analysis, and Kaplan Meir analysis. 40 patients were included (21 male, 54%; mean age 74 years, range 65-87). Surgery was performed a mean 3.8 days after onset of motor symptoms. Mean duration of ambulation and survival were 474 (range 0-1662) and 525 days (range 11-1662), respectively; 53% of patients (21/40) survived and 43% (17/40) retained ambulation for ≥1 year. There was no significant relationship between survival and ambulation for patients aged 65-69, 70-79, or 80-89, although Kaplan Meier analysis suggested stratification. There was a significant relationship between duration of ambulation and pre- and postoperative AIS (p=0.0342, p=0.0358, respectively) and postoperative KPS (p=0.0221). Tokuhashi score was not significantly related to duration of

  12. Spontaneous resolution of a small extradural haematoma in a child.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sinha, A K

    2009-02-01

    We report the rapid spontaneous resolution of a small extradural haematoma (EDH) in a 19-month-old child. The haematoma was managed conservatively. The child went on to make a full recovery. The authors discuss the significance of this surprising clinical finding.

  13. Characteristics of patients who survived 2 years after surgery for spinal metastases : Can we avoid inappropriate patient selection?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, Jorrit Jan; Choi, David; Versteeg, Anne; Albert, Todd; Arts, Mark; Balabaud, Laurent; Bunger, Cody; Buchowski, Jacob Maciej; Chung, Chung Kee; Coppes, Maarten Hubert; Crockard, Hugh Alan; Depreitere, Bart; Fehlings, Michael George; Harrop, James; Kawahara, Norio; Kim, Eun Sang; Lee, Chong Suh; Leung, Yee; Liu, Zhongjun; Martin-Benlloch, Antonio; Massicotte, Eric Maurice; Mazel, Christian; Meyer, Bernhard; Peul, Wilco; Quraishi, Nasir A.; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Tomita, Katsuro; Ulbricht, Christian; Wang, Michael; Oner, F. Cumhur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Survival after metastatic cancer has improved at the cost of increased presentation with metastatic spinal disease. For patients with pathologic spinal fractures and/or spinal cord compression, surgical intervention may relieve pain and improve quality of life. Surgery is generally

  14. Langerhans′ cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra K Tyagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  15. Spinal tumours in neurofibromatosis type 1: an MRI study of frequency, multiplicity and variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakkar, S.D.; Mautner, V.F.; Feigen, U.

    1999-01-01

    In neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) spinal tumours cause neurological symptoms in about 2 % of patients. Among over 1400 patients with NF1 we saw symptomatic spinal tumours in 23 (1.6 %). MRI of the entire spinal canal was obtained in 54 patients aged 5-56 years with NF1. The number, site, morphology and signal characteristics of the spinal tumours were recorded and analysed. There were 24 patients with symptoms such as sensory impairment or paralysis; 30 patients had no neurological deficits. Of the 24 symptomatic patients, 23 (96 %) had spinal tumours, while we saw spinal tumours in 12 (40 %) of the 30 patients without neurological deficits. No spinal segment was preferred in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients. Most intraspinal extramedullary tumours were primarily extradural and intraforaminal. MRI showed intramedullary tumours in 3 patients (6 %), intraspinal extramedullary tumours in 18 (33 %) and intraforaminal tumours in 31 (57 %). Only neurological deficits in patients with NF1 should prompt further diagnostic clarification. In patients with neurological symptoms there may be a multiplicity of masses in the spinal canal, which can lead to difficulties in attaching symptoms to a certain tumour. In patients who do not satisfy the NIH criteria, it can be a helpful observation that spinal tumours in NF1 are primarily intraforaminal, extending into the spinal canal, while in NF2 they are mostly intraspinal intradural tumours. (orig.)

  16. MR with GD-DTPA in the diagnosis of spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenzl, G.; Heywang, S.H.; Vogl, T.

    1988-01-01

    In spinal lesions GD-DTPA has led to a better diagnosis of tumors concerning the extent and differential diagnosis. Important indications for the application of GD-DTPA are intramedullary tumors: excellent information with respect to extent and differentiation cyst from tumor. At extramedullary interadural tumors we got distinction of extramedullary from intramedullary tumors and more information in the differential diagnosis for example in cases of neurinomas and meningiomas. Additional information is also obtained by means of GD-DTPA in extradural tumors: better delineation from the myelon, better possibilities to differentiate between meningiomas, neurinomas and scar and tumor. (orig.) [de

  17. Periosteal chondroma with spinal cord compression in the thoracic spinal canal: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Hyeok; Kang, Byeong Seong; Kwon, Woon Jung; Sim, Hong Bo; Kim, Misung

    2016-01-01

    Periosteal chondroma is a very unusual cartilaginous neoplasm of the spinal canal. We herein report a case of periosteal chondroma in a 41-year-old male who presented with gait disturbance and paresthesia of both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance (MR) images showed an extradural mass which caused compression of the spinal cord at the T5/6 level. The mass showed iso-signal intensity on T1-weighted images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and nodular and peripheral rim enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. Computed tomography (CT) images showed a mass with punctate calcifications and extension into the left T5/6 neural foramen. MR and CT images showed extrinsic cortical bone erosion of the posterior inferior body of T5 and superior pedicle of T6, bone remodeling with overhanging margins, and sclerosis adjacent to the tumor. The patient underwent a complete excision of the mass by left T5/6 hemi-laminectomy and exhibited complete resolution of his symptoms. Histopathologic examination revealed periosteal chondroma. Tumor recurrence was not recorded during the 18-month follow-up period. (orig.)

  18. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisei Sako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered.

  19. Role of radiotherapy in metastatic spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latini, P.; Maranzano, E.; Aristei, C.; Checcaglini, F.; Panizza, B.M.; Perucci, E.; Ricci, S.

    1989-01-01

    A non-randomized prospective trial in which radiotherapy (RT) alone played the major role in the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is reported. Diagnosis was formulated on myelography plus computed tomography (CT). Of 51 cases treated, 48 are evaluable. The therapy consisted of radiation alone (42 cases) or decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy (6 cases). Surgery was performed when the site of the primary tumor was unknown. The group of patients who received radiography alone (42 of 48 evaluable cases) are analysed in this report. Medium to high doses of steroids were administered to all patients depending on the gravity of the case. Patients with chemo-or hormone-responsive primary tumors also received chemotherapy and/or hormone therapy. Pain relief, assessed by comparing use of narcotics and minor analgesics before and after treatment, was achieved in 54% cases (confidence limits, CL = 38-69%). In 36% (CL = 22-51%) of patients back pain diminished to the point when only milder analgesics were necessary (partial remission). Motor performance, based on patients' ability to walk, improved in 48% cases (CL = 31-65%). The 19 patients who were ambulatory before RT, did not deteriorate after treatment. Sphincter function, evaluated by patient's need for indwelling catheter, improved in 3 of 7 automatic dysfunction cases. It was found that early diagnosis was more important than primary tumor type for predicting a good prognosis. In fact, all ambulating patients responded to treatment independent of the radiosensitivity of the tumor histology. In paraparetic patients, the primary tumor type was important in predicting the response capacity to radiation and 11 of 12 paraparetic responders had radioresponsive tumors. There was no difference in response to treatment due to the entity of the myelographic block. No significant complications were caused by therapy. (author). 28 refs.; 4 tabs

  20. Metastatic cervical lymphadenopathy from uterine leiomyosarcoma with good local response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yoon Kyeong; Park, Hee Chul; Kee, Keun Hong; Jeon, Ho Jong; Park, You Hwan; Chung, Choon Hai

    2000-01-01

    The metastasis of uterine leiomyosarcoma to the neck node has not been reported previously and the radiotherapy has been rarely used for the metastatic lesion of the other sites. We report a case of neck metastasis from a uterine leiomyosarcoma, which developed 10 months after surgery and postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. It also involved the parapharyngeal space, adjacent spine, and spinal canal. The metastatic neck mass was inoperable, and was treated by neck radiotherapy (6,000 cGy) and chemotherapy including taxol and carboplatin. The mass has regressed progressively to a nearly impalpable state. She has never developed spinal cord compression syndrome, and has maintained good swallowing for eight months since the neck radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Since the extensive metastatic neck mass showed good local response to high dose radiotherapy and chemotherapy, both treatments may be considered for an unresectable metastatic leiomyosarcoma

  1. Preoperative embolization in the treatment of vascular metastatic lesions of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellad, F.E.; Nourmohammadi, N.; Numaguchi, Y.; Sadato, H.; Levine, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Preoperative embolization of metastatic renal and thyroid carcinomas of the spine is an adjuvant technique that decreases significantly the intraoperative blood loss and resultant morbidity. This paper reports on twenty-one patients with spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic renal and thyroid disease who underwent preoperative spinal arteriography for embolization. Sixteen patients were embolized, two patients twice for recurrent tumor. None of the patients developed postangiographic or embolization complications. The procedures were performed with a digital subtraction technique. Gelfoam particles or lvalon powder was used. If Gelfoam is the embolic material used, surgery should be performed within 24 hours to prevent recanalization

  2. Traumatic Supra- and Infra-tentorial Extradural Hematoma: Case Series and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Yunus Kuntawi; Apriawan, Tedy; Bajamal, Abdul Hafid

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic supra- and infra-tentorial extradural hematoma (TSIEDH) is a rare lesion constituting <2% of all extradural hematomas. There are only a few published articles about TSIEDH. This study included three patients with TSIEDH who were treated and operated at Dr. Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia, from August 2015 to July 2016. Two patients sustained injuries in traffic accidents and one patient was injured by fall. The male to female ratio was 1:2. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≤8 was present in one and GCS score of 9–12 was present in two patients. The brain computed tomography scan verified linear fracture of occipital bone in one and linear fracture of occipital bone with lambdoid suture separation in two patients. Early diagnosis and early surgical intervention of TSIEDH are imperative because the deterioration of TSIEDH is sudden and quick. We presented our experience in treating patients with TSIEDH in Dr. Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia. PMID:29682059

  3. Surgical management of prostate cancer metastatic to the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian J; Fox, Benjamin D; Sciubba, Daniel M; Suki, Dima; Tu, Shi Ming; Kuban, Deborah; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Rhines, Laurence D; Rao, Ganesh

    2009-05-01

    Significant improvements in neurological function and pain relief are the benefits of aggressive surgical management of spinal metastatic disease. However, there is limited literature regarding the management of tumors with specific histological features. In this study, a series of patients undergoing spinal surgery for metastatic prostate cancer were reviewed to identify predictors of survival and functional outcome. The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who were treated with surgery for prostate cancer metastases to the spine between 1993 and 2005 at a single institution. Particular attention was given to initial presentation, operative management, clinical and neurological outcomes, and factors associated with complications and overall survival. Forty-four patients underwent a total of 47 procedures. The median age at spinal metastasis was 66 years (range 50-84 years). Twenty-four patients had received previous external-beam radiation to the site of spinal involvement, with a median dose of 70 Gy (range 30-74 Gy). Frankel scores on discharge were significantly improved when compared with preoperative scores (p = 0.001). Preoperatively, 32 patients (73%) were walking and 33 (75%) were continent. On discharge, 36 (86%) of 42 patients were walking, and 37 (88%) of 42 were continent. Preoperatively, 40 patients (91%) were taking narcotics, with a median morphine equivalent dose of 21.5 mg/day, and 28 patients (64%) were taking steroids, with a median dose of 16 mg/day. At discharge, the median postoperative morphine equivalent dose was 12 mg/day, and the median steroid dose was 0 mg/day (p or = 65 years at the time of surgery was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (p = 0.005). In selected patients with prostate cancer metastases to the spine, aggressive surgical decompression and spinal reconstruction is a useful treatment option. The results show that on average, neurological outcome is improved and use of analgesics

  4. Continuous thoracic extradural 0.5% bupivacaine with or without morphine: effect on quality of blockade, lung function and the surgical stress response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, N B; Mogensen, T; Bigler, D

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-two patients undergoing upper abdominal surgery were entered into a randomized, double-blind study to receive extradural (T7-T8) 0.5% bupivacaine 9 ml followed by 25 mg h-1 with or without additional extradural morphine (bolus 4 mg plus 0.5 mg h-1), for 16 h after operation. Addition...

  5. Traumatic extradural haematomas in children: Experience with 62 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazza, C.; Pasqualin, A.; Feriotti, G.; Da Pian, R.

    1982-01-01

    Sixty-two children with traumatic extradural haematomas are considered. According to the clinical history presented - often atypical - and to the grade of neurological impairment, patients have divided into different clinical groups. Nearly 50% of patients sustained a minor injury, and 26% did not lose consciousness after trauma. Twenty-four per cent of patients did not show fractures on skull X-rays. Atypical location of haematoma was noted in 22 cases, mainly in the anterior fossa (19 cases). Sixty patients were operated on, while two patients were conservatively treated, owing to the limited size of the haematoamas and to the absence of neurological deficits. Associated brain lesions were discovered at surgery in 40% of cases. The overall mortality rate has been 17%, the operative mortality rate 14%. The morbidity rate has been 6%, with 3% of patients presenting severe disability. Morbidity and mortality have been shown to be affected by age - with better prognosis in patients under 10 years of age, by the clinical history presented, by the preoperative conditions, and, mainly, by the presence of a associated brain lesions. As regards location, frontal haematomas have shown a better prognosis and a slower course than convexity haematomas. Finally, prognosis of extradural haematomas in children has improved to some extent in the last years with the advent of the CT scan, possibly due to speed and accuracy of diagnosis. (Author)

  6. Spinal conduction block by intrathecal ketamine in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, H; Dohi, S; Tanahashi, T; Watanabe, Y; Takenaka, M

    1997-07-01

    In addition to its use for intravenous (I.V.) anesthesia, ketamine can provide pain relief in humans when administered spinally. To elucidate the mechanisms of intrathecal (I.T.) ketamine analgesia, we observed differences in the effects of I.V. and I.T. ketamine on intraspinal evoked potentials (ISEPs) in 28 dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital. Bipolar extradural electrodes were inserted at the cervical and lumbar regions of the spinal cord for recording descending ISEPs represented by the two negative deflections, Waves I and II. I.V. ketamine 2 and 10 mg/ kg did not affect the amplitude and latency of Wave I, whereas the large dose (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the amplitude but not the latency of Wave II. I.T. ketamine 1 and 5 mg/kg caused significant dose-dependent decreases in both Wave I and II amplitudes and prolongations of both Wave I and II latencies. These I.T. effects on ISEPs are consistent with previous in vitro observations that ketamine blocks axonal conduction. We conclude that axonal conduction block may contribute to the analgesic mechanism of I.T. ketamine.

  7. Leakage detection on CT myelography for targeted epidural blood patch in spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: calcified or ossified spinal lesions ventral to the thecal sac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Takai, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe significant CT myelography findings for determination of the leak site and outcome of targeted epidural blood patch (EBP) in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks. During 2005-2013, spontaneous CSF leaks were diagnosed for 12 patients with orthostatic headaches. The patients received targeted EBP on the basis of CT myelography assessments. Computed tomography myelograms revealed ventral extradural collection of contrast medium distributed over multiple spinal levels (average 16 levels). Intraforaminal contrast medium extravasations were observed at multiple spinal levels (average 8.2 levels). For 8 (67%) of 12 patients, spinal lesions were noted around the thecal sac and included calcified discs with osteophytes, an ossified posterior longitudinal ligament, and an ossified yellow ligament; lesions were mostly located ventral to the thecal sac and were in close contact with the dura mater. The levels of these spinal lesions were considered potential leak sites and were targeted for EBP. For the remaining 4 patients who did not have definite spinal lesions around the thecal sac, leak site determination was based primarily on the contrast gradient hypothesis. The authors hypothesized that the concentration of extradural contrast medium would be the greatest and the same as that of intradural contrast medium at the leak site but that it would decrease with increased distance from the leak site according to the contrast gradient. Epidural blood patch was placed at the level of spinal lesions and/or of the greatest and same concentration of contrast medium between the intradural and extradural spaces. For 10 of the 12 patients, the orthostatic headaches decreased significantly within a week of EBP and disappeared within a month. For the remaining 2 patients, headaches persisted and medical treatment was required for several months. For 3 patients, thick chronic subdural hematomas caused severe headaches and/or disturbed

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Mariko; Sekiya, Toru; Harada, Junta; Kawakami, Kenji; Tada, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two patients were examined to determine the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the spinal disease. Using different pulse sequences T 1 value was obtained from 38 spines; the result showed that increased T 1 value indicated spinal marrow abnormalities. A comparative study of MRI and bone scintigraphy was performed in 18 patients. Although it was not feasible to evaluate effect of therapy in metastatic disease by MRI, diffuse bone marrow disease, such as diffuse bone marrow metastases and blood dyscrasia could be detected by MRI. This limited study will suggest applicability of MRI in the spinal disease. (author)

  9. Primary vertebral and spinal epidural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukobza, M.; Mazel, C.; Touboul, E.

    1996-01-01

    We examined eight patients with primary spinal epidural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting with spinal cord compression and proven histologically after laminectomy (7 cases) or biopsy (1 case) by MRI. The most common findings were an isointense or low signal relative to the spinal cord on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and high signal on T2-weighted images (T2WI). Spinal cord compression, vertebral bone marrow and paravertebral extension were assessed. Contrast enhancement was intense in seven of the eight cases and homogeneous in all of them. T2WI (performed in 2 cases) may be useful to distinguish metastatic carcinomas and sarcomas. T1WI demonstrated the full extent of the epidural lesion, which was well-delineated in all cases. When the paravertebral extension is not well-defined, a study with contrast medium should be performed. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Comparisons of MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Lee, Kil Woo; Kang, Ik Won; Yun, Ku Sub; Choi, Chul Sun; Bae, Sang Hoon

    1994-01-01

    MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the tuberculosis are well known, but sometimes it might be difficult to differentiate these lesions. Therefore we reviewed and analyzed the MR findings which would be useful for the differentiation. T1- and T2- weighted spin echo images and gadolinium-enhanced T1- weighted images were obtained with 1.5 T and 1.0 T superconductive MR imager. We reviewed MR findings in 16 cases of spinal metastases and 24 cases of spinal tuberculosis in terms of signal intensity, contrast enhancement pattern, disc space involvement, spinal canal compressing feature and paraspinal soft tissue mass. The signal intensities of both lesions were hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI except those of the metastatic lesions from the prostatic carcinoma. Heterogeneous enhancement was noted in 63% of metastasis, whereas peripheral rim enhancement was noted 83% of spinal tuberculosis(p < .001). Spinal canal compression by collapsed vertebra was only noted in spinal metastasis, and that by paraspinal soft tissue was noted in both spinal metastasis and tuberculosis(p<.001). Disc space invasion was noted in 19% of spinal metastasis and 88% of spinal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis was common at lower thoracic spine(T10) and typically involved two or more adjacent vertebral bodies(96%). The important differential point between spinal metastasis and tuberculosis was the enhancement pattern, involvement of two or more contiguous vertebral bodies and the feature of spinal canal compressing. The secondary importance was the disc space involvement pattern

  11. [Extradural temporopolar approach for surgical management of paraclinoid lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Kumagai, Kohsuke; Ueno, Hideaki; Osada, Hideo; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro

    2014-10-01

    Surgical treatment of paraclinoid tumors adjacent to important anatomical structures, such as the optic nerve, optic chiasm, pituitary stalk, and internal carotid artery, should emphasize maximum resection and preservation of visual function. Thus, early localization and exposure of the optic nerve, and complete mobilization and decompression of the optic nerve and internal carotid artery, are necessary in order to prevent intraoperative neurovascular injuries. However, this technique requires wide exposure of the optic-carotid space through the interpeduncular cistern. We have developed an extradural temporopolar approach for resection of paraclinoid tumors, which can also allow early devascularization of arteries that feed the tumors. We evaluated the surgical outcomes of this approach, paying special attention to clinical and visual outcomes. Thirteen patients(4 men, 9 women;24-78 years, mean age 54 years), underwent tumor removal using an extradural temporopolar approach between March 2000 and April 2013. We retrospectively reviewed medical charts, radiological findings, intensive care unit flow sheets, and surgical records. Histological diagnoses included craniopharyngioma(4 cases), pituitary adenoma(3 cases), medial sphenoid ridge meningioma(2 cases), tuberculum sellae meningioma(2 cases), trigeminal neurinoma(1 case), and malignant epidermoid(1 case). Tumors were 1.5-6.0cm in length(mean 3.2cm). Tumors were cystic in all 4 craniopharyngiomas and solid in the other 9 cases. Preoperative neurological deficits included visual disturbance in 10 patients, double vision caused by oculomotor nerve palsy in 2 patients, and vertigo in 1 patient. Additional orbitozygomatic craniotomies were performed in 8 patients. Total tumor removal was performed in 7 patients and subtotal removal performed in 6. The pituitary stalk was microscopically preserved in all patients. Postoperative complications included transient diabetes insipidus in 2 patients, chronic subdural

  12. Unpredictability of regression of analgesia during the continuous postoperative extradural infusion of bupivacaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Hjortsø, N C; Bigler, D

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four otherwise healthy patients scheduled for elective major abdominal surgery received general anaesthesia plus lumbar extradural analgesia. A loading dose of 0.5% plain bupivacaine was given to produce sensory analgesia (pin prick) from T4 to S5 and followed by a continuous infusion of 0...

  13. Vertebral compression fractures after spine irradiation using conventional fractionation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ree, Woo Joong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Chang, Jee Suk; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Seo Hee; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the risk of vertebral compression fracture (VCF) after conventional radiotherapy (RT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) with spine metastasis and to identify risk factors for VCF in metastatic and non-metastatic irradiated spines. We retrospectively reviewed 68 spinal segments in 16 patients who received conventional RT between 2009 and 2012. Fracture was defined as a newly developed VCF or progression of an existing fracture. The target volume included all metastatic spinal segments and one additional non-metastatic vertebra adjacent to the tumor-involved spines. The median follow-up was 7.8 months. Among all 68 spinal segments, there were six fracture events (8.8%) including three new VCFs and three fracture progressions. Observed VCF rates in vertebral segments with prior irradiation or pre-existing compression fracture were 30.0% and 75.0% respectively, compared with 5.2% and 4.7% for segments without prior irradiation or pre-existing compression fracture, respectively (both p < 0.05). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.8% (95% CI, 78.2-97.4). On multivariate analysis, prior irradiation (HR, 7.30; 95% CI, 1.31-40.86) and pre-existing compression fracture (HR, 18.45; 95% CI, 3.42-99.52) were independent risk factors for VCF. The incidence of VCF following conventional RT to the spine is not particularly high, regardless of metastatic tumor involvement. Spines that received irradiation and/or have pre-existing compression fracture before RT have an increased risk of VCF and require close observation.

  14. Radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in very elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Hoskin, Peter J.; Karstens, Johann H.; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Owing to the aging of the population, the proportion of elderly patients receiving cancer treatment has increased. This study investigated the results of radiotherapy (RT) for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in the very elderly, because few data are available for these patients. Methods and Materials: The data from 308 patients aged ≥75 years who received short-course (treatment time 1-5 days) or long-course RT (2-4 weeks) for MSCC were retrospectively analyzed for functional outcome, local control, and survival. Furthermore, nine potential prognostic factors were investigated: gender, performance status, interval from tumor diagnosis to MSCC, tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone or visceral metastases, ambulatory status, and speed at which motor deficits developed. Results: Improvement of motor deficits occurred in 25% of patients, with no further progression of MSCC in an additional 59%. The 1-year local control and survival rate was 92% and 43%, respectively. Improved functional outcomes were associated with ambulatory status and slower developing motor deficits. Improved local control resulted from long-course RT. Improved survival was associated with a longer interval from tumor diagnosis to MSCC, tumor type (breast/prostate cancer, myeloma/lymphoma), lack of visceral or other bone metastases, ambulatory status, and a slower development of motor deficits. Conclusion: Short- and long-course RT are similarly effective in patients aged ≥75 years regarding functional outcome and survival. Long-course RT provided better local control. Patients with better expected survival should receive long-course RT and others short-course RT. The criteria for selection of an appropriate regimen for MSCC in very elderly patients should be the same as for younger individuals

  15. MRI and neurological findings in patients with spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Switlyk, M.D.; Hole, K.H.; Knutstad, K.; Skjeldal, S.; Zaikova, O.; Hald, J.K.; Seierstad, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the recommended primary investigation method for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Initiating treatment before the development of motor deficits is essential to preserve neurological function. However, the relationship between MRI-assessed grades of spinal metastatic disease and neurological status has not been widely investigated. Purpose. To analyze the association between neurological function and MRI-based assessment of the extent of spinal metastases using two different grading systems. Material and Methods. A total of 284 patients admitted to our institution for initial radiotherapy or surgery for symptomatic spinal metastases were included in the study. Motor and sensory deficits were categorized according to the Frankel classification system. Pre-treatment MRI evaluations of the entire spine were scored for the extent of spinal metastases, presence and severity of spinal cord compression, and nerve root compression. Two MRI-based scales were used to evaluate the degree of cord compression and spinal canal narrowing and relate these findings to neurological function. Results. Of the patients included in the study, 28 were non-ambulatory, 49 were ambulatory with minor motor deficits, and 207 had normal motor function. Spinal cord compression was present in all patients with Frankel scores of B or C, 23 of 35 patients with a Frankel score of D (66%), and 48 of 152 patients with a Frankel score of E (32%). The percentage of patients with severe spinal canal narrowing increased with increasing Frankel grades. The grading according to the scales showed a significant association with the symptoms according to the Frankel scale (P < 0.001). Conclusion. In patients with neurological dysfunction, the presence and severity of impairment was associated with the epidural tumor burden. A significant number of patients had radiological spinal cord compression and normal motor function (occult MSCC)

  16. Bilateral cortical atrophy after severe brain trauma and extradural homatoma Atrofia cortical bilateral após traumatismo cranioencefálico grave e hematoma extradural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Louzada

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a severe head injured 43-year old male patient with a large extradural hematoma, Glasgow Coma Scale 3 and dilated fixed pupils. Patient was promptly submitted to surgical evacuation of the lesion, but remained in persistent vegetative state in the post-operative time. Head computed tomography scans performed before surgery, and at early and late post-operative periods comparatively revealed extreme bilateral cortical atrophy. Late consequences of severe head trauma drastically affect the prognosis of patients, being its prevention, and neuroprotection against secondary injury still a therapeutical challenge for neurosurgeons.Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 43 anos, com traumatismo cranioencefálico grave, com grande hematoma extradural, Escala de Coma de Glasgow 3 e pupilas fixas e dilatadas. O paciente foi prontamente submetido à evacuação cirúrgica da lesão mas permaneceu em estado vegetativo persistente no período pós-operatório. As TC de crânio realizadas antes da cirurgia e nos períodos pós-operatórios precoce e tardio revelaram comparativamente extrema atrofia cerebral bilateral. As conseqüências tardias do traumatismo craniano grave afetam drasticamente o prognóstico dos pacientes, sendo sua prevenção, e a neuroproteção contra a injúria secundária ainda um desafio terapêutico para os neurocirurgiões.

  17. The internal vertebral venous plexus prevents compression of the dural sac during atlanto-axial rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reesink, E.M.; Lataster, L.M.A.; Mameren, H. van [Dept. of Anatomy/Embryology, Maastricht Univ. (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Kingma, H. [Dept. of ENT, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2001-10-01

    Deformation of the extradural space and the possibility of impression upon the dural sac during atlanto-axial rotation are investigated. Atlanto-axial rotation leads to a reduction in the cross-sectional area of the bony spinal canal of approximately 40 %. Atlanto-axial rotation was recorded by endocanalar views from a video camera fixed inside the skull of six unembalmed cadavers. Axial thin-section T1-weighted MRI slice sets were acquired from three volunteers (mid-position and maximal left and right rotation of the head and cervical spine). The axial cross-sectional areas of the bony spinal canal, dural sac and spinal cord were measured. In two other persons post-gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI volume scans with fat-suppression prepulse were acquired (mid-position and rotation) to determine venous contents of the extradural space. The 50:50 ratio between left and right extradural halves in mid-position changed to an ipsilateral:contralateral ratio of 20:80 in maximum rotation at the level just above the lateral C1-C2 joints. Directly below these joints the opposite occurred. The post-contrast studies showed an enhancing internal vertebral venous plexus (IVVP), which almost completely occupied the extradural space at the atlanto-axial level. This could not be shown in the cadaver experiments, because of absence of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. During atlanto-axial rotation blood displacement in the IVVP allows major deformations of the extradural space. This prevents dural sac impression. (orig.)

  18. Polymer Nanoparticle-Based Chemotherapy for Spinal Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyun Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant spinal tumors, categorized into primary and metastatic ones, are one of the most serious diseases due to their high morbidity and mortality rates. Common primary spinal tumors include chordoma, chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, and multiple myeloma. Spinal malignancies are not only locally invasive and destructive to adjacent structures, such as bone, neural, and vascular structures, but also disruptive to distant organs (e.g., lung. Current treatments for spinal malignancies, including wide resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, have made significant progress like improving patients’ quality of life. Among them, chemotherapy plays an important role, but its potential for clinical application is limited by severe side effects and drug resistance. To ameliorate the current situation, various polymer nanoparticles have been developed as promising excipients to facilitate the effective treatment of spinal malignancies by utilizing their potent advantages, for example, targeting, stimuli response, and synergetic effect. This review overviews the development of polymer nanoparticles for antineoplastic delivery in the treatment of spinal malignancies and discusses future prospects of polymer nanoparticle-based treatment methods.

  19. Postoperative re-irradiation using stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kei; Nihei, Keiji; Shimizuguchi, Takuya; Ogawa, Hiroaki; Furuya, Tomohisa; Sugita, Shurei; Hozumi, Takahiro; Keisuke Sasai; Karasawa, Katsuyuki

    2018-06-15

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to clarify the outcomes of postoperative re-irradiation using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) in the authors' institution and to identify factors correlated with local control. METHODS Cases in which patients with previously irradiated MESCC underwent decompression surgery followed by spine SBRT as re-irradiation between April 2013 and May 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical procedures were mainly performed by the posterior approach and included decompression and fixation. The prescribed dose for spine SBRT was 24 Gy in 2 fractions. The primary outcome was local control, which was defined as elimination, shrinkage, or no change of the tumor on CT or MRI obtained approximately every 3 months after SBRT. In addition, various patient-, treatment-, and tumor-specific factors were evaluated to determine their predictive value for local control. RESULTS Twenty-eight cases were identified in the authors' institutional databases as meeting the inclusion criteria. The histology of the primary disease was thyroid cancer in 7 cases, lung cancer in 6, renal cancer in 3, colorectal cancer in 3, and other cancers in 9. The most common previous radiation dose was 30 Gy in 10 fractions (15 cases). The mean interval since the most recent irradiation was 16 months (range 5-132 months). The median duration of follow-up after SBRT was 13 months (range 4-38 months). The 1-year local control rate was 70%. In the analysis of factors related to local control, Bilsky grade, number of vertebral levels in the treatment target, the interval between the latest radiotherapy and SBRT, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA), the prognostic index for spinal metastases (PRISM), and the revised Tokuhashi score were not significantly correlated with local control. The favorable group classified by the Rades prognostic score achieved a significantly higher 1-year local control rate than the unfavorable

  20. Cisto aracnóideo extradural do canal espinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Pires Ferreira

    1972-09-01

    Full Text Available É relatado o caso de um paciente que apresentava paraparesia sensitivo-motora evolutiva, datando de um ano. As radiográficas da coluna vertebral e mielografia permitiram o diagnóstico de cisto de aracnóide extradural do canal espinal de localização torácica, que foi confirmado pelo ato cirúrgico. Os autores revisam a literatura assinalando 76 casos já publicados. São comentadas a incidência do processo patológico nos diversos grupos etários, sua localização ao longo do canal raqueano, a evolução do quadro clínico, a etiología e a fisiopatologia do crescimento do cisto, o diagnóstico, a terapêutica e o prognóstico.

  1. Evaluation of intradural stimulation efficiency and selectivity in a computational model of spinal cord stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Howell

    Full Text Available Spinal cord stimulation (SCS is an alternative or adjunct therapy to treat chronic pain, a prevalent and clinically challenging condition. Although SCS has substantial clinical success, the therapy is still prone to failures, including lead breakage, lead migration, and poor pain relief. The goal of this study was to develop a computational model of SCS and use the model to compare activation of neural elements during intradural and extradural electrode placement. We constructed five patient-specific models of SCS. Stimulation thresholds predicted by the model were compared to stimulation thresholds measured intraoperatively, and we used these models to quantify the efficiency and selectivity of intradural and extradural SCS. Intradural placement dramatically increased stimulation efficiency and reduced the power required to stimulate the dorsal columns by more than 90%. Intradural placement also increased selectivity, allowing activation of a greater proportion of dorsal column fibers before spread of activation to dorsal root fibers, as well as more selective activation of individual dermatomes at different lateral deviations from the midline. Further, the results suggest that current electrode designs used for extradural SCS are not optimal for intradural SCS, and a novel azimuthal tripolar design increased stimulation selectivity, even beyond that achieved with an intradural paddle array. Increased stimulation efficiency is expected to increase the battery life of implantable pulse generators, increase the recharge interval of rechargeable implantable pulse generators, and potentially reduce stimulator volume. The greater selectivity of intradural stimulation may improve the success rate of SCS by mitigating the sensitivity of pain relief to malpositioning of the electrode. The outcome of this effort is a better quantitative understanding of how intradural electrode placement can potentially increase the selectivity and efficiency of SCS

  2. Defining spinal instability and methods of classification to optimise care for patients with malignant spinal cord compression: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehan, C.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Malignant Spinal Cord Compression (MSCC) is thought to be increasing in the UK due to an aging population and improving cancer survivorship. The impact of such a diagnosis requires emergency treatment. In 2008 the National Institute of Clinical Excellence produced guidelines on the management of MSCC which includes a recommendation to assess spinal instability. However, a lack of guidelines to assess spinal instability in oncology patients is widely acknowledged. This can result in variations in the management of care for such patients. A spinal instability assessment can influence optimum patient care (bed rest or encouraged mobilisation) and inform the best definitive treatment modality (surgery or radiotherapy) for an individual patient. The aim of this systematic review is to attempt to identify a consensus definition of spinal instability and methods by which it can be classified. - Highlights: • A lack of guidance on metastatic spinal instability results in variations of care. • Definitions and assessments for spinal instability are explored in this review. • A Spinal Instability Neoplastic Scoring (SINS) system has been identified. • SINS could potentially be adopted to optimise and standardise patient care.

  3. Spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis: A rareness in a young adult with thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Shehab; Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Kohla, Samah; Soliman, Dina; Khirfan, Diala; Tambuerello, Adriana; Talaat, Mohamed; Nashwan, Abdulqadir; Caparrotti, Palmira; Yassin, Mohamed A

    2017-08-23

    We report a case of a thalassemia major male patient with back pain associated to severe weakness in lower extremities resulting in the ability to ambulate only with assistance. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of  thoracic and lumbosacral spine was requested. A posterior intraspinal extradural mass lesion compressing the spinal cord at the level of thoracic T5-8 was present, suggesting an extramedullary hematopoietic centre, compressing the spinal cord. He was treated successfully with thalassemia major alone. The patient was treated with blood transfusion, dexamethasone, morphine and paracetamol, followed by radiotherapy in 10 fractions to the spine (daily fraction of 2Gy from T3 to T9, total dose 20 Gy). His pain and neurologic examination quickly improved. A new MRI of the spine, one week after radiotherapy, showed an improvement of the extramedullary hematopoietic mass compression. In conclusion, EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis and spinal cord symptoms. MRI is the most effective method of demonstrating EMH. The rapid recognition and treatment can dramatically alleviate symptoms. There is still considerable controversy regarding indications, benefits, and risks of each of modality of treatment due to the infrequency of this disorder.

  4. Hypodense bubbles in acute extradural haematomas following venous sinus tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chee, C.P.; Habib, Z.A.

    1991-01-01

    Between January 1982 and December 1989, 12 patients with 13 acute extradural haematomas as a result of injury involving the venous sinuses were treated by the first author. The CT scan apperances in 6 cases were remarkable in that there were large bubbles of low density in the hyperdense haematomas and liquid blood was found during the operation. The possible underlying pathophysiological changes that gave rise this appearance are discussed. The CT scan appearance and the proximity of the clot to the venous sinuses should alert the neurosurgeon to the high probabilities of venous sinus tear such that proper treatment can be offered. (orig.)

  5. Hypodense bubbles in acute extradural haematomas following venous sinus tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chee, C.P.; Habib, Z.A. (Malaya Univ. Hospital, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Neurosurgical and Radiological Services)

    1991-04-01

    Between January 1982 and December 1989, 12 patients with 13 acute extradural haematomas as a result of injury involving the venous sinuses were treated by the first author. The CT scan apperances in 6 cases were remarkable in that there were large bubbles of low density in the hyperdense haematomas and liquid blood was found during the operation. The possible underlying pathophysiological changes that gave rise this appearance are discussed. The CT scan appearance and the proximity of the clot to the venous sinuses should alert the neurosurgeon to the high probabilities of venous sinus tear such that proper treatment can be offered. (orig.).

  6. Metastatic disease of the spine: MR evaluation with Gd-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, G.; Abramson, A.; Krol, G.; Zimmerman, R.D.; Deck, M.D.F.

    1987-01-01

    Gd-DTPA was used in the MR evaluation of 22 patients with metastatic disease of the spine. Ten patients had epidural lesions; ten patients had intradural extramedullary spread of tumor; two patients had intramedullary metastases. A 1.5-T superconductive magnet with surface coils was used to obtain 3- or 5-mm sagittal and axial sections of the spine. All patients also received myelography and postmyelographic CT. Gd-DTPA was very sensitive to intradural extramedullary disease. Both nodular metastases and nerve root thickening enhanced. Lesions often poorly defined or not visible at all without contrast were easily seen after administration of gadolinium. Gadolinium was also of benefit in patients with intramedullary metastases. Although abnormalities of cord contour and signal were present in noncontrast studies, the region of enhancement was more localized and focal, suggesting that much of the cord enlargement was due to edema. In patients with extradural disease, gadolinium proved to be useful in selected cases. Generally, epidural tumor extension was visible without contrast. In specific cases, administration of gadolinium was beneficial, for example in localizing regions of tumor for biopsy or in distinguishing possible herniated nucleus pulposus from epidural disease. In conclusion, gadolinium is of significant benefit in intradural extramedullary disease. Metastatic lesions of the cord itself may also be more fully evaluated with contrast scans. However, epidural disease will probably prove to be adequately studied without contrast, although gadolinium may be of use in selected applications

  7. Preoperative embolization in surgical treatment of spinal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Caroline; Dahl, Benny; Frevert, Susanne Christiansen

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess whether preoperative transcatheter arterial embolization of spinal metastases reduces blood loss, the need for transfusion with allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs), and surgery time in the surgical treatment of patients with symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression. MATERIALS......L) versus 902 mL (SD, 416 mL). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative embolization in patients with symptomatic spinal metastasis independent of primary tumor diagnosis did not reduce intraoperative blood loss and allogeneic RBC transfusion significantly but did reduce the surgery time. A small reduction...... instrumentation and randomly assigned to either preoperative embolization (n = 23) or a control group (n = 22). The primary outcome was intraoperative blood loss. Secondary outcomes were perioperative blood loss, allogeneic RBC transfusion, and surgery time. Analyses were performed by intention-to-treat. RESULTS...

  8. Prognostic factors in metastatic spinal cord compression: a prospective study using multivariate analysis of variables influencing survival and gait function in 153 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helweg-Larsen, Susanne; Soerensen, Per Soelberg; Kreiner, Svend

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Based on a very large patient cohort followed prospectively for at least a year or until death, we analyzed the prognostic significance of various clinical and radiological variables on posttreatment ambulatory function and survival. Methods and Materials: During a 3((1)/(2))-year period we prospectively included 153 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of spinal cord compression due to metastatic disease. The patients were followed with regular neurological examinations by the same neurologist for a minimum period of 11 months or until death. The prognostic significance of five variables on gait function and survival time after treatment was analyzed. Results: The type of the primary tumor had a direct influence on the interval between the diagnosis of the primary malignancy and the occurrence of spinal cord compression (p < 0.0005), and on the ambulatory function at time of diagnosis (p = 0.016). There was a clear correlation between the degree of myelographic blockage and gait function (p = 0.000) and between gait function and sensory disturbances (p = 0.000). The final gait was dependent on the gait function at time of diagnosis (p < 0.0005). Survival time after diagnosis depended directly on the time from primary tumor diagnosis until spinal cord compression (p = 0.002), on the ambulatory function at the time of diagnosis (p = 0.018), and on the ambulatory function after treatment. Conclusions: The pretreatment ambulatory function is the main determinant for posttreatment gait function. Survival time is rather short, especially in nonambulatory patients, and can only be improved by restoration of gait function in nonambulatory patients by immediate treatment

  9. [Relationship of motor deficits and imaging features in metastatic epidural spinal cord compression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Bin; Liu, Yao-Sheng; Li, Ding-Feng; Fan, Hai-Tao; Huai, Jian-Ye; Guo, Jun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Ping; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, Wei-Hao; Cao, Yun-Cen; Jiang, Ning; Sui, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Jiu

    2010-06-15

    To explore the relationship of motor deficits of the lower extremities with the imaging features of malignant spinal cord compression (MESCCs). From July 2006 through December 2008, 56 successive MESCC patients were treated at our department. All were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and were scored according to motor deficits Frankel grading on admission. Imaging assessment factors of main involved vertebrae were level of vertebral metastatic location, epidural space involvement, vertebral body involvement, lamina involvement, posterior protrusion of posterior wall, pedicle involvement, continuity of main involved vertebrae, fracture of anterior column, fracture of posterior wall, location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction. Occurrence was the same between paralytic state of MESCCs and epidural space involvement of imaging features. Multiple regression equation showed that paralytic state had a linear regression relationship with imaging factors of lamina involvement (X1), posterior protrusion of posterior wall (X2), location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction (X7) of main involved vertebrae. The optimal regression equation of paralytic state (Y) and imaging feature (X) was Y = -0.009 +0.639X, + 0.149X, +0.282X. Lamina involvement of main involved vertebrae has a greatest influence upon paralytic state of MESCC patients. Imaging factors of lamina involvement, posterior protrusion of posterior wall, location in upper thoracic spine and/or cervicothoracic junction of main involved vertebrae can predict the paralytic state of MESCC patients. MESCC with lamina involvement is more easily encroached on epidural space.

  10. An audit of current practice and management of metastatic spinal cord compression at a regional cancer centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sui, J

    2012-02-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an oncological emergency requiring prompt recognition and management to preserve neurological function and mobility. We performed an audit to assess current practice of MSCC against current best practice as outlined by NICE. Our retrospective audit identified 10 patients from January to December 2009 with confirmed MSCC. The most common primary tumours were prostate 3 (30%), breast 3 (30%) and lung 2 (20%). Pain was the main presenting symptom 9 (90%), followed by weakness 7 (70%) and sensory changes 1 (10%). 5 (50%) had MRI within 24 hours and only 6 (60%) underwent full MRI scan. 8 (80%) had corticosteroids before MRI scan. 6 (60%) received radiotherapy within 24 hours. Only 4 (40%) were referred to orthopaedics and none of these patients had been recommended surgery. Up 14 days following radiological confirmation of MSCC, the number of patients who were unable to walk increased by 20%. Only 5 (50%) were discharged during this period of study. Our audit reported a number of variances in management compared to NICE guideline. These can be improved by following a\\'fast track\\' referral pathway and regular education for junior doctors and primary care doctors.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal tumors. A study using a 0.3 T vertical magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming Hua.

    1992-12-01

    A total of 168 patients with spinal tumors were evaluated with MRI. The study shows that MRI is a sensitive method for demonstration of spinal tumors. MRI also provides a possibility to separate different histological types of tumors based on their morphology and signal characteristics. Intramedullary tumors (25 cases): Ependymomas (6 cases) and astrocytomas (7 cases) were most common. Ependymomas have a more irregular signal pattern than astrocytomas. Astrocytomas are more common in the upper spine and are more often completely cystic. Contrast enhancement is important for separation of cyst, edema and solid tumor. Intradural extramedullary tumors (31 cases): Neuromas (14 cases) and meningeomas (11 cases) were most common. Neuromas always had markedly increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Meningeomas were only hyperintense occasionally. Neuromas were more inhomogeneous than meningeomas on T1-weighted images. Contrast enhancement is valuable for delineation of small tumors. Extradural tumors (91 cases): 76 patients had metastases, 7 primary spinal tumors and 8 multiple myelomas. T1-weighted images are almost always superior to other sequences because tumor invasion in the fatty bone marrow is seen as a low signal area in contrast to the high signal from the fat. Spinal lymphomas (14 cases): May be divided into vertebral, paraspinal and epidural tumors. Most cases have all locations. Spinal neurofibromatosis (7 cases): Most patients had multiple, often bilateral neurofibromas. One patient had a meningeomas on one spinal dysplasia with meningoceles. MRI is superior to other modalities for evaluation of the full extent of the disease. The coronal view is often valuable because of the arrangement of the tumors. In addition to providing diagnosis, MRI is of great value in treatment follow-up

  12. Developing an early alert system for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC): Red Flag credit cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnpenney, Jackie; Greenhalgh, Sue; Richards, Lena; Crabtree, Annamaria; Selfe, James

    2015-01-01

    To produce a user-friendly list of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) Red Flags for non-specialist 'generalist' front-line clinicians working in primary-care settings. The issue of identifying MSCC early to prevent serious long-term disability was a key theme identified by the Task and Finish Group at Greater Manchester and Cheshire Cancer Network (GMCCN) in 2009. It was this group who initially brokered and then coordinated the current development as part of their strategic approach to improving care for MSCC patients. A consensus-building approach that considered the essential minimum data requirements to raise the index of suspicion suggestive of MSCC was adopted. This followed a model of cross-boundary working to facilitate the mutual sharing of expertise across a variety of relevant clinical specialisms. A guideline aimed at helping clinicians to identify the early signs and symptoms of MSCC was produced in the form of a credit card. This credit card includes key statements about MSCC, signposting to key sources of additional information and a user-friendly list of Red Flags which has been developed into an eight-item Red Flag mnemonic. To date, an excess of 120,000 cards have been printed by a variety of organisations and the distribution of the cards is ongoing across the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.

  13. Computed tomography in the treatment of cervical spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hideo

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the cervical and thoracic spinal column was carried out in 12 patients of spinal cord tumor. There were 6 schwannomas, 2 metastatic tumors and other 4 cases of different tumors, which were studied by either a General Electric CT/T or a Toshiba TCT 60 Type A scanner. In all patients, CT-examination followed conventional spinal X-ray studies. The usefulness of the plain spinal CT (PCT: CT without any contrast enhancement neither intravenously nor intrathecally) was to detect subtle bony changes as well as paraspinal soft tissue abnormalities, although it was hard to distinguish the spinal cord by PCT. Metrizamide CT myelography (CTM: CT with intrathecal instillation of metrizamide) was indispensable to identify the intracanalicular architecture. It provided the clue to determine the site and the size of tumor, and it was also useful after surgical procedure. CTM with intravenous contrast enhancement (CTM-CE) together with CTM distinguished the spinal tumor from the spinal cord very well, particularly in the cases of schwannoma. The author supports significant reliability of PCT, CTM and CTM-CE in identifying the presence, the extension and the bony involvement of spinal cord tumors. (author)

  14. CT and MRI findings of calcified spinal meningiomas: correlation with pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Hak Jin [Pusan National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea); Pusan National University School of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea); Lee, In Sook [Pusan National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea); Pusan National University School of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea); Pusan National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea); Choi, Kyung-Un [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea); Pusan National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Busan (Korea); Lee, Young Hwan [Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea); Yi, Jae Hyuck [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea); Song, Jong Woon [Inje University Pusan Paik Hospital, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea); Suh, Kyung Jin [Dongguk University Gyungju Hospital, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Department of Radiology, Gyungju (Korea)

    2010-04-15

    This study was designed to present characteristic CT and MR findings of calcified spinal meningiomas that correlate with pathological findings and to assess the efficacy of CT for the detection of calcifications within a mass in comparison to MRI. Between 1998 and 2009, 10 out of 11 patients who had pathologically confirmed psammomatous meningiomas showed gross calcifications on CT images and were included in this study. On CT scans of the 10 patients, the distribution pattern, morphology and number of calcifications within masses were evaluated. MRI was performed in seven patients and signal intensities of masses were assessed. The pathological results analyzed semi-quantitatively were compared with the density or the size of calcifications within a mass as seen on a CT scan. Seven of 10 masses were located at the thoracic spine level. Eight masses had intradural locations. The other two masses had extradural locations. Four masses were completely calcified based on standard radiographs and CT. Symptoms duration, the size of the mass and size or number of calcifications within a mass had no correlation. The location, size, and distribution pattern of calcifications within masses were variable. On MR images, signal intensity of calcified tumor varied on all imaging sequences. All the masses enhanced after injection of intravenous contrast material. A calcified meningioma should be first suggested when extradural or intradural masses located in the spine contain calcifications regardless of the size or pattern as depicted on CT, especially in the presence of enhancement as seen on MR images. (orig.)

  15. Local control and survival in spinal cord compression from lymphoma and myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallington, M.; Mendis, S.; Premawardhana, U.; Sanders, P.; Shahsavar-Haghighi, K.

    1997-01-01

    Background: Between 1979 and 1989, 48 cases of extradural spinal cord and cauda equina compression in patients with lymphoma (24) and myeloma (24) received local radiation therapy for control of cord compression. Twenty five (52%) of the cases were treated by surgical decompression prior to irradiation. Thirty five (73%) of the cases received chemotherapy following the diagnosis of spinal cord compression. Post-treatment outcome was assessed at a minimum follow-up of 24 months to determine the significant clinical and treatment factors following irradiation. Results: Seventeen (71%) of the lymphoma and 15 (63%) of the myeloma patients achieved local control, here defined as improvement to, or maintenance of ambulation with minimal or no assistance for 3 months from the start of radiotherapy. At a median follow-up of 30 (2-98) for the lymphoma and 10 (1-87) months for the myeloma patients, the results showed that survival following local radiation therapy for cord compression was independently influenced by the underlying disease type in favour of lymphoma compared to myeloma (P<0.01). The median duration of local control and survival figures were 23 and 48 months for the lymphomas compared to 4.5 and 10 months for the myeloma cases. Survival was also independently influenced by preservation of sphincter function at initial presentation (P<0.02) and the achievement of local control following treatment (P<0.01). Discussion: We conclude that while disease type independently impacts on outcome following treatment of spinal cord compression in lymphoma and myeloma, within both of these disease type the achievement of local control of spinal cord compression is an important management priority, for without local control survival may be adversely affected

  16. Bone scintigraphy predicts the risk of spinal cord compression in hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerdjbalie-Maikoe, Vidija; Pelger, Rob C.M.; Nijeholt, Guus A.B. Lycklama; Arndt, Jan-Willem; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Bril, Herman; Papapoulos, Socrates E.; Hamdy, Neveen A.T.

    2004-01-01

    In prostate cancer, confirmation of metastatic involvement of the skeleton has traditionally been achieved by bone scintigraphy, although the widespread availability of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements has tended to eliminate the need for this investigation. The potential of bone scintigraphy to predict skeletal-related events, particularly spinal cord compression, after the onset of hormone refractoriness has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether a new method of evaluating bone scintigraphy would offer a better predictive value for this complication of the metastatic process than is achieved with currently available grading methods. We studied 84 patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer who had undergone bone scintigraphy at the time of hormone escape. Tumour grading and parameters of tumour load (PSA and alkaline phosphatase activity) were available in all patients. The incidence of spinal cord compression was documented and all patients were followed up until death. Bone scintigraphy was evaluated by the conventional Soloway grading and by an additional analysis determining total or partial involvement of individual vertebrae. In contrast to the Soloway method, the new method was able to predict spinal cord compression at various spinal levels. Our data suggest that there is still a place for bone scintigraphy in the management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. (orig.)

  17. A New Classification for Pathologies of Spinal Meninges, Part 1: Dural Cysts, Dissections, and Ectasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekamp, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    The clinical significance of pathologies of the spinal dura is often unclear and their management controversial. To classify spinal dural pathologies analogous to vascular aneurysms, present their symptoms and surgical results. Among 1519 patients with spinal space-occupying lesions, 66 patients demonstrated dural pathologies. Neuroradiological and surgical features were reviewed and clinical data analyzed. Saccular dural diverticula (type I, n = 28) caused by defects of both dural layers, dissections between dural layers (type II, n = 29) due to defects of the inner layer, and dural ectasias (type III, n = 9) related to structural changes of the dura were distinguished. For all types, symptoms consisted of local pain followed by signs of radiculopathy or myelopathy, while one patient with dural ectasia presented a low-pressure syndrome and 10 patients with dural dissections additional spinal cord herniation. Type I and type II pathologies required occlusion of their dural defects via extradural (type I) or intradural (type II) approaches. For type III pathologies of the dural sac no surgery was recommended. Favorable results were obtained in all 14 patients with type I and 13 of 15 patients with type II pathologies undergoing surgery. The majority of dural pathologies involving root sleeves remain asymptomatic, while those of the dural sac commonly lead to pain and neurological symptoms. Type I and type II pathologies were treated with good long-term results occluding their dural defects, while ectasias of the dural sac (type III) were managed conservatively. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  18. Unpredictability of regression of analgesia during the continuous postoperative extradural infusion of bupivacaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Hjortsø, N C; Bigler, D

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four otherwise healthy patients scheduled for elective major abdominal surgery received general anaesthesia plus lumbar extradural analgesia. A loading dose of 0.5% plain bupivacaine was given to produce sensory analgesia (pin prick) from T4 to S5 and followed by a continuous infusion of 0.......5% plain bupivacaine 8 ml h-1. Pain, scored on a 5-point scale, and sensory analgesia were assessed hourly for 16 h after skin incision. If sensory analgesia decreased by more than 5 segments from its preoperative level, or if the pain score reached 2 (moderate pain), the patients were removed from...

  19. Spinal meningeal melanocytoma in a 5-year-old child: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah El-Din, Ahmed M; Aboul-Ela, Hashem M; Alsawy, Mohamed F; Koheil, Ahmed; Ashry, Ahmed H

    2018-01-01

    Meningeal melanocytoma is considered a rare lesion arising from leptomeningeal melanocytes. Nearly two thirds of meningeal melanocytomas were reported in the intracranial compartment and the remaining one third in the spine. Spinal melanocytomas can be extradural or intradural, with extradural variant being more common, and the majority of cases have been single reports. A 5-year-old male presented with a 4-month history of non-radiating low back pain persistent at rest, with otherwise non-remarkable medical history. The patient was neurologically intact with no deficits. Preoperatively, routine laboratory investigations were non-remarkable. MRI imaging was done and showed a lesion at the level of T11 to L4, hyperintense on T1 and hypointense on T2 with homogenous contrast enhancement. Intraoperatively, the lesion was hemorrhagic, brownish, and rubbery in consistency attached to the ventral dura. Microscopic picture revealed dense cytoplasmic brown melanin pigments, with no significant mitoses or nuclear atypia. What is unique about our case is the age of the patient (5 years). To the best of our knowledge, after reviewing the literature, this is the youngest case to be reported. SMM is an extremely rare tumor with a benign course. Complete surgical excision should be attempted. Age of presentation may be as young as in our case and the diagnosis of such a tumor should never be excluded in this early age group with persistent low back ache.

  20. Skeletal metastases - the role of the orthopaedic and spinal surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastley, Nicholas; Newey, Martyn; Ashford, Robert U

    2012-09-01

    Developments in oncological and medical therapies mean that life expectancy of patients with metastatic bone disease (MBD) is often measured in years. Complications of MBD may dramatically and irreversibly affect patient quality of life, making the careful assessment and appropriate management of these patients essential. The roles of orthopaedic and spinal surgeons in MBD generally fall into one of four categories: diagnostic, the prophylactic fixation of metastatic deposits at risk of impending fracture (preventative surgery), the stabilisation or reconstruction of bones affected by pathological fractures (reactive surgery), or the decompression and stabilisation of the vertebral column, spinal cord, and nerve roots. Several key principals should be adhered to whenever operating on skeletal metastases. Discussions should be held early with an appropriate multi-disciplinary team prior to intervention. Detailed pre-assessment is essential to gauge a patient's suitability for surgery - recovery from elective surgery must be shorter than the anticipated survival. Staging and biopsies provide prognostic information. Primary bone tumours must be ruled out in the case of a solitary bone lesion to avoid inappropriate intervention. Prophylactic surgical fixation of a lesion prior to a pathological fracture reduces morbidity and length of hospital stay. Regardless of a lesion or pathological fracture's location, all regions of the affected bone must be addressed, to reduce the risk of subsequent fracture. Surgical implants should allow full weight bearing or return to function immediately. Post-operative radiotherapy should be utilised in all cases to minimise disease progression. Spinal surgery should be considered for those with spinal pain due to potentially reversible spinal instability or neurological compromise. The opinion of a spinal surgeon should be sought early, as delays in referral directly correlate to worse functional recovery following intervention

  1. Treatment of pathologic spinal fractures with combined radiofrequency ablation and balloon kyphoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzanakakis George

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In oncologic patients with metastatic spinal disease, the ideal treatment should be well tolerated, relieve the pain, and preserve or restore the neurological function. The combination of fluoroscopic guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA and kyphoplasty may fulfill these criteria. Methods We describe three pathological vertebral fractures treated with a combination of fluoroscopic guided RFA and kyphoplasty in one session: a 62-year-old man suffering from a painful L4 pathological fracture due to a plasmocytoma, a 68-year-old man with a T12 pathological fracture from metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, and a 71-year-old man with a Th12 and L1 pathological fracture from multiple myeloma. Results The choice of patients was carried out according to the classification of Tomita. Visual analog score (VAS and Oswestry disability index (ODI were used for the evaluation of the functional outcomes. The treatment was successful in all patients and no complications were reported. The mean follow-up was 6 months. Marked pain relief and functional restoration was observed. Conclusion In our experience the treatment of pathologic spinal fractures with combined radiofrequency ablation and balloon kyphoplasty is safe and effective for immediate pain relief in painful spinal lesions in neurologically intact patients.

  2. Metastatic neuroblastoma presenting as refusal to use the left upper extremity in a six-year-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Grover

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial neoplasm in children, commonly presenting at an advanced stage. Despite the high prevalence of metastatic disease with neuroblastoma, metastases to the central nervous system are rare and predominantly involve the spinal cord. We present a case of neuroblastoma with metastases to the brain presenting as refusal to move the left arm. The lesion initially appeared to be both a subdural and epidural hematoma on computed tomography of the head, but upon magnetic resonance imaging, was found to represent metastatic neuroblastoma. In pediatric patients with systemic symptoms and neurologic deficits, metastatic disease, such as neuroblastoma, should be included in the differential diagnosis and appropriate imaging should be obtained.

  3. Reliability analysis of the epidural spinal cord compression scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya; Fourney, Daryl R; Groff, Michael; Schmidt, Meic H; Varga, Peter Paul; Vrionis, Frank D; Yamada, Yoshiya; Gerszten, Peter C; Kuklo, Timothy R

    2010-09-01

    The evolution of imaging techniques, along with highly effective radiation options has changed the way metastatic epidural tumors are treated. While high-grade epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC) frequently serves as an indication for surgical decompression, no consensus exists in the literature about the precise definition of this term. The advancement of the treatment paradigms in patients with metastatic tumors for the spine requires a clear grading scheme of ESCC. The degree of ESCC often serves as a major determinant in the decision to operate or irradiate. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of a 6-point, MR imaging-based grading system for ESCC. To determine the reliability of the grading scale, a survey was distributed to 7 spine surgeons who participate in the Spine Oncology Study Group. The MR images of 25 cervical or thoracic spinal tumors were distributed consisting of 1 sagittal image and 3 axial images at the identical level including T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and Gd-enhanced T1-weighted images. The survey was administered 3 times at 2-week intervals. The inter- and intrarater reliability was assessed. The inter- and intrarater reliability ranged from good to excellent when surgeons were asked to rate the degree of spinal cord compression using T2-weighted axial images. The T2-weighted images were superior indicators of ESCC compared with T1-weighted images with and without Gd. The ESCC scale provides a valid and reliable instrument that may be used to describe the degree of ESCC based on T2-weighted MR images. This scale accounts for recent advances in the treatment of spinal metastases and may be used to provide an ESCC classification scheme for multicenter clinical trial and outcome studies.

  4. Advanced MR imaging for the optimal micro neurosurgical planning in patients with the congential spinal meningeal cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvina, J.; Jansone, A.; Krumina, G.; Dzelzite, S.; Platkajis, A.; Ozolins, H.; Dzelzitis, J.

    2001-01-01

    The extramedullar meningeal cysts are congential anomalies of the spinal canal. The neurological manifestation - the syndromes of radicular pain and the dysfunctions of the pelvic organs are indicators for the neurosurgical treatment. The most complete classification of distinguish the different types of these anomalies is the Nabor's classification. The congential anomalies (malformations) are conventionally diagnosed by TC or conventional MR imaging techniques. These methods can't give a precise answer to the Nabor's classification. The new MR sequences offer the possibility to diagnose these anomalies more precisely. Purpose: to create a new MR protocol for a precise topical diagnostic of the meningeal cysts according to the contemporary embriogenetical, neurological and neurosurgical classification. Conclusions: For the optimal topographical visualisation of the congential spinal meningeal cysts MR in 3 orthogonal planes must be performed. The thin slice techniques with the specific parameters for better visualisation of the nerve roots are necessary. The thin slice, fat suppressed MR sequences are very important for the differential diagnosis of the extradural meningeal cysts from the dermoids, para- and infraspinal fat collections. They are very useful in choosing the optimal microneurosurgical way of the surgical treatment. (authors)

  5. Comparison of computed tomography based parametric and patient-specific finite element models of the healthy and metastatic spine using a mesh-morphing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Meaghan Anne; Whyne, Cari Marisa

    2008-08-01

    A comparative analysis of parametric and patient-specific finite element (FE) modeling of spinal motion segments. To develop patient-specific FE models of spinal motion segments using mesh-morphing methods applied to a parametric FE model. To compare strain and displacement patterns in parametric and morphed models for both healthy and metastatically involved vertebrae. Parametric FE models may be limited in their ability to fully represent patient-specific geometries and material property distributions. Generation of multiple patient-specific FE models has been limited because of computational expense. Morphing methods have been successfully used to generate multiple specimen-specific FE models of caudal rat vertebrae. FE models of a healthy and a metastatic T6-T8 spinal motion segment were analyzed with and without patient-specific material properties. Parametric and morphed models were compared using a landmark-based morphing algorithm. Morphing of the parametric FE model and including patient-specific material properties both had a strong impact on magnitudes and patterns of vertebral strain and displacement. Small but important geometric differences can be represented through morphing of parametric FE models. The mesh-morphing algorithm developed provides a rapid method for generating patient-specific FE models of spinal motion segments.

  6. The effect of pre-vertebroplasty tumor ablation using laser-induced thermotherapy on biomechanical stability and cement fill in the metastatic spine

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Henry; Mousavi, Payam; Chin, Lee; Roth, Sandra; Finkelstein, Joel; Vitken, Alex; Whyne, Cari

    2007-01-01

    A biomechanical study comparing simulated lytic vertebral metastases treated with laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and vertebroplasty versus vertebroplasty alone. To investigate the effect of tumor ablation using LITT prior to vertebroplasty on biomechanical stability and cement fill patterns in a standardized model of spinal metastatic disease. Vertebroplasty in the metastatic spine is aimed at reducing pain, but is associated with risk of cement extravasation in up to 10%. Six pairs of fr...

  7. [Eutopic parturition: psychoprophylaxis or extradural analgesia. Influence on the endocrine response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, M S; Iglesias, J; Freire, J; Martín, M L; Marín Santana, A; Cobo, I; García Rendón, A

    1989-01-01

    Prolactin, ACTH, cortisol and HGH levels have been studied on 30 pregnant women in three different periods: during the labour, at the delivery and 24 hours later. They were divided into 3 groups depending on the analgesia: I) no analgesia (n = 10); II) psychoprophylaxis (n = 10), and III) extradural analgesia (n = 10). Prolactin levels increased during delivery and 24 hours later. A significant increase of ACTH levels (p less than 0.01) was observed during the delivery in the 3 groups even though they were under hasal values 24 hours later. Cortisol increased 38% (p less than 0.01) and 52% (p less than 0.02) in II and III groups, respectively during the delivery. No difference was found with HGH. Our results suggest that endocrine response modified by labour and delivery doesn't change with different analgesia techniques.

  8. Histological effects of fibrin glue and synthetic tissue glues on the spinal cord: are they safe to use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, Pratipal; Thom, Maria; Choi, David

    2017-12-01

    Fibrin glues such as Tisseel ® have been established in neurosurgery for over thirty years. They are recommended for extradural use but have intradural applications. Brachial plexus reimplantation after trauma requires intradural fibrin glue because reimplanted nerves cannot be sutured to the spinal cord. Recently synthetic glues have become popular in spinal surgery but there is limited information about their safety. Our study compared the histological effects of Tisseel ® , Adherus ® and BioGlue ® on spinal cord using our rat brachial plexus repair model. Randomised observational animal study. Forty-one Sprague-Dawley rats divided in to control (n = 9), Tisseel ® (n = 8), BioGlue ® (n = 10) and Adherus ® (n = 14) groups. Under general anaesthesia a posterior midline cervical incision was made and hemi-laminectomies performed at C7 and T1. Dura was opened and T1 dorsal root transected and repositioned on the spinal cord. Two drops of Tisseel ® , BioGlue ® , Adherus ® or no glue (control) were applied over the cut nerve and cord. At days 7, 14 and 28 rats were euthanized, processed and sections stained with Haematoxylin & Eosin and evaluated blind by a neuropathologist. Control and Tisseel ® groups showed only mild focal inflammation in the cord. Adherus ® and Bioglue ® groups showed evidence of spinal cord inflammation and degeneration. All BioGlue ® and Adherus ® rats had evidence of distortion of the cord from the glue mass at all time points. Two BioGlue ® -treated and one Adherus ® -treated rat developed a hemiparesis. One BioGlue ® rat developed hind limb paralysis. One BioGlue ® rat failed to wake up at the end of the procedure. There were no complications in control and Tisseel ® groups. Tisseel ® caused a similar inflammatory response to control and may be used on spinal cord. BioGlue ® and Adherus ® should be applied thinly for a watertight dural closure but intradural use and contact with spinal tissue must be

  9. Radiosurgery for metastatic disease at the craniocervical junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Alexander; Yu, Cheng; Chang, Eric L; Kim, Paul E; Rusch, Mairead C; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2014-12-01

    Metastatic disease of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) can cause pain, cranial nerve deficits, occipitocervical instability, or brainstem/spinal cord compression if left untreated. Many patients with metastasis in this region have a high burden of systemic disease and short life expectancy, making them poor candidates for aggressive surgical resections and fusion procedures. Traditionally, symptom palliation and local disease control in these patients has been achieved through conventional radiation therapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has the advantage of precisely delivering radiation to a target in fewer fractions. To our knowledge, we report the results of the largest series of patients with CVJ metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. We performed a retrospective review of 9 consecutive patients with 10 tumors of the CVJ treated with SRS at the Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California. Two tumors were treated with Gamma Knife, whereas the other 8 received CyberKnife. The median marginal dose was 20 Gy (16-24 Gy) over 1-5 fractions. Point maximal dose to the brainstem or spinal cord ranged between 8 and 18.9 Gy. Median survival was 4 months (1-51 months). Five of six patients presenting with pain had at least partial symptom resolution. No patient went on to require surgical decompression or fusion, and there were no complications directly related to SRS. In well-selected patients, SRS for metastatic lesions of the CVJ has a low risk for complications or treatment failure, while achieving a high rate of palliation of pain symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy for metastatic spinal cord compression from newly diagnosed prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, So; Hozumi, Takahiro; Yamakawa, Kiyofumi; Higashikawa, Akiro; Goto, Takahiro; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Kondo, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    Although hormonal therapy is effective for treatment of prostate cancer, its effect in the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) has not been established. The objective of this study was to clarify the efficacy of conservative treatment of MSCC-induced paralysis resulting from prostate cancer for patients without a previous treatment history. We reviewed data from 38 patients with MSCC-induced paralysis from newly diagnosed prostate cancer who presented to our service between 1984 and 2010. Conservative treatment consisted of hormonal therapy with external radiation therapy (ERT). Patient demographic data, treatment details, involved spine MRI images, complications, and the course of neurologic recovery were investigated. Twenty-five patients were treated conservatively. Mean follow-up period was 36.8 months. Sixteen patients (two with Frankel B, 14 with Frankel C) were unable to walk at initial presentation. After initiating conservative treatment, 75% (12 of 16) of these patients regained the ability to walk within 1 month, 88% (14 in 16) did so within 3 months, and all non-ambulatory patients did so within 6 months. No one had morbid complications. Four patients who did not regain the ability to walk at 1 month were found to have progressed to paraplegia rapidly, and tended to have severe compression as visualized on MRI, with a delay in the start of treatment in comparison with those who did so within 1 month (21.0 vs. 7.8 days). Hormonal therapy associated with ERT is an important option for treatment of MSCC resulting from newly diagnosed prostate cancer. (author)

  11. International Spine Radiosurgery Consortium Consensus Guidelines for Target Volume Definition in Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Brett W.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Lovelock, Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Lis, Eric; Ryu, Samuel; Sheehan, Jason; Gerszten, Peter C.; Chang, Eric; Gibbs, Iris; Soltys, Scott; Sahgal, Arjun; Deasy, Joe; Flickinger, John; Quader, Mubina; Mindea, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is increasingly used to manage spinal metastases. However, target volume definition varies considerably and no consensus target volume guidelines exist. This study proposes consensus target volume definitions using common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Seven radiation oncologists and 3 neurological surgeons with spinal radiosurgery expertise independently contoured target and critical normal structures for 10 cases representing common scenarios in metastatic spine radiosurgery. Each set of volumes was imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. Optimized confidence level consensus contours were identified using histogram agreement analysis and characterized to create target volume definition guidelines. Results: Mean STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity was 0.76 (range, 0.67-0.84) and 0.97 (range, 0.94-0.99), respectively, for gross tumor volume (GTV) and 0.79 (range, 0.66-0.91) and 0.96 (range, 0.92-0.98), respectively, for clinical target volume (CTV). Mean kappa agreement was 0.65 (range, 0.54-0.79) for GTV and 0.64 (range, 0.54-0.82) for CTV (P<.01 for GTV and CTV in all cases). STAPLE histogram agreement analysis identified optimal consensus contours (80% confidence limit). Consensus recommendations include that the CTV should include abnormal marrow signal suspicious for microscopic invasion and an adjacent normal bony expansion to account for subclinical tumor spread in the marrow space. No epidural CTV expansion is recommended without epidural disease, and circumferential CTVs encircling the cord should be used only when the vertebral body, bilateral pedicles/lamina, and spinous process are all involved or there is extensive metastatic

  12. Nuclear medicine and MRI in differential diagnosis of doubtful spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilvasi, J.; Mester, A.R.; Kaposi, P.N.; Gyorke, T.; Karlinger, K.; Mako, E.K.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Purpose of presentation is a retrospective analysis and pictorial assay of MRI in differential diagnosis of spinal diseases with increased Tc-99m-MDP uptake on the whole body bone scan. A retrospective analysis of 200 spine cases was carried out in respect of metastatic, osteoporotic and degenerative bony lesions with similar appearance of bone scan. Referring diagnoses were either spinal pain syndromes or tumour staging. Double headed gamma camera (ADAC) and a low field whole body (0.3 T, Hitachi) scanner were used. Bone scan, SPECT and routine SE T1 and SE T2 sequences were completed with STIR and Gd contrast administration in selected complicated cases. Recently additional opposed phase GRE sequences were used as well. In doubtful whole body scintigraphic cases, SPECT study was performed. Cases with uncertain diagnosis were sent for MRI study. Increased T2 signal and decreased T1 signal, if diffusely distributed in the vertebral body, is characteristic to recent osteoporotic compressions. In cases of non-compressed (metastatic) vertebral bodies with diffuse increased T2 signal increase this appearance had predictive value of imminent compression fracture. Increased T2 signal with decreased T1 signal in adjacent vertebral bodies accompanied by irregularity of contours and of signal intensity involving the inter-vertebral disc, and Gd enhancement were symptoms of infection, in particularly spondylodiscitis. Opposed phase GRE sequences seems to be optimal in differentiation of metastatic lesions versus porotic lesions. We conclude that routine bone scan, and MRI in selected patients suffering from back pain syndrome can help differentiation of osteoporotic versus metastatic and degenerative vertebral lesions. Additional STIR sequence, Gd administration and opposed phase GRE imaging make the diagnosis more specific. (author)

  13. Vitom-3D for Exoscopic Neurosurgery: Initial Experience in Cranial and Spinal Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Joachim M; Burkhardt, Benedikt W

    2017-09-01

    The authors describe the application of a new exoscope that offers 3-dimensional (3D) visualization in cranial and spinal neurosurgery in detail. Five cranial and 11 spinal procedures were performed with a 3D exoscope. Instrument handling, repositioning of the exoscope, handling of the image control unit, the adjustment of magnification and focal length, the depth perception, the image quality, the illumination, and the comfort level of the posture during the procedure were assessed via a questionnaire. The following procedures were performed: Microvascular decompression (n = 1), craniotomy and tumor resection (n = 4), anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical plating (n = 2), cervical laminectomy and lateral mass fixation (n = 1), shear cervical lateral mass osteosynthesis (n = 1), lumbar canal decompression (n = 1), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (n = 2), thoracic intraspinal extradural tumor resection (n = 1), and lumbar discectomy (n = 3). Instrument handling, the intraoperative repositioning and handling of the VITOM-3D, and the comfort level of the intraoperative posture was rated excellent in 100% of procedures. The image quality was rated equal to the operating microscope in 68.75% of procedures. None of the procedures had to be stopped because of technical problems. No surgical complications were noted that could be related to the use of the exoscope. The 3D-exoscopic system is safe and effective tool to perform spinal procedures and less demanding cranial procedures. The image quality and 3D visualization were comparable with the operating microscope. The technique harbors the unique advantage of excellent comfort for the involved surgical team during the procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New imaging characteristics for predicting postoperative neurologic status in patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression. A retrospective analysis of 81 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Mingxing; Liu, Shubin; Yang, Shaoxing; Liu, Yaosheng; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Hongjun

    2017-06-01

    Several clinical features have been proposed for the prediction of postoperative functional outcome in patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC). However, few articles address the relationship between preoperative imaging characteristics and the postoperative neurologic status. This study aims to analyze the postoperative functional outcome and to identify new imaging parameters for predicting postoperative neurologic status in patients with MESCC. This study is a retrospective consecutive case series of patients with MESCC who were treated surgically. We assessed 81 consecutive patients who were treated with decompressive surgery for MESCC between 2013 and 2015. Eight imaging characteristics were analyzed for postoperative motor status by logistic regression models. Neurologic function was assessed using the Frankel grade preoperatively and postoperatively. The following imaging characteristics were assessed for postoperative motor status: location of lesions in the spine, lamina involvement, retropulsion of the posterior wall, number of vertebrae involved, pedicle involvement, fracture of any involved vertebrae, T2 signal of the spinal cord at the compression site, and circumferential angle of spinal cord compression (CASCC). The postoperative neurologic outcome was better than the preoperative neurologic status (p<.01). In the entire group, 40.7% of the patients were non-ambulatory before the surgical procedure, whereas 77.8% of the patients could walk after surgery (p=.01). In the multivariate analysis, the location of the lesions (odds ratio [OR]: 3.89, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-12.77, p=.02) and CASCC (OR: 2.31, 95% CI: 1.44-3.71, p<.01) were significantly associated with postoperative neurologic outcome. A CASCC of more than 180° was associated with an increased OR that approached significance, and the larger the CASCC, the higher the risk of poor postoperative neurologic status. The postoperative neurologic status was

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastases: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Ghizoni, Enrico; Tedeschi, Helder; Pereira, Eduardo Baldon; Giacomini, Leonardo Abdala

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The spine is the most common location for bone metastases. Since cure is not possible, local control and relief of symptoms is the basis for treatment, which is grounded on the use of conventional radiotherapy. Recently, spinal radiosurgery has been proposed for the local control of spinal metastases, whether as primary or salvage treatment. Consequently, we carried out a literature review in order to analyze the indications, efficacy, and safety of radiosurgery in the treatment of spinal metastases. Methods: We have reviewed the literature using the PubMed gateway with data from the Medline library on studies related to the use of radiosurgery in treatment of bone metastases in spine. The studies were reviewed by all the authors and classified as to level of evidence, using the criterion defined by Wright. Results: The indications found for radiosurgery were primary control of epidural metastases (evidence level II), myeloma (level III), and metastases known to be poor responders to conventional radiotherapy – melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (level III). Spinal radiosurgery was also proposed for salvage treatment after conventional radiotherapy (level II). There is also some evidence as to the safety and efficacy of radiosurgery in cases of extramedullar and intramedullar intradural metastatic tumors (level III) and after spinal decompression and stabilization surgery. Conclusion: Radiosurgery can be used in primary or salvage treatment of spinal metastases, improving local disease control and patient symptoms. It should also be considered as initial treatment for radioresistant tumors, such as melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  16. Positional uncertainties on sterotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Seung Hyuck; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Jung In; Park, Jong Min [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    For spinal metastatic cancers, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) plays a key role in tumor control and pain relief by delivering high doses to the lesions. Dose limiting factor to this treatment is spinal cord tolerance. Radiation-induced spinal cord injury, although uncommon, can result in paralysis, sensory deficits, or Brown-Sequard syndrome. Hence, various efforts are necessary to eliminate the risk of radiation myelitis, while keeping adequate dose delivery to target volumes. The Body-FIX system is employed to immobilize the patients. Despite these efforts, residual setup errors and intrafraction motions can cause dosimetric uncertainties. In this context, this study aimed to investigate residual setup errors and intrafraction motions in SRS of spinal metastasis. With appropriate immobilization and 4 DoF corrections, an 1-mm PTV margin is adequate for CTV coverage, accounting for both residual errors. Even with an perfect 6 DoF correction, at least 1-mm PTV margin is still necessary to address intrafraction motions. Given the fixed relative position between the spinal cord and vertebrae, it is assumed that the spinal cord is subject to a same degree of positional uncertainty.

  17. Role of magnetic resonance diffusion imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient values in the evaluation of spinal tuberculosis in Indian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palle, Lalitha; Reddy, MCH Balaji; Reddy, K Jagannath

    2010-01-01

    To define a range of apparent diffusion coefficient values in spinal tuberculosis and to evaluate the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and apparent diffusion coefficient values in patients of spinal tuberculosis. This study was conducted over a period of 20 months and included 110 patients with a total of 230 vertebral bodies. The study was performed in two parts. The first part included all patients of known tuberculosis and patients with classical features of tuberculosis. The second part included patients with spinal pathology of indeterminate etiology. All the patients underwent a routine MRI examination along with diffusion sequences. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated from all the involved vertebral bodies. The mean ADC value of affected vertebrae in first part of the study was found to be 1.4 ± 0.20 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s. This ADC value was then applied to patients in the second part of study in order to determine its ability in predicting tuberculosis. This range of ADC values was significantly different from the mean ADC values of normal vertebrae and those with metastatic involvement. However, there was an overlap of ADC values in a few tuberculous vertebrae with the ADC values in metastatic vertebrae. We found that DW-MRI and ADC values may help in the differentiation of spinal tuberculosis from other lesions of similar appearance. However, an overlap of ADC values was noted with those of metastatic vertebrae. Therefore diffusion imaging and ADC values must always be interpreted in association with clinical history and routine MRI findings and not in isolation

  18. Extradural haematoma of the posterior fossa: a report of eight cases and a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.; Rainoldi, F.; Gipponi, D.; Paoletti, P.

    1986-01-01

    The authors review the literature and present 8 cases of extradural haematoma of the posterior fossa operated from 1979 to 1985 at the Neurosurgical Clinic of the University of Pavia. Emphasis is placed on the importance of an early diagnosis of the symptoms which are often ignored due to the absence of specific clinical signs. The authors recognize a substantial improvement in results because of the recent introduction of CT scanning facilities which permit an early and precise diagnosis of this traumatic pathology. (Author)

  19. Radical Surgery of Only the Anterior Elements of the Spine at the Posterior Element Fusion Level due to Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuto Tsuchiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer can have a favorable prognosis if radical surgery is performed. We encountered a case of spinal metastasis involving three anterior vertebral bodies at the posterior element fusion level and successfully achieved adequate stability by radical surgery involving only the anterior elements. A 67-year-old woman who had numbness and muscle weakness in the lower limbs caused by metastatic spinal tumor at the posterior element fusion level of L1–L3 vertebrae was treated with radical surgery of only the anterior element to gain stability. Similar situations may occur in cases involving other malignant tumor metastases or spinal primary tumors. If such a case occurs, this method could be useful in preventing metastasis to the posterior element.

  20. Imaging of tuberculosis. Pt. 4. Spinal manifestations in 63 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, S.; Nyman, R.S.; Brismar, J.; Hugosson, C.; Lundstedt, C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the radiologic findings in patients with spinal tuberculosis (TB). Material and Methods: Out of a total of 503 patients with TB, 63 (13%) had involvement of the spine. Results: In 40 patients, the spine was the only location; 20 patients had concomitant chest TB. Conventional radiographs gave a good overview, CT visualized the diskovetebral lesions and the paravertebral abscesses, while MR imaging was useful to determine the spread of disease to the soft tissues and the spinal canal. The typical findings were destroyed vertebrae with associated paraspinal soft-tissue mass, with or without abscess formation, sometimes also involving the epidural space together with adjoining disk lesion and focal gibbus formation. Involvement of a single vertebra was a relatively common finding. Large psoas abscesses could occur without any signs of bone involvement. The TB process could sometimes be indistinguishable from malignant processes, and in 3 patients, with multiple lesions in the spine, it mimicked metastatic disease. Conclusion: It is stressed that TB should always be considered in the differential diagnosis when radiologic findings suggest spinal infections or primary or secondary spinal tumors. (orig.)

  1. Automated detection of extradural and subdural hematoma for contrast-enhanced CT images in emergency medical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takeshi; Matoba, Naoto; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yokoi, Shinya; Aizawa, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Keiji; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2007-03-01

    We have been developing the CAD scheme for head and abdominal injuries for emergency medical care. In this work, we have developed an automated method to detect typical head injuries, rupture or strokes of brain. Extradural and subdural hematoma region were detected by comparing technique after the brain areas were registered using warping. We employ 5 normal and 15 stroke cases to estimate the performance after creating the brain model with 50 normal cases. Some of the hematoma regions were detected correctly in all of the stroke cases with no false positive findings on normal cases.

  2. Outcome of early detection and radiotherapy for occult spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Barbachano, Yolanda; Dearnaley, David P.; Parker, Christopher C.; Khoo, Vincent; Huddart, Robert A.; Eeles, Rosalind; Horwich, Alan; Aslam Sohaib, S.

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective analysis in 150 patients with metastatic prostate cancer was conducted to determine whether early detection with MRI spine and treatment of clinically occult spinal cord compromise (SCC) facilitate preservation of neurologic function. Our results suggest that prophylactic radiotherapy for patients with back pain or radiological SCC without neurologic deficit may facilitate preservation of neurologic function. Thus MRI surveillance for SCC may be important for prostate cancer patients with bone metastases

  3. Gd-DTPA MR imaging enhancement of spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, W.P.; Bolla, K.; Mark, A.S.; Tsudura, J.S.; Norman, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen patients with suspected spinal cord tumors were imaged with T1- and T2-weighted sequences before and after the administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Eleven of the 19 patients had spinal cord tumors (three unproven). Eight of 11 patients had intramedullary tumors (four astrocytomas, two ependymomas) and two had extra-medullary tumors (one meningioma, one metastatic melanoma). Other lesions studied include idiopathic syringomyelia (two), spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (one), posttraumatic arachnoiditis (one), and cord infarct (one). All of the tumors enhanced after the administration of Gd-DTPA. Spinal cord enhancement was also noted in association with a spinal cord AVM, a suspected cord infarct, and in the patient with severe arachnoiditis. No enhancement was present in patients with idiopathic or posttraumatic syringomyelia or in the three normal patients. In six of the patients, enhancement was critical in confirming disease that was questionable on the precontrast MR images. Gadolinium enhancement allowed differentiation of tumor from postoperative changes in two patients with spinal cord tumors. Enhanced images localized the lesion more accurately than precontrast MR images in eight patients. In four patients a lesion could only be detected after the administration of contrast. The postcontrast images better defined the margin of tumor from surrounding edema, operative scarring, and cord cavitation. The AVM case had enhancement of slowly flowing veins with Gd-DTPA posterior to an ischemic cord segment. Gd-DTPA enhancement is extremely useful in the detection and therapeutic assessment of spinal cord tumors; however, enhancement is not specific for tumors and should be interpreted in light of the clinical setting

  4. Disappearance of Intracranial Extradural Hematomas: Role of Diastatic Cranial Fracture and Intracranial Pressure - An Institutional Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Abdul Rashid; Kirmani, Altaf Rehman; Wani, Mohammed Afzal

    2018-01-01

    Context: The intracranial extradural hematoma (EDH) occupies space and creates a mass effect on the brain but the tenacious-adhesions of dura to the inner table of skull counters this effect. The intracranial pressure also pushes the hematoma back while it is held by dural tensile-force. Aims: The exploitation of a diastatic fracture, overlying an EDH, by the intracranial pressures to decompress a hematoma out of extradural space into subgaleal/subperiosteal space without surgical intervention. Settings and Design: In a period of 15 years, a group of 11 patients among 729 EDHs were managed conservatively. Materials and Methods: The retrospective study of 11 EDH patients was conducted in the Department of Neurosurgery from January 2000 to December 2014 in 15 years. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical law of variance was used as applicable. Results: Analysis of spontaneous disappearance of intracranial EDH among 11 patients revealed that only 1.5% (11/729) EDHs resolved conservatively. The most cases (63.6%) were children and the youngest being 9 months old. All the patients had a diastatic fracture overlying-EDH and were fully conscious. The cause of head injury in most was the fall from height. The hospital stay ranged from 2 to 4 days. All the patients had a good recovery at the time of discharging. Conclusion: The trial of the conservative or spontaneous disappearance of an EDH through a diastatic fracture into the subgaleal space is similar to burr-hole drainage without surgical intervention but depends upon the neurological status, the intracranial pressure of the patient, and the availability of all the modern neurosurgical gadgets. PMID:29682037

  5. Prognostic factors and a survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression from colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D.; Douglas, S.; Huttenlocher, S. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Veninga, T. [Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bajrovic, A. [University Medical Center Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Rudat, V. [Saad Specialist Hospital Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-12-15

    Background: This study aimed to identify independent prognostic factors and to create a survival score for patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and methods: Data from 121 patients irradiated for MSCC from CRC were retrospectively analyzed. Eleven potential prognostic factors were investigated including tumor type, age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score (ECOG-PS), number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status prior to radiotherapy (RT), other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval from cancer diagnosis to RT of MSCC, time of developing motor deficits prior to RT, and the RT schedule. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved motor function was significantly associated with an ECOG-PS of 1-2 (p = 0.011) and a slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001). Improved local control was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.043) and longer-course RT (p = 0.008). Improved survival was significantly associated with an ECOG-PS of 1-2 (p < 0.001), ambulatory status (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), and a slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.047). These four prognostic factors were included in a survival score. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 6-month survival rate by 10. The prognostic score represented the sum of the factor scores. Four prognostic groups were designed; the 6-month survival rates were 0% for 8-12 points, 26% for 13-18 points, 62% for 20-23 points, and 100% for 24-27 points (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This study identified several independent prognostic factors for treatment outcomes in patients irradiated for MSCC from CRC. The survival prognosis of these patients can be estimated with a new score. (orig.)

  6. Impact of Symptomatic Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression on Survival of Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gustavo Telles; Bergmann, Anke; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2017-12-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common primary tumor sites among patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This disorder is related to neurologic dysfunction and can reduce the quality of life, but the association between MSCC and death is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the occurrence of symptomatic MSCC on overall survival of patients with NSCLC. A cohort study was carried out involving 1112 patients with NSCLC who were enrolled between 2006 and 2014 in a single cancer center. Clinical and sociodemographic data were extracted from the physical and electronic records. Survival analysis of patients with NSCLC was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method. A log-rank test was used to assess differences between survival curves. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were carried out to quantify the relationship between the independent variable (MSCC) and the outcome (overall survival). During the study period, the incidence of MSCC was 4.1%. Patients who presented with MSCC were 1.43 times more likely to die than were those with no history of MSCC (hazard ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-2.00; P = 0.031). The median survival time was 8.04 months (95% CI, 6.13-9.96) for those who presented MSCC and 11.95 months (95% CI, 10.80-13.11) for those who did not presented MSCC during the course of disease (P = 0.002). MSCC is an important and independent predictor of NSCLC worse survival. This effect was not influenced by sociodemographic and clinical factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hybrid surgery-radiosurgery therapy for metastatic epidural spinal cord compression: A prospective evaluation using patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilai, Ori; Amato, Mary-Kate; McLaughlin, Lily; Reiner, Anne S; Ogilvie, Shahiba Q; Lis, Eric; Yamada, Yoshiya; Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya

    2018-05-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) represent an important measure of cancer therapy effect. For patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC), hybrid therapy using separation surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery preserves neurologic function and provides tumor control. There is currently a paucity of data reporting PRO after such combined modality therapy for MESCC. Delineation of hybrid surgery-radiosurgery therapy effect on PRO validates the hybrid approach as an effective therapy resulting in meaningful symptom relief. Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Spine Tumor (MDASI-SP), PROs validated in the cancer population, were prospectively collected. Patients with MESCC who underwent separation surgery followed by stereotactic radiosurgery were included. Separation surgery included a posterolateral approach without extensive cytoreductive tumor excision. A median postoperative radiosurgery dose of 2700 cGy was delivered. The change in PRO 3 months after the hybrid therapy represented the primary study outcome. Preoperative and postoperative evaluations were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for matched pairs. One hundred eleven patients were included. Hybrid therapy resulted in a significant reduction in the BPI items "worst" and "right now" pain ( P < .0001), and in all BPI constructs (severity, interference with daily activities, and pain experience, P < .001). The MDASI-SP demonstrated reduction in spine-specific pain severity and interference with general activity ( P < .001), along with decreased symptom interference ( P < .001). Validated PRO instruments showed that in patients with MESCC, hybrid therapy with separation surgery and radiosurgery results in a significant decrease in pain severity and symptom interference. These prospective data confirm the benefit of hybrid therapy for treatment of MESCC and should facilitate referral of patients with MESCC for surgical evaluation.

  8. Clinical Outcome of Dose-Escalated Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Richter, Anne; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases and paraspinal tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 14 patients, 12 with spinal metastases and a long life expectancy and 2 with paraspinal tumors, were treated for 16 lesions with intensity-modulated, image-guided RT. A median biologic effective dose of 74 Gy 10 (range, 55-86) in a median of 20 fractions (range, 3-34) was prescribed to the target volume. The spinal canal was treated to 40 Gy in 20 fractions using a second intensity-modulated RT dose level in the case of epidural involvement. Results: After median follow-up of 17 months, one local recurrence was observed, for an actuarial local control rate of 88% after 2 years. Local control was associated with rapid and long-term pain relief. Of 11 patients treated for a solitary spinal metastasis, 6 developed systemic disease progression. The actuarial overall survival rate for metastatic patients was 85% and 63% after 1 and 2 years, respectively. Acute Grade 2-3 skin toxicity was seen in 2 patients with no late toxicity greater than Grade 2. No radiation-induced myelopathy was observed. Conclusion: Dose-escalated irradiation of spinal metastases was safe and resulted in excellent local control. Oligometastatic patients with a long life expectancy and epidural involvement are considered to benefit the most from fractionated RT.

  9. Contemporary management of spinal AVFs and AVMs: lessons learned from 110 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Russin, Jonathan J; Zaidi, Hasan A; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Park, Min S; Albuquerque, Felipe C; McDougall, Cameron G; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-09-01

    Spinal arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare, complex spinal vascular lesions that are challenging to manage. Recently, understanding of these lesions has increased thanks to neuroimaging technology. Published reports of surgical results and clinical outcome are limited to small series. The authors present a large contemporary series of patients with spinal AVFs and AVMs who were treated at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Arizona. Retrospective detailed review of a prospective vascular database was performed for all patients with spinal AVFs and AVMs treated between 2000 and 2013. Patient demographic data, AVF and AVM characteristics, surgical results, clinical outcomes, complications, and long-term follow-up were reviewed. Between 2000 and 2013, 110 patients (57 male and 53 female) underwent obliteration of spinal AVFs and AVMs. The mean age at presentation was 42.3 years (range 18 months-81 years). There were 44 patients with AVFs and 66 with AVMs. The AVM group included 27 intramedullary, 21 conus medullaris, 12 metameric, and 6 extradural. The most common location was thoracic spine (61%), followed by cervical (22.7%), lumbar (14.5%), and sacral (1.8%). The most common presenting signs and symptoms included paresis/paralysis (75.5%), paresthesias (60%), pain (51.8%), bowel/bladder dysfunction (41.8%), and myelopathy (36.4%). Evidence of rupture was seen in 26.4% of patients. Perioperative embolization was performed in 42% of patients. Resection was performed in 95 patients (86.4%). Embolization alone was the only treatment in 14 patients (12.7%). One patient was treated with radiosurgery alone. Angiographically verified AVF and AVM obliteration was achieved in 92 patients (83.6%). At a mean follow-up duration of 30.5 months (range 1-205 months), 43 patients (97.7%) with AVFs and 57 (86.4%) with AVMs remained functionally independent (McCormick Scale scores ≤ 2). Perioperative complications were seen in 8

  10. Stenosis of the thoracolumbar vertebral canal in a Basset Hound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stigen, Ø.; Hagen, G.; Kolbjørnsen, Ø.

    1990-01-01

    A three-month-old female basset hound was referred to the Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine with a history of progressive paresis of the pelvic limbs. Following neurological examination and the study of myelograms, extradural masses causing spinal cord compressions at the T 12.13 and T 13 -L 1 junctions were diagnosed. At necropsy bone-tissue of the vertebral laminae was found to have formed stenoses of the vertebral canal producing compressions of the spinal cord. Irreversible tissue-damage was observed in histological sections prepared from the compressed areas of the spinal cord

  11. Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from colonic carcinoma presenting as Brown-Sequard syndrome: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaballo, Mohammed A

    2011-08-02

    Abstract Introduction Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis is very rare. The majority are discovered incidentally during autopsy. Most symptomatic patients present with rapidly progressive neurological deficits and require immediate examination. Few patients demonstrate features of Brown-Séquard syndrome. Radiotherapy is the gold-standard of therapy for Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis. The overall prognosis is poor and the mortality rate is very high. We present what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis of colorectal carcinoma presenting as Brown-Séquard syndrome. Case presentation We present the case of a 71-year-old Caucasian man with colonic adenocarcinoma who developed Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis and showed features of Brown-Séquard syndrome, which is an uncommon presentation of Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis. Conclusion This patient had an Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis, a rare form of metastatic disease, secondary to colonic carcinoma. The metastasis manifested clinically as Brown-Séquard syndrome, itself a very uncommon condition. This syndrome is rarely caused by intramedullary tumors. This unique case has particular interest in medicine, especially for the specialties of medical, surgical and radiation oncology. We hope that it will add more information to the literature about these entities.

  12. Factors affecting survival outcomes of patients with non-metastatic Ewing's sarcoma family tumors in the spine: a retrospective analysis of 63 patients in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Lou, Yan; Hu, Zhiqi; Wang, Ting; Li, Jinsong; Tang, Yu; Wu, Zhipeng; Xu, Leqin; Yang, Xinghai; Song, Dianwen; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-01-01

    Little information has been published in the literature regarding survival outcomes of patients with Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs) of the spine. The purpose of this study is to explore factors that may affect the prognosis of patients with non-metastatic spinal ESFTs. A retrospective analysis of survival outcomes was performed in patients with non-metastatic spinal ESFTs. Univariate and multivariate analyses were employed to identify prognostic factors for recurrence and survival. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were defined as the date of surgery to the date of local relapse and death. Kaplan-Meier methods were applied to estimate RFS and OS. Log-rank test was used to analyze single factors for RFS and OS. Factors with p values ≤0.1 were subjected to multivariate analysis. A total of 63 patients with non-metastatic spinal ESFTs were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 35.1 months (range 1-155). Postoperative recurrence was detected in 25 patients, and distant metastasis and death occurred in 22 and 36 patients respectively. The result of multivariate analysis suggested that age older than 25 years and neoadjuvant chemotherapy were favorable independent prognostic factors for RFS and OS. In addition, total en-bloc resection, postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy and non-distant metastasis were favorable independent prognostic factors for OS. Age older than 25 years and neoadjuvant chemotherapy are favorable prognostic factors for both RFS and OS. In addition, total en-bloc resection, postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy and non-distant metastasis are closely associated with favorable survival.

  13. Comparison of 1 x 8 Gy and 10 x 3 Gy for functional outcome in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiatiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C [Department of Radiatiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Borgmann, Kerstin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Section Radiobiology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Karstens, Johann H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiatiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Alberti, Winfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Since life expectancy is markedly reduced in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), a short and effective radiation schedule is desired. This study investigates a reduction of the overall treatment time to only one day by comparing 1 x 8 Gy to the multi-fractionated 10 x 3 Gy for functional outcome. Methods and materials: Data of 204 patients, treated for MSCC with either 1 x 8 Gy (n = 96) or 10 x 3 Gy (n = 108), were analyzed retrospectively. Motor function and ambulatory status were evaluated before and up to 24 weeks after RT. A multivariate analysis (nominal regression) was performed including radiation schedule, performance status, age, irradiated vertebra, and relevant prognostic factors (histology, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits). Improvement of motor deficits was selected as basic category and compared with no change and deterioration. Results: Univariate analysis showed no significant difference between the schedules for post-treatment motor function and ambulatory rates. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant effect on functional outcome for the prognostic factors, but not for the radiation schedule (p = 0.853 for no change, p = 0.237 for deterioration). Conclusions: Our data suggest the two fractionation schedules to be comparably effective for functional outcome. Thus, 1 x 8 Gy should be considered for patients with a poor survival prognosis.

  14. Comparison of 1 x 8 Gy and 10 x 3 Gy for functional outcome in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Hulshof, Maarten C.; Borgmann, Kerstin; Karstens, Johann H.; Koning, Caro C.E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Since life expectancy is markedly reduced in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), a short and effective radiation schedule is desired. This study investigates a reduction of the overall treatment time to only one day by comparing 1 x 8 Gy to the multi-fractionated 10 x 3 Gy for functional outcome. Methods and materials: Data of 204 patients, treated for MSCC with either 1 x 8 Gy (n = 96) or 10 x 3 Gy (n = 108), were analyzed retrospectively. Motor function and ambulatory status were evaluated before and up to 24 weeks after RT. A multivariate analysis (nominal regression) was performed including radiation schedule, performance status, age, irradiated vertebra, and relevant prognostic factors (histology, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits). Improvement of motor deficits was selected as basic category and compared with no change and deterioration. Results: Univariate analysis showed no significant difference between the schedules for post-treatment motor function and ambulatory rates. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant effect on functional outcome for the prognostic factors, but not for the radiation schedule (p = 0.853 for no change, p = 0.237 for deterioration). Conclusions: Our data suggest the two fractionation schedules to be comparably effective for functional outcome. Thus, 1 x 8 Gy should be considered for patients with a poor survival prognosis

  15. 8 Gy single-dose radiotherapy is effective in metastatic spinal cord compression: Results of a phase III randomized multicentre Italian trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Trippa, Fabio; Casale, Michelina; Costantini, Sara; Lupattelli, Marco; Bellavita, Rita; Marafioti, Luigi; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Santacaterina, Anna; Mignogna, Marcello; Silvano, Giovanni; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a previous randomized trial we showed that the short-course radiotherapy (RT) regimen of 8 Gy x 2 was feasible in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) and short life expectancy. This phase III trial was planned to determine whether in the same category of patients 8 Gy single-dose is as effective as 8 Gy x 2. Materials and methods: Three hundred and twenty-seven patients with MSCC and short life expectancy were randomly assigned to a short-course of 8 Gy x 2 or to 8 Gy single-dose RT. Median follow-up was 31 months (range, 4-58). Results: A total of 303 (93%) patients are assessable, 150 treated with the short-course and 153 with the single-dose RT. No difference in response was found between the two RT schedules adopted. Median duration of response was 5 and 4.5 months for short-course and single-dose RT (p = 0.4), respectively. The median overall survival was 4 months for all cases. Light acute toxicity was registered in a minority of cases. Late toxicity was never recorded. Conclusions: Both RT schedules adopted were effective. As already shown in several trials evaluating RT regimens in uncomplicated painful bone metastases, also MSCC patients may achieve palliation with minimal toxicity and inconvenience with a single-dose of 8 Gy.

  16. Is the Current Management of Patients Presenting With Spinal Trauma to District General Hospitals Fit for Purpose? Our Experience of Delivering a Spinal Service Using an Electronic Referral Platform in a Large District General Teaching Hospital Without Onsite Spinal Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel S; Marynissen, Hans

    2018-04-12

    A retrospective cross-sectional analysis. To describe the provision of a spinal service using an electronic platform to direct management from an external spinal unit, and quantify time taken to obtain definitive management plans whilst under prescribed spinal immobilization. Most attending district general hospitals following spinal trauma will have stable injuries and normal neurology, with only a small proportion requiring urgent transfer to a specialist centre. A retrospective review of 104 patients admitted following vertebral during a 12-month period. The British Orthopaedic Association Standards for Trauma consensus that "spinal immobilisation is not recommended for more than 48 hours" was the standard of care measured against. 100 patients occupied a total of 975 hospital inpatient bed days. 117 radiological investigations were requested after the point of external referral (47 CT-scans, 37 MRI-scans, and 33 weight bearing radiographs). The period between initial referral to the regional spinal service and then receiving a definitive final management had a median value of 72 hours and a range of 0 - 33 days. Patients will have been under some form of prescribed spinal immobilisation until the definitive management plan was communicated. 34 patients (34% of the overall cohort) had a definitive management plan in place within 48 hours. 80 patients had vertebral injuries (73 stable, 6 unstable), 3 patients had prolapsed intervertebral disks, 1 had metastatic disease, and 17 had not evidence of an acute injury following evaluation. Patients are being placed under prescribed immobilisation for longer than is recommended. Delays in obtaining radiological imaging were an important factor, together with the time taken to receive a definitive management plan. Limitations in social care provision and delays in arranging this were additional barriers to hospital discharge following the final management plan. 4.

  17. Do elderly patients benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy for treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, D.; Huttenlocher, S.; Evers, J.N.; Bajrovic, A.; Karstens, J.H.; Rudat, V.; Schild, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of elderly cancer patients has gained importance. One question regarding the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is whether elderly patients benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy? In attempting to answer this question, we performed a matched-pair analysis comparing surgery followed by radiotherapy to radiotherapy alone. Data from 42 elderly (age > 65 years) patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S + RT) were matched to 84 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for ten potential prognostic factors and compared regarding motor function, local control, and survival. Additional matched-pair analyses were performed for the subgroups of patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS, n = 81) and receiving laminectomy (LE, n = 45). Improvement of motor function occurred in 21% after S + RT and 24% after RT (p = 0.39). The 1-year local control rates were 81% and 91% (p = 0.44), while the 1-year survival rates were 46% and 39% (p = 0.71). In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred in 22% after DDSS + RT and 24% after RT alone (p = 0.92). The 1-year local control rates were 95% and 89% (p = 0.62), and the 1-year survival rates were 54% and 43% (p = 0.30). In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE, improvement of motor function occurred in 20% after LE + RT and 23% after RT alone (p = 0.06). The 1-year local control rates were 50% and 92% (p = 0.33). The 1-year survival rates were 32% and 32% (p = 0.55). Elderly patients with MSCC did not benefit from surgery in addition to radiotherapy regarding functional outcome, local control of MSCC, or survival. (orig.)

  18. Paraparesis secondary to erratic migration of Dioctophyma renale in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Swiech Bach

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: A 4 years old mongrel stray bitch, weighing 16kg was submitted to physical examination to demonstrated inability of locomotion with the pelvic limbs. Extradural spinal cord compression was observed in myelotomography of the thoracolumbar segment. The patient was submitted to exploratory hemilaminectomy of T13-L1 and L1-L2, in an attempt to decompress the medullar segments. During the surgery was observed one adult parasite, identified as Dioctophyma renale , located in the extradural space and causing spinal cord compression. The patient was submitted to postoperative physical therapy, presenting clinical improvement 15 days after surgery, remaining on prone position and able to move the pelvic limbs, but not yet able to walk unassisted. It started walking naturally 60 days after the surgery. With the present clinical report, the erratic migration of the parasite Dioctophyma renale should be added to the list of differential diagnoses for patients with paraparesis and extramedullary lesion pattern, especially in endemic areas.

  19. Anti-apoptotic effect of insulin in the control of cell death and neurologic deficit after acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing-Huo; Yang, Shu-Hua; Duan, De-Yu; Cheng, Heng-Hui; Bao, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Yukun

    2007-09-01

    Recent studies confirmed that the new cell survival signal pathway of Insulin-PI3K-Akt exerted cyto-protective actions involving anti-apoptosis. This study was undertaken to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of insulin in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury (SCI) and evaluate its therapeutic effects in adult rats. SCI was produced by extradural compression using modified Allen's stall with damage energy of 40 g-cm force. One group of rats was subjected to SCI in combination with the administration of recombinant human insulin dissolved in 50% glucose solution at the dose of 1 IU/kg day, for 7 days. At the same time, another group of rats was subjected to SCI in combination with the administration of an equal volume of sterile saline solution. Functional recovery was evaluated using open-field walking, inclined plane tests, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) during the first 14 days post-trauma. Levels of protein for B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 gene (Bcl-2), Caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were quantified in the injured spinal cord by Western blot analysis. Neuronal apoptosis was detected by TUNEL, and spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Ultimately, the data established the effectiveness of insulin treatment in improving neurologic recovery, increasing the expression of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 proteins, inhibiting caspase-3 expression decreasing neuronal apoptosis, reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines iNOS and COX-2, and ameliorating microcirculation of injured spinal cord after moderate contusive SCI in rats. In sum, this study reported the beneficial effects of insulin in the treatment of SCI, with the suggestion that insulin should be considered as a potential therapeutic agent.

  20. A Good Short-term Outcome in Delayed Decompression of Cauda Equina Syndrome in Klebsiella pneumoniae Spinal Epidural Abscess: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanifah J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural abscess is a severe, generally pyogenic, infection of the epidural space of spinal cord or cauda equina. The swelling caused by the abscess leads to compression or vascular disruption of neurological structures that requires urgent surgical decompression to avoid significant permanent disability. We share a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae spinal epidural abscess secondary to haematogenous spread of previous lung infection that presented late at our centre with cauda equina syndrome that showed good short-term outcome in delayed decompression. A 50-year old female presented with one-week history of persistent low back pain with progressively worsening bilateral lower limb weakness for seven days and urinary retention associated with saddle anesthesia of 2-day duration. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast of the lumbo-sacral region showed an intramuscular collection of abscess at left gluteus maximus and left multifidus muscle with a L3-L5 posteriorly placed extradural lesion enhancing peripherally on contrast, suggestive of epidural abscess that compressed the cauda equina. The pus was drained using the posterior lumbar approach. Tissue and pus culture revealed Klebsiella pneumoniae, suggestive of bacterial infection. The patient made immediate improvement of muscle power over bilateral lower limbs postoperative followed by ability to control micturition and defecation in the 4th post-operative day. A good short-term outcome in delayed decompression of cauda equine syndrome is extremely rare. Aggressive surgical decompression combined with antibiotic therapy led to good short-term outcome in this patient despite delayed decompression of more than 48 hours.

  1. Metastatic anal sac carcinoma with hypercalcaemia and associated hypertrophic osteopathy in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Giuliano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A seven-year-old male neutered Irish setter was treated for a metastatic anal sac adenocarcinoma (ASAC and hypercalcaemia by complete surgical excision of the primary tumour and partial excision of the sublumbar lymph nodes. Further enlargement of the sublumbar lymph nodes was linked to recurrent hypercalcaemia 3 months after surgical treatment. Medical treatment with Toceranib and Clodronate showed modest results in the treatment of the tumour and the hypercalcaemia. Radiotherapy of the sublumbar lymph nodes and later concurrent carboplatin chemotherapy resulted in partial tumour remission with marked reduction in size of the lymph nodes and normalization of the calcaemia. Unfortunately, concurrently with subsequent relapse of the hypercalaemia, the dog developed hypertrophic osteopathy (HO and lumbar spinal metastasis and the dog was euthanized. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the second case of metastatic apocrine gland carcinoma of the anal sac associated with HO and the first case that describe the development of HO late in the stage of the disease.

  2. SA Journal of Radiology - Vol 11, No 4 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Is anatomical distribution helpful for differentiating TB spondylitis from neoplastic causes of extradural spinal cord compression in children? A pilot study · EMAIL FREE ... CT brain demonstration of basal ganglion calcification in adult HIV/AIDS patients · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  3. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

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    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P. (Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China)), email: zqpddn1@gmail.com; Sun, H.H. (Dept. of Orthopaedic, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical Univ., Xian Shaanxi (China)); Jiang, Y.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Xian Red Cross Hospital, Xian Shaanxi (China))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  4. Accuracy of CT-guided biopsies in 158 patients with thoracic spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, D.J.; He, B.R.; Liu, T.J.; Zhao, Q.P.; Sun, H.H.; Jiang, Y.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Inconsistent accuracies of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsies have been reported in previous studies. Purpose. To determine the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy, to compare the results with those previously reported, and to determine if there are any factors that influence the accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy. Material and Methods. In total, 158 consecutive CT-guided percutaneous thoracic spine procedures (performed at the Dept. of Spinal Surgery, Xian Red Cross Hospital between April 2000 and July 2010) were reviewed. The 158 lesions were categorized by location and radiographic features. Pathological and clinical follow-up were used to determine accuracy. Results. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was 90.5% overall. Biopsy of metastatic bone disease (98.2%) was significantly more accurate than biopsies of primary tumors (80.9%) and of hematological malignancies (47.0%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy was significantly higher for the lower thoracic spine (97.6%) than for the middle (90.0%) or upper thoracic spine (80.4%) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for lytic lesions (96.4%) than for sclerotic lesions (81.3%) (P < 0.010). The accuracy of biopsies performed using the transpedicular approach (91.0%) was not significantly different from that of biopsies performed using posterolateral approaches (91.5%) (0.25 < P < 0.5). Conclusion. Percutaneous CT-guided thoracic spinal biopsy is a viable alternative to open surgical biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy was not affected by any of the variables except for lesion level, histology, and radiographic features

  5. Minimally invasive “separation surgery” plus adjuvsant stereotactic radiotherapy in the management of spinal epidural metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Early reports such as this suggest that MIS techniques can be successfully and safely applied in accomplishing “separation surgery” with adjuvant SBRT in the management of metastatic spinal disease. The potential advantages conferred by MIS techniques such as shortened hospital stay, decreased blood loss, reduced perioperative complications, and earlier initiation of adjuvant radiation are highly desirable in the treatment of this challenging patient population.

  6. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  7. Factors Associated with Life Expectancy in Patients with Metastatic Spine Disease from Adenocarcinoma of the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Khattab, Mohamed H.; Sankey, Eric W.; Elder, Benjamin D.; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy F.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Our objective was to identify preoperative prognostic factors associated with survival in patients with spinal metastasis from lung carcinoma. Methods A retrospective analysis of 26 patients diagnosed with lung carcinoma metastatic to the spinal column was performed to determine factors associated with survival. We used 3 months survival as the clinical cutoff for whether surgical intervention should be performed. We analyzed patients who survived less than 3 months compared with those who survived more than 3 months. Demographic, preoperative, operative, and postoperative factors including functional scores were collected for analysis. Results The median survival for all patients in our study was 3.5 months. We found a statistically significant difference between the group that survived less than 3 months and the group that survived greater than 3 months in terms of extrathoracic metastasis, visceral metastasis, and average postoperative modified Rankin score. Conclusion Determining which patients with lung cancer spinal metastases will benefit from surgical intervention is often dictated by the patient's predicted life expectancy. Factors associated with poorer prognosis include age, functional status, visceral metastases, and extrathoracic metastases. Although the prognosis for patients with lung cancer spinal metastases is poor, some patients may experience long-term benefit from surgical intervention. PMID:26430597

  8. Is anatomical distribution helpful for differentiating TB spondylitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Extradural spinal cord compression in children may be the result of infection/inflammation or neoplasia. It is vital to differentiate between the two as there is considerable difference in the management of these entities. Objective. The aim of this paper is to determine whether there are significant differences ...

  9. The effect of pre-vertebroplasty tumor ablation using laser-induced thermotherapy on biomechanical stability and cement fill in the metastatic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Henry; Mousavi, Payam; Chin, Lee; Roth, Sandra; Finkelstein, Joel; Vitken, Alex; Whyne, Cari

    2007-08-01

    A biomechanical study comparing simulated lytic vertebral metastases treated with laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and vertebroplasty versus vertebroplasty alone. To investigate the effect of tumor ablation using LITT prior to vertebroplasty on biomechanical stability and cement fill patterns in a standardized model of spinal metastatic disease. Vertebroplasty in the metastatic spine is aimed at reducing pain, but is associated with risk of cement extravasation in up to 10%. Six pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric thoracolumbar spinal motion segments were tested in axial compression intact, with simulated metastases and following percutaneous vertebroplasty with or without LITT. Canal narrowing under load, pattern of cement fill, load to failure, and LITT temperature and pressure generation were collected. In all LITT specimens, cement filled the defect without extravasation. The canal extravasation rate was 33% in specimens treated without LITT. LITT and vertebroplasty yielded a trend toward improved posterior wall stability (P = 0.095) as compared to vertebroplasty alone. Moderate rises in temperature and minimal pressure generation was seen during LITT. In this model, elimination of tumor by LITT, facilitates cement fill, enhances biomechanical stability and reduces the risk of cement extravasation.

  10. Functional outcome and survival after radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression in patients with cancer of unknown primary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Fehlauer, Fabian; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Basic, Hiba; Hoskin, Peter J.; Rudat, Volker; Karstens, Johann H.; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) account for about 10% of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). This study aims to define the appropriate radiation regimen for these patients. Methods and Materials: Data of 143 CUP patients irradiated for MSCC were retrospectively evaluated. Short-course radiotherapy (RT) (1x8 Gy, 5x4 Gy, n = 68) and long-course RT (10x3 Gy, 15x2.5 Gy, 20x2 Gy, n = 75) plus 8 further potential prognostic factors (age, gender, performance status, visceral metastases, other bone metastases, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status, time of developing motor deficits before RT) were compared for functional outcome and survival. Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 10% of patients, no further progression of motor deficits in 57%, and deterioration in 33%. On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was positively associated with slower development of motor deficits (p < 0.001), absence of visceral metastases (p = 0.008) and other bone metastases (p = 0.027), and ambulatory status (p = 0.054), not with the radiation regimen (p = 0.74). Recurrence of MSCC in the irradiated region occurred in 7 patients after median 6 months. Median survival was 4 months. On multivariate analysis, better survival was significantly associated with absence of visceral metastases (p < 0.001), absence of other bone metastases (p = 0.005), ambulatory status (p = 0.001), and slower development of motor deficits (p = 0.030). Conclusions: For MSCC treatment in patients with CUP, no significant difference was observed between short-course and long-course RT regarding functional outcome and survival. Short-course RT appears preferable, at least for patients with a poor predicted survival, as it is more patient convenient and more cost-effective

  11. Clinical applicability of biologically effective dose calculation for spinal cord in fractionated spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jinho; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kil, Se Hee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether biologically effective dose (BED) based on linear-quadratic model can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered in 4 or more fractions. Sixty-three metastatic spinal lesions in 47 patients were retrospectively evaluated. The most frequently prescribed dose was 36 Gy in 4 fractions. In planning, we tried to limit the maximum dose to the spinal cord or cauda equina less than 50% of prescription or 45 Gy 2/2 . BED was calculated using maximum point dose of spinal cord. Maximum spinal cord dose per fraction ranged from 2.6 to 6.0 Gy (median 4.3 Gy). Except 4 patients with 52.7, 56.4, 62.4, and 67.9 Gy 2/2 , equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fraction of the patients was not more than 50 Gy 2/2 (12.1–67.9, median 32.0). The ratio of maximum spinal cord dose to prescription dose increased up to 82.2% of prescription dose as epidural spinal cord compression grade increased. No patient developed grade 2 or higher radiation-induced spinal cord toxicity during follow-up period of 0.5 to 53.9 months. In fractionated spine SBRT, BED can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose, provided that the dose per fraction to the spinal cord is moderate, e.g. < 6.0 Gy. It appears that a maximum dose of up to 45–50 Gy 2/2 to the spinal cord is tolerable in 4 or more fractionation regimen

  12. Glucocorticoid-induced diabetes in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helga; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Harder, Eva

    2018-01-01

    in a prospective, observational cohort study. The primary endpoint was development of DM defined by two or more plasma glucose values ≥11.1 mmol/L. Plasma glucose was monitored on a daily basis for 12 days during radiotherapy. RESULTS: Fifty-six of the patients (43%; 95% CI 35-52%) were diagnosed with DM based...... spinal cord compression (MSCC) in patients referred to radiotherapy. Furthermore, to describe the time course of development of DM. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 140 patients were recruited (131 were included in the analysis) with MSCC receiving high-dose glucocorticoid ≥100 mg prednisolone per day were included...... on plasma glucose measurements during the study period. Sixteen patients, 12% (95% CI 6-18%), were treated with insulin. At multivariate analysis, only high baseline HbA1c predicted the development of insulin-treated DM. An HbA1c-value value of 96...

  13. Correlation of MRI and CSF cytology in the diagnosis of medulloblastoma spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, S.K.; Ditchfield, M.R.; Waters, K.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Medulloblastoma frequently spreads to involve the spinal cord, which significantly reduces patient survival and determines whether chemotherapy is utilised and the dose of irradiation to the neuraxis. Staging is usually achieved by MRI of the spine and/or cytology of CSF, both methods having their limitations. Objective. To determine whether there is a correlation between CSF cytology and the demonstration of spinal metastases by MRI and whether CSF cytology is useful when spinal MRI is equivocal. Materials and methods. All cases of medulloblastoma diagnosed at our hospital between 1992 and 1997 were identified. Of 26 cases, 11 presentations (age range 4 months to 12 years) had both CSF cytology (either from the cisterna magna or lumbar puncture) and spinal MRI. The MR studies were reviewed for the presence of metastases and the CSF cytology for the presence of tumour cells. Results. We found 100 % correlation between MRI and CSF cytology for samples taken by lumbar puncture (four negative and three positive on both investigations). No correlation was demonstrated when CSF samples were taken from the cisterna magna. Conclusions. Our data suggest that lumbar CSF cytology may be useful when the MRI is equivocal for the presence of metastatic involvement of the spine by medulloblastoma. (orig.)

  14. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  15. Comparison of intravenous colloid and colloid‑crystalloid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-25

    Sep 25, 2013 ... Wennberg E, Frid I, Haljamae H, Wennergren M, Kjellmer I. Comparison of Ringers acetate with 3% dextran 70 for volume loading before extradural caesarean section. Br J Anaesth 1990;65:654‑60. 11. Sharma SK, Gajraj NM, Sidawi JE. Prevention of hypotension during spinal anaesthesia. A comparison ...

  16. Initial experience with the use of an expandable titanium cage as a vertebral body replacement in patients with tumors of the spinal column: a report of 95 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Ashwin; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Doppenberg, Egon; Suki, Dima; Gokaslan, Ziya; Mendel, Ehud; Rao, Ganesh; Rhines, Laurence D

    2012-01-01

    Vertebral body resection to treat spine tumors necessitates reconstruction to maintain spinal stability. The durability of reconstruction may be a challenge in cancer patients as treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiation coupled with poor nutritional status may compromise bone quality. We present a series of patients who underwent implantation of an expandable titanium cage (ETC) for reconstruction after vertebral body resection for primary or metastatic spine tumors. We report the functional outcome, assess the durability of reconstruction, and describe complications associated with this procedure. A retrospective review of patients undergoing placement of ETC after vertebrectomy for spinal tumor at our institution was performed. From September 2001 to August 2006, 95 patients underwent implantation of an ETC for reconstruction of the anterior spinal column following vertebrectomy for tumor (75 one-level, 19 two-level, 1 three-level). All patients underwent spinal stabilization as well. The median survival after surgery was 13.7 months; 23 patients had primary spinal tumors and 72 had metastatic tumors. Numerical pain scores were significantly improved postoperatively indicating a palliative benefit. No new neurological deficits were noted postoperatively, except when intentional neurological sacrifice was performed for oncologic reasons. Median height correction of 14% (range 0-118%) and median improvement in sagittal alignment of 6° (range 0-28°) were demonstrated on immediate postoperative imaging. Three patients experienced hardware related complications, one of which had posterior migration of the ETC. On postoperative imaging, 12 patients demonstrated subsidence of greater than 1 mm, but none required operative revision. Use of an ETC for spinal reconstruction in patients with spinal tumors is safe, decreases pain associated with pathologic fracture, protects neurologic function, and is durable. We found a very low incidence of cage-related construct

  17. Traumatic Fracture of Thin Pedicles Secondary to Extradural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sequelae, secondary to local mass effect. Our objective is to report a technical case report, illustrating a traumatic spinal injury with multiple pedicle fractures, secondary to atrophic lumbar pedicles as well as the diagnostic workup and surgical management of this problem. Posterior lumbar decompression, resection of the ...

  18. Paraspinal arteriovenous malformation Onyx embolization via an Ascent balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Galdámez, Mario; Rodriguez-Arias, Carlos A; Utiel, Elena; Arreba, Emilio; Gonzalo, Miguel; Arenillas, Juan F

    2014-04-01

    Purely extradural lumbar spinal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare lesions that have diverse presentations and imaging features. The treatment of a symptomatic high flow paraspinal AVM with multiple feeders remains a challenge. We report the first use of an Ascent balloon (dual lumen balloon catheter) to deliver Onyx with excellent penetration to a paraspinal AVM.

  19. African Journal of Neurological Sciences - 2009 Vol. 28 No 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESUME. Le kyste arachnoïdien extra-dural spinal est une affection rare. Sa pathogénie reste méconnue. Nous rapportons le cas d'une jeune fille de 12 ans, sans antécédents pathologiques, admise au service de neurochirurgie, hôpital militaire Avicenne, Marrakech, pour un syndrome de compression médullaire à.

  20. Osteochondromatosis of the cervical spine causing compressive myelopathy in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporn, T.M.; Read, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    A 10-month-old Alaskan malamute presented with cervical pain and hindlimb proprioceptive deficits. Plain and myelographic radiographic studies of the cervical spine demonstrated extradural compression of the spinal cord at the level of C7 and C5. Computed tomography assisted presurgical characterisation of the lesions as osteochondromatosis. Laminectomy permitted successful removal of the lesions

  1. Primary dorsal spine primitive neuroectodermal tumor in an adult patient: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyashiva Munjal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor (psPNET is a rare entity with few cases reported in literature. We report a case of a 50-year-old female who presented to us with paraplegia and was diagnosed with extradural dorsal spine psPNET. The diagnosis was not suspected at presentation or on radiology but was established on histopathological examination. It is important to distinguish it from central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors and from other spinal tumors since it follows a different clinical course and therapeutic outcome.

  2. Comparison of the effects of extradural clonidine with those of morphine on postoperative pain, stress responses, cardiopulmonary function and motor and sensory block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Claus; Qvitzau, S; Greulich, A

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the effects of extradural clonidine 150 micrograms or morphine 4 mg on postoperative pain, stress responses, cardiopulmonary function and motor and sensory block in a double-blind, randomized study in 20 patients undergoing hysterectomy with general anaesthesia. Observations were...... made for 6 h after each patient's first request for analgesia. Clonidine provided greater pain relief than morphine only for the first 2 h of observation (P less than 0.001). Plasma cortisol concentrations decreased to a greater extent (P less than 0.05) with morphine, while plasma glucose...

  3. Basic concepts in metal work failure after metastatic spine tumour surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Patel, Ravish; Wadhwa, Anshuja Charvi; Kumar, Aravind; Milavec, Helena Maria; Sonawane, Dhiraj; Singh, Gurpal; Benneker, Lorin Michael

    2018-04-01

    The development of spinal implants marks a watershed in the evolution of metastatic spine tumour surgery (MSTS), which has evolved from standalone decompressive laminectomy to instrumented stabilization and decompression with reconstruction when necessary. Fusion may not be feasible after MSTS due to poor quality of graft host bed along with adjunct chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy postoperatively. With an increase in the survival of patients with spinal tumours, there is a probability of an increase in the rate of implant failure. This review aims to help establish a clear understanding of implants/constructs used in MSTS and to highlight the fundamental biomechanics of implant/construct failures. Published literature on implant failure after spine surgery and MSTS has been reviewed. The evolution of spinal implants and their role in MSTS has been briefly described. The review defines implant/construct failures using radiological parameters that are practical, feasible, and derived from historical descriptions. We have discussed common modes of implant/construct failure after MSTS to allow further understanding, interception, and prevention of catastrophic failure. Implant failure rates in MSTS are in the range of 2-8%. Variability in patterns of failure has been observed based on anatomical region and the type of constructs used. Patients with construct/implant failures may or may not be symptomatic and present either as early (failures (> 3months). It has been noted that not all the implant failures after MSTS result in revisions. Based on the observed radiological criteria and clinical presentations, we have proposed a clinico-radiological classification for implant/construct failure after MSTS.

  4. Clinical results of nonsurgical treatment for spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Hirohisa; Takahashi, Mitsuru; Inagaki, Jiro; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Sugiura, Hideshi; Yamamura, Shigeki; Iwata, Hisashi

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: In contrast with many analyses of surgical treatment for spinal metastases, there have been only a few recent well-documented publications assessing nonsurgical treatment. This paper is a study of the outcome of nonsurgical therapy for metastatic tumors of the spine. Methods and Materials: One hundred and one patients with spinal metastases were treated with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy without surgical intervention between 1990 and 1995, in prospective analysis, and had follow-up for more than 24 months. This study included 59 men and 42 women with a mean age of 61 years (range: 14 to 81). Mean follow-up periods were 11 months for patients dying of the disease and 53 months for the survivors. Neurological status, pain relief, functional improvement, and cumulative survival rate were assessed. Results: Of the total treated, 67 patients (66%) were evaluated as being neurologically stable or improved after treatment. Pain relief was achieved in 67%, and 64% showed functional improvement. Primary lesion responsiveness to nonsurgical therapy influenced the survival, neurological recovery, pain control, and function. Neurological findings before therapy were useful in predicting ambulatory status after treatment. Conclusion: Nonsurgical treatment was often successful when primary tumors had responsiveness to radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. We found this to be evident even when neurological deficits were found, particularly in lumbar spines. Spinal metastases of tumors with less responsiveness, unless patients were neurologically intact, responded poorly to therapy. Most of the patients who were successfully treated enjoyed relief lasting nearly until death. Their functional ability was limited by general debility, rather than by local tumor regeneration

  5. Pre-metastatic niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peinado, Héctor; Zhang, Haiying; Matei, Irina R.

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that organs of future metastasis are not passive receivers of circulating tumour cells, but are instead selectively and actively modified by the primary tumour before metastatic spread has even occurred. Sowing the 'seeds' of metastasis requires the action of tumour......-secreted factors and tumour-shed extracellular vesicles that enable the 'soil' at distant metastatic sites to encourage the outgrowth of incoming cancer cells. In this Review, we summarize the main processes and new mechanisms involved in the formation of the pre-metastatic niche....

  6. Comparative proteomic investigation of metastatic and non-metastatic osteosarcoma cells of human and canine origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnabi Roy

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in dogs and people. In order to improve clinical outcomes, it is necessary to identify proteins that are differentially expressed by metastatic cells. Membrane bound proteins are responsible for multiple pro-metastatic functions. Therefore characterizing the differential expression of membranous proteins between metastatic and non-metastatic clonal variants will allow the discovery of druggable targets and consequently improve treatment methodology. The objective of this investigation was to systemically identify the membrane-associated proteomics of metastatic and non-metastatic variants of human and canine origin. Two clonal variants of divergent in vivo metastatic potential from human and canine origins were used. The plasma membranes were isolated and peptide fingerprinting was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Selected proteins were further validated using western blotting, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Over 500 proteins were identified for each cell line with nearly 40% of the proteins differentially regulated. Conserved between both species, metastatic variants demonstrated significant differences in expression of membrane proteins that are responsible for pro-metastatic functions. Additionally, CD147, CD44 and vimentin were validated using various biochemical techniques. Taken together, through a comparative proteomic approach we have identified several differentially expressed cell membrane proteins that will help in the development of future therapeutics.

  7. Comparative proteomic investigation of metastatic and non-metastatic osteosarcoma cells of human and canine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jahnabi; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Pondenis, Holly; Fan, Timothy M; Das, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in dogs and people. In order to improve clinical outcomes, it is necessary to identify proteins that are differentially expressed by metastatic cells. Membrane bound proteins are responsible for multiple pro-metastatic functions. Therefore characterizing the differential expression of membranous proteins between metastatic and non-metastatic clonal variants will allow the discovery of druggable targets and consequently improve treatment methodology. The objective of this investigation was to systemically identify the membrane-associated proteomics of metastatic and non-metastatic variants of human and canine origin. Two clonal variants of divergent in vivo metastatic potential from human and canine origins were used. The plasma membranes were isolated and peptide fingerprinting was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Selected proteins were further validated using western blotting, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Over 500 proteins were identified for each cell line with nearly 40% of the proteins differentially regulated. Conserved between both species, metastatic variants demonstrated significant differences in expression of membrane proteins that are responsible for pro-metastatic functions. Additionally, CD147, CD44 and vimentin were validated using various biochemical techniques. Taken together, through a comparative proteomic approach we have identified several differentially expressed cell membrane proteins that will help in the development of future therapeutics.

  8. Differential Expression of Ccn4 and Other Genes Between Metastatic and Non-metastatic EL4 Mouse Lymphoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    S. CHAHAL, MANPREET; TERESA KU, H.; ZHANG, ZHIHONG; M. LEGASPI, CHRISTIAN; LUO, ANGELA; M. HOPKINS, MANDI; E. MEIER, KATHRYN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous work characterized variants of the EL4 murine lymphoma cell line. Some are non-metastatic, and others metastatic, in syngenic mice. In addition, metastatic EL4 cells were stably transfected with phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which further enhanced metastasis. Materials and Methods: Microarray analyses of mRNA expression was performed for non-metastatic, metastatic, and PLD2-expressing metastatic EL4 cells. Results: Many differences were observed between non-metastatic and meta...

  9. The challenges of managing acute extradural hematoma in a Nigerian neurosurgical center--still a long way to go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emejulu, Jude Kennedy C; Uche, Enoch Ogbonnaya; Nwankwo, Ezekiel Uche

    2014-12-01

    Acute extradural hematoma (EDH) is the collection of blood in the potential space between the dura mater and endocranium within 3 days of an incident. It is usually, but not always, a neurosurgical emergency, and early treatment reduces morbidity and mortality, although the outcome is still affected by some other determinants. In Nigeria, the National Health Insurance Scheme does not cover neurosurgical cases, and patients have to pay for all of their treatment regardless of the emergency status. We evaluate epidemiologic patterns, management protocols, and outcome, especially in relation to timely operative intervention, in patients with acute extradural hematoma who presented to our recently established neurosurgical service. This prospective study comprised cases managed in our center from May 2006 to July 2013. Data of all patients with acute EDH were collected on Microsoft Excel software and complemented with hospital charts and operative records. Demographic data, etiologic factors, time interval from injury to presentation in our service, time interval from presentation to definitive treatment, and outcome were collected and analyzed. Within the 86-month study period, 1648 patients presented to our service with head injuries. Acute EDH constituted 3.03%, with a mean of 7.14 cases per year. Among the cases of acute EDH, 92% involved male patients (male-to-female ratio, 11.5:1). Peak age incidence (42%) was 21-30 years (mean, 23 years), and motorcycle road traffic accident was the most common etiologic factor (72%). Operative treatment was performed in 84% of the cases (in 57.1%, operative treatment occurred within 1 week of presentation). Conservative management was employed in 10% of cases. Mortality was 14.9%; most (10%) had severe head injury, although 2.1% had mild injury known to be associated with 0% mortality. Acute EDH is a potentially fatal condition that is easily treatable if presentation, diagnosis, and treatment occur promptly. Our outcomes could

  10. Intrinsic Vertebral Markers for Spinal Level Localization in Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Deepak Kumar; Thakur, Anil; Jain, Mukul; Arya, Arvind; Tripathi, Chandrabhushan; Kumari, Rima; Kushwaha, Suman

    2016-12-01

    Prospective clinical study. To observe the usefulness of anterior cervical osteophytes as intrinsic markers for spinal level localization (SLL) during sub-axial cervical spinal surgery via the anterior approach. Various landmarks, such as the mandibular angle, hyoid bone, thyroid cartilage, first cricoid ring, and C6 carotid tubercle, are used for gross cervical SLL; however, none are used during cervical spinal surgery via the anterior approach. We present our preliminary assessment of SLL over anterior vertebral surfaces (i.e., intrinsic markers) in 48 consecutive cases of anterior cervical spinal surgeries for the disc-osteophyte complex (DOC) in degenerative diseases and granulation or tumor tissue associated with infectious or neoplastic diseases, respectively, at an ill-equipped center. This prospective study on patients undergoing anterior cervical surgery for various sub-axial cervical spinal pathologies aimed to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of SLL via intraoperative palpation of disease-related morphological changes on anterior vertebral surfaces visible on preoperative midline sagittal T1/2-weighted magnetic resonance images. During a 3-year period, 48 patients (38 males,10 females; average age, 43.58 years) who underwent surgery via the anterior approach for various sub-axial cervical spinal pathologies, including degenerative disease (n= 42), tubercular infection (Pott's disease; n=3), traumatic prolapsed disc (n=2), and a metastatic lesion from thyroid carcinoma (n=1), comprised the study group. Intrinsic marker palpation yielded accurate SLL in 79% of patients (n=38). Among those with degenerative diseases (n=42), intrinsic marker palpation yielded accurate SLL in 76% of patients (n=32). Intrinsic marker palpation is an attractive potential adjunct for SLL during cervical spinal surgeries via the anterior approach in well-selected patients at ill-equipped centers (e.g., those found in developing countries). This technique may prove helpful

  11. Predictors of survival in surgically treated patients of spinal metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Padalkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The spinal metastasis occurs in up to 40% of cancer patient. We compared the Tokuhashi and Tomita scoring systems, two commonly used scoring systems for prognosis in spinal metastases. We also assessed the different variables separately with respect to their value in predicting postsurgical life expectancy. Finally, we suggest criteria for selecting patients for surgery based on the postoperative survival pattern. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 102 patients who had been operated for metastatic disease of the spine. Predictive scoring was done according to the scoring systems proposed by Tokuhashi and Tomita. Overall survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Using the log rank test and Cox regression model we assessed the value of the individual components of each scoring system for predicting survival in these patients. Result: The factors that were most significantly associated with survival were the general condition score (Karnofsky Performance Scale (P=.000, log rank test, metastasis to internal organs (P=.0002 log rank test, and number of extraspinal bone metastases (P=.0058. Type of primary tumor was not found to be significantly associated with survival according to the revised Tokuhashi scoring system (P=.9131, log rank test. Stepwise logistic regression revealed that the Tomita score correlated more closely with survival than the Tokuhashi score. Conclusion: The patient′s performance status, extent of visceral metastasis, and extent of bone metastases are significant predictors of survival in patients with metastatic disease. Both revised Tokuhashi and Tomita scores were significantly correlated with survival. A revised Tokuhashi score of 7 or more and a Tomita score of 6 or less indicated >50% chance of surviving 6 months postoperatively. We recommend that the Tomita score be used for prognostication in patients who are contemplating surgery, as it is simpler to score and has a higher

  12. Differentiation of Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Mesenteric Lymph Nodes by Strain Elastography in Surgical Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havre, R F; Leh, S M; Gilja, O H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate if strain elastography could differentiate between metastatic and non-metastatic mesenteric lymph nodes ex-vivo. Materials and Methods: 90 mesenteric lymph nodes were examined shortly after resection from 25 patients including 17 patients with colorectal cancer and 8...... patients with Crohn's disease. Ultrasound-based strain elastography was performed with a linear probe. Tissue hardness in lymph nodes was assessed using visual scales and measuring the strain ratio. B-mode characteristics were also recorded. Pathological diagnosis with grading of fibrosis served...... non-metastatic nodes, but the difference was not significant (65.5 vs. 55.0, p = 0.055). There was no difference between lymph nodes in Crohn's and non-metastatic cancer specimens. The metastatic lymph nodes were significantly more fibrotic than the non-metastatic lymph nodes by the ordinal fibrosis...

  13. Agreement in the assessment of metastatic spine disease using scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Kovacs, Francisco M; Royuela, Ana; Asenjo, Beatriz; Pérez-Ramírez, Ursula; Zamora, Javier

    2015-04-01

    To assess variability in the use of Tomita and modified Bauer scores in spine metastases. Clinical data and imaging from 90 patients with biopsy-proven spinal metastases, were provided to 83 specialists from 44 hospitals. Spinal levels involved and the Tomita and modified Bauer scores for each case were determined twice by each clinician, with a minimum of 6-week interval. Clinicians were blinded to every evaluation. Kappa statistic was used to assess intra and inter-observer agreement. Subgroup analyses were performed according to clinicians' specialty (medical oncology, neurosurgery, radiology, orthopedic surgery and radiation oncology), years of experience (⩽7, 8-13, ⩾14), and type of hospital (four levels). For metastases identification, intra-observer agreement was "substantial" (0.600.80) at the other levels. Inter-observer agreement was "almost perfect" at lumbar spine, and "substantial" at the other levels. Intra-observer agreement for the Tomita and Bauer scores was almost perfect. Inter-observer agreement was almost perfect for the Tomita score and substantial for the Bauer one. Results were similar across specialties, years of experience and type of hospital. Agreement in the assessment of metastatic spine disease is high. These scoring systems can improve communication among clinicians involved in oncology care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential Expression of Ccn4 and Other Genes Between Metastatic and Non-metastatic EL4 Mouse Lymphoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Manpreet S; Ku, H Teresa; Zhang, Zhihong; Legaspi, Christian M; Luo, Angela; Hopkins, Mandi M; Meier, Kathryn E

    Previous work characterized variants of the EL4 murine lymphoma cell line. Some are non-metastatic, and others metastatic, in syngenic mice. In addition, metastatic EL4 cells were stably transfected with phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which further enhanced metastasis. Microarray analyses of mRNA expression was performed for non-metastatic, metastatic, and PLD2-expressing metastatic EL4 cells. Many differences were observed between non-metastatic and metastatic cell lines. One of the most striking new findings was up-regulation of mRNA for the matricellular protein WNT1-inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (CCN4) in metastatic cells; increased protein expression was verified by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Other differentially expressed genes included those for reproductive homeobox 5 (Rhox5; increased in metastatic) and cystatin 7 (Cst7; decreased in metastatic). Differences between PLD2-expressing and parental cell lines were limited but included the signaling proteins Ras guanyl releasing protein 1 (RGS18; increased with PLD2) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2; decreased with PLD2). The results provide insights into signaling pathways potentially involved in conferring metastatic ability on lymphoma cells. Copyright© 2016, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Spinal metastasis of medulloblastoma in adults: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medulloblastoma is a primitive neuro-ectodermal malignant tumor most commonly seen in childhood and rarely and uncommonly in adult age. Treatment consists of surgery followed by radiotherapy. In the case of a relapse there is no overall accepted treatment. Tumor metastasis can be seen along the neural axis, lymph nodes, soft tissues, bones and distant organs. Case Outline. In this paper we present a 45-year-old female patient with a thoraco-spinal extramedullary metastatic medulloblastoma and progressive neurological deterioration seen 11 months after the first operation and description of magnetic resonance and intraoperative finding. Conclusion. Although rare, the presence of metastasis is a poor prognostic factor. The treatment options for patients with metastases are limited and their prognosis continues to remain poor.

  16. Spinal and Paraspinal Ewing Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Shahlaee, Amir H.; Morris, Christopher G.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Scarborough, Mark T.; Pincus, David W.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a review of the 40-year University of Florida experience treating spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors. Patients and Methods: A total of 27 patients were treated between 1965 and 2007. For local management, 21 patients were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 6 with surgery plus RT. All patients with metastatic disease were treated with RT alone. The risk profiles of each group were otherwise similar. The median age was 17 years, and the most frequent subsite was the sacral spine (n = 9). The median potential follow-up was 16 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 62%, 62%, and 90%, respectively. For the nonmetastatic subset (n = 22), the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 71%, 71%, and 89%, respectively. The local control rate was 84% for patients treated with RT alone vs. 100% for those treated with surgery plus RT. Patients who were >14 years old and those who were treated with intensive therapy demonstrated superior local control. Of 9 patients in our series with Frankel C or greater neurologic deficits at presentation, 7 experienced a full recovery with treatment. Of the 27 patients, 37% experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3 or greater toxicity, including 2 deaths from sepsis. Conclusion: Aggressive management of spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors with RT with or without surgery results in high toxicity but excellent local control and neurologic outcomes. Efforts should be focused on identifying disease amenable to combined modality local therapy and improving RT techniques.

  17. Volumetric dynamic contrast enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) for preoperative assessment of the vascularity of spinal metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Carsten Ammitzbøl

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of measuring and grading the vascularity of spinal metastases using dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT). Materials and methods Prior to surgical treatment of symptomatic metastatic spinal cord compression, 20 patients were examined using DCE-CT. The 320......–detector row CT scanner allowed a volumetric acquisition over a range of 16 cm, covering three to four vertebrae. Image analysis was performed at a dedicated workstation, encompassing quantitative and qualitative measurement of the arterial flow (AF) in mL/min/100mL of the vertebrae. The perfusion values...... were analysed using a single input, maximum slope model. The AF assessed by DCE-CT of affected and non-affected vertebrae will be compared, and furthermore, the correlation between AF and intraoperative blood loss will be examined. Results Preliminary results for 5 patients: In two patients the AF...

  18. Evaluation of the MRI with Gd-DTPA enhancement in the diagnosis of brain and spinal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Keiji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Miki, Hitoshi; Sakaki, Saburo; Matsuoka, Kenzo.

    1988-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed using saturation recovery (SR), inversion recovery (IR) and spin echo (SE) pulse sequences before and after the injection of 0.1 mmol of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) per kilogram of body weight. Forty-two patients with gliomas (8), meningiomas (12), neurinomas (5), adenoma (1), craniopharyngioma (1), chordoma (1), malignant lymphomas (2), metastatic brain tumors (2), spinal tumors (4), and other tumors (6) were studied. Contrast enhancement was shown in 35 of the 38 patients with brain tumors and in all those with spinal tumors on T/sub 1/-weighted images. The T/sub 1/ relaxation time was decreased in all of these 39 tumors, while the T/sub 2/ relaxation time showed no definite tendency. No marked side effects were observed following the administration of Gd-DTPA. By using Gd-DTPA enhancement, it was possible to differentiate the tumor from the peritumoral edema on MRI, although it was difficult to do so on precontrast MRI. Among the various pulse sequences, the SR sequence provides the best diagnostic value with Gd-DTPA enhancement in the shortest examination time for screening brain and spinal tumors.

  19. Posterior epidural disc fragment masquerading as spinal tumor: Review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taejune; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Jae Seong; Nam, Kiyeun

    2018-03-09

    Posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment is infrequent because of anatomical barriers, and it is difficult to diagnose posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment because of its rare incidence and the ambiguity of radiologic evaluations. And it is difficult to differentiate it from other diseases such as spinal tumors. Differential diagnosis of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment is clinically important because its diagnosis can affect treatment and prognosis. To investigate the incidence, anatomical concern, etiology, symptom, diagnostic tool, management and prognosis of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment, we reviewed articles including case report. We performed a search of all clinical studies of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment published to date. The following keywords were searched: Posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment, disc migration, posterior epidural disc, extradural migration, dorsal epidural migration, sequestrated disc, and disc fragment. We identified 40 patients of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment from 28 studies. The most common presentation of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment was sudden onset radiculopathy (70.0%), followed by cauda equina syndrome (27.5%). The most frequently used diagnostic modality was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conducted in 36 cases (90.0%), and followed by computed tomography in 14 cases (35.0%). After the imaging studies, the preoperative diagnoses were 45.0% masses, 20.0% lesions, and 12.5% tumors. Characteristic MRI findings in posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment are helpful for diagnosis; it typically displays low signals on T1-weighted images and high signals on T2-weighted images with respect to the parent disc. In addition, most of the disc fragments show peripheral rim enhancement on MRI with gadolinium administration. Electrodiagnostic testing is useful for verifying nerve damage. Surgical treatment was performed in all cases, and neurologic complications were observed in 12.5%. As

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastases: a literature review; Radiocirurgia estereotaxica para metastases de coluna vertebral: revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Ghizoni, Enrico; Tedeschi, Helder; Pereira, Eduardo Baldon; Giacomini, Leonardo Abdala, E-mail: andjoaquim@yahoo.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2013-04-15

    Objective: The spine is the most common location for bone metastases. Since cure is not possible, local control and relief of symptoms is the basis for treatment, which is grounded on the use of conventional radiotherapy. Recently, spinal radiosurgery has been proposed for the local control of spinal metastases, whether as primary or salvage treatment. Consequently, we carried out a literature review in order to analyze the indications, efficacy, and safety of radiosurgery in the treatment of spinal metastases. Methods: We have reviewed the literature using the PubMed gateway with data from the Medline library on studies related to the use of radiosurgery in treatment of bone metastases in spine. The studies were reviewed by all the authors and classified as to level of evidence, using the criterion defined by Wright. Results: The indications found for radiosurgery were primary control of epidural metastases (evidence level II), myeloma (level III), and metastases known to be poor responders to conventional radiotherapy - melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (level III). Spinal radiosurgery was also proposed for salvage treatment after conventional radiotherapy (level II). There is also some evidence as to the safety and efficacy of radiosurgery in cases of extramedullar and intramedullar intradural metastatic tumors (level III) and after spinal decompression and stabilization surgery. Conclusion: Radiosurgery can be used in primary or salvage treatment of spinal metastases, improving local disease control and patient symptoms. It should also be considered as initial treatment for radioresistant tumors, such as melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  1. Metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes. Quantification and different distribution of iodine uptake assessed by dual-energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Stefania [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Radice, Davide [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Femia, Marco; Vigorito, Raffaella [Universita di Milano, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); De Marco, Paolo; Origgi, Daniela [Medical Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Preda, Lorenzo [Division of Radiology, National Centre of Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO Foundation), Pavia (Italy); University of Pavia, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, Pavia (Italy); Barberis, Massimo [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Pathology, Milan (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Interventional Radiology, Milan (Italy); Mauro, Alberto [GE Medical Systems Italia SpA, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano, Department of Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    2018-02-15

    To evaluate quantification of iodine uptake in metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) by dual-energy CT (DECT) and to assess if the distribution of iodine within LNs at DECT correlates with the pathological structure. Ninety LNs from 37 patients (23 with lung and 14 with gynaecological malignancies) were retrospectively selected. Information of LNs sent for statistical analysis included Hounsfield units (HU) at different energy levels; decomposition material densities fat-iodine, iodine-fat, iodine-water, water-iodine. Statistical analysis included evaluation of interobserver variability, material decomposition densities and spatial HU distribution within LNs. Interobserver agreement was excellent. There was a significant difference in iodine-fat and iodine-water decompositions comparing metastatic and non-metastatic LNs (p < 0.001); fat-iodine and water-iodine did not show significant differences. HU distribution showed a significant gradient from centre to periphery within non-metastatic LNs that was significant up to 20-30% from the centre, whereas metastatic LNs showed a more homogeneous distribution of HU, with no significant gradient. DECT demonstrated a lower iodine uptake in metastatic compared to non-metastatic LNs. Moreover, the internal iodine distribution showed an evident gradient of iodine distribution from centre to periphery in non-metastatic LNs, and a more homogeneous distribution within metastatic LNs, which corresponded to the pathological structure. (orig.)

  2. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  3. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  4. Agreement between T2 and haste sequences in the evaluation of thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankin, Joseph M; Hecht, Silke; Thomas, William B

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare half-Fourier-acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) and T2-weighted (T2-W) sequences in dogs with thoracolumbar disc extrusion. MRI studies in 60 dogs (767 individual intervertebral disc spaces) were evaluated. Agreement between T2-W and HASTE sequences was assessed for two criteria: presence of an extradural lesion and treatment recommendation. There was moderate agreement between T2-W and HASTE sequences as to presence of an extradural lesion (kappa = 0.575). HASTE was in agreement in 96.1% of the sites where no extradural lesion was identified on T2-W images, but only in 58.1% of the sites where extradural lesions were identified on T2-W images. There was also moderate agreement between T2-W and HASTE sequences as to treatment recommendations (kappa = 0.476). HASTE was in agreement in 98.4% of the sites where a lesion was considered nonsurgical on T2 but only 82.1% of sites a lesion was considered surgical on T2. In 1.0% of sites considered not surgical and in 9.8% of sites considered equivocal based on T2-W images, a surgical lesion was identified on HASTE. Acquisition of a HASTE sequence in addition to conventional sequences may be beneficial in determining the severity of spinal cord compression in some cases when evaluating the canine spine.

  5. Evaluation of dual energy spectral CT in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer: Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huanhuan [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Department of Radiology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine (China); Yan, Fuhua; Pan, Zilai; Lin, Xiaozhu; Luo, Xianfu; Shi, Cen [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Xiaoyan [Department of Pathology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Baisong [Department of Biomedical Statistics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Huan, E-mail: huanzhangy@126.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer and the status of the regional lymph nodes in rectal cancer is considered to be one of the most powerful prognostic factor in the absence of distant metastatic disease. Detecting LNs metastasis is still a challenging problem due to the presence of microscopic metastasis or inflammatory swelling of LNs. • We investigated the value of dual energy spectral CT in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer. Our study demonstrated that the quantitative normalized iodine concentration (nIC) could be useful for differentiating metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes. The combination of nIC in portal venous phase and conventional size criterion could improve the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of rectal cancer. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the value of dual energy spectral CT (DEsCT) imaging in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer. Methods: Fifty-five patients with rectal cancer underwent the arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PP) contrast-enhanced DEsCT imaging. The virtual monochromatic images and iodine-based material decomposition images derived from DEsCT imaging were interpreted for lymph nodes (LNs) measurement. The short axis diameter and the normalized iodine concentration (nIC) of metastatic and non-metastatic LNs were measured. The two-sample t test was used to compare the short axis diameters and nIC values of metastatic and non-metastatic LNs. ROC analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: One hundred and fifty two LNs including 92 non-metastatic LNs and 60 metastatic LNs were matched using the radiological-pathological correlation. The mean short axis diameter of metastatic LNs was significantly larger than that of the non-metastatic LNs (7.28 ± 2.28 mm vs. 4.90 ± 1.64 mm, P < 0.001). The mean n

  6. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  7. Agreement in the assessment of metastatic spine disease using scoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Kovacs, Francisco M.; Royuela, Ana; Asenjo, Beatriz; Pérez-Ramírez, Ursula; Zamora, Javier; Abraira, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess variability in the use of Tomita and modified Bauer scores in spine metastases. Materials and methods: Clinical data and imaging from 90 patients with biopsy-proven spinal metastases, were provided to 83 specialists from 44 hospitals. Spinal levels involved and the Tomita and modified Bauer scores for each case were determined twice by each clinician, with a minimum of 6-week interval. Clinicians were blinded to every evaluation. Kappa statistic was used to assess intra and inter-observer agreement. Subgroup analyses were performed according to clinicians’ specialty (medical oncology, neurosurgery, radiology, orthopedic surgery and radiation oncology), years of experience (⩽7, 8–13, ⩾14), and type of hospital (four levels). Results: For metastases identification, intra-observer agreement was “substantial” (0.60 < k < 0.80) at sacrum, and “almost perfect” (k > 0.80) at the other levels. Inter-observer agreement was “almost perfect” at lumbar spine, and “substantial” at the other levels. Intra-observer agreement for the Tomita and Bauer scores was almost perfect. Inter-observer agreement was almost perfect for the Tomita score and substantial for the Bauer one. Results were similar across specialties, years of experience and type of hospital. Conclusion: Agreement in the assessment of metastatic spine disease is high. These scoring systems can improve communication among clinicians involved in oncology care

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ... Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  10. Effectiveness of radiation therapy without surgery in metastatic spinal cord compression: final results from a prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Latini, Paolo

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: In assessing effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), we performed a prospective trial in which patients with this complication were generally treated with RT plus steroids, and surgery was reserved for selected cases. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-five consecutive patients with MSCC entered this protocol. Twenty (7%) underwent surgery plus RT, another 255 received RT alone. Of all eligible patients, 25 (10%) early deaths and 21 (8%) entering a feasibility study of RT without steroids, were not evaluable. Of the 209 evaluable cases, 110 were females and 99 males, and median age was 62 years. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 13 to 88) and treatment consisted of 30 Gy RT (using two different schedules) together with steroids (standard or high doses, depending on motor deficit severity). Response was assessed according to back pain and motor and bladder function before and after therapy. Results: Back pain total response rate was 82% (complete or partial response or stable pain, 54, 17, or 11%, respectively). About three-fourths of the patients (76%) achieved full recovery or preservation of walking ability and 44% with sphincter dysfunction improved. Early diagnosis was the most important response predictor so that a large majority of patients able to walk and with good bladder function maintained these capacities. When diagnosis was late, tumors with favorable histologies (i.e., myeloma, breast, and prostate carcinomas) above all responded to RT. Duration of response was also influenced by histology. Favorable histologies are associated to higher median response (myeloma, breast, and prostate carcinomas, 16, 12, and 10 months, respectively). Median survival time was 6 months, with a 28% probability of survival for 1 year. Survival time was longer for patients able to walk before and/or after RT, those with favourable histologies, and females. There was agreement between patient survival and

  11. A rare case of spinal cord compression due to cervical spine metastases from paraganglioma of the jugular foramen-how should it be treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Chourmouzi, Danai; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Katsaridis, Vasileios; Eleftheriadis, Eleftherios; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2018-02-01

    Paragangliomas are benign neoplasms that arise from the autonomic nervous system and the associated paraganglia. Although benign, they have been shown to possess metastatic potential. Involvement of the spine is rare. Even rarer is considered the involvement of the cervical spine. We report a case of a patient with a history of an extra-adrenal non-functional paraganglioma of the jugular foramen which was initially treated with intra-arterial embolization. After a 3-year disease-free follow-up, the patient was presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression due to spinal metastases in C2 and C3 vertebrae. The patient was then treated with surgical decompression and external beam radiation. Therapeutic management with additional treatment options is now under discussion by a multidisciplinary team. Paraganglioma of the jugular foramen with spinal metastasis is an uncommon presentation where increased physician awareness and long-term follow-up are mandatory for all patients with history of paraganglioma.

  12. Acute extradural haematomas in children: A single neurosurgery unit's 12-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enicker, B; Louw, H; Madiba, T

    2016-11-01

    Acute extradural haematomas (AEDHs) occur infrequently in children. This study was undertaken to review our experience with management and outcomes of this condition in children treated in the Neurosurgery Unit at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital. A retrospective review of medical records of all children (age less than or equal to (≤) 12 years) with a diagnosis of AEDH admitted from January 2003 to December 2014 was performed. Records were analyzed for demographics, mechanisms of injury, clinical presentation, neuroradiology findings, management and outcomes at discharge. A total of 150 children with AEDHs were admitted during this period. The mean age was 6.6 ± 3.8 years with a peak incidence in the 7-9 year age group. There were 84 (56%) males, (M: F= 1.3:1). Sixty AEDHs resulted from road traffic crashes (40%). On admission 104 (69.3%) children were Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 13-15, 26 (17.3%) GCS 9-12 and 20 (13.4%) GCS 3-8. Haemoglobin was less than (children and the mean hospital stay was 6.9 ± 6.1 days. Four children (2.7%) died during in-hospital stay period. One hundred and forty one (94%) children had a favourable Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) at discharge. AEDHs in children carry a good prognosis, but can be potentially fatal. A vigilant approach is required when assessing these children, as early diagnosis and treatment yields gratifying results.

  13. Radiation-induced myelopathy in long-term surviving metastatic spinal cord compression patients after hypofractionated radiotherapy: a clinical and magnetic resonance imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maranzano, Ernesto; Bellavita, Rita; Floridi, Piero; Celani, Grazia; Righetti, Enrico; Lupattelli, Marco; Panizza, Bianca Moira; Frattegiani, Alessandro; Pelliccioli, Gian Piero; Latini, Paolo

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy is often administered in metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), but no studies have been published on the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy (RIM) in long-term surviving patients. Our report addresses this topic. Patients and methods: Of 465 consecutive MSCC patients submitted to radiotherapy between 1988 and 1997, 13 live patients (seven females, six males, median age 69 years, median follow-up 69 months) surviving for 2 years or more were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate RIM. All patients underwent radiotherapy. Eight patients underwent a short-course regimen of 8 Gy, with 7 days rest, and then another 8 Gy. Five patients underwent a split-course regimen of 5 Gy x3, 4 days rest, and then 3 Gy x5. Only one patient also underwent laminectomy. Full neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. Results: Of 12 patients submitted to radiotherapy alone, 11 were ambulant (eight without support and three with support) with good bladder function. In nine of these 11 patients, MRI was negative; in one case MRI evidenced an in-field relapse 30 months after the end of radiotherapy, and in the other, two new MSCC foci outside the irradiated spine. In the remaining patient RIM was suspected at 18 months after radiotherapy when the patient became paraplegic and cystoplegic, and magnetic resonance images evidenced an ischemic injury in the irradiated area. The only patient treated with surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy worsened and remained paraparetic. Magnetic resonance images showed cord atrophy at the surgical level, explained as an ischemic necrosis due to surgery injury. Conclusions: On the grounds of our data regarding RIM in long-term surviving MSCC patients, we believe that a hypofractionated radiotherapy regimen can be used for the majority of patients. For a minority of patients, more protracted radiation regimens could be considered

  14. Predictors of Chemotherapy-Induced Toxicity and Treatment Outcomes in Elderly Versus Younger Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Lindberg, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    records from 421 consecutive patients treated with first-line docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) and low-dose prednisolone from 2007 to 2013 at Herlev University Hospital were reviewed. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0, and the Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 guidelines were...... used to evaluate treatment-related toxicity and efficacy. Logistic and Cox regression models were used to predict toxicity and survival. RESULTS: Age ≥ 75 years (odds ratio [OR], 2.33), baseline levels of hemoglobin (OR, 0.89), and previous metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC; OR, 1...

  15. Cement-augmented dorsal instrumentation of the spine as a safe adjunct to the multimodal management of metastatic pheochromocytoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rittirsch Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant pheochromocytoma is a neuroendocrine tumor that originates from chromaffin tissue. Although osseous metastases are common, metastatic dissemination to the spine rarely occurs. Five years after primary diagnosis of extra-adrenal, abdominal pheochromocytoma and laparoscopic extirpation, a 53-year old patient presented with recurrence of pheochromocytoma involving the spine, the pelvis, both proximal femora and the right humerus. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed osteolytic lesions of numerous vertebrae (T1, T5, T10, and T12. In the case of T10, total destruction of the vertebral body with involvement of the rear edge resulted in the risk of vertebral collapse and subsequent spinal stenosis. Thus, dorsal instrumentation (T8-T12 and cement augmentation of T12 was performed after perioperative alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade with phenoxybenzamine and bisoprolol. After thorough preoperative evaluation to assess the risk for surgery and anesthesia, and appropriate perioperative management including pharmacological antihypertensive treatment, dorsal instrumentation of T8-T12 and cement augmentation of T12 prior to placing the corresponding pedicle screws did not result in hypertensive crisis or hemodynamic instability due to the release of catecholamines from metastatic lesions. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report describing cement-augmentation in combination with dorsal instrumentation to prevent osteolytic vertebral collapse in a patient with metastatic pheochromocytoma. With appropriate preoperative measures, cement-augmented dorsal instrumentation represents a safe approach to stabilize vertebral bodies with metastatic malignant pheochromocytoma. Nevertheless, direct manipulation of metastatic lesions should be avoided as far as possible in order to minimize the risk of hemodynamic complications.

  16. Factors predictive of survival and estimated years of life lost in the decade following nontraumatic and traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, B B; Wood-Wentz, C M; Therneau, T M; Walker, M G; Payne, J M; Reeves, R K

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective chart review. To identify factors predictive of survival after spinal cord injury (SCI). Tertiary care institution. Multiple-variable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis for 759 patients with SCI (535 nontraumatic and 221 traumatic) included age, sex, completeness of injury, level of injury, functional independence measure (FIM) scores, rehabilitation length of stay and SCI cause. Estimated years of life lost in the decade after injury was calculated for patients vs uninjured controls. Median follow-up was 11.4 years. Population characteristics included paraplegia, 58%; complete injury, 11%; male sex, 64%; and median rehabilitation length of stay, 16 days. Factors independently predictive of decreased survival were increased age (+10 years; hazard ratio (HR (95% CI)), 1.6 (1.4-1.7)), male sex (1.3 (1.0-1.6)), lower dismissal FIM score (-10 points; 1.3 (1.2-1.3)) and all nontraumatic causes. Metastatic cancer had the largest decrease in survival (HR (95% CI), 13.3 (8.7-20.2)). Primary tumors (HR (95% CI), 2.5 (1.7-3.8)), vascular (2.5 (1.6-3.8)), musculoskeletal/stenosis (1.7 (1.2-2.5)) and other nontraumatic SCI (2.3 (1.5-3.6)) were associated with decreased survival. Ten-year survival was decreased in nontraumatic SCI (mean (s.d.), 1.8 (0.3) years lost), with largest decreases in survival for metastatic cancer and spinal cord ischemia. Age, male sex and lower dismissal FIM score were associated with decreased survival, but neither injury severity nor level was associated with it. Survival after SCI varies depending on SCI cause, with survival better after traumatic SCI than after nontraumatic SCI. Metastatic cancer and vascular ischemia were associated with the greatest survival reduction.

  17. Hemophilia and child abuse as possible causes of epidural hematoma: case report Hemofilia e abuso infantil como possíveis causas de hematoma extradural: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Campos Gomes Pinto

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Head trauma is an important consequence of child abuse. Specific pathophysiological mechanisms in child abuse are responsible for the ''whiplash shaken-baby syndrome'', which would favour the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhages. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a child who developed epidural hematoma following minor-intensity head trauma. Initial diagnosis of child abuse was made, but subsequent investigation led to the diagnosis of hemophilia A. CONCLUSION: Even though epidural hematoma is not closely associated with child abuse, this aethiology must always be considered when the reported trauma mechanism is out of proportion to the magnitude of the encountered lesions.INTRODUÇÃO: Traumatismo crânio-encefálico é importante conseqüência de abuso infantil. Mecanismos fisiopatológicos específicos do abuso infantil são responsáveis pela ''whiplash shaken-baby syndrome'', o que favoreceria o aparecimento de hemorragias intracranianas. RELATO DE CASO: Relatamos o caso de uma criança que desenvolveu hematoma extradural após trauma de pequena intensidade. Foi feito diagnóstico inicial de abuso infantil, mas investigações subseqüentes levaram ao diagnóstico de hemofilia A. CONCLUSÃO: Embora o hematoma extradural não esteja intimamente relacionado com abuso infantil, esta etiologia deve ser sempre considerada quando o mecanismo de trauma relatado estiver fora de proporção com as lesões encontradas.

  18. Computed tomography of the spinal canal for the cervical spine and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Isao; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Nasu, Kichiro; Shioya, Akihide; Ohhama, Mitsuru

    1983-01-01

    The cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord were measured in normal cases and 34 cases of spinal or spinal cord injury. The anteroposterior diameter and area of the normal cervical spinal canal showed a high correlation. The area ratio of the normal cervical spinal canal to the cervical spinal cord showed that the proportion of the cervical spinal cord in the spinal canal was 1/3 - 1/5, Csub(4,5) showing a particularly large proportion. In acute and subacute spinal or spinal cord injury, CT visualized in more details of the spinal canal in cases that x-ray showed definite bone injuries. Computer assisted myelography visualized more clearly the condition of the spinal cord in cases without definite findings bone injuries on x-ray. Demonstrating the morphology of spinal injury in more details, CT is useful for selection of therapy for injured spines. (Chiba, N.)

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal ...

  20. Multilevel 3D Printing Implant for Reconstructing Cervical Spine With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiucan; Wang, Yiguo; Zhao, Yongfei; Liu, Jianheng; Xiao, Songhua; Mao, Keya

    2017-11-15

    MINI: A 3D printing technology is proposed for reconstructing multilevel cervical spine (C2-C4) after resection of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. The personalized porous implant printed in Ti6AL4V provided excellent physicochemical properties and biological performance, including biocompatibility, osteogenic activity, and bone ingrowth effect. A unique case report. A three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is proposed for reconstructing multilevel cervical spine (C2-C4) after resection of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma in a middle-age female patient. Papillary thyroid carcinoma is a malignant neoplasm with a relatively favorable prognosis. A metastatic lesion in multilevel cervical spine (C2-C4) destroys neurological functions and causes local instability. Radical excision of the metastasis and reconstruction of the cervical vertebrae sequence conforms with therapeutic principles, whereas the special-shaped multilevel upper-cervical spine requires personalized implants. 3D printing is an additive manufacturing technology that produces personalized products by accurately layering material under digital model control via a computer. Reporting of this recent technology for reconstructing multilevel cervical spine (C2-C4) is rare in the literature. Anterior-posterior surgery was performed in one stage. Radical resection of the metastatic lesion (C2-C4) and thyroid gland, along with insertion of a personalized implant manufactured by 3D printing technology, were performed to rebuild the cervical spine sequences. The porous implant was printed in Ti6AL4V with perfect physicochemical properties and biological performance, such as biocompatibility and osteogenic activity. Finally, lateral mass screw fixation was performed via a posterior approach. Patient neurological function gradually improved after the surgery. The patient received 11/17 on the Japanese Orthopedic Association scale and ambulated with a personalized skull-neck-thorax orthosis on

  1. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  2. Optical imaging of metabolic adaptability in metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Lisa; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2018-02-01

    Accurate methods for determining metastatic risk from the primary tumor are crucial for patient survival. Cell metabolism could potentially be used as a marker of metastatic risk. Optical imaging of the endogenous fluorescent molecules nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) provides a non-destructive and label-free method for determining cell metabolism. The optical redox ratio (FAD/FAD+NADH) is sensitive to the balance between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We have previously established that hypoxia-reoxygenation stress leads to metastatic potential-dependent changes in optical redox ratio. The objective of this study was to monitor the changes in optical redox ratio in breast cancer cells in response to different periods of hypoxic stress as well various levels of hypoxia to establish an optimal protocol. We measured the optical redox ratio of highly metastatic 4T1 murine breast cancer cells under normoxic conditions and after exposure to 30, 60, and 120 minutes of 0.5% O2. This was followed by an hour of reoxygenation. We found an increase in the optical redox ratio following reoxygenation from hypoxia for all durations. Statistically significant differences were observed at 60 and 120 minutes (p˂0.01) compared with normoxia, implying an ability to adapt to OXPHOS after reoxygenation. The switch to OXPHOS has been shown to be a key promoter of cell invasion. We will present our results from these investigations in human breast cancer cells as well as non-metastatic breast cancer cells exposed to various levels of hypoxia.

  3. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  4. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  5. Atlanto-axial approach for cervical myelography in a Thoroughbred horse with complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Monica; Dimock, Abigail N.; Wisner, Erik R.; Prutton, Jamie W.; Madigan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with clinical signs localized to the first 6 spinal cord segments (C1 to C6) had complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones which precluded performing a routine myelogram. An ultrasound-assisted myelogram at the intervertebral space between the atlas and axis was successfully done and identified a marked extradural compressive myelopathy at the level of the atlas and axis, and axis and third cervical vertebrae. PMID:25392550

  6. Idiopathic epidural lipomatosis as a cause of pain and neurological symptoms attributed initially to radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millwater, C J; Jacobson, I; Howard, G C

    1992-09-01

    Epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition in which overgrowth of extradural fat can lead to back pain, spinal cord compression and radiculopathy. A 51-year-old man developed back pain and reduced mobility following a standard course of radiotherapy for a Stage I seminoma. His symptoms and radiological appearances were initially attributed to radiation fibrosis. Further investigations and operative intervention revealed epidural lipomatosis. The excess lipomatous tissue was removed with complete resolution of his symptoms.

  7. Group B streptococcal metastatic endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelberg, H P; Petashnick, D E; To, K W; Woodcome, H A

    1994-04-15

    Reports of invasive Group B Streptococcus infection in adults with underlying medical conditions have been increasing. Ocular infection with this organism is unusual. Metastatic endophthalmitis in adults caused by this organism has been reported rarely and has only been associated with endocarditis. We encountered two cases of Group B streptococcal metastatic endophthalmitis in adults who did not have endocarditis. These cases reflect the increasing incidence of invasive Group B Streptococcus infection with its varying manifestations. Additionally, they emphasize the importance of considering this pathogen as a cause of metastatic endophthalmitis in adults with predisposing illnesses.

  8. Differential diagnoses of spinal tumors; Differenzialdiagnose spinaler Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A wide variety of degenerative, inflammatory and vascular diseases can resemble the clinical presentation and imaging findings of spinal tumors. This article provides an overview of the most frequent diseases which are important to recognize for diagnostic imaging of the spine. (orig.) [German] Eine Vielzahl degenerativer, entzuendlicher und vaskulaerer Erkrankungen kann das klinische Bild und radiologische Befunde spinaler Tumoren imitieren. Dieser Artikel dient der Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten dieser Erkrankungen, deren Kenntnis wichtig fuer die spinale Bildgebung ist. (orig.)

  9. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  12. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  13. Spinal segmental dysgenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mahomed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a rare congenital spinal abnormality , seen in neonates and infants in which a segment of the spine and spinal cord fails to develop normally . The condition is segmental with normal vertebrae above and below the malformation. This condition is commonly associated with various abnormalities that affect the heart, genitourinary, gastrointestinal tract and skeletal system. We report two cases of spinal segmental dysgenesis and the associated abnormalities.

  14. Hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma as a complication of lumbar spinal anaesthesia: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza Gutierrez, S.; Suescun, M.; Rovira Canellas, A.; Coll Masfarre, S.; Castano Duque, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    We report two cases of hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma secondary to lumbar spinal anaesthesia, identified with MRI. Prompt diagnosis of this infrequent, potentially serious complication of spinal anaesthesia is essential, as early surgical evacuation may be needed. Suggestive MRI findings in this early phase include diffuse occupation filling of the spinal canal with poor delineation of the spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and a poorly-defined high-signal lesion with a low-signal rim on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  15. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  16. Intracardiac Metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Ho Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old man who visited Samsung Medical Center reported experiencing palpitation for 2 weeks. He had undergone excision of a mass in the right buttock due to rhabdomyosarcoma 7 years prior to this visit. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a pedunculated mass in the left ventricle, which was thought to be a vegetation of infective endocarditis, metastasis of the primary tumor, or thrombus. He underwent removal of the cardiac tumor, and the pathologic report was metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma. Thus, here, we report a rare case of metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma in the left ventricle.

  17. Computed tomography scans of metastatic hepatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Kazumasa; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nemoto, Yutaka [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography scans of 114 metastatic hepatic tumors were reviewed. Central low density was found in 82 cases (71.9%) and seems to be characteristic to metastatic hepatic tumors. Dynamic CT was performed on 34 cases, and 21 (61.8%) of these had ring enhancement at the arterial phase. Most of metastatic hepatic tumors could be differentiated from hepatocellular carcinoma. However, metastatic hepatic tumors from renal cell carcinoma, renal rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma and leiomyosarcoma could not be differentiated from hepatocellular carcinoma, even with use of dynamic study.

  18. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... What is a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  20. Extradural spinal angiolipoma associated with bone lysis in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, U.; Lowrie, C.T.; Fitzgerald, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are uncommon tumors arising from the adrenal gland, which have potential for aggressive local spread. The diagnosis is extremely challenging, particularly when classical endocrine signs are absent. This paper presents two canine cases of pheochromocytoma in the vertebral canal and illustrates the potential for detection of the tumor by abdominal ultrasonography

  1. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  2. Spinal cysts. Diagnostic workup and therapy; Spinale Zysten. Diagnostik und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simgen, A. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    Spinal cysts can be classified as meningeal, not meningeal, and tumor-associated cysts. Due to the widespread availability of high-resolution computed tomography and magnet resonance imaging, spinal cysts can be detected with high sensitivity these days. Concerning the variety of potential cystic differential diagnoses, a precise classification is difficult and can often only be realized after surgical inspection or histological examination. Spinal cysts are generally incidental findings during a routine diagnostic workup and need no further therapy. Surgical treatment can be necessary if the spinal cyst reaches a certain size and causes neurological symptoms due to the compression of the spinal cord or the nerve root. (orig.) [German] Spinale Zysten koennen in meningeale, nichtmeningeale und tumorassoziierte Zysten eingeteilt werden. Durch die weite Verbreitung von hochaufloesenden Computer- und Magnetresonanztomographen koennen spinale Zysten heutzutage mit einer hohen Sensitivitaet erkannt werden. Eine genaue Klassifikation kann sich unter der Vielzahl der moeglichen zystischen Differenzialdiagnosen schwierig gestalten und ist haeufig nur durch eine chirurgische Inspektion oder die histologische Untersuchung moeglich. Meistens werden spinale Zysten bei der Routinediagnostik als Zufallsbefunde entdeckt und benoetigen keine weitere Therapie. Erreichen sie allerdings eine gewisse Groesse, koennen sie raumfordernd auf das Myelon oder einzelne Nervenwurzeln wirken und somit ausgepraegte neurologische Symptome verursachen. In solchen Faellen ist ein chirurgisches Vorgehen zur Resektion einer spinalen Zyste notwendig. (orig.)

  3. Paraparesis secondary to erratic migration of Dioctophyma renale in a dog

    OpenAIRE

    Bach, Fernando Swiech; Klaumann, Paulo Roberto; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: A 4 years old mongrel stray bitch, weighing 16kg was submitted to physical examination to demonstrated inability of locomotion with the pelvic limbs. Extradural spinal cord compression was observed in myelotomography of the thoracolumbar segment. The patient was submitted to exploratory hemilaminectomy of T13-L1 and L1-L2, in an attempt to decompress the medullar segments. During the surgery was observed one adult parasite, identified as Dioctophyma renale , located in the extradura...

  4. Emerging Therapies in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Daniel W; Morgans, Alicia K

    2018-04-11

    In the last decade, there have been multiple landmark therapeutic advances for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, both in the castration-resistant and hormone-sensitive setting. In this review, we highlight recent progress and ongoing trials for metastatic prostate cancer, including advances in chemotherapy, androgen receptor-directed therapy, targeted therapies, and immunotherapy. Several landmark studies for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer demonstrated improvement in overall survival with the addition of docetaxel chemotherapy or abiraterone acetate to standard androgen deprivation therapy. A single-arm phase 2 study of the PARP inhibitor olaparib demonstrated high response rates and more favorable progression-free and overall survival for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and DNA repair defects treated with olaparib compared with men without DNA repair defects. Multiple ongoing clinical trials are investigating novel hormonal therapies and combinations of chemotherapy, targeted small molecules, immunotherapy, and radiopharmaceuticals. Progress continues to be made in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, and ongoing clinical trials continue to investigate novel agents and approaches to treatment.

  5. Does the application site of spinal manipulative therapy alter spinal tissues loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Martha; Nougarou, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Prasad, Narasimha; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2018-01-31

    Previous studies found that the intervertebral disc (IVD) experiences the greatest loads during spinal manipulation therapy (SMT). Based on that, this study aimed to determine if loads experienced by spinal tissues are significantly altered when the application site of SMT is changed. A biomechanical robotic serial dissection study. Thirteen porcine cadaveric motion segments. Forces experienced by lumbar spinal tissues. A servo-controlled linear actuator provided standardized 300 N SMT simulations to six different cutaneous locations of the porcine lumbar spine: L2-L3 and L3-L4 facet joints (FJ), L3 and L4 transverse processes (TVP), and the space between the FJs and the TVPs (BTW). Vertebral kinematics were tracked optically using indwelling bone pins; the motion segment was removed and mounted in a parallel robot equipped with a six-axis load cell. Movements of each SMT application at each site were replayed by the robot with the intact specimen and following the sequential removal of spinal ligaments, FJs and IVD. Forces induced by SMT were recorded, and specific axes were analyzed using linear mixed models. Analyses yielded a significant difference (p<.05) in spinal structures loads as a function of the application site. Spinal manipulative therapy application at the L3 vertebra caused vertebral movements and forces between L3 and L4 spinal segment in the opposite direction to when SMT was applied at L4 vertebra. Additionally, SMT applications over the soft tissue between adjacent vertebrae significantly decreased spinal structure loads. Applying SMT with a constant force at different spinal levels creates different relative kinetics of the spinal segments and load spinal tissues in significantly different magnitudes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modern spinal instrumentation. Part 1: Normal spinal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.; Allouni, A.K.; Mankad, K.; Prezzi, D.; Elias, T.; Rankine, J.; Davagnanam, I.

    2013-01-01

    The general radiologist frequently encounters studies demonstrating spinal instrumentation, either as part of the patient's postoperative evaluation or as incidental to a study performed for another purpose. There are various surgical approaches and devices used in spinal surgery with an increased understanding of spinal and spinal implant biomechanics drives development of modern fixation devices. It is, therefore, important that the radiologist can recognize commonly used devices and identify their potential complications demonstrated on imaging. The aim of part 1 of this review is to familiarize the reader with terms used to describe surgical approaches to the spine, review the function and normal appearances of commonly used instrumentations, and understand the importance of the different fixation techniques. The second part of this review will concentrate on the roles that the different imaging techniques play in assessing the instrumented spine and the recognition of complications that can potentially occur.

  7. Cutaneous metastatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Arun

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5.5-year-old male presented with asymptomatic nodules and plaques on his scalp and pubic region of 2 months′ duration. He was having productive cough, haemoptysis, chest pain, anorexia and weight loss and receiving antitubercular treatment for these symptoms for last 3 months. Clinical diagnosis of cutaneous metastatic disease was made. Chest x-ray revealed multiple coin shaped shadows on both sides with pleural effusion. Routine investigations were normal except for anemia and hyperuricemia. Biopsy of skin nodules showed features of metastatic adenocarcinoma. Features and significance of cutaneous metastases are discussed.

  8. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C.; Czech, T.; Diekmann, K.; Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A.; Prayer, D.

    2004-01-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  9. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  10. Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies to the Spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmond, Kristin J.; Robertson, Scott; Lo, Simon S.; Soltys, Scott G.; Ryu, Samuel; McNutt, Todd; Chao, Samuel T.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Ghia, Amol; Chang, Eric L.; Sheehan, Jason; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop consensus contouring guidelines for postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Methods and Materials: Ten spine SBRT specialists representing 10 international centers independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV), spinal cord, and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for 10 representative clinical scenarios in postoperative spine SBRT for metastatic solid tumor malignancies. Contours were imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Agreement between physicians was calculated with an expectation minimization algorithm using simultaneous truth and performance level estimation with κ statistics. Target volume definition guidelines were established by finding optimized confidence level consensus contours using histogram agreement analyses. Results: Nine expert radiation oncologists and 1 neurosurgeon completed contours for all 10 cases. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 (range, 0.71-0.89) and 0.94 (range, 0.90-0.99) for the CTV and 0.79 (range, 0.70-0.95) and 0.92 (range, 0.87-0.99) for the PTV), respectively. Mean κ agreement, which demonstrates the probability that contours agree by chance alone, was 0.58 (range, 0.43-0.70) for CTV and 0.58 (range, 0.37-0.76) for PTV (P<.001 for all cases). Optimized consensus contours were established for all patients with 80% confidence interval. Recommendations for CTV include treatment of the entire preoperative extent of bony and epidural disease, plus immediately adjacent bony anatomic compartments at risk of microscopic disease extension. In particular, a “donut-shaped” CTV was consistently applied in cases of preoperative circumferential epidural extension, regardless of extent of residual epidural extension. Otherwise more conformal anatomic-based CTVs were determined and described. Spinal instrumentation was consistently excluded from the CTV. Conclusions: We provide

  11. Pleiotropic function of ezrin in human metastatic melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Cristina; Brambilla, Daria; Lozupone, Francesco; Matarrese, Paola; de Milito, Angelo; Lugini, Luana; Iessi, Elisabetta; Cecchetti, Serena; Marino, Marialucia; Perdicchio, Maurizio; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Spada, Massimo; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2009-06-15

    The membrane cytoskeleton cross-linker, ezrin, has recently been depicted as a key regulator in the progression and metastasis of several pediatric tumors. Less defined appears the role of ezrin in human adult tumors, especially melanoma. We therefore addressed ezrin involvement in the metastatic phenotype of human adult metastatic melanoma cells. Our results show that cells resected from melanoma metastatic lesions of patients, display marked metastatic spreading capacity in SCID mice organs. Stable transfection of human melanoma cells with an ezrin deletion mutant comprising only 146 N-terminal aminoacids led to the abolishment of metastatic dissemination. In vitro experiments revealed ezrin direct molecular interactions with molecules related to metastatic functions such as CD44, merlin and Lamp-1, consistent with its participation to the formation of phagocitic vacuoles, vesicular sorting and migration capacities of melanoma cells. Moreover, the ezrin fragment capable of binding to CD44 was shorter than that previously reported, and transfection with the ezrin deletion mutant abrogated plasma membrane Lamp-1 recruitment. This study highlights key involvement of ezrin in a complex machinery, which allows metastatic cancer cells to migrate, invade and survive in very unfavorable conditions. Our in vivo and in vitro data reveal that ezrin is the hub of the metastatic behavior also in human adult tumors. Copyright 2008 UICC.

  12. Spinal spindle cell haemangioma: an atypical location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talan-Hranilović, J; Vucić, M; Sajko, T; Bedek, D; Tomić, K; Lupret, V

    2007-03-01

    We present a case of the 31-year-old male patient who complained of weakness in both legs and progressed slowly. Neuroimagine of the thoracic spine showed an intraspinal, extradural mass lesion, measuring 5.3 x 1.2 cm at the Th1-Th3 level. Histologically the lesion was a spindle cell haemangioma composed of dilated vascular spaces and a proliferation of bland appearing interspersed spindle cells. Immunohistochemical analysis was diffusely positive for VIM, SMA and focally for CD34. This lesion is uncommon and shows a predilection for distal extremities. Spindle cell haemangioma within the spine has not been previously reported in the literature.

  13. Primary spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma: Report of five cases and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, P.; Gairola, M.; Julka, P.K.; Rath, G.K.; Sharma, M.C.; Thulkar, S.

    2001-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumour occurring in children and adolescents and exists in two different clinico pathological entities: osseous Ewing's sarcoma (OES) and extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma (EES). Five cases of primary epidural EES are described, which presented with non-specific symptoms leading to a long diagnostic delay. The median age at diagnosis was 22 years (range 13-36 years). The median diagnostic delay was 3 months. All patients had one or more neurological deficits. All underwent surgical exploration with a laminectomy and partial resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy to a dose of 46-50 Gy and chemotherapy with VAC (vincristine, adriamycin and cyclophosphamide) alternating with ICE (ifosphamide, cisplatin and etoposide) for at least six cycles. The mean follow-up period is 21.2 months (range 11-32 months). Four of the five patients achieved a complete remission and are disease free at the time of writing this report. Two patients have a residual neurological deficit - both having presented with long history of neurological deficit. Primary spinal epidural EES should be suspected whenever young patients present with back pain and/or radicular pain, have abnormal neurology and an extradural mass is demonstrated on MRI. Surgical excision followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (50 Gy) and combination chemotherapy (VAC alternating with ICE) achieved local and systemic control in these patients. A greater number of patients and longer follow up are required to evolve a generally accepted treatment policy for this aggressive but potentially curable malignancy. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  15. Neurostimulation for bladder evacuation: is sacral root stimulation a substitute for microstimulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, M; Piechota, H J; Hohenfellner, M; Gleason, C A; Tanagho, E A

    1997-04-01

    To determine by anatomical and functional studies whether stimulation of sacral rootlets might permit selective stimulation of autonomic fibres, thus avoiding the detrusor/sphincter dyssynergia characteristic of current techniques of neurostimulation for bladder evacuation. In 10 male mongrel dogs, the S2 root was isolated and its constituent rootlets followed from their origin in the spinal cord to the point of exit from the dura. The entire root and the individual rootlets were then stimulated, including intra- and extra-dural stimulation and at proximal, mid and distal levels. Neuroanatomical and histological findings showed that rootlets of ventral S2 maintain their identity throughout their intradural course; some carry predominantly autonomic fibres, some predominantly somatic and some a mixture of the two. It appears surgically feasible to identify, isolate and sever the predominantly somatic rootlets intradurally, sparing the predominantly autonomic rootlets for inclusion in extradural electrode placement around the entire sacral root, thus eliminating sphincteric interference with detrusor contraction for voiding at low pressure.

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  18. Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic cancer is cancer that spreads from its site of origin to another part of the body. Learn how cancer spreads, possible symptoms, common sites where cancer spreads, and how to find out about treatment options.

  19. SU-E-J-84: Quantitative Dosimetry Assessment of the Impact of Image Artifacts of Metal Implants in Spinal SABR Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T; Zhang, M; Hanft, S; Green, R; Yue, N; Goyal, S [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Metal rods are frequently used to stabilize the spine in patients with metastatic disease. The high Z material causes imaging artifacts in the surrounding tissue in CT scans, which introduces dosimetric uncertainty when inhomogeneity correction is enabled for radiation treatment planning. The purpose of this study is to quantify the dosimetric deviations caused by the imaging artifacts and to evaluate the effectiveness of using Hounsfield units (HU) overwriting to reduce dosimetric uncertainties. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed treatment plans for 4 patients with metal implants who received stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for metastatic disease to the spine on Tomotherapy HiArt. For all four patients, the region of imaging artifact surrounding the metal implants was contoured and the pixel HU’s were overwritten to be water equivalent. We then generated adaptive treatment plans for these patients using the MVCT pretreatment set up images and batched beamlets in the original treatment plans. The dosimetry deviation between the adaptive and original plans were compared and quantitatively analyzed. Results: For three out of four patient, the major OAR (spinal cord) dose (0.35cc or 10% according to protocols and fractionation) increased (2.7%, 5.5%, 0%, 3.9%, mean=3.0±2.3%, p=0.04), and the PTV dose (D90 or D95 as per prescription) increased for all four patients ( 2%, 5%, 0.7%, 3.6%, mean=2.8±1.9%, p=0.03) in the adaptive plan with HU overwriting. The average point dose deviation of the Tomotherapy DQA for the same patients was −1.0±1.0%. For plans without HU overwriting, the dose deviation from the treatment plan will increase. Conclusion: The metal implant and the imaging artifacts may cause a significant dosimetric impact on radiation treatment plans for spinal disease. The dose to the PTV and the spinal cord was under-calculated in treatment plans without considering the imaging artifacts. HU overwriting can reduce the dosimetry

  20. Working after a metastatic cancer diagnosis: Factors affecting employment in the metastatic setting from ECOG-ACRIN's Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevaarwerk, Amye J; Lee, Ju-Whei; Terhaar, Abigail; Sesto, Mary E; Smith, Mary Lou; Cleeland, Charles S; Fisch, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Improved survival for individuals with metastatic cancer accentuates the importance of employment for cancer survivors. A better understanding of how metastatic cancer affects employment is a necessary step toward the development of tools for assisting survivors in this important realm. The ECOG-ACRIN Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns study was analyzed to investigate what factors were associated with the employment of 680 metastatic cancer patients. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare patients stably working with patients no longer working. There were 668 metastatic working-age participants in the analysis: 236 (35%) worked full- or part-time, whereas 302 (45%) had stopped working because of illness. Overall, 58% reported some change in employment due to illness. A better performance status and non-Hispanic white ethnicity/race were significantly associated with continuing to work despite a metastatic cancer diagnosis in the multivariate analysis. The disease type, time since metastatic diagnosis, number of metastatic sites, location of metastatic disease, and treatment status had no significant impact. Among the potentially modifiable factors, receiving hormonal treatment (if a viable option) and decreasing symptom interference were associated with continuing to work. A significant percentage of the metastatic patients remained employed; increased symptom burden was associated with a change to no longer working. Modifiable factors resulting in work interference should be minimized so that patients with metastatic disease may continue working if this is desired. Improvements in symptom control and strategies developed to help address workplace difficulties have promise for improving this aspect of survivorship. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  1. Day/night difference in extradural cortical stimulation for motor relearning in a subacute stroke rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Sun, Woong; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jiyeong; Kim, Hyun; Shin, Yong-Il; Kim, Yun-Hee; Chang, Won Hyuk

    2016-02-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the proper timing of extradural cortical stimulation (ECS) on the motor relearning in a rat model of subacute photothrombotic stroke. Photothrombotic infarction was induced on the dominant sensorimotor cortex in male Sprague-Dawley rats after training in a single-pellet reaching task (SPRT). Rats were randomly divided into three groups after stroke: ECS during the inactive period (Day-ECS group), ECS during the active period (Night-ECS group) and no ECS (Non-stimulated group). Six sham-operated rats were assigned to the control group. The Day- and Night-ECS group received continuous ECS for 12 hours during the day or night for 2 weeks from day 4 after the stroke. Behavioral assessment with SPRT was performed daily. SPRT showed a significantly faster and greater improvement in the Day and Night-ECS groups than in the Non-stimulated group. In the Day- and Night-ECS groups, the success rate of SPRT differed significantly from Non-stimulated group on day 11 and day 8, respectively. In addition, the Night-ECS group showed a significantly higher SPRT success rate than the Day-ECS group from days 10 to 13. ECS during the active period might be more effective for motor relearning in the subacute stroke rat model.

  2. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-jun Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L 3 to S 1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49% and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%. Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression.

  3. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Yong; Fan, Zi-Wen; Li, Xin-Chun; Cao, Bing-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L3 to S1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49%) and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%). Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression.

  4. Importance of Metastatic Lymph Node Ratio in Non-Metastatic, Lymph Node-Invaded Colon Cancer: A Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Arda; Peker, Kemal; Firat, Deniz; Yilmaz, Bahri; Sayar, Ilyas; Idiz, Oguz; Cakir, Coskun; Demiryilmaz, Ismail; Yilmaz, Ismayil

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic importance of the metastatic lymph node ratio for stage III colon cancer patients and to find a cut-off value at which the overall survival and disease-free survival change. Material/Methods Patients with pathological stage III colon cancer were retrospectively evaluated for: age; preoperative values of Crp, Cea, Ca 19-9, and Afp; pathologic situation of vascular, perineural, lymphatic, and serosal involvement; and metastatic lymph node ratio values were calculated. Results The study included 58 stage III colon cancer patients: 20 (34.5%) females and 38 (65.5%) males were involved in the study. Multivariate analysis was applied to the following variables to evaluate significance for overall survival and disease-free survival: age, Crp, Cea, perineural invasion, and metastatic lymph node ratio. The metastatic lymph node ratio (<0.25 or ≥0.25) is the only independent variable significant for overall and disease-free survival. Conclusions Metastatic lymph node ratio is an ideal prognostic marker for stage III colon cancer patients, and 0.25 is the cut-off value for prognosis. PMID:25087904

  5. Spinal Cord Independence Measure, version III: applicability to the UK spinal cord injured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Clive A; Tesio, Luigi; Itzkovich, Malka; Soni, Bakul M; Silva, Pedro; Mecci, Munawar; Chadwick, Raymond; el Masry, Waghi; Osman, Aheed; Savic, Gordana; Gardner, Brian; Bergström, Ebba; Catz, Amiram

    2009-09-01

    To examine the validity, reliability and usefulness of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure for the UK spinal cord injury population. Multi-centre cohort study. Four UK regional spinal cord injury centres. Eighty-six people with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord Independence Measure and Functional Independence Measure on admission analysed using inferential statistics, and Rasch analysis of Spinal Cord Independence Measure. Internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, discriminant validity; Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscale match between distribution of item difficulty and patient ability measurements; reliability of patient ability measures; fit of data to Rasch model; unidimensionality of subscales; hierarchical ordering of categories within items; differential item functioning across patient groups. Scale reliability (kappa coefficients range 0.491-0.835; (p Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscales compatible with stringent Rasch requirements; mean infit indices high; distinct strata of abilities identified; most thresholds ordered; item hierarchy stable across clinical groups and centres. Misfit and differences in item hierarchy identified. Difficulties assessing central cord injuries highlighted. Conventional statistical and Rasch analyses justify the use of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure in clinical practice and research in the UK. Cross-cultural validity may be further improved.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  8. Effect of two tumors (metastatic and non-metastatic) on tissue distribution of Ga-67 citrate in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durakovic, A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of metastatic and non-metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma on tissue distribution of Ga-67 citrate in Fischer female rats was studied. The homogenate (0.1 ml) of each tumor was injected subcutaneously in separate groups of rats and the animals were studied from day 2-30 after tumor homogenate implantation. All animals were injected with 30 μCi of Ga-67 citrate and sacrificed by halothane anethesia 48 hours later. Tissue samples of blood, lung, heart, liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal, stomach, small and large intestine, ovaries, and lymph nodes (popliteal, lumbar, and mediastinal) were obtained and counted in a gamma well counter. The control group consisted of four animals and tumor bearing groups of seven to eight animals at each time. Ga-67 uptake was increased in the liver (24 days) and in the popliteal lymph nodes on days 7, 10, and 18 in the metastatic tumor group (P<0.05). This probably represents Ga-67 uptake in the metastatic deposits in these organs. No difference was observed in non-metastatic tumor group

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  12. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  14. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-06-07

    Pott's disease (PD) or spinal tuberculosis is a rare condition which accounts for less than 1% of total tuberculosis (TB) cases. The incidence of PD has recently increased in Europe and the United States, mainly due to immigration; however, it is still a rare diagnosis in Scandinavian countries, and if overlooked it might lead to significant neurologic complications. A 78-year-old woman, originally from Eastern Europe, presented to the emergency department with a complaint of nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and severe back pain. On admission she was febrile and had leukocytosis and increased C-reactive protein. Initial spinal x-ray was performed and revealed osteolytic changes in the vertebral body of T11 and T12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine illustrated spondylitis of T10, T11, and T12, with multiple paravertebral and epidural abscesses, which was suggestive of PD. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the patient's gastric fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). Based on MRI and PCR findings, standard treatment for TB was initiated. Results of the spine biopsy and culture showed colonies of MT and confirmed the diagnosis afterwards. Due to the instability of the spine and severe and continuous pain, spine-stabilizing surgery was performed. Her TB was cured after nine months of treatment. PD is an important differential diagnosis of malignancy that should be diagnosed instantly. History of exposure to TB and classic radiologic finding can help make the diagnosis.

  15. Characterizing the location of spinal and vertebral levels in the human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadotte, D W; Cadotte, A; Cohen-Adad, J; Fleet, D; Livne, M; Wilson, J R; Mikulis, D; Nugaeva, N; Fehlings, M G

    2015-04-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques are critical to understanding the pathophysiology of conditions involving the spinal cord. We provide a novel, quantitative solution to map vertebral and spinal cord levels accounting for anatomic variability within the human spinal cord. For the first time, we report a population distribution of the segmental anatomy of the cervical spinal cord that has direct implications for the interpretation of advanced imaging studies most often conducted across groups of subjects. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent a T2-weighted, 3T MRI of the cervical spinal cord. Two experts marked the C3-C8 cervical nerve rootlets, C3-C7 vertebral bodies, and pontomedullary junction. A semiautomated algorithm was used to locate the centerline of the spinal cord and measure rostral-caudal distances from a fixed point in the brain stem, the pontomedullary junction, to each of the spinal rootlets and vertebral bodies. Distances to each location were compared across subjects. Six volunteers had 2 additional scans in neck flexion and extension to measure the effects of patient positioning in the scanner. We demonstrated that substantial variation exists in the rostral-caudal position of spinal cord segments among individuals and that prior methods of predicting spinal segments are imprecise. We also show that neck flexion or extension has little effect on the relative location of vertebral-versus-spinal levels. Accounting for spinal level variation is lacking in existing imaging studies. Future studies should account for this variation for accurate interpretation of the neuroanatomic origin of acquired MR signals. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Disorders of spinal blood circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hevyak, O.M.; Kuzminskyy, A.P.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal strokes are rare. The most common causes of the haemorrhage are spinal cord trauma, vasculitis with signs of haemorrhagic diathesis, spinal vascular congenital anomalies (malformations) and haemangioma. By localization, haemorrhagic strokes are divided into three groups: haematomyelia, spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage, epidural hematoma. Most cavernous malformations are localized at the cervical level, fewer — at thoracic and lumbar levels of the spinal cord. The clinical case of diagno...

  17. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  18. Skeletal-related events significantly impact health-related quality of life in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: data from PREVAIL and AFFIRM trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, F; Ivanescu, C; Phung, D; Loriot, Y; Abhyankar, S; Beer, T M; Tombal, B; Holmstrom, S

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the impact of skeletal-related events (SREs) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in phase III trials of enzalutamide versus placebo. Patients with mCRPC experiencing at least one SRE during AFFIRM and PREVAIL were assessed for trajectory-adjusted mean change in HRQoL by first SRE using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P; AFFIRM, three domains, and PREVAIL, nine domains) and EQ-5D (PREVAIL) instruments. First SREs caused HRQoL deterioration in both trials. Spinal cord compression had the largest impact, with clinically meaningful reductions in seven of nine FACT-P domains in PREVAIL and all three in AFFIRM (mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) change in FACT-P total score -16.95 (-26.47, -7.44) and -9.69 (-16.10, -3.27), respectively). In PREVAIL, first SREs caused clinically meaningful declines in EQ-5D utility index, irrespective of category; spinal cord compression had the largest impact (mean (95% CI) change -0.24 (-0.39, -0.08)). In AFFIRM, FACT-P and FACT-General total scores showed clinically meaningful declines after radiation/surgery to bone. SREs were associated with clinically meaningful functional declines in the daily lives of patients with mCRPC. Spinal cord compression had the largest impact on HRQoL.

  19. Working after a metastatic cancer diagnosis: factors affecting employment in the metastatic setting from ECOG’s Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns (SOAPP) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevaarwerk, Amye; Lee, Ju-Whei; Terhaar, Abigail; Sesto, Mary; Smith, Mary Lou; Cleeland, Charles; Fisch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Improved survival for individuals with metastatic cancer accentuates the importance of employment for cancer survivors. Better understanding of how metastatic cancer affects employment is a necessary step towards the development of tools to assist survivors in this important realm. Methods We analyzed the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group’s “Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns (SOAPP)” study to investigate what factors were associated with employment of 680 metastatic cancer patients. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to compare patients stably working (Group A) to patients no longer working (Group B). Results There were 668 metastatic working-age participants in our analysis; 236 (35%) worked full or part-time while 302 (45%) stopped working due to illness. Overall, 58% reported some change in employment due to illness. Better performance status and non-Hispanic White ethnicity/race were significantly associated with continuing to work despite a metastatic cancer diagnosis on multivariable analysis. Disease type, time since metastatic diagnosis, number of metastatic sites, location of metastatic disease, and treatment status had no significant impact. Among the potentially modifiable factors, receiving hormonal treatment (if a viable option) and decreasing symptom interference were associated with continuing to work. Conclusions A significant percentage of metastatic patients remain employed; symptom burden was associated with change to no longer working. Modifiable factors resulting in work interference should be minimized so that patients with metastatic disease may continue working, if desired. Improvements in symptom control and strategies developed to help address work place difficulties have promise to improve this aspect of survivorship. PMID:26687819

  20. Tetrofosmin in metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghammer, P.; Obwegeser, R.; Ulm, M.; Wiltschke, C.; Kubista, E.; Sinzinger, H.; Zielinski, C.

    1997-01-01

    Tetrofosmin (1,2-bis[bis(2-ethoxyethyl)phosphino]ethan) is currently under investigation for its tumor seeking properties, encouraged by the incidental finding of a malignant breast-lesion on myocardial scintigraphy in 1995 (Rambaldi et al, Clin Nucl Med 1995) using tetrofosmin. Recent reports have confirmed tetrofosmins role in detecting primary tumors in breast cancer. To investigate whether tetrofosmin significantly helps detect metastatic lesions in such patients we performed tetrofosmin scintigraphy in 21 patients with metastatic breast cancer. Patients and methods: Median age of patients was 61 years. In one patient the primary site was unknown. All patients had at least one distant metastasis. 550 MBq of 99m-Tc-tetrofosmin was administered ten minutes before imaging was begun. After obtaining a planar image, a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done of every suspected distant lesion. CT-scans or MRI were used to confirm positive correlation with tetrofosmin scintigraphy. Results: Tetrofosmin scintigraphy correctly diagnosed metastatic disease in 71 % of patients with no false negative and two false positive results. In each of the two patients a mediastinal hot spot suggestive of malignancy was found, but none of those lesions could be proven using CT scans. Excluding patients with liver metastasis from the present analysis, 91 % of all metastasis would have been correctly diagnosed. The first patient in our department had a large metastasis in the upper mediastinum which could not be seen on regular chest films. In the patient in whom the primary site of cancer was unknown, tetrofosmin scintigraphy showed three consecutive nodules in the left mammary, gland in a coronary fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging then confirmed two single nodules of 0.8 cm in diameter. Conclusions: Evaluating 21 patients, the present study was performed to investigate tetrofosmins properties of detecting metastatic lesions in patients with breast cancer. A 91

  1. Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal Centre: Experience at Enugu, Nigeria. ... The thoracic spine{9(41%)}was most often involved. ... Five (23%) patients with injury at cervical level died from respiratory failure.

  2. Spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the spine that was present from birth Narrow spinal canal that the person was born with Herniated or slipped disk, which ... when you sit down or lean forward. Most people with spinal stenosis cannot walk for a long ... During a physical exam, your health care provider will try to ...

  3. A Brain–Spinal Interface Alleviating Gait Deficits after Spinal Cord Injury in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Borton, David; Wagner, Fabien; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste; Buse, Nicolas; Gandar, Jerome; Barraud, Quentin; Xing, David; Rey, Elodie; Duis, Simone; Jianzhong, Yang; Ko, Wai Kin D.; Li, Qin; Detemple, Peter; Denison, Tim; Micera, Silvestro; Bezard, Erwan; Bloch, Jocelyne; Courtine, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury disrupts the communication between the brain and the spinal circuits that orchestrate movement. To bypass the lesion, brain–computer interfaces1–3 have directly linked cortical activity to electrical stimulation of muscles, which have restored grasping abilities after hand paralysis1,4. Theoretically, this strategy could also restore control over leg muscle activity for walking5. However, replicating the complex sequence of individual muscle activation patterns underlying natural and adaptive locomotor movements poses formidable conceptual and technological challenges6,7. Recently, we showed in rats that epidural electrical stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord can reproduce the natural activation of synergistic muscle groups producing locomotion8–10. Here, we interfaced leg motor cortex activity with epidural electrical stimulation protocols to establish a brain–spinal interface that alleviated gait deficits after a spinal cord injury in nonhuman primates. Rhesus monkeys were implanted with an intracortical microelectrode array into the leg area of motor cortex; and a spinal cord stimulation system composed of a spatially selective epidural implant and a pulse generator with real-time triggering capabilities. We designed and implemented wireless control systems that linked online neural decoding of extension and flexion motor states with stimulation protocols promoting these movements. These systems allowed the monkeys to behave freely without any restrictions or constraining tethered electronics. After validation of the brain–spinal interface in intact monkeys, we performed a unilateral corticospinal tract lesion at the thoracic level. As early as six days post-injury and without prior training of the monkeys, the brain–spinal interface restored weight-bearing locomotion of the paralyzed leg on a treadmill and overground. The implantable components integrated in the brain–spinal interface have all been approved for investigational

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow ...

  5. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation of the lumbar and sacral spinal cord: a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sofia R.; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; de Carvalho, Mamede; Miranda, Pedro C.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Our aim was to perform a computational study of the electric field (E-field) generated by transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) applied over the thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal cord, in order to assess possible neuromodulatory effects on spinal cord circuitry related with lower limb functions. Approach. A realistic volume conductor model of the human body consisting of 14 tissues was obtained from available databases. Rubber pad electrodes with a metallic connector and a conductive gel layer were modelled. The finite element (FE) method was used to calculate the E-field when a current of 2.5 mA was passed between two electrodes. The main characteristics of the E-field distributions in the spinal grey matter (spinal-GM) and spinal white matter (spinal-WM) were compared for seven montages, with the anode placed either over T10, T8 or L2 spinous processes (s.p.), and the cathode placed over right deltoid (rD), umbilicus (U) and right iliac crest (rIC) areas or T8 s.p. Anisotropic conductivity of spinal-WM and of a group of dorsal muscles near the vertebral column was considered. Main results. The average E-field magnitude was predicted to be above 0.15 V m-1 in spinal cord regions located between the electrodes. L2-T8 and T8-rIC montages resulted in the highest E-field magnitudes in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (>0.30 V m-1). E-field longitudinal component is 3 to 6 times higher than the ventral-dorsal and right-left components in both the spinal-GM and WM. Anatomical features such as CSF narrowing due to vertebrae bony edges or disks intrusions in the spinal canal correlate with local maxima positions. Significance. Computational modelling studies can provide detailed information regarding the electric field in the spinal cord during tsDCS. They are important to guide the design of clinical tsDCS protocols that optimize stimulation of application-specific spinal targets.

  6. Non osseous intra-spinal tumors in children and adolescents: spinal column deformity (in french)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, I.; Zeller, R.; Dubousset, J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose of the study. The delay in diagnosis of spinal tumors is not rare. The chief complaint may include pain, walking disability and spinal or limb deformities. The purpose of our study is to analyze the spinal deformities associated with non osseous intra-spinal tumors, to assess the complications of treatment, and to set out a preventive protocol. Methods. The incidence and pattern of spinal deformity was assessed before tumor treatment and ultimately after laminectomy or osteoplastic laminotomy (or lamino-plasty). Results. Among the 9 cases with preexisting spinal deformity, the curve magnitude increased after laminectomy in 4. A kyphotic, kyphoscoliotic or scoliotic deformity developed in 18 cases after surgery for tumor resection. Among these 18 patients, only one had bad an adequate osteoplastic laminotomy. The treatment of spinal deformities was surgical in 12 cases, and done by either posterior or anterior and posterior combined arthrodesis. Discussion. Spinal deformity may be the main complaint of a patient who has intraspinal tumor. Prevention of post-laminectomy spinal deformity is mandatory, and could be done by osteoplastic laminotomy and the use of a brace during a minimum period of 4 to 6 months after surgery. Conclusion. Diagnosis of intraspinal tumors in children and adolescents should be done early, and lamino-arthrectomy should be replaced by osteoplastic laminotomy. (authors)

  7. CD147 and matrix-metalloproteinase-2 expression in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüke, Julia; Vukoja, Vlatka; Brandenbusch, Tim; Nassar, Khaled; Rohrbach, Jens Martin; Grisanti, Salvatore; Lüke, Matthias; Tura, Aysegül

    2016-06-03

    Extracellular matrix remodelling regulated by matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) inducer (CD147) is a crucial process during tumor cell invasion and regulation of blood supply. In this study, we evaluated the correlation of CD147 and MMP-2 expression with major prognostic factors for uveal melanoma and the development of metastasis. The expression of CD147 and MMP-2 was analyzed in 49 samples of uveal melanomas. Triple immunofluorescence stainings using markers against glial cells (GFAP), endothelial cells (CD34) and macrophages (CD68) were performed to further analyse the exact localisation of CD147 and MMP-2 positivity. In 28 cases clinical metastatic disease were found. The remaining 21 cases showed no signs of metastatic disease for an average follow-up of 10 years. Correlation analysis (Pearson correlation) was performed to analyse the association of CD147 and MMP-2 expression with known prognostic factors, vasculogenic mimicry (VM), the mature vasculature (von Willebrand Factor) and tumor induced angiogenesis (by means of Endoglin expression). CD147 and MMP-2 were expressed in 47 (96.0 %) of the uveal melanomas. CD147 up-regulation was significantly correlated with a higher MMP-2 expression. The overall expression analysis revealed no significant difference in the metastatic (p = 0.777) and non-metastatic subgroup (p = 0.585). No correlation of CD147 expression and any system of blood supply was evident. In the non-metastatic sub-group a significant correlation of clustered CD147 positive cells with largest basal diameter (p = 0.039), height (p = 0.047) and TNM-stage (p = 0.013) was evident. These data may indicate that CD147 regulates MMP-2 expression in uveal melanoma cells.

  8. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [de

  9. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.

    2001-01-01

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  10. Functionalization of nanotextured substrates for enhanced identification of metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Nuzhat; Raziul Hasan, Mohammad; Kim, Young-tae; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2017-09-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of low survival rates among cancer patients. Once cancer cells metastasize, it is extremely difficult to contain the disease. We report on a nanotextured platform for enhanced detection of metastatic cells. We captured metastatic (MDA-MDB-231) and non-metastatic (MCF-7) breast cancer cells on anti-EGFR aptamer modified plane and nanotextured substrates. Metastatic cells were seen to change their morphology at higher rates when captured on nanotextured substrates than on plane substrates. Analysis showed statistically different morphological behaviors of metastatic cells that were very pronounced on the nanotextured substrates. Several distance matrices were calculated to quantify the dissimilarity of cell shape change. Nanotexturing increased the dissimilarity of the metastatic cells and as a result the contrast between metastatic and non-metastatic cells increased. Jaccard distance measurements found that the shape change ratio of the non-metastatic and metastatic cells was enhanced from 1:1.01 to 1:1.81, going from plane to nanotextured substrates. The shape change ratio of the non-metastatic to metastatic cells improved from 1:1.48 to 1:2.19 for the Hausdorff distance and from 1:1.87 to 1:4.69 for the Mahalanobis distance after introducing nanotexture. Distance matrix analysis showed that nanotexture increased the shape change ratios of non-metastatic and metastatic cells. Hence, the detectability of metastatic cells increased. These calculated matrices provided clear and explicit measures to discriminate single cells for their metastatic state on functional nanotextured substrates.

  11. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Conley, Anthony P; Reed, Damon R

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma), adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor) and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma) in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. PMID:23700373

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  13. Trastuzumab and survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Karin; Schoffer, Olaf; Link, Theresa; Forberger, Almuth; Petzold, Andrea; Niedostatek, Antje; Werner, Carmen; Klug, Stefanie J; Werner, Andreas; Gatzweiler, Axel; Richter, Barbara; Baretton, Gustavo; Wimberger, Pauline

    2017-08-01

    Prognosis of Her2-positive breast cancer has changed since the introduction of trastuzumab for treatment in metastatic and early breast cancer. It was described to be even better compared to prognosis of Her2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of trastuzumab in our cohort. Besides the effect of adjuvant pretreatment with trastuzumab on survival of patients with metastatic Her2-positive breast cancer was analyzed. All patients with primary breast cancer of the Regional Breast Cancer Center Dresden diagnosed during the years 2001-2013 were analyzed for treatment with or without trastuzumab in the adjuvant and in the metastatic treatment setting using Kaplan-Meier survival estimation and Cox regression. Age and tumor stage at time of first diagnosis of breast cancer as well as hormone receptor status, grading, time, and site of metastasis at first diagnosis of distant metastatic disease were analyzed. Of 4.481 female patients with primary breast cancer, 643 presented with metastatic disease. Her2-positive status was documented in 465 patients, including 116 patients with primary or secondary metastases. Median survival of patients with Her2-positive primary metastatic disease was 3.0 years (95% CI 2.3-4.0). After adjustment for other factors, survival was better in patients with Her2-positive breast cancer with trastuzumab therapy compared to Her2-negative metastatic disease (HR 2.10; 95% CI 1.58-2.79). Analysis of influence of adjuvant therapy with and without trastuzumab by Kaplan-Meier showed a trend for better survival in not pretreated patients. Median survival was highest in hormone receptor-positive Her2-positive (triple-positive) primary metastatic breast cancer patients with 3.3 years (95% CI 2.3-4.6). Prognosis of patients with Her2-positive metastatic breast cancer after trastuzumab treatment is more favorable than for Her2-negative breast cancer. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy with or without

  14. Spinal CT scan, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  15. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  16. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barile, Antonio; Limbucci, Nicola; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  17. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  18. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    leukocytosis and increased C-reactive protein. Initial spinal x-ray was performed and revealed osteolytic changes in the vertebral body of T11 and T12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine illustrated spondylitis of T10, T11, and T12, with multiple paravertebral and epidural abscesses, which...... was suggestive of PD. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the patient's gastric fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). Based on MRI and PCR findings, standard treatment for TB was initiated. Results of the spine biopsy and culture showed colonies of MT and confirmed the diagnosis afterwards. Due...

  19. Analysis of prognostic factors for survival in patients with primary spinal chordoma using the SEER Registry from 1973 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yue; Lu, Lingyun; Chen, Junquan; Zhong, Yong; Dai, Zhehao

    2018-04-06

    Spinal chordomas are rare primary osseous tumors that arise from the remnants of the notochord. They are commonly considered slow-growing, locally invasive neoplasms with little tendency to metastasize, but the high recurrent rate of spinal chordomas may seriously affect the survival rate and quality of life of patients. The aim of the study is to describe the epidemiological data and determine the prognostic factors for decreased survival in patients with primary spinal chordoma. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry database, a US population-based cancer registry database, was used to identify all patients diagnosed with primary spinal chordoma from 1973 to 2014. We utilized Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to evaluate the association between patients overall survival and relevant characteristics, including age, gender, race, disease stage, treatment methods, primary tumor site, marital status, and urban county background. In the data set between 1973 and 2014, a total of 808 patients were identified with primary spinal chordoma. The overall rate of distant metastatic cases in our cohort was only 7.7%. Spinal chordoma was more common occurred in men (62.6%) than women (37.3%). Majority of neoplasms were found in the White (87.9%), while the incidence of the Black is relatively infrequent (3.3%). Three hundred fifty-seven spinal chordomas (44.2%) were located in the vertebral column, while 451 patients' tumor (55.8%) was located in the sacrum or pelvis. Age ≥ 60 years (HR = 2.72; 95%CI, 1.71 to 2.89), distant metastasis (HR = 2.16; 95%CI, 1.54 to 3.02), and non-surgical therapy (HR = 2.14; 95%CI, 1.72 to 2.69) were independent risk factors for survival reduction in analysis. Survival did not significantly differ as a factor of tumor site (vertebrae vs sacrum/pelvis) for primary spinal chordoma (HR = 0.93, P = 0.16). Race (P = 0.52), gender (P = 0.11), marital status (P = 0.94), and

  20. The Lesioned Spinal Cord Is a “New” Spinal Cord: Evidence from Functional Changes after Spinal Injury in Lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David

    2017-01-01

    Finding a treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) focuses on reconnecting the spinal cord by promoting regeneration across the lesion site. However, while regeneration is necessary for recovery, on its own it may not be sufficient. This presumably reflects the requirement for regenerated inputs to interact appropriately with the spinal cord, making sub-lesion network properties an additional influence on recovery. This review summarizes work we have done in the lamprey, a model system for SCI research. We have compared locomotor behavior (swimming) and the properties of descending inputs, locomotor networks, and sensory inputs in unlesioned animals and animals that have received complete spinal cord lesions. In the majority (∼90%) of animals swimming parameters after lesioning recovered to match those in unlesioned animals. Synaptic inputs from individual regenerated axons also matched the properties in unlesioned animals, although this was associated with changes in release parameters. This suggests against any compensation at these synapses for the reduced descending drive that will occur given that regeneration is always incomplete. Compensation instead seems to occur through diverse changes in cellular and synaptic properties in locomotor networks and proprioceptive systems below, but also above, the lesion site. Recovery of locomotor performance is thus not simply the reconnection of the two sides of the spinal cord, but reflects a distributed and varied range of spinal cord changes. While locomotor network changes are insufficient on their own for recovery, they may facilitate locomotor outputs by compensating for the reduction in descending drive. Potentiated sensory feedback may in turn be a necessary adaptation that monitors and adjusts the output from the “new” locomotor network. Rather than a single aspect, changes in different components of the motor system and their interactions may be needed after SCI. If these are general features, and where

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  2. Outcomes of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for spinal trauma and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Park, Ashley; Maharaj, Monish; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the clinical and radiological results of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation in the management of spinal trauma and metastatic tumours. A retrospective analysis was performed on a series of 14 patients who were operated on from March 2009 to November 2011 by a single surgeon (RJM). Following a radiological review (CT scan/MRI), six patients underwent short segment fixation, while the remaining underwent long segment fixation. All patients had routine follow-ups at 4, 6, 12months, and annually thereafter. Clinical examinations were conducted preoperatively and postoperatively, and the length of operation, blood loss, and postoperative pain relief were recorded. There was a single patient with an incision site complication. The mean blood loss was 269mL. All of the parameters demonstrated no significant differences between the trauma and the tumour groups (p=0.10). The neurological power scores improved for all patients, with the largest increase being from a score of 2 to 4. At follow-up, the majority of patients had returned to their previous activities and had reduced pain scores. One patient suffered high pain levels from other medical conditions that were not related to the operation. Minimally invasive pedicle screw fixation is a suitable option for patients with spinal tumours and fractures, with acceptable safety and efficacy in this small retrospective patient series. We have seen favourable results in our patients, who have experienced an increased quality of life following their surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunotherapy of distant metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schadendorf, D; Algarra, S M; Bastholt, L

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated with signif......Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated...

  4. Thoracic Epidural Teratoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Quon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Spinal teratomas comprise a rare subset of spinal cord tumors, and here, we describe an even rarer childhood thoracic extradural-intracanalicular teratoma. The clinical presentation, management, and pathophysiology of these tumors are reviewed to promote recognition and guide treatment of these lesions. Methods We report the case of a 21-month-old boy who presented with marked spasticity, as well as failure to ambulate and meet motor milestones. Additionally, we provide a literature review of spinal teratomas, including their clinical presentation, work-up, pathophysiology, and underlying genetics. Results An MRI of the spine revealed a large dorsal epidural tumor extending from T3 to T10 with heterogeneous contrast enhancement and severe spinal cord compression. The tumor was resected revealing a cystic mass with tissue resembling hair, muscle, as well as cartilage; pathology confirmed the diagnosis of teratoma. Gross total resection was achieved, and the child eventually gained ambulatory function. Conclusions Given that spinal teratomas are rare entities that can present with significant neurologic compromise, they must remain on clinicians’ differentials. Unfortunately, the exact origin of these tumors remains inconclusive and requires further investigation.

  5. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  6. Optogenetics of the Spinal Cord: Use of Channelrhodopsin Proteins for Interrogation of Spinal Cord Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Habibur; Nam, Youngpyo; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2017-12-29

    Spinal cord circuits play a key role in receiving and transmitting somatosensory information from the body and the brain. They also contribute to the timing and coordination of complex patterns of movement. Under disease conditions, such as spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain, spinal cord circuits receive pain signals from peripheral nerves, and are involved in pain development via neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators released from neurons and glial cells. Despite the importance of spinal cord circuits in sensory and motor functions, many questions remain regarding the relationship between activation of specific cells and behavioral responses. Optogenetics offers the possibility of understanding the complex cellular activity and mechanisms of spinal cord circuits, as well as having therapeutic potential for addressing spinal cord-related disorders. In this review, we discuss recent findings in optogenetic research employing the channelrhodopsin protein to assess the function of specific neurons and glia in spinal cord circuits ex vivo and in vivo. We also explore the possibilities and challenges of employing optogenetics technology in future therapeutic strategies for the treatment of spinal disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Spinal Meninges and Their Role in Spinal Cord Injury: A Neuroanatomical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassner, Lukas; Grillhösl, Andreas; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Thomé, Claudius; Bühren, Volker; Strowitzki, Martin; Winkler, Peter A

    2018-02-01

    Current recommendations support early surgical decompression and blood pressure augmentation after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Elevated intraspinal pressure (ISP), however, has probably been underestimated in the pathophysiology of SCI. Recent studies provide some evidence that ISP measurements and durotomy may be beneficial for individuals suffering from SCI. Compression of the spinal cord against the meninges in SCI patients causes a "compartment-like" syndrome. In such cases, intentional durotomy with augmentative duroplasty to reduce ISP and improve spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP) may be indicated. Prior to performing these procedures routinely, profound knowledge of the spinal meninges is essential. Here, we provide an in-depth review of relevant literature along with neuroanatomical illustrations and imaging correlates.

  8. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  9. A patient presenting with spinal cord compression who had two distinct follicular cell type thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, E; Sokmensuer, C; Yildiz, B O; Engin, H; Bozkurt, M F; Aras, T; Barista, I; Gurlek, A

    2004-06-01

    A 61-yr-old woman presented with complaints of weakness and pain in her legs. A magnetic resonance imaging showed a 3 x 5.6 x 7.8 cm mass lesion destructing the T1 and T2 vertebral bodies and compressing the spinal cord. The mass was excised surgically. It was follicular carcinoma metastasis of the cervicodorsal region. Then, she underwent a total thyroidectomy. Pathological examination showed two different types of carcinomas in two different focuses; follicular carcinoma in the left lobe and follicular variant papillary carcinoma in the isthmic lobe. After the operation she was given 100 mCi 131I. This is the first report of a patient who had both metastatic follicular carcinoma and follicular variant papillary carcinoma together.

  10. Trans-spinal direct current stimulation for the modulation of the lumbar spinal motor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuck, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Trans-spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS) is a noninvasive neuromodulatory tool for the modulation of the spinal neurocircuitry. Initial studies have shown that tsDCS is able to induce a significant and lasting change in spinal-reflex- and corticospinal information processing. It is therefore

  11. MR imaging of spinal factors and compression of the spinal cord in cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Ishii, Sukenobu; Tani, Shotaro; Sato, Tetsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of surgical 109 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively reviewed to examine whether MR imaging would replace conventional radiological procedures in determining spinal factors and spinal cord compression in this disease. MR imaging was useful in determining spondylotic herniation, continuous type of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, and calcification of yellow ligament, probably replacing CT myelography, discography, and CT discography. When total defect of the subarachnoid space on T2-weighted images and block on myelograms were compared in determining spinal cord compression, the spinal cord was affected more extensively by 1.3 intervertebral distance (IVD) on T2-weighted images. When indentation of one third or more in anterior and posterior diameter of the spinal cord was used as spinal cord compression, the difference in the affected extension between myelography and MR imaging was 0.2 IVD on T1-weighted images and 0.6 IVD on T2-weighted images. However, when block was seen in 3 or more IVD on myelograms, the range of spinal cord compression tended to be larger on T1-weighted images. For a small range of spinal cord compression, T1-weighted imaging seems to be helpful in determining the range of decompression. When using T2-weighted imaging, the range of decompression becomes large, frequently including posterior decompression. (N.K.)

  12. An in vitro correlation of mechanical forces and metastatic capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indra, Indrajyoti; Undyala, Vishnu; Kandow, Casey; Thirumurthi, Umadevi; Beningo, Karen A; Dembo, Micah

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical forces have a major influence on cell migration and are predicted to significantly impact cancer metastasis, yet this idea is currently poorly defined. In this study we have asked if changes in traction stress and migratory properties correlate with the metastatic progression of tumor cells. For this purpose, four murine breast cancer cell lines derived from the same primary tumor, but possessing increasing metastatic capacity, were tested for adhesion strength, traction stress, focal adhesion organization and for differential migration rates in two-dimensional and three-dimensional environments. Using traction force microscopy (TFM), we were surprised to find an inverse relationship between traction stress and metastatic capacity, such that force production decreased as the metastatic capacity increased. Consistent with this observation, adhesion strength exhibited an identical profile to the traction data. A count of adhesions indicated a general reduction in the number as metastatic capacity increased but no difference in the maturation as determined by the ratio of nascent to mature adhesions. These changes correlated well with a reduction in active beta-1 integrin with increasing metastatic ability. Finally, in two dimensions, wound healing, migration and persistence were relatively low in the entire panel, maintaining a downward trend with increasing metastatic capacity. Why metastatic cells would migrate so poorly prompted us to ask if the loss of adhesive parameters in the most metastatic cells indicated a switch to a less adhesive mode of migration that would only be detected in a three-dimensional environment. Indeed, in three-dimensional migration assays, the most metastatic cells now showed the greatest linear speed. We conclude that traction stress, adhesion strength and rate of migration do indeed change as tumor cells progress in metastatic capacity and do so in a dimension-sensitive manner

  13. Molecular Subgroup of Primary Prostate Cancer Presenting with Metastatic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven M; Knight, Laura A; McCavigan, Andrena M; Logan, Gemma E; Berge, Viktor; Sherif, Amir; Pandha, Hardev; Warren, Anne Y; Davidson, Catherine; Uprichard, Adam; Blayney, Jaine K; Price, Bethanie; Jellema, Gera L; Steele, Christopher J; Svindland, Aud; McDade, Simon S; Eden, Christopher G; Foster, Chris; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E; Mason, Malcolm D; Kay, Elaine W; Waugh, David J; Harkin, D Paul; Watson, R William; Clarke, Noel W; Kennedy, Richard D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 4-25% of patients with early prostate cancer develop disease recurrence following radical prostatectomy. To identify a molecular subgroup of prostate cancers with metastatic potential at presentation resulting in a high risk of recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was performed using gene expression data from 70 primary resections, 31 metastatic lymph nodes, and 25 normal prostate samples. Independent assay validation was performed using 322 radical prostatectomy samples from four sites with a mean follow-up of 50.3 months. Molecular subgroups were identified using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. A partial least squares approach was used to generate a gene expression assay. Relationships with outcome (time to biochemical and metastatic recurrence) were analysed using multivariable Cox regression and log-rank analysis. A molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancer with biology similar to metastatic disease was identified. A 70-transcript signature (metastatic assay) was developed and independently validated in the radical prostatectomy samples. Metastatic assay positive patients had increased risk of biochemical recurrence (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [1.13-2.33]; p=0.0092) and metastatic recurrence (multivariable HR=3.20 [1.76-5.80]; p=0.0001). A combined model with Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post surgical (CAPRA-S) identified patients at an increased risk of biochemical and metastatic recurrence superior to either model alone (HR=2.67 [1.90-3.75]; pmolecular subgroup of primary prostate cancers with metastatic potential. The metastatic assay may improve the ability to detect patients at risk of metastatic recurrence following radical prostatectomy. The impact of adjuvant therapies should be assessed in this higher-risk population. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  15. Comparison of cutting and pencil-point spinal needle in spinal anesthesia regarding postdural puncture headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Liu, Yang; Song, WenYe; Kan, ShunLi; Liu, FeiFei; Zhang, Di; Ning, GuangZhi; Feng, ShiQing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH), mainly resulting from the loss of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), is a well-known iatrogenic complication of spinal anesthesia and diagnostic lumbar puncture. Spinal needles have been modified to minimize complications. Modifiable risk factors of PDPH mainly included needle size and needle shape. However, whether the incidence of PDPH is significantly different between cutting-point and pencil-point needles was controversial. Then we did a meta-analysis to assess the incidence of PDPH of cutting spinal needle and pencil-point spinal needle. Methods: We included all randomly designed trials, assessing the clinical outcomes in patients given elective spinal anesthesia or diagnostic lumbar puncture with either cutting or pencil-point spinal needle as eligible studies. All selected studies and the risk of bias of them were assessed by 2 investigators. Clinical outcomes including success rates, frequency of PDPH, reported severe PDPH, and the use of epidural blood patch (EBP) were recorded as primary results. Results were evaluated using risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous variables. Rev Man software (version 5.3) was used to analyze all appropriate data. Results: Twenty-five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in our study. The analysis result revealed that pencil-point spinal needle would result in lower rate of PDPH (RR 2.50; 95% CI [1.96, 3.19]; P < 0.00001) and severe PDPH (RR 3.27; 95% CI [2.15, 4.96]; P < 0.00001). Furthermore, EBP was less used in pencil-point spine needle group (RR 3.69; 95% CI [1.96, 6.95]; P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Current evidences suggest that pencil-point spinal needle was significantly superior compared with cutting spinal needle regarding the frequency of PDPH, PDPH severity, and the use of EBP. In view of this, we recommend the use of pencil-point spinal needle in spinal anesthesia and lumbar puncture. PMID:28383416

  16. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H...... intraspinal administration of substances through the spinal loop dialysis probe....

  17. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønne, Greger; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common spinal procedure in the elderly. To avoid persisting low back pain, adding arthrodesis has been recommended, especially if there is a coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, this strategy remains con...

  18. Transcutaneous spinal stimulation as a therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grecco LH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leandro H Grecco,1,3,4,* Shasha Li,1,5,* Sarah Michel,1,6,* Laura Castillo-Saavedra,1 Andoni Mourdoukoutas,7 Marom Bikson,7 Felipe Fregni1,21Spaulding Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA; 3Special Laboratory of Pain and Signaling, Butantan Institute, 4Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Namur, Belgium; 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, The City College of New York, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI still have limited effects. Electrical stimulation might facilitate plastic changes in affected spinal circuitries that may be beneficial in improving motor function and spasticity or SCI-related neuropathic pain. Based on available animal and clinical evidence, we critically reviewed the physiological basis and therapeutic action of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation in SCI. We analyzed the literature published on PubMed to date, looking for the role of three main noninvasive stimulation techniques in the recovery process of SCI and focusing mainly on transcutaneous spinal stimulation. This review discusses the main clinical applications, latest advances, and limitations of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Although most recent research in this topic has focused on transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS, we also reviewed the technique of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES as potential methods to modulate spinal cord

  19. Multiple urinary bladder masses from metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Choo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma that manifested with multiple exophytic intravesical masses, mimicking a multifocal primary bladder tumor. Biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis confirmed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated palliatively with external beam radiotherapy to prevent possible symptoms from local tumor progression. This case illustrates that when a patient with known prostate cancer presents with multifocal bladder tumors, the possibility of metastatic prostate cancer should be considered.

  20. Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0390 TITLE: Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zheng Li CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0390 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Zheng Li 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...14 Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast  Cancer   A. Introduction (1paragraph) The overall goal of this proposal is to prepare TrkC

  1. Neuroradiology of the spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Molsen, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Radiodiagnostics of the vertebral column and of the spinal cord under normal conditions and under different pathological alterations are elaborated. Especially cervical and thoracal myelography, lumbosacral myeloradiculography, spinal arteriography and phlebography as well as spinal computerized tomography are discussed in detail

  2. Morphological analysis of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals using CT myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Ohmori, K.; Takatsu, T.; Teramoto, T.; Ishida, Y.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-01-01

    To verify the conventional concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'', we performed a morphological analysis of the relations of the cervical spinal canal, dural tube and spinal cord in normal individuals. The sagittal diameter, area and circularity of the three structures, and the dispersion of each parameter, were examined on axial sections of CT myelograms of 36 normal subjects. The spinal canal was narrowest at C4, followed by C5, while the spinal cord was largest at C4/5. The area and circularity of the cervical spinal cord were not significantly correlated with any parameter of the spinal canal nor with the sagittal diameter and area of the dural tube at any level examined, and the spinal cord showed less individual variation than the bony canal. Compression of the spinal cord might be expected whenever the sagittal diameter of the spinal canal is below the lower limit of normal, that is about 12 mm on plain radiographs. Thus, we concluded that the concept of ''developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal'' was reasonable and acceptable. (orig.). With 2 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy leads to an increase in pain relief for spinal metastases: a comparison study with a regimen of 30 Gy in 10 fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinlan; Xiao, Jianghong; Peng, Xingchen; Duan, Baofeng; Li, Yan; Ai, Ping; Yao, Min; Chen, Nianyong

    2017-12-22

    Under the existing condition that the optimum radiotherapy regimen for spinal metastases is controversial, this study investigates the benefits of dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) with 60-66 Gy in 20-30 fractions for spinal metastases. In the dose-escalation group, each D50 of planning gross tumor volume (PGTV) was above 60 Gy and each Dmax of spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) was below 48 Gy. The median biological effective dose (BED) of Dmax of spinal cord was lower in the dose-escalation group compared with that in the 30-Gy group (69.70 Gy vs. 83.16 Gy, p pain responses were better in the dose-escalation group than those in the 30-Gy group ( p = 0.005 and p = 0.024), and the complete pain relief rates were respectively 73.69% and 34.29% ( p = 0.006), 73.69% and 41.38% ( p = 0.028) in two compared groups. In the dose-escalation group, there is a trend of a longer duration of pain relief, a longer overall survival and a lower incidence of acute radiation toxicities. No late radiation toxicities were observed in both groups. Dosimetric parameters and clinical outcomes, including pain response, duration of pain relief, radiation toxicities and overall survival, were compared among twenty-five metastatic spinal lesions irradiated with the dose-escalation regimen and among forty-four lesions treated with the 30-Gy regimen. Conventionally-fractionated IG-IMRT for spinal metastases could escalate dose to the vertebral lesions while sparing the spinal cord, achieving a better pain relief without increasing radiation complications.

  4. The management of metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer requires an integrated approach including both directed and systemic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Shamil D; Topliss, Duncan J

    2017-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) presented with left thigh and right flank numbness. He had known progressive and widespread bony metastases, for which he received palliative radiotherapy, and multiple bilateral asymptomatic pulmonary metastases. CT scan and MRI of the spine revealed metastases at right T10-L1 vertebrae with extension into the central canal and epidural disease at T10 and T11 causing cord displacement and canal stenosis but retention of spinal cord signal. Spinal surgery was followed by palliative radiotherapy resulting in symptom resolution. Two months later, sorafenib received approval for use in Australia and was commenced and up-titrated with symptomatic management of mild adverse effects. Follow-up CT scan three months after commencement of sorafenib revealed regression of pulmonary metastases but no evident change in most bone metastases except for an advancing lesion eroding into the right acetabulum. The patient underwent a right total hip replacement, intra-lesional curettage and cementing. After six months of sorafenib therapy, CT scanning showed enlarging liver lesions with marked elevation of serum thyroglobulin. Lenvatinib was commenced and sorafenib was ceased. He now has stable disease with a falling thyroglobulin more than 5 years after metastatic radioiodine-refractory DTC was diagnosed. In DTC, 5% of distant metastases become radioiodine-refractory, resulting in a median overall survival of 2.5-3.5 years. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has recently been demonstrated to increase progression-free survival in these patients but poses some unique management issues and is best used as part of an integrated approach with directed therapy. Directed therapies may have greater potential to control localised disease and related symptoms when compared to systemic therapies.Consider TKI therapy in progressive disease where benefits outweigh risks.Active surveillance and

  5. Experimental spinal cord trauma: a review of mechanically induced spinal cord injury in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Dauda; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; Mohamad, Masro; Aziz, Izzuddin; Sanusi, Junedah

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that animal spinal cord compression (using methods such as clips, balloons, spinal cord strapping, or calibrated forceps) mimics the persistent spinal canal occlusion that is common in human spinal cord injury (SCI). These methods can be used to investigate the effects of compression or to know the optimal timing of decompression (as duration of compression can affect the outcome of pathology) in acute SCI. Compression models involve prolonged cord compression and are distinct from contusion models, which apply only transient force to inflict an acute injury to the spinal cord. While the use of forceps to compress the spinal cord is a common choice due to it being inexpensive, it has not been critically assessed against the other methods to determine whether it is the best method to use. To date, there is no available review specifically focused on the current compression methods of inducing SCI in rats; thus, we performed a systematic and comprehensive publication search to identify studies on experimental spinalization in rat models, and this review discusses the advantages and limitations of each method.

  6. Potentialities of spinal liquor scanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlakhov, N.; Vylkanov, P.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that spinal liquor scanography is a harmless and informative method for the examination of patients, permitting to detect injury foci for spinal cord tumours in 90% cases, for acute injuries of the vertebral column and spinal cord in 89.5% cases, for herniation of nucleus pulposus in 81% cases. The method of spinal liquor scanography can be used in neurology and neurosurgery to select the method of treatment and to evaluate its efficiency

  7. Characteristics and Patterns of Metastatic Disease from Chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare, slow-growing malignant tumor arising from notochordal remnants. A retrospective review of patient records at two major referral centers was undertaken to assess the incidence, location, and prognostic factors of metastatic disease from chordoma. 219 patients with chordoma (1962–2009 were identified. 39 patients (17.8% developed metastatic disease, most frequently to lung (>50%. Median survival from the time of initial diagnosis was 130.4 months for patients who developed metastatic disease and 159.3 months for those who did not (P=0.05. Metastatic disease was most common in the youngest patients (P=0.07, and it was 2.5 times more frequent among patients with local recurrence (26.3% than in those without (10.8% (P=0.003. Patient survival with metastatic disease was highly variable, and it was dependent on both the location of the tumor primary and the site of metastasis. Metastasis to distal bone was the most rapid to develop and had the worst prognosis.

  8. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  9. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: Opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training. Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection. Because the NMDA receptor has been implicated in formalin-induced central sensitization, we tested whether pretreatment with NMDA affects spinal learning. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24h. These data provide strong evidence for an

  10. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  11. Foramen magnum schwannoma: review of the literature and report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Caiado, Stella; Oliveira, Nidia di Paula Silva; Paula Neto, Walter Teixeira de; Campos, Flavio do Amaral; Santos, Alair Augusto Sarmet Moreira Damas dos

    2001-01-01

    The authors report an unusual presentation of a voluminous neck schwannoma in a 53-year-old female that presented with a three-year history of progressive weakness associated with impaired movement of the limbs. Neurological examination revealed postural instability, unstable and paraparetic gait, tetraparesis and dyspnea. A preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the neck revealed an expansive, extradural, well-circumscribed lesion, with soft-tissue attenuation, at the level of C1-C2 vertebral bodies. During surgery, the tumor was found to be extradural, lateral to the cervical spinal cord, attached to the C1 left nerve root and extending upwards through the foramen magnum. Histopathological analysis of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. The patient showed a favorable outcome with progressive improvement of the symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging proved to be valuable in the detection and evaluation of the lesion, although the definite diagnosis was achieved only after histopathological studies. We concluded that magnetic resonance imaging for early diagnosis and prompt surgical resection seems to be the best approach to achieve good prognosis. (author)

  12. Foramen magnum schwannoma: review of the literature and report of a case; Schwannoma do forame magno: revisao e relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Caiado, Stella; Oliveira, Nidia di Paula Silva; Paula Neto, Walter Teixeira de [Fundacao Educacional Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biomedicas. Faculdade de Medicina de Teresopolis]. E-mail: marcelonacif30@hotmail.com; Mello, Ricardo Andrade Fernandes de [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Jauregui, Gustavo Federico [Hospital Geral de Bonsucesso, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Campos, Flavio do Amaral [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Santos, Alair Augusto Sarmet Moreira Damas dos [Instituto de Pos-graduacao Medica Carlos Chagas (IPGMCC), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Curso de Pos-graduacao em Radiologia

    2001-02-01

    The authors report an unusual presentation of a voluminous neck schwannoma in a 53-year-old female that presented with a three-year history of progressive weakness associated with impaired movement of the limbs. Neurological examination revealed postural instability, unstable and paraparetic gait, tetraparesis and dyspnea. A preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the neck revealed an expansive, extradural, well-circumscribed lesion, with soft-tissue attenuation, at the level of C1-C2 vertebral bodies. During surgery, the tumor was found to be extradural, lateral to the cervical spinal cord, attached to the C1 left nerve root and extending upwards through the foramen magnum. Histopathological analysis of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. The patient showed a favorable outcome with progressive improvement of the symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging proved to be valuable in the detection and evaluation of the lesion, although the definite diagnosis was achieved only after histopathological studies. We concluded that magnetic resonance imaging for early diagnosis and prompt surgical resection seems to be the best approach to achieve good prognosis. (author)

  13. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  14. Postoperative spinal infection mimicking systemic vasculitis with titanium-spinal implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathopoulos Konstantinos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary systemic vasculitis after posterior spinal fusion surgery is rare. It is usually related to over-reaction of immune-system, to genetic factors, toxicity, infection or metal allergies. Case Description A 14 year-old girl with a history of extended posterior spinal fusion due to idiopathic scoliosis presented to our department with diffuse erythema and nephritis (macroscopic hemuresis and proteinuria 5 months post surgery. The surgical trauma had no signs of inflammation or infection. The blood markers ESR and CRP were increased. Skin tests were positive for nickel allergy, which is a content of titanium alloy. The patient received corticosteroids systematically (hydrocortisone 10 mg for 6 months, leading to total recess of skin and systemic reaction. However, a palpable mass close to the surgical wound raised the suspicion of a late infection. The patient had a second surgery consisting of surgical debridement and one stage revision of posterior spinal instrumentation. Intraoperative cultures were positive to Staphylococcus aureus. Intravenous antibiotics were administered. The patient is now free of symptoms 24 months post revision surgery without any signs of recurrence of either vasculitis or infection. Literature Review Systemic vasculitis after spinal surgery is exceptionally rare. Causative factors are broad and sometimes controversial. In general, it is associated with allergy to metal ions. This is usually addressed with metal on metal total hip bearings. In spinal surgery, titanium implants are considered to be inert and only few reports have presented cases with systemic vasculitides. Therefore, other etiologies of immune over-reaction should always be considered, such as drug toxicity, infection, or genetic predisposition. Purposes and Clinical Relevance Our purpose was to highlight the difficulties during the diagnostic work-up for systemic vasculitis and management in cases of posterior spinal surgery.

  15. REPORT OF SEVEN CASES OF METASTATIC TUMOURS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major Adebayo

    Metastatic lesions may mimic odontogenic infections and other disease conditions in the oral cavity in presentation leading to late diagnosis by the unwary clinician. In Nigeria, reports on jaw tumours from metastasis elsewhere are quite scarce. This report presents a series of histologically verified metastatic tumours to the ...

  16. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  17. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ultrasonic imaging of metastatic carcinoma in thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Ling; Yang Tao; Tang Ying; Mao Jingning; Chen Wei; Wang Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the ultrasonic findings of metastatic thyroid carcinoma and to evaluate the diagnostic value of the ultrasonic imaging for patients with metastatic thyroid neoplasm. Methods: The ultrasonic imaging characteristics of ten patients who were diagnosed with metastatic thyroid carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. In all the cases, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the thyroid was performed during the clinical diagnosis. Results: The ultrasonic images of the ten patients fell into four types: multiple nodules in the thyroid, single nodule in the thyroid, diffuse calcification and heterogeneous echo. Seven cases showed speckled calcific foci. Abnormal blood flow signal was found in 9 cases. Conclusion: The ultrasonic findings of metastatic carcinoma in the thyroid gland are various and non-specific. Color Doppler ultrasound may provide ample evidence. The diagnosis depends on FNAC. (authors)

  19. Outcomes of Adolescent and Adult Patients with Lung Metastatic Osteosarcoma and Comparison of Synchronous and Metachronous Lung Metastatic Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Gok Durnali

    Full Text Available Osteosarcomas with lung metastases are rather heterogenous group. We aimed to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of osteosarcoma patients with lung metastases and to compare the synchronous and metachronous lung metastatic groups. A total of 93 adolescent and adult patients with lung metastatic osteosarcoma, from March 1995 to July 2011, in a single center, were included. Sixty-five patients (69.9% were male. The median age was 19 years (range, 14-74. Thirty-nine patients (41.9% had synchronous lung metastases (Group A and 54 patients (58.1% had metachronous lung metastases (Group B. The 5-year and 10-year post-lung metastases overall survival (PLM-OS was 17% and 15%, respectively. In multivariate analysis for PLM-OS, time to lung metastases (p = 0.010, number of metastatic pulmonary nodules (p = 0.020, presence of pulmonary metastasectomy (p = 0.007 and presence of chemotherapy for lung metastases (p< 0.001 were found to be independent prognostic factors. The median PLM-OS of Group A and Group B was 16 months and 9 months, respectively. In Group B, the median PLM-OS of the patients who developed lung metastases within 12 months was 6 months, whereas that of the patients who developed lung metastases later was 16 months. Time to lung metastases, number and laterality of metastatic pulmonary nodules, chemotherapy for lung metastatic disease and pulmonary metastasectomy were independent prognostic factors for patients with lung metastatic osteosarcoma. The best PLM-OS was in the subgroup of patients treated both surgery and chemotherapy. The prognosis of the patients who developed lung metastases within 12 months after diagnosis was worst.

  20. The transformation of spinal curvature into spinal deformity: pathological processes and implications for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawes Martha C

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review summarizes what is known about the pathological processes (e.g. structural and functional changes, by which spinal curvatures develop and evolve into spinal deformities. Methods Comprehensive review of articles (English language only published on 'scoliosis,' whose content yielded data on the pathological changes associated with spinal curvatures. Medline, Science Citation Index and other searches yielded > 10,000 titles each of which was surveyed for content related to 'pathology' and related terms such as 'etiology,' 'inheritance,' 'pathomechanism,' 'signs and symptoms.' Additional resources included all books published on 'scoliosis' and available through the Arizona Health Sciences Library, Interlibrary Loan, or through direct contact with the authors or publishers. Results A lateral curvature of the spine–'scoliosis'–can develop in association with postural imbalance due to genetic defects and injury as well as pain and scarring from trauma or surgery. Irrespective of the factor that triggers its appearance, a sustained postural imbalance can result, over time, in establishment of a state of continuous asymmetric loading relative to the spinal axis. Recent studies support the longstanding hypothesis that spinal deformity results directly from such postural imbalance, irrespective of the primary trigger, because the dynamics of growth within vertebrae are altered by continuous asymmetric mechanical loading. These data suggest that, as long as growth potential remains, evolution of a spinal curvature into a spinal deformity can be prevented by reversing the state of continuous asymmetric loading. Conclusion Spinal curvatures can routinely be diagnosed in early stages, before pathological deformity of the vertebral elements is induced in response to asymmetric loading. Current clinical approaches involve 'watching and waiting' while mild reversible spinal curvatures develop into spinal deformities with

  1. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Yamada, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ishii, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Saito, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Tanji, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Kobayashi, T. (Inst. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Miyagi (Japan)); Soma, Y. (Div. of Neurology, Takeda Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu (Japan)); Sakamoto, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)

  2. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  3. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  4. Post spinal meningitis and asepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videira, Rogerio L R; Ruiz-Neto, P P; Brandao Neto, M

    2002-07-01

    Post spinal meningitis (PSM) is a complication still currently being reported. After two PSM cases in our hospital an epidemiological study was initiated, which included a survey of techniques for asepsis that are applied in our department. Cases defined as PSM comprised meningitis within a week after spinal anesthesia. Anesthesia records, anesthesia complication files and the records of the Hospital Commission for Infection Control from 1997 to 2000 were reviewed. Asepsis techniques applied were surveyed by a questionnaire answered by all our department's anesthesiologists. The equipment and procedures for spinal anesthesia were listed. Current anesthesia textbooks were reviewed for recommendations regarding asepsis techniques in conjunction with spinal anesthesia. Three cases of PSM were identified following 38,128 spinal anesthesias whereas none was observed in 12,822 patients subjected to other types of regional or general anesthesia (P>0.05). Culture of cerebrospinal fluid yielded Streptococcus in two patients and was negative in the other patient. The asepsis technique applied by the anesthesiologists varied considerably. The literature review showed that aspects on asepsis for spinal anesthesia are poorly covered. The incidence of meningitis was similar in patients subjected to spinal anesthesia and in those subjected to other anesthetic techniques. Asepsis techniques were found to differ considerably among our staff members, reflecting the lack of well-defined published standards for this procedure. We recommend that asepsis for spinal anesthesia should not be less rigorous than for surgical asepsis.

  5. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  6. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankwah EK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ernest K Amankwah,1 Anthony P Conley,2 Damon R Reed2 1Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Sarcoma Department, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma, adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. Keywords: chemotherapy, pediatric sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences ...

  8. The effect of spinal manipulative therapy on spinal range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan, Mario; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Budgell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) has been shown to have an effect on spine-related pain, both clinically and in experimentally induced pain. However, it is unclear if it has an immediate noticeable biomechanical effect on spinal motion that can be measured in terms of an increased range of motion...

  9. CT diagnosis of acute spinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhama, Mitsuru; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Kimura, Ko; Yamazaki, Gyoji; Nasu, Yoshiro; Shioya, Akihide

    1982-01-01

    CT pictures of 22 acute spinal injuries with damage of the spinal cord were evaluated. In the cases of spinal cord damage with bone injury, changes in the vertebral canal were fully observed by CT. In some of spinal cord damages without bone injury, narrowing of the vertebral canal was demonstrated by CT combined with CT myelography and reconstruction. Evaluation of CT number showed a high density area in damaged spinal cord in some cases. CT was thus considered to be useful as an adjunct diagnostic aid. (Ueda, J.)

  10. Reacquisition of E-cadherin expression in metastatic deposits of signet-ring cell carcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal system: a potential anchor for metastatic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yihong R; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2017-06-01

    To examine the expression of E-cadherin in paired primary and metastatic signet-ring cell carcinomas (SRCC) of various organ systems in order to explore the potential role of the molecule in metastatic dissemination of this unique tumour type. Thirty-seven consecutive cases of SRCC from various organs with paired primary and metastatic tumorous tissue available were retrieved. The intensity of membranous E-cadherin expression was semiquantitatively scored on a scale of 0-3+. Reduced E-cadherin expression was a distinct feature of primary SRCC and was observed in 78% of primary tumours. Interestingly, the E-cadherin reduction was less frequently seen in metastatic SRCC when compared with their primary counterparts, and was only found in 57% of tumours in lymph node metastases or at distant sites of relapse. Furthermore, the mean score of E-cadherin expression of primary SRCC was significantly lower than that of their metastatic counterparts (2.3 vs 1.8; p=0.008). When divided by organ systems, the reacquisition of E-cadherin expression in the metastatic deposits was most remarkable in the SRCC of upper gastrointestinal tract origin (2.3 vs 1.4; p=0.003), whereas no significant difference was observed in other organ systems. While the reduction of E-cadherin in primary SRCC supports its pivotal role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a process crucial in tumour progression and metastatic dissemination, the re-expression of this molecule in metastatic SRCC cells implies a reversal to their epithelial phenotype (thus mesenchymal-epithelial transition) which, in turn, theoretically helps tumour cells to anchor and form cohesive metastatic deposits. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Embolization of spinal arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Mi Young; Kim, Sun Yong; Park, Bok Hwan

    1990-01-01

    Recently, therapeutic embolization has been advocated as the treatment of choice for spinal AVM(arteriovenous malformations). The authors review our experience with two cases of spinal AVM treated by embolization using coaxial Tracker-18 microcatheter with Latvian. The patients included a 10 year old male with glomus type and a 14 year old female with juvenile type spinal AVM revealed recanalization 5 month later. Embolization provides curative or temporary treatment for spinal AVM. After embolic occlusion, delayed reassessment with arteriography is indicated, particularly if symptoms persist or recur

  12. MR imaging of spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchberger, W.; Springer, P.; Birbamer, G.; Judmaier, W.; Kathrein, A.; Daniaux, H.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the acute and chronic stages of spinal trauma. 126 MR examinations of 120 patients were evaluated retrospectively. In 15 cases of acute spinal cord injury, correlation of MR findings with the degree of neurological deficit and eventual recovery was undertaken. Cord anomalies in the acute stage were seen in 16 patients. Intramedullary haemorrhage (n=6) and cord transection (n=2) were associated with complete injuries and poor prognosis, whereas patients with cord oedema (n=7) had incomplete injuries and recovered significant neurological function. In the chronic stage, MR findings included persistent cord compression in 8 patients, syringomyelia or post-traumatic cyst in 12, myelomalacia in 6, cord atrophy in 9, and cord transection in 7 patients. In acute spinal trauma, MR proved useful in assessing spinal cord compression and instability. In addition, direct visualisation and characterisation of posttraumatic changes within the spinal cord may offer new possibilities in establishing the prognosis for neurological recovery. In the later stages, potentially remediable causes of persistent or progressive symptoms, such as chronic spinal cord compression or syringomyelia can be distinguished from other sequelae of spinal trauma, such as myelomalacia, cord transection or atrophy. (orig.) [de

  13. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  14. Bee Venom Acupuncture Reduces Interleukin-6, Increases Interleukin-10, and Induces Locomotor Recovery in a Model of Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento de Souza, Raquel; Silva, Fernanda Kohn; Alves de Medeiros, Magda

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) initiate a series of molecular and cellular events in which inflammatory responses can lead to major neurological dysfunctions. The present study aims to investigate whether bee venom (BV) acupuncture applied at acupoints ST36 (Zusanli) and GV3 (Yaoyangquan) could minimize locomotor deficits and the magnitude of neural tissue losses, and change the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after an SCI by compression. Wistar rats were subjected to an SCI model by compression in which a 2-French Fogarty embolectomy catheter was inflated in the extradural space. The effects of BV acupuncture, in which 20 μL of BV diluted in saline (0.08 mg/kg) was injected at acupoints GV3 and ST36 [BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI] was compared with BV injected at nonacupoints [BV(NP)-SCI] and with no treatment [group subjected only to SCI (CTL-SCI)]. The BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI group showed a significant improvement in the locomotor performance and a decrease of lesion size compared with the controls. BV acupuncture at the ST36 + GV3 increased the expression of interleukin-10 (anti-inflammatory) at 6 hours and reduced the expression of interleukin-6 (proinflammatory) at 24 hours after SCI compared with the controls. Our results suggest that BV acupuncture can reduce neuroinflammation and induce recovery in the SCI compression model. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Targeting Lumbar Spinal Neural Circuitry by Epidural Stimulation to Restore Motor Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Karen; McKay, W Barry; Binder, Heinrich; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation has a long history of application for improving motor control in spinal cord injury. This review focuses on its resurgence following the progress made in understanding the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and on recent reports of its augmentative effects upon otherwise subfunctional volitional motor control. Early work revealed that the spinal circuitry involved in lower-limb motor control can be accessed by stimulating through electrodes placed epidurally over the posterior aspect of the lumbar spinal cord below a paralyzing injury. Current understanding is that such stimulation activates large-to-medium-diameter sensory fibers within the posterior roots. Those fibers then trans-synaptically activate various spinal reflex circuits and plurisegmentally organized interneuronal networks that control more complex contraction and relaxation patterns involving multiple muscles. The induced change in responsiveness of this spinal motor circuitry to any residual supraspinal input via clinically silent translesional neural connections that have survived the injury may be a likely explanation for rudimentary volitional control enabled by epidural stimulation in otherwise paralyzed muscles. Technological developments that allow dynamic control of stimulation parameters and the potential for activity-dependent beneficial plasticity may further unveil the remarkable capacity of spinal motor processing that remains even after severe spinal cord injuries.

  16. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  17. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis

  18. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass.

  19. Focal Anterior Displacement of the Thoracic Spinal Cord without Evidence of Spinal Cord Herniation or an Intradural Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Yoon; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings on focal anterior displacement of the thoracic spinal cord in asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass. We identified 12 patients (male:female = 6:6; mean age, 51.7; range, 15-83 years) between 2007 and 2011, with focal anterior displacement of the spinal cord and without evidence of an intradural mass or spinal cord herniation. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings in consensus. An asymmetric spinal cord deformity with a focal dented appearance was seen on the posterior surface of the spinal cord in all patients, and it involved a length of 1 or 2 vertebral segments in the upper thoracic spine (thoracic vertebrae 1-6). Moreover, a focal widening of the posterior subarachnoid space was also observed in all cases. None of the patients had myelopathy symptoms, and they showed no focal T2-hyperintensity in the spinal cord with the exception of one patient. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow artifacts were seen in the posterior subarachnoid space of the affected spinal cord level. Computed tomography myelography revealed preserved CSF flow in the two available patients. Focal anterior spinal cord indentation can be found in the upper thoracic level of asymptomatic patients without a spinal cord herniation or intradural mass

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  2. Assessing attitudes toward spinal immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouland, Andrew J; Jenkins, J Lee; Levy, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prospective studies have improved knowledge of prehospital spinal immobilization. The opinion of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers regarding spinal immobilization is unknown, as is their knowledge of recent research advances. To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and comfort of prehospital and Emergency Department (ED) EMS providers regarding spinal immobilization performed under a non-selective protocol. An online survey was conducted from May to July of 2011. Participants were drawn from the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services and the Howard County General Hospital ED. The survey included multiple choice questions and responses on a modified Likert scale. Correlation analysis and descriptive data were used to analyze results. Comfort using the Kendrick Extrication Device was low among ED providers. Experienced providers were more likely to indicate comfort using this device. Respondents often believed that spinal immobilization is appropriate in the management of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. Reported use of padding decreased along with the frequency with which providers practice and encounter immobilized patients. Respondents often indicated that they perform spinal immobilization due solely to mechanism of injury. Providers who feel as if spinal immobilization is often performed unnecessarily were more likely to agree that immobilization causes an unnecessary delay in patient care. The results demonstrate the need for improved EMS education in the use of the Kendrick Extrication Device, backboard padding, and spinal immobilization in the management of penetrating trauma. The attitudes highlighted in this study are relevant to the implementation of a selective spinal immobilization protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Normal morphology of the cervical spinal cord and spinal canal using MRI in Japanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Fumihiko; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Suda, Kota; Yamagata, Masatsune; Ueta, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish standard MRI values for the cervical spinal canal, dural tube, and spinal cord in healthy Japanese subjects and to define developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal based on MRI data. To establish standard values for ''finger grip and release in 10 seconds (G and R test)'' and ''10 second step test'' in healthy Japanese subjects. There were approximately 100 volunteers representing each gender and generation, including persons aged in their 20s to 70s. The sagittal diameter of the spinal canal, and the sagittal diameter and axial area of the dural tube and spinal cord were measured on MRIs of 1,211 subjects. From this data, we calculated the spinal cord occupation rate in the dural tube for defining developmental stenosis of the cervical spinal canal. ''Finger grip and release in 10 seconds (G and R test)'' and ''10 second step test'' were also examined on 1,211 subjects. The spinal canal diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 11.7±1.6 mm in males and 11.6±1.5 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 12.9±1.4 mm in males and 12.5±1.3 mm in females. Dural tube diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 9.5±1.8 mm in males and 9.6±1.6 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 11.2±1.4 mm in males and 11.1±1.4 mm in females. Dural tube area in axial images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 155.7±32.1 mm 2 in males and 149.6±29.0 mm 2 in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 187.4±32.6 mm 2 in males and 177.0±32.7 mm 2 in females. Spinal cord diameter in sagittal images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level was 5.9±1.0 mm in males and 5.8±0.9 mm in females, while that at the C5 vertebral body level was 6.5±0.7 mm in males and 6.4±0.7 mm in females. Spinal cord area in axial images for all ages at the C5/6 intervertebral disc level

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos ... Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. ...

  5. Metastatic neoplasms of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenner, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metastatic neoplasms to the central nervous system are often encountered in the practice of surgical neuropathology. It is not uncommon for patients with systemic malignancies to present to medical attention because of symptoms from a brain metastasis and for the tissue samples procured from these lesions to represent the first tissue available to study a malignancy from an unknown primary. In general surgical pathology, the evaluation of a metastatic neoplasm of unknown primary is a very complicated process, requiring knowledge of numerous different tumor types, reagents, and staining patterns. The past few years, however, have seen a remarkable refinement in the immunohistochemical tools at our disposal that now empower neuropathologists to take an active role in defining the relatively limited subset of neoplasms that commonly metastasize to the central nervous system. This information can direct imaging studies to find the primary tumor in a patient with an unknown primary, clarify the likely primary site of origin in patients who have small tumors in multiple sites without an obvious primary lesion, or establish lesions as late metastases of remote malignancies. Furthermore, specific treatments can begin and additional invasive procedures may be prevented if the neuropathologic evaluation of metastatic neoplasms provides information beyond the traditional diagnosis of ''metastatic neoplasm.'' In this review, differential cytokeratins, adjuvant markers, and organ-specific antibodies are described and the immunohistochemical signatures of metastatic neoplasms that are commonly seen by neuropathologists are discussed

  6. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong-jun Hou; Yong Huang; Zi-wen Fan; Xin-chun Li; Bing-yi Cao

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy v...

  8. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW Marguerite ... play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  10. Reducing risk of spinal haematoma from spinal and epidural pain procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Harald; Norum, Hilde; Fenger-Eriksen, Christian; Alahuhta, Seppo; Vigfússon, Gísli; Thomas, Owain; Lagerkranser, Michael

    2018-04-25

    Central neuraxial blocks (CNB: epidural, spinal and their combinations) and other spinal pain procedures can cause serious harm to the spinal cord in patients on antihaemostatic drugs or who have other risk-factors for bleeding in the spinal canal. The purpose of this narrative review is to provide a practise advisory on how to reduce risk of spinal cord injury from spinal haematoma (SH) during CNBs and other spinal pain procedures. Scandinavian guidelines from 2010 are part of the background for this practise advisory. We searched recent guidelines, PubMed (MEDLINE), SCOPUS and EMBASE for new and relevant randomised controlled trials (RCT), case-reports and original articles concerning benefits of neuraxial blocks, risks of SH due to anti-haemostatic drugs, patient-related risk factors, especially renal impairment with delayed excretion of antihaemostatic drugs, and specific risk factors related to the neuraxial pain procedures. Epidural and spinal analgesic techniques, as well as their combination provide superior analgesia and reduce the risk of postoperative and obstetric morbidity and mortality. Spinal pain procedure can be highly effective for cancer patients, less so for chronic non-cancer patients. We did not identify any RCT with SH as outcome. We evaluated risks and recommend precautions for SH when patients are treated with antiplatelet, anticoagulant, or fibrinolytic drugs, when patients' comorbidities may increase risks, and when procedure-specific risk factors are present. Inserting and withdrawing epidural catheters appear to have similar risks for initiating a SH. Invasive neuraxial pain procedures, e.g. spinal cord stimulation, have higher risks of bleeding than traditional neuraxial blocks. We recommend robust monitoring routines and treatment protocol to ensure early diagnosis and effective treatment of SH should this rare but potentially serious complication occur. When neuraxial analgesia is considered for a patient on anti

  11. Spinal and para spinal tumors treated by Cyberknife: feasibility and efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, J.; Thariat, J.; Benezery, K.; Courdi, A.; Doyen, J.; Mammar, H.; Bondiau, P.Y.; Chanalet, S.; Paquis, P.; Frenay, M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiotherapy using the Cyberknife has become a key treatment in the multidisciplinary management of secondary tumours, as well as primary benign or malignant tumours located within or adjacent to vertebral bodies and the spinal cord. The aim of this treatment is to improve local control and clinical response, including previously irradiated cases. Patients and methods In this study, we present the first patients treated with Cyberknife between December 2006 and December 2007 for spinal or para spinal tumours. The primary aim was to assess the feasibility and tolerance of stereotactic radiotherapy using the Cyberknife. Secondary aims were to establish the short-term local control, to calculate the local progression-free survival and overall survival. Clinical examination and imaging procedures were performed every three months. Response was assessed according to RECIST criteria. Results During that period, 16 patients were treated with Cyberknife. Thirteen patients had been pre-treated, three of whom had received spinal cord doses considered to be maximal. Three patients did not receive previous irradiation. The median age was 59 (36-74). The most frequent symptoms were pain (n = 8) and motor weakness (n = 4). The median dose was 30 Gy (16-50). The median number of fractions was 3 (1-5). No patient developed acute myelitis. Three patients developed acute reaction. Overall survival at 18 months was 72.4%, with a mean survival of 18.2 months (95% CI: 15.4-20.9). Local progression-free survival at 18 months was 58.4%, with a mean value of 16.9 months (95% CI: 13.6-20.2). Conclusion The use of stereotactic radiotherapy with Cyberknife represents a major progress in the management of para spinal tumours. The main advantages are better sparing of the spinal cord and the possibility of increasing the dose to the tumour target volume. (authors)

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ... Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What are the chances of regaining feeling and mobility after a spinal cord injury? play_arrow How long does it usually take for feeling and movement to return after a spinal cord ...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal ... with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ... Spinal Cord Injuries Video Library SCI Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to ... a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? ...

  19. Survival analysis in patients with metastatic spinal disease: the influence of surgery, histology, clinical and neurologic status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spine is the most common site for skeletal metastasis in patients with malignancy. Vertebral involvement quantification, neurological status, general health status and primary tumor histology are factors to set surgical planning and therapeutic targets. We evaluated the impact of general clinical and neurological status, histologic type and surgery in survival. Method : The study sample consisted of consecutive patients admitted from July 2010 to January 2013 for treatment. Results : Sixty eight patients were evaluated. 23 were female and 45 were male. Main primary neoplasic sites were: breast, prostate, lung/pleura and linfoproliferative. Thirty three out of 68 received surgical treatment, 2 received percutaneous biopsy and 33 had nonsurgical treatment. Survival : Log Rank curves revealed no statistical significant difference according to histological type, surgical approach and Frankel Score. Karnofsky Score was statistically different. Conclusion : Histological type and clinical status were statistically associated with life expectancy in vertebral metastatic disease.

  20. Long-term safety and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy for spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantel, Frederick; Glatz, Stefan; Toussaint, Andre; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Patients with long life expectancy despite metastatic status might benefit from long-term local control of spinal metastases. Dose-intensified radiotherapy (RT) is believed to control tumor growth better and thus offers longer pain relief. This single-institution study reports on fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases in patients with good life expectancy based on performance status, extent of metastases, histology, and time to metastasis. Between 2004 and 2010, 36 treatment sites in 32 patients (median age 55 years; male 61 %; median Karnofsky performance score 85) were treated with fractionated SBRT. The median treatment dose was 60 Gy (range, 48.5-65 Gy) given in a median of 20 fractions (range, 17-33); the median maximum dose to the planning risk volume for the spinal cord (PRV-SC) was 46.6 Gy. All patients suffering from pain prior to RT reported pain relief after treatment; after a median follow-up of 20.3 months, 61 % of treatment sites were pain-free, another 25 % associated with mild pain. In 86 % of treatments, patients were free from neurological symptoms at the time of the last clinical follow-up. Acute grade 1 toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were observed in 11 patients. Myelopathy did not occur in any patient. Radiologically controlled freedom from local progression was 92 and 84 % after 12 and 24 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 19.6 months. Patient selection resulted in long OS despite metastatic disease, and dose-intensified fractionated SBRT for spinal metastases was safe and achieved long-term local tumor control and palliation of pain. (orig.) [German] Patienten mit guter Lebenserwartung trotz metastasierter Erkrankung koennten von einer lang andauernden lokalen Kontrolle von Wirbelsaeulenmetastasen profitieren. Eine dosisintensivierte Radiotherapie (RT) kann vermutlich eine bessere Tumorkontrolle und daher eine laengere Schmerzpalliation erreichen. Ausgewertet wurden die monozentrischen

  1. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  2. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  3. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ... arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  7. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  8. Treatment outcome of radiation therapy and concurrent targeted molecular therapy in spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Rhee, Woo Joong; Lee, Jeong Shin; Cho, Yeo Na; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent radiation therapy with or without targeted molecular therapy for the treatment of spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A total of 28 spinal metastatic lesions from RCC patients treated with radiotherapy between June 2009 and June 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen lesions were treated concurrently with targeted molecular therapy (concurrent group) and 15 lesions were not (nonconcurrent group). Local control was defined as lack of radiographically evident local progression and neurological deterioration. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range, 2 to 58 months), the 1-year local progression-free rate (LPFR) was 67.0%. The patients with concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed significantly higher LPFR than those without (p = 0.019). After multivariate analysis, use of concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed a tendency towards improved LPFR (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 1.16). There was no difference in the incidence of systemic progression between concurrent and nonconcurrent groups. No grade ≥2 toxicities were observed during or after radiotherapy. Our study suggests the possibility that concurrent use of targeted molecular therapy during radiotherapy may improve LPFR. Further study with a large population is required to confirm these results.

  9. Treatment outcome of radiation therapy and concurrent targeted molecular therapy in spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Rhee, Woo Joong; Lee, Jeong Shin; Cho, Yeo Na; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent radiation therapy with or without targeted molecular therapy for the treatment of spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A total of 28 spinal metastatic lesions from RCC patients treated with radiotherapy between June 2009 and June 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen lesions were treated concurrently with targeted molecular therapy (concurrent group) and 15 lesions were not (nonconcurrent group). Local control was defined as lack of radiographically evident local progression and neurological deterioration. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range, 2 to 58 months), the 1-year local progression-free rate (LPFR) was 67.0%. The patients with concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed significantly higher LPFR than those without (p = 0.019). After multivariate analysis, use of concurrent targeted molecular therapy showed a tendency towards improved LPFR (hazard ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 1.16). There was no difference in the incidence of systemic progression between concurrent and nonconcurrent groups. No grade ≥2 toxicities were observed during or after radiotherapy. Our study suggests the possibility that concurrent use of targeted molecular therapy during radiotherapy may improve LPFR. Further study with a large population is required to confirm these results

  10. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have...... the most common clinically relevant adverse events associated with enzalutamide treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Enzalutamide significantly decreased the risk of radiographic progression and death and delayed the initiation of chemotherapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. (Funded by Medivation and Astellas...... skeletal-related event (hazard ratio, 0.72), a complete or partial soft-tissue response (59% vs. 5%), the time until prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (hazard ratio, 0.17), and a rate of decline of at least 50% in PSA (78% vs. 3%) (P

  11. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmel, Filip; Dumarey, Nicolas; Palestro, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor 99m Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and 67 Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [ 18 F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including radiolabelled

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  13. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord ...

  15. Unusual causes of spinal foraminal widening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibis, A.H.; Markonis, A.; Karantanas, A.H. [Dept. of CT and MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece)

    2000-01-01

    Spinal neural foraminal widening is usually caused by benign lesions, most commonly neurofibromas. Rare lesions can also cause spinal neural foraminal widening. Computed tomography and/or MRI are the modalities of choice for studying the spinal foraminal widening. The present pictorial review describes six rare lesions, namely a lateral thoracic meningocele, a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, a tuberculous abscess, an osteoblastoma, a chondrosarcoma and a malignant tumour of the lung which caused spinal neural foraminal widening. (orig.)

  16. Spinal Tissue Loading Created by Different Methods of Spinal Manipulative Therapy Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funabashi, Martha; Nougarou, François; Descarreaux, Martin; Prasad, Narasimha; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2017-05-01

    Comparative study using robotic replication of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) vertebral kinematics together with serial dissection. The aim of this study was to quantify loads created in cadaveric spinal tissues arising from three different forms of SMT application. There exist many distinct methods by which to apply SMT. It is not known presently whether different forms of SMT application have different effects on spinal tissues. Should the method of SMT application modulate spinal tissue loading, quantifying this relation may help explain the varied outcomes of SMT in terms of effect and safety. SMT was applied to the third lumbar vertebra in 12 porcine cadavers using three SMT techniques: a clinical device that applies forces through a hand-held instrument (INST), a manual technique of applying SMT clinically (MAN) and a research device that applies parameters of manual SMT through a servo-controlled linear actuator motor (SERVO). The resulting kinematics from each SMT application were tracked optically via indwelling bone pins. The L3/L4 segment was then removed, mounted in a parallel robot and the resulting kinematics from SMT replayed for each SMT application technique. Serial dissection of spinal structures was conducted to quantify loading characteristics of discrete spinal tissues. In terms of load magnitude, SMT application with MAN and SERVO created greater forces than INST in all conditions (P < 0.05). Additionally, MAN and SERVO created comparable posterior forces in the intact specimen, but MAN created greater posterior forces on IVD structures compared to SERVO (P < 0.05). Specific methods of SMT application create unique vertebral loading characteristics, which may help explain the varied outcomes of SMT in terms of effect and safety. N/A.

  17. Spinal Anesthesia with Isobaric Tetracaine in Patients with Previous Lumbar Spinal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hwan; Jeon, Dong-Hyuk; Chang, Chul Ho; Lee, Sung-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Previous lumbar spinal surgery (PLSS) is not currently considered as a contraindication for regional anesthesia. However, there are still problems that make spinal anesthesia more difficult with a possibility of worsening the patient's back pain. Spinal anesthesia using combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) in elderly patients with or without PLSS was investigated and the anesthetic characteristics, success rates, and possible complications were evaluated. Materials and Methods Fifty patients without PLSS (Control group) and 45 patients with PLSS (PLSS group) who were scheduled for total knee arthroplasty were studied prospectively. A CSEA was performed with patients in the left lateral position, and 10 mg of 0.5% isobaric tetracaine was injected through a 27 G spinal needle. An epidural catheter was then inserted for patient controlled analgesia. Successful spinal anesthesia was defined as adequate sensory block level more than T12. The number of skin punctures and the onset time were recorded, and maximal sensory block level (MSBL), time to 2-segment regression, success rate and complications were observed. Results The success rate of CSEA in Control group and PLSS group was 98.0%, and 93.3%, respectively. The median MSBL in PLSS group was higher than Control group [T4 (T2-L1) vs. T6 (T3-T12)] (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference in the number of patients who required ephedrine for the treatment of hypotension in PLSS group (p = 0.028). Conclusion The success rate of CSEA in patients with PLSS was 93.3%, and patients experienced no significant neurological complications. The MSBL can be higher in PLSS group than Control group. PMID:19430559

  18. Histomorphology of the Olfactory Mucosa and Spinal Tissue Sparing Following Transplantation in the Partial Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Delaviz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nowadays, cellular and tissues transplant has become the focus of attention for spinal cord injury. It has been shown olfactory nerve cells or olfactory mucosa whi have more efficient on nervous tissue repair and they have been more studied in experimental study. Furthermore, they were used in a few clinical centers for spinal defect. But mucosa tissue and spinal tissue have different structure and there is doubt about the integration of mucosa tissue in nervous tissue. Thus, in this research the morphology and the effect of the fetal olfactory mucosa (FOM on spinal tissue sparing were studied after transplanted into the spinal cord hemisection in rats. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Iran University of Medical Sciences in 2008. Of thirty eight female Sprague-Dawley (200-250g rats twenty- eight were spinally hemisected at the L1 spinal level and were randomized into two groups of 14 animals. Treatment group received FOM graft and the control group received fetal respiratory mucosa graft (FRM. The other animals received surgical procedure without spinal cord injury as a sham group. The morphology of the transplant region and spinal tissue sparing was examined histological eight weeks after transplantation. The collected data was analyzed by the SPSS software using ANOVA and the morphology of the transplant region were studied by light microscope. Results: Histological study showed that the both mucosa tissues could not integrate with the parenchyma of the spinal tissue. Although the FOM were fused more than the FRM with the host tissue but clear boundary was seen at the graft–host interface. The mean spinal tissue sparing of the treatment group increased a little compare to the control but a significant difference was not apparent whereas, the spinal tissue sparing in treatment and control groups compare to the sham group decreased significantly (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Transplantation of

  19. Dyskospondylitis and paravertebral abscesses in a calf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testoni, S.

    2006-01-01

    A case of progressive spastic paraparesis due to a dyskospondylitis at the level of T9-T10 is described in a four-month old Holstein female calf. The calf was recumbent, but bright, alert and willing to suckle. Despite repeated attempts, the calf was not able to assume the sternal recumbency. The radiological findings were decisive for the in life diagnosis. Spinal radiography of the thoraco-lumbar region revealed lysis and collapse of T9 and T10 vertebral bodies; irregular proliferative new bone was evident. Lumbo-sacral myelography showed a narrowing and dorsal displacement of the ventral contrast column at the same spinal level, indicating a severe ventral extradural compression of the spinal cord. At the level of the thoracic cavity, a 20 x 15 cm diameter opacity extending ventrally to T8-T13 and caudo-dorsally to the heart was also evident. At gross necroscopy, two approximately 15 cm diameter encapsulated paravertebral abscesses were evident in the thoracis cavity just below the spinal column. A pure culture of Fusobacterium necrophorum was obtained from them. A saggital section of the spine showed an erosive suppurative process of T9 and T10 vertebral bodies that provoked the compression of the thoracic tract of the spinal cord [it

  20. Marrow heterotopia in thalassemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Gouliamos, A.; Andreou, J.

    1986-05-01

    The subject of marrow heterotopia has been reviewed on the basis of 15 cases suffering from thalassemia. Other cases reported in the literature were also reviewed. Using conventional radiography, scintigraphy, computerized tomography and myelography, 17% of the cases admitted into the hospital with the diagnosis of Thalassemia, were found to have macroscopic masses of marrow heterotopia. The most common site of development of these masses was the costovertebral gutter, followed by the anterior end of the ribs and the extradural space of the spinal canal. In one case, masses were located in the maxillary antra. The clinical implications, the pathogenesis of the masses and the differential diagnosis from other tumour-like entities are discussed. Three patients presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. All three patients were treated satisfactorily with small doses of radiotherapy.

  1. The marrow heterotopia in thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, C.; Gouliamos, A.; Andreou, J.

    1986-01-01

    The subject of marrow heterotopia has been reviewed on the basis of 15 cases suffering from thalassemia. Other cases reported in the literature were also reviewed. Using conventional radiography, scintigraphy, computerized tomography and myelography, 17% of the cases admitted into the hospital with the diagnosis of Thalassemia, were found to have macroscopic masses of marrow heterotopia. The most common site of development of these masses was the costovertebral gutter, followed by the anterior end of the ribs and the extradural space of the spinal canal. In one case, masses were located in the maxillary antra. The clinical implications, the pathogenesis of the masses and the differential diagnosis from other tumour-like entities are discussed. Three patients presented with symptoms and signs of spinal cord compression. All three patients were treated satisfactorily with small doses of radiotherapy. (orig.)

  2. Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour in Young Adults - A Report of two Rare Cases and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhya Lakshmi S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Primitive Neuro Ectodermal Tumours’ (PNET are highly aggressive embryonal tumours of presumed neural crest origin. They are derived from neoplastic transformation of common progenitor cells in the sub ependymal matrix layer. They are more common in children. They are small round cell tumours affecting the central nervous system (CNS, others being Ewing’s sarcoma, medullobalstoma, lymphomas etc. They are classified based on their immune histochemical characteristics- neuronal, astrocytic, ependymal, retinal photo receptor, undifferentiated. Undifferentiated variety carries better prognosis. GFAP expression is an important prognostic factor. Presence of p53 germ line mutation indicates an increased risk for developing PNET. Spinal PNET are secondary to CSF metastasis from cranium commonly. Primary spinal PNET tumours are rare and extradural location is extremely rare. PNET needs multimodality approach but carries poor prognosis when compared to other CNS tumours.

  3. Functional outcome after a spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Richard Bernardus

    2008-01-01

    This thesis takes a closer look at the functional outcome after a spinal fracture. An introduction to different aspects regarding spinal fractures is presented in Chapter 1. The incidence of traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fractures without neurological deficit in the Netherlands is approximately 1.2

  4. Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Chan, Yuen; Chong, Hsu Pheen; Farah, Jibril Osman

    2016-01-01

    The aims are to present a case series of Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulators with analysis of the possible mechanism of this syndrome and discuss how this phenomenon can be prevented. Data were collected retrospectively between 2007 and 2013 for all patients presenting with failure of spinal cord stimulators. The diagnostic criterion for Twiddler's syndrome is radiological evidence of twisting of wires in the presence of failure of spinal cord stimulation. Our unit implants on average 110 spinal cord stimulators a year. Over the 5-year study period, all consecutive cases of spinal cord stimulation failure were studied. Three patients with Twiddler's syndrome were identified. Presentation ranged from 4 to 228 weeks after implantation. Imaging revealed repeated rotations and twisting of the wires of the spinal cord stimulators leading to hardware failure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported series of Twiddler's syndrome with implantable pulse generators (IPGs) for spinal cord stimulation. Hardware failure is not uncommon in spinal cord stimulation. Awareness and identification of Twiddler's syndrome may help prevent its occurrence and further revisions. This may be achieved by implanting the IPG in the lumbar region subcutaneously above the belt line. Psychological intervention may have a preventative role for those who are deemed at high risk of Twiddler's syndrome from initial psychological screening.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabina Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the establishment of the various hospitals with rehabilitation units, rehabilitation centres and physical therapy units in different institutions. However, the spinal cord injury rehabilitation setting and scenario is different in Nepal from those in the developed countries since spinal cord injury rehabilitation care has not been adequately incorporated into the health care delivery system nor its importance has been realized within the medical community of Nepal. To name few, lack of human resource for the rehabilitation care, awareness among the medical personnel and general population, adequate scientific research evidence regarding situation of spinal injury and exorbitant health care policy are the important hurdles that has led to the current situation. Hence, it is our responsibility to address these apparent barriers to successful implementation and functioning of rehabilitation so that those with spinal injury would benefit from enhanced quality of life. Keywords: rehabilitation; spinal injury.

  6. Relationship between intrinsic radiation sensitivity and metastatic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Anne M.; Mei, Su; Doty, Jay; Chen Yi; Pardo, Francisco S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Prior studies emphasized genetic modulation of tumorigenicity, and experimental metastatic potential in cells transfected with oncogenes. Whether the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of cells might correlate with parallel changes in metastatic potential is unknown. Methods and Materials: Rat embryo cells (REC) were transfected with the following oncogenes, and where appropriate, with corresponding selection markers: pCMV neopEJ6.6ras, pEJ6.6ras/v-myc, pE1a, and pEJ6-.6ras/E1a. Individual transfectant clones and corresponding pooled cellular populations were propagated in selective medium. In vitro cellular radiation sensitivity was determined via clonogenic assays, a minimum of three, by standard techniques and individual SF 2 and MID parameters determined. Tumorigenicity was defined as the number of tumors forming following the injection of 1 x 10 5 - 1 x 10 6 cells into the axillary pouch of three different strains of immune-deficient mice. Animals were killed once resultant tumors reached a maximum size of 1.5-2.0 cm in maximum diameter. For determination of experimental metastatic potential, between 1 x 10 5 -1 x 10 6 cells were injected into the tail veins of litter-matched sibling mice in parallel to the tumorigenicity studies. Results: Radiobiologic studies indicate similar levels of radiation sensitivity among REC, mock-transfected REC, E1a, and combined E1a/ras transfectants. pEJ6.6ras, and combined ras/myc transfected pooled cellular populations demonstrated increases in radiation resistance when compared to the pooled radiobiologic data from untransfected and mock-transfected corresponding pooled cellular populations (p 2 , MID). Rat embryo cells, E1a, and mock-transfectants were relatively radiation sensitive and nontumorigenic. pE1a/ras was tumorigenic but demonstrated relatively low experimental metastatic potential. Ras, and ras/myc transfectants, demonstrated similar levels of experimental metastatic potential on lung colonization assays

  7. The Protective Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation Postconditioning Against Spinal Cord Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huixian; Dong, Xiuhua; Jin, Mu; Cheng, Weiping

    2018-01-18

    Delayed paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) remains one of the most severe complications of thoracoabdominal aneurysm surgery, for which effective prevention and treatment is still lacking. The current study investigates whether spinal cord stimulation (SCS) postconditioning has neuroprotective effects against spinal cord IRI. Ninety-six New Zealand white male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups as follows: a sham group and three experimental groups (C group, 2 Hz group, and 50 Hz group) n = 24/group. Spinal cord ischemia was induced by transient infrarenal aortic balloon occlusion for 28 min, after which rabbits in group C underwent no additional intervention, while rabbits in the other two experimental groups underwent 2 Hz or 50 Hz epidural SCS for 30 min at the onset of reperfusion and then daily until sacrifice. Hind limb neurologic function of rabbits was assessed using Jacob scale. Lumbar spinal cords were harvested immediately after sacrifice for histological examination and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. The number of viable α-motor neurons in ventral horn was counted and TUNEL-positive rate of α-motor neurons was calculated. Spinal cord IRI was caused by transient infrarenal aorta occlusion for 28 min. Both 2 Hz and 50 Hz SCS postconditioning had neuroprotective effects, particularly the 2 Hz SCS postconditioning. Comparing to C group and 50 Hz group, rabbits in the 2 Hz group demonstrated better hind limb motor function and a lower rate of TUNEL-positive α-motor neuron after eight hours, one day, three days, and seven days of spinal cord reperfusion. More viable α-motor neurons were preserved after one and three days of spinal cord reperfusion in 2 Hz group rabbits than in C group and 50 Hz group rabbits. SCS postconditioning at 2 Hz protected the spinal cord from IRI. © 2018 International Neuromodulation Society.

  8. Spinal metastases of malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materlik, B.; Steidle-Katic, U.; Feyerabend, T.; Richter, E.; Wauschkuhn, B.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Extracranial metastases of malignant gliomas are rare. We report 2 cases with spinal metastases in patients suffering from glioma. Patients and Method: Two patients (33 and 57 years old) developed spinal canal metastases of a glioblastoma multiforme and anaplastic astrocytoma Grade III respectively 25 and 9 months after surgical resection and radiotherapy. Both metastases were confirmed pathohistologically. Results: Intraspinal metastases were irradiated with a total dose of 12.6 Gy and 50 Gy. Treatment withdrawal was necessary in one patient due to reduced clinical condition. Regression of neurological symptoms was observed in the second patient. Conclusions: Spinal spread of malignant glioma should be considered during care and follow-up in glioma patients with spinal symptoms. (orig.) [de

  9. SCT: Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Lévy, Simon; Dupont, Sara M; Fonov, Vladimir S; Stikov, Nikola; Louis Collins, D; Callot, Virginie; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-15

    For the past 25 years, the field of neuroimaging has witnessed the development of several software packages for processing multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to study the brain. These software packages are now routinely used by researchers and clinicians, and have contributed to important breakthroughs for the understanding of brain anatomy and function. However, no software package exists to process mpMRI data of the spinal cord. Despite the numerous clinical needs for such advanced mpMRI protocols (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, cervical spondylotic myelopathy, etc.), researchers have been developing specific tools that, while necessary, do not provide an integrative framework that is compatible with most usages and that is capable of reaching the community at large. This hinders cross-validation and the possibility to perform multi-center studies. In this study we introduce the Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT), a comprehensive software dedicated to the processing of spinal cord MRI data. SCT builds on previously-validated methods and includes state-of-the-art MRI templates and atlases of the spinal cord, algorithms to segment and register new data to the templates, and motion correction methods for diffusion and functional time series. SCT is tailored towards standardization and automation of the processing pipeline, versatility, modularity, and it follows guidelines of software development and distribution. Preliminary applications of SCT cover a variety of studies, from cross-sectional area measures in large databases of patients, to the precise quantification of mpMRI metrics in specific spinal pathways. We anticipate that SCT will bring together the spinal cord neuroimaging community by establishing standard templates and analysis procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Avelumab: A Review in Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt

    2018-05-24

    Avelumab (Bavencio ® ) is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that is directed against programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Avelumab functions as an immune checkpoint inhibitor and has recently been approved in the USA, the EU and Japan for the treatment of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). It is thus the first therapeutic agent specifically approved for use in this indication, and is approved for use independent of line of treatment. Approval for avelumab in metastatic MCC was based on the two-part, single-arm, phase II trial, JAVELIN Merkel 200. In Part A of the study, confirmed objective responses were observed in approximately one-third of patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic MCC treated with avelumab. The responses were observed early and appeared to be durable, with an estimated 74% of responses having a duration ≥ 12 months. Furthermore, interim results from a separate cohort of patients (Part B) indicate an objective response rate for avelumab of > 60% in patients who were chemotherapy-naïve in the metastatic disease setting. Avelumab is associated with a risk of immune-related adverse events but, overall, has an acceptable and manageable safety and tolerability profile. In conclusion, currently available data suggest that avelumab presents a clinically beneficial new treatment option for metastatic MCC, a rare but aggressive cancer associated with a poor prognosis.

  11. Spinal epidural hematomas examined on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejnowski, G.; Poniatowska, R.; Kozlowski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematomas are rare pathology, caused by trauma or spontaneous. In clinical examination acute spinal cord compression is observed. MRI designations appear entirely particular. In sagittal projection, biconvex mass in the dorsal, or sometimes ventral part of the spinal canal is clearly visible. This is well delineated by the thecal sac from the cord and cauda equina. MRI investigations in 3 patients revealed corresponding with spinal bone injuries and cord edema epidural hematomas. Differential diagnosis must contain subdural hematoma and epidural neoplasms or abscess. (author)

  12. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  13. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school......-based prospective cohort study. All 5th and 6th grade students (11-13 years) at 14 schools in the Region of Southern Denmark were invited to participate (N = 1,348). Data were collected in 2010 and again two years later, using an e-survey completed during school time. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain...... reported their pain as relatively infrequent and of low intensity, whereas the participants with frequent pain also experienced pain of higher intensity. The two-year incidence of spinal pain varied between 40% and 60% across the physical locations. Progression of pain from one to more locations and from...

  15. Enhanced Metastatic Recurrence Via Lymphatic Trafficking of a High-Metastatic Variant of Human Triple-Negative Breast Cancer After Surgical Resection in Orthotopic Nude Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-03-01

    We previously developed and characterized a highly invasive and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) variant by serial orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in nude mice. Eventually, a highly invasive and metastatic variant of human TNBC was isolated after lymph node metastases was harvested and orthotopically re-implanted into the mammary gland of nude mice for two cycles. The variant thereby isolated is highly invasive in the mammary gland and metastasized to lymph nodes in 10 of 12 mice compared to 2 of 12 of the parental cell line. In the present report, we observed that high-metastatic MDA-MB-231H-RFP cells produced significantly larger subcutaneous tumors compared with parental MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Extensive lymphatic trafficking by high-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells was also observed. High-metastatic MDA-MB-231 developed larger recurrent tumors 2 weeks after tumor resection compared with tumors that were not resected in orthotopic models. Surgical resection of the MDA-MB-231 high-metastatic variant primary tumor in orthotopic models also resulted in rapid and enhanced lymphatic trafficking of residual cancer cells and extensive lymph node and lung metastasis that did not occur in the non-surgical mice. These results suggest that surgical resection of high metastatic TNBC can greatly increase the malignancy of residual cancer. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 559-569, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  17. Gamma-knife radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors from primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Bine; Satoh, Ken; Saijo, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    Forty patients with metastatic brain tumors from primary lung cancer underwent radiosurgery (γ-knife). We retrospectively compared their prior treatment history, number of metastatic foci, and performance status, to evaluate the effects of, and indications for, γ-knife therapy. After both the primary and the metastatic tumors were controlled, performance status could be used as an index in the choice of γ-knife therapy. Our results demonstrate that repeated γ-knife radiosurgeries prolonged survival time. Gamma-knife radiosurgery improves quality of life and prognosis of patients with metastatic brain tumors. (author)

  18. A Novel Differentiation Therapy Approach to Reduce the Metastatic Potential of Basal, Highly Metastatic, Triple-Negative Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    metastatic process (Condeelis and Pollard 2006), we quantitated macrophage recruitment in the lungs of mice injected with 231-Empty or 231-GATA3 cells by...image quantitation of Ki-67 expression and H&E staining of metastatic lung lesions using Apirio Image Analysis software (Figure 9) which demonstrated...expression in MD A-MB-231 and in another triple negative breast cancer cell line, Hs578T Transient knock down of GATA3 in the lum inal GATA3 positiv

  19. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  20. Disseminated breast cancer cells acquire a highly malignant and aggressive metastatic phenotype during metastatic latency in the bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn G Marsden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in the bone marrow may exist in a dormant state for extended periods of time, maintaining the ability to proliferate upon activation, engraft at new sites, and form detectable metastases. However, understanding of the behavior and biology of dormant breast cancer cells in the bone marrow niche remains limited, as well as their potential involvement in tumor recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of dormant disseminated breast cancer cells (prior to activation in the bone marrow. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Total bone marrow, isolated from mice previously injected with tumorspheres into the mammary fat pad, was injected into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. As a negative control, bone marrow isolated from non-injected mice was injected into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. The resultant tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Mouse lungs, livers, and kidneys were analyzed by H+E staining to detect metastases. The injection of bone marrow isolated from mice previously injected with tumorspheres into the mammary fat pad, resulted in large tumor formation in the mammary fat pad 2 months post-injection. However, the injection of bone marrow isolated from non-injected mice did not result in tumor formation in the mammary fat pad. The DTC-derived tumors exhibited accelerated development of metastatic lesions within the lung, liver and kidney. The resultant tumors and the majority of metastatic lesions within the lung and liver exhibited a mesenchymal-like phenotype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Dormant DTCs within the bone marrow are highly malignant upon injection into the mammary fat pad, with the accelerated development of metastatic lesions within the lung, liver and kidney. These results suggest the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype of DTCs during

  1. Control of Metastatic Progression by microRNA Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, Nora; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression is a defining feature of human malignancy. Specific miRNAs have been identified as promoters or suppressors of metastatic progression. These miRNAs control metastasis through divergent or convergent regulation of metastatic gene pathways. Some miRNA regulatory networks govern cell-autonomous cancer phenotypes, while others modulate the cell-extrinsic composition of the metastatic microenvironment. The use of small RNAs as probes into the molecular and cellular underpinnings of metastasis holds promise for the identification of candidate genes for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:23728460

  2. Epidermotropic metastatic melanoma with perilesional depigmentation in an Indian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Doshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a rare form of cutaneous malignancy encountered in the dark skin population. Epidermotropic metastatic melanoma is a rare form of cutaneous metastatic melanoma which can mimic primary melanoma on histopathology. Hence its differentiation is of immense prognostic importance. The occurrence of rim of depigmentation around the primary cutaneous melanoma has previously been reported to portend a bad prognosis. The occurrence of vitiligo like lesions in patients with metastatic melanoma in comparison has a better prognosis. However the occurrence of depigmentation around the secondaries is rare and its importance is not well known. Hence we wish to report a case of epidermotropic metastatic melanoma with perilesional depigmentation in a 78 year old Indian male.

  3. WITHDRAWN: Systemic treatments for metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Tom; Fish, Reg; Coles, Bernadette; Mason, Malcolm

    2018-02-07

    Systemic therapies for metastatic cutaneous melanoma, the most aggressive of all skin cancers, remain disappointing. Few lasting remissions are achieved and the therapeutic aim remains one of palliation.Many agents are used alone or in combination with varying degrees of toxicity and cost. It is unclear whether evidence exists to support these complex regimens over best supportive care / placebo. To review the benefits from the use of systemic therapies in metastatic cutaneous melanoma compared to best supportive care/placebo, and to establish whether a 'standard' therapy exists which is superior to other treatments. Randomised controlled trials were identified from the MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR/CENTRAL databases. References, conference proceedings, and Science Citation Index/Scisearch were also used to locate trials. Cancer registries and trialists were also contacted. Randomised controlled trials of adults with histologically proven metastatic cutaneous melanoma in which systemic anti-cancer therapy was compared with placebo or supportive care. Study selection was performed by two independent reviewers. Data extraction forms were used for studies which appeared to meet the selection criteria and, where appropriate, full text articles were retrieved and reviewed independently. No randomised controlled trials were found comparing a systemic therapy with placebo or best supportive care in metastatic cutaneous melanoma. There is no evidence from randomised controlled clinical trials to show superiority of systemic therapy over best supportive care / placebo in the treatment of malignant cutaneous melanoma.Given that patients with metastatic melanoma frequently receive systemic therapy, it is our pragmatic view that a future systematic review could compare any systemic treatment, or combination of treatments, to single agent dacarbazine.

  4. M.R. imaging of spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Minoru; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Abe, Satoru; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Nomura, Mikio; Saito, Hisatoshi.

    1987-01-01

    In many papers about the M.R. imaging of spinal disorders, almost all the diagnoses have been carried out using only the sagittal image. However, we ourselves have thus for diagnosed about 500 cases of spinal disorders using the resistive type of MRI (0.15 T). On the basis of our experience, we have established two main principles as regards the MRI diagnosis of spinal disorders: 1) a surface coil must be used in the diagnosis of spinal disorders, and 2) diagnosis must be carried out by the use of both sagittal and axial images. We present some typical cases of spinal disorders in this paper. From these cases, we see that MRI has advantages and disadvantages as regards the diagnosis of spinal disorders compared with X-ray diagnostic apparatus. The first advantageous point is that we can directly obtain an image of the spinal cord without the intrathecal injection of a contrast material. The second point is that MRI can avoid the bone artifacts which often occur when using the X-ray CT; moreover, there is none of the hazard connected with the use of X-rays. The biggest disadvantage is that the spatial resolution of the resistive type of MRI is slightly inferior to that of the high-resolutional X-ray CT. The second disadvantage is that the ability to detect an ossificative process, such as disc disease or OPLL, is very restricted because of the low signal intensity from the cortical bone. We propose two points for the improvement of the MR imaging of spinal disorders. One is the production of a high-sensitivity surface coil. The other is the application of Gd-DTPA, which is thought to have a high potential to detect spinal disorders. If we can realize these points, the images of spinal disorders produced by the resistive type of MRI will be clearer and more informative. (J.P.N.)

  5. Spinal computed tomography: New perspectives in the diagnostics of spine and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, K.

    1979-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the spine and spinal cord is gaining more and more importance as a valuable neuroradiological method of investigation. Performed as a noninvasive procedure, without any or with intravenous contrast enhancement, it may be used in diagnosing paravertebral soft tissue lesions, constrictive lesions of the bony spinal canal, structural changes of the vertebral column or of individual vertebrae, vascular intraspinal lesions, and intraspinal tumors with abnormally high or abnormally low attenuation values. Performed as an invasive procedure, after intrathecal introduction of metrizamide, spinal CT may be used in conjunction with conventional metrizamide myelography (secondary CT-myelography) or primarily (primary CT-myelography) in selected cases, taking advantage of its unique properties, namely to axially visualize the spine and related soft tissue structures and to detect even small differences in attenuation. Further improvement of spinal CT, particularly with regard to routine non-invasive demonstration of the intraspinal soft tissues, can be awaited. (orig.) [de

  6. Caught in the act: revealing the metastatic process by live imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam R. Fein

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of metastatic cancer in patients is poor. Interfering with metastatic spread is therefore important for achieving better survival from cancer. Metastatic disease is established through a series of steps, including breaching of the basement membrane, intravasation and survival in lymphatic or blood vessels, extravasation, and growth at distant sites. Yet, although we know the steps involved in metastasis, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of dissemination and colonization of distant organs are incompletely understood. Here, we review the important insights into the metastatic process that have been gained specifically through the use of imaging technologies in murine, chicken embryo and zebrafish model systems, including high-resolution two-photon microscopy and bioluminescence. We further discuss how imaging technologies are beginning to allow researchers to address the role of regional activation of specific molecular pathways in the metastatic process. These technologies are shedding light, literally, on almost every step of the metastatic process, particularly with regards to the dynamics and plasticity of the disseminating cancer cells and the active participation of the microenvironment in the processes.

  7. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  8. Nerve Root Compression Increases Spinal Astrocytic Vimentin in Parallel With Sustained Pain and Endothelial Vimentin in Association With Spinal Vascular Reestablishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jenell R; Lee, Jasmine; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2017-10-01

    Temporal immunohistochemistry analysis of spinal cord tissue from a rat model of cervical radiculopathy. The goal was to measure spinal endothelial and astrocytic vimentin expression after a painful nerve root compression to define spinal cellular expression of vimentin in the context of pain. The intermediate filament, vimentin, is expressed in a variety of cell types in the spinal cord and is modulated in response to neural pathologies. Early after nerve root compression spinal astrocytes become activated and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) breakdown occurs in parallel with development of pain-related behaviors; these spinal responses remain activated as does the presence of pain. In addition to vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression is a hallmark of astrocyte activation. In contrast, vascular endothelial cells down-regulate vimentin expression in parallel with vascular breakdown. It is not known whether spinal astrocytes and endothelial cells modulate their expression of vimentin in response to a painful neural injury. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured and spinal cord tissue was harvested at days 1 and 7 after a unilateral nerve root compression in rats. Vimentin was coimmunolabeled with GFAP to label astrocytes and von Willebrand factor (VWF) for endothelial cells in the spinal cord on the side of injury. Spinal astrocytic vimentin increases by day 7 after nerve root compression, corresponding to when mechanical hyperalgesia is maintained. Spinal endothelial vimentin increases as early as day 1 after a painful compression and is even more robust at day 7. The delayed elevation in spinal astrocytic vimentin corresponding to sustained mechanical hyperalgesia supports its having a relationship with pain maintenance. Further, since BSCB integrity has been shown to be reestablished by day 7 after a painful compression, endothelial expressed vimentin may help to fortify spinal vasculature contributing to BSCB stability. N/A.

  9. Thoracic Cavernoma with Intraosseous and Extradural Component Mimicking Metastasis: Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocaman Umit

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural cavernomas are quite rare lesions and only 5% of all cavernomas are located in the spine. The lesions are most commonly localized in the thoracic region. The differential diagnosis includes neurogenic tumors, lymphoma, schwannoma, meningioma, multiple myeloma, Ewing's sarcoma and metastasis. A 40- year-old male patient presented with paraplegia and MR images revealed an epidural soft tissue constricting the right posterolateral of the cord at the T6 level. Pathology showed cavernous hemangioma. A literature search revealed no other case that so closely mimicked metastasis by invading all components of the thoracic vertebra and also expanding to the epidural distance. We therefore present the case emphasizing these features.

  10. Spinal-cord swelling in acute multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Seiji; Tashiro, Kunio; Naganuma, Mutsuo; Hida, Kazutoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    Despite the frequent involvement of the spinal cord by multiple sclerosis, reports concerning neuroradiological findings regarding these lesions have been limited; most of them have demonstrated a normal or small spinal cord. Two cases of acute paraparesis showed evidence of spinal-cord swelling on myelography and CT myelography, initially suggesting the diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. Spinal-cord swelling was demonstrated more clearly on CT myelography than on conventional myelography. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made with the aid of the CSF findings, the clinical course, and the contracting-cord sign. The ''contracting-cord sign'' means the diminution of the spinal-cord diameter in the chronic stage. Since acute multiple sclerosis may produce spinal-cord swelling simulating a tumor, careful investigations are necessary to avoid unwarranted surgical interventions. (author)

  11. Directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure via the collateral network: correlations with changes in systemic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Yuya; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Inafuku, Hitoshi; Nagano, Takaaki; Hirayasu, Tsuneo; Yamashiro, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    During thoracoabdominal surgery in which segmental arteries are sacrificed over a large area, blood supply routes from collateral networks have received attention as a means of avoiding spinal cord injury. The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord blood supply through a collateral network by directly measuring spinal cord blood flow and spinal cord perfusion pressure experimentally. In beagle dogs (n = 8), the thoracoabdominal aorta and segmental arteries L1-L7 were exposed, and a temporary bypass was created for distal perfusion. Next, a laser blood flow meter was placed on the spinal dura mater in the L5 region to measure the spinal cord blood flow. The following were measured simultaneously when the direct blood supply from segmental arteries L2-L7 to the spinal cord was stopped: mean systemic blood pressure, spinal cord perfusion pressure (blood pressure within the aortic clamp site), and spinal cord blood flow supplied via the collateral network. These variables were then investigated for evidence of correlations. Positive correlations were observed between mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord blood flow during interruption of segmental artery flow both with (r = 0.844, P flow with and without distal perfusion (r = 0.803, P network from outside the interrupted segmental arteries, and high systemic blood pressure (∼1.33-fold higher) was needed to obtain the preclamping spinal cord blood flow, whereas 1.68-fold higher systemic blood pressure was needed when distal perfusion was halted. Spinal cord blood flow is positively correlated with mean systemic blood pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure under spinal cord ischemia caused by clamping a wide range of segmental arteries. In open and endovascular thoracic and thoracoabdominal surgery, elevating mean systemic blood pressure is a simple and effective means of increasing spinal cord blood flow, and measuring spinal cord perfusion pressure seems to be useful for monitoring

  12. Integrative Genome Comparison of Primary and Metastatic Melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Nazarian, Rosalynn M.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Wu, Min; Scott, Kenneth L.; Kwong, Lawrence N.; Xiao, Yonghong; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Granter, Scott R.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Golub, Todd; Duncan, Lyn M.; Wagner, Stephan N.; Brennan, Cameron; Chin, Lynda

    2010-01-01

    A cardinal feature of malignant melanoma is its metastatic propensity. An incomplete view of the genetic events driving metastatic progression has been a major barrier to rational development of effective therapeutics and prognostic diagnostics for melanoma patients. In this study, we conducted global genomic characterization of primary and metastatic melanomas to examine the genomic landscape associated with metastatic progression. In addition to uncovering three genomic subclasses of metastastic melanomas, we delineated 39 focal and recurrent regions of amplification and deletions, many of which encompassed resident genes that have not been implicated in cancer or metastasis. To identify progression-associated metastasis gene candidates, we applied a statistical approach, Integrative Genome Comparison (IGC), to define 32 genomic regions of interest that were significantly altered in metastatic relative to primary melanomas, encompassing 30 resident genes with statistically significant expression deregulation. Functional assays on a subset of these candidates, including MET, ASPM, AKAP9, IMP3, PRKCA, RPA3, and SCAP2, validated their pro-invasion activities in human melanoma cells. Validity of the IGC approach was further reinforced by tissue microarray analysis of Survivin showing significant increased protein expression in thick versus thin primary cutaneous melanomas, and a progression correlation with lymph node metastases. Together, these functional validation results and correlative analysis of human tissues support the thesis that integrated genomic and pathological analyses of staged melanomas provide a productive entry point for discovery of melanoma metastases genes. PMID:20520718

  13. The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.; Terwey, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of in vivo measurements of the cervical canal and spinal cord. They indicate that tension in the spinal cord increases during flexion. They conclude that, as the dorsal approach avoids this increased tension of the spinal cord, the surgical treatment in chronic cervical myelopathy using this route seems to be preferable

  14. Posterior extradural migration of extruded thoracic and lumbar disc fragments: role of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugroschl, C.; Dietemann, J.L.; Kehrli, P.; Ragragui, O.; Maitrot, D.; Gigaud, M.; Manelfe, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report three patients with a sequestrated disc fragment posterior to the thecal sac. The affected disc was lumbar in two cases and thoracic in the third. Disc fragment migration is usually limited to the anterior extra dural space. Migration of a disc fragment behind the dural sac is seldom encountered. MRI appears to be the method of choice to make this diagnosis. The disc fragments gave low signal on T1- and slightly high signal on T2-weighted images and showed rim contrast enhancement. The differential diagnosis includes abscess, metastatic tumour and haematoma. (orig.)

  15. Metastatic melanoma of mesentery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, M. S.; Ali, S.A.; Shirazi, B.; Shamim, M.

    2004-01-01

    A case of malignant melanoma metastatic to small bowel mesentery in an old female is reported. Her primary malignant melanoma of nasal mucosa was already treated. She presented with intestinal obstruction, underwent surgical excision of the tumour and was tumour-free postoperatively. (author)

  16. Single-Fraction Versus 5-Fraction Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Limited Survival Prognoses: Results of a Matched-Pair Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Huttenlocher, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Šegedin, Barbara; Perpar, Ana [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Conde, Antonio J.; Garcia, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Consorcio Hospital Provincial de Castellón, Castellón (Spain); Veninga, Theo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cacicedo, Jon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cruces University Hospital, Barakaldo, Vizcaya (Spain); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: This study compared single-fraction to multi-fraction short-course radiation therapy (RT) for symptomatic metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC) in patients with limited survival prognosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients who received 8 Gy × 1 fraction were matched (1:1) to 121 patients treated with 4 Gy × 5 fractions for 10 factors including age, sex, performance status, primary tumor type, number of involved vertebrae, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, interval between tumor diagnosis and MESCC, pre-RT ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits prior to RT. Endpoints included in-field repeated RT (reRT) for MESCC, overall survival (OS), and impact of RT on motor function. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test for in-field reRT for MESCC and OS and with the ordered-logit model for effect of RT on motor function. Results: Doses of 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 4 Gy × 5 fractions were not significantly different with respect to the need for in-field reRT for MESCC (P=.11) at 6 months (18% vs 9%, respectively) and 12 months (30% vs 22%, respectively). The RT regimen also had no significant impact on OS (P=.65) and post-RT motor function (P=.21). OS rates at 6 and 12 months were 24% and 9%, respectively, after 8 Gy × 1 fraction versus 25% and 13%, respectively, after 4 Gy × 5 fractions. Improvement of motor function was observed in 17% of patients after 8 Gy × 1 fraction and 23% after 4 Gy × 5 fractions, respectively. Conclusions: There were no significant differences with respect to need for in-field reRT for MESCC, OS, and motor function by dose fractionation regimen. Thus, 8 Gy × 1 fraction may be a reasonable option for patients with survival prognosis of a few months.

  17. Targeting Lumbar Spinal Neural Circuitry by Epidural Stimulation to Restore Motor Function After Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Minassian, Karen; McKay, W. Barry; Binder, Heinrich; Hofstoetter, Ursula S.

    2016-01-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation has a long history of application for improving motor control in spinal cord injury. This review focuses on its resurgence following the progress made in understanding the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and on recent reports of its augmentative effects upon otherwise subfunctional volitional motor control. Early work revealed that the spinal circuitry involved in lower-limb motor control can be accessed by stimulating through electrodes placed epidur...

  18. Intramedullary spinal melanocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meic H. Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a benign lesion arising from leptomeningeal melanocytes that at times can mimic its malignant counterpart, melanoma. Lesions of the spine usually occur in extramedullary locations and present with spinal cord compression symptoms. Because most reported spinal cases occur in the thoracic region, these symptoms usually include lower extremity weakness or numbness. The authors present a case of primary intrame­dullary spinal meningeal melanocytoma presenting with bilateral lower extremity symptoms in which the patient had no known supratentorial primary lesions. Gross total surgical resection allowed for full recovery, but early recurrence of tumor was detected on close follow-up monitoring, allowing for elective local radiation without loss of neurological function. Case reports of such tumors discuss different treatment strategies, but just as important is the close follow-up monitoring in these patients even after gross total surgical resection, since these tumors can recur.

  19. Sexual and reproductive function in spinal cord injury and spinal surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore H. Albright

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual and reproductive health is important quality of life outcomes, which can have a major impact on patient satisfaction. Spinal pathology arising from trauma, deformity, and degenerative disease processes may be detrimental to sexual and reproductive function. Furthermore, spine surgery may impact sexual and reproductive function due to post-surgical mechanical, neurologic, and psychological factors. The aim of this paper is to provide a concise evidence-based review on the impact that spine surgery and pathology can have on sexual and reproductive function. A review of published literature regarding sexual and reproductive function in spinal injury and spinal surgery patients was performed. We have found that sexual and reproductive dysfunction can occur due to numerous etiological factors associated with spinal pathology. Numerous treatment options are available for those patients, depending on the degree of dysfunction. Spine surgeons and non-operative healthcare providers should be aware of the issues surrounding sexual and reproductive function as related to spine pathology and spine surgery. It is important for spine surgeons to educate their patients on the operative risks that spine surgery encompasses with regard to sexual dysfunction, although current data examining these topics largely consists of level IV data.

  20. Independent spinal cord atrophy measures correlate to motor and sensory deficits in individuals with spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Hans Magnus Henrik; Barthelemy, Dorothy; Skimminge, A.

    2011-01-01

    touch and pinprick, and muscle strength. Antero-posterior width (APW), left-right width (LRW) and cross-sectional spinal cord area (SCA) were extracted from MRI at the spinal level of C2. The angular variation of the spinal cord radius over the full circle was also extracted and compared...... with the clinical scores.Results:The motor score was correlated to LRW and the sensory scores were correlated to APW. The scores correlated also well with decreases in spinal cord radius in oblique angles in coherent and non-overlapping sectors for the sensory and motor qualities respectively.Conclusion:APW and LRW...

  1. Paralysis following stereotactic spinal irradiation in pigs suggests a tolerance constraint for single-session irradiation of the spinal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Foster, Ryan D.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Meyer, Jeffrey; Sayre, James W.; Huang, Hao; Öz, Orhan K.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Paralysis observed during a study of vertebral bone tolerance to single-session irradiation led to further study of the dose-related incidence of motor peripheral neuropathy. Materials and methods: During a bone tolerance study, cervical spinal nerves of 15 minipigs received bilateral irradiation to levels C5–C8 distributed into three dose groups with mean maximum spinal nerve doses of 16.9 ± 0.3 Gy (n = 5), 18.7 ± 0.5 Gy (n = 5), and 24.3 ± 0.8 Gy (n = 5). Changes developing in the gait of the group of pigs receiving a mean maximum dose of 24.3 Gy after 10–15 weeks led to the irradiation of two additional animals. They received mean maximum dose of 24.9 ± 0.2 Gy (n = 2), targeted to the left spinal nerves of C5–C8. The followup period was one year. Histologic sections from spinal cords and available spinal nerves were evaluated. MR imaging was performed on pigs in the 24.9 Gy group. Results: No pig that received a maximum spinal nerve point dose ⩽19.0 Gy experienced a change in gait while all pigs that received ⩾24.1 Gy experienced paralysis. Extensive degeneration and fibrosis were observed in irradiated spinal nerves of the 24.9 Gy animals. All spinal cord sections were normal. Irradiated spinal nerve regions showed increased thickness and hypointensity on MR imaging. Conclusion: The single-session tolerance dose of the cervical spinal nerves lies between 19.0 and 24.1 Gy for this model

  2. The HDAC inhibitor Vorinostat diminishes the in vitro metastatic behavior of Osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaodong; Brynien, Daniel; Weiss, Kurt R

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignancy of bone and affects patients in the first two decades of life. The greatest determinant of survival is the presence of pulmonary metastatic disease. The role of epigenetic regulation in OS, specifically the biology of metastases, is unknown. Our previous study with the murine OS cell populations K7M2 and K12 demonstrated a significant correlation of metastatic potential with the DNA methylation level of tumor suppressor genes. In the current study, we investigated if the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, vorinostat, could regulate the metastatic potential of highly metastatic OS cells. Our results revealed that vorinostat treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 OS cells was able to greatly reduce the proliferation and metastatic potential of the cells. Morphological features related to cell motility and invasion were changed by vorinostat treatment. In addition, the gene expressions of mTOR, ALDH1, and PGC-1 were downregulated by vorinostat treatment. These data suggest that vorinostat may be an effective modulator of OS cell metastatic potential and should be studied in preclinical models of metastatic OS.

  3. The HDAC Inhibitor Vorinostat Diminishes the In Vitro Metastatic Behavior of Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common primary malignancy of bone and affects patients in the first two decades of life. The greatest determinant of survival is the presence of pulmonary metastatic disease. The role of epigenetic regulation in OS, specifically the biology of metastases, is unknown. Our previous study with the murine OS cell populations K7M2 and K12 demonstrated a significant correlation of metastatic potential with the DNA methylation level of tumor suppressor genes. In the current study, we investigated if the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, vorinostat, could regulate the metastatic potential of highly metastatic OS cells. Our results revealed that vorinostat treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 OS cells was able to greatly reduce the proliferation and metastatic potential of the cells. Morphological features related to cell motility and invasion were changed by vorinostat treatment. In addition, the gene expressions of mTOR, ALDH1, and PGC-1 were downregulated by vorinostat treatment. These data suggest that vorinostat may be an effective modulator of OS cell metastatic potential and should be studied in preclinical models of metastatic OS.

  4. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  5. Anatomy of the Spinal Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Gabrillargues, Jean; Coll, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The spinal meninges have received less attention than the cranial meninges in the literature, although several points remain debatable and poorly understood, like their phylogenesis, their development, and their interactions with the spinal cord. Their constancy among the chordates shows their crucial importance in central nervous system homeostasis and suggests a role far beyond mechanical protection of the neuraxis. This work provides an extensive study of the spinal meninges, from an overview of their phylogenesis and embryology to a descriptive and topographic anatomy with clinical implications. It examines their involvement in spinal cord development, functioning, and repair. This work is a review of the literature using PubMed as a search engine on Medline. The stages followed by the meninges along the phylogenesis could not be easily compared with their development in vertebrates for methodological aspects and convergence processes throughout evolution. The distinction between arachnoid and pia mater appeared controversial. Several points of descriptive anatomy remain debatable: the functional organization of the arterial network, and the venous and lymphatic drainages, considered differently by classical anatomic and neuroradiological approaches. Spinal meninges are involved in neurodevelopment and neurorepair producing neural stem cells and morphogens, in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and neuraxis functioning by the synthesis of active molecules, and the elimination of waste products of central nervous system metabolism. The spinal meninges should be considered as dynamic functional formations evolving over a lifetime, with ultrastructural features and functional interactions with the neuraxis remaining not fully understood.

  6. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  7. Drug therapy in spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, S; Khandelwal, Gaurav

    2013-06-01

    Although the discovery of effective anti-tuberculosis drugs has made uncomplicated spinal tuberculosis a medical disease, the advent of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the co-infection of HIV with tuberculosis have led to a resurgence of the disease recently. The principles of drug treatment of spinal tuberculosis are derived from our experience in treating pulmonary tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is classified to be a severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and hence is included in Category I of the WHO classification. The tuberculosis bacilli isolated from patients are of four different types with different growth kinetics and metabolic characteristics. Hence multiple drugs, which act on the different groups of the mycobacteria, are included in each anti-tuberculosis drug regimen. Prolonged and uninterrupted chemotherapy (which may be 'short course' and 'intermittent' but preferably 'directly observed') is effective in controlling the infection. Spinal Multi-drug-resistant TB and spinal TB in HIV-positive patients present unique problems in management and have much poorer prognosis. Failure of chemotherapy and emergence of drug resistance are frequent due to the failure of compliance hence all efforts must be made to improve patient compliance to the prescribed drug regimen.

  8. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun; Bae, Ji Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis

  9. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  10. Associations between primary tumor RAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutation status and metastatic site in patients with chemo-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Troels Dreier; Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Larsen, Finn Ole

    2018-01-01

    investigated the association between RAS (KRAS or NRAS), BRAF, PIK3CA mutations and metastatic pattern in patients with metastatic (m) CRC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study reviewed Danish biobank and database of patients with mCRC who received cetuximab and irinotecan, independent of RAS mutation status...

  11. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T 2 - and T 1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Spinal dysraphism illustrated; Embroyology revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullas V Acharya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord development occurs through three consecutive periods of gastrulation, primary nerulation and secondary neurulation. Aberration in these stages causes abnormalities of the spine and spinal cord, collectively referred as spinal dysraphism. They can be broadly classified as anomalies of gastrulation (disorders of notochord formation and of integration; anomalies of primary neurulation (premature dysjunction and nondysjunction; combined anomalies of gastrulation and primary neurulation and anomalies of secondary neurulation. Correlation with clinical and embryological data and common imaging findings provides an organized approach in their diagnosis.

  13. Mobile myelographic filling defects: Spinal cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Cimino, C.; Passerini, A.; La Mantia, L.

    1986-03-01

    Cysticercosis usually affects the brain and is easily demonstrated by CT. Spinal cysticercosis is much rarer and is usually diagnosed only at surgery. Myelographic demonstration of multiple rounded filling defects, some of which were mobile, allowed diagnosis of spinal extramedullary cysticercosis in an unsuspected case. The literature on spinal cysticercosis is briefly reviewed. Diagnosis is important in view of the recent development of medical treatment.

  14. Malignant Mesothelioma Versus Metastatic Carcinoma of the Pleura: A CT Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhshayesh Karam, Mehrdad; Karimi, Shirin; Mosadegh, Leila; Chaibakhsh, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare malignant neoplasm of the pleura that typically affects individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos through a variety of industries. MPM presents with several CT features similar to more common pleural diseases such as metastatic pleural malignancy. The aim of this study is to differentiate malignant pleural mesothelioma from metastatic carcinoma of the pleura by pathological and radiological assessment in order to investigate accuracy of CT scan in this regard and to compare CT features of these two malignancies. Chest CT scans of 55 pleural malignancy patients including MPM and metastatic pleural malignancy were evaluated in this retrospective study. The pathologist made the definite diagnosis based on immunohistochemistry. A chest radiologist unaware of the pathology diagnosis observed all CT scans. Several parameters including pleural thickening, pleural effusion, thickening of inter lobar fissure, contralateral extension, contraction of involved hemithorax, parenchymal involvement (infiltration, nodules, fibrosis), pleural mediastinal involvement, lymphadenopathy, extrapleural invasion (hepatic, chest wall, diaphragm, intraperitoneal), and pericardial involvement were checked. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS version 16, and the ability of CT scan to differentiate malignant pleural mesothelioma and metastatic pleural diseases was investigated. Totally 29 males and 26 females were assessed in this study. Based on pathology, 17 MPM and 38 metastatic pleural malignancies were diagnosed. According to CT study, about 82% of the patients with MPM and about 79% of the patients with metastatic pleural diseases were correctly diagnosed by a radiologist. The most common findings suggestive of MPM were pleural thickening (88.2%), loculated effusion (58.8%), and thickening of the interlobar fissure (47.1%). Whereas free pleural effusion (71.7%), parenchymal infiltration (65.8%) and pleural thickening (63.2%) were

  15. Cervical spinal cord injury without radiological abnormality in adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatoe H

    2000-01-01

    Spinal cord injury occurring without concomitant radiologically demonstrable trauma to the skeletal elements of the spinal canal rim, or compromise of the spinal canal rim without fracture, is a rare event. Though documented in children, the injury is not very well reported in adults. We present seventeen adult patients with spinal cord injury without accompanying fracture of the spinal canal rim, or vertebral dislocation, seen over seven years. None had preexisting spinal canal stenosis or c...

  16. Risk factors in iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalva-Iborra, A; Alcanyis-Alberola, M; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Giner-Pascual, M

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, there has been a change in the aetiology of spinal cord injury. There has been an increase in the number of elderly patients with spinal cord injuries caused by diseases or medical procedures. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury in our unit. The secondary aim is to study what variables can be associated with a higher risk of iatrogenesis. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study of patients with acute spinal cord injury admitted from June 2009 to May 2014 was conducted. The information collected included the patient age, aetiology, neurological level and grade of injury when admitted and when discharged, cardiovascular risk factors, a previous history of depression and any prior treatment with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. We applied a logistic regression. The grade of statistical significance was established as Pinjury was the thoracic level (48%). The main aetiology of spinal cord injury caused by iatrogenesis was surgery for degenerative spine disease, in patients under the age of 30 were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury is a frequent complication. A statistically significant association between a patient history of depression and iatrogenic spinal cord injury was found as well as with anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use prior to iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

  17. SPINAL CORD- A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayamma K. N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord is situated within the vertebral canal extending from the lower end of the medulla oblongata at the upper border of first cervical vertebra. In early foetal life, it extends throughout the length of the vertebral canal, and at the time of birth, it reaches the level of third lumbar vertebra. In adult, it ends at the lower border of first lumbar vertebra and thereafter continued as filum terminale, which gets attached to tip of coccyx. Spinal cord is covered by three protective membranes called spinal meninges, diameter, arachnoid and pia mater. The diameter and arachnoid mater extent up to second sacral vertebra and the pia mater forms filum terminale and extend at the tip of coccyx. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty spinal cord cadaveric specimen were studied by dissection method after exposing the vertebral canal. The roots of spinal nerve were sectioned on both sides and the cord is released along with its coverings. The dura and arachnoid mater were incised longitudinally and the subarachnoid space, blood vessels, nerve roots, ligament denticulata, cervical and lumbar enlargements were observed. The blood vessels including radicular arteries were also studied photographed. RESULTS The spinal cord is a highly vascular structure situated within the vertebral canal, covered by diameter, arachnoid mater and pia mater. Spinal dura is thicker anteriorly than posteriorly. The pia mater forms linea splendens, which extend along the whole length of the cord in front of the anterior median fissure. The average length of the cord is 38 cm. The length and breadth of cervical enlargement was more compared to lumbar enlargement. The number of rootlets in both dorsal and ventral roots accounts more in cervical compared to other regions of the cord. The ligament denticulata is a thin transparent bands of pia mater attached on either sides of the cord between the dorsal and ventral roots of spinal nerves. The tooth like extensions are well

  18. Acute injuries of the spinal cord and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, U.; Freund, M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots are involved. Patients may even die of a spinal shock. Besides presenting the important embryologic and anatomical basis underlying the typical radiological findings of spinal trauma, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are correlated. Special situations, such as the involvement of the alar ligaments and typical injuries in children, will be discussed as well as specific traumatic patters relevant for imaging. Based on the actual literature and recommendations of professional organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic evaluation of spinal injuries. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual imaging modalities are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  19. Stereotactic irradiation for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Ryutaro

    2017-01-01

    First, this paper reviewed the latest findings of stereotactic irradiation (STI) for metastatic brain tumors. Then, it described the results of randomized controlled trials for single or a few (2-4) metastasis in the following comparison tests: (1) comparison between whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone group and (WBRT + STI) group, (2) comparison between STI alone group and (STI + WBRT) group, (3) comparison between STI alone group and (tumorectomy + WBRT) group, (4) comparison between (STI + WBRT) group and (tumorectomy + WBRT) group, and (5) between (tumorectomy + WBRT) group and (tumorectomy + STI) group. Among these, STI alone without WBRT has obtained a certain consensus. Against multiple metastatic brain tumors of 5 or more, when considering cognitive impairment and QOL loss by adding WBRT, it is general consensus that STI alone may be sufficient. At the authors' institution, cyber knife (CK) was introduced in 2008 and nearly 300 stereotactic radiotherapy for metastatic brain tumors have been performed annually. By adopting a robot arm and development of a lesion tracking system, the positional correction against the deviation of the bone margin of the skull is guaranteed in real time to ensure accuracy during irradiation, and hypofractionated stereotactic irradiation becomes easier. (A.O.)

  20. Colon carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, J.W. Jr.; Carter, M.P.; Berens, S.V.; Long, R.F.; Caplan, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the thyroid gland rarely is encountered in clinical practice; however, autopsy series have shown that it is not a rare occurrence. A case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with metastases to the thyroid is reported. A review of the literature reveals that melanoma, breast, renal, and lung carcinomas are the most frequent tumors to metastasize to the thyroid. Metastatic disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cold nodules on radionuclide thyroid scans, particularly in patients with a known primary

  1. Metastatic melanoma masquerading as a furuncle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Aslam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma metastasizes to the skin in about 10-17% of patients. Although there are reports of metastatic melanoma masquerading as panniculitis and erysipelas, it is very uncommon for it to present as an inflammatory skin lesion. When malignant melanoma cells invade the superficial dermal lymphatic vessels it can result in erythema, edema and induration of the overlying skin. This presentation can be problematic for clinicians if they do not suspect melanoma and choose not to biopsy the lesion. We report a case of an elderly man with a history of invasive melanoma who presented with a furuncle-like lesion that was found to be in-transit metastatic melanoma.

  2. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, Paavel G.; Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ozcan, Fidan; Feydy, Antoine; Maier, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  3. Correlation of force control with regional spinal DTI in patients with cervical spondylosis without signs of spinal cord injury on conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Paavel G. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Inserm U894, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Sanchez, Katherine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Service de Medecine Physique et de Readaptation, APHP, CHU Cochin, Paris (France); INSERM U1153 Epidemiologie Clinique des Maladies Osteo-Articulaires, Paris (France); Ozcan, Fidan [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Feydy, Antoine [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Service de Radiologie B, APHP, CHU Cochin, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Maier, Marc A. [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, FR 3636 Neurosciences, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate spinal cord structure in patients with cervical spondylosis where conventional MRI fails to reveal spinal cord damage. We performed a cross-sectional study of patients with cervical spondylosis without conventional MRI findings of spinal cord damage and healthy controls. Subjects were studied using spinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), precision grip and foot force-tracking tasks, and a clinical examination including assessment of neurological signs. A regional analysis of lateral and medial spinal white matter across multiple cervical levels (C1-C5) was performed. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (lowest Pavlov ratio) in patients (p < 0.05). Patients with spondylosis had greater error and longer release duration in both grip and foot force-tracking. Similar spinal cord deficits were present in patients without neurological signs. Increased error in grip and foot tracking (low accuracy) correlated with increased RD in the lateral spinal cord at the level of greatest compression (p ≤ 0.01). Spinal DTI can detect subtle spinal cord damage of functional relevance in cervical spondylosis, even in patients without signs on conventional T2-imaging and without neurological signs. (orig.)

  4. Aggressive or conservative management in extradural hematomas in children – a challenging neurosurgical choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tascu A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available epidural hematomas (EDH in children appear as a consequence of head trauma. Although emergency surgical intervention was the classical neurosurgical treatment for EDH, lately there has been observed a tendency to replace operation by conservative management, whenever the neurological status and imaging appearance allows it. The aim of this article is to present our experience in treating EDH in children 0-3 years old and to establish a management protocol for EDH in infants, by evaluating the clinical and neuroimaging status, of both surgically and conservatively treated patients, from hospital admission to discharge. Retrospective study includes 52 patients diagnosed with an extradural hematoma, admitted in the First Neurosurgery Department of the Clinical Hospital ‘Bagdasar-Arseni’ in Bucharest, from January 2004 to December 2013. The patients were identified by diagnosis from the clinic’s database; clinical and imaging data was extracted from the patient’s individual records and crosschecked with the operating protocols. Cerebral CT scan was the preferred imaging investigation for diagnosis. Our study includes 52 patients (26 boys and 26 girls, with a mean age of 14.5 months (range 6 weeks - 3 years old. 25 patients were surgically treated, while the other 27 received symptomatic medication and were monitored clinically and by imaging exams. The most frequent clinical manifestations were intracranial hypertension (21 patients and psychomotor agitation (19 patients. The traumatic mechanisms were: accidental falling (38 patients, blunt head trauma (3 patients, road accident (2 patients, unspecified (8 patients other causes (1 patient. Based on the Glasgow Coma Scale classification of TBI, 39 patients suffered a mild TBI, 7 a moderate TBI and 6 patients suffered a severe TBI. Most of the patients had a good recovery; there was a total of two deaths. The most common location for the EDHs was parietal (20 patients and temporal-parietal (11

  5. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  6. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to Jejunum: An Unusual Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Medic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The small intestine is a very uncommon and peculiar site for metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC. We present a clinical presentation of insidious and unusual development of a jejunal metastasis while having stable disease in a remainder of metastatic sites, in a patient undergoing immunotherapy with nivolumab. Due to the extreme rarity of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the lumen of the small bowel, it is easy to overlook and misdiagnose symptoms of this pathologic entity, particularly when the remainder of metastatic disease responds well to ongoing therapy.

  7. The clinical application studies of CT spinal angiography with 64-detector row spiral CT in diagnosing spinal vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Sijia; Zhang Mengwei; Liu Xiping; Zh Yushen; Liu Jinghong; Wang Zhonghui; Zang Peizhuo; Shi Qiang; Wang Qiang; Liang Chuansheng; Xu Ke

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To explore the value of CT spinal angiography with 64-detector row spiral CT in diagnosing spinal vascular malformations. Methods: Seventeen patients with initial MR and clinical findings suggestive of spinal vascular diseases underwent CT spinal angiography. Among these, 14 patients took DSA examination within 1 week after CT scan, 7 patients underwent surgical treatment, and 6 patients underwent vascular intervention embolotheraphy. CT protocol: TOSHIBA Aquilion 64 Slice CT scanner, 0.5 mm thickness, 0.5 s/r, 120 kV and 350 mA, positioned at the aortic arch level, and applied with 'sure start' technique with CT threshold of 180 Hu. Contrast agent Iohexol (370 mg I/ml) was injected at 6 ml/s velocity with total volume of 80 ml. The post-processing procedures included MPR, CPR, MIP, VR, etc. Among the 17 patients, four patients underwent fast dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography imaging. CT spinal angiography and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography (3D CE-MRA) images were compared and evaluated with DSA and operation results based on disease type, lesion range, feeding arteries, fistulas, draining veins of vascular malformation by three experienced neuroradiologists independently, using double blind method. The data were analyzed using SPSS analytic software with χ 2 -test. We compared the results with DSA and operation results. Results: The statistical analysis of the diagnostic results by the three experienced neuroradiologists had no statistical difference (P > 0.05). All of the 17 patients showed clearly the abnormality of spinal cord vessels and the range of lesions by CT spinal angiography. Among them, one patient was diagnosed as arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) by MRI and CT spinal angiography, which was verified by surgical operation. DSA of the same patient, however, did not visualize the lesion. One case was diagnosed as AVM complicated with AVF by DSA, but CT spinal angiography could only show AVM not AVF. The

  8. The clinical application studies of CT spinal angiography with 64-detector row spiral CT in diagnosing spinal vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Sijia [Department of Radiology, No. 1 Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)], E-mail: scarlettgao@126.com; Zhang Mengwei; Liu Xiping; Zh Yushen; Liu Jinghong; Wang Zhonghui [Department of Radiology, No. 1 Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zang Peizhuo [Department of Neurosurgery, No. 1 Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Shi Qiang; Wang Qiang [Department of Radiology, No. 1 Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liang Chuansheng [Department of Neurosurgery, No. 1 Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xu Ke [Department of Radiology, No. 1 Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2009-07-15

    Background and purpose: To explore the value of CT spinal angiography with 64-detector row spiral CT in diagnosing spinal vascular malformations. Methods: Seventeen patients with initial MR and clinical findings suggestive of spinal vascular diseases underwent CT spinal angiography. Among these, 14 patients took DSA examination within 1 week after CT scan, 7 patients underwent surgical treatment, and 6 patients underwent vascular intervention embolotheraphy. CT protocol: TOSHIBA Aquilion 64 Slice CT scanner, 0.5 mm thickness, 0.5 s/r, 120 kV and 350 mA, positioned at the aortic arch level, and applied with 'sure start' technique with CT threshold of 180 Hu. Contrast agent Iohexol (370 mg I/ml) was injected at 6 ml/s velocity with total volume of 80 ml. The post-processing procedures included MPR, CPR, MIP, VR, etc. Among the 17 patients, four patients underwent fast dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography imaging. CT spinal angiography and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography (3D CE-MRA) images were compared and evaluated with DSA and operation results based on disease type, lesion range, feeding arteries, fistulas, draining veins of vascular malformation by three experienced neuroradiologists independently, using double blind method. The data were analyzed using SPSS analytic software with {chi}{sup 2}-test. We compared the results with DSA and operation results. Results: The statistical analysis of the diagnostic results by the three experienced neuroradiologists had no statistical difference (P > 0.05). All of the 17 patients showed clearly the abnormality of spinal cord vessels and the range of lesions by CT spinal angiography. Among them, one patient was diagnosed as arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) by MRI and CT spinal angiography, which was verified by surgical operation. DSA of the same patient, however, did not visualize the lesion. One case was diagnosed as AVM complicated with AVF by DSA, but CT spinal angiography could only show

  9. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  10. Tolerance of the human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Zhu, G.; Yin, F.-F.; Ajlouni, M.; Kim, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Tolerance of the spinal cord to the single dose of radiation is not well defined. Although there are cases of human spinal cord tolerance from re-irradiation to the same cord level, the information about the tolerance of human spinal cord to single large dose of radiosurgery is not available. We carried out spinal radiosurgery to treat spinal metastasis and studied the single dose tolerance of the human spinal cord in an ongoing dose escalation paradigm. A total of 39 patients with 48 lesions of spinal metastasis were treated with single dose radiosurgery at Henry Ford Hospital. The radiosurgery dose was escalated from 8 Gy to 16 Gy at 2 Gy increment. The radiation dose was prescribed to periphery of the spinal tumor. The radiation dose to the spinal cord was estimated by computerized dosimetry. The median follow-up time was 10 months (range 6-18 months) from the radiosurgery. The endpoint of the study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the spinal radiosurgery and to determine the tolerance of human spinal cord to single dose radiosurgery. The dose to the spinal cord was generally less than 50 % of the prescribed radiation dose. The volume of the spinal cord that received higher than this dose was less than 20 % of the anterior portion of the spinal cord. Maximum single dose of 8 Gy was delivered to the anterior 20 % of the spinal cord in this dose escalation study. The dose volume histogram will be presented. There was no acute or subacute radiation toxicity detected clinically and radiologically during the maximum follow-up of 20 months. Further dose escalation is in progress. The single tolerance dose of the human spinal cord appears to be at least 8 Gy when it was given to the 20 % of the cord volume, although the duration of follow up is not long enough to detect severe late cord toxicity. This study offers a valuable radiobiological basis of the normal spinal cord tolerance, and opens spinal radiosurgery as a safe treatment for spinal metastasis

  11. Spinal endoscopy combined with selective CT myelography for dural closure of the spinal dural defect with superficial siderosis: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Higashino, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Shinsuke; Akazawa, Ayumi; Arai, Hiroshi; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Matsuda, Ken; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Awara, Kousuke; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2018-01-01

    The authors describe a new procedure to detect the tiny dural hole in patients with superficial siderosis (SS) and CSF leakage using a coronary angioscope system for spinal endoscopy and selective CT myelography using a spinal drainage tube. Under fluoroscopy, surgeons inserted the coronary angioscope into the spinal subarachnoid space, similar to the procedure of spinal drainage, and slowly advanced it to the cervical spine. The angioscope clearly showed the small dural hole and injured arachnoid membrane. One week later, the spinal drainage tube was inserted, and the tip of the drainage tube was located just below the level of the dural defect found by the spinal endoscopic examination. This selective CT myelography clarifies the location of the dural defect. During surgery, the small dural hole could be easily located, and it was securely sutured. It is sometimes difficult to detect the actual location of the small dural hole even with thin-slice MRI or dynamic CT myelography in patients with SS. The use of a coronary angioscope for the spinal endoscopy combined with selective CT myelography may provide an effective examination to assess dural closure of the spinal dural defect with SS in cases without obvious dural defects on conventional imaging.

  12. Clinicopathologic factors associated with de novo metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tiansheng; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2016-12-01

    While breast cancers with distant metastasis at presentation (de novo metastasis) harbor significantly inferior clinical outcomes, there have been limited studies analyzing the clinicopathologic characteristics in this subset of patients. In this study, we analyzed 6126 breast cancers diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 to identify factors associated with de novo metastatic breast cancer. When compared to patients without metastasis at presentation, race, histologic grade, estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) and HER2 statuses were significantly associated with de novo metastasis in the entire cohort, whereas age, histologic grade, PR and HER2 status were the significant parameters in the subset of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIB/III). The patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer had a significant older mean age and a